WorldWideScience

Sample records for resident fish requirements

  1. Discharge residence of TLD tagged fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romberg, G.P.; Prepejchal, W.

    1974-01-01

    Although visual observations suggested that fish remained in the discharge for considerable periods, temperature-sensitive tags indicated the majority of fish spend less than 50 hr or 10 percent of the time at discharge temperatures. During 1974 a second fish tagging study was conducted, using temperature-sensitive tags to yield discharge residence times of Lake Michigan salmonids at Point Beach thermal discharge. Preliminary results revealed that many fish tag values were close to Unit I line indicating that calculated maximum discharge residence times for these fish will be nearly 100 percent of the elapsed time

  2. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

    1997-06-01

    In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

  3. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2009-07-08

    In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix K: Resident fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. In this appendix the Resident Fish Work Group (RFWG) has attempted to characterize and evaluate impacts of dam operation on an extremely complex and diverse integrated resource. Not only is this required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for SOR, there are resident fish populations that have status under the Federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) or equivalent state regulations (Kootenai River white sturgeon, Snake River white sturgeon, sandroller, shorthead and torrent sculpins, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, redband trout, and burbot). The RFWG has also attempted to develop operating alternatives that benefit not only resident fish, but anadromous fish, wildlife, and other human interests as well. The authors have recognized the co-evolution of resident fish, anadromous fish, and other integrated resources in the basin

  5. Review of BPA funded sturgeon, resident fish and wildlife projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) held a public meeting on November 19--21, 1991, for the purpose of review, coordination, and consultation of the BPA-funded projects for sturgeon, resident fish, and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin (Basin). The comments received after the meeting were favorable and the participants agreed that the meeting was stimulating and productive. The information exchanged should lead to better coordination with other projects throughout the Basin. This document list the projects by title, the project leaders and BPA's project officers, and an abstract of each leader's presentation

  6. 76 FR 51317 - Waiver of Citizenship Requirements for Crewmembers on Commercial Fishing Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ...-AB50 Waiver of Citizenship Requirements for Crewmembers on Commercial Fishing Vessels AGENCY: Coast... regulations a description of the procedures for requesting and processing waivers of citizenship requirements... above. Relief from these citizenship and permanent resident status requirements is provided in 46 U.S.C...

  7. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    , and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  8. Stable isotopes as tracers of residency for fish on inshore coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jean P.; Pitt, Kylie A.; Fry, Brian; Connolly, Rod M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the migratory movements of fish between habitats is an important priority for fisheries management. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotopes were used to evaluate the degree of movement and residency for five fish species collected from coral reefs in Queensland, Australia. Isotope values of fish were measured and compared between slow-turnover muscle tissue and fast-turnover liver tissue, with isotopic agreement between liver and muscle generally indicating resident animals, and relatively low C isotope values in muscle indicating migrants. Three fish species, rabbitfish (Siganus fuscescens), painted sweetlips (Diagramma labiosum) and Guenther's wrasse (Pseudolabrus guentheri) showed relatively consistent carbon isotope values between muscle and liver tissue as expected for resident populations. One quarter of bream (Acanthopagrus australis) individuals showed much lower δ13C values in muscle than liver. These low values diverged from the -10 to -15‰ values of residents and were more similar to the -20‰ values of fish collected from coastal riverine habitats, the presumed migration source. Moses perch (Lutjanus russelli) also showed substantial differences between muscle and liver C isotopes for about a quarter of individuals, but the overall higher C values of these individuals indicated they may have switched diets within island habitats rather than migrating. Our results were consistent with previous studies of fish residency and indicate that measuring stable isotopes in multiple tissues provides a useful methodology for characterizing fish residency in inshore areas.

  9. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  10. Thermal plume residence and temperature exposure of salmonid fishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spigarelli, S.A.; Romberg, G.P.; Thommes, M.M.; Prepejchal, W.

    1976-01-01

    A nondestructive echo-location technique was used to estimate the density-distribution patterns of fish and to determine the influence of discharge design and location on fish attraction. Studies were conducted between 1972 and 1975 at the Point Beach and Zion nulcear power plants and Waukegan fossil-fuel power plant on Lake Michigan. Preliminary inspection of results indicates seasonal attraction of abundant species, such as alewife, trout, and salmon. In general, fish densities in the plume area tend to be elevated relative to unheated areas during spring and early summer. Power plant location and discharge type apparently affect the magnitude and timing of attraction to discharges. Fish in plume areas generally are observed at elevated temperatures or near temperature interfaces. Data analyses include conventional approaches to detect differences in mean densities over time and space and recent developments in time-series analysis. Predictability of fish responses will depend on the identification of temporal and spatial distribution patterns

  11. Amino acid nutrition of fishes: requirements and supplementation of diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketola, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is: (1) to make a concise review of the published dietary requirements of fishes for amino acids, (2) to describe recent findings at the Tunison Laboratory concerning amino acid nutrition of trout, (3) to review specific signs of deficiency of amino acids, and (4) to discuss use of the fish egg amino acid pattern as a guideline to formulating new feeds or studying amino acid requirements of fishes for which there is limited information on their quantitative requirements.

  12. CNA Training Requirements and Resident Care Outcomes in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Lerner, Nancy B; Yang, Bo Kyum; Han, Kihye

    2017-06-01

    To examine the relationship between certified nursing assistant (CNA) training requirements and resident outcomes in U.S. nursing homes (NHs). The number and type of training hours vary by state since many U.S. states have chosen to require additional hours over the federal minimums, presumably to keep pace with the increasing complexity of care. Yet little is known about the impact of the type and amount of training CNAs are required to have on resident outcomes. Compiled data on 2010 state regulatory requirements for CNA training (clinical, total initial training, in-service, ratio of clinical to didactic hours) were linked to 2010 resident outcomes data from 15,508 NHs. Outcomes included the following NH Compare Quality Indicators (QIs) (Minimum Data Set 3.0): pain, antipsychotic use, falls with injury, depression, weight loss and pressure ulcers. Facility-level QIs were regressed on training indicators using generalized linear models with the Huber-White correction, to account for clustering of NHs within states. Models were stratified by facility size and adjusted for case-mix, ownership status, percentage of Medicaid-certified beds and urban-rural status. A higher ratio of clinical to didactic hours was related to better resident outcomes. NHs in states requiring clinical training hours above federal minimums (i.e., >16hr) had significantly lower odds of adverse outcomes, particularly pain falls with injury, and depression. Total and in-service training hours also were related to outcomes. Additional training providing clinical experiences may aid in identifying residents at risk. This study provides empirical evidence supporting the importance of increased requirements for CNA training to improve quality of care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. 26 CFR 301.6362-6 - Requirements relating to residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... purposes other than its individual income tax (such as liability for State inheritance tax or jurisdiction...) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Seizure of Property for Collection of Taxes § 301.6362-6 Requirements relating to residence. (a) In general. A tax imposed by a State meets the...

  14. 34 CFR 668.33 - Citizenship and residency requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Citizenship and residency requirements. 668.33 Section 668.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Student Eligibility § 668...

  15. Duck Valley Resident Fish Stocking Program, 2000 Final Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes fish-stocking program was begun in 1988 and is intended to provide a subsistence fishery for the tribal members. The program stocks catchable and fingerling size trout in Mt. View and Sheep Creek Reservoirs. Rainbow trout are purchased from only certified disease-free facilities to be stocked in our reservoirs. This project will help restore a fishery for tribal members that historically depended on wild salmon and steelhead in the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers and their tributaries for their culture as well as for subsistence. This project is partial substitution for loss of anadromous fish production due to construction and operation of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Until anadromous fish can be returned to the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers this project will continue indefinitely. As part of this project the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes will also receive income in the form of fees from non-tribal members who come to fish these reservoirs. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the fishery will include sampling for length/weight/condition and for signs of disease. A detailed Monitoring and evaluation plan has been put in place for this project. However due to budget limitations on this project only the fishery surveys and limited water quality work can be completed. A creel survey was initiated in 1998 and we are following the monitoring and evaluation schedule for this program (as budget allows) as well as managing the budget and personnel. This program has been very successful in the past decade and has provided enjoyment and sustenance for both tribal and non-tribal members. All biological data and stocking rates will be including in the Annual reports to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  16. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  17. Fishing input requirements of artisanal fishers in coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efforts towards increase in fish production through artisanal fishery can be achieved by making needed inputs available. Fishing requirements of artisanal fishers in coastal communities of Ondo State, Nigeria were studied. Data were obtained from two hundred and sixteen artisans using multistage random sampling ...

  18. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

    2003-09-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area

  19. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O' Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-01-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan

  20. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-02-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  1. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2005-11-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  2. Reach-scale land use drives the stress responses of a resident stream fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Zachary W; Wahl, David H; Suski, Cory D

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To date, relatively few studies have tried to determine the practicality of using physiological information to help answer complex ecological questions and assist in conservation actions aimed at improving conditions for fish populations. In this study, the physiological stress responses of fish were evaluated in-stream between agricultural and forested stream reaches to determine whether differences in these responses can be used as tools to evaluate conservation actions. Creek chub Semotilus atromaculatus sampled directly from forested and agricultural stream segments did not show differences in a suite of physiological indicators. When given a thermal challenge in the laboratory, creek chub sampled from cooler forested stream reaches had higher cortisol levels and higher metabolic stress responses to thermal challenge than creek chub collected from warmer and more thermally variable agricultural reaches within the same stream. Despite fish from agricultural and forested stream segments having different primary and secondary stress responses, fish were able to maintain homeostasis of other physiological indicators to thermal challenge. These results demonstrate that local habitat conditions within discrete stream reaches may impact the stress responses of resident fish and provide insight into changes in community structure and the ability of tolerant fish species to persist in agricultural areas.

  3. Effects of Pile Driving on the Residency and Movement of Tagged Reef Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D Iafrate

    Full Text Available The potential effects of pile driving on fish populations and commercial fisheries have received significant attention given the prevalence of pile driving occurring in coastal habitats throughout the world. Behavioral impacts of sound generated from these activities on fish typically have a greater area of influence than physical injury, and may therefore adversely affect a greater portion of the local population. This study used acoustic telemetry to assess the movement, residency, and survival of 15 sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus and 10 grey snapper (Lutjanus griseus in Port Canaveral, Florida, USA, in response to 35 days of pile driving at a wharf complex. No obvious signs of mortality or injury to tagged fish were evident from the data. Received sound pressure levels from pile strikes on the interior of the wharf, where reef fish primarily occur, were on average 152-157 dB re 1 μPa (peak. No significant decrease in sheepshead daytime residency was observed during pile driving within the central portion of the wharf and area of highest sound exposure, and no major indicators of displacement from the exposure wharf with the onset of pile driving were observed. There was evidence of potential displacement from the exposure wharf that coincided with the start of pile driving observed for 2 out of 4 grey snapper, along with a decrease in daytime residency for a subset of this species with high site fidelity prior to the event. Results indicate that snapper may be more likely to depart an area of pile driving disturbance more readily than sheepshead, but were less at risk for behavioral impact given the lower site fidelity of this species.

  4. Influence of forest and rangeland management on anadromous fish habitat in Western North America: habitat requirements of anadromous salmonids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.W. Reiser; T.C. Bjornn

    1979-01-01

    Habitat requirements of anadromous and some resident salmonid fishes have been described for various life stages, including upstream migration of adults, spawning, incubation, and juvenile rearing. Factors important in the migration of adults are water temperature, minimum water depth, maximum water velocity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and...

  5. Is Exposure to Macondo Oil Reflected in the Otolith Chemistry of Marsh-Resident Fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Duarte, Paola C; Fodrie, F Joel; Jensen, Olaf P; Whitehead, Andrew; Galvez, Fernando; Dubansky, Benjamin; Able, Kenneth W

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and physiological responses in Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) in the northern Gulf of Mexico have confirmed oil exposure of resident marsh fish following the Macondo blowout in 2010. Using these same fish, we evaluated otolith microchemistry as a method for assessing oil exposure history. Laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze the chemical composition of sagittal otoliths to assess whether a trace metal signature could be detected in the otoliths of F. grandis collected from a Macondo-oil impacted site in 2010, post-spill relative to pre-spill, as well as versus fish from areas not impacted by the spill. We found no evidence of increased concentrations of two elements associated with oil contamination (nickel and vanadium) in F. grandis otoliths regardless of Macondo oil exposure history. One potential explanation for this is that Macondo oil is relatively depleted of those metals compared to other crude oils globally. During and after the spill, however, elevated levels of barium, lead, and to a lesser degree, copper were detected in killifish otoliths at the oil-impacted collection site in coastal Louisiana. This may reflect oil contact or other environmental perturbations that occurred concomitant with oiling. For example, increases in barium in otoliths from oil-exposed fish followed (temporally) freshwater diversions in Louisiana in 2010. This implicates (but does not conclusively demonstrate) freshwater diversions from the Mississippi River (with previously recorded higher concentrations of lead and copper), designed to halt the ingress of oil, as a mechanism for elevated elemental uptake in otoliths of Louisiana marsh fishes. These results highlight the potentially complex and indirect effects of the Macondo oil spill and human responses to it on Gulf of Mexico ecosystems, and emphasize the need to consider the multiple stressors acting simultaneously on inshore fish communities.

  6. Variation in Spring Nearshore Resident Fish Species Composition and Life Histories in the Lower San Joaquin Watershed and Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R. Brown

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Providing freshwater to human populations while protecting or rehabilitating ecosystem health is a significant challenge to water resource managers and requires accurate knowledge of aquatic resources. Previous studies of fish assemblages in the San Francisco Estuary and watershed have focused on specific habitat types, water bodies, or geographic subregions. In this study, we use seining data from two monitoring programs to provide an integrated view of spring nearshore resident fish species composition and life history characteristics in five regions: the San Joaquin River, the upper Sacramento River, the lower Sacramento River, the northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (North Delta, and the Interior Delta. Data for the period March-May from 1994 to 2002, showed that spring species composition of the San Joaquin River was very different from the other four regions. Total catch in the San Joaquin River was dominated by small, short-lived batch spawning alien species (93%, particularly red shiner Cyprinella lutrensis (>75% of total catch. The upper and lower Sacramento River were very similar in species composition and life history characteristics and less dominated by alien fish (

  7. Biomonitoring fallout 137Cs in resident and migratory fishes collected along the southern coast of India and assessment of dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohan Feroz; Wesley, Samuel Godwin

    2012-05-01

    The globally distributed fallout radionuclide (137)Cs was monitored in 25 resident and 22 migratory fish species collected from some regions of west and east coast of southern India to establish a baseline data. The samples were collected during June 2008 to June 2009. Higher level of (137)Cs was noted in planktivorous fishes and lower level in herbivores. A significant variation in (137)Cs was observed between fishes with different feeding habits and different migratory pattern. Oceanodromic migratory fishes displayed higher cesium levels than other migratory types. Similarly, migratory fishes displayed higher (137)Cs concentration compared to resident fishes. The overall range of (137)Cs varied from 0.06 to 0.3 Bq/kg in fishes. The biological concentration varied from 55 to 250. The average external dose rate to fishes was calculated to be 2.7 × 10(-7) μGy/h, while the internal dose rate varied from 8.50 × 10(-6) to 5.27 × 10(-5) μGy/h. The hazard quotient for fishes was found to be less than 1. The average intake of (137)Cs via fishes to the public was calculated to be 3.5 Bq/year and subsequently the committed effective dose was 0.05 μSv/year. The data obtained were less than global average and comparable to those of many regions.

  8. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Rishi MD; Syed T. Hoda MD; James M. Crawford MD, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and ins...

  9. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Syed T.; Crawford, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9) felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates. PMID:28725766

  10. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Rishi MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9 felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates.

  11. 41 CFR 302-11.407 - What documentation must we require the employee to submit before paying residence transaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... we require the employee to submit before paying residence transaction expenses? 302-11.407 Section... ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES 11-ALLOWANCES FOR EXPENSES INCURRED IN CONNECTION WITH RESIDENCE... before paying residence transaction expenses? Before paying residence transaction expenses, you must...

  12. Acute toxicity of cadmium, lead, zinc, and their mixtures to stream-resident fish and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebane, Christopher A.; Dillon, Frank S.; Hennessy, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted 150 tests of the acute toxicity of resident fish and invertebrates to Cd, Pb, and Zn, separately and in mixtures, in waters from the South Fork Coeur d'Alene River watershed, Idaho, USA. Field-collected shorthead sculpin (Cottus confusus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi), two mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus and Rhithrogena sp.), a stonefly (Sweltsa sp.), a caddisfly (Arctopsyche sp.), a snail (Gyraulus sp.), and hatchery rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), were tested with all three metals. With Pb, the mayflies (Drunella sp., Epeorus sp., and Leptophlebiidae), a Simuliidae black fly, a Chironomidae midge, a Tipula sp. crane fly, a Dytiscidae beetle, and another snail (Physa sp.), were also tested. Adult westslope cutthroat trout were captured to establish a broodstock to provide fry of known ages for testing. With Cd, the range of 96-h median effect concentrations (EC50s) was 0.4 to >5,329μg/L, and the relative resistances of taxa were westslope cutthroat trout ≈ rainbow trout ≈ sculpin << other taxa; with Pb, EC50s ranged from 47 to 3,323μg/L, with westslope cutthroat trout < rainbow trout < other taxa; and with Zn, EC50s ranged from 21 to 3,704μg/L, with rainbow trout < westslope cutthroat trout ≈ sculpin << other taxa. With swim-up trout fry, a pattern of decreasing resistance with increasing fish size was observed. In metal mixtures, the toxicities of the three metals were less than additive on a concentration-addition basis.

  13. 75 FR 17942 - Public Housing Contracting With Resident-Owned Businesses/Application Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Public Housing Contracting With Resident-Owned Businesses/ Application Requirements... subject proposal. Public Housing Agencies (PHAs) enter into contracts, not to cumulatively exceed $1,000,000, with eligible resident-owned businesses under an alternative procurement process. As such, PHAs...

  14. Resident fish stock status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams : 2000 annual report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, N.; McLellan, J.; Crossley, B.

    2001-01-01

    The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project

  15. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, Jr., Neil [Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA (United States); McLellan, Jason G [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA (United States); Crossley, Brian [Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA (United States); O' Connor, Dick

    2001-01-01

    The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project

  16. Multi year observations reveal variability in residence of a tropical Demersal Fish, Lethrinus nebulosus: implications for spatial management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Pillans

    Full Text Available Off the Ningaloo coast of North West Western Australia, Spangled Emperor Lethrinus nebulosus are among the most highly targeted recreational fish species. The Ningaloo Reef Marine Park comprises an area of 4,566 km2 of which 34% is protected from fishing by 18 no-take sanctuary zones ranging in size from 0.08-44.8 km2. To better understand Spangled Emperor movements and the adequacy of sanctuary zones within the Ningaloo Reef Marine Park for this species, 84 Spangled Emperor of a broad spectrum of maturity and sex were tagged using internal acoustic tags in a range of lagoon and reef slope habitats both inside and adjacent to the Mangrove Bay Sanctuary zone. Kernel Utilisation Distribution (KUD was calculated for 39 resident individuals that were detected for more than 30 days. There was no relationship with fish size and movement or site fidelity. Average home range (95% KUD for residents was 8.5±0.5 km2 compared to average sanctuary zone size of 30 km2. Calculated home range was stable over time resulting in resident animals tagged inside the sanctuary zone spending ∼80% of time within the sanctuary boundaries. The number of fish remaining within the array of receivers declined steadily over time and after one year more than 60% of tagged fish had moved outside the sanctuary zone and also beyond the 28 km2 array of receivers. Long term monitoring identified the importance of shifting home range and was essential for understanding overall residency within protected areas and also for identifying spawning related movements. This study indicates that despite exhibiting stable and small home ranges over periods of one to two years, more than half the population of spangled emperor move at scales greater than average sanctuary size within the Ningaloo Reef Marine Park.

  17. Spatial variability of biochemical responses in resident fish after the M/V Hebei Spirit Oil Spill (Taean, Korea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jee-Hyun; Chae, Young Sun; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Moonkoo; Yim, Un Hyuk; Ha, Sung Yong; Han, Gi Myung; An, Joon Geon; Kim, Eunsic; Shim, Won Joon

    2012-09-01

    This study describes the spatial variation and the duration of the impacts from the Hebei Spirit oil spill using specific biochemical indices in resident benthic fish. Enzymatic activities and biliary PAHs metabolites were higher at the site closer to the spill area in four months after spill incident. Regarding our results of detoxification response, markers of Phase I followed a similar trend in accordance with levels of biliary metabolites, while markers of phase II and GST appeared relatively unchanged.

  18. Habitat Requirements and Foraging Ecology of the Madagascar Fish-Eagle

    OpenAIRE

    Berkelman, James

    1997-01-01

    With a population estimate of 99 pairs, the Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) is one of the rarest birds of prey in the world. I investigated the ecological requirements of the Madagascar fish-eagle in 1994 and 1995 to help determine management action to prevent its extinction. I investigated fish-eagle foraging ecology in 1996 to determine its prey preference and whether fish abundance and availabi...

  19. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C.; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C.; Wu, H. Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP‐accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)‐MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU‐MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two‐year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for‐profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs. PACS numbers: 01.40.Fk, 01.40.gb PMID:24710434

  20. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C; Wu, H Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Gibbons, John P

    2014-03-06

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP-accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)-MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU-MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two-year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for-profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs.

  1. An "education for life" requirement to promote lifelong learning in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Mukta; Desbiens, Norman A

    2010-12-01

    Lifelong learning is an integral component of practice-based learning and improvement. Physicians need to be lifelong learners to provide timely, efficient, and state-of-the-art patient care in an environment where knowledge, technology, and social requirements are rapidly changing. To assess graduates' self-reported perception of the usefulness of a residency program requirement to submit a narrative report describing their planned educational modalities for their future continued medical learning ("Education for Life" requirement), and to compare the modalities residents intended to use with their reported educational activities. Data was compiled from the Education for Life reports submitted by internal medicine residents at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga from 1998 to 2000, and from a survey sent to the same 27 graduates 2 to 4 years later from 2000 to 2004. Twenty-four surveys (89%) were returned. Of the responding graduates, 58% (14/24) found the Education for Life requirement useful for their future continued medical learning. Graduates intended to keep up with a mean of 3.4 educational modalities, and they reported keeping up with 4.2. In a multivariable analysis, the number of modalities graduates used was significantly associated with the number they had planned to use before graduation (P  =  .04) but not with their career choice of subspecialization. The majority of residents found the Education for Life requirement useful for their future continued medical learning. Graduates, regardless of specialty, reported using more modalities for continuing their medical education than they thought they would as residents. Considering lifelong learning early in training and then requiring residents to identify ways to practice lifelong learning as a requirement for graduation may be dispositive.

  2. The impact of the implementation of work hour requirements on residents' career satisfaction, attitudes and emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dongseok; Dickey, Jamie; Wessel, Kristen; Girard, Donald E

    2006-10-17

    To assess the impact of work hours' limitations required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) on residents' career satisfaction, emotions and attitudes. A validated survey instrument was used to assess residents' levels of career satisfaction, emotions and attitudes before and after the ACGME duty hour requirements were implemented. The "pre" implementation survey was distributed in December 2002 and the "post" implementation one in December 2004. Only the latter included work-hour related questions. The response rates were 56% for the 2002 and 72% for the 2004 surveys respectively. Although career satisfaction remained unchanged, numerous changes occurred in both emotions and attitudes. Compared to those residents who did not violate work-hour requirements, those who did were significantly more negative in attitudes and emotions. With the implementation of the ACGME work hour limitations, the training experience became more negative for those residents who violated the work hour limits and had a small positive impact on those who did not violate them. Graduate medical education leaders must innovate to make the experiences for selected residents improved and still maintain compliance with the work hour requirements.

  3. 76 FR 58226 - Waiver of Citizenship Requirements for Crewmembers on Commercial Fishing Vessels; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Part 28 [Docket No. USCG-2011-0887] RIN 1625-AB61 Waiver of Citizenship Requirements for Crewmembers on Commercial Fishing Vessels; Correction... August 18, 2011, entitled ``Waiver of Citizenship Requirements for Crewmembers on Commercial Fishing...

  4. Trophic feasibility of reintroducing anadromous salmonids in three reservoirs on the north fork Lewis River, Washington: Prey supply and consumption demand of resident fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorel, Mark H.; Hansen, Adam G.; Connelly, Kristin A.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The reintroduction of anadromous salmonids in reservoirs is being proposed with increasing frequency, requiring baseline studies to evaluate feasibility and estimate the capacity of reservoir food webs to support reintroduced populations. Using three reservoirs on the north fork Lewis River as a case study, we demonstrate a method to determine juvenile salmonid smolt rearing capacities for lakes and reservoirs. To determine if the Lewis River reservoirs can support reintroduced populations of juvenile stream-type Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, we evaluated the monthly production of daphniaDaphnia spp. (the primary zooplankton consumed by resident salmonids in the system) and used bioenergetics to model the consumption demand of resident fishes in each reservoir. To estimate the surplus of Daphnia prey available for reintroduced salmonids, we assumed a maximum sustainable exploitation rate and accounted for the consumption demand of resident fishes. The number of smolts that could have been supported was estimated by dividing any surplus Daphnia production by the simulated consumption demand of an individual Chinook Salmon fry rearing in the reservoir to successful smolt size. In all three reservoirs, densities of Daphnia were highest in the epilimnion, but warm epilimnetic temperatures and the vertical distribution of planktivores suggested that access to abundant epilimnetic prey was limited. By comparing accessible prey supply and demand on a monthly basis, we were able to identify potential prey supply bottlenecks that could limit smolt production and growth. These results demonstrate that a bioenergetics approach can be a valuable method of examining constraints on lake and reservoir rearing capacity, such as thermal structure and temporal food supply. This method enables numerical estimation of rearing capacity, which is a useful metric for managers evaluating the feasibility of reintroducing Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. in lentic systems.

  5. Potential pressure indicators for fishing, and their data requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piet, G.J.; Quirijns, F.J.; Robinson, L.; Greenstreet, S.P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Indicators of fishing pressure are necessary to support an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM). We present a framework that distinguishes four levels of pressure indicators that move from being a simple description of anthropogenic activity to more precisely describing the actual

  6. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project probability/coordination study resident fish and wildlife impacts. Phase 3. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitzinger, E.

    1997-12-01

    Phase 3 began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transinontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased habitat for adult and juvenile white sturgeon and adult rainbow trout. But, the flows have failed to meet mean monthly flow recommendations for the past three years despite the addition of the flow augmentation releases. It is unlikely that the flow augmentation releases have had any significant long-term benefit for sturgeon and rainbow trout in the Snake River. Flow augmentation releases from the Boise and Payette rivers have in some years helped to meet or exceed minimum flow recommendations in these tributaries. The minimum flows would not have been reached without the flow augmentation releases. But, in some instances, the timing of the releases need to be adjusted in order to maximize benefits to resident fishes in the Boise and Payette rivers

  7. 75 FR 38975 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Foreign Fishing Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Foreign Fishing Reporting Requirements AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...-2276 or [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Foreign fishing activities can be... abundance of the species. This notice is for the extension of a currently approved information collection...

  8. Changes in assimilation of C3 marsh plants by resident fishes in estuarine systems with distinct hydrogeomorphology features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adna Ferreira Garcia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although saltmarshes are widely recognized as important habitats providing shelter for estuarine organisms and protection against predators, there is still no consensus on the trophic value of marsh plants for estuarine food webs. We employed stable isotopes to evaluate differences in assimilation of nutrients derived from marsh plants with C3 (Juncus acutus, Scirpus maritimus, Scirpus olneyi and C4 (Spartina densiflora photosynthetic pathways by resident fishes in three estuaries with contrasting hydrogeomorphology characteristics. Carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N stable isotope ratios of basal food sources (C3 and C4 marsh plants, macroalgae, seagrass and seston and estuarine resident fishes (Achirus garmani, Atherinella brasiliensis, Genidens genidens, Ctenogobius shufeldti, Jenynsia multidentata, Odonthestes argentinensis were analyzed in two choked lagoons (Tramandai-29°S, Patos-30°S and a coastal river (Chui-33°S. Average δ13C values of consumers were statistically significant higher in the two choked-type estuaries (Tramandaí: -16.11; Patos: -15.82 than in the coastal river (Chui: -24.32 (p0.292. SIAR mixing models revealed that the most assimilated basal food sources by consumers in the choked-type lagoon estuaries were a pool of 13C enriched food sources (macroalgae, C4 marsh and seagrass and seston (95% credibility interval: 0.38 to 0.80 and 0.00 to 0.54, respectively. In contrast, nutrients derived from C3-marsh plants were the main basal food source assimilated by estuarine resident fishes at the coastal river (0.33 to 0.87. These findings could be explained by the absence of extensive shallow embayments and a steeper slope at the coastal river that could promote higher transport of C3-marsh detritus and, consequently, higher assimilation by estuarine fishes. In contrast, detritus derived from C3 marsh plants could be trapped in the upper intertidal zone of choked-typed estuaries and, consequently, be less available for aquatic

  9. Comparing Anesthesiology Residency Training Structure and Requirements in Seven Different Countries on Three Continents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias V

    2017-01-01

    , for example, the duration of post-medical school training and national requirements for certain rotations, a number of cases, faculty supervision, national in-training written exams, and duty hour limits. These data were augmented by review of each country's publicly available residency training documents...... as available on the internet. Post-medical school anesthesia residency duration varied: three years (Brazil), four years (USA), five years (Canada and Switzerland), six years (Japan and Denmark) to nine years (UK), as did the number of explicitly required clinical rotations of a defined duration: zero (Denmark......), one (Switzerland and UK), four (Brazil), six (Canada), and 12 (USA). Minimum case requirements exist in the USA, Japan, and Brazil, but not in the other countries. National written exams taken during training exist for all countries studied except Japan and Denmark. The countries studied increasingly...

  10. Environmental influences on the spatial ecology and spawning behaviour of an estuarine-resident fish, Macquaria colonorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, C. T.; Reinfelds, I. V.; Ives, M. C.; Gray, C. A.; West, R. J.; van der Meulen, D. E.

    2013-02-01

    Estuarine-resident fishes are highly susceptible to the effects of environmental and anthropogenic impacts on their assemblages and habitats. We investigated the distribution, movement and spawning behaviour of estuary perch, Macquaria colonorum, in response to selected environmental variables using an acoustic telemetry array in a large tidal river in south-eastern (SE) Australia. Adult M. colonorum were monitored for up to two years, covering two consecutive spawning periods between September 2007 and 2009. Salinity, water temperature and river flows all had a significant relationship with their estuarine distribution. In particular, large-scale movements were influenced by large freshwater inflow events and the resultant reduction in salinity levels, together with the seasonal cooling and warming trends in water temperatures associated with spawning behaviour. During the winter months, male and female M. colonorum migrated from their upper estuarine home ranges to the lower estuarine spawning grounds in synchrony, with numbers of individual visits by both sexes consistently higher in the 'wetter' winter/spring period of 2008. Location, arrival, departure and occupation time within the spawning grounds were similar between sexes and years. Both resident and migrating M. colonorum exhibited strong diel, and to a lesser extent, tidal behavioural patterns, with fish more likely to be detected at night and during the ebb tides. It is postulated that the effect of environmental fluctuations on the distribution and movement of M. colonorum is influenced by behavioural mechanisms in response to osmoregulatory stress, predator-prey interactions and reproductive activity. The results also demonstrate the importance of accounting for autocorrelation inherent in telemetry data, and for developing management strategies that are more robust to the effect of future climate trends on estuarine fish populations.

  11. Perceptions of the 2011 ACGME duty hour requirements among residents in all core programs at a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefur, Benjamin J; Shewmaker, Diana M; Lohse, Christine M; Rose, Steven H; Colletti, James E

    2017-11-10

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented revisions to resident duty hour requirements (DHRs) in 2011 to improve patient safety and resident well-being. Perceptions of DHRs have been reported to vary by training stage and specialty among internal medicine and general surgery residents. The authors explored perceptions of DHRs among all residents at a large academic medical center. The authors administered an anonymous cross-sectional survey about DHRs to residents enrolled in all ACGME-accredited core residency programs at their institution. Residents were categorized as medical and pediatric, surgery, or other. In total, 736 residents representing 24 core specialty residency programs were surveyed. The authors received responses from 495 residents (67%). A majority reported satisfaction (78%) with DHRs and believed DHRs positively affect their training (73%). Residents in surgical specialties and in advanced stages of training were significantly less likely to view DHRs favorably. Most respondents believed fatigue contributes to errors (89%) and DHRs reduce both fatigue (80%) and performance of clinical duties while fatigued (74%). A minority of respondents (37%) believed that DHRs decrease medical errors. This finding may reflect beliefs that handovers contribute more to errors than fatigue (41%). Negative perceived effects included diminished patient familiarity and continuity of care (62%) and diminished clinical educational experiences for residents (41%). A majority of residents reported satisfaction with the 2011 DHRs, although satisfaction was significantly less among residents in surgical specialties and those in advanced stages of training.

  12. An alternative method for estimating the status of resident reef fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stock status of roman Chrysoblephus laticeps was estimated in the Goukamma, a temperate South African marine protected area (MPA). Standardised catch per unit effort (CPUE) from a controlled angling survey on both sides of the MPA border was employed to extrapolate the CPUE at zero fishing mortality. Converted ...

  13. In-State-Tuition for Unauthorized Residents: Teaching a Person to Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Joe; Martinez, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Illegal immigration has become one of the most important issues we face as a nation, and as greater attention is focused on the sociological and economic impact of illegal immigration, policies related to in-state-tuition for unauthorized residents are in a state of flux. Since 2005, the number of states offering in-state-tuition for unauthorized…

  14. Kalispel (i.e. Kalispell) resident fish project; annual report, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998

  15. Trace elements in two marine fish species during estuarine residency: Non-essential versus essential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieiro, C.L.; Coelho, J.P.; Pacheco, M.; Duarte, A.C.; Pereira, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We assessed essential and non-essential trace elements loads in two marine fish. ► We found similarly low levels of Zn, Cr, and As in both sites and species. ► We compared recommended daily allowances with the estimated daily intake. ► Arsenic was higher than tolerable commercial levels and USA average daily intake. - Abstract: Trace element levels in fish are of particular interest, owing the potential risk to human health. In accordance, juveniles of Dicentrarchus labrax and of Liza aurata were sampled and arsenic, cadmium, chromium, selenium and zinc were determined in the muscle. The levels of trace elements in muscle demonstrated to be similar for both species and sites, with the exception of selenium levels at reference, which seemed to be higher in D. labrax. Moreover, apart from arsenic levels in muscle, all elements were in conformity with the existent regulatory guidelines for fish consumption. The dietary intake of each element was also calculated, with arsenic and selenium showing intakes above the recommended dietary allowances. Nevertheless, no arsenic speciation was carried out and thus no accurate risk evaluation could be established. Additionally, selenium levels never exceeded the dietary allowances more than five times, which are considered safe.

  16. Choline Essentiality and Its Requirement in Diets for Juvenile Parrot Fish (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Khosravi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 12-wk feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the essentiality of choline supplementation in diets for parrot fish. Five isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were supplemented with 0 (as control, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg choline per kg diet, and a positive control diet without choline contained 0.3% of 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol as choline biosynthesis inhibitor (designated as Con, C500, C1000, C2000 and Con+, respectively. Triplicate groups of fish (body weight, 8.8±0.01 g were fed one of the experimental diets at a rate of 4% body weight twice daily. The fish fed Con+ diet revealed significantly lower growth performance and feed utilization efficiency than other fish groups. Supplementation of choline to the basal diet did not significantly influence fish growth. The highest liver lipid content was observed in fish fed the Con+ diet and inversely correlated with liver choline concentration although the differences were not significant. Also, significantly higher liver linoleic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid contents were found in fish fed the Con+ diet. Innate immune parameters including respiratory burst and myeloperoxidase activities were not significantly affected by dietary choline levels. The findings in this study conclude that choline concentration of approximately 230 mg kg−1 diet meets the requirement of parrot fish.

  17. Fishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, G.

    1984-09-01

    Two classifications of fishing jobs are discussed: open hole and cased hole. When there is no casing in the area of the fish, it is called open hole fishing. When the fish is inside the casing, it is called cased hole fishing. The article lists various things that can become a fish-stuck drill pipe, including: broken drill pipe, drill collars, bit, bit cones, hand tools dropped in the well, sanded up or mud stuck tubing, packers become stuck, and much more. It is suggested that on a fishing job, all parties involved should cooperate with each other, and that fishing tool people obtain all the information concerning the well. That way they can select the right tools and methods to clean out the well as quickly as possible.

  18. Assessment of metal and bacterial contamination in cultivated fish and impact on human health for residents living in the Mekong Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanpiwat, Penradee; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Widmer, Kenneth; Himeno, Seiichiro; Miyataka, Hideki; Vu, Ngoc-Ut; Tran, Van-Viet; Pham, Thi-Tuyet-Ngan

    2016-11-01

    Fish is the main source of animal protein and micronutrients for inhabitants in the lower Mekong River basin. Consumption of fish in the basin ranges from 41 to 51 kg capita(-1) year(-1). Thus, concerns of human health impacts caused by daily intake of metals contained in fish, and the incidence of bacterial contamination from Listeria and Escherichia coli have been raised. This study was conducted to 1) determine concentrations of metals, fecal indicator organisms, and Listeria spp. in cultivated common diet fish, and 2) assess human health risks as results of fish consumption on a daily basis. The results showed significant impacts of metal accumulation in fish especially from the intensive aquaculture. Chemical use to promote the rapid allometric growth of fish was expected to be the explanation for this finding. Concentrations of metals contained in different fish species were not statistically different with the exceptions of Na, Mn, and Zn. This might be due to the mobility of elements in aquaculture farms. Listeria and E. coli log CFU/g were 1.36 ± 0.11 (standard error) and 1.57 ± 0.1 s.e., respectively with higher counts observed in samples collected in market sites. Lastly, for human health risk assessment via fish consumption, it was found that hazard quotients of consuming As, Cu, and Zn contained in all fish species could contribute adverse health effects to the local residents (hazard quotients higher than 1). Therefore, risk management measures must be promoted and implemented in all study areas to reduce potential risks to local Vietnamese residents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A research study into the requirements of disabled residents for rehabilitation services in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zongjie, Yin; Hong, Dai; Zhongxin, Xiao; Hui, Xue

    2007-05-30

    Rehabilitation services need strengthening further. This study explores a sample of the population in Beijing in order to establish the extent of medical impairments and disabilities. It describes the present utilization of rehabilitation by different economic groups of the population and also explores the attitudes of these same groups to the concepts inherent in rehabilitation. The conclusions are that a considerable information program is needed to help people with disabilities to access and utilize services appropriately. Finally, it concludes that the present Rehabilitation Services need to be professionally improved and expanded. In China, the spectrum of disease is changing, along with the development of society, and progress in science and technology. The requirements of people for medical rehabilitation following major accidents, and acute or chronic disease, leading to disability and handicap, increase year by year. This is especially so now, with the added geriatric problems of an aging population. At present, rehabilitation services and resources within this country are limited. It is difficult to meet the immediate or long-term needs of disabled persons. Recently, there have been many national publications describing the requirements and discussing those factors which influence Rehabilitation Service provision, but much of this discussion has been theoretically based, rather than facing practical issues. We can find no studies describing the nature and extent of disabling disorders in the Beijing population and, in particular, few formal studies relating the provision of rehabilitation services to that population in need of this essential management process. We have therefore carried out a survey-based study to demonstrate the present rehabilitation service requirements for disabled residents in some typical Beijing urban districts. We have also looked at those factors which influence clients to accept the various services which are available to them

  20. Introducing radiology report checklists among residents: adherence rates when suggesting versus requiring their use and early experience in improving accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Daniel K; Lin, Eaton; Silberzweig, James E; Kagetsu, Nolan J

    2014-03-01

    To retrospectively compare resident adherence to checklist-style structured reporting for maxillofacial computed tomography (CT) from the emergency department (when required vs. suggested between two programs). To compare radiology resident reporting accuracy before and after introduction of the structured report and assess its ability to decrease the rate of undetected pathology. We introduced a reporting checklist for maxillofacial CT into our dictation software without specific training, requiring it at one program and suggesting it at another. We quantified usage among residents and compared reporting accuracy, before and after counting and categorizing faculty addenda. There was no significant change in resident accuracy in the first few months, with residents acting as their own controls (directly comparing performance with and without the checklist). Adherence to the checklist at program A (where it originated and was required) was 85% of reports compared to 9% of reports at program B (where it was suggested). When using program B as a secondary control, there was no significant difference in resident accuracy with or without using the checklist (comparing different residents using the checklist to those not using the checklist). Our results suggest that there is no automatic value of checklists for improving radiology resident reporting accuracy. They also suggest the importance of focused training, checklist flexibility, and a period of adjustment to a new reporting style. Mandatory checklists were readily adopted by residents but not when simply suggested. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genes required for Lactococcus garvieae survival in a fish host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Aurora; Fernández, Lucia; Reimundo, Pilar; Guijarro, José A

    2007-10-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is considered an emergent pathogen in aquaculture and it is also associated with mastitis in domestic animals as well as human endocarditis and septicaemia. In spite of this, the pathogenic mechanisms of this bacterium are poorly understood. Signature-tagged mutagenesis was used to identify virulence factors and to establish the basis of pathogen-host interactions. A library of 1250 L. garvieae UNIUD074-tagged Tn917 mutants in 25 pools was screened for the ability to grow in fish. Among them, 29 mutants (approx. 2.4 %) were identified which could not be recovered from rainbow trout following infection. Sequence analysis of the tagged Tn917-interrupted genes in these mutants indicated the participation in pathogenesis of the transcriptional regulatory proteins homologous to GidA and MerR; the metabolic enzymes asparagine synthetase A and alpha-acetolactate synthase; the ABC transport system of glutamine and a calcium-transporting ATPase; the dltA locus involved in alanylation of teichoic acids; and hypothetical proteins containing EAL and Eis domains, among others. Competence index experiments in several of the selected mutants confirmed the relevance of the Tn917-interrupted genes in the development of the infection process. The results suggested some of the metabolic routes and enzymic systems necessary for the complete virulence of this bacterium. This work is believed to represent the first report of a genome-wide scan for virulence factors in L. garvieae. The identified genes will further our understanding of the pathogenesis of L. garvieae infections and may provide targets for intervention or lead to the development of novel therapies.

  2. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.G.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1989-08-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the life history, distribution and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates. Profiles are prepared to assist with environmental impact assessment. The Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) is an important commercial fish along the Atlantic coast. In the South Atlantic Region, Atlantic menhaden spawn during winter in continental shelf waters. Adults then move inshore and northward in spring; some move into estuaries as far as the brackish-freshwater boundary. Atlantic menhaden larvae in the South Atlantic Region enter estuaries after 1 to 3 months at sea. Young fish move into the shallow regions of estuaries and seem to prefer vegetated marsh habitats. Atlantic menhaden are size-selective plankton feeders as larvae, and filter feeders as juveniles and adults. Due to their large population size, individual growth rates, and seasonal movements, Atlantic menhaden annually consume and redistribute large amounts of energy and materials. They are also important prey for large game fishes such as bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), and bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus). The Atlantic menhaden is associated with estuarine and nearshore systems during all phases of its life cycle. Young menhaden require these food-rich habitats to survive and grown. Destruction of estuarine wetlands has decreased nursery habitat available to Atlantic menhaden and other estuarine wetlands has decreased nursery habitat available to Atlantic menhaden and other estuarine-dependent species. 115 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. 41 CFR 302-3.221 - If I travel to another place in the U.S. (other than my actual place of residence) am I required...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... place in the U.S. (other than my actual place of residence) am I required to spend time at my actual place of residence to receive reimbursement? 302-3.221 Section 302-3.221 Public Contracts and Property... another place in the U.S. (other than my actual place of residence) am I required to spend time at my...

  4. Evaluation of methods to estimate the essential amino acids requirements of fish from the muscle amino acid profile

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida Bicudo,Álvaro José; Possebon Cyrino,José Eurico

    2014-01-01

    Many methods to estimate amino acid requirement based on amino acid profile of fish have been proposed. This study evaluates the methodology proposed by Meyer & Fracalossi (2005) and by Tacon (1989) to estimate amino acids requirement of fish, which do exempt knowledge on previous nutritional requirement of reference amino acid. Data on amino acid requirement of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, were used to validate de accuracy of those methods. Meyer & Fracalossi's and Tacon's methodol...

  5. Optimum number of procedures required to achieve procedural skills competency in internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad; Bhulani, Nizar; Jafferani, Asif; Naeem, Quratulain; Ahsan, Syed; Motiwala, Afaq; van Dalen, Jan; Hamid, Saeed

    2015-10-23

    Procedural skills training forms an essential, yet difficult to assess, component of an Internal Medicine Residency Program. We report the development of process of documentation and assessment of procedural skills training. An explanatory sequential mixed methods design was adopted where both quantitative and qualitative information was collected sequentially. A survey was conducted within the Department of Internal Medicine at The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan to determine the optimum number of procedures needed to be performed by residents at each year of residency. Respondents included both faculty and the residents in the Department. Thereafter, all responses were compiled and later scrutinized by a focus group comprising of a mix of faculty from various subspecialties and resident representatives. A total of 64 responses were obtained. A significant difference was found in eight procedural skills' status between residents and faculty, though none of these were significant after accounting for multiple consecutive testing. However, the results were reviewed and a consensus for the procedures needed was developed through a focus group. A finalized procedural list was generated to determine: (a) the minimum number of times each procedure needed to be performed by the resident before deemed competent; (b) the level of competency for each procedure for respective year of residency. We conclude that the opinion of both the residents and the faculty as key stakeholders is vital to determine the number of procedures to be performed during an Internal Medicine Residency. Documentation of procedural competency development during the training would make the system more objective and hence reproducible. A log book was designed consisting of minimum number of procedures to be performed before attaining competency.

  6. Matching metal pollution with bioavailability, bioaccumulation and biomarkers response in fish (Centropomus parallelus) resident in neotropical estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Iara C; Duarte, Ian D; Pimentel, Natieli Q; Rocha, Lívia D; Morozesk, Mariana; Bonomo, Marina M; Azevedo, Vinicius C; Pereira, Camilo D S; Monferrán, Magdalena V; Milanez, Camilla R D; Matsumoto, Silvia T; Wunderlin, Daniel A; Fernandes, Marisa N

    2013-09-01

    Two neotropical estuaries affected by different anthropogenic factors were studied. We report levels of metals and metalloids in water and sediment as well as their influence on genetic, biochemical and morphological biomarkers in the native fish Centropomus parallelus. Biomarkers reflected the fish health status. Multivariate statistics indicated both spatial and temporal changes in both water and sediment, which are linked to the elemental composition and health status of inhabitant fish, showing the biggest influence of surface water, followed by sediments and interstitial water. Bioaccumulation in fish muscle was useful to identify elements that were below detection limits in water, pointing out the risk of consuming fish exceeding allowance limits for some elements (As and Hg in this case). Multivariate statistics, including physical, chemical and biological issues, presents a suitable tool, integrating data from different origin allocated in the same estuary, which could be useful for future studies on estuarine systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CERN CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR AN APPLICATION FOR A FRENCH RESIDENCE PERMIT ISSUED BY A PREFECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2001-01-01

    All non-French nationals who reside in France for more than three consecutive months or who, in the case of intermittent periods of residence, are effectively present in France for more than three months in any six-month period must obtain a residence or stay permit (titre de séjour). If members of the CERN personnel and members of their families fulfil those conditions inter alia, they normally receive a legitimation document, which is valid as a residence or stay permit, from the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Carte spéciale FI or AT, Carte d'assimilé à un membre de mission diplomatique). However, members of the personnel with permanent resident status (résident permanent) are not, by virtue of that status, entitled to a legitimation document and must obtain a residence permit issued by a Prefecture. For the latter purpose, with the agreement of the Prefecture de l'Ain, CERN (i.e. the Personnel Records Office, Human Resources Division, office 33/1-...

  8. Some results of recent surveys of fish and shellfish consumption by age and region of U.S. residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupp, E.M.; Baes, C.F. III; Miller, F.L.

    1980-01-01

    Since ingestion of foods is considered a major source of pollutant intake by man, the knowledge of detailed food consumption patterns is necessary to determine health risks and compliance with regulatory standards. As currently available literature lacks data necessary for complete evaluation of aquatic foods via human consumption of fish and shellfish, a review of recent surveys of fish consumption in the U.S. was performed. The data in these surveys were subjected to statistical analysis to determine percentage distributions of individuals eating different quantities of marine and freshwater fish and shellfish. Included are surveys on consumption of sportfish from the Columbia River and Lake Michigan areas and a comprehensive study of fish consumption in the nine census regions of the U.S. The results of these studies indicate that the quantity, as reported, of each type of fish eaten increases as a function of the age of consumers. Regional differences are most apparent in the use of shellfish and freshwater fish. About 94% of children and 96-100% of adults eat some kind of fish with a per capita average of 4.97 kg/yr. Since this quantity is on an actual consumption basis, as as opposed to 'as purchased', the per capita consumption rate is lower than usually reported in the literature. (author)

  9. Return Spawning/Rearing Habitat to Anadromous/Resident Fish within the Fishing Creek to Legendary Bear Creek Analysis Area Watersheds; 2002-2003 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Jr., Emmit E. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-03-01

    This project is a critical component of currently on-going watershed restoration effort in the Lochsa River Drainage, including the Fishing (Squaw) Creek to Legendary Bear (Papoose) Creek Watersheds Analysis Area. In addition, funding for this project allowed expansion of the project into Pete King Creek and Cabin Creek. The goal of this project is working towards the re-establishment of healthy self-sustaining populations of key fisheries species (spring Chinook salmon, steelhead, bull trout, and westslope cutthroat trout) through returning historic habitat in all life stages (spawning, rearing, migration, and over-wintering). This was accomplished by replacing fish barrier road crossing culverts with structures that pass fish and accommodate site conditions.

  10. Evaluation of methods to estimate the essential amino acids requirements of fish from the muscle amino acid profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro José de Almeida Bicudo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many methods to estimate amino acid requirement based on amino acid profile of fish have been proposed. This study evaluates the methodology proposed by Meyer & Fracalossi (2005 and by Tacon (1989 to estimate amino acids requirement of fish, which do exempt knowledge on previous nutritional requirement of reference amino acid. Data on amino acid requirement of pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, were used to validate de accuracy of those methods. Meyer & Fracalossi's and Tacon's methodology estimated the lysine requirement of pacu, respectively, at 13 and 23% above requirement determined using dose-response method. The values estimated by both methods lie within the range of requirements determined for other omnivorous fish species, the Meyer & Fracalossi (2005 method showing better accuracy.

  11. Matching metal pollution with bioavailability, bioaccumulation and biomarkers response in fish (Centropomus parallelus) resident in neotropical estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Iara C.; Duarte, Ian D.; Pimentel, Natieli Q.; Rocha, Lívia D.; Morozesk, Mariana; Bonomo, Marina M.; Azevedo, Vinicius C.; Pereira, Camilo D.S.

    2013-01-01

    Two neotropical estuaries affected by different anthropogenic factors were studied. We report levels of metals and metalloids in water and sediment as well as their influence on genetic, biochemical and morphological biomarkers in the native fish Centropomus parallelus. Biomarkers reflected the fish health status. Multivariate statistics indicated both spatial and temporal changes in both water and sediment, which are linked to the elemental composition and health status of inhabitant fish, showing the biggest influence of surface water, followed by sediments and interstitial water. Bioaccumulation in fish muscle was useful to identify elements that were below detection limits in water, pointing out the risk of consuming fish exceeding allowance limits for some elements (As and Hg in this case). Multivariate statistics, including physical, chemical and biological issues, presents a suitable tool, integrating data from different origin allocated in the same estuary, which could be useful for future studies on estuarine systems. -- Highlights: •C. parallelus is a suitable bioindicator for assessing environmental quality in estuaries. •Biomarkers matched water quality pointing out different pollution scenarios. •Chemometrics allows extrapolating results from field and laboratory. •Chemometrics helps integrating biology and chemistry. -- Chemometrics allows matching pollution with bioaccumulation of metals and biomarkers responses in the fish Centropomus parallelus evidencing differences in estuaries quality

  12. Feeding the world's largest fish: highly variable whale shark residency patterns at a provisioning site in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jordan A; Araujo, Gonzalo; Labaja, Jessica; McCoy, Emer; Murray, Ryan; Ponzo, Alessandro

    2017-09-01

    Provisioning wildlife for tourism is a controversial yet widespread practice. We analysed the residency patterns of juvenile whale sharks ( Rhincodon typus ) in Oslob, Philippines, where provisioning has facilitated a large shark-watching operation since 2011. We identified 208 individual sharks over three years, with an average of 18.6 (s.d. = 7.8, range = 6-43) individuals sighted per week. Weekly shark abundance varied seasonally and peak-season abundance (approx. May-November) increased across years. Whale sharks displayed diverse individual site visitation patterns ranging from a single visit to sporadic visits, seasonal residency and year-round residency. Nine individuals became year-round residents, which represents a clear response to provisioning. The timing of the seasonal peak at Oslob did not align with known non-provisioned seasonal aggregations elsewhere in the Philippines, which could suggest that seasonal residents at Oslob exploit this food source when prey availability at alternative sites is low. Since prolonged residency equates to less time foraging naturally, provisioning could influence foraging success, alter distributions and lead to dependency in later life stages. Such impacts must be carefully weighed against the benefits of provisioning (i.e. tourism revenue in a remote community) to facilitate informed management decisions.

  13. Total mercury and methylmercury levels in pregnant women, nursing women and preschool children resident in fishing villages in the eighth region of Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, C.G.; Rodriguez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    The main aim of this project is to perform a descriptive study about the levels of total mercury (Hg-T) and of methylmercury (Me-Hg) in scalp hair specimens of a selected human population of high risk in the Eighth Region of Chile, the group studied included pregnant women (PW), nursing women (NW) and preschool children residing in fishing villages distributed within the coastal zone of this region, the diets of the test group included fish and shellfish as main food components. The degree of Hg contamination of this population was compared to a control population (''core programme''). The methylmercury-to-total mercury ratio (Me-Hg/Hg-T) levels in scalp hair enabled interpretation of the results with respect to the degree of contamination by Hg, and the dietary habits of the sample donors of each fishing village under study. Furthermore, Se levels in scalp hair of the populations with relatively high Hg content were to be investigated for possible correlation with Me-Hg levels (''supplementary programme''). 5 refs, 2 figs, 9 tabs

  14. Increased levels of harvest and habitat law enforcement and public awareness for anadromous salmonids and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin - Demonstration period, 1992-1994. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA's program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin

  15. Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1995-06-01

    This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

  16. Seasonal and environmental influences on recruitment patterns and habitat usage among resident and transient fishes in a World Heritage Site subtropical estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, H A; Gray, C A; Broadhurst, M K; Spach, H L; Nagelkerken, I

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether the fish communities inhabiting shallow non-vegetated habitats in two divergent bays in a subtropical World Heritage Site estuarine system differed according to wet (spring-summer) and dry (autumn-winter) seasons or polyhaline and mesohaline zones, within the broader objective of facilitating spatio-temporal management. Species richness (total of 74 taxa; total length, L T  = 11-552 mm) and abundance (51 109 individuals) were mostly greater in the wet than dry season and in polyhaline than mesohaline areas. There was a major effect of rainfall on recruitment, particularly among transient fishes, which could be the result of enhanced survival of young via greater productivity (food resources) and protection from predators (via turbidity reducing visual cues). Salinity had strong interactive effects with rainfall and temperature in one bay, with greater species richness and overall abundances as well as large abundances of four key species [Anchoa januaria and Atherinella brasiliensis (pelagic residents), Cetengraulis edentulus (pelagic transient) and Diapterus rhombeus (demersal transient)] during the wet season in polyhaline areas; possibly reflecting a biodiversity hotspot that might be affected by distance to the estuary mouth and convergence hydrology. Regionally, the results support enforcing spatio-temporal restrictions to minimize anthropogenic activities within statutory (but not always enforced) protected areas. Globally, the data reiterate the need to identify and understand biotic and abiotic effects on estuarine ichthyofaunal distributions and abundances as a precursor to their management. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs

  18. Spinal Microgliosis Due to Resident Microglial Proliferation Is Required for Pain Hypersensitivity after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Gu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury causes neuropathic pain accompanied by remarkable microgliosis in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, it is still debated whether infiltrated monocytes contribute to injury-induced expansion of the microglial population. Here, we found that spinal microgliosis predominantly results from local proliferation of resident microglia but not from infiltrating monocytes after spinal nerve transection (SNT by using two genetic mouse models (CCR2RFP/+:CX3CR1GFP/+ and CX3CR1creER/+:R26tdTomato/+ mice as well as specific staining of microglia and macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of SNT-induced microglial proliferation correlated with attenuated neuropathic pain hypersensitivities. Microglial proliferation is partially controlled by purinergic and fractalkine signaling, as CX3CR1−/− and P2Y12−/− mice show reduced spinal microglial proliferation and neuropathic pain. These results suggest that local microglial proliferation is the sole source of spinal microgliosis, which represents a potential therapeutic target for neuropathic pain management.

  19. Psychotherapy Training for Residents: Reconciling Requirements with Evidence-Based, Competency-Focused Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekera, Priyanthy; Manring, John; Lynn, David John

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) changed the training requirements in psychotherapy, moving toward evidence-based therapies and emphasizing competence and proficiency as outcomes of training. This article examines whether the therapies…

  20. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): English Sole

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    University 104 Nash Hall Corvallis, OR 97331-3803 Project Officer David Moran U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Weflands Research Center 1010 Gause... Sopher , T.L. 1974. A trawl survey of fishery. Portland, Oregon. 330 pp. the fishes of Arcata Bay, California. M.S. Thesis. Humboldt State Univer- sity

  1. Species Profile: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic): Bluefish

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Osteichthyes Division ..................... Teleostei MORPHOLOGY/IDENTIFICATION Order ...................... Perciformes Family...rates are highly transient,’ with little known among Perciform fishes, allowing incentive to remain in a localized rapid buoyancy adjustment (Bentley

  2. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: Influence of contaminated fish consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Lin, W.T.; Liao, P.C.; Su, H.J.; Chen, H.L.

    2006-01-01

    An abandoned pentachlorophenol plant and nearby area in southern Taiwan was heavily contaminated by dioxins, impurities formed in the PCP production process. The investigation showed that the average serum PCDD/Fs of residents living nearby area (62.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) was higher than those living in the non-polluted area (22.5 and 18.2 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) (P < 0.05). In biota samples, average PCDD/F of milkfish in sea reservoir (28.3 pg WHO-TEQ/g) was higher than those in the nearby fish farm (0.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g), and Tilapia and shrimp showed the similar trend. The average daily PCDD/Fs intake of 38% participants was higher than 4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg/day suggested by the world health organization. Serum PCDD/F was positively associated with average daily intake (ADI) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status. In addition, a prospective cohort study is suggested to determine the long-term health effects on the people living near factory. - Inhabitants living near a deserted PCP factory are exposed to high PCDD/F levels

  3. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: Influence of contaminated fish consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.C. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Research Center of Environmental Trace Toxic Substances, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lin, W.T. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Liao, P.C. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Research Center of Environmental Trace Toxic Substances, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Su, H.J. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Research Center of Environmental Trace Toxic Substances, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.L. [Department of Industrial Safety and Health, Hung Kuang University, Taichung, 34 Chung Chie Rd. Sha Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: hsiulin@sunrise.hk.edu.tw

    2006-05-15

    An abandoned pentachlorophenol plant and nearby area in southern Taiwan was heavily contaminated by dioxins, impurities formed in the PCP production process. The investigation showed that the average serum PCDD/Fs of residents living nearby area (62.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) was higher than those living in the non-polluted area (22.5 and 18.2 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) (P < 0.05). In biota samples, average PCDD/F of milkfish in sea reservoir (28.3 pg WHO-TEQ/g) was higher than those in the nearby fish farm (0.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g), and Tilapia and shrimp showed the similar trend. The average daily PCDD/Fs intake of 38% participants was higher than 4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg/day suggested by the world health organization. Serum PCDD/F was positively associated with average daily intake (ADI) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status. In addition, a prospective cohort study is suggested to determine the long-term health effects on the people living near factory. - Inhabitants living near a deserted PCP factory are exposed to high PCDD/F levels.

  4. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Southwest).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    populations (Spratt used for spawning (Miller and 1976). Other known spawning areas are Schmidkte 1956; Rabin and Barnhart San Diego Bay, San Luis ...Commer., NOAA 39(11):1537-1540. Tech. Rep. NMFS SSRF-665:1-8. Blaxter, J.H.S. 1962. Herring Eldridge, M•B., T. Echeverria , and rearing - IV. Rearing...M.B. Eldridge, and Wang, J.C.S. 1981. Taxonomy of the T. Echeverria . 1974. Effects of early life stages of fishes: fishes benzene (a water soluble

  5. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (North Atlantic): Softshell Clam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Veterinary Sciences University of Maine Orono, ME 04469 Project Officer John Parsons National Coastal Ecosystems Team U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1010...Research and Development Damariscotta, Maine 04543 and 11. Con,,c, C) or Gran(G) No Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences (C) University of Maine

  6. Effect of Fish Oil on Serum Levels of Lipid Profile, Lipoprotein (a, Apolipoprotein A-1 and B, Fasting Sugar and Insulin, and InsulinResistance in the Elderly Residents of Kahrizak Charity Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Fakhrzadeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to investigate the effect of ω-3 fatty acids on lipid profiles, lipoprotein (a, apolipoprotein A-1 and apolipoprotein B, fasting glucose and insulin, and insulin resistance in a group of Iranian elderly subjects. Methods & Materials: In this clinical trial, 124 elderly residents of the KahrizakCharity Foundation, aged 65 and older were divided into two intervention (consumption of 1 gram per day of fish oil and control (consumption of placebo groups. Blood sampling was done at the baseline and at the end of the study. Results: After 6 months, TG and apo A-1 increased significantly (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased significantly in the control group (P=0.009. Overall and comparative effects of fish oil were positively significant (P=0.02. Conclusion: fish oil intake can be effective in reduction of serumtriglycerides in elderly.

  7. Acceptability and Impact of a Required Palliative Care Rotation with Prerotation and Postrotation Observed Simulated Clinical Experience during Internal Medicine Residency Training on Primary Palliative Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergo, Maxwell T; Sachs, Sharona; MacMartin, Meredith A; Kirkland, Kathryn B; Cullinan, Amelia M; Stephens, Lisa A

    2017-05-01

    Improving communication training for primary palliative care using a required palliative care rotation for internal medicine (IM) residents has not been assessed. To assess skills acquisition and acceptability for IM residents not selecting an elective. A consecutive, single-arm cohort underwent preobjective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with learner-centric feedback, two weeks of clinical experience, and finally a post-OSCE to crystallize learner-centric take home points. IM second year residents from Dartmouth-Hitchcock were exposed to a required experiential palliative care rotation. Pre- and post-OSCE using a standardized score card for behavioral skills, including patient-centered interviewing, discussing goals of care/code status, and responding to emotion, as well as a confidential mixed qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the experience. Twelve residents were included in the educational program (two were excluded because of shortened experiences) and showed statistically significant improvements in overall communication and more specifically in discussing code status and responding to emotions. General patient-centered interviewing skills were not significantly improved, but prerotation scores reflected pre-existing competency in this domain. Residents viewed the observed simulated clinical experience (OSCE) and required rotation as positive experiences, but wished for more opportunities to practice communication skills in real clinical encounters. A required palliative care experiential rotation flanked by OSCEs at our institution improved the acquisition of primary palliative care communication skills similarly to other nonclinical educational platforms, but may better meet the needs of the resident and faculty as well as address all required ACGME milestones.

  8. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Atlantic). Striped Bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    the sides (Werner 1980). Osteological vomer and paiatines (Hardy 1978). differences are also evident in the three species (Woolcott 1957; Harrell 1984...Percichthyidae) by means of osteological patterns, meristics and Holland, B.F., Jr., and G.F. Yelverton. 1973. morphometrics. Ph.D. Dissertation. Uni...1957. Comparative osteology Striped Bass Subcommittee of the House of of serranid fishes of the genus Roccus Representatives. 9 pp. (Mitchill). Copeia

  9. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents: Five-Year Experience at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Arvind; Hoda, Syed T; Crawford, James M

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9) felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates.

  10. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Atlantic) Hard Clam,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    certain shell size, and siphon (Kellogg 1I03). Food becomes 0 then mortality greatly decreases. entanoled in a mucus straud .rd is passed to the mouth...depressus, Neopanope sie,h,k,l,m, N. texana, Rh rapanopeus harrissi, y Calico crab Ovalipes ocellatus h Moon snails Polinices duplicatus, Lunatia heros b,c...Mar. Fish. .7.: 17-16t.Comm~. Leaf]. No. 14, Washington, D.C. Meqdlhdes, H. 1 41 An PC010l~idI study of snails of the genius Bus con Moore, C.J. 1979

  11. A retrospective review of required projects in systems-based practice in a single anesthesiology residency: a 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Emerick, Trent D; Patel, Rita M

    2015-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has emphasized in its core competencies and more recently, in its Milestones Project, that residents understand the importance of systems-based practice (SBP). The objectives of the study are to evaluate the quality of residents' SBP projects and to determine the degrees that were subsequently implemented. A retrospective educational observational study. A university-based anesthesiology training institution. One hundred forty-nine anesthesiology residents in their final (postgraduate year 4) year of training who completed SBP projects for the last 10 years (2004-2013). A structured SBP course was provided for postgraduate year 4 anesthesiology residents with deadlines set such as project identification, data collection, and proposal draft. Each resident's written SBP proposal received inputs by 2 members of the department executive steering committee. The SBP projects concluded with oral presentations by each resident to the department executive steering committee, who provided overall scores. All SBP projects were categorized into 7 categories: safety initiatives, economic analysis, process analysis, policy change recommendations, education initiatives, teamwork/communication, and operating room efficiency. Evaluation scores using a Likert scale (1-9, where 9 is the best) were analyzed. The rate of implementation of project ideas within the department based on the presentations to the executive committee was examined. Of 149 projects, policy change recommendations was the most frequently chosen category (46 projects; 30.9%), followed by process analysis (36 projects; 24.2%). The overall evaluation score was 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD). A total of 53 projects (35.6%) were implemented in the department. There was no statistical difference between SBPs with implementation vs SBPs without implementation in terms of evaluation scores, year of the presentation, or categories. This SBP project has given residents the

  12. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  13. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: influence of contaminated fish consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Ching-Chang; Lin Wu-Ting; Liao Po-Chi; Su Huey-Jen [Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health/Research Center of Environmental Trace Toxic substances, Medical Coll., National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan); Chen Hsiu-Lin [Inst. of Basic Medical Sciences, Medical Coll., National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan)

    2004-09-15

    Many reports have suggested that PCDD/Fs (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans) contribute to immune deficiency, liver damage, human carcinogenesis, and neuromotor maturation in children. Therefore, beginning in 1999, the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a survey to determine serum levels of PCDD/Fs in the general populations living around 19 incinerators in Taiwan. Relatively high average serum PCDD/F levels were unexpectedly found in Tainan city, a less industrialized area in southwestern Taiwan, than in other urban areas. We therefore reviewed the usage history of the land and found that a factory situated between Hsien-Gong Li and Lu-Erh Li, two administrative units of Tainan city, had been manufacturing pentachlorophenol (PCP) between 1967 and 1982. PCDD/Fs are formed as byproducts in the PCP manufacturing process. Exposure to PCP and its derivatives via the food chain is the most significant intake route of PCDD/Fs in consumers in the European Union (EU). In Japan, in addition to combustion processes, PCP and chlornitrofen (CNP) have also been identified as the major sources of PCDD/Fs in Tokyo Bay7. A preliminary investigation showed that the soil in the PCP factory and sediments in the sea reservoir (13 hectares) near the deserted factory were seriously contaminated with PCDD/Fs (260-184,000 and 20-6220 pg I-TEQ/g, respectively), levels higher than those in other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the PCDD/F levels of fish meat in the sea reservoir and the serum in inhabitants living in the vicinity of the closed PCP plant and other nearby areas. The data from human and other biota samples might clarify the transmission pathway of the PCDD/F contaminants from the PCP factory to local residents, provide information about the exposure status of those living in the vicinity of the deserted PCP factory, and also lead to useful suggestions for controlling PCDD/F accumulation in those living near such

  14. Relationships among Mercury Concentration, and Stable Isotope Ratios of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Scalp Hair of Residents from Seven Countries: Effects of Marine Fish and C4 Plants Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Tetsuya; Hayasaka, Moriaki; Ogasawra, Hideki; Kimura, Osamu; Kotaki, Yuichi; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the Hg concentration, and δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values in the scalp hair of residents from seven countries; Vietnam, New Zealand, Spain, the USA, South Korea, Brazil and Japan. Relationships among the data in each country and among the seven countries were then examined. The highest Hg concentration as well as the highest or higher δ¹⁵N value in each country was found in the hair of a heavy marine fish-eater, whereas the lowest Hg concentration and δ¹⁵N value were found in the hair of a v...

  15. Multidimensional fractionation is a requirement for quantitation of Golgi-resident glycosylation enzymes from cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Hung; Chik, Jenny H L; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P

    2015-02-06

    Glycosylation results from the concerted action of glycosylation enzymes in the secretory pathway. In general, gene expression serves as the primary control mechanism, but post-translational fine-tuning of glycosylation enzyme functions is often necessary for efficient synthesis of specific glycan epitopes. While the field of glycomics has rapidly advanced, there lacks routine proteomic methods to measure expression of specific glycosylation enzymes needed to fill the gap between mRNA expression and the glycomic profile in a "reverse genomics" workflow. Toward developing this workflow we enriched Golgi membranes from two human colon cancer cell lines by sucrose density centrifugation and further mass-based fractionation by SDS-PAGE. We then applied mass spectrometry to demonstrate a doubling in the number of Golgi resident proteins identified, compared to the unenriched, low speed centrifuged supernatant of lysed cells. A total of 35 Golgi-resident glycosylation enzymes, of which 23 were glycosyltransferases, were identified making this the largest protein database so far of Golgi resident glycosylation enzymes experimentally identified in cultured human cells. We developed targeted mass spectrometry assays for specific quantitation of many of these glycosylation enzymes. Our results show that alterations in abundance of glycosylation enzymes at the protein level were generally consistent with the resultant glycomic profiles, but not necessarily with the corresponding glycosyltransferase mRNA expression as exemplified by the case of O-glycan core 1 T synthase.

  16. Fish communities of the Sacramento River Basin: Implications for conservation of native fishes in the Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J.T.; Brown, L.R.

    2002-01-01

    The associations of resident fish communities with environmental variables and stream condition were evaluated at representative sites within the Sacramento River Basin, California between 1996 and 1998 using multivariate ordination techniques and by calculating six fish community metrics. In addition, the results of the current study were compared with recent studies in the San Joaquin River drainage to provide a wider perspective of the condition of resident fish communities in the Central Valley of California as a whole. Within the Sacramento drainage, species distributions were correlated with elevational and substrate size gradients; however, the elevation of a sampling site was correlated with a suite of water-quality and habitat variables that are indicative of land use effects on physiochemical stream parameters. Four fish community metrics - percentage of native fish, percentage of intolerant fish, number of tolerant species, and percentage of fish with external anomalies - were responsive to environmental quality. Comparisons between the current study and recent studies in the San Joaquin River drainage suggested that differences in water-management practices may have significant effects on native species fish community structure. Additionally, the results of the current study suggest that index of biotic integrity-type indices can be developed for the Sacramento River Basin and possibly the entire Central Valley, California. The protection of native fish communities in the Central Valley and other arid environments continues to be a conflict between human needs for water resources and the requirements of aquatic ecosystems; preservation of these ecosystems will require innovative management strategies.

  17. Tropical fishes dominate temperate reef fish communities within western Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yohei; Feary, David A; Kanda, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kosaku

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is resulting in rapid poleward shifts in the geographical distribution of tropical and subtropical fish species. We can expect that such range shifts are likely to be limited by species-specific resource requirements, with temperate rocky reefs potentially lacking a range of settlement substrates or specific dietary components important in structuring the settlement and success of tropical and subtropical fish species. We examined the importance of resource use in structuring the distribution patterns of range shifting tropical and subtropical fishes, comparing this with resident temperate fish species within western Japan (Tosa Bay); the abundance, diversity, size class, functional structure and latitudinal range of reef fishes utilizing both coral reef and adjacent rocky reef habitat were quantified over a 2 year period (2008-2010). This region has undergone rapid poleward expansion of reef-building corals in response to increasing coastal water temperatures, and forms one of the global hotspots for rapid coastal changes. Despite the temperate latitude surveyed (33°N, 133°E) the fish assemblage was both numerically, and in terms of richness, dominated by tropical fishes. Such tropical faunal dominance was apparent within both coral, and rocky reef habitats. The size structure of the assemblage suggested that a relatively large number of tropical species are overwintering within both coral and rocky habitats, with a subset of these species being potentially reproductively active. The relatively high abundance and richness of tropical species with obligate associations with live coral resources (i.e., obligate corallivores) shows that this region holds the most well developed temperate-located tropical fish fauna globally. We argue that future tropicalisation of the fish fauna in western Japan, associated with increasing coral habitat development and reported increasing shifts in coastal water temperatures, may have considerable positive economic

  18. Tropical fishes dominate temperate reef fish communities within western Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Nakamura

    Full Text Available Climate change is resulting in rapid poleward shifts in the geographical distribution of tropical and subtropical fish species. We can expect that such range shifts are likely to be limited by species-specific resource requirements, with temperate rocky reefs potentially lacking a range of settlement substrates or specific dietary components important in structuring the settlement and success of tropical and subtropical fish species. We examined the importance of resource use in structuring the distribution patterns of range shifting tropical and subtropical fishes, comparing this with resident temperate fish species within western Japan (Tosa Bay; the abundance, diversity, size class, functional structure and latitudinal range of reef fishes utilizing both coral reef and adjacent rocky reef habitat were quantified over a 2 year period (2008-2010. This region has undergone rapid poleward expansion of reef-building corals in response to increasing coastal water temperatures, and forms one of the global hotspots for rapid coastal changes. Despite the temperate latitude surveyed (33°N, 133°E the fish assemblage was both numerically, and in terms of richness, dominated by tropical fishes. Such tropical faunal dominance was apparent within both coral, and rocky reef habitats. The size structure of the assemblage suggested that a relatively large number of tropical species are overwintering within both coral and rocky habitats, with a subset of these species being potentially reproductively active. The relatively high abundance and richness of tropical species with obligate associations with live coral resources (i.e., obligate corallivores shows that this region holds the most well developed temperate-located tropical fish fauna globally. We argue that future tropicalisation of the fish fauna in western Japan, associated with increasing coral habitat development and reported increasing shifts in coastal water temperatures, may have considerable

  19. Sewage sludge ash to phosphate fertilizer by chlorination and thermal treatment: residence time requirements for heavy metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Benedikt; Wegerer, Harald; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Rechberger, Helmut; Winter, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash can be performed by mixing the ash with environmentally compatible chlorides (e.g. CaCl2 or MgCl2) and water, pelletizing the mixture and treating the pellets in a rotary reactor at about 1000 degrees C. Thermogravimetry-mass spectroscopy, muffle oven tests (500-1150 degrees C) and investigations in a laboratory-scale rotary reactor (950-1050 degrees C, residence time 1-25 min) were carried out. In the rotary reactor, up to 97% of Cu, 95% Pb and 95% Zn can be removed at 1050 degrees C. As Cl release starts from 400 degrees C (obtained from thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry experiments), heavy metals are already removed partially within the heating period. This heavy metal removal can be described as being similar to a first-order rate law. To meet the limit values specified in the Austrian and German fertilizer ordinances, residence times of the order of minutes are sufficient at 950 degrees C.

  20. Relationships among Mercury Concentration, and Stable Isotope Ratios of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Scalp Hair of Residents from Seven Countries: Effects of Marine Fish and C4 Plants Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Endo

    Full Text Available We analyzed the Hg concentration, and δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values in the scalp hair of residents from seven countries; Vietnam, New Zealand, Spain, the USA, South Korea, Brazil and Japan. Relationships among the data in each country and among the seven countries were then examined. The highest Hg concentration as well as the highest or higher δ¹⁵N value in each country was found in the hair of a heavy marine fish-eater, whereas the lowest Hg concentration and δ¹⁵N value were found in the hair of a vegetarian or non (marginal-fish eater. Hg concentrations were positively correlated with the δ¹⁵N values in each country, and increased markedly in samples with δ¹⁵N values exceeding 9.0 ‰, probably due to fish consumption. The highest Hg concentration could be found in sample, with a δ¹³C value between -19 and -18‰, probably reflecting the δ¹³C value of the marine food web.

  1. Relationships among Mercury Concentration, and Stable Isotope Ratios of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Scalp Hair of Residents from Seven Countries: Effects of Marine Fish and C4 Plants Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tetsuya; Hayasaka, Moriaki; Ogasawra, Hideki; Kimura, Osamu; Kotaki, Yuichi; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the Hg concentration, and δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values in the scalp hair of residents from seven countries; Vietnam, New Zealand, Spain, the USA, South Korea, Brazil and Japan. Relationships among the data in each country and among the seven countries were then examined. The highest Hg concentration as well as the highest or higher δ¹⁵N value in each country was found in the hair of a heavy marine fish-eater, whereas the lowest Hg concentration and δ¹⁵N value were found in the hair of a vegetarian or non (marginal)-fish eater. Hg concentrations were positively correlated with the δ¹⁵N values in each country, and increased markedly in samples with δ¹⁵N values exceeding 9.0 ‰, probably due to fish consumption. The highest Hg concentration could be found in sample, with a δ¹³C value between -19 and -18‰, probably reflecting the δ¹³C value of the marine food web.

  2. Design and operation of ventilation in low energy residences – A survey on code requirements and building reality from six European countries and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Carmen Bocanegra-Yanez, Maria; Rojas, Gabriel; Zukowska-Tejsen, Daria

    recovery is becoming the dominating ventilation system installed in new residences in Europe. However, there are countries, where, due to tradition, national legislation and/or cost reasons, other types of ventilation like mechanical exhaust or manual window ventilation are applied. Demand Controlled...... Ventilation is often allowed or even recommended in standards, but rarely implemented in practice, except for humidity controlled trickle vents in France. The main barriers against mechanical ventilation with heat recovery seem to be high capital cost, space requirements and duct routing as well as problems...

  3. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Gulf of Mexico). GRASS SHRIMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    6 Parasites ................................................... 6 Behavioral Ecology........................................... 6 GROWTH...limited genera Macrobrachium and Palaemon. value as fish bait (Huner 1979) or food Furthermore, unlike Palaemonetes, for cultured fish or humans, their... Macrobrachium bears hepatic spines ecological importance is unquestioned. (Figure lh) and Palaemon floridanus Grass shrimp have been extensively has a

  4. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Florida): Gray, Lane, Mutton and Yellowtail Snappers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    fication of most species off south variable : gray to green-brown, Florida as well. There is some generally wi th redd ish ti nges disparity between...8217 * .....-.... Growth among snappers varies snapper also indicated that qrowth is considerably (Table 4). The lack of variable , probably being strongly...Cuba. Nota 2:1-16. reef fishes. J. Fish Biol. 5:69-84. Rojas, L.E. 1960. Estudios estadisticos y biologicos National Marine Fishery Service sobre pargo

  5. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  6. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  7. 50 CFR 36.13 - Subsistence fishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subsistence fishing. 36.13 Section 36.13 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE... fishing. Fish may be taken by local rural residents for subsistence uses in compliance with applicable...

  8. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: influence of contaminated fish consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C C; Lin, W T; Liao, P C; Su, H J; Chen, H L

    2006-05-01

    An abandoned pentachlorophenol plant and nearby area in southern Taiwan was heavily contaminated by dioxins, impurities formed in the PCP production process. The investigation showed that the average serum PCDD/Fs of residents living nearby area (62.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) was higher than those living in the non-polluted area (22.5 and 18.2 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) (Pfarm (0.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g), and Tilapia and shrimp showed the similar trend. The average daily PCDD/Fs intake of 38% participants was higher than 4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg/day suggested by the world health organization. Serum PCDD/F was positively associated with average daily intake (ADI) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status. In addition, a prospective cohort study is suggested to determine the long-term health effects on the people living near factory.

  9. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Softshell Clam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    pm in diameter. Mucus , secreted by the Adult softshell clams feed by mantle, gills, and visceral mass, filtering microscopic particles of collects...Busycon canaliculatum, and the determining post-settling survival of lobed moon snail Polynices duplicatus softshell clams, predation by fish (Andrews 1970...consequently the mantle and gills are increasingly greater concentrations constantly exposed to sediments and increase mucus secretions and decrease

  10. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). ALEWIFE/BLUEBACK HERRING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    0.32 0.05 sexual maturity (compared to growth rates of immature fish). Mean weights of spawning alewives in Damariscotta Young-of-the-year alewives ap...Netzel and Stanek 1966); DL = Damariscotta Lake, Maine (Walton 1979). bA/M = alewife males; A/F = alewife females; A/MF = alewife males and females

  11. Gender-Based Differences in Surgical Residents' Perceptions of Patient Safety, Continuity of Care, and Well-Being: An Analysis from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Kristen A; Chung, Jeanette W; Matulewicz, Richard S; Kelz, Rachel R; Shea, Judy A; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Yang, Anthony D; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about gender differences in residency training experiences and whether duty hour policies affect these differences. Using data from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial, we examined gender differences in surgical resident perceptions of patient safety, education, health and well-being, and job satisfaction, and assessed whether duty hour policies affected gender differences. We compared proportions of male and female residents expressing dissatisfaction or perceiving a negative effect of duty hours on aspects of residency training (ie patient safety, resident education, well-being, job satisfaction) overall and by PGY. Logistic regression models with robust clustered SEs were used to test for significant gender differences and interaction effects of duty hour policies on gender differences. Female PGY2 to 3 residents were more likely than males to be dissatisfied with patient safety (odds ratio [OR] = 2.50; 95% CI, 1.29-4.84) and to perceive a negative effect of duty hours on most health and well-being outcomes (OR = 1.51-2.10; all p gender differences in career dissatisfaction among interns (p = 0.028), but widened gender differences in negative perceptions of duty hours on patient safety (p job satisfaction (p Gender differences exist in perceptions of surgical residency. These differences vary across cohorts and can be influenced by duty hour policies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Gulf of Mexico). WHITE SHRIMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    detritus, chitin, parts of annelids September 1979. and gastropods, fish parts, bryozoans, sponges , corals, filaments )f algae, The hait shrimp fishery...foods. , and newly hatched brine shrimp to feed the mysis stages. Christmas and White shrimp are an important Etzold (1977) reported that early food for...effort and and marine organisms. Wiley- price-cost trends in the Gulf of Interscience, New York. 868 pp. Mexico shrimp fishery: implications on Mexico’s

  14. Arthropod pests of dried fish and fish by product in a tropical urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animal Research International ... A four months research survey of arthropod pests infesting dried fish sold in a tropical urban community market (Ogige), Nsukka, Ngeria showed that 10 genera o dried freshwater fish ... Keywords: Arthropod pests, Visiting pest, Resident pest, Dried fish, Cod, Fish bone, Urban market ...

  15. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): Ghost Shrimp and Blue Mud Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    liters (1) 0.2642 gallons cubic meters (m3 ) 35.31 cubic feet cubic meters (m3) 0.0008110 acre-feet milligrams (mg) 0.00003527 ounces grams ( g ) 0.03527...the fifth pair finding specimens as far south as El somewhat pincerlike as in the ghost Estuario de Punto Banda, Baja Cali- shrimp (Schmitt 1921). The...Project/Task/Work Unit No. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Fishery Research Center 11. conct(c) or Grnt( G )No. Building 204, Naval Station

  16. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  17. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  18. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn

  19. Geolocating fish using Hidden Markov Models and Data Storage Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Pedersen, Martin Wæver; Madsen, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Geolocation of fish based on data from archival tags typically requires a statistical analysis to reduce the effect of measurement errors. In this paper we present a novel technique for this analysis, one based on Hidden Markov Models (HMM's). We assume that the actual path of the fish is generated...... by a biased random walk. The HMM methodology produces, for each time step, the probability that the fish resides in each grid cell. Because there is no Monte Carlo step in our technique, we are able to estimate parameters within the likelihood framework. The method does not require the distribution...... of inference in state-space models of animals. The technique can be applied to geolocation based on light, on tidal patterns, or measurement of other variables that vary with space. We illustrate the method through application to a simulated data set where geolocation relies on depth data exclusively....

  20. Fish Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people often mistakenly eat fish. This happens in kitchens when fish gets into a food product because the staff use the same surfaces, utensils (like knives, cutting boards, or pans), or oil to prepare both fish and other foods. This ...

  1. Partial migration in fishes: definitions, methodologies and taxonomic distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, B B; Skov, C; Hulthén, K

    2012-01-01

    Partial migration, where populations are composed of both migratory and resident individuals, is extremely widespread across the animal kingdom. Researchers studying fish movements have long recognized that many fishes are partial migrants, however, no detailed taxonomic review has ever been...

  2. Fish consumption behavior and rates in native and non-native people in Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Joanna

    2014-08-01

    Fish are a healthy source of protein and nutrients, but contaminants in fish may provide health risks. Determining the risk from contaminants in fish requires site-specific information on consumption patterns. We examine consumption rates for resident and expatriates in the Jeddah region of Saudi Arabia, by species of fish and fishing location. For Saudis, 3.7% of males and 4.3% of females do not eat fish; for expatriates, the percent not eating fish is 6.6% and 6.1% respectively. Most people eat fish at home (over 90%), and many eat fish at restaurants (65% and 48%, respectively for Saudis and expatriates). Fish eaten at home comes from local fish markets, followed by supermarkets. Saudis included fish in their diets at an average of 1.4±1.2 meals/week at home and 0.8±0.7 meals/week at restaurants, while expats ate 2.0±1.7 meals/week at home and 1.1±1.1 meals/week in restaurants. Overall, Saudis ate 2.2 fish meals/week, while expats ate 3.1 meals/week. Grouper (Epinephelus and Cephalopholis) were eaten by 72% and 60% respectively. Plectropomus pessuliferus was the second favorite for both groups and Hipposcarus harid and Lethrinus lentjan were in 3rd and 4th place in terms of consumption. Average meal size was 68. g for Saudis and 128. g for expatriates. These data can be used by health professionals, risk assessors, and environmental regulators to examine potential risk from contaminants in fish, and to compare consumption rates with other sites. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Fish hemoglobins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. de Souza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate hemoglobin, contained in erythrocytes, is a globular protein with a quaternary structure composed of 4 globin chains (2 alpha and 2 beta and a prosthetic group named heme bound to each one. Having myoglobin as an ancestor, hemoglobin acquired the capacity to respond to chemical stimuli that modulate its function according to tissue requirements for oxygen. Fish are generally submitted to spatial and temporal O2 variations and have developed anatomical, physiological and biochemical strategies to adapt to the changing environmental gas availability. Structurally, most fish hemoglobins are tetrameric; however, those from some species such as lamprey and hagfish dissociate, being monomeric when oxygenated and oligomeric when deoxygenated. Fish blood frequently possesses several hemoglobins; the primary origin of this finding lies in the polymorphism that occurs in the globin loci, an aspect that may occasionally confer advantages to its carriers or even be a harmless evolutionary remnant. On the other hand, the functional properties exhibit different behaviors, ranging from a total absence of responses to allosteric regulation to drastic ones, such as the Root effect.

  4. Information for members of the personnel residing in the Canton of Vaud and who are required to complete the 2005 income tax declaration

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    CERN has recently been informed that the Swiss Federal tax authorities have still not authorised the Canton of Vaud to modify the taxation rules for members of the personnel residing in the Canton, in particular those of Swiss nationality, following the introduction of the internal taxation system at CERN. Pending a statement from the Federal tax authorities, the members of the personnel concerned are requested to complete the 2005 income tax declaration in compliance with the following instructions: Members of the personnel of Swiss nationality residing in the Canton of Vaud must complete the 2005 income tax declaration, declaring all their sources of income and assets, including the income they received from CERN (state the taxable amount as it appears in the annual certificate of internal taxation that you received in April). They must return their declaration forthwith to the relevant tax office. N.B.: they should write the following statement in the Comments section of the form, namely 'Membre du pers...

  5. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  6. Species profiles: Life history and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida): King mackerel and Spanish mackerel. [Scomberomorus cavalla; Scomberomorus maculatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godcharles, M.F.; Murphy, M.D.

    1986-06-01

    This Species Profile on king and Spanish mackerel summarizes the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, fishery descriptions, ecological role, and environmental requirements of these coastal pelagic fish to assist environmental impact assessment. King and Spanish mackerel support major commercial and sport fisheries in south Florida. In 1974 to 1983, Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic commercial landings of king mackerel declined from 10.4 to 4.3 million lb.; Spanish mackerel have fluctuated between 4.9 to 17.4 million lb. Both inhabit coastal waters, but Spanish mackerel are generally found closer to beaches and in outer estuarine waters. Both species feed principally on estuarine-dependent species. They are highly migratory, exhibiting seasonal migrations to winter feeding grounds off south Florida and summer spawning/feeding grounds in the northern Gulf of Mexico and off the Atlantic coast of the Southeastern US. Spawning occurs from March/April through September/October between the middle and Outer Continental Shelf (35 to 183 mi) for king mackerel and the inner shelf (12 to 34 mi) for Spanish mackerel. King mackerel reach sexual maturity in their 3rd and 4th years and Spanish, between their 2nd and 3rd. Female king mackerel live longer and grow larger and faster than males. Spanish mackerel live to 8 years; females also grow faster than males. King and Spanish mackerel feed principally on schooling fishes. Larvae and juveniles of both species are prey to little tunny and dolphin; adults are prey for sharks and bottlenose dolphin. Temperature and salinity are important factors regulating mackerel distribution.

  7. Black, green, and red abalones. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ault, J.S.

    1985-03-01

    Black, green, and red abalones (Haliotis cracherodii, H. fulgens, and H. rufescens, respectivley) are of commercial and ecological importance and are distributed widely along the California coast. The abalones are morphologically similar; species are distinguished by particular shell sculpture, color, and body characteristics. Their latitudinal and bathymetric distribution is stratified and most closely related to temperature. Small juveniles eat mainly microflora; adults eat primarily drift macro-algae, preferring specific brown or red algae, when available. Spawning occurs during summer; gonad ripening depends on food quality and quantity and water temperature. Larvae are lecithotrophic and remain planktonic for periods of 5 to 14 days after hatching; settling is substrate specific. Postlarvae and adults require hard substrate for attachment. Juveniles are cryptic, adults usually more exposed. Growth rates are similar, although maximum size varies with species. Increases in shell length and body weight correlate positively with food abundance and temperature. Below depths of 6 m, sea urchins are major competitors for food and space. Predation by invertebrates is low. Decreased abalone production from central California is associated with range expansion and increased predation by sea otters, the major source of abalone mortality. General declines in California landings are due to mortality from improper picking and replacement, habitat degradation, and perhaps overfishing. Commercial and sport diving efforts have increased sharply, whereas annual landings of abalones declined from 1965 to 1982.

  8. California sea mussel and bay mussel: Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, W.N.; Hassler, T.J.; Moran, D.P.

    1988-09-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are prepared to assist in environmental impact assessment. The California sea mussel, Mytilus californianus, and the bay mussel, M. edulis, are commonly collected for bait. Some commercial landing and aquaculture occurs at a very low level of production. Both species are distributed along the California coast; the sea mussel is more commonly found on intertidal coastal rocks and the bay mussel on pilings and other hard substrates in bays and estuaries. The eggs of both species develop into a trochophore stage in 12--24 hours after fertilization, and the planktonic larval stage lasts 3--4 weeks. Sexual maturity can occur in one year. Spawning of the sea mussel occurs sporadically throughout the year; the bay mussel spawns in central California in late fall and winter. Maximum length is 120--150 mm for the bay mussel and 200--250 mm for the sea mussel. Both species are regarded as unsafe to eat from May 1 to October 31 due to the possible presence of paralytic shellfish poisoning. 55 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. 26 CFR 25.2702-5 - Personal residence trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a portion of the residence is used in an activity meeting the requirements of section 280A(c) (1) or... provision of lodging (e.g. a hotel or a bed and breakfast). A residence is not a personal residence if... portion of their interests in the residence) to the same personal residence trust, provided that the...

  10. Fish allergy and fish allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuehn, A; Hilger, Christiane; Ollert, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Fish is one of the main elicitors for food allergies. For a long time, the clinical picture of fish allergy was reduced to the following features. First, fish-allergic patients suffer from a high IgE cross-reactivity among fishes so that they have to avoid all species. Second, clinically relevant...... symptoms are linked to the presence of IgE-antibodies recognizing parvalbumin, the fish panallergen. This view was challenged by results from recent studies as follows. 1. Allergic reactions which are limited to single or several fish species (mono-or oligosensitisations) apply not only to single cases...... review gives an overview on the clinical characteristics of fish allergy and the molecular properties of relevant fish allergens. The advancement of the IgE-based diagnosis using a panel of well-defined fish allergens from different species is in the focus of the discussion. © 2016 Dustri-Verlag Dr. Karl...

  11. Perspectives on fish impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Data on fish impingement and related parameters are being gathered at a large number of power stations throughout the country at substantial monetary and manpower costs. A national survey of fish impingement at power plants was conducted and much of the information compiled in a standardized format--an effort that we think will aid in planning improvements in the design, siting, and operation of the cooling-water intakes. This paper examines the objectives of the fish impingement studies, monitoring programs, variables affecting fish impingement, siting and design criteria, state-of-the-art of screening systems, and suggestions for meeting 316(b) requirements. It also discusses where the emphasis should be placed in future fish-impingement related activities

  12. 36 CFR 13.1204 - Traditional red fish fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Traditional red fish fishery... Provisions § 13.1204 Traditional red fish fishery. Local residents who are descendants of Katmai residents... regulations or conditions established by the Superintendent, to continue their traditional fishery for red...

  13. fish feed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    En-Joy

    with fishing nets. Fish were identified and authenticated at the Fishery section,. Department of Biological Sciences,. Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria ..... salmon.Aquaculture, 89: 301-314. GABRIEL, U. U., AKINROTIMI, O. A.,. BEKIBELE, D. O., ONUNKWO, D. N. and ANYANWU, P. E. (2007). Locally produced fish feed ...

  14. Fish Dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Marie

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that was inspired by Greek pottery, specifically dishes shaped as fish. Explains that fourth-grade students drew a fish shape that was later used to create their clay version of the fish. Discusses how the students examined the pottery to make decisions about color and design. (CMK)

  15. Needs Assessment for Incoming PGY-1 Residents in Neurosurgical Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, David M; Haji, Faizal A; Matte, Marie C; Clarke, David B

    2015-01-01

    Residents must develop a diverse range of skills in order to practice neurosurgery safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the foundational skills required for neurosurgical trainees as they transition from medical school to residency. Based on the CanMEDS competency framework, a web-based survey was distributed to all Canadian academic neurosurgical centers, targeting incoming and current PGY-1 neurosurgical residents as well as program directors. Using Likert scale and free-text responses, respondents rated the importance of various cognitive (e.g. management of raised intracranial pressure), technical (e.g. performing a lumbar puncture) and behavioral skills (e.g. obtaining informed consent) required for a PGY-1 neurosurgical resident. Of 52 individuals contacted, 38 responses were received. Of these, 10 were from program directors (71%), 11 from current PGY-1 residents (58%) and 17 from incoming PGY-1 residents (89%). Respondents emphasized operative skills such as proper sterile technique and patient positioning; clinical skills such as lesion localization and interpreting neuro-imaging; management skills for common scenarios such as raised intracranial pressure and status epilepticus; and technical skills such as lumbar puncture and external ventricular drain placement. Free text answers were concordant with the Likert scale results. We surveyed Canadian neurosurgical program directors and PGY-1 residents to identify areas perceived as foundational to neurosurgical residency education and training. This information is valuable for evaluating the appropriateness of a training program's goals and objectives, as well as for generating a national educational curriculum for incoming PGY-1 residents.

  16. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  17. Using otolith microchemistry and shape to assess the habitat value of oil structures for reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Ashley M; Macreadie, Peter I; Bishop, David P; Booth, David J

    2015-05-01

    Over 7500 oil and gas structures (e.g. oil platforms) are installed in offshore waters worldwide and many will require decommissioning within the next two decades. The decision to remove such structures or turn them into reefs (i.e. 'rigs-to-reefs') hinges on the habitat value they provide, yet this can rarely be determined because the residency of mobile species is difficult to establish. Here, we test a novel solution to this problem for reef fishes; the use of otolith (earstone) properties to identify oil structures of residence. We compare the otolith microchemistry and otolith shape of a site-attached coral reef fish (Pseudanthias rubrizonatus) among four oil structures (depth 82-135 m, separated by 9.7-84.2 km) on Australia's North West Shelf to determine if populations developed distinct otolith properties during their residency. Microchemical signatures obtained from the otolith edge using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) differed among oil structures, driven by elements Sr, Ba and Mn, and to a lesser extent Mg and Fe. A combination of microchemical data from the otolith edge and elliptical Fourier (shape) descriptors allowed allocation of individuals to their 'home' structure with moderate accuracy (overall allocation accuracy: 63.3%, range: 45.5-78.1%), despite lower allocation accuracies for each otolith property in isolation (microchemistry: 47.5%, otolith shape: 45%). Site-specific microchemical signatures were also stable enough through time to distinguish populations during 3 separate time periods, suggesting that residence histories could be recreated by targeting previous growth zones in the otolith. Our results indicate that reef fish can develop unique otolith properties during their residency on oil structures which may be useful for assessing the habitat value of individual structures. The approach outlined here may also be useful for determining the residency of reef fish on artificial reefs, which would

  18. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  20. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  1. Current food safety management systems in fish-exporting companies require further improvements to adequately cope with contextual pressure: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onjong, Hillary Adawo; Wangoh, John; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau

    2014-10-01

    Fish-processing plants still face food safety (FS) challenges worldwide despite the existence of several quality assurance standards and food safety management systems/s (FSMSs). This study assessed performance of FSMS in fish exporting sector considering pressure from the context in which they operate. A FSMS diagnostic tool with checklist was used to assess the context, FSMS, and FS output in 9 Kenyan fish exporting companies. Majority (67%) companies operated at moderate- to high-risk context but with an average performance in control and assurance activities. This situation could be insufficient to deal with ambiguity, uncertainty, and vulnerability issues in the context characteristics. Contextual risk posed by product characteristics (nature of raw materials) and chain environment characteristics was high. Risk posed by the chain environment characteristics, low power in supplier relationships, and low degree of authority in customer relationships was high. Lack of authority in relationship with suppliers would lead to high raw material risk situation. Even though cooling facilities, a key control activity, was at an advanced level, there was inadequate packaging intervention equipment which coupled with inadequate physical intervention equipment could lead to further weakened FSMS performance. For the fish companies to improve their FSMS to higher level and enhance predictability, they should base their FSMS on scientific information sources, historical results, and own experimental trials in their preventive, intervention, and monitoring systems. Specific suggestions are derived for improvements toward higher FSMS activity levels or lower risk levels in context characteristics. Weak areas in performance of control and assurance activities in export fish-processing sector already implementing current quality assurance guidelines and standards were studied taking into consideration contextual pressure wherein the companies operate. Important mitigation

  2. 22 CFR 42.22 - Returning resident aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returning resident aliens. 42.22 Section 42.22... Returning resident aliens. (a) Requirements for returning resident status. An alien shall be classifiable as... presented that: (1) The alien had the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence at the...

  3. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  4. Pediatric Program Leadership's Contribution Toward Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Savanna L; Perkins, Kate; Reilly, Maura R; Sim, Myung-Shin; Li, Su-Ting T

    2018-02-27

    Residency program leaders are required to support resident well-being, but often do not receive training in how to do so. Determine frequency in which program leadership provides support for resident well-being, comfort in supporting resident well-being, and factors associated with need for additional training in supporting resident well-being. National cross-sectional web-based survey of pediatric program directors, associate program directors, and coordinators in June 2015, on their experience supporting resident well-being. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics compared responses between groups. Generalized linear modeling, adjusting for program region, size, program leadership role, and number of years in role determined factors associated with need for additional training. 39.3% (322/820) of participants responded. Most respondents strongly agreed that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their role, but few reported supporting resident well-being as part of their job description. Most reported supporting residents' clinical, personal, and health issues at least annually, and in some cases weekly, with 72% spending >10% of their time on resident well-being. Most program leaders desired more training. After adjusting for level of comfort in dealing with resident well-being issues, program leaders more frequently exposed to resident well-being issues were more likely to desire additional training (pProgram leaders spend a significant amount of time supporting resident well-being. While they feel that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their job, opportunities exist for developing program leaders through including resident wellness on job descriptions and training program leaders how to support resident well-being. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dietary nitrogen and fish welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Luis E C; Aragão, Cláudia; Dias, Jorge; Costas, Benjamín; Terova, Genciana; Martins, Catarina; Tort, Lluis

    2012-02-01

    Little research has been done in optimizing the nitrogenous fraction of the fish diets in order to minimize welfare problems. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on how amino acid (AA) metabolism may be affected when fish are under stress and the possible effects on fish welfare when sub-optimal dietary nitrogen formulations are used to feed fish. In addition, it intends to evaluate the current possibilities, and future prospects, of using improved dietary nitrogen formulations to help fish coping with predictable stressful periods. Both metabolomic and genomic evidence show that stressful husbandry conditions affect AA metabolism in fish and may bring an increase in the requirement of indispensable AA. Supplementation in arginine and leucine, but also eventually in lysine, methionine, threonine and glutamine, may have an important role in enhancing the innate immune system. Tryptophan, as precursor for serotonin, modulates aggressive behaviour and feed intake in fish. Bioactive peptides may bring important advances in immunocompetence, disease control and other aspects of welfare of cultured fish. Fishmeal replacement may reduce immune competence, and the full nutritional potential of plant-protein ingredients is attained only after the removal or inactivation of some antinutritional factors. This review shows that AA metabolism is affected when fish are under stress, and this together with sub-optimal dietary nitrogen formulations may affect fish welfare. Furthermore, improved dietary nitrogen formulations may help fish coping with predictable stressful events.

  6. A glance at the requirements for obtaining the Spanish nationality by residence / Una mirada a los requisitos de la obtención de la nacionalidad española por residencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Cobas Cobiella

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We live in a globalized world and the mobility of people identifies the modernity of our time. Therefore, obtaining Spanish nationality by residence is an important issue in the Spanish social, economic, political and legal environment. For a foreign to acquire the nationality is a long road to travel with more thorns than roses, so this issue needs to be seen as seriously as possible. The objective of this work is to outline some of the doctrines of the latest case law on the subject, in relation to the requirements for obtaining Spanish nationality. Starting from the premise that when a foreigner comes to acquiring the nationality, it is how to get to the promised land, "El Dorado".

  7. Fish parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems......This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems...

  8. Fish reproduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocha, Maria João; Arukwe, Augustine; Kapoor, B. G

    2008-01-01

    ... of reproductive systems is essential for such studies. Fishes comprise over 28,000 species, with a remarkable variability in morphology, physiology and environmental adaptation. Knowledge on fish reproduction is scattered across numerous sources that shows a dynamic research field. The Editors believe it to be an opportune moment for a...

  9. Fish assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Daniel J.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Li, Hiram W.; Li, Judith; Hauer, F. Richard; Lamberti, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Methods to sample fishes in stream ecosystems and to analyze the raw data, focusing primarily on assemblage-level (all fish species combined) analyses, are presented in this chapter. We begin with guidance on sample site selection, permitting for fish collection, and information-gathering steps to be completed prior to conducting fieldwork. Basic sampling methods (visual surveying, electrofishing, and seining) are presented with specific instructions for estimating population sizes via visual, capture-recapture, and depletion surveys, in addition to new guidance on environmental DNA (eDNA) methods. Steps to process fish specimens in the field including the use of anesthesia and preservation of whole specimens or tissue samples (for genetic or stable isotope analysis) are also presented. Data analysis methods include characterization of size-structure within populations, estimation of species richness and diversity, and application of fish functional traits. We conclude with three advanced topics in assemblage-level analysis: multidimensional scaling (MDS), ecological networks, and loop analysis.

  10. Fishing effects on energy use by North Sea fishes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jennings, S.; Hal, van R.; Hiddink, J.G.; Maxwell, T.A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Fishing affects patterns of energy use in fish populations, as demonstrated by changes in population energy consumption and the size and age when energy demands are greatest. We compare theoretical predictions and observed patterns of energy use (expressed as the primary production required to

  11. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates, North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic, South Florida, Gulf of Mexico, Pacific Southwest and Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    for the sea otter in some areas. The most important anadromous fish species are chinook and coho salmon, steelhead, striped bass, American shad, and...Species native to an area. industrial fish - Fish used for pet or fur farm food, bait, fish meal, fish oil, or other industrial products. infauna

  12. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  13. Model Legislation on Student Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education in the States, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Because of the radical variance in residency requirements from state to state and sometimes from institution to institution, and because of several court cases involving this issue, the Education Commission of the States appointed a Committee to develop (1) a statement of principles for consideration in drafting legislation in connection with…

  14. One Fish, Two Fish, Redfish, You Fish!

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Katherine; Timmons, Maryellen; Medders, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The recreational fishing activity presented in this article provides a hands-on, problem-based experience for students; it unites biology, math, economics, environmental policy, and population dynamics concepts. In addition, the activity allows students to shape environmental policy in a realistic setting and evaluate their peers' work. By…

  15. 78 FR 12015 - Western Pacific Fisheries; Fishing in the Marianas Trench, Pacific Remote Islands, and Rose Atoll...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... PRIA coral reef ecosystem (0). Longline and purse seine fishing has also occurred in the EEZ around the... in the Islands Unit may include family and friends of residents of CNMI and Guam fishing communities... Monument may include family and friends of residents of the American Samoa fishing community. (ii) Monetary...

  16. Selection criteria of residents for residency programs in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, Yousef; Ayed, Adel

    2013-01-19

    In Kuwait, 21 residency training programs were offered in the year 2011; however, no data is available regarding the criteria of selecting residents for these programs. This study aims to provide information about the importance of these criteria. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from members (e.g. chairmen, directors, assistants …etc.) of residency programs in Kuwait. A total of 108 members were invited to participate. They were asked to rate the importance level (scale from 1 to 5) of criteria that may affect the acceptance of an applicant to their residency programs. Average scores were calculated for each criterion. Of the 108 members invited to participate, only 12 (11.1%) declined to participate. Interview performance was ranked as the most important criteria for selecting residents (average score: 4.63/5.00), followed by grade point average (average score: 3.78/5.00) and honors during medical school (average score: 3.67/5.00). On the other hand, receiving disciplinary action during medical school and failure in a required clerkship were considered as the most concerning among other criteria used to reject applicants (average scores: 3.83/5.00 and 3.54/5.00 respectively). Minor differences regarding the importance level of each criterion were noted across different programs. This study provided general information about the criteria that are used to accept/reject applicants to residency programs in Kuwait. Future studies should be conducted to investigate each criterion individually, and to assess if these criteria are related to residents' success during their training.

  17. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  18. Fish pelleting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    lion tonnes (Punch 2014). The increasing growth in .... CAS = critical stress (Pa) particulate density ..... Design and fabrication of fish meal pellet processing machine ... 59. T a b le 1. : W eig h t, efficien cy a n d d ry n ess o. f p ro cessed fish m ea. l p ellets. S a m p le. Tested. W eig h. t o f. In g red ien ts. (K g. ) W eig h. t o.

  19. Fish Oncology: Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Nadeau, Marie-Eve; Groff, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    The scientific literature contains a wealth of information concerning spontaneous fish neoplasms, although ornamental fish oncology is still in its infancy. The occurrence of fish neoplasms has often been associated with oncogenic viruses and environmental insults, making them useful markers for environmental contaminants. The use of fish, including zebrafish, as models of human carcinogenesis has been developed and knowledge gained from these models may also be applied to ornamental fish, although more studies are required. This review summarizes information available about fish oncology pertaining to veterinary clinicians. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Teaching Forensic Psychiatry to General Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that general psychiatry residency training programs provide trainees with exposure to forensic psychiatry. Limited information is available on how to develop a core curriculum in forensic psychiatry for general psychiatry residents and few articles have been…

  1. Hawaii ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for reef, marine, estuarine, and native stream fish species in coastal Hawaii. Vector polygons in this data...

  2. Louisiana ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for freshwater (inland) fish species in coastal Louisiana. Vector polygons represent water-bodies and other...

  3. Maryland ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data...

  4. Virginia ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and brackishwater fish species in Virginia. Vector polygons in this data...

  5. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  6. Fishing Access Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department maintains developed fishing access areas. These sites provide public access to waters in Vermont for shore fishing...

  7. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly efficient and fragmented, with the majority of all activities requiring 4 minutes or less. Residents spent a large portion of their time waiting for other services. In light of these data, we

  8. Simulation Activity in Otolaryngology Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Wiet, Gregory J; Seidman, Michael; Hussey, Heather M; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Fried, Marvin P

    2015-08-01

    Simulation has become a valuable tool in medical education, and several specialties accept or require simulation as a resource for resident training or assessment as well as for board certification or maintenance of certification. This study investigates current simulation resources and activities in US otolaryngology residency programs and examines interest in advancing simulation training and assessment within the specialty. Web-based survey. US otolaryngology residency training programs. An electronic web-based survey was disseminated to all US otolaryngology program directors to determine their respective institutional and departmental simulation resources, existing simulation activities, and interest in further simulation initiatives. Descriptive results are reported. Responses were received from 43 of 104 (43%) residency programs. Simulation capabilities and resources are available in most respondents' institutions (78.6% report onsite resources; 73.8% report availability of models, manikins, and devices). Most respondents (61%) report limited simulation activity within otolaryngology. Areas of simulation are broad, addressing technical and nontechnical skills related to clinical training (94%). Simulation is infrequently used for research, credentialing, or systems improvement. The majority of respondents (83.8%) expressed interest in participating in multicenter trials of simulation initiatives. Most respondents from otolaryngology residency programs have incorporated some simulation into their curriculum. Interest among program directors to participate in future multicenter trials appears high. Future research efforts in this area should aim to determine optimal simulators and simulation activities for training and assessment as well as how to best incorporate simulation into otolaryngology residency training programs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  9. Do bacteria, not fish, produce 'fish kairomone'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringelberg, J.; Van Gool, E.

    1998-01-01

    Fish-associated chemicals enhance phototactic downward swimming in Daphnia. If perch were treated with the antibiotic ampicillin, this enhancement was significantly decreased. Therefore, not fish, but bacteria associated with fish, seem to produce this kairomone. [KEYWORDS: Diel vertical migration;

  10. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  11. The challenges of residents teaching neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Samuel A; Józefowicz, Ralph F

    2004-07-01

    Teaching is integrated into the daily practice of residents, and it is a skill necessary for practice as well as academics. The settings in which teaching and learning take place are ubiquitous but include classrooms, small groups, bedside rounds, and grand rounds. Given the learning environment of residency, neurology residents should have working knowledge of basic principles of effective teaching to make learning successful. Teaching also reinforces knowledge, and residents will likely be better practitioners if some basic skills of teaching are practiced. Neurology teaching techniques for residents are rarely addressed in the medical literature. Although information regarding teaching principles in medicine exists, there is little information regarding how residents teach. We examine and review some of the more effective methods and appreciated qualities in teachers, with a particular emphasis for the neurology resident. We also review whom neurologists need to teach and the various settings in which teaching may take place. Neurology residents encounter a variety of audiences in a variety of settings that require diverse teaching skills to effectively convey information to other providers as well as patients. The majority of these skills should be learned in residency to establish a foundation for teaching, regardless of future practice settings.

  12. Assessment of heavy metal residues in water, fish tissue and human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Residual levels of lead, chromium, cadmium and zinc in water and fish tissue from. Ubeji River, Warri and blood samples from residents of Ubeji were analysed. Control water and fish samples were obtained from Eleyele River and blood from residents of Ibadan. All the samples collected were digested using a ...

  13. Pregnancy and the Plastic Surgery Resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Rebecca M; Weston, Jane S; Furnas, Heather J

    2017-01-01

    Combining pregnancy with plastic surgery residency has historically been difficult. Two decades ago, 36 percent of plastic surgery program directors surveyed actively discouraged pregnancy among residents, and 33 percent of women plastic surgeons suffered from infertility. Most alarmingly, 26 percent of plastic surgery trainees had had an elective abortion during residency. With increasing numbers of women training in plastic surgery, this historical lack of support for pregnancy deserves further attention. To explore the current accommodations made for the pregnant plastic surgery resident, an electronic survey was sent to 88 plastic surgery program directors in the United States. Fifty-four responded, for a response rate of 61.36 percent. On average, a director trained a total of 7.91 women among 17.28 residents trained over 8.19 years. Of the women residents, 1.43 were pregnant during a director's tenure, with 1.35 of those residents taking maternity leave. An average 1.75 male residents took paternity leave. Approximately one-third of programs had a formal maternity/paternity leave policy (36.54 percent) which, in most cases, was limited to defining allowed weeks of leave, time required to fulfill program requirements, and remuneration during leave. This survey of plastic surgery directors is a first step in defining the challenges training programs face in supporting the pregnant resident. Directors provided comments describing their challenges accommodating an absent resident in a small program and complying with the American Board of Plastic Surgery's required weeks of training per year. A discussion of these challenges is followed by suggested solutions.

  14. Allergy to fish collagen: Thermostability of collagen and IgE reactivity of patients' sera with extracts of 11 species of bony and cartilaginous fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Kobayashi

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: The IgE reactivity of patients' sera to fish collagen in extracts was retained even when fish meat was treated by a high heating load. As for the fish collagen, the IgE reactivities to cartilaginous fish were lower than that to bony fish. Reducing IgE reactivity to fish meat using heat is difficult, and other modalities will be required to produce hypoallergenic fish meat.

  15. 8 CFR 316.5 - Residence in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Residence in the United States. 316.5... REQUIREMENTS FOR NATURALIZATION § 316.5 Residence in the United States. (a) General. Unless otherwise specified, for purposes of this chapter, including § 316.2 (a)(3), (a)(5), and (a)(6), an alien's residence is...

  16. 38 CFR 21.4279 - Combination correspondence-residence program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... correspondence-residence program. 21.4279 Section 21.4279 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Assistance Programs Assessment and Pursuit of Courses § 21.4279 Combination correspondence-residence program. (a) Requirements for pursuit. A program of education may be pursued partly in residence and partly by...

  17. Preservation of fish and fish products by use of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, Noemi.

    1986-09-01

    This report reviews the use of the radurization process in the preservation of fish and fish products. The literature describes several aspects of the process such as the fish species and the doses required, the wholesomeness of the radurized fish, and recommendations by international authorities on the applicability of the process. Areas of further research have been identified. The report concludes that radurization is an effective process for extending the shelf life of fish and fish products. Doses ranging from 0.75 to 2.5 kGy extend the shelf life two to three times compared to unirradiated controls. The loss of nutritional value at these doses is insignificant, and no deleterious short- or long-term toxicological effects have been detected in studies on animals. However, further study is required on consumer acceptance, economic feasibility, and radiation sensitivity of parasites in fish and fish products. 159 refs

  18. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  19. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  20. Killer whale prey - Determining prey selection by southern resident killer whales (SRKW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prey selectivity by southern resident killer whales is being determined by analyses of fish scales and tissue from predation events and feces. Information on killer...

  1. Global health education in emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havryliuk, Tatiana; Bentley, Suzanne; Hahn, Sigrid

    2014-06-01

    Interest in global health and international electives is growing among Emergency Medicine (EM) residents in the United States (US). The majority of EM residency programs offer opportunities for international electives. The degree of participation among residents and type of support provided by the residency program, however, remains unclear. To explore the current state of global health education among EM residents who participate in international electives. A 12-question survey was e-mailed to the program directors of the 192 EM residency programs in the US. The survey included questions about the number of residents participating in international electives and the types of preparation, project requirements, supervision, and feedback participating residents receive. The response rate was 53% with 102 responses. Seventy-five of 102 (74%) programs reported that at least one resident participated in an international elective in the 2010-2011 academic year. Forty-three programs (42%) report no available funding to support any resident on an international elective. Residents receive no preparation for international work in 41 programs (40%). Only 25 programs (26%) required their residents to conduct a project while abroad. Forty-nine programs (48%) reported no formal debriefing session, and no formal feedback was collected from returning residents in 57 of 102 (59%) programs. The majority of EM residencies have residents participating in international electives. However, the programs report variable preparation, requirements, and resident supervision. These results suggest a need for an expanded and more structured approach to international electives undertaken by EM residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Resident participation in neighbourhood audit tools - a scoping review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, Aafke C L; Devilee, Jeroen; van Kempen, Elise; den Broeder, Lea

    2018-01-01

    Healthy urban environments require careful planning and a testing of environmental quality that goes beyond statutory requirements. Moreover, it requires the inclusion of resident views, perceptions and experiences that help deepen the understanding of local (public health) problems. To facilitate

  3. Resident participation in neighbourhood audit tools : a scoping review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, Aafke C.L.; Devilee, Jeroen; van Kempen, Elise; den Broeder, Lea

    2017-01-01

    Background: Healthy urban environments require careful planning and a testing of environmental quality that goes beyond statutory requirements. Moreover, it requires the inclusion of resident views, perceptions and experiences that help deepen the understanding of local (public health) problems. To

  4. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  5. Evolution of the Pathology Residency Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Suzanne Z.; Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The required medical knowledge and skill set for the pathologist of 2020 are different than in 2005. Pathology residency training curriculum must accordingly change to fulfill the needs of these ever-changing requirements. In order to make rational curricular adjustments, it is important for us to know the current trajectory of resident training in pathology—where we have been, what our actual current training curriculum is now—to understand how that might change in anticipation of meeting the needs of a changing patient and provider population and to fit within the evolving future biomedical and socioeconomic health-care setting. In 2013, there were 143 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited pathology residency training programs in the United States, with approximately 2400 residents. There is diversity among residency training programs not only with respect to the number of residents but also in training venue(s). To characterize this diversity among pathology residency training programs, a curriculum survey was conducted of pathology residency program directors in 2013 and compared with a similar survey taken almost 9 years previously in 2005 to identify trends in pathology residency curriculum. Clinical pathology has not changed significantly in the number of rotations over 9 years; however, anatomic pathology has changed dramatically, with an increase in the number of surgical pathology rotations coupled with a decline in stand-alone autopsy rotations. With ever-expanding medical knowledge that the graduating pathology resident must know, it is necessary to (1) reflect upon what are the critical need subjects, (2) identify areas that have become of lesser importance, and then (3) prioritize training accordingly. PMID:28725779

  6. Fish and shellfish allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalayasingam, Meera; Lee, Bee-Wah

    2015-01-01

    Fish and shellfish consumption has increased worldwide, and there are increasing reports of adverse reactions to fish and shellfish, with an approximate prevalence of 0.5-5%. Fish allergy often develops early in life, whilst shellfish allergy tends to develop later, from adolescence onwards. Little is known about the natural history of these allergies, but both are thought to be persistent. The clinical manifestations of shellfish allergy, in particular, may vary from local to life-threatening 'anaphylactic' reactions within an individual and between individuals. Parvalbumin and tropomyosin are the two major allergens, but several other allergens have been cloned and described. These allergens are highly heat and biochemically stable, and this may in part explain the persistence of these allergies. Diagnosis requires a thorough history, skin prick and in-vitro-specific IgE tests, and oral challenges may be needed for diagnostic confirmation. Strict avoidance of these allergens is the current standard of clinical care for allergic patients, and when indicated, an anaphylactic plan with an adrenaline auto-injector is prescribed. There are no published clinical trials evaluating specific oral immunotherapy for fish or shellfish allergy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Fish health and fish quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian

    , the fibroblast cell-line RTHDF from rainbow trout was found to be an immune competent cell type. This was examined since a fast up-regulation of IL-1β and IL-8 shortly after tissue damage was observed in muscle tissue from rainbow trout. These observations led to the suggestion that local resident cells...

  8. Artisan fishing and the fishing company in Óbidos, Pará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Aviz

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This work is product of the Project "The time of the plant: the disciplinamento of the workers of the fishing industry (Óbidos-Pará: a comparative study", developed in the years of 2002 and 2003 in the municipality of Óbidos, Pará, objectifying to understand the importance of the time in the disciplinamento of the work in the obidense fishing company. Interviews opened in entrepreneurs had been carried through of fish, controlling, heads of quality control, people in charge of hall and other actors involved in the sector fishing boat and applied half-open questionnaires with laborers and fishing. One used the photographic, recording register and the notebook of notations. The research was carried through in the fishing companies Mundial and Pasquarelli, Colony Z-19 Fishing, in the boats (river Amazon of the artisan fishing and in its residences. As central focus it was looked for to unmask the characteristics of the 'disciplined time' in the sector of improvement of the fishing company, and to detach the joint of the 'natural time' in the process of capture of the fished one. Leaving of these estimated, it was used the 'disciplined time' and the 'natural time' conceived by Thompson (1975.

  9. Problem neurology residents: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabby, David S; Majeed, Muhammed H; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2011-06-14

    Problem residents are found across most medical specialties at a prevalence of about 10%. This study was designed to explore the prevalence and causes of problem neurology residents and to compare neurology programs' responses and outcomes. Directors of 126 US neurology residency programs were sent an electronic survey. We collected data on demographics, first and all "identifiers" of problem residents, and year of training in which the problem was found. We asked about observable signs, etiology, and who performed remediation. We asked what resources were used and what outcomes occurred. Ninety-five program directors completed surveys (75% response rate). Almost all neurology programs have problem residents (81%). Age, sex, marital status, being a US native, or attending a US medical school had no effect on problem status. Being a parent carried a lower likelihood of problems (32%). Most commonly the problem is acted on during the first year of training. Faculty members without defined educational roles were the most frequent first identifiers. Program directors were the most common remediators. The most common remediation techniques were increasing supervision and assigning a faculty mentor. Graduate medical education office and psychiatric or psychological counseling services were most often used. Eleven percent of problem residents required a program for impaired physicians and 14% required a leave of absence. Sixteen percent were dismissed from their programs. The prevalence of problem residents in neurology is similar to other disciplines, and various resources are available to remediate them.

  10. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... such as the Scandinavian countries, where healthcare systems are slightly different. The aim of this study was to examine prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in one out of three postgraduate medical training regions in Denmark, and to produce both a quantifiable overview and in-depth understanding...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  11. Identifying Gaps and Launching Resident Wellness Initiatives: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Battaglioli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burnout, depression, and suicidality among residents of all specialties have become a critical focus for the medical education community, especially among learners in graduate medical education. In 2017 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME updated the Common Program Requirements to focus more on resident wellbeing. To address this issue, one working group from the 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS focused on wellness program innovations and initiatives in emergency medicine (EM residency programs. Methods: Over a seven-month period leading up to the RWCS event, the Programmatic Initiatives workgroup convened virtually in the Wellness Think Tank, an online, resident community consisting of 142 residents from 100 EM residencies in North America. A 15-person subgroup (13 residents, two faculty facilitators met at the RWCS to develop a public, central repository of initiatives for programs, as well as tools to assist programs in identifying gaps in their overarching wellness programs. Results: An online submission form and central database of wellness initiatives were created and accessible to the public. Wellness Think Tank members collected an initial 36 submissions for the database by the time of the RWCS event. Based on general workplace, needs-assessment tools on employee wellbeing and Kern’s model for curriculum development, a resident-based needs-assessment survey and an implementation worksheet were created to assist residency programs in wellness program development. Conclusion: The Programmatic Initiatives workgroup from the resident-driven RWCS event created tools to assist EM residency programs in identifying existing initiatives and gaps in their wellness programs to meet the ACGME’s expanded focus on resident wellbeing.

  12. Freshwater fishes of Tsitsikamma National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fishes in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Fish assemblages in six river systems were sampled in 2001, with a total of 323 fish from eight species recorded. Indigenous fish collected included four freshwater species (Pseudobarbus afer, Pseudobarbus tenuis, Sandelia capensis, Anguilla mossambica, three estuarine species (Monodactylus falciformis, Caffrogobius gilchristi, Myxus capensis, and one alien (Micropterus salmoides. One additional indigenous species (Galaxias zebratus and two aliens (Salmo trutta, Oncorhynchus mykiss could potentially occur within the park. The topography and locality of the park presents a unique opportunity to meaningfully conserve the endangered P. tenuis as well as other fish characteristic of the eastern reaches of the Cape Floristic Region. Management action is required to minimise opportunities for further establishment and spread of alien fish species and to conserve indigenous fish assemblages within the park.

  13. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  14. Fish Tales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-01-01

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not

  15. Fish Tales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-07-06

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical

  16. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  17. Are the French neurology residents satisfied with their training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codron, P; Roux, T; Le Guennec, L; Zuber, M

    2015-11-01

    There have been dramatic changes in neurology over the past decade; these advances require a constant adaptation of residents' theoretical and practical training. The French Association of Neurology Residents and the College of Neurology Teachers conducted a national survey to assess the French neurology residents' satisfaction about their training. A 16-item questionnaire was sent via e-mail to French neurology residents completing training in 2014. Data were collected and processed anonymously. Of eligible respondents, 126 returned the survey, representing approximately 40% of all the French neurology residents. Most residents (78%) rated their clinical training favorably. Seventy-two percent reported good to excellent quality teaching of neurology courses from their faculty. However, many residents (40%) felt insufficient their doctoral thesis supervision. All residents intended to enter fellowship training after their residency, and most of them (68%) planned to practice in a medical center. French neurology residents seemed satisfied with the structure and quality of their training program. However, efforts are required to improve management of the doctoral thesis and make private practice more attractive and accessible during the residency. In the future, similar surveys should be scheduled to regularly assess neurology residents' satisfaction and the impact of the forthcoming national and European reforms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. 50 CFR 21.50 - Depredation order for resident Canada geese nests and eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... geese nests and eggs. 21.50 Section 21.50 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.50 Depredation order for resident Canada geese nests and eggs. (a... nests and eggs, and what is its purpose? The nest and egg depredation order for resident Canada geese...

  19. Fishing activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Ferdinand; Puig, Pere; Martin, Jacobo; Micallef, Aaron; Krastel, Sebastian; Savini, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    Unlike the major anthropogenic changes that terrestrial and coastal habitats underwent during the last centuries such as deforestation, river engineering, agricultural practices or urbanism, those occurring underwater are veiled from our eyes and have continued nearly unnoticed. Only recent advances in remote sensing and deep marine sampling technologies have revealed the extent and magnitude of the anthropogenic impacts to the seafloor. In particular, bottom trawling, a fishing technique consisting of dragging a net and fishing gear over the seafloor to capture bottom-dwelling living resources has gained attention among the scientific community, policy makers and the general public due to its destructive effects on the seabed. Trawling gear produces acute impacts on biota and the physical substratum of the seafloor by disrupting the sediment column structure, overturning boulders, resuspending sediments and imprinting deep scars on muddy bottoms. Also, the repetitive passage of trawling gear over the same areas creates long-lasting, cumulative impacts that modify the cohesiveness and texture of sediments. It can be asserted nowadays that due to its recurrence, mobility and wide geographical extent, industrial trawling has become a major force driving seafloor change and affecting not only its physical integrity on short spatial scales but also imprinting measurable modifications to the geomorphology of entire continental margins.

  20. Deep Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Omer; Sadanandan, Sajith Kecheril; Wählby, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism in biomedical research, especially suitable for morphological screening due to its transparent body during early development. Deep learning has emerged as a dominant paradigm for data analysis and found a number of applications in computer vision and image analysis. Here we demonstrate the potential of a deep learning approach for accurate high-throughput classification of whole-body zebrafish deformations in multifish microwell plates. Deep learning uses the raw image data as an input, without the need of expert knowledge for feature design or optimization of the segmentation parameters. We trained the deep learning classifier on as few as 84 images (before data augmentation) and achieved a classification accuracy of 92.8% on an unseen test data set that is comparable to the previous state of the art (95%) based on user-specified segmentation and deformation metrics. Ablation studies by digitally removing whole fish or parts of the fish from the images revealed that the classifier learned discriminative features from the image foreground, and we observed that the deformations of the head region, rather than the visually apparent bent tail, were more important for good classification performance.

  1. Microbiological spoilage of fish and fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1996-01-01

    biochemical indicators of spoilage. Shewanzella putrefaciens and Pseudomonas spp. are the specific spoilage bacteria of iced fresh fish regardless of the origin of the fish. Modified atmosphere stored marine fish from temperate waters are spoiled by the CO2 resistant Photobacterium phosphoreum whereas Gram......Spoilage of fresh and lightly preserved fish products is caused by microbial action. This paper reviews the current knowledge in terms of the microbiology of fish and fish products with particular emphasis on identification of specific spoilage bacteria and the qualitative and quantitative...

  2. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized pharmacy residents were more satisfied than pharmacy practice residents, and women were more satisfied than men.

  3. Got a Sick Fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Got a sick fish? Fish with disease can show a variety of signs. If you notice your pet fish having any unusual disease signs, contact your veterinarian ...

  4. Fish tapeworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish tapeworm infection is an intestinal infection with a parasite found in fish. ... The fish tapeworm ( Diphyllobothrium latum ) is the largest parasite that infects humans. Humans become infected when they eat raw ...

  5. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  6. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  7. Residents as teachers: survey of Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor K; Burke, Clarissa A; Narula, Archna

    2013-09-01

    To examine Canadian family medicine residents' perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. A 16-question online survey. Canadian family medicine residency programs. Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills.

  8. Fish welfare: Fish capacity to experience pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Marijana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Teleost fish possess similar nociceptive processing systems to those found in terrestrial vertebrates. It means that they react to potential painful stimuli in a similar manner as mammals and birds. However, the welfare of fish has been the focus of less research than that of higher vertebrates. Humans may affect the welfare of fish through fisheries, aquaculture and a number of other activities. There is scientific evidence to support the assumption that fish have the capacity to experience pain because they possess functional nociceptors, endogenous opioids and opioid receptors, brain structures involved in pain processing and pathways leading from nociceptors to higher brain structures. Also, it is well documented that some anaesthetics and analgesics may reduce nociceptive responses in fish. Behavioural indicators in fish such as lip-rubbing and rocking behaviours are the best proof that fish react to potential painful stimuli. This paper is an overview of some scientific evidence on fish capacity to experience pain.

  9. Marine Fish Hybridization

    KAUST Repository

    He, Song

    2017-04-01

    Natural hybridization is reproduction (without artificial influence) between two or more species/populations which are distinguishable from each other by heritable characters. Natural hybridizations among marine fishes were highly underappreciated due to limited research effort; it seems that this phenomenon occurs more often than is commonly recognized. As hybridization plays an important role in biodiversity processes in the marine environment, detecting hybridization events and investigating hybridization is important to understand and protect biodiversity. The first chapter sets the framework for this disseration study. The Cohesion Species Concept was selected as the working definition of a species for this study as it can handle marine fish hybridization events. The concept does not require restrictive species boundaries. A general history and background of natural hybridization in marine fishes is reviewed during in chapter as well. Four marine fish hybridization cases were examed and documented in Chapters 2 to 5. In each case study, at least one diagnostic nuclear marker, screened from among ~14 candidate markers, was found to discriminate the putative hybridizing parent species. To further investigate genetic evidence to support the hybrid status for each hybrid offspring in each case, haploweb analysis on diagnostic markers (nuclear and/or mitochondrial) and the DAPC/PCA analysis on microsatellite data were used. By combining the genetic evidences, morphological traits, and ecological observations together, the potential reasons that triggered each hybridization events and the potential genetic/ecology effects could be discussed. In the last chapter, sequences from 82 pairs of hybridizing parents species (for which COI barcoding sequences were available either on GenBank or in our lab) were collected. By comparing the COI fragment p-distance between each hybridizing parent species, some general questions about marine fish hybridization were discussed: Is

  10. 77 FR 35419 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Waiver of the Foreign Residence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... for Waiver of the Foreign Residence Requirement of Section 212(e) of the Immigration and Nationality... collection under review: Form I- 612, Application for waiver of the foreign residence requirement of section... collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Application for Waiver of the Foreign Residence Requirement of...

  11. Heavy metals in commercial fish in New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Levels of contaminants in fish are of particular interest because of the potential risk to humans who consume them. While attention has focused on self-caught fish, most of the fish eaten by the American public comes from commercial sources. We sampled 11 types of fish and shellfish obtained from supermarkets and specialty fish markets in New Jersey and analyzed them for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium. We test the null hypothesis that metal levels do not vary among fish types, and we consider whether the levels of any metals could harm the fish themselves or their predators or pose a health risk for human consumers. There were significant interspecific differences for all metals, and no fish types had the highest levels of more than two metals. There were few significant correlations (Kendall tau) among metals for the three most numerous fish (yellowfin tuna, bluefish, and flounder), the correlations were generally low (below 0.40), and many correlations were negative. Only manganese and lead positively were correlated for tuna, bluefish, and flounder. The levels of most metals were below those known to cause adverse effects in the fish themselves. However, the levels of arsenic, lead, mercury, and selenium in some fish were in the range known to cause some sublethal effects in sensitive predatory birds and mammals and in some fish exceeded health-based standards. The greatest risk from different metals resided in different fish; the species of fish with the highest levels of a given metal sometimes exceeded the human health guidance or standards for that metal. Thus, the risk information given to the public (mainly about mercury) does not present a complete picture. The potential of harm from other metals suggests that people not only should eat smaller quantities of fish known to accumulate mercury but also should eat a diversity of fish to avoid consuming unhealthy quantities of other heavy metals. However, consumers should

  12. Dietary fish oil and experimental atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Hartog

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIn the review of (most human) fish oil studies in chapter 1 it was shown that the data are not all confirmative and only a few studies were well-controlled. However, the safety of the needed experimental high doses of fish oil requires further investigation. The general aims of this

  13. Factors influencing resident's decision to reside in gated and guarded community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsudin, Zarina; Shamsudin, Shafiza; Zainal, Rozlin

    2017-10-01

    Gated communities are residential areas developed with restricted access with strictly controlled entrances and surrounded by a close perimeter of wall or fences. Developers, conscious of the need to fulfill the requirement of living in modern and sophisticated lifestyle and gated properties become the trend and mushroomed over the past decade. Nowadays, it is obvious that gated and guarded communities become almost a dominant feature of Malaysia housing development projects. The focus of this paper is to identify the factors contribute resident's decision to reside in gated and guarded community and to study social interaction among gated communities' residents. 150 questionnaires were distributed to the residents of selected gated and guarded community area in order to achieve the objectives and analyzed by using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) and descriptive analysis. The result was tabulated and presented in charts and graphs for a clear and better understanding. The five main factors contribute to resident decision to reside in gated communities were identified and ranked; there are privacy, security, location, lifestyle and prestige. Besides, the residents are feeling neutral towards the facilities and services provided in their gated and guarded residential area. A comprehensive improvement towards the facilities and services is needed to reach higher satisfaction from the residents.

  14. Fish under exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, A.P.; Planas, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Improved knowledge on the swimming physiology of fish and its application to fisheries science and aquaculture (i.e., farming a fitter fish) is currently needed in the face of global environmental changes, high fishing pressures, increased aquaculture production as well as increased concern on fish

  15. Plastic fish

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In terms of weight, the plastic pollution in the world’s oceans is estimated to be around 300,000 tonnes. This plastic comes from both land-based and ocean-based sources. A lecture at CERN by chemist Wolfgang Trettnak addressed this issue and highlighted the role of art in raising people’s awareness.   Artwork by Wolfgang Trettnak. Packaging materials, consumer goods (shoes, kids’ toys, etc.), leftovers from fishing and aquaculture activities… our oceans and beaches are full of plastic litter. Most of the debris from beaches is plastic bottles. “PET bottles have high durability and stability,” explains Wolfgang Trettnak, a chemist by education and artist from Austria, who gave a lecture on this topic organised by the Staff Association at CERN on 26 May. “PET degrades very slowly and the estimated lifetime of a bottle is 450 years.” In addition to the beach litter accumulated from human use, rivers bring several ki...

  16. Three Kinds of Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    2012-01-01

    There are three kinds of fish. Fish you were given, fish you bought and fish you lease. This might sound a bit odd, but it is nevertheless the basis for the activities of Danish commercial fishers since the introduction of transferable fishing concessions (TFCs) in 2007. In the current 2012 reform...... of market based systems are wild speculation, concentration and monopolization of fishing access and subsequent leasing with fishing communities and new entrants very likely being worse off (see for example the chapter “From fishing rights to financial derivatives” is this volume or Olson 2011; Sumaila 2010...... will examine five Danish fishing operations and discuss how they have reacted in different ways to the newly introduced system of transferable fishing concessions. By introducing TFCs as a solution to fleet overcapacity, the EU Commission will also be introducing a system where buying, selling and leasing...

  17. Results of the 2003 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) surveys of residents and chief residents in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Buck, David A.; Singh, Anurag K.; Engleman, Mark; Thakkar, Vipul; Frank, Steven J.; Flynn, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To document demographic characteristics of current residents, career motivations and aspirations, and training program policies and resources. Methods: In 2003, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted two nationwide surveys: one of all U.S. radiation oncology residents and one of chief residents. Results: The Chief Residents' Survey was completed by representatives from all 77 programs (response rate, 100%). The Residents' Survey was returned by 229 respondents (response rate, 44%). In each, 32% of respondents were female. The most popular career after residency was private practice (46%), followed by permanent academic practice (28%). Changes that would entice those choosing private practice to consider an academic career included more research experience as a resident (76%), higher likelihood of tenure (69%), lesser time commitment (66%), and higher salary (54%). Although the majority of respondents were satisfied with educational experience overall, a number of programs were reported to provide fewer resources than required. Conclusions: Median program resources and numbers of outliers are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess the relative adequacy of experience in their own programs. Policy-making bodies and individual programs should consider these results when developing interventions to improve educational experiences of residents and to increase retention of radiation oncologists in academic practice

  18. Fish and mussels: importance of fish for freshwater mussel conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Sousa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Co-extinctions have received trivial consideration in discussions about the global conservation crisis, even though recent studies have emphasised their importance. This situation is even more pronounced in freshwater ecosystems where this phenomenon is largely unrecognized. In this presentation we explore the role of fish for freshwater mussels’ conservation. Freshwater mussels’ need fish as a host to complete their life cycle and given this premise is expected that changes in the fish community due to species extinctions or additions may have great effects. We reviewed the published information and we found: 1 that most of the studies were published in the last few years; 2 that most of the studies were performed in North America (69%, which is probably due to the high number of endemic threatened species in this continent; 3 that most of the mussel species that are specialists in fish hosting are listed as vulnerable or endangered (55%; 4 most studies were performed in laboratory (83% and 5 that the majority of studies were focused on life cycle or on identifying suitable fish hosts of freshwater mussel species with few studies focusing on threats. Since the interaction between fish and freshwater mussels can be easily disrupted and serious threats to this interaction have arisen (e.g. loss and fragmentation of habitat, changes in river flow, climate change, introduction of invasive species, pollution a more holistic approach is needed to find the best management strategies to conserve these animals. In addition, more field studies are required and more information on African, South American and Asian species is essential. Neglect the possible fundamental role of fish in the decline or extinction of freshwater mussels may impair the success of any measure devoted to their conservation; therefore, this issue cannot be ignored.

  19. Fish barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Mats

    1992-11-01

    In addition to literature reviews laboratory experiments with both strobe light and different kinds of sound stimuli were carried out. In the experiments silver eel, brown trout, arctic char and salmon smolts were tested. The experiments showed that in darkness silver eel avoided strobe light with intensities between 0.4 and 8.7 lux with 80-90% avoidance in 8.7 lux. The avoidance reactions decreased when background light was raised to 9 lux. Brown trout did not show as strong avoidance reactions possibly due to aggressive behaviour between different individuals of brown trout. The avoidance reaction was however more pronounced in dim background lift with an intensity of 5 lux than in darkness. The experiments also showed that the avoidance reactions started within a few seconds after exposure to strobe light. The frequencies 6.0 and 15 Hz were more effective as triggers of avoidance reactions than were the frequencies 2.1 and 160 Hz. Arctic char did not show any avoidance reactions to strobe light. It was actually attracted to strobe light with the frequency 160 Hz in total darkness and indifferent in dim background light 10 lux. Experiments in running water also showed that salmon smolts could be diverted from an area exposed to strobe light with the frequency 15.0 Hz. The effect was more pronounced in darkness than in dim background light and also more pronounced when water current was 20 cm/s than when it was 40 or 60 cm/s. Experiments to test the avoidance reactions to sound was also performed. The evaluation of these results where however complicated by the fact that the fishes swam rapidly to and fro in the experimental chamber and thus by pure chance very frequently were close to the sound generator

  20. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Medicaid Services (CMS) Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set, Version 2.0; and (ii) Describing... Set, Version 2.0 must be submitted electronically to VA at the IP address provided by VA to the State... information collection requirements in this section under control number 2900-0160) [65 FR 968, Jan. 6, 2000...

  1. Extremes in Otolaryngology Resident Surgical Case Numbers: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Tiffany P; Franzese, Christine B

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of minimum case numbers on otolaryngology resident case log data and understand differences in minimum, mean, and maximum among certain procedures as a follow-up to a prior study. Study Design Cross-sectional survey using a national database. Setting Academic otolaryngology residency programs. Subjects and Methods Review of otolaryngology resident national data reports from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) resident case log system performed from 2004 to 2015. Minimum, mean, standard deviation, and maximum values for total number of supervisor and resident surgeon cases and for specific surgical procedures were compared. Results The mean total number of resident surgeon cases for residents graduating from 2011 to 2015 ranged from 1833.3 ± 484 in 2011 to 2072.3 ± 548 in 2014. The minimum total number of cases ranged from 826 in 2014 to 1004 in 2015. The maximum total number of cases increased from 3545 in 2011 to 4580 in 2015. Multiple key indicator procedures had less than the required minimum reported in 2015. Conclusion Despite the ACGME instituting required minimum numbers for key indicator procedures, residents have graduated without meeting these minimums. Furthermore, there continues to be large variations in the minimum, mean, and maximum numbers for many procedures. Variation among resident case numbers is likely multifactorial. Ensuring proper instruction on coding and case role as well as emphasizing frequent logging by residents will ensure programs have the most accurate data to evaluate their case volume.

  2. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Colton H L; Diaconu, Silviu; Alfadil, Sara; Woodall, Jhade; Grant, Michael; Lifchez, Scott; Nam, Arthur; Rasko, Yvonne

    2017-09-01

    Over the past decade, plastic surgery programs have continued to evolve with the addition of 1 year of training, increase in the minimum number of required aesthetic cases, and the gradual replacement of independent positions with integrated ones. To evaluate the impact of these changes on aesthetic training, a survey was sent to residents and program directors. A 37 question survey was sent to plastic surgery residents at all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery training programs in the United States. A 13 question survey was sent to the program directors at the same institutions. Both surveys were analyzed to determine the duration of training and comfort level with cosmetic procedures. Eighty-three residents (10%) and 11 program directors (11%) completed the survey. Ninety-four percentage of residents had a dedicated cosmetic surgery rotation (an increase from 68% in 2015) in addition to a resident cosmetic clinic. Twenty percentage of senior residents felt they would need an aesthetic surgery fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery compared with 31% in 2015. Integrated chief residents were more comfortable performing cosmetic surgery cases compared with independent chief residents. Senior residents continue to have poor confidence with facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  3. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  4. Some Basic Principles of Fish processing in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    J.F.N. Abowei; C.C. Tawari

    2011-01-01

    Some basic principles offish processing in Nigeria is reviewed to provide information for fish culturist to effectively manage the processing of their products. Processing of fish into forms for human consumption or suitable to be used as a supplement in animal food has been neglected in fish culture practices. This may be due to the high technology required in some of the processes and the fact that those involved in actual fish production are ignorant of the different processing methods. In...

  5. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support &apos

  6. DETERMINANTS OF SPECIALTY CHOICE OF RESIDENT DOCTORS; CASE STUDY--AMONG RESIDENT DOCTORS IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuoji, Roland I; Adebanji, Atinuke; Abdulsalam, Moruf A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Abolarinwa, Abimbola A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined medical specialty selection by Nigerian resident doctors using a marketing research approach to determine the selection criteria and the role of perceptions, expected remuneration, and job placement prospects of various specialties in the selection process. Data were from the Community of residents from April 2014 to July 2014. The cohort included 200 residents, but only 171 had complete information. Data were obtained from a cross section of resident doctors in the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital and at the 2014 Ordinary General Meeting of the National Association of Resident Doctors(NARD) where representatives from over 50 Teaching hospitals in Nigeria attended. Using a client behaviour model as a framework, a tripartite questionnaire was designed and administered to residents to deduce information on their knowledge about and interests in various specialties, their opinions of sixteen specialties, and the criteria they used in specialty selection. A total of 171 (85.5%) questionnaires were returned. ln many instances, consistency between selection criteria and perceptions of a specialty were accompanied by interest in pursuing the specialty. Job security, job availability on completion of programme, duration of training and qualifying examinations were highly correlated with p value job security and financial remuneration related variables. Using marketing research concepts for medical specialty selection (Weissmanet al 2012) stipulates that choice of speciality is influenced by criteria and perception. This study shows that job security expected financial remuneration, and examination requirements for qualification are major determinants of the choice of speciality for residents.

  7. Fish communities of the Wilderness Lakes System in the southern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis A. Olds

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Wilderness Lakes System, a temporarily open and closed estuary with three associated lakes situated in the southern Cape region of South Africa, was sampled using a range of sampling gears to assess the fish community. A total of 25 species were sampled throughout the system, with the highest diversity in the Touw Estuary (23 species and the lowest in Langvlei (11 species. Estuary-associated marine species (13 species dominated species richness with smaller proportions of estuarine resident (7 species, freshwater (3 species and catadromous species (2 species. Estuarine resident species dominated the catch numerically. The size–class distribution of euryhaline marine species indicated that upon entering the Touw Estuary as juveniles, the fish move up the system towards Rondevlei where they appear to remain. Three freshwater species were recorded in the system, all of which are alien to the Wilderness Lakes System. Decreasing salinity in the upper lakes appears to be a driving factor in the distribution and increasing abundance of the freshwater fishes. Sampling followed a drought, with the system experiencing substantially increased levels of mouth closure compared to a similar study conducted in the 1980s. The timing of mouth opening and the degree of connectivity between the lakes influence the nursery function of the system as a whole. Management actions need to focus on improving ecological functioning of this system, in particular how mouth opening is managed, to facilitate nursery function and limit the establishment of invasive species. Conservation implications: Key management actions are required to improve fish recruitment potential into and within the system. These include maintenance of adequate marine inflow through adherence to artificial mouth breaching protocols and improving connectivity between the lakes through sediment removal from localised deposition points within the connecting channels.

  8. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  9. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Pharmacy Resident Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A.B. Cauthon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to utilize an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE for assessment of pharmacy residents. Innovation: Post-graduate year 1 (PGY1 and post-graduate year 2 (PGY2 pharmacy residents completing multiple, local residency programs were invited to participate in an OSCE. A total of eight PGY1 residents and one PGY2 resident completed the OSCE. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP residency program goals were aligned for each case, which were originally developed for a fourth-year pharmacy student OSCE. Station design included outpatient and inpatient settings with patient and physician interactions. Median communication and clinical skills scores were evaluated. Critical Analysis: The OSCE allows for assessment of all residents on common scenarios. Pharmacy residents met competency requirements and demonstrated excellent communication skills. The OSCE was able to evaluate both physician-pharmacist communication and patient-pharmacist communication. Baseline performance related to the ASHP goals and objectives was not completed; however, the OSCE could highlight resident strengths and weaknesses in communication and clinical skills. The OSCE could simulate independent practice, may reduce bias, and could provide an evaluation of the resident by a patient. However, the OSCE incurs higher resource utilization, specifically monetary and time, than other assessment methods. Next Steps: The pilot study results provide a beginning for further study of OSCEs for pharmacy residents. Further study should include surveying the residency directors about use of the OSCE, a comparison of performance between the OSCE and preceptor evaluations of residents on ASHP goals and objectives, and an evaluation of OSCE implementation at different time points within the residency. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in

  10. Analysis of a Resident Aesthetic Clinic: Process for Rhinoplasty, Resident Experience, and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandel, Michael G; DʼSouza, Gehaan F; Reid, Christopher M; Dobke, Marek K; Gosman, Amanda A

    2017-05-01

    Plastic surgery residents often desire additional training in rhinoplasty than what is provided by their residency program. The goal of this study was to define and evaluate a specific process used to structure preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative protocols for rhinoplasty patients in the resident aesthetic clinic (RAC) to enhance qualitative and quantitative experience. Complication rates and patient/resident satisfaction scores were also examined. Resident clinic rhinoplasty patients underwent a well-defined and established process that included patient education and informed consent, preoperative planning in a conference-based session, specific adherence to established surgical techniques, and structured postoperative management and follow-up. This process also included supervision criteria for residents in the operating room and clinical setting. Patient and resident satisfaction at the RAC was evaluated by a Web-based survey. A database of procedural complications and methods was compiled and evaluated. Between June 2012 and June 2015, 146 aesthetic resident cases were completed through the University of California, San Diego Residency Aesthetic Surgery Program. Of these cases, 34 (17%) were rhinoplasty procedures. Residents at our institution assisted on an average of 55 rhinoplasty procedures with the faculty and performed an average of 12 rhinoplasty procedures as primary surgeons. The residents surveyed felt that they had a good autonomous experience (P < 0.001), and 90% reported confidence with rhinoplasty. Postoperative complications were recorded and included asymmetry (n = 4, 10.5%), septal perforation (n = 1, 2.6%), and difficulty in breathing (n = 6, 15.8%). There were no patients who experienced infections, and the complication rate requiring revision in the operating room was 0%. Optimizing protocols in rhinoplasty in an RAC has allowed for the RAC to flourish in the breadth and complexity of rhinoplasty operations. This has enabled

  11. Evaluation of otolaryngology residency program websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Gupta, Amar; Johnson, Andrew P; Zuliani, Giancarlo; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Prior to applying or interviewing, most prospective applicants turn to the Internet when evaluating residency programs, making maintenance of a comprehensive website critical. While certain "intangibles" such as reputation may not be communicated effectively online, residency websites are invaluable for conveying other aspects of a program. Prior analyses have reported that certain criteria such as research experience and didactics are important considerations for applicants. To evaluate the comprehensiveness of otolaryngology residency websites. Review of otolaryngology residency program websites. Websites of 99 civilian residency programs were searched for the presence of 23 criteria. Presence of 23 criteria for application process, incentives, instruction, research, clinical training, and other. Only 5 programs contained at least three-quarters of the criteria analyzed; on average programs reported less than 50% of information sought. Among the 99 residency program websites, a description of the following criteria was noted: comprehensive faculty listing (88%), didactics (80%), contact e-mail (77%), current residents (74%), description of facilities (70%), intern schedule (70%), research requirements (69%), otolaryngology rotation schedule (64%), other courses (61%), ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) link (55%), year-to-year responsibility progression (47%), call schedule (40%), active/past research projects (37%), area information (34%), message from the program director (33%) or chair (23%), selection criteria (30%), salary (directly on site) (23%), surgical statistics (18%), parking (9%), and meal allowance (7%). The mean (SD) percentage present of factors encompassing "clinical training" was 55% (23%), significantly higher than the mean (SD) percentage of factors covered under the "incentives" category (19% [11%]; P = .01). The proportion of overall criteria present on websites did not differ on organizing programs by region (range, 42

  12. Learning environment: assessing resident experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byszewski, Anna; Lochnan, Heather; Johnston, Donna; Seabrook, Christine; Wood, Timothy

    2017-06-01

    Given their essential role in developing professional identity, academic institutions now require formal assessment of the learning environment (LE). We describe the experience of introducing a novel and practical tool in postgraduate programmes. The Learning Environment for Professionalism (LEP) survey, validated in the undergraduate setting, is relatively short, with 11 questions balanced for positive and negative professionalism behaviours. LEP is anonymous and focused on rotation setting, not an individual, and can be used on an iterative basis. We describe how we implemented the LEP, preliminary results, challenges encountered and suggestions for future application. Academic institutions now require formal assessment of the learning environment METHODS: The study was designed to test the feasibility of introducing the LEP in the postgraduate setting, and to establish the validity and the reliability of the survey. Residents in four programmes completed 187 ratings using LEP at the end of one of 11 rotations. The resident response rate was 87 per cent. Programme and rotation ratings were similar but not identical. All items rated positively (favourably), but displays of altruism tended to have lower ratings (meaning less desirable behaviour was witnessed), as were ratings for derogatory comments (again meaning that less desirable behaviour was witnessed). We have shown that the LEP is a feasible and valid tool that can be implemented on an iterative basis to examine the LE. Two LEP questions in particular, regarding derogatory remarks and demonstrating altruism, recorded the lowest scores, and these areas deserve attention at our institution. Implementation in diverse programmes is planned at our teaching hospitals to further assess reliability. This work may influence other postgraduate programmes to introduce this assessment tool. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  13. Impingement and entrainment of fishes at the Savannah River Plant: an NPDES 316b demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, R.W.; Frietsche, R.F.; Miracle, R.D.

    1978-02-01

    Environmental impacts of the Savannah River Plant's withdrawal of Savannah River water include impingement of juvenile and adult fish on trash removal screens, and entrainment of planktonic fish eggs and larval fish into the pumping system. The Savannah River Plant (SRP) has the capacity to pump 3.6 million cubic meters of water per day--25% of the minimal river discharge--for cooling and other purposes. Present removal is 7% of the actual river discharge. In the river and intake canals reside sixty-nine species of fishes. The species composition of the resident fish community of the intake canals is similar to the species composition in the river, but different in relative species abundance. The dominant sunfishes tend to reside in the canals for long periods and seldom go from canal to canal. The fish impingement rate at the plant ranks very low in comparison with electric power plants on inland waters. Thirty-five species of fishes were impinged during 1977. The average impingement rate of 7.3 fish per day extrapolates to 2,680 fish per year. No single species comprised more than 10% of the sample. The most commonly impinged species were bluespotted sunfish, warmouth, channel catfish, and yellow perch. The relative abundance of those species impinged deviates from their relative abundance in the canal fish population

  14. Documenting resident procedure and diagnostic experience: simplifying the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Broadhurst, J

    1997-10-01

    The Residency Review Committee (RRC) requires documentation of family practice residents' procedural and diagnostic experiences. Further, hospital privileging is frequently based on documentation of prior clinical experience. Residency programs need a user-friendly (ie, resident-friendly) mechanism for collecting data and generating reports to document these experiences. This paper outlines a simplified, user-friendly method of documenting resident procedural and diagnostic experiences. We developed a pocket-sized, optically scannable card for data input. This is coupled with a computerized database with report generation capability. The system is based on diagnostic clusters to further simplify the data input process. The system's setup costs are about $10,000. Annual maintenance and operational fees are about $5,000. After instituting the system, the number of residents submitting documentation information increased substantially. This system meets both RRC and potential clinical privileging requirements and provides a useful tool for guiding resident evaluation and developing appropriate training opportunities during the latter half of the residency. Simplified, accurate documentation may allow for comparisons among residents at various levels--program, state, and national.

  15. A theory-informed, process-oriented Resident Scholarship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasitboon, Satid; Darby, John B; Hair, Amy B; Rose, Karen M; Ward, Mark A; Turner, Teri L; Balmer, Dorene F

    2016-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide curricula for residents to engage in scholarly activities but does not specify particular guidelines for instruction. We propose a Resident Scholarship Program that is framed by the self-determination theory (SDT) and emphasize the process of scholarly activity versus a scholarly product. The authors report on their longitudinal Resident Scholarship Program, which aimed to support psychological needs central to SDT: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. By addressing those needs in program aims and program components, the program may foster residents' intrinsic motivation to learn and to engage in scholarly activity. To this end, residents' engagement in scholarly processes, and changes in perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness were assessed. Residents engaged in a range of scholarly projects and expressed positive regard for the program. Compared to before residency, residents felt more confident in the process of scholarly activity, as determined by changes in increased perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Scholarly products were accomplished in return for a focus on scholarly process. Based on our experience, and in line with the SDT, supporting residents' autonomy, competence, and relatedness through a process-oriented scholarship program may foster the curiosity, inquisitiveness, and internal motivation to learn that drives scholarly activity and ultimately the production of scholarly products.

  16. Interventional Pain Procedures in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sanjeev; Cicone, Caitlin; Chang, Philip

    2018-04-01

    Exposure to interventional pain procedures is now a required component of training in physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies as mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Data regarding resident exposure and competency in these procedures remain limited. Objectives were to determine the volume and type of exposure physical medicine and rehabilitation residents have to interventional pain procedures and to obtain faculty-perceived opinions regarding competency of incoming fellows as it pertains to interventional pain management. Online surveys were sent to program directors of physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies and fellowship directors of interventional spine, sports medicine, and pain medicine fellowships. Surveys inquired about educational methods, the volume of procedures in which residents actively participate, and faculty-perceived competency of trainees performing procedures. Thirty-nine residency programs and 27 fellowships responded to the surveys. Of the 39 residencies that responded, there was great variation in the exposure residents receive. Most programs reported that residents have moderate exposure to common procedures such as ultrasound-guided knee injections and lumbar epidural injections. In addition, while most residency program directors report graduates to be "fairly prepared" (33%) to "well prepared" (20.5%) with regard to spine procedures, most fellowship directors (63%) describe incoming fellows to be at the "beginner" level.

  17. Scholar Quest: A Residency Research Program Aligned With Faculty Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R. Panchal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ACGME requires that residents perform scholarly activities prior to graduation, but this is difficult to complete and challenging to support. We describe a residency research program, taking advantage of environmental change aligning resident and faculty goals, to become a contributor to departmental cultural change and research development. Methods: A research program, Scholar Quest (SQ, was developed as a part of an Information Mastery program. The goal of SQ is for residents to gain understanding of scholarly activity through a mentor-directed experience in original research. This curriculum is facilitated by providing residents protected time for didactics, seed grants and statistical/staff support. We evaluated total scholarly activity and resident/faculty involvement before and after implementation (PRE-SQ; 2003-2005 and POST-SQ; 2007-2009. Results: Scholarly activity was greater POST-SQ versus PRE-SQ (123 versus 27 (p<0.05 with an incidence rate ratio (IRR=2.35. Resident and faculty involvement in scholarly activity also increased PRE-SQ to POST-SQ (22 to 98 residents; 10 to 39 faculty, p<0.05 with an IRR=2.87 and 2.69, respectively. Conclusion: Implementation of a program using department environmental change promoting a resident longitudinal research curriculum yielded increased resident and faculty scholarly involvement, as well as an increase in total scholarly activity.

  18. Small-Boat Noise Impacts Natural Settlement Behavior of Coral Reef Fish Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N; Holles, Sophie; Ferarri, Maud C O; Chivers, Douglas P; McCormick, Mark I; Meekan, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    After a pelagic larval phase, settlement-stage coral reef fish must locate a suitable reef habitat for juvenile life. Reef noise, produced by resident fish and invertebrates, provides an important cue for orientation and habitat selection during this process, which must often occur in environments impacted by anthropogenic noise. We adapted an established field-based protocol to test whether recorded boat noise influenced the settlement behavior of reef fish. Fewer fish settled to patch reefs broadcasting boat + reef noise compared with reef noise alone. This study suggests that boat noise, now a common feature of many reefs, can compromise critical settlement behavior of reef fishes.

  19. Fishing fleet profiling methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferraris, Jocelyne

    2002-01-01

    A fishing fleet profile aims tho assist in understanding the complexity and structure of fisheries from a technical and socio-economic point of view, or from the point of view of fishing strategies...

  20. Fish population dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gulland, J. A

    1977-01-01

    This book describes how the dynamics of fish populations can be analysed in terms of the factors affecting their rates of growth, mortality and reproduction, with particular emphasis on the effects of fishing...

  1. Hawaiian Fish Distributors Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is proprietary sales data from one Kona-based fish dealer for August 1986 to Decemeber 1988. Fishing was generally around Kona. This is Dealer Data and is...

  2. Pittsburgh Fish Fry Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Lenten Fish Fry records for the Greater Pittsburgh region. Data is collected before and during the Lenten fish fry season each year by Code for Pittsburgh. Data is...

  3. Scorpion fish sting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002849.htm Scorpion fish sting To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Scorpion fish are members of the family Scorpaenidae, which includes ...

  4. Methodology and assumptions for evaluating heating and cooling energy requirements in new single-family residential buildings: Technical support document for the PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) microcomputer program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.J.; Ritschard, R.; Bull, J.; Byrne, S.; Turiel, I.; Wilson, D.; Hsui, C.; Foley, D.

    1987-01-01

    This report provides technical documentation for a software package called PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) developed by LBL. PEAR offers an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy savings associated with various energy conservation measures used in site-built, single-family homes. This program was designed for use by non-technical groups such as home builders, home buyers or others in the buildings industry, and developed as an integral part of a set of voluntary guidelines entitled Affordable Housing Through Energy Conservation: A Guide to Designing and Constructing Energy Efficient Homes. These guidelines provide a method for selecting and evaluating cost-effective energy conservation measures based on the energy savings estimated by PEAR. This work is part of a Department of Energy program aimed at conducting research that will improve the energy efficiency of the nation's stock of conventionally-built and manufactured homes, and presenting the results to the public in a simplified format.

  5. Commercial cage fish culture

    OpenAIRE

    Aigbadon, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    With increasing emphasis in Nigeria on aquaculture as an alternative to dwindling artisanal fishing and scarce foreign exchange for fish import, cage fish culture, is a more profitable aquaculture practice than pond culture. It appears to be one of the most viable business ventures with minimum risks. It is a highly recommendable project

  6. Medusivorous fishes, a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ates, R.M.L.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary review is presented of fish species having consumed pelagic Cnidaria (Scyphozoa and Hydrozoa) as well as Ctenophora. Quantitative data are scarce. Knowledge of morphological and physiological adaptations of fishes foraging on gelatinous plankton is almost non-existent. Many fish

  7. Fish eye optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, R.; Michalova, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report on small student (high—school) project of the Czech Academy of Sciences dealing with animal (fish) eyes and possible application in science and technology. Albeit most fishes have refractive eyes, the recent discoveries confirm that some fishes have reflective eyes with strange arrangements as well.

  8. [Strategy for educating senior dermatological residents in mycology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Sei, Yoshihiro; Hiruma, Masataro; Watanabe, Shinichi; Makimura, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    To improve the ability of dermatologists to diagnose cutaneous mycoses, we have proposed a list of the minimum mycological knowledge and skills required by senior residents of dermatology. The list includes ability to select the most appropriate sampling method, knowledge of the basic method of potassium hydroxide (KOH) examination and skill in performing fungal cultures and identifying the most prevalent fungal species isolated from skin lesions. It is not possible for the Japanese Society of Medical Mycology to train every senior resident directly, and it is difficult for them to acquire sufficient expertise independently. Consequently, training and advice given by instructors in residents' home institutes is essential. A project of an advanced course for instructors, who are in charge of educating senior residents in their own institute, may be possible. Therefore, we have proposed here a list for instructors of the knowledge and skills required to educate senior residents. Employing this list should realize improved skill in dermatologists.

  9. Training Psychiatry Residents in Psychotherapy: The Role of Manualized Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Joshua; Kyle, Brandon N; Johnson, Toni L; Saeed, Sy Atezaz

    2017-06-01

    Evidence-based treatment and manualized psychotherapy have a recent but rich history. As interest and research have progressed, defining the role of treatment manuals in resident training and clinical practice has become more important. Although there is not a universal definition of treatment manual, most clinicians and researchers agree that treatment manuals are an essential piece of evidence-based therapy, and that despite several limitations, they offer advantages in training residents in psychotherapy. Requirements for resident training in psychotherapy have changed over the years, and treatment manuals offer a simple and straightforward way to meet training requirements. In a search limited to only depression, two treatment manuals emerged with the support of research regarding both clinical practice and resident training. In looking toward the future, it will be important for clinicians to remain updated on further advances in evidence based manualized treatment as a tool for training residents in psychotherapy, including recent developments in online and smartphone based treatments.

  10. Histamine (Scombroid) Fish Poisoning: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Charles; Teuber, Suzanne; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-02-01

    Histamine fish poisoning, also known as scombroid poisoning, is the most common cause of ichythyotoxicosis worldwide and results from the ingestion of histamine-contaminated fish in the Scombroidae and Scomberesocidae families, including mackerel, bonito, albacore, and skipjack. This disease was first described in 1799 in Britain and re-emerged in the medical literature in the 1950s when outbreaks were reported in Japan. The symptoms associated with histamine fish poisoning are similar to that of an allergic reaction. In fact, such histamine-induced reactions are often misdiagnosed as IgE-mediated fish allergy. Indeed, histamine fish poisoning is still an underrecognized disease. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of scombroid disease. Because more than 80% of fish consumed in the USA is now imported from other countries, the disease is intimately linked with the global fish trade (National Marine Fisheries Service, 2012). Preventing future scombroid outbreaks will require that fishermen, public health officials, restaurant workers, and medical professionals work together to devise international safety standards and increase awareness of the disease. The implications of scombroid poisoning go far beyond that of fish and have broader implications for the important issues of food safety.

  11. Evaluation of Application Space Expansion for the Sensor Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRolph, Christopher R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed an instrument known as the sensor fish that can be released into downstream passage routes at hydropower facilities to collect data on the physical conditions that a fish might be exposed to during passage through a turbine. The US Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program sees value in expanding the sensor fish application space beyond large Kaplan turbines in the northwest United States to evaluate conditions to which a greater variety of fish species are exposed. Development of fish-friendly turbines requires an understanding of both physical passage conditions and biological responses to those conditions. Expanding the use of sensor fish into other application spaces will add to the knowledge base of physical passage conditions and could also enhance the use of sensor fish as a site-specific tool in mitigating potential impacts to fish populations from hydropower. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Hydropower Assessment Program (NHAAP) database contains hydropower facility characteristics that, along with national fish distribution data, were used to evaluate potential interactions between fish species and project characteristics related to downstream passage issues. ORNL developed rankings for the turbine types in the NHAAP database in terms of their potential to impact fish through injury or mortality during downstream turbine passage. National-scale fish distributions for 31 key migratory species were spatially intersected with hydropower plant locations to identify facilities where turbines with a high threat to fish injury or mortality overlap with the potential range of a sensitive fish species. A dataset was produced that identifies hydropower facilities where deployment of the sensor fish technology might be beneficial in addressing issues related to downstream fish passage. The dataset can be queried to target specific geographic regions, fish species, license expiration

  12. Constraints and motivations related to fishing along the Lake Ontario coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Brincka; Diane M. Kuehn; Valerie. Luzadis

    2012-01-01

    The number of nonresident anglers along the Lake Ontario coast has decreased over the past 15 years. Therefore, in order to sustain a strong sport fishing industry, local businesses and tourism promoters might want to tap into the large resident angler market group. This study examines resident anglers' social, environmental, and economic constraints/facilitators...

  13. A discriminant analysis of social and psychological factors influencing fishing participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane Kuehn

    2006-01-01

    Lake Ontario, one of North America?s Great Lakes, provides coastal residents of New York State with a sportfishery integral to both local traditions and the economy. Recent and projected declines in the number of state residents fishing Lake Ontario have generated concerns among fishery managers and business owners. In order to identify management and marketing...

  14. Turbine related fish mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eicher, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to assess the factors affecting turbine-related fish mortality. The mechanics of fish passage through a turbine is outlined, and various turbine related stresses are described, including pressure and shear effects, hydraulic head, turbine efficiency, and tailwater level. The methodologies used in determining the effects of fish passage are evaluated. The necessity of adequate controls in each test is noted. It is concluded that mortality is the result of several factors such as hardiness of study fish, fish size, concentrations of dissolved gases, and amounts of cavitation. Comparisons between Francis and Kaplan turbines indicate little difference in percent mortality. 27 refs., 5 figs

  15. Food wastes as fish feeds for polyculture of low-trophic-level fish: bioaccumulation and health risk assessments of heavy metals in the cultured fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhang; Lam, Cheung-Lung; Mo, Wing-Yin; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Choi, Wai-Ming; Man, Yu-Bon; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-04-01

    The major purpose of this study was to use different types of food wastes which serve as the major sources of protein to replace the fish meal used in fish feeds to produce quality fish. Two types of food waste-based feed pellets FW A (with cereals) and FW B (with cereals and meat products) and the commercial feed Jinfeng® were used to culture fingerlings of three low-trophic-level fish species: bighead carp, grass carp, and mud carp (in the ratio of 1:3:1) for 1 year period in the Sha Tau Kok Organic Farm in Hong Kong. Heavy metal concentrations in all of the fish species fed with food waste pellets and commercial pellets in Sha Tau Kok fish ponds were all below the local and international maximum permissible levels in food. Health risk assessments indicated that human consumption of the fish fed with food waste feed pellets was safe for the Hong Kong residents. The present results revealed that recycling of food waste for cultivating low-trophic-level fish (mainly herbivores and detritus feeders) is feasible, and at the same time will ease the disposal pressure of food waste, a common problem of densely populated cities like Hong Kong.

  16. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  17. Using Reflections of Recent Resident Graduates and their Pediatric Colleagues to Evaluate a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Kamei, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes: In response to the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandate for residency programs to use feedback to improve its educational program, we piloted a novel evaluation strategy of a residency program using structured interviews of resident graduates working in a primary care practice and their physician associates. Methods: A research assistant performed a structured telephone interview. Quantitative data assessing the graduate’s self-assessment and the graduate’s clinical practice by the associate were analyzed. In addition, we performed a qualitative analysis of the interviews. Results: Thirteen resident graduates in primary care practice and seven physician practice associates participated in the study. Graduate self-assessment revealed high satisfaction with their residency training and competency. The associates judged our graduates as highly competent and mentioned independent decision-making and strong interpersonal skills (such as teamwork and communication as important. They specifically cited the graduate’s skills in intensive care medicine and adolescent medicine as well as communication and teamwork skills as important contributions to their practice. Conclusions: The ACGME Outcomes Project, which increases the emphasis on educational outcomes in the accreditation of residency education programs, requires programs to provide evidence of its effectiveness in preparing residents for practice. Direct assessment of the competency of our physician graduates in practice using structured interviews of graduates and their practice associates provide useful feedback information to a residency program as part of a comprehensive evaluation plan of our program’s curriculum and can be used to direct future educational initiatives of our training program

  18. A basic residency curriculum concerning the chronically mentally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, L R; Cutler, D L; Krohn, D D; Factor, R M; Goldfinger, S M; Goldman, C R; Lamb, H R; Lefley, H; Minkoff, K; Schwartz, S R

    1989-10-01

    In this paper a group of knowledgeable individuals with expertise in psychiatric education present their recommendations for a basic psychiatric residency curriculum concerning the chronically mentally ill. The proposed curriculum consists of knowledge, skill, and attitude educational objectives, as well as clinical experiences, faculty supervision, didactics and seminars, and evaluation mechanisms. Recommendations are also made concerning changes in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Special Requirements for Residency Training in Psychiatry, which would require residency programs to place more emphasis on training to meet the needs of the chronically mentally ill. Obstacles to the implementation of the proposed recommendations are presented and possible solutions are discussed.

  19. Fish allergy: in review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Michael F; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-06-01

    Globally, the rising consumption of fish and its derivatives, due to its nutritional value and divergence of international cuisines, has led to an increase in reports of adverse reactions to fish. Reactions to fish are not only mediated by the immune system causing allergies, but are often caused by various toxins and parasites including ciguatera and Anisakis. Allergic reactions to fish can be serious and life threatening and children usually do not outgrow this type of food allergy. The route of exposure is not only restricted to ingestion but include manual handling and inhalation of cooking vapors in the domestic and occupational environment. Prevalence rates of self-reported fish allergy range from 0.2 to 2.29 % in the general population, but can reach up to 8 % among fish processing workers. Fish allergy seems to vary with geographical eating habits, type of fish processing, and fish species exposure. The major fish allergen characterized is parvalbumin in addition to several less well-known allergens. This contemporary review discusses interesting and new findings in the area of fish allergy including demographics, novel allergens identified, immunological mechanisms of sensitization, and innovative approaches in diagnosing and managing this life-long disease.

  20. Do Fish Resist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Joseph Wadiwel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of scientific studies on the question of whether fish feel pain. Some have suggested that some fish indeed do feel pain and that this has significant welfare implications (2003. Others have argued that fish do not have the brain development necessary to feel pain. In terms of number of animals killed, the slaughter of sea animals for human consumption significantly exceeds that of any land animals that we use for food, and sea animal slaughter practices frequently lack any basic welfare protections. If fish can be shown to feel pain—or more importantly, if humans can agree that fish feel pain—then this would place a significant question mark over many contemporary fishing practices.  This article substitutes the question 'Do Fish Feel Pain?' with an alternative: 'Do Fish Resist?' It explores the conceptual problems of understanding fish resistance, and the politics of epistemology that surrounds and seeks to develop a conceptual framework for understanding fish resistance to human capture by exploring the development of fishing technologies - the hook, the net and contemporary aquaculture.

  1. FISH PRODUCTION WORLDWIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiana Melania COSTAICHE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fishing is one of the oldest occupations, which over the years has gone through several stages. In the economic terms the increase in intensive industrial system of the fish is advantageous because the specific energy consumption is low, given that they not need to maintain body temperature at high temperatures. Having regard to demographic trends in continue increasing, and the tendency of decrease fisheries leads to increased the production of aquaculture fish by order to ensure enough quantity and quality. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the evolution of fish production worldwide and in particular to show the evolution of production of fish from fisheries and aquaculture. To highlight the evolution global fish production given two ways to get fish respectively from aquaculture and fisheries, that have used data from FAOSTAT for 2007-2012. Also we can see that approximately 90% of the fish production is fished in the sea and only 10% in the territorial waters. The fish production in Africa had an ascending trend in the period under review. Analyzing fish production the share of total world continents is noted that Asia has a share of 68% in 2007 and increase to 73% in 2012.

  2. Augmented fish health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michak, P.; Rogers, R.; Amos, K.

    1991-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Historically, all agencies involved with fish health in the Columbia Basin were conducting various levels of fish health monitoring, pathogen screening and collection. The goals of this project were; to identify, develop and implement a standardized level of fish health methodologies, develop a common data collection and reporting format in the area of artificial production, evaluate and monitor water quality, improve communications between agencies and provide annual evaluation of fish health information for production of healthier smolts. This completion report will contain a project evaluation, review of the goals of the project, evaluation of the specific fish health analyses, an overview of highlights of the project and concluding remarks. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  3. Zoonoses associated with fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Shane

    2011-09-01

    The taxonomic group that composes the fishes is the most diverse group of vertebrates worldwide. The challenges of unique physiologies, a foreign environment, and many unknowns attract a passionate group of biologists and veterinarians. Economically, fishes have become vital as food, bait, and companion animals. Fishermen and fish handlers (processing plants) represent the historical human population exposed to fish zoonoses, but growth in aquaculture and aquarium hobbyists have led to an increase in published fish-borne zoonotic cases starting in the late 1950s that bloomed in the 1980s. Human physicians, particularly dermatologists and infectious disease specialists, are now more aware of fish-borne zoonoses, but they can be assisted with diagnosis when informed patients give more detailed histories with fish/water exposure.

  4. Analysis of the Physicochemical Burden of Oyo State Fish Pond ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other macroscopic observations showed that PHWW was slimy to touch, fowl smelling, dark in colour and had animal life forms such as maggots and flying insects residing in it. CCWW was brownish in colour and slightly smelly and fishes were sighted. OYSFP was dark, muddy, fowl smelling, the surface was covered by ...

  5. Distribution patterns of fishes in a freshwater deprived Eastern Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reduced riverine flow into the Kariega Estuary resulted in an extremely restricted river-estuary interface (REI) zone being made available to resident and migrant fish species. Despite the low freshwater input recorded, the catadromous freshwater mullet Myxus capensis was abundant within the REI zone and headwater ...

  6. Resident and Non resident Persons in Theory and Practice Tax – Case of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitore Morina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In each country there is the attempt to impose their jurisdiction persons who derive income and require sufficient connection between the state and these persons to enable the collection of these revenues on behalf of taxes. However, it should be asked which connection is required between the state and subjects of law to achieve this goal. There is a number of factors stemming from the subjects of law that can create report - link between the state and subjects of law, such as: citizenship, residence, nationality, presence in the state concerned, etc. Tax systems in the country (domestic tax systems will determine which subject will be considered for the purposes of the tax legislation of the respective state tax subject to domestic (resident and which foreign (non- resident. In this context, local tax legislation must modulate two basic issues: The first, are the characteristics of natural and legal persons who are established, organized and operate within the boundaries of the respective state (resident and the Second, the characteristics of natural and legal persons who are established and organized under the laws of foreign (non- resident.

  7. 21 CFR 123.12 - Special requirements for imported products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for imported products. This section sets forth specific requirements for imported fish and fishery... fish or fishery products being offered for import; (B) Obtaining either a continuing or lot-by-lot... that the imported fish or fishery product is or was processed in accordance with the requirements of...

  8. Time trend investigation of PCBs, PBDEs, and organochlorine pesticides in selected n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid rich dietary fish oil and vegetable oil supplements; nutritional relevance for human essential n-3 fatty acid requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Miriam N; Covaci, Adrian; Gheorghe, Adriana; Schepens, Paul

    2004-03-24

    In addition to being used in the food and animal feed industry, fish oils have also been used traditionally as dietary supplements. Due to the presence of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, fish oils have therapeutic benefits in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular, immunological, and arthritic diseases, as well as childhood deficiency diseases such as rickets, because of a high content of vitamin D. However, fish oils are also susceptible to contamination with lipophilic organic chemicals that are now ubiquitous contaminants of marine ecosystems. Many vegetable oils are sources of the shorter chain precursor forms of n-3 fatty acids, and in recent years the specialist dietary supplement market has expanded to include these oils in a variety of different formulations. This paper reports analytical results of selected contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers, for a range of commercially available n-3 fatty acid rich fish and vegetable oil dietary supplements. Using principal component analysis, the values are compared with historic samples to elucidate time trends in contamination profiles. Levels of contaminants are discussed in relation to the nutritional benefits to the consumer of long- and short-chain forms of n-3 fatty acids.

  9. Fishing drives declines in fish parasite diversity and has variable effects on parasite abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Sandin, Stuart A; Zgliczynski, Brian; Guerra, Ana Sofía; Micheli, Fiorenza

    2014-07-01

    Despite the ubiquity and ecological importance of parasites, relatively few studies have assessed their response to anthropogenic environmental change. Heuristic models have predicted both increases and decreases in parasite abundance in response to human disturbance, with empirical support for both. However, most studies focus on one or a few selected parasite species. Here, we assess the abundance of parasites of seven species of coral reef fishes collected from three fished and three unfished islands of the Line Islands archipelago in the central equatorial Pacific. Because we chose fish hosts that spanned different trophic levels, taxonomic groups, and body sizes, we were able to compare parasite responses across a broad cross section of the total parasite community in the presence and absence of fishing, a major human impact on marine ecosystems. We found that overall parasite species richness was substantially depressed on fished islands, but that the response of parasite abundance varied among parasite taxa: directly transmitted parasites were significantly more abundant on fished than on unfished islands, while the reverse was true for trophically transmitted parasites. This probably arises because trophically transmitted parasites require multiple host species, some of which are the top predators most sensitive to fishing impacts. The increase in directly transmitted parasites appeared to be due to fishing-driven compensatory increases in the abundance of their hosts. Together, these results provide support for the predictions of both heuristic models, and indicate that the direction of fishing's impact on parasite abundance is mediated by parasite traits, notably parasite transmission strategies.

  10. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for estuarine, benthic, and pelagic fish in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of...

  11. Health effects of fish and fish oils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chandra, Ranjit Kumar

    1989-01-01

    .... Based on epidemiologic data, it has been suggested that a fish-containing diet is beneficial in the prevention and management of a variety of disorders including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and psoriasis...

  12. Columbia River ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in Columbia River. Vector polygons in this...

  13. Western Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and anadromous fish species in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set...

  14. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector...

  15. [Knowledge of health care ethics in paediatric residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández González, A; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Cambra Lasaosa, F J; Quintero Otero, S; Ramil Fraga, C; García Palacios, M V; Hernández Rastrollo, R; Ruiz Extremera, M A

    2014-02-01

    Bioethics has been recently incorporated in to the educational programs of both medical students and medical residents as part of their curriculum. However, its training based on clinical practice is not well structured. To evaluate the knowledge of bioethics in Spanish paediatric residents, and to analyse how this relates to the medical education during graduate and post-graduate training. A questionnaire with 20 multiple choice questions was designed to evaluate the knowledge in basic ethics with potential implications in clinical practice. We evaluated the education received during graduate and post-graduate training, and the main ethical conflicts faced. A total of 210 completed questionnaires were received from medical residents in paediatrics from 20 different Spanish hospitals, of whom 47 of these were first year residents (R1), 49 were second year residents (R2), 57 were third year residents (R3), and the remaining 57 were final year residents (R4). The mean number of correct answers was 16.8 out of 20. No differences were found between residents in different years of training, nor were there any differences between the group that had received specific training in bioethics versus those who had not. Residents were more likely to give wrong answers related with informed consent, the law on the freedom of the patient, principles of quality of life, the case analysis system, and the dimension of distributive justice. Limitation of therapeutic efforts was identified as the main ethical problem faced in clinical practice by Spanish residents in paediatrics. Most of the knowledge of bioethics is acquired during graduate training, and improved very little throughout the period of medical residence. Our results suggest that efforts are required in organising and structuring the education in bioethics during the training of residents in paediatrics. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  17. Technical Suitability and Static Stability of Sungkur Fishing Boats for Fish and Shrimp Catching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmilyansari; Rosadi, E.; Iriansyah

    2017-10-01

    Sungkur fishing gear is operated actively on one the side of fishing boat, which requires technical suitability and fishing gear stability to ensure success in fish catching. This is a case study which aimed to analyze some technical issues related to the boat, boat’s hydrostatic parameters, and the boat’s stability. The data were collected though observation, measuring the boat to obtain the offset table. The data were analyzed numerically and descriptively. The data were processed with technical formula, Microsoft Office’s Excel software, graphic display, minitab, statistical data processing, and maxsurf program. The research results showed that: (1) the sungkur fishing boat dimensional ratio L/B (6.47 - 7.00); L/D (10.90 - 11.20) and B/D (1.60 - 1.668) is within the range value of Indonesian fishing boats suitable to operate the fishing gear by towing or dragging. However, during fish catching operation, there have been problems in a hydrodynamic force due to the fishing gear movement, which affect the fish catching efficiency. (2) The boat’s coefficient of fineness is in the fine type shape; the displacement on each waterline has increased; the loads of the boat are getting larger following the increase of waterline from one to five; this is also shown from the increasing midship area value. Ton per centimeter immersion to change wl 1 by 1 cm needs 0.04 tons of weight. (3) Sungkur fishing boat have a good static stability, which is proven by the positive value of angle of maximum GZ by 79.1 - 83.6. In other words, the boat has the ability to return to its original position after tilting; however, stability dynamics happens because fishing gear operation are located on just one side of boat.

  18. Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Shear on Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Guensch, Greg R.

    2000-09-20

    The overall objective of our studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish's tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system, in other words, determining or assuming that those conditions known to injure fish will provide the descriptions of conditions that engineers must consider in the design of a turbine system. These biological specifications must be carefully and thoroughly documented throughout the design of a fish friendly turbine. To address the development of biological specifications, we designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response.

  19. Eutrophic waters, algal bloom and fish kill in fish farming areas in Bolinao, Pangasinan, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Azanza, Rhodora V.; Villanoy, Cesar L.; Jacinto, Gil S.

    2008-01-01

    The coastal waters of Bolinao, Pangasinan, Philippines experienced environmental changes over a 10-year period (1995-2005), the most significant effect of which was the major fish kill event in 2002 that coincided with the first reported Philippine bloom of a dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum. Days before the bloom, dissolved oxygen was <2.0 mg/l in the waters that were stratified. These conditions may be linked to the uncontrolled proliferation of fish pens and cages to more than double the allowable limit of 544 units for Bolinao waters. Mariculture activities release organic matter from unconsumed feed and fecal material that accumulate in the water and sediments. In over 10 years, water quality conditions have become eutrophic with ammonia increasing by 56%, nitrite by 35%, nitrate by 90%, and phosphate by 67%. The addition of more fish pens and cages placed additional stress to this poorly flushed, shallow area that affected water quality due to changes in the water residence time

  20. Fish elevator and method of elevating fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truebe, Jonathan; Drooker, Michael S.

    1984-01-01

    A means and method for transporting fish from a lower body of water to a higher body of water. The means comprises a tubular lock with a gated entrance below the level of the lower body of water through which fish may enter the lock and a discharge passage above the level of the upper body of water. The fish raising means in the lock is a crowder pulled upward by a surface float as water from the upper body of water gravitationally flows into the closed lock filling it to the level of the upper body. Water is then pumped into the lock to raise the level to the discharge passage. The crowder is then caused to float upward the remaining distance through the water to the level of the discharge passage by the introduction of air into a pocket on the underside of the crowder. The fish are then automatically discharged from the lock into the discharge passage by the out of water position of the crowder. The movement of the fish into the discharge passage is aided by the continuous overflow of water still being pumped into the lock. A pipe may be connected to the discharge passage to deliver the fish to a selected location in the upper body of water.

  1. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an 'editing approach' within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences. This study highlights several

  2. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P.; Zickmund, Susan L.; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    Background In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. Methods The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an ‘editing approach’ within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Results Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences

  3. Factors Influencing Resident Choice of Prosthodontic Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarwsky, Pandora Keala Lee; Wang, Yan; Shah, Kumar; Koka, Sreenivas

    2017-06-01

    The decision by prosthodontic residency program directors to employ the Match process highlights the need to understand applicant priorities that influence their choice of which programs to rank highly. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that were most important to residents when choosing from among nonmilitary based prosthodontics dental residency programs in the United States. Following completion of a pilot study, all currently enrolled prosthodontic residents at nonmilitary residency programs were invited to participate via the internet. The study consisted of a survey instrument asking residents to rank 26 possible factors that might impact an applicant's choice of residency program. In addition, the instrument collected other possible influencing variables including gender and debt load. Mean rank scores were compared to determine the most and least important factors. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare specific factors between the possible influencing variables. Two hundred and thirty residents completed the survey instrument, representing a 54.1% response rate of possible participants. With regard to factors influencing program choice, reputation of the residency program was the factor ranked the highest by participants, followed in descending order by the program director's personality, curriculum content, access to use of the latest digital technology, and opportunities for dental implant placement. Quality of schools for children, community outreach opportunities, and the ability to moonlight were ranked as the least important factors. Male and female residents ranked factors such as tuition/stipend, curriculum content, and community outreach opportunities significantly differently. Depending on debt load, residents ranked the factors tuition/stipend, ability to moonlight, curriculum content, and safety of the area where the program is differently. Current prosthodontic residents valued the reputation of the program as the most

  4. Struggling to be self-directed: residents' paradoxical beliefs about learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagle, Melissa; Anandarajah, Gowri; Goldman, Roberta E; Reis, Shmuel

    2011-12-01

    Self-directed learning (SDL) skills serve as the basis for physician lifelong learning; however, residency training does not typically emphasize SDL skills. To understand residents' needs regarding SDL curricula, the authors used qualitative methods to examine the residency learning culture and residents' views of SDL. The authors conducted individual, in-depth, semistructured interviews with all 13 final-year residents at the Brown University Family Medicine Residency Program. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Using an iterative individual and group process, four researchers conducted a qualitative analysis of the transcripts, identifying major themes and higher-order interpretations. Major themes included resident beliefs about learning, the learning culture in residency, and developmental progress in learning. Four paradoxes emerged in the analysis: (1) Residents understand and value the concept of SDL, but they engage in limited goal setting and reflection and report lack of skills to manage their own learning, particularly in the clinical setting. (2) Despite being immersed in what aims to be a learner-centered culture, many residents still value traditional, teacher-centered approaches. (3) Residents recognize patient care as the most powerful stimulus for SDL, but they often perceive patient care and learning as competing priorities. (4) Residents desire external guidance for SDL. Graduating residents lacked confidence in their SDL skills and their ability to manage their learning, especially in clinical settings. Fostering SDL skills during residency will likely require training and guidance for SDL as well as changes in the structure and culture of residency.

  5. Training in radiological protection of residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicent, M. D.; Fernandez, M. J.; Olmos, C.; Isidoro, B.; Espana, M. L.; Arranz, L.

    2013-01-01

    In compliance with the current laws, radiation protection (RP) training is required during the formative programs of certain Health Sciences specialties. Laws entrust to official bodies in specialized training the adoption of necessary measures to coordinate and ensure a correct implementation. The aim of this study is to describe Community of Madrid experience in RP training to specialists during their formative programs, and to determine the number of residents trained and analyze their satisfaction level with the training. A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed, including all training specialists from the Community of Madrid during the 2007-2011 period. We determined the number of residents trained per year and we evaluated their satisfaction level with the training through a survey. A total of 55 training courses were carried out and 5820 residents have been trained during the 2007-2011 period. the student satisfaction level with the training has increased gradually from 6.1 points in 2007 to 7.0 points in 2011. The development of the RP formative program for residents in the Community of Madrid has meant the start up o the necessary official mechanisms to ensure the quality and adequacy of training in this area, covering the formative needs of the collective. (Author)

  6. Assuring fish safety and quality in international fish trade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ababouch, Lahsen [United Nations, Food and Agricultural Organization, Chief, Fish Utilization and Marketing Services, FAO Headquarters, F-607 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail lahsen.ababouch@fao.org

    2006-07-01

    International trade in fishery commodities reached US$ 58.2 billion in 2002, a 5% improvement relative to 2000 and a 45% increase over 1992 levels. Within this global trade, developing countries registered a net trade surplus of US$ 17.4 billion in 2002 and accounted for almost 50% by value and 55% of fish exports by volume. This globalization of fish trade, coupled with technological developments in food production, handling, processing and distribution, and the increasing awareness and demand of consumers for safe and high quality food have put food safety and quality assurance high in public awareness and a priority for many governments. Consequently, many countries have tightened food safety controls, imposing additional costs and requirements on imports. As early as 1980, there was an international drive towards adopting preventative HACCP-based safety and quality systems. More recently, there has been a growing awareness of the importance of an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to food safety and quality throughout the entire food chain. Implementation of this approach requires an enabling policy and regulatory environment at national and international levels with clearly defined rules and standards, establishment of appropriate food control systems and programmes at national and local levels, and provision of appropriate training and capacity building. This paper discusses the international framework for fish safety and quality, with particular emphasis on the United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organization's (FAO) strategy to promote international harmonization and capacity building.

  7. Assuring fish safety and quality in international fish trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababouch, Lahsen

    2006-01-01

    International trade in fishery commodities reached US 58.2 billion dollars in 2002, a 5% improvement relative to 2000 and a 45% increase over 1992 levels. Within this global trade, developing countries registered a net trade surplus of US 17.4 billion dollars in 2002 and accounted for almost 50% by value and 55% of fish exports by volume. This globalization of fish trade, coupled with technological developments in food production, handling, processing and distribution, and the increasing awareness and demand of consumers for safe and high quality food have put food safety and quality assurance high in public awareness and a priority for many governments. Consequently, many countries have tightened food safety controls, imposing additional costs and requirements on imports. As early as 1980, there was an international drive towards adopting preventative HACCP-based safety and quality systems. More recently, there has been a growing awareness of the importance of an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to food safety and quality throughout the entire food chain. Implementation of this approach requires an enabling policy and regulatory environment at national and international levels with clearly defined rules and standards, establishment of appropriate food control systems and programmes at national and local levels, and provision of appropriate training and capacity building. This paper discusses the international framework for fish safety and quality, with particular emphasis on the United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organization's (FAO) strategy to promote international harmonization and capacity building.

  8. Assuring fish safety and quality in international fish trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ababouch, Lahsen . E-mail lahsen.ababouch@fao.org

    2006-01-01

    International trade in fishery commodities reached US$ 58.2 billion in 2002, a 5% improvement relative to 2000 and a 45% increase over 1992 levels. Within this global trade, developing countries registered a net trade surplus of US$ 17.4 billion in 2002 and accounted for almost 50% by value and 55% of fish exports by volume. This globalization of fish trade, coupled with technological developments in food production, handling, processing and distribution, and the increasing awareness and demand of consumers for safe and high quality food have put food safety and quality assurance high in public awareness and a priority for many governments. Consequently, many countries have tightened food safety controls, imposing additional costs and requirements on imports. As early as 1980, there was an international drive towards adopting preventative HACCP-based safety and quality systems. More recently, there has been a growing awareness of the importance of an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to food safety and quality throughout the entire food chain. Implementation of this approach requires an enabling policy and regulatory environment at national and international levels with clearly defined rules and standards, establishment of appropriate food control systems and programmes at national and local levels, and provision of appropriate training and capacity building. This paper discusses the international framework for fish safety and quality, with particular emphasis on the United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organization's (FAO) strategy to promote international harmonization and capacity building

  9. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  10. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Henricks MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016. Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  11. 26 CFR 1.6049-8 - Interest and original issue discount paid to residents of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... residents of Canada. 1.6049-8 Section 1.6049-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... original issue discount paid to residents of Canada. (a) Interest subject to reporting requirement. For... nonresident alien individual is an individual who resides in Canada and is not a United States citizen. The...

  12. An overview of the ongoing insights in selenium research and its role in fish nutrition and fish health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kifayat Ullah; Zuberi, Amina; Fernandes, João Batista Kochenborger; Ullah, Imdad; Sarwar, Huda

    2017-12-01

    In the present review, the ongoing researches about selenium research in fish nutrition have been comprehensively discussed. Selenium research is getting popularity in fish nutrition as it is required for the normal growth and proper physiological and biochemical functions in fish. Its deficiency or surplus amounts create severe problems in fish. It is available as inorganic form, organic form, and nano form. In fish, most of the previous research is about the selenium requirements for fish by using only one selenium source mainly the inorganic one. Selenium shows maximum biological activity and bioavailability when it is supplied in proper form. However, to differentiate the more bioavailable and less toxic form of selenium, sufficient information is needed about the comparative bioavailability of different selenium forms in different fish species. In fish, important data about the new forms of selenoproteins is still scarce. Therefore, it is necessary to focus on the determination and elucidation of the new selenoproteins in fish through the utilization of recent approaches of molecular biology and proteomics. The adaptation of these new approaches will replace the old fashioned methodologies regarding the selenium research in fish nutrition. Moreover, the use of molecular biology and proteomics-based new approaches in combination with selenium research will help in optimizing the area of fish nutrition and will improve the feed intake, growth performance, and more importantly the flesh quality which has a promising importance in the consumer market.

  13. Mercury in Forage Fish from Mexico and Central America: Implications for Fish-Eating Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John E; Kirk, David A; Elliott, Kyle H; Dorzinsky, Jessica; Lee, Sandi; Inzunza, Ernesto Ruelas; Cheng, Kimberly M T; Scheuhammer, Tony; Shaw, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global contaminant of aquatic food chains. Aquatic birds, such as the osprey (Pandion haliaetus), with migratory populations breeding in Canada and the northern United States and wintering in the Central and South America, can be exposed to mercury on both the breeding and wintering ranges. We examined Hg levels in 14 fish taxa from 24 osprey wintering sites identified from satellite telemetry. Our main goal was to determine whether fish species that feature in the diet of overwintering and resident fish-eating birds reached toxicity thresholds for Hg. Mean Hg levels in fish whole carcasses ranged from a high of 0.18 µg g(-1) (wet weight) in Scomberomorus sierra to a low of 0.009 µg g(-1) in Catostomidae. Average Hg levels were within published toxicity threshold values in forage fish for only two sites in Mexico (Puerto Vallarta and San Blas Estuary), and all were marine species, such as mackerel (Scomberomorus sierra), sea catfish (Ariopus spp.), and sardinas species (Centropomus spp.). Except for one sample from Nicaragua, sea catfish from Puerto Morazan, none of the fish from sites in Central America had Hg levels which exceeded the thresholds. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed geographical differences in Hg levels with significant pairwise differences between sites along the Pacific Ocean (Mexico) versus the Bay of Campeche, partly due to differences in species composition of sampled fish (and species distributions). Hg increased with trophic level, as assessed by nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(15)N but not δ(13)C), in freshwater and marine, but not estuarine, environments. Hg concentrations in forage fish do not account for the elevated Hg reported for many osprey populations on the breeding grounds, thus primary sources of contamination appear to be in the north.

  14. Adoption Of Improved Fish Technologies Among Fish Farmers In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A shortfall exists between fish supply and fish demand in the country despite the introduction of improved technology to fish farmers. This led to huge wage bill on the importation of fish to meet the protein need of the ever increasing population. This prompted this study with focus on adoption of improved fish technologies ...

  15. Vaccination in Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    vaccines have reduced the need for usage of antibiotics with more than 99 % since the 1980s. Fish can be vaccinated by three different administration routes: injection, immersion and oral vaccination. Injection vaccination (intraperitoneal injection of vaccine) is the most time consuming and labor...... intensive method, which however, provides the best protection of the fish. Immersion vaccination is used for immunization of a high number of small fish is cost-efficient and fast (30 sec immersion into vaccine). Oral vaccination (vaccine in feed) is the least efficient. As in higher vertebrates fish...... respond to vaccination by increasing the specific antibody titer and by activating the cellular responses. My talk will cover vaccination methods in fish, immune responses and some adverse effect of oil-adjuvanted vaccines in fish with reference to our work in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss....

  16. The Changing Scenario of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Natasha; Dragovic, Kristina; Trester, Richard; Blankstein, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant changes have been noted in aspects of obstetrics-gynecology (ob-gyn) training over the last decade, which is reflected in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) operative case logs for graduating ob-gyn residents. Objective We sought to understand the changing trends of ob-gyn residents' experience in obstetric procedures over the past 11 years. Methods We analyzed national ACGME procedure logs for all obstetric procedures recorded by 12 728 ob-gyn residents who graduated between academic years 2002–2003 and 2012–2013. Results The average number of cesarean sections per resident increased from 191.8 in 2002–2003 to 233.4 in 2012–2013 (17%; P obstetric logs demonstrated decreases in volume of vaginal, forceps, and vacuum deliveries, and increases in cesarean and multifetal deliveries. Change in experience may require use of innovative strategies to help improve residents' basic obstetric skills. PMID:26457146

  17. Recovery potential of the world's coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, M Aaron; Graham, Nicholas A J; Cinner, Joshua E; Wilson, Shaun K; Williams, Ivor D; Maina, Joseph; Newman, Steven; Friedlander, Alan M; Jupiter, Stacy; Polunin, Nicholas V C; McClanahan, Tim R

    2015-04-16

    Continuing degradation of coral reef ecosystems has generated substantial interest in how management can support reef resilience. Fishing is the primary source of diminished reef function globally, leading to widespread calls for additional marine reserves to recover fish biomass and restore key ecosystem functions. Yet there are no established baselines for determining when these conservation objectives have been met or whether alternative management strategies provide similar ecosystem benefits. Here we establish empirical conservation benchmarks and fish biomass recovery timelines against which coral reefs can be assessed and managed by studying the recovery potential of more than 800 coral reefs along an exploitation gradient. We show that resident reef fish biomass in the absence of fishing (B0) averages ∼1,000 kg ha(-1), and that the vast majority (83%) of fished reefs are missing more than half their expected biomass, with severe consequences for key ecosystem functions such as predation. Given protection from fishing, reef fish biomass has the potential to recover within 35 years on average and less than 60 years when heavily depleted. Notably, alternative fisheries restrictions are largely (64%) successful at maintaining biomass above 50% of B0, sustaining key functions such as herbivory. Our results demonstrate that crucial ecosystem functions can be maintained through a range of fisheries restrictions, allowing coral reef managers to develop recovery plans that meet conservation and livelihood objectives in areas where marine reserves are not socially or politically feasible solutions.

  18. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest

  19. Surgical residency: A tenant's view

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'To sleep: perchance to dream', is the frequent mantra of the surgical resident. However, unlike. Hamlet, there is no ensuing speculation as to what dreams may come as there are seldom any!! Surgical residency has been both vilified and immortalized, but the fact remains that it is one of the most challenging, provocative ...

  20. POPs and stable isotopes in bird and forage fish tissues - Persistent organic pollutant levels in juvenile salmonids, forage fish and their avian predators from Puget Sound and the outer WA coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is examining contaminant loads of fish prey species of a resident marine bird (Rhinoceros Auklet) breeding in inland waters (Puget Sound) and in the...

  1. Fish and wildlife surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the monitoring of radioactive contaminants in fish and wildlife species that inhabit the Colombia River and Hanford Site. Wildlife have access to areas of the Site containing radioactive contamination, and fish can be exposed to contamination in spring water entering the river along the shoreline. Therefore, samples are collected at various locations annually, generally during the hunting or fishing season, for selected species

  2. Intelligent Fish Freshness Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gholam Hosseini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish species identification and automated fish freshness assessment play important roles in fishery industry applications. This paper describes a method based on support vector machines (SVMs to improve the performance of fish identification systems. The result is used for the assessment of fish freshness using artificial neural network (ANN. Identification of the fish species involves processing of the images of fish. The most efficient features were extracted and combined with the down-sampled version of the images to create a 1D input vector. Max-Win algorithm applied to the SVM-based classifiers has enhanced the reliability of sorting to 96.46%. The realisation of Cyranose 320 Electronic nose (E-nose, in order to evaluate the fish freshness in real-time, is experimented. Intelligent processing of the sensor patterns involves the use of a dedicated ANN for each species under study. The best estimation of freshness was provided by the most sensitive sensors. Data was collected from four selected species of fishes over a period of ten days. It was concluded that the performance can be increased using individual trained ANN for each specie. The proposed system has been successful in identifying the number of days after catching the fish with an accuracy of up to 91%.

  3. Fish and hydroelectricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorpette, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the problems that hydroelectric plants have regarding fish populations. The utilities that operate these plants are finding that accommodating migrating fish presents unique engineering challenges, not the least of which involves designing and building systems to protect fish species whose migratory behavior remains something of a mystery. Where such systems cannot be built, the status of hydroelectric dams may be in doubt, as is now the case with several dams in the United States. A further twist in some regions in the possibility that certain migratory fish will be declared threatened or endangered-a development that could wreak havoc on the hydroelectric energy supply in those regions

  4. Preparing Future Leaders: An Integrated Quality Improvement Residency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Stacy; Shields, Sara; Upshur, Carole

    2016-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recognized the importance of quality improvement (QI) training and requires that accredited residencies in all specialties demonstrate that residents are "integrated and actively participate in interdisciplinary clinical quality improvement and patient safety activities." However, competing demands in residency training may make this difficult to accomplish. The study's objective is to develop and evaluate a longitudinal curriculum that meets the ACGME requirement for QI and patient safety training and links to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices. Residents in the Worcester Family Medicine Residency (WFMR) participated in a faculty-developed quality improvement curriculum that included web-based tutorials, quality improvement projects, and small-group sessions across all 3 years of residency. They completed self-evaluations of knowledge and use of curricular activities annually and at graduation, and comparisons were made between two graduating classes, as well as comparison of end of PGY2 to end of PGY3 for one class. Graduating residents who completed the full 3 years of the curriculum rated themselves as significantly more skilled in nine of 15 areas assessed at end of residency compared to after PGY2 and reported confidence in providing future leadership in a focus group. Five areas were also rated significantly higher than prior-year residents. Involving family medicine residents in a longitudinal curriculum with hands-on practice in implementing QI, patient safety, and chronic illness management activities that are inclusive of PCMH goals increased their self-perceived skills and leadership ability to implement these new and emerging evidence-based practices in primary care.

  5. Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeCaire, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a

  6. Nutrition Value Of Development Of Snack Cireng Cassava And Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nur Rochimiwati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Snack are ready-made foods that are self-produced or purchased from sellers or merchants. Snack sellers can be found along the roadside in stalls cake shops around the crowded places like schools offices colleges and so on. The Ministry of Health 2014 states that snack is a given or consumed between two time of meals with an energy value of about 200 Kilocalories and 5 grams of protein. Whereas PMT-US standard Supplementary Feeding of School Children requires 200-300 kilocalories and 5-7 grams of protein. Snacks are sold around the school by unsettled and non-resident sellers in the school stalls or canteens. Various snacks are sold as rice noodles sweet corn fried tempe tofu fried foods meatballs bread cracker potatos jelly cooked rice noodles cimol cilok cireng biscuits milk iced tea iced juices etc Alfid TA Retno I Setho and Yohanes K Bastianus DR Anasari M 2013 The BPOM Food and Drug Supervisory Agency research in Alfid in 2003 stated that from 9465 samples 80 contain harmful ingredients. Snack also has a contribution in the fulfillment of daily nutrition that is energy amounted to 233.11 28.41 Kcal and protein at 6.21 1.39 gram Rachmawati HN 2013. This type of research is experimental with cireng manufacture from cassava and fish cassava cireng Fish and tapioca and cireng original made from tapioca flour. The study aims to determine the taste nutritional value and large of serving portions. The results were obtained for all three products The weighing 50 gram serving portion nutritional value has not reached the standard of the nutritional value of snacks. From the aspect of approaching cireng original flavor is cireng tapioca plus cassava and fish while cireng cassava and fish not like cireng original. It is advisable to develop or further modify in order to achieve nutritional standards of snack and as a healthy and safe snacks and the characteristics of cireng are not lost.

  7. Biological and communication skills needed for introduced fish biologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    What skills and knowledge will a new graduate seeking employment need to work with introduced fishes? Clearly, success in introduced species management—similar to other disciplines in fisheries—requires a mixture of scientific and communication skills. However, specific abilities especially important to a biologist who manages introduced fishes should be highlighted. Unlike most other management strategies, stocking an introduced species can result in unintended and irreversible impacts, so particular care must be employed when stocking is considered. Furthermore, fish populations in areas outside of the introduced species management area might also be affected, usually negatively, if the introduced fish escapes. Therefore, rock-solid knowledge of basic aquatic ecology, including risk management; fish taxonomy (so the wrong fish species is not mistakenly stocked!); familiarity with human values of both the time and the place (which requires communication skills); and a strong understanding of human history are all important.

  8. Fish silage as feed ingredient for fish and livestock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurangwa, E.; Vuuren, van A.M.; Poelman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present report analyses through a literature review the potential of fish silage to valorise fish processing by-products into economically relevant protein sources for fish and livestock feed production in East Africa.

  9. Fish-allergic patients may be able to eat fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Ahmad A; Bahna, Sami L

    2015-03-01

    Reported fish allergy prevalence varies widely, with an estimated prevalence of 0.2% in the general population. Sensitization to fish can occur by ingestion, skin contact or inhalation. The manifestations can be IgE or non-IgE mediated. Several fish allergens have been identified, with parvalbumins being the major allergen in various species. Allergenicity varies among fish species and is affected by processing or preparation methods. Adverse reactions after eating fish are often claimed to be 'allergy' but could be a reaction to hidden food allergen, fish parasite, fish toxins or histamine in spoiled fish. Identifying such causes would allow free consumption of fish. Correct diagnosis of fish allergy, including the specific species, might provide the patient with safe alternatives. Patients have been generally advised for strict universal avoidance of fish. However, testing with various fish species or preparations might identify one or more forms that can be tolerated.

  10. Pediatric resident perceptions of shift work in ward rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Osamu; Mishina, Hiroki; Jasti, Harish; Sakai, Hirokazu; Ishiguro, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Although the long working hours of physicians are considered to be a social issue, no effective policies such as duty hour regulations have so far been proposed in Japan. We implemented an overnight call shift (OCS) system for ward rotations to improve the working environment for residents in a pediatric residency program. We later conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire asking the residents to compare this system with the traditional overnight call system. Forty-one pediatric residents participated in this survey. The residents felt that the quality of patient care improved (80.4% agreed). Most felt that there was less emphasis on education (26.8%) and more emphasis on service (31.7%). Overall, the residents reported that the OCS was beneficial (90.2%). In conclusion, the pediatric residents considered the OCS system during ward rotations as beneficial. Alternative solutions are vital to balance improvements in resident work conditions with the requirement for a high quality of education. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Partial migration in fishes: causes and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, B.B.; Hulthén, K.; Brodersen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Partial migration, where only some individuals from a population migrate, has been widely reported in a diverse range of animals. In this paper, what is known about the causes and consequences of partial migration in fishes is reviewed. Firstly, the ultimate and proximate drivers of partial...... migration are reflected upon: what ecological factors can shape the evolution of migratory dimorphism? How is partial migration maintained over evolutionary timescales? What proximate mechanisms determine whether an individual is migratory or remains resident? Following this, the consequences of partial...... with a reflection on the future opportunities in this field, and the avenues of research that are likely to be fruitful to shed light on the enduring puzzle of partial migration in fishes...

  12. Five Key Leadership Actions Needed to Redesign Family Medicine Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakowski, Stanley M; Eiff, M Patrice; Green, Larry A; Pugno, Perry A; Waller, Elaine; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Carney, Patricia A

    2015-06-01

    New skills are needed to properly prepare the next generation of physicians and health professionals to practice in medical homes. Transforming residency training to address these new skills requires strong leadership. We sought to increase the understanding of leadership skills useful in residency programs that plan to undertake meaningful change. The Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) project (2007-2014) was a comparative case study of 14 family medicine residencies that engaged in innovative training redesign, including altering the scope, content, sequence, length, and location of training to align resident education with requirements of the patient-centered medical home. In 2012, each P4 residency team submitted a final summary report of innovations implemented, overall insights, and dissemination activities during the study. Six investigators conducted independent narrative analyses of these reports. A consensus meeting held in September 2012 was used to identify key leadership actions associated with successful educational redesign. Five leadership actions were associated with successful implementation of innovations and residency transformation: (1) manage change; (2) develop financial acumen; (3) adapt best evidence educational strategies to the local environment; (4) create and sustain a vision that engages stakeholders; and (5) demonstrate courage and resilience. Residency programs are expected to change to better prepare their graduates for a changing delivery system. Insights about effective leadership skills can provide guidance for faculty to develop the skills needed to face practical realities while guiding transformation.

  13. 49 CFR 173.218 - Fish meal or fish scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 173.218 Section 173.218... Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) Except as provided in Column (7) of the HMT in § 172.101 of this subchapter, fish meal or fish scrap, containing at least 6%, but not more than 12% water, is authorized for...

  14. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Nori L; Bazzerelli, Amy; Lim, Jenny; Wu Chao Ying, Valerie; Steigerwald, Sarah; Strickland, Matt

    2015-06-01

    Currently, general surgeons provide about 50% of endoscopy services across Canada and an even greater proportion outside large urban centres. It is essential that endoscopy remain a core component of general surgery practice and a core competency of general surgery residency training. The Canadian Association of General Surgeons Residents Committee supports the position that quality endoscopy training for all Canadian general surgery residents is in the best interest of the Canadian public. However, the means by which quality endoscopy training is achieved has not been defined at a national level. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs requires standardization across the country and improved measurement to ensure that competency and basic credentialing requirements are met.

  15. Resident Bacteria-Stimulated Interleukin-10-Secreting B Cells Ameliorate T-Cell-Mediated Colitis by Inducing T-Regulatory-1 Cells That Require Interleukin-27 SignalingSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Mishima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The regulatory roles of interleukin-10 (IL10-producing B cells in colitis are not fully understood, so we explored the molecular mechanisms by which these cells modulate mucosal homeostasis. Methods: CD4+ T cells from wild-type (WT, Il10−/−, or Il27ra−/− mice were cotransferred with B cells from specific pathogen-free (SPF or germ-free (GF WT or Il10−/− mice into Rag2−/−Il10−/−(double-knockout mice, and the severity of colitis and intestinal regulatory T-cell populations were characterized. In vitro, WT or Il10−/− B cells were cocultured with unfractionated, naïve or regulatory T cells plus Il10−/− antigen-presenting cells and stimulated with cecal bacterial lysate (CBL with or without IL27 or anti-IL10R blockade. Gene expressions, cytokines in the supernatant and cell populations were assessed. Results: WT but not Il10−/− B cells attenuated T helper cell TH1/TH17-mediated colitis in double-knockout mice that also received WT but not Il10−/− T cells. In vitro, CBL-stimulated WT B cells secrete abundant IL10 and suppress interferon-γ (IFNγ and IL17a-production by T cells without requiring cell contact. Although both WT and Il10−/− B cells induced Foxp3+CD4+ T-regulatory cells, only WT B cells induced IL10-producing (Foxp3-negative T regulatory-1 (Tr-1 cells both in vivo and in vitro. However, IL10-producing B cells did not attenuate colitis or induce Tr-1 cells in the absence of T cell IL27 signaling in vivo. WT B cell-dependent Tr-1 induction and concomitant decreased IFNγ-secretion were also mediated by T-cell IL27-signaling in vitro. Conclusions: IL10-secreting B cells activated by physiologically relevant bacteria ameliorate T-cell-mediated colitis and contribute to intestinal homeostasis by suppressing effector T cells and inducing Tr-1 cells via IL27-signaling on T cells. Keywords: Experimental

  16. 78 FR 47335 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing Contracting With Resident-Owned...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... Information Collection: Public Housing Contracting With Resident-Owned Business--Application Requirements... Contracting with Resident- Owned Businesses/Application Requirements. OMB Approval Number: 2577-0161... with State law; Certification that shows the business is owned by residents, disclosure documents that...

  17. 78 FR 65697 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing, Contracting With Resident-Owned...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... Information Collection: Public Housing, Contracting With Resident-Owned Businesses--Application Requirements..., Contracting with Resident-Owned Businesses-Application Requirements. OMB Approval Number: 2577-0161. Type of... State law; Certification that shows the business is owned by residents, disclosure documents that...

  18. Fish crackers development from minced fish and starch: an innovative approach to a traditional product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rodrigues Pinheiro Neiva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop sensory acceptable, high nutritional value fish crackers that could be kept at room temperature for 180 days. Minced fish of different low-value species was the raw material employed to produce two types of fish crackers: a the traditional keropok cracker, which was expanded by deep frying; and b a low-fat fish cracker, expanded by microwave cooking. The protein content of the fried fish crackers (FFCs and that of the microwaved fish crackers (MFCs were high (10.86 and 14.70%, respectively. The essential amino acid contents of the two types of fish cracker were above the FAO requirements for adults, and the lysine content was above the requirements for children. Sensory analysis, performed by adult panelists, resulted in a general level of acceptability of 90% for the MFCs and of 97% for the FFCs. Vacuum packaging maintained microbiological and physicochemical properties for a storage period of 180 days at room temperature.

  19. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. fish Barbus aeneus (Burchell)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by the larger fish. Animal prey items offer a high-energy food resource but, with the exception of fishes, crabs, molluscs, amphibia and some of the larger insects, the bulk of those available in the aquatic environment are small forms such as chironomid larvae, copepod, ostracod and cladoceran crustacea and oligochaetes.

  1. Increasing faculty participation in resident education and providing cost-effective self-assessment module credit to faculty through resident-generated didactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Malatesta, Theresa M; Anné, Pramila R; McAna, John; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Dicker, Adam P; Den, Robert B

    Board certified radiation oncologists and medical physicists are required to earn self-assessment module (SAM) continuing medical education (CME) credit, which may require travel costs or usage fees. Data indicate that faculty participation in resident teaching activities is beneficial to resident education. Our hypothesis was that providing the opportunity to earn SAM credit in resident didactics would increase faculty participation in and improve resident education. SAM applications, comprising CME certified category 1 resident didactic lectures and faculty-generated questions with respective answers, rationales, and references, were submitted to the American Board of Radiology for formal review. Surveys were distributed to assess main academic campus physician, affiliate campus physician, physicist, and radiation oncology resident impressions regarding the quality of the lectures. Survey responses were designed in Likert-scale format. Sign-test was performed with P < .05 considered statistically different from neutral. First submission SAM approval was obtained for 9 of 9 lectures to date. A total of 52 SAM credits have been awarded to 4 physicists and 7 attending physicians. Main academic campus physician and affiliate campus physician attendance increased from 20% and 0%, respectively, over the 12 months preceding CME/SAM lectures, to 55.6% and 20%, respectively. Survey results indicated that the change to SAM lectures increased the quality of resident lectures (P = .001), attending physician participation in resident education (P < .0001), physicist involvement in medical resident education (P = .0006), and faculty motivation to attend resident didactics (P = .004). Residents reported an increased amount of time required to prepare lectures (P = .008). We are the first department, to our knowledge, to offer SAM credit to clinical faculty for participation in resident-generated didactics. Offering SAM credit at resident lectures is a cost-effective alternative

  2. Pathology residency training: time for a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domen, Ronald E; Baccon, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    The exponential growth of the field of pathology over the past several decades has created challenges for residency training programs. These challenges include the ability to train competent pathologists in 4 years, an increased demand for fellowship training, and the structuring and completion of maintenance of certification. The authors feel that pathology residency training has reached a critical point and that a new paradigm for training is required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Impact of the 80-Hour Resident Workweek on Surgical Residents and Attending Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Matthew M.; Kellogg, Katherine C.; Ferguson, Charles M.; Abbott, William M.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of the 80-hour resident workweek restrictions on surgical residents and attending surgeons. Summary Background Data: The ACGME mandated resident duty hour restrictions have required a major workforce restructuring. The impact of these changes needs to be critically evaluated for both the resident and attending surgeons, specifically with regards to the impact on motivation, job satisfaction, the quality of surgeon training, the quality of the surgeon's life, and the quality of patient care. Methods: Four prospective studies were performed at a single academic surgical program with data collected both before the necessary workforce restructuring and 1 year after, including: 1) time cards to assess changes in components of daily activity; 2) Web-based surveys using validated instruments to assess burnout and motivation to work; 3) structured, taped, one-on-one interviews with an external PhD investigator; and 4) statistical analyses of objective, quantitative data. Results: After the work-hour changes, surgical residents have decreased “burnout” scores, with significantly less “emotional exhaustion” (Maslach Burnout Inventory: 29.1 “high” vs. 23.1 “medium,” P = 0.02). Residents have better quality of life both in and out of the hospital. They felt they got more sleep, have a lighter workload, and have increased motivation to work (Herzberg Motivation Dimensions). We found no measurable, statistically significant difference in the quality of patient care (NSQIP data). Resident training and education objectively were not statistically diminished (ACGME case logs, ABSITE scores). Attending surgeons perceived that their quality of their life inside and outside of the hospital was “somewhat worse” because of the work-hour changes, as they had anticipated. Many concerns were identified with regards to the professional development of future surgeons, including a change toward a shift-worker mentality that is not patient

  4. When does fishing lead to more fish? Community consequences of bottom trawl fisheries in demersal food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Denderen, P Daniel; van Kooten, Tobias; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D

    2013-10-22

    Bottom trawls are a globally used fishing gear that physically disturb the seabed and kill non-target organisms, including those that are food for the targeted fish species. There are indications that ensuing changes to the benthic invertebrate community may increase the availability of food and promote growth and even fisheries yield of target fish species. If and how this occurs is the subject of ongoing debate, with evidence both in favour and against. We model the effects of trawling on a simple ecosystem of benthivorous fish and two food populations (benthos), susceptible and resistant to trawling. We show that the ecosystem response to trawling depends on whether the abundance of benthos is top-down or bottom-up controlled. Fishing may result in higher fish abundance, higher (maximum sustainable) yield and increased persistence of fish when the benthos which is the best-quality fish food is also more resistant to trawling. These positive effects occur in bottom-up controlled systems and systems with limited impact of fish feeding on benthos, resembling bottom-up control. Fishing leads to lower yields and fish persistence in all configurations where susceptible benthos are more profitable prey. Our results highlight the importance of mechanistic ecosystem knowledge as a requirement for successful management.

  5. Ten-year trends in family medicine residency productivity and staffing: impact of electronic health records, resident duty hours, and the medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Sarah; Hughes, Lauren; Fitch, Wes; Pauwels, Judith

    2012-02-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs), resident duty hour restrictions, and Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) innovations have all impacted the clinical practices of residency programs over the past decade. The University of Washington Family Medicine Network (UWFMN) residencies have collaborated for 10 years in collecting and comparing data regarding the productivity and operations of their training programs to identify the program-level effects of such changes. Based on five survey results from 2000 to 2010, this study examines changes in faculty and resident productivity and staffing models of UWFMN residency training clinics using a standardized methodology, specifically describing the productivity impact of EHR changes and duty hour restrictions and the implementation of the PCMH by residencies. Data were systematically collected via standardized questionnaire, evaluated for quality, clarified, and then analyzed. Resident productivity decreased over the 10-year interval, with resident total yearly patient visits down 17.2%. Core family medicine faculty productivity was highly variable among programs, and nonphysician provider visits increased. Faculty part-time status increased. Front office, medical assistant, and nursing staffing grew significantly, but other administrative staff decreased, resulting in minimal change in total non-provider staffing. A majority of programs engaged in PCMH initiatives in 2010 and had implemented an EHR. Physician productivity in UWFMN residency programs decreased for all resident physicians from 2000 to 2010, likely due to a combination of decreased resident duty hours and other clinical practice changes. Productivity trends have implications for the structure and training requirements for family medicine residency programs.

  6. Cryopreservation of Fish Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokura, Hisashi

    Present status of research activities in cryopreservation of fish gamete in aquaculture field was introduced. More than 59 fish species have been reported in the research histories and nearly half of them were studied during recent 10 years. This means that the research activities are increasing, though commercial profit have not obtained yet. Fish species of which sperm can successfully cryopreserved is still limited comparing to numerous species in telost. One of the major obstacle for improvement of the technique is existence of wide specie specific variance in the freezing tolerance of fish sperm. The varianc can possibly be explaind thorugh the informations obtained by the studies in comparative spermatology, which is recently activated field in fish biology.

  7. Three Kinds of Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    2012-01-01

    will examine five Danish fishing operations and discuss how they have reacted in different ways to the newly introduced system of transferable fishing concessions. By introducing TFCs as a solution to fleet overcapacity, the EU Commission will also be introducing a system where buying, selling and leasing...... of the Common Fisheries Policy in the European Union, the European Commission are pushing for a “Danish model”, arguing in a briefing paper that experience in a member state “where a TFC system is used shows that risks can be avoided through design” (European Commission on Fisheries 2012:2). The known risks...... of market based systems are wild speculation, concentration and monopolization of fishing access and subsequent leasing with fishing communities and new entrants very likely being worse off (see for example the chapter “From fishing rights to financial derivatives” is this volume or Olson 2011; Sumaila 2010...

  8. Fish allergy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Cristina Y; Reche, Marta; Fiandor, Ana; Valbuena, Teresa; Cuevas, Teresa; Esteban, Manuel Martin

    2008-11-01

    Fish and its derived products play an important role in human nutrition, but they may also be a potent food allergen. Fish can be an ingested, contact, and inhalant allergen. Gad c I, a Parvalbumin, the major allergen in codfish, is considered as fish and amphibian pan-allergen. Prevalence of fish allergy appears to depend on the amount of fish eaten in the local diet. In Europe, the highest consumption occurs in Scandinavian countries, Spain and Portugal. In Spain, fish is the third most frequent allergen in children under 2 yr of age after egg and cow's milk. An adverse reaction to fish may be of non-allergic origin, due to food contamination or newly formed toxic products, but the most frequent type of adverse reactions to fish are immunologic-mediated reactions (allergic reactions). Such allergic reactions may be both IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated. Most cases are IgE-mediated, due to ingestion or contact with fish or as a result of inhalation of cooking vapors. Some children develop non-IgE-mediated type allergies such as food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome. The clinical symptoms related to IgE-mediated fish allergy are most frequently acute urticaria and angioedema as well as mild oral symptoms, worsening of atopic dermatitis, respiratory symptoms such as rhinitis or asthma, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting. Anaphylaxis may also occur. Among all the species studied, those from the Tunidae and Xiphiidae families appear to be the least allergenic.

  9. Smoking cessation counseling by surgical and nonsurgical residents: opportunities for health promotion education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon R; Lai, Hollis; Bédard, Eric L R

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in North America and a major contributor to surgically treated diseases and operative complications. Counseling by residents can be an effective means of helping patients to quit smoking, and with the introduction of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and CanMEDS competency frameworks, health promotion is a required component of residency training. However, past studies have found that smoking cessation counseling by residents, and in particular surgical residents, is lacking. In light of the introduction of health promotion as a core competency in residency training, this study was designed to examine the attitudes and practices of residents at our institution regarding smoking cessation counseling, comparing surgical and nonsurgical residents and seeking to identify barriers to resident counseling. An internet-based questionnaire was distributed to all residents at the University of Alberta in the fall of 2012. Items examined residents׳ attitudes and practices related to smoking cessation counseling and barriers to counseling. Although almost all residents believed that smoking cessation was important and that counseling was part of their job as a resident, far fewer routinely practiced the counseling behaviors examined. Surgical residents were less likely to perform counseling and more likely to think that counseling was not part of their job. Surgical residents were also more likely to identify obstacles to counseling such as a lack of time and formal training. Residents, and surgical residents in particular, are missing opportunities to help their patients quit smoking and improve their health. Given their positive attitudes toward counseling, it may be possible to improve their counseling practices through simple means. By identifying obstacles to counseling and tools that may increase residents׳ tendency to perform counseling, this study can help to guide training programs

  10. Helping Residents Protect Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building on the successful early engagement of the Plain Sect agricultural community, the Eastern Lancaster County Source Water Protection Collaborative is expanding its efforts to involve local residents in the work of protecting drinking water sources.

  11. Why fishing magnifies fluctuations in fish abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christian N K; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Sandin, Stuart A; Hewitt, Roger; Hollowed, Anne; Beddington, John; May, Robert M; Sugihara, George

    2008-04-17

    It is now clear that fished populations can fluctuate more than unharvested stocks. However, it is not clear why. Here we distinguish among three major competing mechanisms for this phenomenon, by using the 50-year California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) larval fish record. First, variable fishing pressure directly increases variability in exploited populations. Second, commercial fishing can decrease the average body size and age of a stock, causing the truncated population to track environmental fluctuations directly. Third, age-truncated or juvenescent populations have increasingly unstable population dynamics because of changing demographic parameters such as intrinsic growth rates. We find no evidence for the first hypothesis, limited evidence for the second and strong evidence for the third. Therefore, in California Current fisheries, increased temporal variability in the population does not arise from variable exploitation, nor does it reflect direct environmental tracking. More fundamentally, it arises from increased instability in dynamics. This finding has implications for resource management as an empirical example of how selective harvesting can alter the basic dynamics of exploited populations, and lead to unstable booms and busts that can precede systematic declines in stock levels.

  12. Surgical resident education in patient safety: where can we improve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Luke R; Levy, Shauna M; Kellagher, Caroline M; Etchegaray, Jason M; Thomas, Eric J; Kao, Lillian S; Lally, Kevin P; Tsao, KuoJen

    2015-12-01

    Effective communication and patient safety practices are paramount in health care. Surgical residents play an integral role in the perioperative team, yet their perceptions of patient safety remain unclear. We hypothesized that surgical residents perceive the perioperative environment as more unsafe than their faculty and operating room staff despite completing a required safety curriculum. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, and perioperative nurses in a large academic children's hospital participated in multifaceted, physician-led workshops aimed at enhancing communication and safety culture over a 3-y period. All general surgery residents from the same academic center completed a hospital-based online safety curriculum only. All groups subsequently completed the psychometrically validated safety attitudes questionnaire to evaluate three domains: safety culture, teamwork, and speaking up. Results reflect the percent of respondents who slightly or strongly agreed. Chi-square analysis was performed. Sixty-three of 84 perioperative personnel (75%) and 48 of 52 surgical residents (92%) completed the safety attitudes questionnaire. A higher percentage of perioperative personnel perceived a safer environment than the surgical residents in all three domains, which was significantly higher for safety culture (68% versus 46%, P = 0.03). When stratified into two groups, junior residents (postgraduate years 1-2) and senior residents (postgraduate years 3-5) had lower scores for all three domains, but the differences were not statistically significant. Surgical residents' perceptions of perioperative safety remain suboptimal. With an enhanced safety curriculum, perioperative staff demonstrated higher perceptions of safety compared with residents who participated in an online-only curriculum. Optimal surgical education on patient safety remains unknown but should require a dedicated, systematic approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. the contribution of resident physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Trusch, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    A telephone survey of resident physicians to the basic conditions in which they work has been conducted in 14 of the 16 federal states. In the center of the survey stood the general medicine within the prisons. This limitation was necessary in order to achieve comparability to primary medical care outside of correctional services. There are 140 salaried and tenured resident pysicians and 97 contract doctors in the general medical care of approx. 70000 prisoners in 185 independent prisons ...

  14. Resilience of predators to fishing pressure on coral patch reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R.E.; Parrish, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Numbers and biomass of piscivorous fish and their predation on other fish may often be high in undisturbed coral reef communities. The effects of such predation have sometimes been studied by removal of piscivores (either experimentally or by fishermen). Such perturbations have usually involved removal of large, highly vulnerable, mobile piscivores that are often actively sought in fisheries. The effects of fishing on smaller, demersal, semi-resident piscivores have been little studied. We studied such effects on the fish communities of patch reefs at Midway atoll by experimentally removing major resident, demersal, piscivorous fishes. First, four control reefs and four experimental reefs were selected, their dimensions and habitats mapped, and their visible fish communities censused repeatedly over 1 year. Census of all control and experimental reefs was continued for the following 39 months, during which known piscivores were collected repeatedly by hand spearing. Records were kept of catch and effort to calculate CPUE as an index of predator density. Spearfishing on the experimental reefs removed 2504 piscivorous fish from 12 families and 43 taxa (mostly species). The species richness of the catch did not show an overall change over the duration of the experiment. Spearman rank correlation analysis showed some unexpected positive correlations for density in numbers and biomass of major fished piscivorous groups (especially lizardfish) over the experiment. Only two relatively minor fished piscivorous taxa declined in abundance over the experiment, while the overall abundance of piscivores increased. Visual censuses of fish on the experimental reefs also failed to show reduction of total piscivores over the full experimental period. No significant trend in the abundance of lizardfish censused over the full period was apparent on any of the control reefs. The high resilience of piscivores on these experimental reefs to relatively intense fishing pressure could

  15. Minimum Data Set Active Resident Information Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS Active Resident Report summarizes information for residents currently in nursing homes. The source of these counts is the residents MDS assessment record....

  16. Sleep Quality Among Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Aguiar Melo, Matias; das Chagas Medeiros, Francisco; Meireles Sales de Bruin, Veralice; Pinheiro Santana, José Abraão; Bastos Lima, Alexandre; De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Medical residency programs are traditionally known for long working hours, which can be associated with a poor quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness. However, few studies have focused on this theme. Our objective was to investigate sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and their relation with anxiety, social phobia, and depressive symptoms. This cross-sectional observational study involved 59 psychiatry residents. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure the quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness ([EDS] and ESS > 10), respectively. Among the 59 psychiatry residents, 59.3% had poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) and 28.8% had EDS. Poor sleep quality was associated with higher EDS (P = 0.03) and the year of residency program (P = 0.03). Only 20% of residents with poor sleep had consulted at least once for sleep problems; 54.2% had used medications for sleep; and 16.9% were using medications at the time of interview. Only 30% obtained medication during medical consultations. Poor sleep was associated with irregular sleep hours (P = 0.001) and long periods lying down without sleep (P = 0.03). Poor sleep quality was also associated with high scores of anxiety symptoms (P Psychiatry residents frequently have poor sleep quality and EDS. Considering that sleep disorders can affect quality of life, predispose to metabolic syndrome, and be associated with worse performance at work, attention to this clinical problem is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Recycle food wastes into high quality fish feeds for safe and quality fish production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Hung; Mo, Wing-Yin; Choi, Wai-Ming; Cheng, Zhang; Man, Yu-Bon

    2016-12-01

    The amount of food waste generated from modern societies is increasing, which has imposed a tremendous pressure on its treatment and disposal. Food waste should be treated as a valuable resource rather than waste, and turning it into fish feeds would be a viable alternative. This paper attempts to review the feasibility of using food waste to formulate feed pellets to culture a few freshwater fish species, such as grass carp, grey mullet, and tilapia, under polyculture mode (growing different species in the same pond). These species occupy different ecological niches, with different feeding modes (i.e., herbivorous, filter feeding, etc.), and therefore all the nutrients derived from the food waste could be efficiently recycled within the ecosystem. The problems facing environmental pollution and fish contamination; the past and present situation of inland fish culture (focusing on South China); upgrade of food waste based feed pellets by adding enzymes, vitamin-mineral premix, probiotics (yeast), prebiotics, and Chinese medicinal herbs into feeds; and potential health risks of fish cultivated by food waste based pellets are discussed, citing some local examples. It can be concluded that appropriate portions of different types of food waste could satisfy basic nutritional requirements of lower trophic level fish species such as grass carp and tilapia. Upgrading the fish pellets by adding different supplements mentioned above could further elevated the quality of feeds, leading to higher growth rates, and enhanced immunity of fish. Health risk assessments based on the major environmental contaminants (mercury, PAHs and DDTs) in fish flesh showed that fish fed food waste based pellets are safer for consumption, when compared with those fed commercial feed pellets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Information seeking behaviour of fish farmers in Oyo State | Akinbile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The technical nature of fish farming requires that the knowledge of practitioners are constantly updated and this can be achieved through their enhanced information seeking behaviour as information use of fish farmers is crucial for effectively meeting their information needs. This study, thus, determined the information ...

  19. The OECD Fish Testing Framework Project: Summary of Workshop Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    An integrated Fish Testing Framework was initiated in mid-2009 as OECD Project 2.30 with the United States as the lead country. The objectives of the project were to review the regulatory needs and data requirements for fish testing and review the currency of existing OECD Test ...

  20. DNA barcoding of South Africa's ornamental freshwater fish – are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA barcoding of South Africa's ornamental freshwater fish – are the names reliable? ... African Journal of Aquatic Science ... Because its effective implementation requires accurate identification, the aim of the present study was to test whether DNA barcoding is a useful tool to identify freshwater fishes in the South African ...

  1. Response of benthic fauna to experimental bottom fishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sciberras, Marija; Hiddink, Jan Geert; Jennings, Simon; Szostek, Claire L.; Hughes, Kathryn M.; Kneafsey, Brian; Clarke, Leo J.; Ellis, Nick; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.; Mcconnaughey, Robert A.; Hilborn, Ray; Collie, Jeremy S.; Pitcher, C.R.; Amoroso, Ricardo O.; Parma, Ana M.; Suuronen, Petri; Kaiser, Michel J.

    2018-01-01

    Bottom-contact fishing gears are globally the most widespread anthropogenic sources of direct disturbance to the seabed and associated biota. Managing these fishing disturbances requires quantification of gear impacts on biota and the rate of recovery following disturbance. We undertook a systematic

  2. An Innovative Clinical Skills “Boot Camp” for Dental Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Castillo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available During a 1-year hospital-based residency, dental residents are required to rotate through many departments including surgery, medicine, and emergency medicine. It became apparent that there was a gap between clinical skills knowledge taught in dental school curriculum and skills required for hospital-based patient care. In response, a simulation-based intensive clinical skill “boot camp” was created. The boot camp provided an intensive, interactive 3-day session for the dental residents. During the 3 days, residents were introduced to medical knowledge and skills that were necessary for their inpatient hospital rotations but were lacking in traditional dental school curriculum. Effectiveness of the boot camp was assessed in terms of knowledge base and comfort through presession and postsession surveys. According to resident feedback, this intensive introduction for the dental residents improved their readiness for their inpatient hospital-based residency.

  3. Association of the 2011 ACGME resident duty hour reform with general surgery patient outcomes and with resident examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Ravi; Chung, Jeanette W; Jones, Andrew T; Cohen, Mark E; Dahlke, Allison R; Ko, Clifford Y; Tarpley, John L; Lewis, Frank R; Hoyt, David B; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-12-10

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricted resident duty hour requirements beyond those established in 2003, leading to concerns about the effects on patient care and resident training. To determine if the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or in resident examination performance. Quasi-experimental study of general surgery patient outcomes 2 years before (academic years 2009-2010) and after (academic years 2012-2013) the 2011 duty hour reform. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals were compared using a difference-in-differences approach adjusted for procedural mix, patient comorbidities, and time trends. Teaching hospitals were defined based on the proportion of cases at which residents were present intraoperatively. Patients were those undergoing surgery at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP). General surgery resident performance on the annual in-training, written board, and oral board examinations was assessed for this same period. National implementation of revised resident duty hour requirements on July 1, 2011, in all ACGME accredited residency programs. Primary outcome was a composite of death or serious morbidity; secondary outcomes were other postoperative complications and resident examination performance. In the main analysis, 204,641 patients were identified from 23 teaching (n = 102,525) and 31 nonteaching (n = 102,116) hospitals. The unadjusted rate of death or serious morbidity improved during the study period in both teaching (11.6% [95% CI, 11.3%-12.0%] to 9.4% [95% CI, 9.1%-9.8%], P general surgery patient outcomes or differences in resident examination performance. The implications of these findings should be considered when evaluating the merit of the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform and revising related policies in the future.

  4. Practice gaps in patient safety among dermatology residents and their teachers: a survey study of dermatology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swary, Jillian Havey; Stratman, Erik J

    2014-07-01

    Curriculum and role modeling adjustments are necessary to address patient safety gaps occurring during dermatology residency. To identify the source of clinical practices among dermatology residents that affect patient safety and determine the best approach for overcoming gaps in knowledge and practice patterns that contribute to these practices. A survey-based study, performed at a national medical dermatology meeting in Itasca, Illinois, in 2012, included 142 dermatology residents from 44 residency programs in the United States and Canada. Self-reported rates of dermatology residents committing errors, identifying local systems errors, and identifying poor patient safety role modeling. Of surveyed dermatology residents, 45.2% have failed to report needle-stick injuries incurred during procedures, 82.8% reported cutting and pasting a previous author's patient history information into a medical record without confirming its validity, 96.7% reported right-left body part mislabeling during examination or biopsy, and 29.4% reported not incorporating clinical photographs of lesions sampled for biopsy in the medical record at their institution. Residents variably perform a purposeful pause ("time-out") when indicated to confirm patient, procedure, and site before biopsy, with 20.0% always doing so. In addition, 59.7% of residents work with at least 1 attending physician who intimidates the residents, reducing the likelihood of reporting safety issues they witness. Finally, 78.3% have witnessed attending physicians purposefully disregarding required safety steps. Our data reinforce the need for modified curricula, systems, and teacher development to reduce injuries, improve communication with patients and between physicians, residents, and other members of the health care team, and create an environment free of intimidation.

  5. Why do fish school?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matz LARSSON

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized movements (schooling emit complex and overlapping sound and pressure curves that might confuse the inner ear and lateral line organ (LLO of a predator. Moreover, prey-fish moving close to each other may blur the electro-sensory perception of predators. The aim of this review is to explore mechanisms associated with synchronous swimming that may have contributed to increased adaptation and as a consequence may have influenced the evolution of schooling. The evolutionary development of the inner ear and the LLO increased the capacity to detect potential prey, possibly leading to an increased potential for cannibalism in the shoal, but also helped small fish to avoid joining larger fish, resulting in size homogeneity and, accordingly, an increased capacity for moving in synchrony. Water-movements and incidental sound produced as by-product of locomotion (ISOL may provide fish with potentially useful information during swimming, such as neighbour body-size, speed, and location. When many fish move close to one another ISOL will be energetic and complex. Quiet intervals will be few. Fish moving in synchrony will have the capacity to discontinue movements simultaneously, providing relatively quiet intervals to allow the reception of potentially critical environmental signals. Besides, synchronized movements may facilitate auditory grouping of ISOL. Turning preference bias, well-functioning sense organs, good health, and skillful motor performance might be important to achieving an appropriate distance to school neighbors and aid the individual fish in reducing time spent in the comparatively less safe school periphery. Turning preferences in ancestral fish shoals might have helped fish to maintain groups and stay in formation, reinforcing aforementioned predator confusion mechanisms, which possibly played a role in the lateralization of the vertebrate brain [Current Zoology 58 (1: 116–128, 2012].

  6. Perspectives on healthy eating among Appalachian residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Howell, Britteny M; Swanson, Mark; Grosh, Christopher; Bardach, Shoshana

    2013-08-01

    Extensive attention has been focused on improving the dietary intake of Americans. Such focus is warranted due to increasing rates of overweight, obesity, and other dietary-related disease. To address suboptimal dietary intake requires an improved, contextualized understanding of the multiple and intersecting influences on healthy eating, particularly among those populations at greatest risk of and from poor diet, including rural residents. During 8 focus groups (N = 99) and 6 group key informant interviews (N = 20), diverse Appalachian rural residents were queried about their perceptions of healthy eating, determinants of healthy food intake, and recommendations for improving the dietary intake of people in their communities. Participants included church members and other laypeople, public health officials, social service providers, health care professionals, and others. Participants offered insights on healthy eating consistent with the categories of individual, interpersonal, community, physical, environmental, and society-level influences described in the socioecological model. Although many participants identified gaps in dietary knowledge as a persistent problem, informants also identified extraindividual factors, including the influence of family, fellow church members, and schools, policy, advertising and media, and general societal trends, as challenges to healthy dietary intake. We highlight Appalachian residents' recommendations for promoting healthier diets, including support groups, educational workshops, cooking classes, and community gardening. We discuss the implications of these findings for programmatic development in the Appalachian context. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  7. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers

  8. Which Fish Should I Eat? Perspectives Influencing Fish Consumption Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Anna L.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Mariën, Koenraad; Rheinberger, Christoph M.; Schoeny, Rita; Sunderland, Elsie; Korrick, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diverse perspectives have influenced fish consumption choices. Objectives: We summarized the issue of fish consumption choice from toxicological, nutritional, ecological, and economic points of view; identified areas of overlap and disagreement among these viewpoints; and reviewed effects of previous fish consumption advisories. Methods: We reviewed published scientific literature, public health guidelines, and advisories related to fish consumption, focusing on advisories targeted at U.S. populations. However, our conclusions apply to groups having similar fish consumption patterns. Discussion: There are many possible combinations of matters related to fish consumption, but few, if any, fish consumption patterns optimize all domains. Fish provides a rich source of protein and other nutrients, but because of contamination by methylmercury and other toxicants, higher fish intake often leads to greater toxicant exposure. Furthermore, stocks of wild fish are not adequate to meet the nutrient demands of the growing world population, and fish consumption choices also have a broad economic impact on the fishing industry. Most guidance does not account for ecological and economic impacts of different fish consumption choices. Conclusion: Despite the relative lack of information integrating the health, ecological, and economic impacts of different fish choices, clear and simple guidance is necessary to effect desired changes. Thus, more comprehensive advice can be developed to describe the multiple impacts of fish consumption. In addition, policy and fishery management inter-ventions will be necessary to ensure long-term availability of fish as an important source of human nutrition. PMID:22534056

  9. Commercial production of fish meal from fish waste

    OpenAIRE

    Eyo, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The importance of fish meal production as a means of reducing fish waste currently being experienced in the fisheries subsector is discussed. Cost estimate for Nigeria establishing a fish meal manufacturing plant and suggestions on rational execution of the project are presented. If properly located and well managed, the project will serve to convert fish waste to cash in the industrial fishery

  10. Effect of Recreational Fish Feeding on Reef Fish Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feeding fish with bread or other food is widely used by tour operators to enhance human-animal interactions in coral reefs. Little is known, however, about the effects of recreational fish feeding on fish community structure and fish behaviour. These two issues were examined in this study within three marine protected areas ...

  11. Technical Resources for Fish and Shellfish Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on ways to develop local fish advisories, access national state and local fish advisories, obtain information on fish tissue contamination and fish tissue studies, and access information on fish consumption and human health.

  12. ACGME proposes dropping the 16 hour resident shift limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME is proposing that first-year residents would no longer be limited to 16-hour shifts during the 2017-2018 academic year under a controversial proposal released today (1. Instead, individual residency programs could assign first-year trainees to shifts as long as 28 hours, the current limit for all other residents. The 28-hour maximum includes 4 transitional hours that's designed in part to help residents improve continuity of care. The plan to revise training requirements does not change other rules designed to protect all residents from overwork. including the maximum80 hours per week. The ACGME capped the shifts of first-year residents at 16 hours in 2011 as a part of an ongoing effort to make trainee schedules more humane and avoid clinical errors caused by sleep deprivation. ACGME CEO Thomas Nasca, MD, told Medscape Medical News that the problem arises largely from first-year residents not being ...

  13. A patient safety education program in a medical physics residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric C; Nyflot, Matthew; Spraker, Matthew B; Kane, Gabrielle; Hendrickson, Kristi R G

    2017-11-01

    Education in patient safety and quality of care is a requirement for radiation oncology residency programs according to accrediting agencies. However, recent surveys indicate that most programs lack a formal program to support this learning. The aim of this report was to address this gap and share experiences with a structured educational program on quality and safety designed specifically for medical physics therapy residencies. Five key topic areas were identified, drawn from published recommendations on safety and quality. A didactic component was developed, which includes an extensive reading list supported by a series of lectures. This was coupled with practice-based learning which includes one project, for example, failure modes and effect analysis exercise, and also continued participation in the departmental incident learning system including a root-cause analysis exercise. Performance was evaluated through quizzes, presentations, and reports. Over the period of 2014-2016, five medical physics residents successfully completed the program. Evaluations indicated that the residents had a positive experience. In addition to educating physics residents this program may be adapted for medical physics graduate programs or certificate programs, radiation oncology residencies, or as a self-directed educational project for practicing physicists. Future directions might include a system that coordinates between medical training centers such as a resident exchange program. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Residents' leadership styles and effectiveness as perceived by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, J D; Magrinat, G; Hansen, C J; Bailey, R S

    1986-01-01

    Although physicians are required to act as leaders in a variety of situations, leadership ability and leadership training have been largely ignored by medical educators. The leadership styles and leadership effectiveness of 17 residents in a community hospital were studied as part of a leadership training seminar. Self-ratings and ratings of the residents by nurses who had worked with them were used to assess the residents' leadership style and the nurses' perceptions of the effectiveness of those styles. Styles that emphasized relationships with co-workers (encouraging and coaching styles) predominated over low relationship-oriented styles (delegating and structuring). The nurses perceived individual residents who exhibited encouraging and coaching leadership styles as being distinctly more effective leaders than the residents who exhibited structuring and delegating styles. The residents, however, rated all four styles as similarly effective. Leadership training programs and studies of the type reported here may provide an opportunity for faculty members to help residents learn more appropriate and productive styles of leadership.

  15. Incorporating population medicine into primary care residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysinger, Wayne S; King, Valerie; Foster, Tina C; Geffken, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Expanded competencies in population health and systems-based medicine have been identified as a need for primary care physicians. Incorporating formal training in preventive medicine is one method of accomplishing this objective. We identified three family medicine residencies that have developed formal integrated pathways for residents to also complete preventive medicine residency requirements during their training period. Although there are differences, each pathway incorporates a structured approach to dual residency training and includes formal curriculum that expands resident competencies in population health and systems-based medicine. A total of 26 graduates have completed the formally combined family and preventive medicine residencies. All are board certified in family medicine, and 22 are board certified in preventive medicine. Graduates work in a variety of academic, quality improvement, community, and international settings utilizing their clinical skills as well as their population medicine competencies. Dual training has been beneficial in job acquisition and satisfaction. Incorporation of formal preventive medicine training into family medicine education is a viable way to use a structured format to expand competencies in population medicine for primary care physicians. This type of training, or modifications of it, should be part of the debate in primary care residency redesign.

  16. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweiki E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehyal Shweiki,1 Niels D Martin,2 Alec C Beekley,1 Jay S Jenoff,1 George J Koenig,1 Kris R Kaulback,1 Gary A Lindenbaum,1 Pankaj H Patel,1 Matthew M Rosen,1 Michael S Weinstein,1 Muhammad H Zubair,2 Murray J Cohen1 1Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. Keywords: learning, education, achievement

  17. A dedicated research program increases the quantity and quality of orthopaedic resident publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Daniel; Gugala, Zbigniew; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-04-01

    between postresidency publications by trainees who graduated with versus without the research program in the number of publications, citations, and average journal impact factor per resident. A regression analysis showed no difference in citation rates of the residents' published papers before and since implementation of the research program. Currently in the United States, there are no standard policies or requirements that dictate how research should be incorporated in orthopaedic surgery residency training programs. The results of our study suggest that implementation of a dedicated resident research program improves the quantity and to some extent quality of orthopaedic resident research publications, but this effect did not persist after graduation.

  18. 24 CFR 964.115 - Resident council requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT TENANT PARTICIPATION AND TENANT OPPORTUNITIES IN PUBLIC HOUSING Tenant Participation...) It must adopt written procedures such as by-laws, or a constitution which provides for the election...

  19. Proxy measures of fitness suggest coastal fish farms can act as population sources and not ecological traps for wild gadoid fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Dempster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ecological traps form when artificial structures are added to natural habitats and induce mismatches between habitat preferences and fitness consequences. Their existence in terrestrial systems has been documented, yet little evidence suggests they occur in marine environments. Coastal fish farms are widespread artificial structures in coastal ecosystems and are highly attractive to wild fish. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate if coastal salmon farms act as ecological traps for wild Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua and saithe (Pollachius virens, we compared proxy measures of fitness between farm-associated fish and control fish caught distant from farms in nine locations throughout coastal Norway, the largest coastal fish farming industry in the world. Farms modified wild fish diets in both quality and quantity, thereby providing farm-associated wild fish with a strong trophic subsidy. This translated to greater somatic (saithe: 1.06-1.12 times; cod: 1.06-1.11 times and liver condition indices (saithe: 1.4-1.8 times; cod: 2.0-2.8 times than control fish caught distant from farms. Parasite loads of farm-associated wild fish were modified from control fish, with increased external and decreased internal parasites, however the strong effect of the trophic subsidy overrode any effects of altered loads upon condition. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Proxy measures of fitness provided no evidence that salmon farms function as ecological traps for wild fish. We suggest fish farms may act as population sources for wild fish, provided they are protected from fishing while resident at farms to allow their increased condition to manifest as greater reproductive output.

  20. Immobilization thresholds of electrofishing relative to fish size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, C.R.; Miranda, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    Fish size and electrical waveforms have frequently been associated with variation in electrofishing effectiveness. Under controlled laboratory conditions, we measured the electrical power required by five electrical waveforms to immobilize eight fish species of diverse sizes and shapes. Fish size was indexed by total body length, surface area, volume, and weight; shape was indexed by the ratio of body length to body depth. Our objectives were to identify immobilization thresholds, elucidate the descriptors of fish size that were best associated with those immobilization thresholds, and determine whether the vulnerability of a species relative to other species remained constant across electrical treatments. The results confirmed that fish size is a key variable controlling the immobilization threshold and further suggested that the size descriptor best related to immobilization is fish volume. The peak power needed to immobilize fish decreased rapidly with increasing fish volume in small fish but decreased slowly for fish larger than 75-100 cm 3. Furthermore, when we controlled for size and shape, different waveforms did not favor particular species, possibly because of the overwhelming effect of body size. Many of the immobilization inconsistencies previously attributed to species might simply represent the effect of disparities in body size.

  1. The effects of fishing, climate change, and other anthropogenic disturbances on red grouper and other reef fishes in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Felicia C; Koenig, Christopher C

    2010-08-01

    In this article, we consider the potential effects of anthropogenic disturbances on marine fish species known or suspected to be habitat engineers. The three species of interest inhabit different marine habitats at different life stages, and therefore can have significant influences across the sea floor at broad spatial scales. The primary species include the shallow-water Atlantic goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara), which inhabits mangrove root systems as juveniles, and caves, shipwrecks, and rocky reefs as adults; red grouper (E. morio), which excavates habitat throughout its benthic life in Karst regions of the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic, from the coast to the shelf-edge; and tilefish (Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps), a species that lives on the continental slope and constructs elaborate, pueblo-esque burrows. The anthropogenic disturbances of greatest interest in the Gulf of Mexico include fishing, hypoxia, red tide, oil and gas exploration, and climatic change. We suggest that to understand the broader effects of both natural and anthropogenic disturbances on biomass and productivity in these species requires that we first understand the strength of interactions between them and the other species residing within their communities (e.g., predators, prey, commensals, and mutualists).

  2. Recycled fishing nets as reinforcement of existing concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Ida Maria Gieysztor; Sigvardsen, Nina Marie; Bonnerup, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Large amounts of fishing nets are discarded every year polluting the oceans with plastic fibers on a global scale. Due to the big fishing industry in Greenland, an alternative use for discarded fishing nets would have a decreasing effect on the amount of marine litter in the Arctic. A use...... for discarded fishing nets could be as fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites for near surface mounted reinforcement (NSMR). NSMR prolongs the lifetime of existing structures, and thus reduces the amount of materials transported to Greenland, reducing CO2-emission and expenses. The effect of NSMR FRP bars...... of cracks in the shear zone and resisting a higher load is seen. A method for casting NSMR FRP bars with discarded fishing nets was developed, evaluated and suggestions for improvements were made. This study paves the way for the possibility of using discarded fishing nets as NSMR FRP bars but requires...

  3. Isotopic and elemental analysis of fish tissues for provenance determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannella, Carmela; Adamo, Paola; Opper, Christine; Schwendinger, Susanne; Knezevic, Sara; Van den Oever, Sabrina; Tchaikovsky, Anastassiya; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The reliable tracing of the productions flows of food products through the entire supply chain is an essential requirement for all types of food commodities qualified by origin, composition and quality. This is a minimum requirement to implement safety for the consumer, enhance consumer confidence and countervail fraudulent practices. One important food commodity is fish and fish products. Reliable methods to trace the origin of fish have become of high importance. The investigation focused on the identification of adequate geochemical marker in fish meat and the corresponding linkage to the ambient water. The Sr/Ca ratio along with the 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio analyzed by (multi collector) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC ICP-MS) proved to be the most potential tools in this respect. For the first time, a direct link of fish meat to water could be accomplished.In addition, fish hard parts (otoliths, fin rays, fish bones) were under investigation to reconstruct the habitat changes during the lifespan of a fishes life. Fish hard parts have the potential to serve as "life time recorder". Thus the spatial investigation of the elemental and isotopic composition can be used to monitor habitat changes with time. The spatially resolved data of hard tissues was collected by means of Laser Ablation Split Stream ICP-MS/MC ICP-MS. This work is accomplished within the scope of the project "CSI: TRACE YOUR FOOD".

  4. Estimating the impact of oyster restoration scenarios on transient fish production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Elizabeth; Borrett, Stuart R.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Peterson, Bradley J.

    2017-01-01

    Oyster reef restoration projects are increasing in number both to enhance oyster density and to retain valuable ecosystem services provided by oyster reefs. Although some oyster restoration projects have demonstrated success by increasing density and biomass of transient fish, it still remains a challenge to quantify the effects of oyster restoration on transient fish communities. We developed a bioenergetics model to assess the impact of selected oyster reef restoration scenarios on associated transient fish species. We used the model to analyze the impact of changes in (1) oyster population carrying capacity; (2) oyster population growth rate; and (3) diet preference of transient fish on oyster reef development and associated transient fish species. Our model results indicate that resident fish biomass is directly affected by oyster restoration and oyster biomass, and oyster restoration can have cascading impacts on transient fish biomass. Furthermore, the results highlight the importance of a favorable oyster population growth rate during early restoration years, as it can lead to rapid increases in mean oyster biomass and biomass of transient fish species. The model also revealed that a transient fish's diet solely dependent on oyster reef-derived prey could limit the biomass of transient fish species, emphasizing the importance of habitat connectivity in estuarine areas to enhance transient fish species biomass. Simple bioenergetics models can be developed to understand the dynamics of a system and make qualitative predictions of management and restoration scenarios.

  5. Surgical implantation of transmitters into fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    Although the Animal Welfare Act does not cover poikilotherms, individual institutions and policies and legal requirements other than the Animal Welfare Act (e.g., the US Public Health Service and the Interagency Research Animal Committee's Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Training) require the review of projects involving fish by institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs). IACUCs may, however, lack the knowledge and experience to evaluate fish projects judiciously, especially when the projects are in field settings. Surgeries involving implantation of transmitters and other instruments into the coelom, which now comprise a very common research tool in the study of free-ranging fishes, are examples of surgeries that use a broad spectrum of surgical and anesthetic techniques, some of which would not be considered acceptable for similar work on mammals. IACUCs should apply the standards they would expect to be used for surgeries on homeotherms to surgeries on fish. Surgeons should be carefully trained and experienced. Surgical instruments and transmitters should be sterile. Regulations and laws on the use of drugs in animals should be followed, particularly those concerned with anesthetics and antibiotics used on free-ranging fish. Exceptions to surgical procedures should be made only when circumstances are extreme enough to warrant the use of less than optimal procedures.

  6. Hydrodynamics of vertical jumping in Archer fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techet, Alexandra H.; Mendelson, Leah

    2017-11-01

    Vertical jumping for aerial prey from an aquatic environment requires both propulsive power and precise aim to succeed. Rapid acceleration to a ballistic velocity sufficient for reaching the prey height occurs before the fish leaves the water completely and experiences a thousandfold drop in force-producing ability. In addition to speed, accuracy and stability are crucial for successful feeding by jumping. This talk examines the physics of jumping using the archer fish as a model. Better known for their spitting abilities, archer fish will jump multiple body lengths out of the water for prey capture, from a stationary position just below the free surface. Modulation of oscillatory body kinematics and use of multiple fins for force production are identified as methods through which the fish can meet requirements for both acceleration and stabilization in limited space. Quantitative 3D PIV wake measurements reveal how variations in tail kinematics relate to thrust production throughout the course of a jumping maneuver and over a range of jump heights. By performing measurements in 3D, the timing, interactions, and relative contributions to thrust and lateral forces from each fin can be evaluated, elucidating the complex hydrodynamics that enable archer fish water exit.

  7. Ascent of neotropical migratory fish in the Itaipu Reservoir fish pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrakis, S.; Miranda, L.E.; Gomes, L.C.; Makrakis, M.C.; Junior, H.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The Piracema Canal is a complex 10-km fish pass system that climbs 120m to connect the Paran?? River to the Itaipu Reservoir along the Brazil-Paraguay border. The canal was constructed to allow migratory fishes to reach suitable habitats for reproduction and feeding in tributaries upstream from the reservoir. The Piracema Canal attracted 17 of the 19 long-distance migratory species that have been recorded in the Paran?? River Basin and Paraguay-Paran?? Basin. However, the incidence of migratory fish decreased from downstream to upstream, with the pattern of decrease depending on species. Overall, 0.5% of the migratory fish that entered the Piracema Canal and segment 1, eventually were able to reach segment 5 and potentially Itaipu Reservoir. Ascension rate was examined relative to various physical attributes of canal segments; maximum water velocity emerged as the most influential variable affecting fish passage. Water velocity may be manipulated by controlling water discharge, and by re-engineering critical sections of the canal. Because the Itaipu Reservoir flooded a set of falls that separated two distinct biogeographical regions, facilitating fish movements through the Piracema Canal into the Itaipu Reservoir presents a management dilemma that requires deliberation in the context of the fish assemblages rather than on selected migratory species. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Reef fishes have higher parasite richness at unfished Palmyra Atoll compared to fished Kiritimati Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Shaw, Jenny C.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2008-01-01

    We compared parasite communities at two coral atolls in the Line Islands chain of the central Pacific (Kiritimati Island and Palmyra Atoll). Palmyra Atoll is relatively pristine while Kiritimati Island is heavily fished. At each island, we sampled five fish species for helminth and arthropod endoparasites: Chromis margaritifer, Plectroglyphidodon dickii,Paracirrhites arcatus, Acanthurus nigricans, and Lutjanus bohar. The surveys found monogeneans, digeneans, cestodes, nematodes, acanthocephalans, and copepods. Parasite richness was higher at Palmyra compared to Kiritimati for all five fish species. Fishes from Palmyra also tended to have more parasites species per host, higher parasite prevalence, and higher parasite abundance than did fishes from Kiritimati. The lower parasitism at Kiritimati may result from a simplified food web due to over fishing. Low biodiversity could impair parasite transmission by reducing the availability of hosts required by parasites with complex life cycles. Most notably, the lower abundances of larval shark tapeworms at Kiritimati presumably reflect the fact that fishing has greatly depleted sharks there in comparison to Palmyra.

  9. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzuner Arzu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27 and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11 by e-mail and by personal contact. Results A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%. Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e

  10. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuner, Arzu; Topsever, Pinar; Unluoglu, Ilhami; Caylan, Ayse; Dagdeviren, Nezih; Uncu, Yesim; Mazicioğlu, Mumtaz; Ozçakir, Alis; Ozdemir, Hakan; Ersoy, Fusun

    2010-04-15

    Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27) and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11) by e-mail and by personal contact. A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%). Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e-learning. Participation in courses and congresses was considered

  11. SIS - Fish Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Fish Assessment data set within the Species Information System (SIS) constraints information related to fishery stock assessments, including assessment meta-data...

  12. Fishing Community Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To enable fisheries managers to comply with National Standard 8 (NS8), NMFS social scientists around the nation are preparing fishing community profiles that present...

  13. Fishing and stock fluctuations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laevastu, Taivo; Favorite, F

    1988-01-01

    .... Scarcely publicized are the multitude of causes of fish stock fluctuations. This book attempts to summarize the available knowledge on the subject and includes original work of the authors on a matter vital to the fisheries industries of the world...

  14. In Place of Fishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ounanian, Kristen

    Communities historically reliant on fisheries have faced changing circumstances in terms of their livelihoods, identities, demographics, and viabilities. I examine various manifestations of fisheries dependence and the process of transition as related to six cases of fishing communities undergoing...

  15. Fish-friendly future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookshier, P.; Newman, Gemma

    2001-01-01

    The latest US research into ways of reducing the harm to fish from hydroelectric turbines is outlined. Laboratory studies, field studies and advanced computational studies are being carried out to improve the understanding of and reduce the effects of stress and injury to fish from turbines. The Advanced Hydro Turbine System programme is part of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Programme. Turbine passage injuries are caused by a number of mechanisms, leaving the fish either dead or stunned. Advanced turbine technology can help to minimise fish injury and can add dissolved oxygen to the discharged water, thus improving water quality. Turbine modifications are aimed at all species, but studies have focussed on salmon, trout and eels. The new minimum gap runner (MGR) appear as efficient as standard Kaplan turbines

  16. Freshwater Fish Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater fish are ecologically important in stream ecosystems, and they provide people with significant food, recreation, and conservation value as biological indicator of freshwater streams. Historically, the streams and rivers of southern New England supported moderately dive...

  17. West Coast Fishing Ethnography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Created as part of a 2012 BOEM study on OCS renewable energy space-use conflicts, this data contains the commercial and recreational fishing locations off the...

  18. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  19. A review of teaching methods and outcomes of resident phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplowitz, Kevin; Yazdanie, Mohammad; Abazari, Azin

    Cataract surgery with phacoemulsification is a challenging procedure for surgeons in training to learn to perform safely, efficiently, and effectively. We review the auxiliary learning tools outside the operating room that residency programs have incorporated into their curriculum to improve surgical skills, including wet laboratory and surgical simulators. We then discuss different methods of teaching cataract surgery in the operating room. Our goal is to define a learning curve for cataract surgery. We demonstrate that complication rates decline significantly after a resident performs an average of 70 cases. We summarize the reported incidence and risk factors for complications in resident-performed cataract surgery to help identify cases that require a higher level of skill to improve visual outcomes. We suggest that future studies include details on preoperative comorbidities, risk stratification, resident skill level, and frequency of takeover by attending. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Fish protection at steam-electric power plants: alternative screening devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Since the enactment of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, very few innovations have surfaced that advance the state of intake technology for fish protection at steam-electric power plants. After careful examination of basic hydrology, hydraulics, and ecology of the source water body is completed and after a suitable location for the intake is established, the design process reduces to the development of proper screening techniques and to the provision of a means of preventing resident and migratory species from entering the intake structure. As a result of this design process, three basic fish protection concepts have evolved: fish deterrence, fish collection and removal, and fish diversion. Intake screening devices that protect fish are discussed

  1. The technology of fish-vegetable feed production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukatova M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Perspective direction of the Volga-Caspian basin fisheries is increasing the productivity of aquaculture production which requires the availability of sufficient quantities of feed. The cutting waste of carp and crucian carp, crayfish processing (cephalothorax, wheat bran, soy isolate, freshwater plants – pondweed perfoliate, fish-vegetable ration, produced feeding staffs have been investigated. In researching samples of manufactured pelleted feeds the standard methods adopted in the animal feed industry have been used. The number of nitrogen-free extractives and energy value has been determined by calculation. The composition of fish-vegetable ration has been worked out. Some manufacturing inspection of fish-vegetable feed technology using proofing process has been carried out. The possibility of manufacturing on the basis of crushed fish waste of the company LLC "VES" and dry ingredients of fish-vegetable feed has been determined; the output of feed at water content of not more than 10 % is 43 % of feed mix based on the mass of directed waste equal to 84 %. The pilot batch of dry fish-vegetable feed has been investigated to establish quality indicators. It has been determined that fish-vegetable feed meets the requirements of GOST 10385–2014 "Combined feeding staffs for fishes. General specifications" as for main quality indicators and refers to economic grower for catfish and carp fish weighing more than 50 g. This reveals good palatability of the experimental batch of floating feed by carp fish species and African catfish. Thus, fish-vegetable feed manufacturing technology can be implemented in the production for processing secondary raw materials: waste from butchering fish by grinding, cooking, mixing with selected vegetable fillings which is waste of flour or grain processing industries and freshwater plants mowed annually during the reclamation works on the Volga delta.

  2. Social learning in fish

    OpenAIRE

    Atton, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Social learning is known to be a common phenomenon in fish, which they utilise under many different contexts, including foraging, mate-choice and migration. Here I review the literature on social learning in fish and present two studies. The first examines the ability of threespined sticklebacks to use social learning in the enhancement of food preferences. The second study examines the ability of both threespined sticklebacks and ninespined sticklebacks to use social learning in the avoidanc...

  3. Senescence in fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhead, A.D.

    1979-01-01

    A long-standing theory, that there is a fundamental difference in aging between fishes and higher vertebrates, is still alive in the minds of many. In 1932, Bidder proposed that aging was causatively related to the cessation of growth at sexual maturity. Fish, which continue to grow throughout their lives, would not age, and therefore were potentially immortal. His ideas were clearly disproven by Comfort, who established that the survival curves of a laboratory population of guppies, Poecilia reticulata, were very similar to those of a small mammal population under laboratory conditions. Recent data from field and laboratory studies, including histological evidence, amply confirm the occurrence of senescence in fishes. Natural death in fish has been associated with reproduction. There is good evidence for a number of species which shows that, with increasing size, the gonad forms a greater proportion of total body weight. In older, larger fish, extensive energy depletion for reproduction is suggested as an important factor in mortality. Reproductive modifications in older fish are also noted.

  4. The Impact of Resident Training on Communication with Families in the Intensive Care Unit. Resident and Family Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amy M; Rock, Laura K; Gadmer, Nina M; Norwich, Diana E; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    In high-acuity settings such as intensive care units (ICUs), the quality of communication with patients' families is a particularly important component of care. Evidence shows that ICU communication is often inadequate and can negatively impact family outcomes. To assess the impact of a communication training program on resident skills in communicating with families in an ICU and on family outcomes. We conducted a prospective, single-site educational intervention study. The intervention featured a weekly required communication training program (4 h total) during the ICU rotation, which included interactive discussion, and role play with immediate feedback from simulated family members. All internal medicine residents on ICU rotation between July 2012 and July 2014 were invited to participate in the study. Family members who had a meeting with an enrolled resident were approached for a survey or interview. The primary outcome was family ratings of how well residents met their informational and emotional needs. The response rate for the resident baseline survey was 93% (n = 149 of 160), and it was 90% at postcourse and 84% at 3-month follow-up. Of 303 family members approached, 237 were enrolled. Enrolled family members who had a confirmed meeting with a resident were eligible to complete a survey or interview. The completion rate was 86% (n = 82 of 95). Family members were more likely to describe residents as having "fully met" (average rating of 10/10 on 0-10 scale) their informational and emotional needs when the resident had completed two or three course sessions (84% of family members said conversation with these residents "fully met" their needs), as compared with residents who had taken one session or no sessions (25% of family members said needs were "fully met") (P training program designed for integration into medical residency programs was associated with strongly positive family member outcomes and significant improvements in residents' perceived skills

  5. MERCURY EXPOSURE FROM FISH CONSUMPTION WITHIN THE JAPANESE AND KOREAN COMMUNITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public health guidance pertaining to fish consumption requires that we be cognizant of the health concerns associated with eating contaminated fish and the nutritional benefits obtained from fish consumption. In doing so, a need exists for an improved understanding of the extent ...

  6. Is the accreditation council for graduate medical education a suitable proxy for resident unions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lypson, Monica L; Hamstra, Stanley J; Colletti, Lisa

    2009-03-01

    In 1999, the National Labor Relations Board reversed its own rulings and determined that resident physicians were categorized as employees and not students under the National Labor Relations Act in the private sector. This change opened the door for residents to collectively bargain for employment benefits. Concerns were raised that conflicts in the area of service-versus-educational demands on residents' time were better handled by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) than by residents' unions. This article explores the extent to which conflicts exist between advocating for working conditions and for educational issues and, more specifically, whether there are any resident interests that are not covered by current ACGME regulations. In other words, has the ACGME evolved into a reasonable proxy for resident unions? The authors describe their experience with the University of Michigan House Officer Association, mutual gains bargaining, the impact that the ACGME 2003 and 2007 institutional requirements have had on employment contracts, and whether these requirements clarify or confuse resident issues. To date, the ACGME continues to revise its requirements, many of which preempt and exceed the power that most local unions have. However, only blunt tools (e.g., removal of accreditation) are available to the ACGME to address violations of requirements. The ACGME, to potentially function as a full resident union, would need to find more precise methods for timely feedback to both resident and hospital parties as well as more powerful tools to deal with violations of its regulations and requirements.

  7. Exploring relationships among land ownership, agricultural land use, and native fish species richness in the Upper Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.; Rohweder, Jason J.

    2012-01-01

    The general effects of agriculture on in-stream fish communities in the Upper Midwestern United States have been well studied for nearly three decades (Karr et al. 1985; Nerbonne and Vondracek 1991; Zimmerman et al. 2001; Goldstein and Meador 2005). Specific impacts include: lowered water levels, sediment loading and nutrient enrichment, loss of riparian habitat, changes to channel morphometry and physical habitat, and changes to the forage base. As part of the National Fish Habitat Action Plan (NFHAP), an initiative to protect, restore, and enhance the nation's fish and aquatic communities, the Fishers and Farmers Partnership specifically focuses on working with agricultural producers to help protect and restore aquatic resources in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) (Fig. 1). Successful protection and/or restoration will require the partnership and local conservation agencies to effectively communicate and work with local landowners. However, roughly 43% of the agricultural lands in the UMRB are not operated by those who own the land (National Agricultural Statistics Service 2009) and this is expected to increase as heirs of farm estates now reside greater distances from their home farms than ever before (Arbuckle 2010).

  8. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  9. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Hodgkinson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type, and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type. The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation.

  10. Innovation in utilization of fish tanks for fish culture among fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated innovation in utilization of fish tanks for fish culture among fish farmers in Obio/Akpor Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. Data for this study was obtained through the administration of questionnaire and scheduled interview to 120 sampled fish farmers randomly selected from the study ...

  11. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a... legal representative. (5) Conveyance upon death. Upon the death of a resident with a personal fund...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must meet...

  12. Mentorship in orthopaedic and trauma residency training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mentorship is important in residency training as it is necessary for personal and professional development of the resident trainees. Objectives: This study documents mentorship in orthopaedic residency training programme in Nigeria by assessing the awareness of orthopaedic residents on the role of a mentor, ...

  13. Surgery resident learning styles and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessa, Jack; Ciardiello, Kenneth A; Perlman, Stacie

    2005-01-01

    To determine if surgical residents share a preferred learning style as measured by Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and if a relationship exists between resident learning style and achievement as measured by a standardized examination (AME). Also, core faculty learning styles were assessed to determine if faculty and residents share a preferred learning style. Kolb's LSI, Version 3, was administered to 16 surgical residents and the residency program's core faculty of 6 attending physicians. To measure academic achievement, the American Medical Education (AME) examination was administered to residents. The Hospital of Saint Raphael, General Surgery Residency Program, New Haven, Connecticut. Both instruments were administered to residents during protected core curriculum time. Core faculty were administered the LSI on an individual basis. Surgical residents of the Hospital of Saint Raphael's General Surgery Residency Program and 6 core faculty members Analysis of resident learning style preference revealed Converging as the most commonly occurring style for residents (7) followed by Accommodating (5), Assimilating (3), and Diverging (1). The predominant learning style for core faculty was also Converging (4) with 2 Divergers. The average score for the Convergers on the AME was 62.6 compared with 42 for the next most frequently occurring learning style, Accommodators. In this surgical residency program, a preferred learning style for residents seems to exist (Converging), which confirms what previous studies have found. Additionally, residents with this learning style attained a higher average achievement score as measured by the AME. Also, core faculty share the same preferential learning style as this subset of residents.

  14. The resident's view of residency training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, D G

    1966-04-09

    In the view of residents in their last year of specialty training, the Fellowship is now becoming the operative standard for obtaining hospital privileges in urban centres and they felt that this implied that the two standards, the Certificate and the Fellowship of the Royal College, were not achieving the purpose for which they were designed. Although 80% of the residents intended to write the Fellowship, few viewed a year in a basic science department or in research as of intrinsic value in terms of their future practice.The examinations of the Royal College were the subject of criticism, most residents feeling that the examinations did not test the knowledge and ability gained in training. Most expressed a desire for ongoing evaluation during the training period.Service responsibilities were generally regarded as too heavy.Despite the criticism of both training and examination, most residents felt that their training had provided them with the experience and background they needed to practise as specialists.

  15. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-08-01

    Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

  16. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Practical Implications for an Effective Radiology Residency Quality Improvement Program for Milestone Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Rebecca; Lewis, Madelene; Ackerman, Susan; Hill, Jeanne; Thacker, Paul; Matheus, Maria; Tipnis, Sameer; Gordon, Leonie

    2017-01-01

    Utilization of a radiology resident-specific quality improvement (QI) program and curriculum based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones can enable a program's assessment of the systems-based practice component and prepare residents for QI implementation post graduation. This article outlines the development process, curriculum, QI committee formation, and resident QI project requirements of one institution's designated radiology resident QI program. A method of mapping the curriculum to the ACGME milestones and assessment of resident competence by postgraduate year level is provided. Sample projects, challenges to success, and lessons learned are also described. Survey data of current trainees and alumni about the program reveal that the majority of residents and alumni responders valued the QI curriculum and felt comfortable with principles and understanding of QI. The most highly valued aspect of the program was the utilization of a resident education committee. The majority of alumni responders felt the residency quality curriculum improved understanding of QI, assisted with preparation for the American Board of Radiology examination, and prepared them for QI in their careers. In addition to the survey results, outcomes of resident project completion and resident scholarly activity in QI are evidence of the success of this program. It is hoped that this description of our experiences with a radiology resident QI program, in accordance with the ACGME milestones, may facilitate the development of successful QI programs in other diagnostic radiology residencies. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Canadian general surgery resident: defining current challenges for surgical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Corey; Labossière, Joseph; Rommens, Kenton; Birch, Daniel W

    2012-08-01

    Surgery training programs in Canada and the United States have recognized the need to modify current models of training and education. The shifting demographic of surgery trainees, lifestyle issues and an increased trend toward subspecialization are the major influences. To guide these important educational initiatives, a contemporary profile of Canadian general surgery residents and their impressions of training in Canada is required. We developed and distributed a questionnaire to residents in each Canadian general surgery training program, and residents responded during dedicated teaching time. In all, 186 surveys were returned for analysis (62% response rate). The average age of Canadian general surgery residents is 30 years, 38% are women, 41% are married, 18% have dependants younger than 18 years and 41% plan to add to or start a family during residency. Most (87%) residents plan to pursue postgraduate education. On completion of training, 74% of residents plan to stay in Canada and 49% want to practice in an academic setting. Almost half (42%) of residents identify a poor balance between work and personal life during residency. Forty-seven percent of respondents have appropriate access to mentorship, whereas 37% describe suitable access to career guidance and 40% identify the availability of appropriate social supports. Just over half (54%) believe the stress level during residency is manageable. This survey provides a profile of contemporary Canadian general surgery residents. Important challenges within the residency system are identified. Program directors and chairs of surgery are encouraged to recognize these challenges and intervene where appropriate.

  19. 41 CFR 301-10.306 - What will I be reimbursed if authorized to use a POV instead of a taxi between my residence and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reimbursed if authorized to use a POV instead of a taxi between my residence and office to a common carrier terminal, or from my residence directly to a common carrier terminal on travel requiring an overnight stay... taxi between my residence and office to a common carrier terminal, or from my residence directly to a...

  20. A Faculty Development Session or Resident as Teacher Session for Didactic and Clinical Teaching Techniques; Part 1 of 2: Engaging Learners with Effective Didactic Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Boysen-Osborn, Megan; Toohey, Shannon; Gisondi, Michael; Wolff, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Audience: This workshop is intended for faculty members in an emergency medicine (or other) residency program, but is also appropriate for chief residents and medical student educators, including basic science faculty. Introduction: Faculty development sessions are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and enhance the learning environment within residency programs. Resident as teacher sessions are importa...

  1. The fishing industry - toward supply chain modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Toke Koldborg; Nielsen, Jette; Larsen, Erling P.

    requirements onto the chains. In this paper, we consider the supply chain structure of the Danish fishing industry and illustrate the potential of using mathematical models to identify quality and value-adding activities. This is a first step toward innovative supply chain modelling aimed to identify benefits......Mathematical models for simulating and optimizing supply chain aspects such as distribution planning and optimal use of raw materials are widely used. However, modelling based on a holistic chain view is less studied, and food-related aspects such as quality and shelf life issues enforce additional...... for actors along chains in the fishing industry....

  2. Resident participation in neighbourhood audit tools — a scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofland, Aafke C L; Devilee, Jeroen; van Kempen, Elise; den Broeder, Lea

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthy urban environments require careful planning and a testing of environmental quality that goes beyond statutory requirements. Moreover, it requires the inclusion of resident views, perceptions and experiences that help deepen the understanding of local (public health) problems. To facilitate this, neighbourhoods should be mapped in a way that is relevant to them. One way to do this is participative neighbourhood auditing. This paper provides an insight into availability and characteristics of participatory neighbourhood audit instruments. Methods A scoping review in scientific and grey literature, consisting of the following steps: literature search, identification and selection of relevant audit instruments, data extraction and data charting (including a work meeting to discuss outputs), reporting. Results In total, 13 participatory instruments were identified. The role of residents in most instruments was as ‘data collectors’; only few instruments included residents in other audit activities like problem definition or analysis of data. The instruments identified focus mainly on physical, not social, neighbourhood characteristics. Paper forms containing closed-ended questions or scales were the most often applied registration method. Conclusions The results show that neighbourhood auditing could be improved by including social aspects in the audit tools. They also show that the role of residents in neighbourhood auditing is limited; however, little is known about how their engagement takes place in practice. Developers of new instruments need to balance not only social and physical aspects, but also resident engagement and scientific robustness. Technologies like mobile applications pose new opportunities for participative approaches in neighbourhood auditing. PMID:29346663

  3. Behavioral Response of Reef Fish and Green Sea Turtles to Midfrequency Sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watwood, Stephanie L; Iafrate, Joseph D; Reyier, Eric A; Redfoot, William E

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern over the potential effects of high-intensity sonar on wild fish populations and commercial fisheries. Acoustic telemetry was employed to measure the movements of free-ranging reef fish and sea turtles in Port Canaveral, FL, in response to routine submarine sonar testing. Twenty-five sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus), 28 gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus), and 29 green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) were tagged, with movements monitored for a period of up to 4 months using an array of passive acoustic receivers. Baseline residency was examined for fish and sea turtles before, during, and after the test event. No mortality of tagged fish or sea turtles was evident from the sonar test event. There was a significant increase in the daily residency index for both sheepshead and gray snapper at the testing wharf subsequent to the event. No broad-scale movement from the study site was observed during or immediately after the test.

  4. 8 CFR 216.2 - Notification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirement that the alien apply for removal of the conditions within the ninety days immediately preceding... petitioning spouse, or alien entrepreneur of the requirement to file a petition to remove conditions within... status of conditional permanent resident. At the time an alien acquires conditional permanent residence...

  5. Fishing down the largest coral reef fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Douglas

    2014-07-15

    Studies on remote, uninhabited, near-pristine reefs have revealed surprisingly large populations of large reef fish. Locations such as the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, northern Marianas Islands, Line Islands, U.S. remote Pacific Islands, Cocos-Keeling Atoll and Chagos archipelago have much higher reef fish biomass than islands and reefs near people. Much of the high biomass of most remote reef fish communities lies in the largest species, such as sharks, bumphead parrots, giant trevally, and humphead wrasse. Some, such as sharks and giant trevally, are apex predators, but others such as bumphead parrots and humphead wrasse, are not. At many locations, decreases in large reef fish species have been attributed to fishing. Fishing is well known to remove the largest fish first, and a quantitative measure of vulnerability to fishing indicates that large reef fish species are much more vulnerable to fishing than small fish. The removal of large reef fish by fishing parallels the extinction of terrestrial megafauna by early humans. However large reef fish have great value for various ecological roles and for reef tourism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Objective Assessment of General Surgery Residents Followed by Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas, Becca L; Buckarma, EeeLN H; Mohan, Monali; Pandian, T K; Farley, David R

    Surgical training programs often lack objective assessment strategies. Complicated scheduling characteristics frequently make it difficult for surgical residents to undergo formal assessment; actually having the time and opportunity to remediate poor performance is an even greater problem. We developed a novel methodology of assessment for residents and created an efficient remediation system using a combination of simulation, online learning, and self-assessment options. Postgraduate year (PGY) 2 to 5 general surgery (GS) residents were tested in a 5 station, objective structured clinical examination style event called the Surgical X-Games. Stations were 15 minutes in length and tested both surgical knowledge and technical skills. Stations were scored on a scale of 1 to 5 (1 = Fail, 2 = Mediocre, 3 = Pass, 4 = Good, and 5 = Stellar). Station scores ≤ 2 were considered subpar and required remediation to a score ≥ 4. Five remediation sessions allowed residents the opportunity to practice the stations with staff surgeons. Videos of each skill or test of knowledge with clear instructions on how to perform at a stellar level were offered. Trainees also had the opportunity to checkout take-home task trainers to practice specific skills. Residents requiring remediation were then tested again in-person or sent in self-made videos of their performance. Academic medical center. PGY2, 3, 4, and 5 GS residents at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. A total of, 35 residents participated in the Surgical X-Games in the spring of 2015. Among all, 31 (89%) had scores that were deemed subpar on at least 1 station. Overall, 18 (58%) residents attempted remediation. All 18 (100%) achieved a score ≥ 4 on the respective stations during a makeup attempt. Overall X-Games scores and those of PGY2s, 3s, and 4s were higher after remediation (p < 0.05). No PGY5s attempted remediation. Despite difficulties with training logistics and busy resident schedules, it is feasible to objectively

  7. Risk-benefit evaluation of fish from Chinese markets: Nutrients and contaminants in 24 fish species from five big cities and related assessment for human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Zhen-Yu, E-mail: zdu@nifes.no [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Zhang, Jian [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, 100050 (China); Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Wang, Chunrong; Li, Lixiang; Man, Qingqing [Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, 100050 (China); Lundebye, Anne-Katrine; Froyland, Livar [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), N-5817 Bergen (Norway)

    2012-02-01

    The risks and benefits of fish from markets in Chinese cities have not previously been fully evaluated. In the present study, 24 common fish species with more than 400 individual samples were collected from markets from five big Chinese cities in 2007. The main nutrients and contaminants were measured and the risk-benefit was evaluated based on recommended nutrient intakes and risk level criteria set by relevant authorities. The comprehensive effects of nutrients and contaminants in marine oily fish were also evaluated using the data of two related human dietary intervention trials performed in dyslipidemic Chinese men and women in 2008 and 2010, respectively. The results showed that concentrations of contaminants analyzed including DDT, PCB{sub 7}, arsenic and cadmium were much lower than their corresponding maximum limits with the exception of the mercury concentration in common carp. Concentrations of POPs and n-3 LCPUFA, mainly EPA and DHA, were positively associated with the lipid content of the fish. With a daily intake of 80-100 g marine oily fish, the persistent organic pollutants in fish would not counteract the beneficial effects of n-3 LCPUFA in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk markers. Marine oily fish provided more effective protection against CVD than lean fish, particularly for the dyslipidemic populations. The risk-benefit assessment based on the present daily aquatic product intake in Chinese urban residents (44.9 and 62.3 g for the average values for all cities and big cities, respectively) indicated that fish, particularly marine oily fish, can be regularly consumed to achieve optimal nutritional benefits from n-3 LCPUFA, without causing significant contaminant-related health risks. However, the potential health threat from contaminants in fish should still be emphasized for the populations consuming large quantities of fish, particularly wild fish. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We collected 24 fish species with more than

  8. Risk–benefit evaluation of fish from Chinese markets: Nutrients and contaminants in 24 fish species from five big cities and related assessment for human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Chunrong; Li, Lixiang; Man, Qingqing; Lundebye, Anne-Katrine; Frøyland, Livar

    2012-01-01

    The risks and benefits of fish from markets in Chinese cities have not previously been fully evaluated. In the present study, 24 common fish species with more than 400 individual samples were collected from markets from five big Chinese cities in 2007. The main nutrients and contaminants were measured and the risk–benefit was evaluated based on recommended nutrient intakes and risk level criteria set by relevant authorities. The comprehensive effects of nutrients and contaminants in marine oily fish were also evaluated using the data of two related human dietary intervention trials performed in dyslipidemic Chinese men and women in 2008 and 2010, respectively. The results showed that concentrations of contaminants analyzed including DDT, PCB 7 , arsenic and cadmium were much lower than their corresponding maximum limits with the exception of the mercury concentration in common carp. Concentrations of POPs and n-3 LCPUFA, mainly EPA and DHA, were positively associated with the lipid content of the fish. With a daily intake of 80–100 g marine oily fish, the persistent organic pollutants in fish would not counteract the beneficial effects of n-3 LCPUFA in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk markers. Marine oily fish provided more effective protection against CVD than lean fish, particularly for the dyslipidemic populations. The risk–benefit assessment based on the present daily aquatic product intake in Chinese urban residents (44.9 and 62.3 g for the average values for all cities and big cities, respectively) indicated that fish, particularly marine oily fish, can be regularly consumed to achieve optimal nutritional benefits from n-3 LCPUFA, without causing significant contaminant-related health risks. However, the potential health threat from contaminants in fish should still be emphasized for the populations consuming large quantities of fish, particularly wild fish. - Highlights: ► We collected 24 fish species with more than 400 individual samples

  9. E-conferencing for delivery of residency didactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Tsveti; Roth, Linda M

    2002-07-01

    ease of use, cost-efficiency, and wide availability of equipment. Residents had the advantage of both geographic and temporal independence. Our e-conferences were interactive, and in addition to a PowerPoint presentation, faculty provided Web sites and hyperlinks for references. Initial problems included slow-speed connection, the requirement for digital materials, and the need for residents and faculty to adjust to a new learning method. There was also a need for increased coordination at the sites and reliance on electronic communication. To assess the effectiveness of the program, residents completed knowledge pre- and post-tests and a conference evaluation form. We also monitored conference attendance rates. Preliminary results indicated positive resident attitudes toward distance learning and significant increases in conference attendance. To objectively evaluate this instructional delivery method, we will compare residents' knowledge gains in the face-to-face instructor group with those of the group to which the lecture is broadcast. Ultimately, we are hoping to offer this educational opportunity to other family practice residency programs in the area, to medical students interested in family medicine, and to community family physicians for continuing medical education. We are considering the addition of streaming video to the presentations in the future, once the bandwidth of the Internet connections is sufficient.

  10. Epigenomics in marine fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, David C H; Schulte, Patricia M

    2016-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are an underappreciated and often ignored component of an organism's response to environmental change and may underlie many types of phenotypic plasticity. Recent technological advances in methods for detecting epigenetic marks at a whole-genome scale have launched new opportunities for studying epigenomics in ecologically relevant non-model systems. The study of ecological epigenomics holds great promise to better understand the linkages between genotype, phenotype, and the environment and to explore mechanisms of phenotypic plasticity. The many attributes of marine fish species, including their high diversity, variable life histories, high fecundity, impressive plasticity, and economic value provide unique opportunities for studying epigenetic mechanisms in an environmental context. To provide a primer on epigenomic research for fish biologists, we start by describing fundamental aspects of epigenetics, focusing on the most widely studied and most well understood of the epigenetic marks: DNA methylation. We then describe the techniques that have been used to investigate DNA methylation in marine fishes to date and highlight some new techniques that hold great promise for future studies. Epigenomic research in marine fishes is in its early stages, so we first briefly discuss what has been learned about the establishment, maintenance, and function of DNA methylation in fishes from studies in zebrafish and then summarize the studies demonstrating the pervasive effects of the environment on the epigenomes of marine fishes. We conclude by highlighting the potential for ongoing research on the epigenomics of marine fishes to reveal critical aspects of the interaction between organisms and their environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Guidelines for use of fishes in research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of Fishes in Research Committee (joint committee of the American Fisheries Society, the American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists

    2014-01-01

    The 2004 and 2014 Guidelines were developed to provide a structure that advances appropriate attention toward valid experimental designs and procedures with aquatic animals while ensuring humane treatment of the experimental subjects. At a practical level, the Guidelines are intended to provide general recommendations on field and laboratory endeavors, such as sampling, holding, and handling fishes; to offer information on administrative matters, including regulations and permits; and to address typical ethical concerns, such as perceptions of pain or discomfort experienced by experimental subjects. These Guidelines must be recognized as guidelines. They are not intended to provide detailed instructions but rather to alert investigators to a broad array of topics and concerns to consider prior to initiating study. At a comprehensive level, the principles upon which these Guidelines are based are broadly applicable, and many of the described practices and approaches can be adapted to situations involving other aquatic animal species and conditions. Understanding the differences between fishes and other vertebrates, especially mammals, is critically important to conducting scientifically sound research with fishes. Disparities in life histories and mortality rates in fishes versus other vertebrates are critical in designing sustainable sampling levels in fish populations. The UFR Committee points out that (1) compared to mammalian populations, adult populations of many fish species persist despite very high natural mortality rates in juvenile stages by virtue of the fact that most species lay thousands or tens of thousands of eggs; (2) because of these mortality patterns, research on fishes, especially field research or research on early life stages, can involve, and often requires, much larger numbers of research subjects than does research on mammals; and (3) the animal handling and husbandry requirements for fishes are fundamentally different from those for

  12. Can Fish Catch On in Your Class?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzow, John W.; Kane, Philip N.

    1983-01-01

    Presented are several classroom activities using fish. These include gyotaku (Japanese fish printing), use of a dichotomous key to classify fish, "invent-a-fish" activities, and others. Includes discussion of fish facts and copies of fish key and invent-a-fish cards. (JN)

  13. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement.

  14. Cowlitz Falls fish passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system

  15. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen K. Purcell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  16. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals. PMID:22355456

  17. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K; Laing, Kerry J; Winton, James R

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  18. Freshwater and fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxen, R.

    1997-01-01

    Severe radioactive contamination of the freshwater environment could have serious consequences for both drinking water and fish. Most of the Nordic countries have an abundance of freshwater lakes and rivers. Finland alone has about 56,000 lakes, each with a surface area of 1 hectare or more. Nearly 10% of Finland's surface is covered with lakes and rivers. In Sweden, about 9% of the surface area is freshwater, in Norway about 5%, and in Denmark only about 2%. Freshwater plays a minor role in Iceland, but even there numerous rivers discharge from the volcanic soils to the Ocean. Cs-137 and 90 Sr are likely to be the most important radionuclides with respect to long term radioactive contamination of freshwater. If radioactive deposition occurs in the absence of snow and ice radionuclides will contaminate the surface water directly and may rapidly enter the aquatic food chain. Fish which eat contaminated plankton become contaminated almost immediately. Deposition during summer increases the transfer for radionuclides to fish since fish metabolism is faster during the warm season. During the cold period, fish metabolism is slow and thus uptake and excretion of radiocaesium are also slow. (EG)

  19. 41 CFR 302-11.100 - For which residence may I receive reimbursement for under this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false For which residence may... Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES 11-ALLOWANCES FOR EXPENSES INCURRED IN CONNECTION WITH RESIDENCE TRANSACTIONS Title Requirements...

  20. Effects of trawl selectivity and genetic parameters on fish body length under long-term trawling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Peng; Cui, He; Sheng, Huaxiang; Zhao, Fenfang; Tang, Yanli; Chen, Zelin

    2015-10-01

    Long-term fishing pressure affects the biological characteristics of exploited fish stocks. The biological characteristics of hairtail ( Trichiurus lepturus) in the East China Sea are unable to recover because of long-term trawling. Fishing induces evolutionary effects on the fish's biological characteristics. Evidence of these changes includes small size at age, a shift to earlier age structure, and early maturation. Natural and artificial selection usually affect the fish's life history. Selection can induce different chances of reproduction, and individual fish can give a different genetic contribution to the next generation. In this study, analysis of time-dependent probability of significance and test of sensitivity were used to explore the effects of fish exploitation rate, mesh size, and heritability with long-term trawling. Results showed that fishing parameters were important drivers to exploited fish population. However, genetic traits altered by fishing were slow, and the changes in biological characteristics were weaker than those caused by fishing selection. Exploitation rate and mesh size exhibited similar evolutionary trend tendency under long-term fishing. The time-dependent probability of significance trend showed a gradual growth and tended to be stable. Therefore, the direction of fishing-induced evolution and successful management of fish species require considerable attention to contribute to sustainable fisheries in China.

  1. Hair mercury levels and food consumption in residents from the Pearl River Delta: South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dingding; Kang, Yuan; Cheng, Zhang; Wang, Hongsheng; Huang, Minjuan; Wu, Shengchun; Chen, Kunci; Wong, Ming H

    2013-01-15

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) is located in the Southern part of China and is the main region for fish culture in Guangdong Province. In order to assess the potential health risks associated with dietary consumption of mercury, hair samples from 91 urban, town and fishing village residents, 37 species of fish, cereal, vegetables, and meat samples were collected. The average total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in hair were 1.08 ± 0.94 and 0.58 ± 0.59 μg/g, respectively. Daily Hg intake via fish consumption is significantly correlated with THg and MeHg accumulated in human hair (r=0.48, pfood types showed that both fish and cereal consumption were the two main routes of Hg exposure for residents in the sampling areas. Besides food intake, smoking was also an important source for daily THg intake in the smoke group, contributing 11-18% to EDI of THg. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Student Expenses in Residency Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Nilsen, Kari; Callaway, Paul; Grothusen, Jill; Gillenwater, Cole; King, Samantha; Unruh, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    The student costs of residency interviewing are of increasing concern but limited current information is available. Updated, more detailed information would assist students and residency programs in decisions about residency selection. The study objective was to measure the expenses and time spent in residency interviewing by the 2016 graduating class of the University of Kansas School of Medicine and assess the impact of gender, regional campus location, and primary care application. All 195 students who participated in the 2016 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) received a 33 item questionnaire addressing interviewing activity, expenses incurred, time invested and related factors. Main measures were self-reported estimates of expenses and time spent interviewing. Descriptive analyses were applied to participant characteristics and responses. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and chi-square tests compared students by gender, campus (main/regional), and primary care/other specialties. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) on the dependent variables provided follow-up tests on significant MANOVA results. A total of 163 students (84%) completed the survey. The average student reported 38 (1-124) applications, 16 (1-54) invitations, 11 (1-28) completed interviews, and spent $3,500 ($20-$12,000) and 26 (1-90) days interviewing. No significant differences were found by gender. After MANOVA and ANOVA analyses, non-primary care applicants reported significantly more applications, interviews, and expenditures, but less program financial support. Regional campus students reported significantly fewer invitations, interviews, and days interviewing, but equivalent costs when controlled for primary care application. Cost was a limiting factor in accepting interviews for 63% and time for 53% of study respondents. Students reported investing significant time and money in interviewing. After controlling for other variables, primary care was associated with significantly

  3. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1990 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, James W.

    1990-08-15

    Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Contract AI79-87BP35585 was implemented on July 20, 1987. This report briefly describes third-year work being done to meet contract requirements for fish disease surveillance at Service facilities in the Columbia River basin and for histopathological support services provided to participating state agencies. It also summarizes the health status of fish reared at participating Service hatcheries and provides a summary of case history data for calendar year 1989. Items of note included severe disease losses to infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in summer steelhead trout in Idaho, the detection of IHN virus in juvenile spring chinook salmon at hatcheries on the lower Columbia River, and improved bacterial kidney disease (BKD) detection and adult assay by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technology at the Dworshak Fish Health Center. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to 13 Columbia River Basin National Fish Hatcheries. Case history data was fully documented in a computerized data base for storage and analysis and is summarized herein. 2 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  5. [French residents' training in instrumental deliveries: A national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, C; Raimond, E; Dupont, A; Pelissier, A; Bonneau, S; Gabriel, R; Graesslin, O

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate French residents in Obstetrics and Gynaecology's training in instrumental deliveries in 2015. We conducted a national descriptive survey among 758 residents between December 2014 and January 2015. Respondents were invited by email to specify their University Hospital, their current university term, the number of instrumental deliveries performed by vacuum extractor, forceps or spatulas, and whether they made systematic ultrasound exams before performing the extraction. Response rate was 34.7 % (n=263). There were important differences between regions in terms of type of instruments used. Vacuum extractor was the most commonly used instrument for instrumental deliveries by French residents (56.9 %), more than forceps (25.2 %) and spatulas (17.9 %). At the end of the residency, all the residents had been trained in instrumental deliveries with at least two instruments. The training of difficult techniques as well as their perfect control is required for instrumental deliveries. Yet, we are forced to note that there are substantial differences in the French residents' training in instrumental deliveries depending on their region. So, teaching at least two techniques seems essential as well as improving the training capacities and standardizing practices. A greater systematization of the teaching of the mechanics and obstetric techniques might be a solution to be considered too. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Cooperative learning as applied to resident instruction in radiology reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Donald; Georges, Alexandra; Vaslow, Dale

    2007-12-01

    The study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of an active form of resident instruction, cooperative learning, and the residents' response to that form of instruction. The residents dictated three sets of reports both before and after instruction in radiology reporting using the cooperative learning method. The reports were evaluated for word count, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, advancement on clinical spectrum, clarity, and comparison to prior reports. The reports were evaluated for changes in performance characteristics between the pre- and postinstruction dictations. The residents' response to this form of instruction was evaluated by means of a questionnaire. The instruction was effective in changing the resident dictations. The results became shorter (Pcooperative learning activities. The least positive responses related to the amount of time devoted to the project. Sixty-three percent of respondents stated that the time devoted to the project was appropriate. Cooperative learning can be an effective tool in the setting of the radiology residency. Instructional time requirements must be strongly considered in designing a cooperative learning program.

  7. Trends in violence education in family medicine residency curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronholm, Peter F; Singh, Vijay; Fogarty, Colleen T; Ambuel, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Violence is a significant public health issue with far-reaching implications for the health of individuals and their communities. Our objective was to describe trends in violence-related training in family medicine residency programs since the last national survey was conducted in 1997. Surveys were sent to 337 US family medicine residency programs with the program director having active Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) membership. Measures included residency setting and characteristics, violence-related curricular content, teaching techniques and personnel, timing of content, and impact of changes in Residency Review Committee (RRC) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses comparing measures across time were used. A total of 201 (60%) surveys were completed. The most common violence curricula was child (83%) and elder abuse (76%), and the most common teachers of violence-related content were family physicians, psychologists, and social workers. The most common teaching methods were clinical precepting (94%), lectures (90%), case vignettes (71%), and intimate partner violence (IPV) shelter experiences (67%). ACGME and RRC changes were not reflected in self-reported measures of curricular emphasis or time. Violence curricular content and number of hours has been constant in family medicine residencies over time. An increase in the reported use of active learning strategies was identified as a trend across surveys. Next steps for violence curricula involve assessment of residents' competency to identify and intervene in violence.

  8. The impact of a novel resident leadership training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Samir S; Hayley, Barbara; Fagan, Shawn P; Berger, David H; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2004-11-01

    Today's complex health care environment coupled with the 80-hour workweek mandate has required that surgical resident team interactions evolve from a military command-and-control style to a collaborative leadership style. A novel educational curriculum was implemented with objectives of training the residents to have the capacity/ability to create and manage powerful teams through alignment, communication, and integrity integral tools to practicing a collaborative leadership style while working 80 hours per week. Specific strategies were as follows: (1) to focus on quality of patient care and service while receiving a high education-to-service ratio, and (2) to maximize efficiency through time management. This article shows that leadership training as part of a resident curriculum can significantly increase a resident's view of leadership in the areas of alignment, communication, and integrity; tools previously shown in business models to be vital for effective and efficient teams. This curriculum, over the course of the surgical residency, can provide residents with the necessary tools to deliver efficient quality of care while working within the 80-hour workweek mandate in a more collaborative style environment.

  9. Patterns in reef fish assemblages: Insights from the Chagos Archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilys, Melita; Roche, Ronan; Koldewey, Heather; Turner, John

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of variability in the composition of fish assemblages across the Indo-Pacific region is crucial to support coral reef ecosystem resilience. Whilst numerous relationships and feedback mechanisms between the functional roles of coral reef fishes and reef benthic composition have been investigated, certain key groups, such as the herbivores, are widely suggested to maintain reefs in a coral-dominated state. Examining links between fishes and reef benthos is complicated by the interactions between natural processes, disturbance events and anthropogenic impacts, particularly fishing pressure. This study examined fish assemblages and associated benthic variables across five atolls within the Chagos Archipelago, where fishing pressure is largely absent, to better understand these relationships. We found high variability in fish assemblages among atolls and sites across the archipelago, especially for key groups such as a suite of grazer-detritivore surgeonfish, and the parrotfishes which varied in density over 40-fold between sites. Differences in fish assemblages were significantly associated with variable levels of both live and recently dead coral cover and rugosity. We suggest these results reflect differing coral recovery trajectories following coral bleaching events and a strong influence of 'bottom-up' control mechanisms on fish assemblages. Species level analyses revealed that Scarus niger, Acanthurus nigrofuscus and Chlorurus strongylocephalos were key species driving differences in fish assemblage structure. Clarifying the trophic roles of herbivorous and detritivorous reef fishes will require species-level studies, which also examine feeding behaviour, to fully understand their contribution in maintaining reef resilience to climate change and fishing impacts.

  10. Ethical considerations for field research on fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhett H. Bennett

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Collection of data from animals for research purposes can negatively impact target or by-catch species if suitable animal ethics practices are not followed. This study aimed to assess the ethical requirements of peer-reviewed scientific journals that publish primary literature on fishes, and review the ethical considerations and animal care guidelines of national and international documents on the ethical treatment of animals for research, to provide an overview of the general ethical considerations for field research on fishes. A review of 250 peer-reviewed, ISI-rated journals publishing primary research on fishes revealed that nearly half (46% had no mention of ethics, treatment of animals or ethical requirements for publication in their author guidelines or publication policies. However, 18% of the journals reviewed identify a specific set of ethical guidelines to be followed before publishing research involving animals. Ethical considerations for investigators undertaking field research on fishes, common to most animal care policies, legislation and guiding documents, include adhering to relevant legislation, minimising sample sizes, reducing or mitigating pain and distress, employing the most appropriate and least invasive techniques and accurately reporting methods and findings. This information will provide potential investigators with a useful starting point for designing and conducting ethical field research. Application of ethical best practices in field sampling studies will improve the welfare of study animals and the conservation of rare and endangered species. Conservation implications: This article provides a list of ethical considerations for designing and conducting field research on fishes. By reviewing sampling techniques and processes that are frequently used in field research on fishes and by highlighting the potential negative impacts of these sampling techniques, this article is intended to assist researchers in planning

  11. Freshwater fishes of Golden Gate Highlands National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fishes in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park. A total of 1778 fish specimens from three species were collected during surveys carried out in the Little Caledon River during 2002. The chubbyhead barb Barbus anoplus was the only indigenous species recorded, and comprised 99.5 of the total catch. Two of the three recorded species were alien {Cypnnus carpio, Oncorhynchus mykiss}. A further nine indigenous species could potentially occur within the park, though are unlikely to be permanent residents. Barriers formed by instream impoundments may prevent temporary immigration of indigenous fishes, but also limit the further spread of alien species in the park's rivers.

  12. A dedicated scholarly research program in an adult and pediatric neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Haut, Sheryl R; Lipton, Richard B; Milstein, Mark J; Ocava, Lenore C; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Moshé, Solomon L; Mehler, Mark F

    2017-04-04

    To describe and assess the effectiveness of a formal scholarly activity program for a highly integrated adult and pediatric neurology residency program. Starting in 2011, all graduating residents were required to complete at least one form of scholarly activity broadly defined to include peer-reviewed publications or presentations at scientific meetings of formally mentored projects. The scholarly activity program was administered by the associate residency training director and included an expanded journal club, guided mentorship, a required grand rounds platform presentation, and annual awards for the most scholarly and seminal research findings. We compared scholarly output and mentorship for residents graduating within a 5-year period following program initiation (2011-2015) and during the preceding 5-year preprogram baseline period (2005-2009). Participation in scholarship increased from the preprogram baseline (24 of 53 graduating residents, 45.3%) to the postprogram period (47 of 57 graduating residents, 82.1%, p Neurology.

  13. Health status of UK care home residents: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Adam Lee; Franklin, Matthew; Bradshaw, Lucy; Logan, Pip; Elliott, Rachel; Gladman, John R F

    2014-01-01

    UK care home residents are often poorly served by existing healthcare arrangements. Published descriptions of residents' health status have been limited by lack of detail and use of data derived from surveys drawn from social, rather than health, care records. to describe in detail the health status and healthcare resource use of UK care home residents a 180-day longitudinal cohort study of 227 residents across 11 UK care homes, 5 nursing and 6 residential, selected to be representative for nursing/residential status and dementia registration. Barthel index (BI), Mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Neuropsychiatric index (NPI), Mini-nutritional index (MNA), EuroQoL-5D (EQ-5D), 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), diagnoses and medications were recorded at baseline and BI, NPI, GHQ-12 and EQ-5D at follow-up after 180 days. National Health Service (NHS) resource use data were collected from databases of local healthcare providers. out of a total of 323, 227 residents were recruited. The median BI was 9 (IQR: 2.5-15.5), MMSE 13 (4-22) and number of medications 8 (5.5-10.5). The mean number of diagnoses per resident was 6.2 (SD: 4). Thirty per cent were malnourished, 66% had evidence of behavioural disturbance. Residents had contact with the NHS on average once per month. residents from both residential and nursing settings are dependent, cognitively impaired, have mild frequent behavioural symptoms, multimorbidity, polypharmacy and frequently use NHS resources. Effective care for such a cohort requires broad expertise from multiple disciplines delivered in a co-ordinated and managed way.

  14. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Cross-Cultural Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elyse R; Betancourt, Joseph R; Miller, Elizabeth; Nathan, Michael; MacDonald, Ellie; Ananeh-Firempong, Owusu; Stone, Valerie E

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physicians increasingly face the challenge of managing clinical encounters with patients from a range of cultural backgrounds. Despite widespread interest in cross-cultural care, little is known about resident physicians' perceptions of what will best enable them to provide quality care to diverse patient populations. OBJECTIVES To assess medicine residents' (1) perceptions of cross-cultural care, (2) barriers to care, and (3) training experiences and recommendations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Qualitative individual interviews were conducted with 26 third-year medicine residents at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston (response rate = 87%). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. RESULTS Despite significant interest in cross-cultural care, almost all of the residents reported very little training during residency. Most had gained cross-cultural skills through informal learning. A few were skeptical about formal training, and some expressed concern that it is impossible to understand every culture. Challenges to the delivery of cross-cultural care included managing patients with limited English proficiency, who involve family in critical decision making, and who have beliefs about disease that vary from the biomedical model. Residents cited many implications to these barriers, ranging from negatively impacting the patient-physician relationship to compromised care. Training recommendations included making changes to the educational climate and informal and formal training mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS If cross-cultural education is to be successful, it must take into account residents' perspectives and be focused on overcoming residents' cited barriers. It is important to convey that cross-cultural education is a set of skills that can be taught and applied, in a time-efficient manner, rather than requiring an insurmountable knowledge base. PMID:16704391

  15. Applicability of Perinereis aibuhitensis Grube for fish waste removal from fish cages in Sanggou Bay, P. R. China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jinghui; Jiang, Zengjie; Jansen, Henrice M.; Hu, Fawen; Fang, Jianguang; Liu, Yi; Gao, Yaping; Du, Meirong

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of integrated polychaete-fish culture for fish waste removal to offset negative impact induced by organic benthic enrichment. A field study demonstrated that deposition rate was significantly higher underneath the fish farm than that in control area. The material settling under the farm was characterized by a high amount of fish feces (45%) and uneaten feed (27%). Both feeding rate (FR) and apparent digestibility rate (ADR) increased with decreasing body weight, as was indicated by significantly a higher rate observed for the groups containing smaller individuals in a lab study. The nutrient in fresh deposited material (De) was higher than that in sediments collected under the farm (Se), resulting in lower feces production but higher apparent digestibility rate for the De group as feeding rate was similar. Consequently, higher nutrient removal efficiency was observed in the De group. A mass balance approach indicated that approximately 400-500 individuals m-2 is required for removing all waste materials deposited underneath the fish farm, whereas abundance can be lower (about 300-350 individuals m-2) when only the fish waste needs to be removed. The results showed that a significant amount of waste had been accumulated in the fish cages in Sanggou Bay. The integration of fish with P. aibuhitensis seems promising for preventing organic pollution in the sediment and therefore is an effective strategy for mitigating negative effect of fish farms. Thus such integration can become a new IMTA (integrated multi-trophic aquaculture) model in Sanggou Bay.

  16. Dietary intake of PBDEs of residents at two major electronic waste recycling sites in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J.K.Y. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Man, Y.B. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Wu, S.C. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wong, M.H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-10-01

    The dietary intake of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) of local residents from 2 major electronic waste (e-waste) processing sites (Guiyu, Guangdong Province and Taizhou, Zhejiang Province) in China was investigated. Seventy-four food items were collected from these sites, divided into 9 food groups (freshwater fish, marine fish, shellfish, pork, poultry, chicken offal, egg, vegetables and cereals), and examined for residual PBDE concentrations. Out of all food items examined, the freshwater bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) contained extremely high (11,400 ± 254 ng/g wet wt.) concentrations of PBDE, the highest concentrations amongst published data concerning PBDE detected in freshwater fish. Food consumption data obtained through semi-quantitative food intake questionnaires showed that Guiyu residents had a PBDE dietary intake of 931 ± 772 ng/kg bw/day, of which BDE-47 (584 ng/kg bw/day) exceeded the US EPA's reference dose (100 ng/kg/day). Taizhou (44.7 ± 26.3 ng/kg bw/day) and Lin'an (1.94 ± 0.86 ng/kg bw/day) residents exhibited lower readings. The main dietary source of PBDEs in Guiyu and Taizhou residents was seafood (88–98%) and pork (41%) in Lin'an. The present results indicated that health risks arising from PBDE dietary exposure are of significance in terms of public health and food safety to local residents of e-waste processing sites. - Highlights: ► Food basket analysis was conducted in 2 major e-waste processing sites in China. ► Different food items were contaminated by PBDE contained in e-waste sites in China. ► Guiyu residents had an potential unsafe level of PBDE dietary exposure.

  17. Teaching residents to write a research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, S T

    1993-09-01

    Medical writing and publications are important in developing a scholarly basis for residency programs and in providing a learning experience for both resident and faculty mentors. Residency directors must provide the stimulus and support for both faculty and residents' varied creative activities. This support manifests itself in a commitment to scholarly activity (including a dedicated research person), the procurement of available research materials, the establishment of a process or plan for beginning a research project, and the development of a method for rewarding or recognizing faculty and residents who produce scholarly works. Some osteopathic residency programs may need to train faculty in research skills at the same time that residents are learning to write. Trained faculty are better models and coaches for residents engaged in research. Beginning with a fundamental, but disciplined, writing program, both faculty and residents may learn methods for sharing new knowledge or acquiring those skills necessary to critically analyze the medical literature.

  18. Fish remains and humankind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K G Jones

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The four papers in this issue represent a trawl of the reports presented to the Fourth meeting of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ Fish Remains Working Group, which met at the University of York in 1987. The conference discussed material from many parts of the world - from Australasia to the north-west coast of America - and many eras, ranging in date from the early Pleistocene to the 1980s. It demonstrated both the variety of work being carried out and the growing interest in ancient fish remains. Internet Archaeology plans to publish other batches of papers from this conference. These reports will demonstrate the effort being made to distinguish between assemblages of fish remains which have been deposited by people and those which occur in ancient deposits as a result of the action of other agents. To investigate this area, experiments with modern material and observations of naturally occurring fish bone assemblages are supplemented with detailed analysis of ancient and modern fish remains. The papers published here illustrate the breadth of research into osteology, biogeography, documentary research, and the practicalities of recovering fish remains. Read, digest and enjoy them! Using the Internet for publishing research papers is not only ecologically sound (saving paper, etc. it disseminates scholarship to anyone anywhere on the planet with access to what is gradually becoming necessary technology in the late 20th century. Hopefully, future groups of papers will include video and audio material recorded at the conference, and so enable those who could not attend to gain further insights into the meeting and the scholarship underpinning this area of research.

  19. Soluble protein isolated from low cost fish and fish wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Lekshmy Nair, A.; Gopakumar, K.

    1982-01-01

    The method of preparation, composition, amino acid content, protein efficiency ratio and areas of possible application of water soluble protein isolates from low cost fish and fish wastes are discussed in detail in this communication.

  20. Fish consumption and track to a fish feed formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai-Juan, Soong; Ramli, Razamin; Rahman, Rosshairy Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Strategically located in the equator, Malaysia is blessed with plenty of fish supply. The high demand in fish consumption has helped the development in the fishery industry and provided numerous jobs in the secondary sector, contributing significantly to the nation's income. A survey was conducted to understand the trend of current demands for fish for the purpose of designing a feed formulation, which is still limited in this area of study. Results showed that grouper fish in restaurants commanded a very high price compared to other species of fish. Tiger grouper gained the highest demand in most restaurants, while giant grouper had the highest price in restaurants. Due to the demand and challenges to culture this type of fish, a framework for fish feed formulation is proposed. The formulation framework when materialized could be an alternative to the use of trash fish as the feed for grouper.

  1. Otolaryngology Residency Program Research Resources and Scholarly Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villwock, Jennifer A; Hamill, Chelsea S; Nicholas, Brian D; Ryan, Jesse T

    2017-06-01

    Objective To delineate research resources available to otolaryngology residents and their impact on scholarly productivity. Study Design Survey of current otolaryngology program directors. Setting Otolaryngology residency programs. Subjects and Methods An anonymous web-based survey was sent to 98 allopathic otolaryngology training program directors. Fisher exact tests and nonparametric correlations were used to determine statistically significant differences among various strata of programs. Results Thirty-nine percent (n = 38) of queried programs responded. Fourteen (37%) programs had 11 to 15 full-time, academic faculty associated with the residency program. Twenty (53%) programs have a dedicated research coordinator. Basic science lab space and financial resources for statistical work were present at 22 programs (58%). Funding is uniformly provided for presentation of research at conferences; a minority of programs (13%) only funded podium presentations. Twenty-four (63%) have resident research requirements beyond the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandate of preparing a "manuscript suitable for publication" prior to graduation. Twenty-five (67%) programs have residents with 2 to 3 active research projects at any given time. None of the investigated resources were significantly associated with increased scholarly output. There was no uniformity to research curricula. Conclusions Otolaryngology residency programs value research, evidenced by financial support provided and requirements beyond the ACGME minimum. Additional resources were not statistically related to an increase in resident research productivity, although they may contribute positively to the overall research experience during training. Potential future areas to examine include research curricula best practices, how to develop meaningful mentorship and resource allocation that inspires continued research interest, and intellectual stimulation.

  2. Incorporating gross anatomy education into radiation oncology residency: a 2-year curriculum with evaluation of resident satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Alvin R; Lee, W Robert; Madden, Richard; Sims, Ershela; Hoang, Jenny K; White, Leonard E; Marks, Lawrence B; Chino, Junzo P

    2011-05-01

    Radiation oncologists require a thorough understanding of anatomy, but gross anatomy is not part of the standard residency curriculum. "Oncoanatomy" is an educational program for radiation oncology residents at Duke University that integrates cadaver dissection into the instruction of oncologic anatomy, imaging, and treatment planning. In this report, the authors document their experience with a 2-year curriculum. Nineteen radiation oncology residents from Duke University and the University of North Carolina participated during academic years 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Monthly modules, based on anatomic site, consisted of one or two clinically oriented hour-long lectures, followed by a 1-hour gross anatomy session. Clinical lectures were case based and focused on radiographic anatomy, image segmentation, and field design. Gross anatomy sessions centered on cadaver prosections, with small groups rotating through stations at which anatomists led cadaver exploration. Adjacent monitors featured radiologic imaging to facilitate synthesis of gross anatomy with imaging anatomy. Satisfaction was assessed on a 10-point scale via anonymous survey. Twenty modules were held over the 2-year period. Participants gave the course a median rating of 8 (interquartile range, 7-9), with 1 signifying "as effective as the worst educational activities" and 10 "as effective as the best educational activities." High resident satisfaction was seen with all module components. Incorporating a structured, 2-year gross anatomy-based curriculum into radiation oncology residency is feasible and associated with high resident satisfaction. Copyright © 2011 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency Program: Relationship between Lifestyle Behaviors and Burnout and Wellbeing Measures in First-Year Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClafferty, Hilary; Brooks, Audrey J; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Brenner, Michelle; Brown, Melanie; Esparham, Anna; Gerstbacher, Dana; Golianu, Brenda; Mark, John; Weydert, Joy; Yeh, Ann Ming; Maizes, Victoria

    2018-04-23

    It is widely recognized that burnout is prevalent in medical culture and begins early in training. Studies show pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout rates comparable to other specialties. Newly developed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in professionalism and personal development recognize the unacceptably high resident burnout rates and present an important opportunity for programs to improve residents experience throughout training. These competencies encourage healthy lifestyle practices and cultivation of self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, mindfulness, and compassion—a paradigm shift from traditional medical training underpinned by a culture of unrealistic endurance and self-sacrifice. To date, few successful and sustainable programs in resident burnout prevention and wellness promotion have been described. The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR) curriculum, developed in 2011, was designed in part to help pediatric programs meet new resident wellbeing requirements. The purpose of this paper is to detail levels of lifestyle behaviors, burnout, and wellbeing for the PIMR program’s first-year residents ( N = 203), and to examine the impact of lifestyle behaviors on burnout and wellbeing. The potential of the PIMR to provide interventions addressing gaps in lifestyle behaviors with recognized association to burnout is discussed.

  4. Fish in Ecotoxicological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesela Yancheva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination (heavy metals, pesticides, POPs, etc. is a serious environmental issue which has been raising lots of attention in the last decades because it can destroy aquatic ecosystems and hence, reduce biodiversity. In the field of ecotoxicology it is of main interest to investigate what the effects of organic and inorganic toxicants on different biological organization (cell, tissue, organism, population are. Thus, many authors use different test organisms and particularly, fish. In the current study we aimed to present collected data from the last years which describe why fish is an appropriate species in terms of ecotoxicological research.

  5. Access and Fishing Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, I look at the implications of transferable quotas on the organization of production; that is, how fishing activities are structured around access to the individual and transferable quotas and how, in turn, the quotas structure the production. Therefore, this chapter will give...... a detailed ethnographic description of five different fishing operations and then compare them on a number of different fronts. This will direct us to some general differences in their modes of operation in relation to the vessel quota share (VQS) system and lead us to the next chapter, where the principal...

  6. Addressing the mandate for hand-off education: a focused review and recommendations for anesthesia resident curriculum development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane-Fall, Meghan B; Brooks, Amber K; Wilkins, Sara A; Davis, Joshua J; Riesenberg, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that residency programs teach residents about handoffs and ensure their competence in this communication skill. Development of hand-off curricula for anesthesia residency programs is hindered by the paucity of evidence regarding how to conduct, teach, and evaluate handoffs in the various settings where anesthesia practitioners work. This narrative review draws from literature in anesthesia and other disciplines to provide recommendations for anesthesia resident hand-off curriculum development and evaluation.

  7. Progress and challenges of fish sperm vitrification: A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Miaomiao; Siddique, Mohammad Abdul Momin; Dzyuba, Borys; Cuevas-Uribe, Rafael; Shaliutina-Kolešová, Anna; Linhart, Otomar

    2017-08-01

    To survive low temperature is required for a long-term storage (cryopreservation), cells should be vitrified to a state in which intracellular water is solidified without ice crystal formation. Two different approaches are described for fish sperm cryopreservation: 1) sperm conventional cryopreservation, in which extracellular water is partially crystallized and 2) sperm vitrification, in which both intra- and extra-cellular liquids are vitrified. Sperm vitrification has been applied to some fish species with limited success. Traditional vitrification requires rapid cooling/warming rates, small sample carriers, and using high permeable cryoprotectant concentrations. The latter cause cytotoxic effects which must be well managed and will require continuous effort to match an appropriate cryoprotectant with suitable apparatus and warming methods. Novel cryoprotectant-free sperm vitrification approach has been applied to several fishes. This review summarizes development of basic procedures and discusses advantages and disadvantages of vitrification when applied it to fish sperm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary selenium and copper intake by resident undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary selenium and copper intake by resident undergraduate students of the University of Ghana. ... Conclusion: Due to the importance of these micronutrients and in the face of poor nutritional status, as judged by the few that met the required RDAs as well as excess, there is a need to carry out blood analyses to ...

  9. Injection safety practices among resident doctors in a tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The prevalence of needle stick injury was high, awareness of reporting was high but the level of reporting was low. Behavior change communication models are required to bring about a positive change in the practice of reporting. Key words: Injection safety, resident doctors, University of Benin Teaching ...

  10. Psychiatry Residency Education in Canada: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperson, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article provides a brief overview of the history of psychiatry residency training in Canada,and outlines the rationale for the current training requirements, changes to the final certification examination,and factors influencing future trends in psychiatry education and training. Method: The author compiled findings and reports on…

  11. Anesthesiology residents' perspective about good teaching--a qualitative needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortwein, Heiderose; Blaum, Wolf E; Spies, Claudia D

    2014-01-01

    Germany, like many other countries, will soon have a shortage of qualified doctors. One reason for the dissatisfaction amongst medical residents are the relatively unstructured residency training programs despite increasing importance of outcome-based education. The aim of our study was to identify characteristics and requirements for good teaching during anesthesiology residency training from the resident's point of view. A consensus workshop with residents from all medical universities in Germany was held. Participants were allocated to one of the three topics, chosen based on a 2009 nationwide evaluation of residency. The three topics were (A) characteristics of helpful/good teachers, (B) characteristics of helpful/good conditions and (C) characteristics of helpful/good curricular structure. Each group followed a nominal group technique consensus process to define and rank characteristics for a good residency. 31 (79.5%) resident representatives were present. The consented results put emphasis on the importance of structured curricula including transparent goals and objectives, in training formative assessments and quality assurance measures for the program. Residents further long for trained trainers with formal teaching qualifications and protected teaching time. Good residency training requires careful consideration of all stakeholders' needs. Results reflect and extend previous findings and are at least to some degree easily implemented. These findings are an important step to establish a broader consensus within the discipline.

  12. Resident-Perceived Benefit of a Diagnostic and Interventional Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Jennifer; Siddiqui, Imran; Jain, Nitin B.; Kohler, Minna J.; Donovan, Jayne; Gerrard, Paul; Borg-Stein, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) training is now a required component of physiatry residency, but formal curriculum guidelines are not yet required or established. The authors’ objective was to assess the educational value of a collaborative residency MSUS training program. The authors designed a structured MSUS training curriculum for residents based on the authors’ experience and previous literature. Twenty-five residents participated in this MSUS curriculum designed by faculty and chief residents. Resident volunteers were trained by the faculty as “table trainers” who taught their peers in small groups. Handson MSUS training sessions were led by a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation faculty MSUS expert. A Likert scale–formatted questionnaire assessed resident-perceived value of the curriculum. Response rate was 96% (22 of 23). Self-reported MSUS knowledge comparing precurriculum and postcurriculum implementation resulted in significant improvement (P = 0.001). Peer teaching was highly valued, with 86% of residents rating it “very” or “extremely” beneficial (mean [SD] score, 3.9 [1.1]). Self-guided learning, by supplemental scanning and reading, was rated “beneficial” or “very beneficial” by 73% of residents (3.0 [0.7]). The authors’ successful pilot program may serve as a teaching model for other residency programs. PMID:26098924

  13. Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity: a resident education tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croley JA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Croley,1 C Helen Malone,1 Brandon P Goodwin,1 Linda G Phillips,2 Eric L Cole,2 Richard F Wagner1 1Department of Dermatology, 2Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA Background: Surgical reconstructive planning following Mohs surgery can be a difficult subject for dermatology residents to master. Prior research demonstrates that active learning is preferred and more effective compared to passive learning models and that dermatology residents desire greater complexity and volume in surgical training. We present a novel, active, problem-based learning tool for the education of Mohs reconstruction with the goal of improving residents’ ability to plan surgical reconstructions.Materials and methods: The Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity is an active, problem-based learning activity in which residents designed repairs for planned Mohs defects prior to surgery on an iPad application or on a printed photograph. The attending Mohs surgeon reviewed the reconstructive designs, provided feedback, guided discussion, and facilitated insight into additional issues requiring further review. Residents performed or observed the Mohs and reconstructive surgical procedures for respective repairs. Surveys were administered to participants before and after participating in the Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity to assess the educational value of the activity. Survey responses were recorded on a 5-point Likert scale.Results: Mean participant-reported confidence in flap and graft knowledge, flap and graft planning, and flap and graft performance increased 1.50–2.50 Likert scale points upon completion of the Mohs surgery rotation by residents participating in the educational activity. The observed trend was larger in the dermatology resident subset, with increases of 2.00–3.50 Likert scale points reported for these questions. Mean participant

  14. A patient safety curriculum for medical residents based on the perspectives of residents and supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J.D.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a patient safety course for medical residents based on the views of medical residents and their supervisors. Methods: In 2007, questionnaires were distributed to investigate residents' and supervisors' perspectives on the current patient safety performance and educational

  15. Role of Pharmacy Residency Training in Career Planning: A Student's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhaney, Ashley; Weber, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacy students typically become more focused on career planning and assessment in the final year of their PharmD training. Weighing career options in the advanced pharmacy practice experience year can be both exciting and stressful. The goal of this article is to provide a primer on how pharmacy students can assess how a residency can fit into career planning. This article will describe the various career paths available to graduating students, highlight ways in which a residency can complement career choices, review the current state of the job market for pharmacists, discuss the current and future plans for residency programs, and present thoughts from some current and former residents on why they chose to complete a residency. Most career paths require some additional training, and a residency provides appropriate experience very quickly compared to on-the-job training. Alternative plans to residency training must also be considered, as there are not enough residency positions for candidates. Directors of pharmacy must consider several factors when giving career advice on pharmacy residency training to pharmacy students; they should provide the students with an honest assessment of their work skills and their abilities to successfully complete a residency. This assessment will help the students to set a plan for improvement and give them a better chance at being matched to a pharmacy residency.

  16. What factors influence attending surgeon decisions about resident autonomy in the operating room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reed G; George, Brian C; Meyerson, Shari L; Bohnen, Jordan D; Dunnington, Gary L; Schuller, Mary C; Torbeck, Laura; Mullen, John T; Auyang, Edward; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Choi, Jennifer; Choti, Michael; Endean, Eric; Foley, Eugene F; Mandell, Samuel; Meier, Andreas; Smink, Douglas S; Terhune, Kyla P; Wise, Paul; DaRosa, Debra; Soper, Nathaniel; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fryer, Jonathan P

    2017-12-01

    Educating residents in the operating room requires balancing patient safety, operating room efficiency demands, and resident learning needs. This study explores 4 factors that influence the amount of autonomy supervising surgeons afford to residents. We evaluated 7,297 operations performed by 487 general surgery residents and evaluated by 424 supervising surgeons from 14 training programs. The primary outcome measure was supervising surgeon autonomy granted to the resident during the operative procedure. Predictor variables included resident performance on that case, supervising surgeon history with granting autonomy, resident training level, and case difficulty. Resident performance was the strongest predictor of autonomy granted. Typical autonomy by supervising surgeon was the second most important predictor. Each additional factor led to a smaller but still significant improvement in ability to predict the supervising surgeon's autonomy decision. The 4 factors together accounted for 54% of decision variance (r = 0.74). Residents' operative performance in each case was the strongest predictor of how much autonomy was allowed in that case. Typical autonomy granted by the supervising surgeon, the second most important predictor, is unrelated to resident proficiency and warrants efforts to ensure that residents perform each procedure with many different supervisors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Competency-based achievement system: using formative feedback to teach and assess family medicine residents' skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Shelley; Poth, Cheryl N; Donoff, Michel; Humphries, Paul; Steiner, Ivan; Schipper, Shirley; Janke, Fred; Nichols, Darren

    2011-09-01

    Family medicine residency programs require innovative means to assess residents' competence in "soft" skills (eg, patient-centred care, communication, and professionalism) and to identify residents who are having difficulty early enough in their residency to provide remedial training. To develop a method to assess residents' competence in various skills and to identify residents who are having difficulty. The Competency-Based Achievement System (CBAS) was designed to measure competence using 3 main principles: formative feedback, guided self-assessment, and regular face-to-face meetings. The CBAS is resident driven and provides a framework for meaningful interactions between residents and advisors. Residents use the CBAS to organize and review their feedback, to guide their own assessment of their progress, and to discern their future learning needs. Advisors use the CBAS to monitor, guide, and verify residents' knowledge of and competence in important skills. By focusing on specific skills and behaviour, the CBAS enables residents and advisors to make formative assessments and to communicate their findings. Feedback indicates that the CBAS is a user-friendly and helpful system to assess competence.

  18. Continuity of Care in Resident Outpatient Clinics: A Scoping Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jeremey; Payne, Brittany; Clemans-Taylor, B Lee; Snyder, Erin Dunn

    2018-02-01

    Continuity between patients and physicians is a core principle of primary care and an accreditation requirement. Resident continuity clinics face challenges in nurturing continuity for their patients and trainees. We undertook a scoping review of the literature to better understand published benchmarks for resident continuity; the effectiveness of interventions to improve continuity; and the impact of continuity on resident and patient satisfaction, patient outcomes, and resident career choice. We developed a MEDLINE search strategy to identify articles that defined continuity in residency programs in internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics published prior to December 31, 2015, and used a quality evaluation tool to assess included studies. The review includes 34 articles describing 12 different measures of continuity. The usual provider of care and continuity for physician formulas were most commonly utilized, and mean baseline continuity was 56 and 55, respectively (out of a total possible score of 100). Clinic and residency program redesign innovations (eg, advanced access scheduling, team-based care, and block scheduling) were studied and had mixed impact on continuity. Continuity in resident clinics is lower than published continuity rates for independently practicing physicians. Interventions to enhance continuity in resident clinics have mixed effects. More research is needed to understand how changes in continuity affect resident and patient satisfaction, patient outcomes, and resident career choice. A major challenge to research in this area is the lack of empanelment of residents' patients, creating difficulties in scheduling and measuring continuity visits.

  19. TH-E-201-02: Hands-On Physics Teaching of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  20. TH-E-201-00: Teaching Radiology Residents: What, How, and Expectation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  1. TH-E-201-01: Diagnostic Radiology Residents Physics Curriculum and Updates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensakovic, W.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  2. Reef fish communities in the central Red Sea show evidence of asymmetrical fishing pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Kattan, Alexander

    2017-03-09

    In order to assess human impacts and develop rational restoration goals for corals reefs, baseline estimates of fish communities are required. In Saudi Arabian waters of the Red Sea, widespread unregulated fishing is thought to have been ongoing for decades, but there is little direct evidence of the impact on reef communities. To contextualize this human influence, reef-associated fish assemblages on offshore reefs in Saudi Arabia and Sudan in the central Red Sea were investigated. These reefs have comparable benthic environments, experience similar oceanographic influences, and are separated by less than 300 km, offering an ideal comparison for identifying potential anthropogenic impacts such as fishing pressure. This is the first study to assess reef fish biomass in both these regions, providing important baselines estimates. We found that biomass of top predators on offshore Sudanese reefs was on average almost three times that measured on comparable reefs in Saudi Arabia. Biomass values from some of the most remote reefs surveyed in Sudan’s far southern region even approach those previously reported in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, northern Line Islands, Pitcairn Islands, and other isolated Pacific islands and atolls. The findings suggest that fishing pressure has significantly altered the fish community structure of Saudi Arabian Red Sea reefs, most conspicuously in the form of top predator removal. The results point towards the urgent need for enhanced regulation and enforcement of fishing practices in Saudi Arabia, while making a strong case for protection in the form of no-take marine protected areas to maintain preservation of the relatively intact southern Sudanese Red Sea.

  3. Pre-migratory differentiation of wild brown trout into migrant and resident individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C.; Aarestrup, Kim; Norum, U.

    2003-01-01

    sites in April by electrofishing and eventually caught in downstream smolt traps ('migrants') placed in the main river or by electrofishing ('residents') on the initial sites in June. Upon each capture, smolt appearance and body size were evaluated, and a non-lethal gill biopsy was taken and used for Na...... a smolt-like appearance before the onset of migration and had higher rate of change of gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity than fish remaining residents. The rate of change of gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity was independent of the distance migrated to the trap (3-28 km). Thus in bimodal wild brown trout populations...

  4. Characterisation of the Fish Producing and Fish Processing Sectors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since a few years, there is a focus on the expansion of the fish industry in Mauritius in view of its contribution in boosting the economic situation of the country. This study was undertaken to characterise the two main sub-sectors of this industry namely the fish producing and fish processing sectors. A survey was carried out in ...

  5. Characterisation of the Fish Producing and Fish Processing Sectors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    developing countries provided about 50% of all the fish and fish products entering the global market in 2001. In fact, with an Exclusive Economic Zone of 1.9 million km2, Mauritius as a maritime nation has a reasonable stock of various fish species. (FAO, 2006). With much emphasis being placed on the development of the.

  6. Fishing activities and fish species diversity assessment in Eleiyele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out for 12 months during which the fishermen catches were monitored and fishing activities were assessed in Eleiyele Lake, Ibadan. The fish species at landing sites on the lake were identified using morphometric and meristic features. Fish species composition recorded in Eleiyele reservor in this ...

  7. Response of potential fish community indicators to fishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piet, G.J.; Jennings, S.

    2005-01-01

    Fish community metrics and diversity indices have often been proposed as indicators to support an Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management. The response of eight fish community indicators to spatio-temporal changes in fishing effort was studied by comparing the rate of change in (i) areas subject

  8. Economic differential of integrated fish, rice cum piggery and fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish, rice cum piggery and fish, rice cum poultry production integration platforms were set up to perfect the ideas of integrated fish farming in Sierra Leone. Water quality parameters measured biweekly included: dissolved oxygen, water temperature, pH, water hardness, water alkalinity, ammonia, nitrate, BOD and nitrite.

  9. Fish Commoditization: Sustainability Strategies to Protect Living Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Mimi E.; Pitcher, Tony J.

    2012-01-01

    The impacts of early fishing on aquatic ecosystems were minimal, as primitive technologies were used to harvest fish primarily for food. As fishing technology grew more sophisticated and human populations dispersed and expanded, local economies transitioned from subsistence to barter and trade. Expanded trade networks and mercantilization led to…

  10. Fish parasites, fish food, and the marine environment | Nnadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper addresses the incontrovertible fact that fish and fish products have historically been a reliable supplier of protein, in particular, and food, in general for humans. Seventy to a hundred metric tons arc caught each year since the early seventies. Fish protein represents about twenty five percent of the total animal ...

  11. The research rotation: competency-based structured and novel approach to research training of internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrov Vihren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, the Accreditation Council of graduate medical education (ACGME requires all accredited Internal medicine residency training programs to facilitate resident scholarly activities. However, clinical experience and medical education still remain the main focus of graduate medical education in many Internal Medicine (IM residency-training programs. Left to design the structure, process and outcome evaluation of the ACGME research requirement, residency-training programs are faced with numerous barriers. Many residency programs report having been cited by the ACGME residency review committee in IM for lack of scholarly activity by residents. Methods We would like to share our experience at Lincoln Hospital, an affiliate of Weill Medical College Cornell University New York, in designing and implementing a successful structured research curriculum based on ACGME competencies taught during a dedicated "research rotation". Results Since the inception of the research rotation in 2004, participation of our residents among scholarly activities has substantially increased. Our residents increasingly believe and appreciate that research is an integral component of residency training and essential for practice of medicine. Conclusion Internal medicine residents' outlook in research can be significantly improved using a research curriculum offered through a structured and dedicated research rotation. This is exemplified by the improvement noted in resident satisfaction, their participation in scholarly activities and resident research outcomes since the inception of the research rotation in our internal medicine training program.

  12. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.

    2009-09-14

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including changes in pressure as they pass through turbines and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). To examine pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists conducted specific tests using a hyperbaric chamber. Tests were designed to simulate Kaplan turbine passage conditions and to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes, with and without the complication of fish being acclimated to gas-supersaturated water.

  13. 50 CFR 14.81 - Marking requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING... requirement. Except as otherwise provided in this subpart, no person may import, export, or transport in interstate commerce any container or package containing any fish or wildlife (including shellfish and fishery...

  14. Fish reproduction: strategies and tactics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Potts, G. W; Wootton, R. J

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises a much needed review of recent developments and new ideas in fish reproductive biology, with special reference to the adaptive significance of reproductive patterns observed in teleost fishes...

  15. KLA - Live Hauling of Fish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In certain markets, live fish can be sold for substantially higher prices than fresh dressed fish. A significant live-haul industry has developed in the U.S. and...

  16. Temperature - Live Hauling of Fish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In certain markets, live fish can be sold for substantially higher prices than fresh dressed fish. A significant live-haul industry has developed in the U.S. and...

  17. LCA of Danish fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    The article presents the main results from a PhD dissertation about environmental impacts from Danish fish products.......The article presents the main results from a PhD dissertation about environmental impacts from Danish fish products....

  18. Teaching Communication Skills to Radiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N; Yacob, Sammy; Mithqal, Ayman

    The transition of health care in the United States from volume to value requires a systems-based approach aligning clinical services across the continuum of care. The ability to communicate effectively and resolve conflict is a critical skill within the systems-based model. Recognizing the essential role of communication in medicine, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education has designated interpersonal and communication skills a core competency for all residents regardless of specialty. Yet, communication skills are often developed through on-the-job training or not at all. Traditional educational curricula use a predominantly didactic approach without opportunities for trainees to observe, actively experiment, or reflect on what is learned as a part of the learning process. In this article, we describe a 1-day experiential communication skills workshop customized for radiology residents that consists of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and conflict management sessions designed to develop interpersonal, communication, and conflict management skills through group discussion, role-play, and simulation. The purpose of this educational initiative was to determine the perceived value of an experiential communication skills workshop designed for radiology trainees. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Thirteen junior (first- or second-year) resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8), were committed to the team (6.8), resolved conflict (6.7), ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7), participated actively (7.0), and managed resources (6.6). Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4) than with being chief resident (5.8). The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year) chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  20. Assessment demersal fish stocks Mauritania

    OpenAIRE

    Corten, A.A.H.M.; Goudswaard, P.C.; Heessen, H.J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The RIVO project "Assessment of demersal fish stocks in Mauritania" was commissioned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of The Netherlands to produce information on the state of the demersal fish stocks (species that live near the bottom) in Mauritania, in particular octopus and shrimps. These stocks are fished by fleets from the EU, working under the fishery agreement between the EU and Mauritania. Although there are no Dutch vessels targeting demersal fish in Mauritania, the government of T...

  1. How to Represent a Fish?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elspeth Probyn

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article canvasses a broad range of fish representations across several disciplines. It asks what cultural studies can learn from scientific representation of fish, and argues that in turn cultural studies can be a nuanced understanding of the work of images. The objective of the article is to open debate about fish and their sustainability beyond discrete disciplines and/or ideologies. This, it is argued, is crucial if we are to go beyond a simplified cultural politics of fish.

  2. Of Fish and Micrornas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    lab, we investigate miRNA regulation during viral infection and vaccination in rainbow trout. We aim to identify miRNA biomarkers during infection and vaccination in order to understand the complex web of interactions involved in the underlying host immune responses. They may also be used as suitable...... selection markers to identify disease-resistant fish....

  3. ChillFish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Tobias; Jensen, Mads Møller

    2016-01-01

    Breathing exercises can help children with ADHD control their stress level, but it can be hard for a child to sustain attention throughout such an exercise. In this paper, we present ChillFish, a breath-controlled biofeedback game designed in collaboration with ADHD professionals to investigate...

  4. fish Barbus aeneus (Burchell)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teen lengtes bo. 400 mm begin 'n tweede Ius by die punt van die prim6re. Ius vonn. Die verwante visvretende B. kimberleyensis kan by vurklengtes onder 90 mm nie ..... Gut lengths and food habits of fishes - A note. Limnological Society of Southern. Africa, Newsletter no. 20: 1-7. SKELTON, P.H. & CAMBRAY, J.A. 1981.

  5. Fish-induced keriorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ka Ho; Nichols, Peter D; But, Paul Pui-Hay

    2009-01-01

    Many deep-sea fishes store large amounts of wax esters in their body for buoyancy control. Some of them are frequently caught as by-catch of tuna and other fishes. The most noteworthy ones include escolar and oilfish. The accumulation of the indigestible wax esters in the rectum through consumption of these fish engenders discharges or leakage per rectum as orange or brownish green oil, but without noticeable loss of water. This physiological response is called keriorrhea, which is variously described as "oily diarrhea," "oily orange diarrhea," or "orange oily leakage" by the mass media and bloggers on the internet. Outbreaks of keriorrhea have been repeatedly reported across continents. Additional symptoms including nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea were complained by the victims. They are probably due to anxiety or panic when suffering from keriorrhea. Escolar and oilfish are banned from import and sale in Italy, Japan, and South Korea. Rapid detection of the two fishes is imperative to ensure proper labeling and safeguarding of the public before and after any keriorrhea outbreak.

  6. The fish egg microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Y. Liu

    Prof. dr. F. Govers (promotor); Prof. dr. J.M. Raaijmakers (promotor); Dr. I. de Bruijn (co-promotor); Wageningen University, 13 June 2016, 170 pp.

    The fish egg microbiome: diversity and activity against the oomycete pathogen

  7. De fiscale fishing expedition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelmann, E.

    2016-01-01

    In de fiscale literatuur en/of mediaberichten duikt met enige regelmaat de term ‘fishing expedition’ op. De term wordt in rechterlijke uitspraken en in beleid genoemd, in nationale en internationale context. Het valt op dat voor die term kennelijk slechts indirecte definities bestaan, althans ik heb

  8. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  9. Laboratory studies on the effects of shear on fish: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dauble, D. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moursund, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abernethy, C. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cada, G. F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The overall objective of these studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish-friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish’s tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system; in other words, determining or assuming conditions known to injure fish will assist engineers in the design of a fish-friendly turbine system. To address the development of biological specifications, this experiment designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response. The test data reported here provide quantified strain rates and the relationship of these forces to direct and indirect biological effects on fish. The study concludes that juvenile salmonids and American shad should survive shear environments where strain rates do not exceed 500 cm/s/cm at a Dy of 1.8 cm. Additional studies are planned with a sensor fish to better link hydraulic conditions found within the laboratory and field environments.

  10. White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume I..

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

    1985-06-01

    Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developed to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost ratio of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. 28 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. A single-institution experience: the integrated vascular surgery residency's effect on fellowship and general surgery resident case volume and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Megan I; Downes, Kathryne; Miladinovic, Branko; Illig, Karl A; Armstrong, Paul A; Back, Martin R; Johnson, Brad L; Shames, Murray L

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether the formation of an integrated vascular surgery residency (0 + 5) has negatively impacted the case volume and diversity of the vascular surgery fellows (5 + 2) and chief general surgeons at the same institution. Operative data from the vascular integrated (0 + 5), independent (5 + 2), and general surgery residencies at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed to determine vascular surgery case volumes from 2006-2012. National operative data (Residency Review Committee) were used for comparison of diversity and volume. Standard statistical methods were applied. During this period, the 5 + 2 fellows at our institution performed on average 741 (range, 554-1002) primary cases and 1091 (range, 844-1479) combined primary and secondary cases for the 2-year fellowship. Our integrated residency began in July 2007. Our fellows' primary case volumes remained relatively stable between 2006 and 2011, with a 4% increase in the number of cases, although their total (primary and secondary) case volumes fell 15%; by comparison, the equivalent national 50th percentile rates rose 16% during this time frame. Our institution's general surgery residents performed an average of 116 (range, 56-221) vascular cases individually during their 5-year residency from 2005-2011. From 2006-2011, the total case volume fell only 5%, while the national 50th percentile rate fell 24%. Across all years, however, resident and fellow volumes both continue to be above Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education minimum requirements, and the major vascular case volume at our institution in all groups studied remained statistically greater than or equal to the national 50th percentile of cases. Our first integrated resident to graduate finished in June 2012 with 931 total vascular cases and 249 general surgery cases for a total operative experience of 1180 cases during the 5-year residency. Finally, after an 8-year period (2003-2010) in which none of

  12. BIOTECHNOLOGY OF THE FISH AQUACULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Buchatsky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The latest progress in biotechnology on fish aquaculture and different modern methods of investigations for increasing of fish productivity in aquaculture are analyzed. Except for the applied aspect, the use of modern biotechnological methods of investigations opens new possibilities for fundamental researches of sex-determining mechanisms, polyploidy, distant hybridization, and developmental biology of bony fishes. Review contains examples of utilizing modern biotechnology methods to obtain transgenic fishes with accelerated growth and for designing surrogate fishes. Methods for receiving unisexual shoals of salmon and sturgeon female fishes with the view of obtaining a large quantity of caviar, as well as receiving sterile (triploid fishes are analyzed. Great attention is given to androgenesis, particularly to disperm one, in connection with the problem of conserving rare and vanishing fish species using only sperm genetic material. Examples how distant hybrids may be obtained with the use of disperm androgenesis and alkylated DNA are given. Methods of obtaining fish primordium germ cells, recent developments in cultivation of fish stem cells and their use in biotechnology, as well as ones of transplantation of oogonium and spermatogonium to obtain surrogate fishes. The examples of successful experiments on spermatogonial xenotransplantation and characteristic of antifreezing fish proteins and also the prospect of their practical usage are given.

  13. Dietary nitrogen and fish welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conceicao, L.E.C.; Aragao, C.; Dias, J.; Costas, B.; Terova, G.; Martins, C.I.; Tort, L.

    2012-01-01

    Little research has been done in optimizing the nitrogenous fraction of the fish diets in order to minimize welfare problems. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on how amino acid (AA) metabolism may be affected when fish are under stress and the possible effects on fish welfare when

  14. Fish welfare in capture fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, L.J.L.; Berentsen, P.B.M.; Boer, de I.J.M.; Vis, van de J.W.; Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2018-01-01

    Concerns about the welfare of production animals have extended from farm animals to fish, but an overview of the impact of especially capture fisheries on fish welfare is lacking. This review provides a synthesis of 85 articles, which demonstrates that research interest in fish welfare in capture

  15. Mercury exposure through fish consumption in riparian populations at reservoir Guri, using nuclear techniques, Bolivar State, Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez, Dario; Gali, Gladys; Milano, S.; Paolini, J.; Venegas, Gladys; Carvajal, M.; Marquez, Oscar

    2002-01-01

    In the reservoir Guri located at the south of Venezuela in Bolivar State has occurred the bioaccumulation process. Several studies have demonstrated it. In samples of 42 specimens of carnivorous trophic level, the average value of total mercury was 1.90 mg/g with a maximum of 6.04 mg/g. As first job it was necessary to identify and classify the infrastructures of each town according to their use due to the lack of updated demographic information. In this investigation is described the home characteristics with relation to its residence conditions and work status of home bosses through the design and application of a survey by home in two communities nearby reservoir Guri: 'La Paragua' and 'El Manteco'. A simple questionnaire was also designed and applied where home bosses were asked for the weekly frequency of consumption of fish, especially those of carnivorous habits as well as the quantity in grams consumed per week. Homes were better structured at 'La Paragua' than at 'El Manteco' but in the latest the monthly income by home was bigger nevertheless, it does not meet the requirements of the basic basket in Venezuela of US $ 323 for a four people family. The overall consumption of fish per week was twice higher at 'El Manteco' (1,485 kg) than at 'La Paragua' (678 kg). The fish specie consumed as first priority at 'La Paragua' was Prochilodus rubrotaeniatus ('Coporo') which is of detritivorous alimentary habits while the second more consumed was Cichla ocellaris ('Pavon') of carnivorous alimentary habits. On the opposite side, at 'El Manteco' the first priority of fish was Cichla ocellaris ('Pavon') while the second one was for Prochilodus rubrotaeniatus ('Coporo'). Next step will be the organic mercury analysis in hair samples and the nutritional profile in individuals from the selected homes: 36 at 'La Paragua' and 50 at 'El Manteco' towns. (author)

  16. A case-based approach for teaching professionalism to residents with online discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARK T. NADEAU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Programs must demonstrate that their residents are taught and assessed in professionalism. Most programs struggle with finding viable ways to teach and assess this critical competency. UTHSCSA Family and Community Medicine Residency developed an innovative option for interactive learning and assessment of residents in this competency which would be transferrable to other programs and specialties. Methods: The innovative approach uses an asynchronous online format on Blackboard. Threaded discussions on Blackboard require thoughtful reflective writing after case assessment and critical evaluation of other resident posts. Participation, content and progress of all resident postings are monitored by administrative staff and faculty. Faculty can further engage the residents at any point to deepen the discussion and learning. Results: 100% of all senior residents attained the required learning objectives. All were actively engaged in the assignments. Six cases have been developed using a Learning Matrix to demonstrate evaluation areas from the specialty specific competencies. Written feedback from residents verified the validity of case content in context of their current clinical practice. Postings by residents have provided value and insight for the faculty to access the professional development of our Family Medicine residents. The Clinical Competency Committee evaluates all third year residents using this information specific to the professionalism milestones. By using an asynchronous online approach to case discussion, all residents are involved with all aspects of this curriculum. Conclusions: More specific measurable learning outcomes are possible using this approach. Resident participation and engagement is easier to track and monitor than a lecture-based format and easier to capture valuable data than relying on evaluation feedback. Our Annual Review process will identify areas for improvement in the existing cases and help

  17. Migration confers survival benefits against avian predators for partially migratory freshwater fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Christian; Chapman, Ben B.; Baktoft, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    in a freshwater fish (roach, Rutilus rutilus) that commonly migrates from lakes to streams during winter confers a significant survival benefit with respect to bird (cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo spp.) predation. We tagged over 2000 individual fish in two Scandinavian lakes over 4 years and monitored migratory......The importance of predation risk in shaping patterns of animal migration is not well studied, mostly owing to difficulties in accurately quantifying predation risk for migratory versus resident individuals. Here, we present data from an extensive field study, which shows that migration...... behaviour using passive telemetry. Next, we calculated the predation vulnerability of fish with differing migration strategies, by recovering data from passive integrated transponder tags of fish eaten by cormorants at communal roosts close to the lakes. We show that fish can reduce their predation risk...

  18. Habitat heterogeneity: importance of salt marsh pools and high marsh surfaces to fish production in two Gulf of Maine salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. MacKenzie; M. Dionne

    2008-01-01

    Both permanent high marsh pools and the intertidal surfaces of Spartina patens high marshes in southern Maine, USA, proved to be important habitat for resident mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus production. Manipulations of fish movement onto high marsh Surfaces revealed similar growth rates and production among fish that were (1) restricted to pools, (2) had access to...

  19. Assessing Lost Ecosystem Service Benefits Due to Mining-Induced Stream Degradation in the Appalachian Region: Economic Approaches to Valuing Recreational Fishing Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sport fishing is a popular activity for Appalachian residents and visitors. The region’s coldwater streams support a strong regional outdoor tourism industry. We examined the influence of surface coal mining, in the context of other stressors, on freshwater sport fishing in...

  20. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanet residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been gratned the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...