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Sample records for residency continuity clinic

  1. Continuity of Care in Resident Outpatient Clinics: A Scoping Review of the Literature.

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    Walker, Jeremey; Payne, Brittany; Clemans-Taylor, B Lee; Snyder, Erin Dunn

    2018-02-01

    Continuity between patients and physicians is a core principle of primary care and an accreditation requirement. Resident continuity clinics face challenges in nurturing continuity for their patients and trainees. We undertook a scoping review of the literature to better understand published benchmarks for resident continuity; the effectiveness of interventions to improve continuity; and the impact of continuity on resident and patient satisfaction, patient outcomes, and resident career choice. We developed a MEDLINE search strategy to identify articles that defined continuity in residency programs in internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics published prior to December 31, 2015, and used a quality evaluation tool to assess included studies. The review includes 34 articles describing 12 different measures of continuity. The usual provider of care and continuity for physician formulas were most commonly utilized, and mean baseline continuity was 56 and 55, respectively (out of a total possible score of 100). Clinic and residency program redesign innovations (eg, advanced access scheduling, team-based care, and block scheduling) were studied and had mixed impact on continuity. Continuity in resident clinics is lower than published continuity rates for independently practicing physicians. Interventions to enhance continuity in resident clinics have mixed effects. More research is needed to understand how changes in continuity affect resident and patient satisfaction, patient outcomes, and resident career choice. A major challenge to research in this area is the lack of empanelment of residents' patients, creating difficulties in scheduling and measuring continuity visits.

  2. Educating generalists: factors of resident continuity clinic associated with perceived impact on choosing a generalist career.

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    Laponis, Ryan; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Hollander, Harry; Cornett, Patricia; Julian, Katherine

    2011-12-01

    Fewer residents are choosing general internal medicine (GIM) careers, and their choice 5 be influenced by the continuity clinic experience during residency. We sought to explore the relationship between resident satisfaction with the continuity clinic experience and expressed interest in pursuing a GIM career. We surveyed internal medicine residents by using the Veterans Health Administration Office of Academic Affiliations Learners' Perceptions Survey-a 76-item instrument with established reliability and validity that measures satisfaction with faculty interactions, and learning, working, clinical, and physical environments, and personal experience. We identified 15 reliable subscales within the survey and asked participants whether their experience would prompt them to consider future employment opportunities in GIM. We examined the association between satisfaction measures and future GIM interest with 1-way analyses of variance followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests. Of 217 residents, 90 (41%) completed the survey. Residents felt continuity clinic influenced career choice, with 22% more likely to choose a GIM career and 43% less likely. Those more likely to choose a GIM career had higher satisfaction with the learning (P  =  .001) and clinical (P  =  .002) environments and personal experience (P care (P  =  .009), workflow (P  =  .001), professional/personal satisfaction (P continuity clinic experience 5 influence residents' GIM career choice. Residents who indicate they are more likely to pursue GIM based on that clinical experience have higher levels of satisfaction. Further prospective data are needed to assess if changes in continuity clinic toward these particular factors can enhance career choice.

  3. A survey of primary care resident attitudes toward continuity clinic patient handover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfer of clinic patients from graduating residents to interns or junior residents occurs every year, affecting large numbers of patients. Breaches in care continuity may occur, with potential for risk to patient safety. Several guidelines have been developed for implementing standardized inpatient sign-outs, but no specific guidelines exist for outpatient handover. Methods: Residents in primary care programs – internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics – at a US academic medical center were invited to participate in an online survey. The invitation was extended approximately 2 years after electronic medical record (EMR rollout began at the institution. Results: Of 71 eligible residents, 22 (31% responded to the survey. Of these, 18 felt that handover of ambulatory patients was at least moderately important – but only one affirmed the existence of a system for handover. IM residents perceived that they had the highest proportion of high-risk patients (p=0.042; transition-of-care letters were more important to IM residents than other respondents (p=0.041. Conclusion: There is room for improvement in resident acknowledgement of handover processes in continuity clinics. In this study, IM residents attached greater importance to a specific handover tool than other primary care residents. Thus, the different primary care specialties may need to have different handover tools available to them within a shared EMR system.

  4. Change in Residents' Experience in Continuity Clinic After Patient-Focused Primary Care Redesign.

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    Fogel, Benjamin N; Warrick, Stephen; Finkelstein, Jonathan A; Klein, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of efforts to redesign primary care has primarily focused on clinical services, with limited assessment of the effect on learners. This study evaluated the change in pediatric residents' perception of training, teamwork, and patient care in 2 different continuity clinic settings that were implementing patient-focused primary care redesign. Continuity clinic residents at 2 large urban pediatric training programs completed a survey, developed de novo, before and after primary care redesign. Differences in the proportion of positive (≥4 of 5) ratings before and after redesign were compared using chi-squared tests in 2 practice sites, each of which focused on improving specific aspects of their practice. The response rate was >70% in both sites and in both years. Residents in the site focused on teamwork and continuity were more likely to report improved teamwork training (64% vs 83%; P care in clinic also improved (47% vs 68%; P continuity clinic. Future redesign efforts deliberately involving residents might further enhance continuity clinic training. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving pediatric immunization rates: description of a resident-led clinical continuous quality improvement project.

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    Jones, Kyle Bradford; Gren, Lisa H; Backman, Richard

    2014-09-01

    Increased emphasis is being placed on the continuous quality improvement (CQI) education of residents of all specialties. This article describes a resident-led continuous quality improvement (CQI) project, based on a novel curriculum, to improve the immunization rates of children under 2 years old at the Madsen Family Health Center (MHC). All third-year residents were trained in the FOCUS-PDSA CQI methodology through concurrent didactic lectures and experience leading the CQI team. The CQI team included clinical staff led by a third-year family medicine resident and mentored by a member of the family medicine faculty. Immunization records were distributed to provider-medical assistant teamlets daily for each pediatric patient scheduled in clinic as the intervention. Compliance with the intervention (process measure), as well as immunization rates at 2 and 5 months post-intervention (outcome measure), were monitored. Immunization records were printed on 84% of clinic days from October 24, 2011 to March 31, 2012. The percentage of patients immunized at baseline was 66%. The percentage immunized as of December 31, 2011 was 96% and was 91% as of March 31, 2012. An important educational experience was organized for third-year family medicine residents through learning CQI skills, leading a CQI team, and directing a CQI project to completion. Significant improvement in the percentage of patients under 2 years old immunized at the MHC was achieved by presenting provider-medical assistant teamlets with immunization records of all pediatric patients on the daily clinic schedule.

  6. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Team-Based Care and its Educational Value in the Continuity Clinic: A Qualitative Study.

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    Soones, Tacara N; O'Brien, Bridget C; Julian, Katherine A

    2015-09-01

    In order to teach residents how to work in interprofessional teams, educators in graduate medical education are implementing team-based care models in resident continuity clinics. However, little is known about the impact of interprofessional teams on residents' education in the ambulatory setting. To identify factors affecting residents' experience of team-based care within continuity clinics and the impact of these teams on residents' education. This was a qualitative study of focus groups with internal medicine residents. Seventy-seven internal medicine residents at the University of California San Francisco at three continuity clinic sites participated in the study. Qualitative interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. The authors used a general inductive approach with sensitizing concepts in four frames (structural, human resources, political and symbolic) to develop codes and identify themes. Residents believed that team-based care improves continuity and quality of care. Factors in four frames affected their ability to achieve these goals. Structural factors included communication through the electronic medical record, consistent schedules and regular team meetings. Human resources factors included the presence of stable teams and clear roles. Political and symbolic factors negatively impacted team-based care, and included low staffing ratios and a culture of ultimate resident responsibility, respectively. Regardless of the presence of these factors or resident perceptions of their teams, residents did not see the practice of interprofessional team-based care as intrinsically educational. Residents' experiences practicing team-based care are influenced by many principles described in the interprofessional teamwork literature, including understanding team members' roles, good communication and sufficient staffing. However, these attributes are not correlated with residents' perceptions of the educational value of team-based care. Including residents in

  7. Use of the 'BEARS' sleep screening tool in a pediatric residents' continuity clinic: a pilot study.

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    Owens, Judith A; Dalzell, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a simple, 5-item pediatric sleep screening instrument, the BEARS (B=Bedtime Issues, E=Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, A=Night Awakenings, R=Regularity and Duration of Sleep, S=Snoring) in obtaining sleep-related information and identifying sleep problems in the primary care setting. Pediatric residents' continuity clinic in a tertiary care children's hospital. BEARS forms were placed in the medical records of a convenience sample of 2 to 12 year old children presenting for well child visits over the 5 month study period. Sleep-related information recorded in the BEARS visit and in the pre-BEARS visit, which was the subject's most recent previous well child check (WCC), was coded with respect to whether or not a sleep problem was indicated, and whether sleep issues were addressed. A total of 195 children had both a documented pre-BEARS and BEARS WCC visit. BEARS visits were significantly more likely than the pre-BEARS visits to have any sleep information recorded (98.5% vs. 87.7%, pcare setting.

  8. Burned Out at the Bedside: Patient Perceptions of Physician Burnout in an Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinic.

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    Lafreniere, Justin P; Rios, Rebeca; Packer, Hillary; Ghazarian, Sharon; Wright, Scott M; Levine, Rachel B

    2016-02-01

    Burnout is high among resident physicians and may be associated with suboptimal patient care and reduced empathy. To investigate the relationship between patient perceptions of empathy and enablement and physician burnout in internal medicine residents. Cross-sectional, survey-based observational study between December 2012 and March 2013 in a resident continuity clinic located within a large urban academic primary care practice in Baltimore, Maryland. Study participants were 44 PGY1-3 residents and a convenience sample of their English-speaking adult primary care patients (N = 244). Patients rated their resident physicians using the Consultation and Relational Empathy Measure (CARE) and the Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI). Residents completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). We tested for associations between resident burnout and patients' perceptions of resident empathy (CARE) and enablement (PEI) using multilevel regression analysis. Multilevel regression analyses indicated significant positive associations between physician depersonalization scores on the MBI and patient ratings of empathy (B = 0.28, SE = 0.17, p care encounters. The relationship between physician distress and patient perceptions of care has important implications for medical education and requires further study.

  9. The impact of a Medical Home for children with developmental disability within a pediatric resident continuity clinic. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Jana S; Wolraich, Mark L; Gillaspy, Stephen R; Martin, Vyonda G; Wild, Robert C

    2014-12-01

    Primary care provided in a Medical Home (MH) can improve outcomes for Children with Special Health Care Needs. It is important for residents to experience MH in their training. The Oklahoma Family Support 360 project, a five-year collaborative initiative, established a MH in a pediatric primary care resident continuity clinic at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. A study of the effects of enhancement of the seven key MH attributes showed a significant decrease in Emergency Service use, a significant increase in Dental Service use, high satisfaction with MH activities, and high ratings for a positive impact on quality of life for the child and family. The project demonstrated that a MH could be established in a pediatric academic program, improved health service use, and had a high level of satisfaction from participating families. This model provides a good example of the MH qualities for residents in training.

  10. Dermatology discharge continuity clinic enhances resident autonomy and insight into transitions-of-care competencies: a cross-sectional survey study

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Jasmine Kaur; Mostaghimi, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Dermatology residents perform consults on hospitalized patients, but are often limited in their ability to follow-up with these patients after discharge, leading to inadequate follow-up and understanding of post-discharge transitions of care. In 2013, a discharge continuity clinic (DCC) staffed by the inpatient consult dermatology resident and attending dermatologist was established at one of the four adult hospital sites residents rotate through in the Harvard Combined Dermatology Residency ...

  11. Implementing a Multifaceted Quality-Improvement Curriculum in an Obstetrics-Gynecology Resident Continuity-Clinic Setting: A 4-Year Experience

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    Sepulveda, Debra; Varaklis, Kalli

    2012-01-01

    Background Although many residency programs are instituting quality improvement (QI) curricula in response to both institutional and external mandates, there are few reports of successful integration of resident initiated projects into these QI curricula with documented impact on health care processes and measures. Intervention We introduced a multifaceted curriculum into an Obstetrics-Gynecology continuity clinic. Following a needs assessment, we developed a didactic session to introduce residents to QI tools and the how to of a mentored resident-initiated project. Resident projects were presented to peers and faculty and were evaluated. A postgraduation survey assessed residents' satisfaction with the curriculum and preparedness for involvement in QI initiatives after residency. We also assessed whether this resulted in sustained improvement in health care measures. Results The curriculum was presented to 7 classes of residents (n  =  25) and 17 resident initiated projects have been completed. Twenty-one residents (84%) completed the preintervention survey and 12 of 17 (71%) residents who completed the entire curriculum completed the postintervention survey. Sustained change in surrogate health measures was documented for 4 projects focused on improving clinical measures, and improvement in clinical systems was sustained in 9 of the remaining 13 projects (69%). Most of the respondents (75%, n  =  9) agreed or strongly agreed that the projects done in residency provided a helpful foundation to their current QI efforts. Conclusion This project successfully demonstrates that a multifaceted program in QI education can be implemented in a busy Obstetrics-Gynecology residency program, resulting in sustained improvement in surrogate health measures and in clinical systems. A longitudinal model for resident projects results in an opportunity for reflection, project revision, and a maintenance plan for continued clinical impact. PMID:23730448

  12. Optimal Methods to Screen Men and Women for Intimate Partner Violence: Results from an Internal Medicine Residency Continuity Clinic

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    Kapur, Nitin A.; Windish, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Contradictory data exist regarding optimal methods and instruments for intimate partner violence (IPV) screening in primary care settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal method and screening instrument for IPV among men and women in a primary-care resident clinic. We conducted a cross-sectional study at an urban, academic,…

  13. Dermatology discharge continuity clinic enhances resident autonomy and insight into transitions-of-care competencies: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Jasmine; Mostaghimi, Arash

    2017-05-15

    Dermatology residents perform consults on hospitalized patients, but are often limited in their ability to follow-up with these patients after discharge, leading to inadequate follow-up and understanding of post-discharge transitions of care. In 2013, a discharge continuity clinic (DCC) staffed by the inpatient consult dermatology resident and attending dermatologist was established at one of the four adult hospital sites residents rotate through in the Harvard Combined Dermatology Residency Program. Resident perceptions about the DCC and their educational experience on inpatient consult rotations with a DCC and without a DCC were obtained using a cross-sectional survey instrument in June 2016. Self-reported data from a multi-year cohort of dermatology residents (n = 14 of 20, 70% response rate) reveals that the DCC enabled resident autonomy and resident satisfaction in care of their patients,insight into the disease-related challenges and the broader social context during transitions of care from inpatient to outpatient settings, and more enriching learning experiences than inpatient consult rotations without a DCC. Dermatology residents self-report participation in an inpatient consult rotation with aDCC supports their autonomy and achievement of post-discharge transitions-of-care competencies.

  14. Humility Through Humiliation in Continuity Clinic.

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    Lelkes, Efrat

    2016-01-01

    For freshly minted MDs, residency represents a period of transition from being a medical student to becoming a physician. This evolution is often fraught. Continuity clinic-a mandatory component of pediatric residency training-can be a battleground for this tribulation. This essay explores the author's journey from the first days of her continuity clinic to the last. The author recounts her struggles, her fears, her certainty of being an imposter, and her steps towards becoming a pediatrician.

  15. Continuity of care in dermatology residency programs in the United States.

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    Loh, Tiffany; Vazirnia, Aria; Afshar, Maryam; Dorschner, Robert; Paravar, Taraneh

    2017-05-15

    As established by the AccreditationCouncil for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME),dermatology residents in the United States must participate in continuity clinic. This requirement may be achieved through multiple means, allowing for program variation. To better assess continuity clinic's role in resident learning, more data on this component of graduate medical education is needed. An anonymous online survey was distributed via the American Board of Dermatology list serv to all U.S. dermatology residents. Continuity clinic organization, setting, frequency, and patient and preceptor characteristics were assessed; resident satisfaction and learning were compared. Of 231 responses, 7.8% reported continuity clinic daily, 77.1% weekly, 9.1% every other week, 3.0%monthly, 0.4% once every several months, and 2.2%only during certain blocks. Of the clinics reported,80.1% were "resident-run with attending" and 11.3%were attending-run. The rest were "resident-run with no attending" (0.9%), both resident and attending run(3.0%), or "other" (4.8%). Trainees in resident-run clinics (with attendings) reported greater continuity of care than those in attending-run clinics (p<0.001).Residents reported better teaching with attending presence during patient encounters than when attendings were present only if concerns were raised(p<0.01).

  16. Attitudes of Portuguese medical residents' towards clinical communication skills.

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    Loureiro, Elizabete; Severo, Milton; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2015-08-01

    To explore the attitudes and perceptions of Portuguese residents towards Clinical Communication Skills (CCS) and the need for complementary training. 78 medical residents responded to an on-line questionnaire which comprised demographic data, open-ended questions and a Portuguese version of the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS). Residents gave significantly higher scores (Pcommunication skills in general, compared to CSAS2 (attitudes towards the teaching/learning process of CCS). Residents doing their residency training in other parts of the country, other than the north, reveal a higher perception of insufficient training (72.7% vs. 38.7%, P=0.036). Residents showed more positive attitudes towards communication skills than towards the teaching/learning process. They admit to need more training in CCS in their residency year and highlight that the clinical cycle of undergraduate education should integrate these topics. Content analysis indicates that residents' perceptions are context-influenced. Integration of CCS in the undergraduate education, enhanced during post-graduate training. Training of clinical faculty and supervisors/tutors and the role that stakeholders have to play in order to promote continuous training in CCS; encourage patient-centeredness and reflective practice, as to facilitate transfer of acquired skills to clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

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    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce.

  18. Experimental determination of residence time distribution in continuous dry granulation.

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    Mangal, Haress; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2017-05-30

    With increasing importance of continuous manufacturing, the interest in integrating dry granulation into a continuous manufacturing line is growing. Residence time distribution measurements are of importance as they provide information about duration of materials within the process. These data enable traceability and are highly beneficial for developing control strategies. A digital image analysis system was used to determine the residence time distribution of two materials with different deformation behavior (brittle, plastic) in the milling unit of dry granulation systems. A colorant was added to the material (20%w/w iron oxide), which did not affect the material properties excessively, so the milling process could be mimicked well. Experimental designs were conducted to figure out which parameters effect the mean residence time strongly. Moreover, two types of dry granulation systems were contrasted. Longer mean residence times were obtained for the oscillating mill (OM) compared to the conical mill (CM). For co-processed microcrystalline cellulose residence times of 19.8-44.4s (OM) and 11.6-29.1s (CM) were measured, mainly influenced by the specific compaction force, the mill speed and roll speed. For dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrate residence times from 17.7-46.4 (OM) and 5.4-10.2s (CM) were measured, while here the specific compaction force, the mill speed and their interactions with the roll speed had an influence on the mean residence time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

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    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  20. Blended Learning in Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Education: Impact on Resident Clinical Performance.

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    Ghareeb, Allen; Han, Heeyoung; Delfino, Kristin; Taylor, Funminiyi

    2016-01-01

    Effects of residents' blended learning on their clinical performance have rarely been reported. A blended learning pilot program was instituted at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine's Obstetrics and Gynecology program. One of the modules was chronic hypertension in pregnancy. We sought to evaluate if the resident blended learning was transferred to their clinical performance six months after the module. A review of patient charts demonstrated inadequate documentation of history, evaluation, and counseling of patients with chronic hypertension at the first prenatal visit by Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN) residents. A blended learning module on chronic hypertension in pregnancy was then provided to the residents. A retrospective chart review was then performed to assess behavioral changes in the OB/GYN residents. This intervention was carried out at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Southern Illinois University. All 16 OB/GYN residents were enrolled in this module as part of their educational curriculum. A query of all prenatal patients diagnosed with chronic hypertension presenting to the OB/GYN resident clinics four months prior to the implementation of the blended learning module (March 2015-June 2015) and six months after (July 20, 2015-February 2016) was performed. Data were collected from outpatient charts utilizing the electronic medical record. Data were abstracted from resident documentation at the first prenatal visit. The residents thought that the blended learning module was applicable to performance improvement in the real-world setting. Patients evaluated before ( n = 10) and after ( n = 7) the intervention were compared. After the intervention, there was an increase in assessment of baseline liver enzymes, referral for electrocardiogram, and early assessment for diabetes in the obese patients. More patients were provided a blood pressure cuff after the module (71.4% vs. 20%). Data were provided to the residents in an

  1. Blended Learning in Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Education: Impact on Resident Clinical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Ghareeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Effects of residents’ blended learning on their clinical performance have rarely been reported. A blended learning pilot program was instituted at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine's Obstetrics and Gynecology program. One of the modules was chronic hypertension in pregnancy. We sought to evaluate if the resident blended learning was transferred to their clinical performance six months after the module. Intervention A review of patient charts demonstrated inadequate documentation of history, evaluation, and counseling of patients with chronic hypertension at the first prenatal visit by Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN residents. A blended learning module on chronic hypertension in pregnancy was then provided to the residents. A retrospective chart review was then performed to assess behavioral changes in the OB/GYN residents. Context This intervention was carried out at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Southern Illinois University. All 16 OB/GYN residents were enrolled in this module as part of their educational curriculum. A query of all prenatal patients diagnosed with chronic hypertension presenting to the OB/GYN resident clinics four months prior to the implementation of the blended learning module (March 2015–June 2015 and six months after (July 20, 2015–February 2016 was performed. Data were collected from outpatient charts utilizing the electronic medical record. Data were abstracted from resident documentation at the first prenatal visit. Outcome The residents thought that the blended learning module was applicable to performance improvement in the real-world setting. Patients evaluated before ( n = 10 and after ( n = 7 the intervention were compared. After the intervention, there was an increase in assessment of baseline liver enzymes, referral for electrocardiogram, and early assessment for diabetes in the obese patients. More patients were provided a blood pressure cuff after the module (71

  2. Evaluation of clinical teaching quality in competency-based residency training in Lithuania

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    Eglė Vaižgėlienė

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Resident evaluations of clinical teachers are influenced by teachers’ age, gender, year of residency training, type of teachers’ academic position and whether or not a clinical teacher performed self-evaluation. Development of CBME should be focused on the continuous evaluation of quality, clinical teachers educational support and the implementation of e-portfolio.

  3. Progressive Surgical Autonomy in a Plastic Surgery Resident Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jillian K.; Gao, Lani; Lee, Tara M.; Waldrop, Jimmy L.; Sargent, Larry A.; Kennedy, J. Woody; Rehm, Jason P.; Brzezienski, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Resident clinics are thought to catalyze educational milestone achievement through opportunities for progressively autonomous surgical care, but studies are lacking for general plastic surgery resident clinics (PSRCs). We demonstrate the achievement of increased surgical autonomy and continuity of care in a PSRC. Methods: A retrospective review of all patients seen in a PSRC from October 1, 2010, to October 1, 2015, was conducted. Our PSRC is supervised by faculty plastic surgery attendings, though primarily run by chief residents in an accredited independent plastic surgery training program. Surgical autonomy was scored on a 5-point scale based on dictated operative reports. Graduated chief residents were additionally surveyed by anonymous online survey. Results: Thousand one hundred forty-four patients were seen in 3,390 clinic visits. Six hundred fifty-three operations were performed by 23 total residents, including 10 graduating chiefs. Senior resident autonomy averaged 3.5/5 (SD = 1.5), 3.6/5 (SD = 1.5), to 3.8/5 (SD = 1.3) in postgraduate years 6, 7, and 8, respectively. A linear mixed model analysis demonstrated that training level had a significant impact on operative autonomy when comparing postgraduate years 6 and 8 (P = 0.026). Graduated residents’ survey responses (N = 10; 100% response rate) regarded PSRC as valuable for surgical experience (4.1/5), operative autonomy (4.4/5), medical knowledge development (4.7/5), and the practice of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies (4.3/5). Preoperative or postoperative continuity of care was maintained in 93.5% of cases. Conclusion: The achievement of progressive surgical autonomy may be demonstrated within a PSRC model. PMID:28607848

  4. The PRIME curriculum. Clinical research training during residency.

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    Kohlwes, R J; Shunk, R L; Avins, A; Garber, J; Bent, S; Shlipak, M G

    2006-05-01

    The Primary Medical Education (PRIME) program is an outpatient-based, internal medicine residency track nested within the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) categorical medicine program. Primary Medical Education is based at the San Francisco Veteran's Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), 1 of 3 teaching hospitals at UCSF. The program accepts 8 UCSF medicine residents annually, who differentiate into PRIME after internship. In 2000, we implemented a novel research methods curriculum with the dual purposes of teaching basic epidemiology skills and providing mentored opportunities for clinical research projects during residency. Single academic internal medicine program. The PRIME curriculum utilizes didactic lecture, frequent journal clubs, work-in-progress sessions, and active mentoring to enable residents to "try out" a clinical research project during residency. Among 32 residents in 4 years, 22 residents have produced 20 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 1 paper under review, and 2 book chapters. Their clinical evaluations are equivalent to other UCSF medicine residents. While learning skills in evidence-based medicine, residents can conduct high-quality research. Utilizing a collaboration of General Internal Medicine researchers and educators, our curriculum affords residents the opportunity to "try-out" clinical research as a potential future career choice.

  5. What are internal medicine residents missing? A communication needs assessment of outpatient clinical encounters.

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    Lundberg, Kristina L

    2014-09-01

    In order to guide curricular innovation, we looked at the feasibility and utility of performing a targeted needs assessment of the communication skills of PGY2 internal medicine (IM) residents in their continuity clinic, utilizing faculty direct observation with a validated instrument for communication skills evaluation. A convenience sample of PGY2 residents in the Emory University School of Medicine IM Residency Program was invited to participate. Using the SEGUE Framework, a checklist of medical communication tasks, faculty assessed residents during a clinic encounter. Thirty out of 53 (57%) PGY2 residents were assessed. SEGUE results indicate residents were most likely to "maintain patient's privacy" (100%), "greet patient appropriately" (97%) and "check/clarify information" (100%). Residents were least likely to "acknowledge waiting time" (7%), "explore psychosocial/emotional factors" (27%) and "outline agenda for visit" (33%). The SEGUE Framework is a feasible tool to evaluate the communication skills of IM residents in a clinic setting. Many PGY2 IM residents in a large, urban practice do not elicit important psychosocial information during outpatient clinic visits. More observation and evaluation of residents' communication skills are needed, with emphasis on building skills to "Understand the Patient's Perspective." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Pharmacy Resident Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A.B. Cauthon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to utilize an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE for assessment of pharmacy residents. Innovation: Post-graduate year 1 (PGY1 and post-graduate year 2 (PGY2 pharmacy residents completing multiple, local residency programs were invited to participate in an OSCE. A total of eight PGY1 residents and one PGY2 resident completed the OSCE. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP residency program goals were aligned for each case, which were originally developed for a fourth-year pharmacy student OSCE. Station design included outpatient and inpatient settings with patient and physician interactions. Median communication and clinical skills scores were evaluated. Critical Analysis: The OSCE allows for assessment of all residents on common scenarios. Pharmacy residents met competency requirements and demonstrated excellent communication skills. The OSCE was able to evaluate both physician-pharmacist communication and patient-pharmacist communication. Baseline performance related to the ASHP goals and objectives was not completed; however, the OSCE could highlight resident strengths and weaknesses in communication and clinical skills. The OSCE could simulate independent practice, may reduce bias, and could provide an evaluation of the resident by a patient. However, the OSCE incurs higher resource utilization, specifically monetary and time, than other assessment methods. Next Steps: The pilot study results provide a beginning for further study of OSCEs for pharmacy residents. Further study should include surveying the residency directors about use of the OSCE, a comparison of performance between the OSCE and preceptor evaluations of residents on ASHP goals and objectives, and an evaluation of OSCE implementation at different time points within the residency. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in

  7. Resident continuity of care experience in a Canadian general surgery training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Ravindar S.; Walker, G. Ross

    Objectives To provide baseline data on resident continuity of care experience, to describe the effect of ambulatory centre surgery on continuity of care, to analyse continuity of care by level of resident training and to assess a resident-run preadmission clinic’s effect on continuity of care. Design Data were prospectively collected for 4 weeks. All patients who underwent a general surgical procedure were included if a resident was present at operation. Setting The Division of General Surgery, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont. Outcome measures Preoperative, operative and inhospital postoperative involvement of each resident with each case was recorded. Results Residents assessed preoperatively (before entering the operating room) 52% of patients overall, 20% of patients at the ambulatory centre and 83% of patients who required emergency surgery. Of patients assessed by the chief resident, 94% were assessed preoperatively compared with 32% of patients assessed by other residents ( p 0.1). Conclusions This study serves as a reference for the continuity of care experience in Canadian surgical programs. Residents assessed only 52% of patients preoperatively, and only 40% of patients had complete continuity of care. Factors such as ambulatory surgery and junior level of training negatively affected continuity experience. Such factors must be taken into account in planning surgical education. PMID:10526519

  8. The 50/50 Block Schedule: Impact on Residents' and Preceptors' Perceptions, Patient Outcomes, and Continuity of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantea, Rachel; Buranosky, Raquel; Simak, Deborah; Hoffman, Erika; Zimmer, Shanta M; Elnicki, David Michael

    2017-11-30

    Traditionally, internal medicine continuity clinic consists of a half day per week, regardless of rotation, which may create conflict with ongoing inpatient responsibilities. A 50/50 block schedule, which alternates inpatient and outpatient rotations and concentrates continuity clinic during outpatient rotations, minimizes conflicting responsibilities. However, its impact on patient care has not been widely studied. Continuity is a concern, and intervisit continuity in particular has not been evaluated. We implemented a 50/50 block model with "clinic buddy" system to optimize continuity and assessed outcomes pre- and postintervention. Residents alternated inpatient and elective blocks, with clinic 1 full day per week on elective blocks only. Resident and preceptor perceptions were measured using 5-point Likert surveys to evaluate impact on clinic experience and workload. The authors calculated visit and intervisit continuity using a Usual Provider of Care index and measured blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c as quality markers to evaluate the impact on continuity and quality of care. Participants were 208 medicine residents and 39 core faculty members at 3 University of Pittsburgh Medical Center clinics. The intervention was implemented in June 2014. In the 50/50 system, inpatient distractions decreased (3.59 vs. 1.71, p care (3.13 vs. 3.61), and multidisciplinary teams worked well together (3.51 vs. 4.08) (all p continuity was unchanged (73%, both models, p = .79). Visit continuity decreased (67.2% vs. 63.7%, p continuity was preserved, visit continuity was slightly decreased, and patient outcomes were not impacted in this model.

  9. Evaluation of clinical teaching quality in competency-based residency training in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaižgėlienė, Eglė; Padaiga, Žilvinas; Rastenytė, Daiva; Tamelis, Algimantas; Petrikonis, Kęstutis; Fluit, Cornelia

    2017-12-01

    In 2013, all residency programs at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences were renewed into the competency-based medical education curriculum (CBME). In 2015, we implemented the validated EFFECT questionnaire together with the EFFECT-System for quality assessment of clinical teaching in residency training. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of characteristics of the resident (year of training) and clinical teacher (gender, age, and type of academic position) on teaching quality, as well as to assess areas for teaching quality improvement. Residents from 7 different residency study programs filled out 333 EFFECT questionnaires evaluating 146 clinical teachers. We received 143 self-evaluations of clinical teachers using the same questionnaire. Items were scored on a 6-point Likert scale. Main outcome measures were residents' mean overall (MOS), mean subdomain (MSS) and clinical teachers' self-evaluation scores. The overall comparisons of MOS and MSS across study groups and subgroups were done using Student's t test and ANOVA for trend. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated in order to see how residents' evaluations match with self-evaluations for every particular teacher. To indicate areas for quality improvement items were analyzed subtracting their mean score from the respective (sub)domain score. MOS for domains of "role modeling", "task allocation", "feedback", "teaching methodology" and "assessment" valued by residents were significantly higher than those valued by teachers (Pevaluation questionnaires were rated significantly higher by residents in role modeling subdomains (Phigher than the female teachers (Phigher (Pevaluations of clinical teachers are influenced by teachers' age, gender, year of residency training, type of teachers' academic position and whether or not a clinical teacher performed self-evaluation. Development of CBME should be focused on the continuous evaluation of quality, clinical teachers

  10. Analysis of a Resident Aesthetic Clinic: Process for Rhinoplasty, Resident Experience, and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandel, Michael G; DʼSouza, Gehaan F; Reid, Christopher M; Dobke, Marek K; Gosman, Amanda A

    2017-05-01

    Plastic surgery residents often desire additional training in rhinoplasty than what is provided by their residency program. The goal of this study was to define and evaluate a specific process used to structure preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative protocols for rhinoplasty patients in the resident aesthetic clinic (RAC) to enhance qualitative and quantitative experience. Complication rates and patient/resident satisfaction scores were also examined. Resident clinic rhinoplasty patients underwent a well-defined and established process that included patient education and informed consent, preoperative planning in a conference-based session, specific adherence to established surgical techniques, and structured postoperative management and follow-up. This process also included supervision criteria for residents in the operating room and clinical setting. Patient and resident satisfaction at the RAC was evaluated by a Web-based survey. A database of procedural complications and methods was compiled and evaluated. Between June 2012 and June 2015, 146 aesthetic resident cases were completed through the University of California, San Diego Residency Aesthetic Surgery Program. Of these cases, 34 (17%) were rhinoplasty procedures. Residents at our institution assisted on an average of 55 rhinoplasty procedures with the faculty and performed an average of 12 rhinoplasty procedures as primary surgeons. The residents surveyed felt that they had a good autonomous experience (P < 0.001), and 90% reported confidence with rhinoplasty. Postoperative complications were recorded and included asymmetry (n = 4, 10.5%), septal perforation (n = 1, 2.6%), and difficulty in breathing (n = 6, 15.8%). There were no patients who experienced infections, and the complication rate requiring revision in the operating room was 0%. Optimizing protocols in rhinoplasty in an RAC has allowed for the RAC to flourish in the breadth and complexity of rhinoplasty operations. This has enabled

  11. Improving year-end transfers of care in academic ambulatory clinics: a survey of pediatric resident physician perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Lerner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In resident primary care continuity clinics, at the end of each academic year, continuity of care is disrupted when patients cared for by the graduating class are redistributed to other residents. Yet, despite the recent focus on the transfers of care between resident physicians in inpatient settings, there has been minimal attention given to patient care transfers in academic ambulatory clinics. We sought to elicit the views of pediatric residents regarding year-end patient handoffs in a pediatric resident continuity clinic.Methods: Residents assigned to a continuity clinic of a large pediatric residency program completed a questionnaire regarding year-end transfers of care.Results: Thirty-one questionnaires were completed out of a total 45 eligible residents (69% response. Eighty seven percent of residents strongly or somewhat agreed that it would be useful to receive a written sign-out for patients with complex medical or social issues, but only 35% felt it would be useful for patients with no significant issues. Residents more frequently reported having access to adequate information regarding their new patients’ medical summary (53% and care plan (47% than patients’ functional abilities (30%, social history (17%, or use of community resources (17%. When rating the importance of receiving adequate sign-out in each those domains, residents gave most importance to the medical summary (87% of residents indicating very or somewhat important and plan of care (84%. Residents gave less importance to receiving sign-out regarding their patients’ functional abilities (71% social history (58%, and community resources (58%. Residents indicated that lack of access to adequate patient information resulted in additional work (80%, delays or omissions in needed care (56%, and disruptions in continuity of care (58%.Conclusions: In a single-site study, residents perceive that they lack adequate information during year-end patient transfers

  12. Virtual patients in continuing medical education and residency training: a pilot project for acceptance analysis in the framework of a residency revision course in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Ronny; Hanebeck, Benjamin; Oberle, Stephan; Simon, Anke; Choukair, Daniela; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Huwendiek, Sören

    2015-01-01

    Virtual patients (VPs) are a one-of-a-kind e-learning resource, fostering clinical reasoning skills through clinical case examples. The combination with face-to-face teaching is important for their successful integration, which is referred to as "blended learning". So far little is known about the use of VPs in the field of continuing medical education and residency training. The pilot study presented here inquired the application of VPs in the framework of a pediatric residency revision course. Around 200 participants of a pediatric nephology lecture ('nephrotic and nephritic syndrome in children') were offered two VPs as a wrap-up session at the revision course of the German Society for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ) 2009 in Heidelberg, Germany. Using a web-based survey form, different aspects were evaluated concerning the learning experiences with VPs, the combination with the lecture, and the use of VPs for residency training in general. N=40 evaluable survey forms were returned (approximately 21%). The return rate was impaired by a technical problem with the local Wi-Fi firewall. The participants perceived the work-up of the VPs as a worthwhile learning experience, with proper preparation for diagnosing and treating real patients with similar complaints. Case presentations, interactivity, and locally and timely independent repetitive practices were, in particular, pointed out. On being asked about the use of VPs in general for residency training, there was a distinct demand for more such offers. VPs may reasonably complement existing learning activities in residency training.

  13. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Rishi MD; Syed T. Hoda MD; James M. Crawford MD, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and ins...

  14. Continuous Deep Sedation Until Death in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Case Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anquinet, L.; Rietjens, J.A.C.; Vandervoort, A.; van der Steen, J.T.; van der Stichele, R.; Deliens, L.; Block, L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the characteristics of continuous deep sedation until death and the prior decision-making process of nursing home residents dying with dementia and to evaluate this practice according to features reflecting sedation guideline recommendations. Design Epidemiological

  15. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  16. The Importance of and the Complexities Associated With Measuring Continuity of Care During Resident Training: Possible Solutions Do Exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A; Conry, Colleen M; Mitchell, Karen B; Ericson, Annie; Dickinson, W Perry; Martin, James C; Carek, Peter J; Douglass, Alan B; Eiff, M Patrice

    2016-04-01

    Evolutions in care delivery toward the patient-centered medical home have influenced important aspects of care continuity. Primary responsibility for a panel of continuity patients is a foundational requirement in family medicine residencies. In this paper we characterize challenges in measuring continuity of care in residency training in this new era of primary care. We synthesized the literature and analyzed information from key informant interviews and group discussions with residency faculty and staff to identify the challenges and possible solutions for measuring continuity of care during family medicine training. We specifically focused on measuring interpersonal continuity at the patient level, resident level, and health care team level. Challenges identified in accurately measuring interpersonal continuity of care during residency training include: (1) variability in empanelment approaches for all patients, (2) scheduling complexity in different types of visits, (3) variability in ability to attain continuity counts at the level of the resident, and (4) shifting make-up of health care teams, especially in residency training. Possible solutions for each challenge are presented. Philosophical issues related to continuity are discussed, including whether true continuity can be achieved during residency training and whether qualitative rather than quantitative measures of continuity are better suited to residencies. Measuring continuity of care in residency training is challenging but possible, though improvements in precision and assessment of the comprehensive nature of the relationships are needed. Definitions of continuity during training and the role continuity measurement plays in residency need further study.

  17. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Syed T.; Crawford, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9) felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates. PMID:28725766

  18. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Rishi MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9 felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates.

  19. Clinical Skills Verification, Formative Feedback, and Psychiatry Residency Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalack, Gregory W.; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the implementation of Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) in their program as an in-training assessment intended primarily to provide formative feedback to trainees, strengthen the supervisory experience, identify the need for remediation of interviewing skills, and secondarily to demonstrating resident competence…

  20. Clinical pharmacology | Blockman | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 3 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Clinical pharmacology. M Blockman. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  1. National study of continuity clinic satisfaction in pediatric fellowship training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangat M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Gangat,1 Genna W Klein,1 Hillel W Cohen,2 Rubina A Heptulla1 1Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, 2Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY, USA Background: A national online survey was conducted to evaluate pediatric subspecialty fellow satisfaction regarding continuity clinic experience. Methods: An anonymous online survey (SurveyMonkey™ was developed to evaluate demographics of the program, clinic organization, and patient and preceptor characteristics, and to compare fellow satisfaction when fellows were the primary providers with faculty supervision versus attending-run clinics assisted by fellows or a combination of the two models. Pediatric subspecialty fellows in a 3-year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited program in the United States (excluding emergency medicine, neonatology, and critical care were invited to participate. Results: There were 644 respondents and nearly half (54% of these had fellow-run clinics. Eighty-six percent of fellows responded that they would prefer to have their own continuity clinics. Higher satisfaction ratings on maintaining continuity of care, being perceived as the primary provider, and feeling that they had greater autonomy in patient management were associated with being part of a fellow-run clinic experience (all P < 0.001. Additionally, fellow-run clinics were associated with a feeling of increased involvement in designing a treatment plan based on their differential diagnosis (P < 0.001. There were no significant associations with patient or preceptor characteristics. Conclusion: Fellow-run continuity clinics provide fellows with a greater sense of satisfaction and independence in management plans. Keywords: resident education/training, workforce, pediatric, patient-provider relationship, pediatric outpatient clinic

  2. Virtual Patients in continuing medical education and residency training: a pilot project for acceptance analysis in the framework of a residency revision course in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann, Ronny

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Virtual patients (VPs are a one-of-a-kind e-learning resource, fostering clinical reasoning skills through clinical case examples. The combination with face-to-face teaching is important for their successful integration, which is referred to as “blended learning”. So far little is known about the use of VPs in the field of continuing medical education and residency training. The pilot study presented here inquired the application of VPs in the framework of a pediatric residency revision course. Methods: Around 200 participants of a pediatric nephology lecture (‘nephrotic and nephritic syndrome in children’ were offered two VPs as a wrap-up session at the revision course of the German Society for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ 2009 in Heidelberg, Germany. Using a web-based survey form, different aspects were evaluated concerning the learning experiences with VPs, the combination with the lecture, and the use of VPs for residency training in general.Results: N=40 evaluable survey forms were returned (approximately 21%. The return rate was impaired by a technical problem with the local Wi-Fi firewall. The participants perceived the work-up of the VPs as a worthwhile learning experience, with proper preparation for diagnosing and treating real patients with similar complaints. Case presentations, interactivity, and locally and timely independent repetitive practices were, in particular, pointed out. On being asked about the use of VPs in general for residency training, there was a distinct demand for more such offers. Conclusion: VPs may reasonably complement existing learning activities in residency training.

  3. Strategic Application of Residence-Time Control in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mándity, István M; Ötvös, Sándor B; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    As a sustainable alternative for conventional batch-based synthetic techniques, the concept of continuous-flow processing has emerged in the synthesis of fine chemicals. Systematic tuning of the residence time, a key parameter of continuous-reaction technology, can govern the outcome of a chemical reaction by determining the reaction rate and the conversion and by influencing the product selectivity. This review furnishes a brief insight into flow reactions in which high chemo- and/or stereoselectivity can be attained by strategic residence-time control and illustrates the importance of the residence time as a crucial parameter in sustainable method development. Such a fine reaction control cannot be performed in conventional batch reaction set-ups. PMID:26246983

  4. Saudi Internal Medicine Residents׳ Perceptions of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination as a Formative Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Alaidarous

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Commission for Health Specialties first implemented the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE as part of the final year Internal Medicine clerkship exam during the 2007–2008 academic year. This study evaluated Internal Medicine residents׳ overall perceptions of the OSCE as a formative assessment tool. It focused on residents׳ perceptions of the OSCE stations׳ attributes, determined the acceptability of the process, and provided feedback to enhance further development of the assessment tool. The main objective was to assess Internal Medicine resident test-takers׳ perceptions and acceptance of the OSCE, and to identify its strengths and weaknesses through their feedback. Sixty six residents were involved in the studied administered on November 8th 2012 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Overall, resident׳s evaluation of the OSCE was favorable and encouraging. To this end, we recommend that formative assessment opportunities using the OSCE for providing feedback to students should be included in the curriculum, and continuing refinement and localized adaptation of OSCEs in use should be pursued by course directors and assessment personnel.

  5. Assessment of noise exposures in a pediatric dentistry residency clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadid, Khaled; Klein, Ulrich; Meinke, Deanna

    2011-01-01

    In addition to sounds from dental equipment, pediatric dentists are exposed to noise produced by precooperative and/or noncooperative children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the daily personal noise exposure of a pediatric dentistry resident while treating children in a teaching clinic to determine both comprehensive noise doses and peak noise occurrences as well as to assess the risk for noise-induced hearing loss. A noise dosimeter (Noise-Pro DLX) was used to measure the total personal noise exposure dose using the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hearing Conservation Amendment criteria and the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) occupational noise exposure revised criteria. Comprehensive noise doses for 31 days were obtained for a single resident. OSHA and NIOSH-allowable limits were not exceeded during any one day in the study period. Noise levels during crying episodes, however, were higher than the reported noise levels of dental instruments and reached maximum levels of 112.9 dBA. Noise levels to which the pediatric dental resident was exposed fell below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's damage-risk thresholds for noise-induced hearing loss.

  6. Use of a registry-generated audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention in an internal medicine resident clinic--a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kris G; Thomas, Matthew R; Stroebel, Robert J; McDonald, Furman S; Hanson, Gregory J; Naessens, James M; Huschka, Todd R; Kolars, Joseph C

    2007-12-01

    Disease registries, audit and feedback, and clinical reminders have been reported to improve care processes. To assess the effects of a registry-generated audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention on diabetes care. Randomized controlled trial conducted in a resident continuity clinic during the 2003-2004 academic year. Seventy-eight categorical Internal Medicine residents caring for 483 diabetic patients participated. Residents randomized to the intervention (n = 39) received instruction on diabetes registry use; quarterly performance audit, feedback, and written reports identifying patients needing care; and had letters sent quarterly to patients needing hemoglobin A1c or cholesterol testing. Residents randomized to the control group (n = 39) received usual clinic education. Hemoglobin A1c and lipid monitoring, and the achievement of intermediate clinical outcomes (hemoglobin A1c audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention in a resident continuity clinic modestly improved diabetes care processes, but did not influence intermediate clinical outcomes.

  7. Improving Continuity of Care Reduces Emergency Department Visits by Long-Term Care Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Emily Gard; Clarke, Barry; Burge, Frederick; Varatharasan, Nirupa; Archibald, Greg; Andrew, Melissa K

    2016-01-01

    Care by Design™ (CBD) (Canada), a model of coordinated team-based primary care, was implemented in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, to improve access to and continuity of primary care and to reduce high rates of transfers to emergency departments (EDs). This was an observational time series before and after the implementation of CBD (Canada). Participants are LTCF residents with 911 Emergency Health Services calls from 10 LTCFs, representing 1424 beds. Data were abstracted from LTCF charts and Emergency Health Services databases. The primary outcome was ambulance transports from LTCFs to EDs. Secondary outcomes included access (primary care physician notes in charts) and continuity (physician numbers and contacts). After implementation of CBD (Canada), transports from LTCFs to EDs were reduced by 36%, from 68 to 44 per month (P = .01). Relational and informational continuity of care improved with resident charts with ≥10 physician notes, increasing 38% before CBD to 55% after CBD (P = .003), and the median number of chart notes increased from 7 to 10 (P = .0026). Physicians contacted before 911 calls and onsite assessment increased from 38% to 54% (P = .01) and 3.7% to 9.2% (P = .03), respectively, before CBD to after CBD. A 34% reduction in overall transports from LTCFs to EDs is likely attributable to improved onsite primary care, with consistent physician and team engagement and improvements in continuity of care. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  8. Older adults' attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life: a pilot study interviewing residents of two continuing care communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Louise C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individualized decision making has been recommended for cancer screening decisions in older adults. Because older adults' preferences are central to individualized decisions, we assessed older adults' perspectives about continuing cancer screening later in life. Methods Face to face interviews with 116 residents age 70 or over from two long-term care retirement communities. Interview content included questions about whether participants had discussed cancer screening with their physicians since turning age 70, their attitudes about information important for individualized decisions, and their attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life. Results Forty-nine percent of participants reported that they had an opportunity to discuss cancer screening with their physician since turning age 70; 89% would have preferred to have had these discussions. Sixty-two percent believed their own life expectancy was not important for decision making, and 48% preferred not to discuss life expectancy. Attitudes about continuing cancer screening were favorable. Most participants reported that they would continue screening throughout their lives and 43% would consider getting screened even if their doctors recommended against it. Only 13% thought that they would not live long enough to benefit from cancer screening tests. Factors important to consider stopping include: age, deteriorating or poor health, concerns about the effectiveness of the tests, and doctors recommendations. Conclusion This select group of older adults held positive attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life, and many may have had unrealistic expectations. Individualized decision making could help clarify how life expectancy affects the potential survival benefits of cancer screening. Future research is needed to determine whether educating older adults about the importance of longevity in screening decisions would be acceptable, affect older adults

  9. Diabetes Quality of Care Before and After Implementation of a Resident Clinic Practice Partnership System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elizabeth A; Crowley, Matthew J; Powers, Benjamin J; Sanders, Linda L; Olsen, Maren K; Danus, Susanne; McNeill, Diana B; Zaas, Aimee K

    Deficiencies in resident diabetes care quality may relate to continuity clinic design. This retrospective analysis compared diabetes care processes and outcomes within a traditional resident continuity clinic structure (2005) and after the implementation of a practice partnership system (PPS; 2009). Under PPS, patients were more likely to receive annual foot examinations (odds ratio [OR] = 11.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.2, 18.5), microalbumin screening (OR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.6, 3.4), and aspirin use counseling (OR = 3.8; 95% CI = 2.5, 6.0) and were less likely to receive eye examinations (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.36, 0.82). Hemoglobin A1c and lipid testing were similar between periods, and there was no difference in achievement of diabetes and blood pressure goals. Patients were less likely to achieve cholesterol goals under PPS (OR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.39, 0.98). Resident practice partnerships may improve processes of diabetes care but may not affect intermediate outcomes.

  10. Using continuous underway isotope measurements to map water residence time in hydrodynamically complex tidal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Kraus, Tamara; Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffery A.; von Dessonneck, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopes present in water (δ2H, δ18O) have been used extensively to evaluate hydrological processes on the basis of parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, mixing, and residence time. In estuarine aquatic habitats, residence time (τ) is a major driver of biogeochemical processes, affecting trophic subsidies and conditions in fish-spawning habitats. But τ is highly variable in estuaries, owing to constant changes in river inflows, tides, wind, and water height, all of which combine to affect τ in unpredictable ways. It recently became feasible to measure δ2H and δ18O continuously, at a high sampling frequency (1 Hz), using diffusion sample introduction into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. To better understand the relationship of τ to biogeochemical processes in a dynamic estuarine system, we continuously measured δ2H and δ18O, nitrate and water quality parameters, on board a small, high-speed boat (5 to >10 m s–1) fitted with a hull-mounted underwater intake. We then calculated τ as is classically done using the isotopic signals of evaporation. The result was high-resolution (∼10 m) maps of residence time, nitrate, and other parameters that showed strong spatial gradients corresponding to geomorphic attributes of the different channels in the area. The mean measured value of τ was 30.5 d, with a range of 0–50 d. We used the measured spatial gradients in both τ and nitrate to calculate whole-ecosystem uptake rates, and the values ranged from 0.006 to 0.039 d–1. The capability to measure residence time over single tidal cycles in estuaries will be useful for evaluating and further understanding drivers of phytoplankton abundance, resolving differences attributable to mixing and water sources, explicitly calculating biogeochemical rates, and exploring the complex linkages among time-dependent biogeochemical processes in hydrodynamically complex environments such as estuaries.

  11. Clinical teachers' views on how teaching teams deliver and manage residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, Irene; Lombarts, Kiki; van der Vleuten, Cees; Mann, Karen; Jacobs, Johanna; Scherpbier, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Residents learn by working in a multidisciplinary context, in different locations, with many clinical teachers. Although clinical teachers are collectively responsible for residency training, little is known about the way teaching teams function. We conducted a qualitative study to explore clinical

  12. Improving Clinical Feedback to Anesthesia Residents by Using an Optical Scanner and a Microcomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Mark A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    At the University of Iowa problems associated with managing evaluations of anesthesia residents led to a major backlog of unanalyzed evaluation forms. A system developed at the University that enables ongoing feedback to residents and provides a method to assess the clinical competence of residents is described. (Author/MLW)

  13. Clinical teachers' views on how teaching teams deliver and manage residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Irene; Lombarts, Kiki; Van Der Vleuten, Cees; Mann, Karen; Jacobs, Johanna; Scherpbier, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Residents learn by working in a multidisciplinary context, in different locations, with many clinical teachers. Although clinical teachers are collectively responsible for residency training, little is known about the way teaching teams function. We conducted a qualitative study to explore clinical teachers' views on how teaching teams deliver residency training. Data were collected during six focus group interviews in 2010. The analysis revealed seven teamwork themes: (1) clinical teachers were more passionate about clinical expertise than about knowledge of teaching and teamwork; (2) residents needed to be informed about clinical teachers' shared expectations; (3) the role of the programme director in the teaching team needed further clarification; (4) the main topics of discussion in teaching teams were resident performance and the division of teaching tasks; (5) the structural elements of the organisation of residency training were clear; (6) clinical teachers had difficulty giving and receiving feedback and (7) clinical teachers felt under pressure to be accountable for team performance to external parties. The clinical teachers did not consider teamwork to be of any great significance to residency training. Teachers' views of professionalism and their own experiences as residents may explain their non-teamwork directed attitude. Efforts to strengthen teamwork within teaching teams may impact positively on the quality of residency training.

  14. Clinical risk and depression (continuing education credit).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, S

    1997-01-22

    This article provides information and guidance to nurses on clinical risks in mental health, particularly that of depression. It relates to UKCC professional development category: Reducing risk and Care enhancement.

  15. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees? key performance indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Karen A.; Raimo, John; Spielmann, Kelly; Chaudhry, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC) through the creation of a resident dashboard.Methods: Program leadership at a large univers...

  16. An Innovative Clinical Skills “Boot Camp” for Dental Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Castillo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available During a 1-year hospital-based residency, dental residents are required to rotate through many departments including surgery, medicine, and emergency medicine. It became apparent that there was a gap between clinical skills knowledge taught in dental school curriculum and skills required for hospital-based patient care. In response, a simulation-based intensive clinical skill “boot camp” was created. The boot camp provided an intensive, interactive 3-day session for the dental residents. During the 3 days, residents were introduced to medical knowledge and skills that were necessary for their inpatient hospital rotations but were lacking in traditional dental school curriculum. Effectiveness of the boot camp was assessed in terms of knowledge base and comfort through presession and postsession surveys. According to resident feedback, this intensive introduction for the dental residents improved their readiness for their inpatient hospital-based residency.

  17. A Model for Clinical Informatics Education for Residents: Addressing an Unmet Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Mark V; Luo, Brooke T; Orenstein, Evan W; Luberti, Anthony A

    2018-04-01

    Opportunities for education in clinical informatics exist throughout the spectrum of formal education extending from high school to postgraduate training. However, physicians in residency represent an underdeveloped source of potential informaticians. Despite the rapid growth of accredited fellowship programs since clinical informatics became a board-eligible subspecialty in 2011, few resident physicians are aware of their role at the intersection of clinical medicine and health information technology or associated opportunities. In an effort to educate and engage residents in clinical informatics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has developed a three-pronged model: (1) an elective rotation with hands-on project experience; (2) a longitudinal experience that offers increased exposure and mentorship; and (3) a resident founded and led working group in clinical informatics. We describe resident participation in these initiatives and lessons learned, as well as resident perceptions of how these components have positively influenced informatics knowledge and career choices. Since inception of this model, five residents have pursued the clinical informatics fellowship. This educational model supports resident involvement in hospital-wide informatics efforts with tangible projects and promotes wider engagement through educational opportunities commensurate with the resident's level of interest. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  18. Clinical teachers' views on how teaching teams deliver and manage residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, I.; Lombarts, K.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Mann, K.; Jacobs, J.; Scherpbier, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Residents learn by working in a multidisciplinary context, in different locations, with many clinical teachers. Although clinical teachers are collectively responsible for residency training, little is known about the way teaching teams function. Aim: We conducted a qualitative study to

  19. Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training across in- and outpatient clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Sommer, Johanna; Hudelson, Patricia; Demaurex, Florence; Luthy, Christophe; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Nendaz, Mathieu; De Grave, Willem; Dolmans, Diana; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-05-01

    Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training are important to identify before designing context-specific training programmes, since learrners' perceived needs can influence the effectiveness of training. To explore residents' perceptions of their training needs and training experiences around communication skills, and whether these differ between residents training in inpatient and outpatient clinical settings. Four focus groups (FG) and a self-administered questionnaire were conducted with residents working in in- and outpatient medical service settings at a Swiss University Hospital. Focus groups explored residents' perceptions of their communication needs, their past training experiences and suggestions for future training programmes in communication skills. Transcripts were analysed in a thematic way using qualitative analytic approaches. All residents from both settings were asked to complete a questionnaire that queried their sociodemographics and amount of prior training in communication skills. In focus groups, outpatient residents felt that communication skills were especially useful in addressing chronic diseases and social issues. In contrast, inpatient residents emphasized the importance of good communication skills for dealing with family conflicts and end-of-life issues. Felt needs reflected residents' differing service priorities: outpatient residents saw the need for skills to structure the consultation and explore patients' perspectives in order to build therapeutic alliances, whereas inpatient residents wanted techniques to help them break bad news, provide information and increase their own well-being. The survey's overall response rate was 56%. Its data showed that outpatient residents received more training in communication skills and more of them than inpatient residents considered communication skills training to be useful (100% vs 74%). Outpatient residents' perceived needs in communication skills were more patient

  20. Do Journal Clubs Work? The Effectiveness of Journal Clubs in a Clinical Pastoral Education Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleenor, David; Sharma, Vanshdeep; Hirschmann, Jo; Swarts, Heidi

    2018-01-01

    Journal clubs are an established means of ongoing learning in medicine. Beginning with physicians in the nineteenth century, journal clubs have gradually become established in nursing and other allied health professions. However, their use in Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) is relatively new. We describe the creation of a journal club for CPE residents and discuss the lessons learned from this effort. Over two years, a journal club was conducted with two different cohorts of residents. Residents were surveyed regarding the perceived strengths and weaknesses of the journal club and their recommendations for improvement. A small group of six to eight residents appears to be most effective. Focusing on a specific topic is preferable to broad-based readings. Residents preferred greater discussion about the applicability of the research findings to their clinical activity. Finally, the pros and cons of residents selecting articles and use of the Rush Research Summary Worksheet are discussed.

  1. 8 CFR 245a.15 - Continuous residence in an unlawful status since prior to January 1, 1982, through May 4, 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuous residence in an unlawful status... Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.15 Continuous residence in an... residence in the United States can be found at § 245a.2(d)(3). (2) The following evidence may establish an...

  2. Identification of Best Practices for Resident Aesthetic Clinics in Plastic Surgery Training: The ACAPS National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    C. Scott Hultman, MD, MBA, FACS; Cindy Wu, MD; Michael L. Bentz, MD; Richard J. Redett, MD; R. Bruce Shack, MD; Lisa R. David, MD; Peter J. Taub, MD; Jeffrey E. Janis, MD

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Resident aesthetic clinics (RACs) have demonstrated good outcomes and acceptable patient satisfaction, but few studies have evaluated their educational, financial, or medicolegal components. We sought to determine RAC best practices. Methods: We surveyed American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeon members (n = 399), focusing on operational details, resident supervision, patient safety, medicolegal history, financial viability, and research opportunities. Of the 96 respondent...

  3. Residency Programs and Clinical Leadership Skills Among New Saudi Graduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-01-01

    Nurse residency programs have been adopted by health care organizations to assist new graduate nurses with daily challenges such as intense working environments, increasing patient acuity, and complex technologies. Overall, nurse residency programs are proven beneficial in helping nurses transition from the student role to independent practitioners and bedside leaders. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of residency programs on leadership skills of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. The study design was cross-sectional involving a convenience sample (n = 98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The Clinical Leadership Survey was used to measure the new graduate nurses' clinical leadership skills based on whether they completed a residency program or not. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine leadership skills in this sample of new Saudi graduate nurses. A significant difference was found between residents and nonresidents in their leadership skills (t = 10.48, P = .000). Specifically, residents were significantly more likely to show higher levels of leadership skills compared to their counterparts. Attending a residency program was associated with a significant increase in clinical leadership skills. The findings of this study indicate that there is a need to implement more residency programs in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. It is imperative that nurse managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' leadership skills, which will in turn improve patient care. Further research should examine how residency programs influence new graduate nurses' transition from student to practitioner with regard to clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluating the quality, clinical relevance, and resident perception of the radiation oncology in-training examination: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Bar Ad, Voichita; McAna, John; Dicker, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    The yearly radiation oncology in-training examination (ITE) by the American College of Radiology is a widely used, norm-referenced educational assessment, with high test reliability and psychometric performance. We distributed a national survey to evaluate the academic radiation oncology community's perception of the ITE. In June 2014, a 7-question online survey was distributed via e-mail to current radiation oncology residents, program directors, and attending physicians who had completed residency in the past 5 years or junior attendings. Survey questions were designed on a 5-point Likert scale. Sign test was performed with P ≤ .05 considered statistically different from neutral. Thirty-one program directors (33.3%), 114 junior attendings (35.4%), and 225 residents (41.2%) responded. Junior attendings and program directors reported that the ITE directly contributed to their preparation for the American Board of Radiology written certification (P = .050 and .004, respectively). Residents did not perceive the examination as an accurate assessment of relevant clinical and scientific knowledge (P quality assurance is insufficient in its current form (P quality assurance and clinical relevance in the ITE. Although the current examination allows limited feedback, establishing a venue for individualized feedback may allow continual and timely improvement of the ITE. Adopting a criterion-referenced examination may further increase resident investment in and utilization of this valuable learning tool. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Essentials and guidelines for clinical medical physics residency training programs: executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, Joann I; Willis, Charles E; Burmeister, Jay W; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Das, Rupak K; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Gerbi, Bruce J; Harkness, Beth A; Patton, James A; Peck, Donald J; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Sandison, George A; White, Sharon L; Wichman, Brian D; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Both, Stefan

    2014-05-08

    There is a clear need for established standards for medical physics residency training. The complexity of techniques in imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology continues to increase with each passing year. It is therefore imperative that training requirements and competencies are routinely reviewed and updated to reflect the changing environment in hospitals and clinics across the country. In 2010, the AAPM Work Group on Periodic Review of Medical Physics Residency Training was formed and charged with updating AAPM Report Number 90. This work group includes AAPM members with extensive experience in clinical, professional, and educational aspects of medical physics. The resulting report, AAPM Report Number 249, concentrates on the clinical and professional knowledge needed to function independently as a practicing medical physicist in the areas of radiation oncology, imaging, and nuclear medicine, and constitutes a revision to AAPM Report Number 90. This manuscript presents an executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

  6. A Faculty Development Session or Resident as Teacher Session for Clinical and Clinical Teaching Techniques; Part 2 of 2: Engaging Learners with Effective Clinical Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This workshop is intended for faculty members in an emergency medicine (or other residency program, but is also appropriate for chief residents and medical student clerkship educators. Introduction: Faculty development sessions are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and enhance the learning environment within residency programs. Resident as teacher sessions are important in helping residents transition from junior learners to supervisors of medical students and junior residents. Part I of this two-part workshop introduces learners to effective techniques to engaging learners with clinical and bedside teaching. Objectives: By the end of this workshop, the learner will: 1 describe and implement nine new clinical teaching techniques; 2 implement clinical teaching techniques specific to junior and senior resident learners. Methods: This educational session is uses several blended instructional methods, including team- based learning (modified, the flipped classroom, audience response systems, pause procedures.

  7. [Pediatric palliative care: a national survey of French pediatric residents' knowledge, education, and clinical experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeubvre, C; Viallard, M-L; Schell, M

    2014-08-01

    The need for educational training of healthcare professionals in palliative care is an important issue. Training and practice of pediatric residents in the field of pediatric palliative care (PPC) has never been assessed, although the organization of the medical curriculum in France is currently being revised. This study presents a national survey of pediatric residents, using a computerized anonymous questionnaire. Four different areas were studied: epidemiological data, theoretical and practical knowledge, education, and clinical experience in PPC. The response rate was 39% (n=365/927). Whatever their age or regional location, 25% of residents did not know any details of the French law concerning patients' rights and the end of life. Experience with PPC starts very early since 77% of the first-year pediatric residents experienced at least one child in a palliative care and/or end-of-life situation. During their entire residency, 87% of the residents had experience with PPC and nearly all (96%) end-of-life care. Furthermore, 76% had participated in announcing palliative care (cancer, ICU, etc.) or a serious illness, and 45% had met and discussed with bereaved parents. Furthermore, while 97% of the pediatric residents received training in adult palliative care, mainly before their residency, only 60% received specific PPC training. Ninety-six percent of all French pediatric residents encountered a PPC situation during their residency. That 77% of them had experienced PPC during their first year of residency shows the importance of early training in PPC for pediatric residents. Furthermore, this study points out that there is a significant lack in PPC training since 40% of all residents in the study received no specific PPC training. Progress in education remains insufficient in the dissemination of knowledge on the legal framework and concepts of palliative medicine: while the medical curriculum is being revised, we suggest that training in medical ethics and PPC

  8. Heart rate, anxiety and performance of residents during a simulated critical clinical encounter: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Samuel; Horeczko, Timothy; Cotton, Dale; Bair, Aaron

    2014-07-27

    High-fidelity patient simulation has been praised for its ability to recreate lifelike training conditions. The degree to which high fidelity simulation elicits acute emotional and physiologic stress among participants - and the influence of acute stress on clinical performance in the simulation setting - remain areas of active exploration. We examined the relationship between residents' self-reported anxiety and a proxy of physiologic stress (heart rate) as well as their clinical performance in a simulation exam using a validated assessment of non-technical skills, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (Ottawa GRS). This was a prospective observational cohort study of emergency medicine residents at a single academic center. Participants managed a simulated clinical encounter. Anxiety was assessed using a pre- and post-simulation survey, and continuous cardiac monitoring was performed on each participant during the scenario. Performance in the simulation scenario was graded by faculty raters using a critical actions checklist and the Ottawa GRS instrument. Data collection occurred during the 2011 academic year. Of 40 eligible residents, 34 were included in the analysis. The median baseline heart rate for participants was 70 beats per minute (IQR: 62 - 78). During the simulation, the median maximum heart rate was 140 beats per minute (IQR: 137 - 151). The median minimum heart rate during simulation was 81 beats per minute (IQR: 72 - 92), and mean heart rate was 117 beats per minute (95% CI: 111 - 123). Pre- and post-simulation anxiety scores were equal (mean 3.3, IQR: 3 to 4). The minimum and maximum Overall Ottawa GRS scores were 2.33 and 6.67, respectively. The median Overall score was 5.63 (IQR: 5.0 to 6.0). Of the candidate predictors of Overall performance in a multivariate logistic regression model, only PGY status showed statistical significance (P = 0.02). Simulation is associated with physiologic stress, and heart rate elevation alone

  9. Toward an Ecological Perspective of Resident Teaching Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are…

  10. Nurses' clinical decision-making for preserving nursing home residents' remaining abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jung Eun; Kim, Mi So; Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Sung Ok

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to clarify and conceptualise nurses' clinical decision-making for preserving the remaining abilities of nursing home residents suffering from physical-cognitive functional decline. Older adults experience physical, psychological and social changes, but their remaining abilities differ across individuals. This study used a qualitative research to gain a deeper understanding of nursing homes nurses' clinical decision-making. In-depth interviews with 32 experienced nurses were undertaken. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Six categories and 58 subcategories of nursing practice related to managing the remaining abilities of residents with physical-cognitive functional decline were generated. The results of this study revealed five themes: (1) seeing residents' potential, (2) physical, emotional and psychosocial care in daily routines, (3) keeping personalised charts, (4) encouraging, promoting and physical and emotional support and (5) preparing residents for more independent living. The results were categorised into nurses' personal strategies based on their experience, practical nursing knowledge, nursing interventions and nursing evaluation criteria. The themes reflected positive views on the residents' functional abilities and the nursing homes nurses' perception that their goal was to help residents achieve their highest level of independence. Preserving nursing home residents' remaining abilities represents nurses' optimistic view of residents' functional status. Routine care tailored for preserving the remaining abilities of individual nursing home residents with physical-cognitive functional decline is needed. Preserving the remaining abilities of nursing home resident is supported by therapeutic interactions including close contact as well as physical and emotional support. Nurses' main goal in working with residents with remaining abilities is improving their independence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The pedagogic characteristics of a clinical conference for senior residents and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, N D; Nagler, J; Lovejoy, F H; Hafler, J P

    1995-09-01

    To determine the pedagogic characteristics of a clinical conference for senior pediatric residents and selected faculty. Nineteen senior pediatric residents and 14 selected faculty members participated in a daily clinical conference at Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass. Qualitative research design using videotapes of nine consecutive hour-long sessions to generate pedagogic topics to be investigated using a questionnaire administered to participating residents and faculty. Narrative responses were analyzed to find pedagogic themes. Analysis of videotapes generated the following three topics: What facilitated learning? What was learned? What makes the process of teaching and learning effective? In the questionnaire residents indicated that learning was facilitated by resident-faculty interactions (19/19), faculty participation (19/19), and information resources (12/19). Content learned included information (16/19), approach to diagnosis (11/19), management strategies (14/19), and different perspective (14/19). An effective process of teaching and learning was attributed to case-based resident initiated discussion (19/19), facilitation by the chief resident (16/19), and non-competitive discussions in which expert faculty played a nondominant role (19/19). Faculty identified identical factors relating to all three themes. The mean rating of the conference was 4.5/5 (SD, +/- 0.50) and 4.7/5 (SD, +/- 0.45) by residents and faculty, respectively (Likert scale, 1 to 5). The pedagogic effectiveness of this conference was attributed to a resident-centered, case-based learning format and a discussion process characterized by noncompetitive interactions among faculty and residents, strong group facilitation by the chief resident, and participation of faculty experts in a nondominant role.

  12. Neurohospitalists enhance resident perception of the educational and clinical value of a night float rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, James G

    2013-10-01

    Neurology residency training programs have been profoundly impacted by recent changes in resident duty hours, workloads, and supervisory requirements. In response, many programs have adopted a night float coverage system to minimize the requirements for overnight call. The majority involves residents working a block of night shifts in what is typically a service-oriented rotation. Recently, concerns have arisen regarding the impact of this design on resident education and patient care. We have developed a novel on-site nighttime neurohospitalist model for the explicit purpose of steepening the initial learning curve for neurology residents in an effort to rapidly improve their neurological skills and, in conjunction, overnight patient care. We surveyed residents after the initiation of this system to assess their perception of the impact of direct overnight supervision on education and patient care. As part of ongoing quality improvement efforts, surveys were administered to neurology house staff at a tertiary academic medical center after they had completed service on the night float rotation both with and without an attending in the hospital using a retrospective pre/postdesign. There was a robust positive impact on resident's perception of overall quality, educational value, and clinical quality on the night float rotation with an attending on-site. Despite an overall perception that their autonomy was maintained, residents believed barriers to contact the attending were lower, and attending interaction during critical decision making was more frequent. Direct overnight supervision by a neurohospitalist enhances the educational value and care quality on overnight resident rotations.

  13. Transfer of communication skills to the workplace during clinical rounds: impact of a program for residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Bragard, Isabelle; Delvaux, Nicole; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Marchal, Serge; Meunier, Julie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2010-08-26

    Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds. Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm). Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models. Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median=92) compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median=88) (p=.046). Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR)=1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI)=1.02-1.34; p=.023). Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR=1.01; 95%CI=1.01-1.02; p=.018) and supportive utterances (RR=0.99; 95%CI=0.98-1.00; p=.042) (respectively 1.15 (RR), 1.08-1.23 (95%CI), pcommunication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to training attendance but remained limited. Future studies should therefore focus on the improvement of the efficacy of communication skills training in order to ensure a more important training effect size on transfer.

  14. Core components of clinical education: a qualitative study with attending physicians and their residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIREZA ESTEGHAMATI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In medical education, particularly in residency courses, most of the training occurs in real clinical environments. Workplace-based learning profoundly affects students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice; therefore, it should be properly planned. Due to the extensiveness of the clinical environment and its importance in training residents, investigating how residents learn in these environments and detecting factors that influence effectiveness will help curriculum designers to promote residents’ learning by improving their learning environment. Therefore, our qualitative content analysis study, aimed to examine the experiences and perspectives of internal and surgical residents and their attending physicians about learning in clinical settings. Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was conducted through purposeful sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 internal and surgical residents and 15 of their attending physicians at educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Results: The main categories explored in this study were hidden curriculum, learning resources, and learning conditions. In the context of clinical environment and under its individual culture, residents learn professionalism and learn to improve their communication skills with patients and colleagues. Because of clinical obligations such as priority of treating the patients for education or workload of the attending physicians, residents acquire most of their practical knowledge from colleagues, fellows, or follow-up patients in different learning conditions (such as: educational rounds, morning reports and outpatient clinics. They see some of their attending physicians as role models. Conclusion: Changing cultural and contextual factors is of prime importance to promote a learning-oriented environment in a clinical setting. The present findings will help curriculum planners and attending physicians to improve

  15. Residency evaluation and adherence design study: Young ophthalmologists' perception of their residency programs – Clinical and surgical skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Gogate

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Residency training is the basis of good clinical and surgical practice. Purpose: The aim is to know the demographics, training experience, and perception of young ophthalmologists to improve the present residency programs in India. Setting: Young ophthalmologists trained in India. Methods: A survey was conducted by the Academic and Research Committee of the All India Ophthalmology Society, in 2014–2016 of young ophthalmologists (those trained between 2002 and 2012, with 2–10 years' postresidency experience to gauge teaching of clinical and surgical skills during the postgraduate residency program. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 16. Results: Of the 1005 respondents, 531 fulfilled inclusion criteria. Average age was 32.6 years (standard deviation [SD] 4. On a scale of 0–10, clinical skills teaching was graded as (mean, SD: Slit lamp examination (7.2, SD 2.8, indirect ophthalmoscopy (6.2, SD 3.3, gonioscopy (5.7, SD 3.4, perimetry (6.2, SD 3.2, optical coherence tomography (4.6, SD 4, and orthoptic evaluation (4.3, SD 3.1. The mean (SD and median of surgeries performed independently was intracapsular cataract extraction 3.0 (14.9, 0; extracapsular cataract extraction 39.9 (53.2, 18; small incision cataract surgery 75.3 (64.4, 55; phacoemulsification 30 (52.6, 1; pterygium excision 31.5 (43.5, 15; dacryocystectomy 20.3 (38.1, 4; dacryocystorhinostomy 11.7 (26.2, 2; chalazion 46.4 (48.3, 30; trabeculectomies 4 (14.9, 0; strabismus correction 1.4 (4.9, 0; laser-assisted in situ Keratomileusis 1.5 (12.2, 0; retinal detachment 1.5 (12.5, 0; vitrectomy 3.0 (17.0, 0; keratoplasty 5.2 (17.8, 0; eyelid surgery 8.6 (18.9, 2 and ocular emergencies 41.7 (52.4, 20. Observed and assisted surgeries were more common. However, the range of grading was 0–10 in all categories. Conclusion: Residency training in India varies considerably from program to program. Standardization is needed to assure all graduates

  16. Commentary: the postdoctoral residency match in clinical neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Doug; Grote, Christopher L

    2016-07-01

    Postdoctoral recruitment in clinical neuropsychology has evolved significantly over the past two decades. Prior to 1994, there were no organized recruitment guidelines for the specialty. From 1994 to 2001, the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology (APPCN) facilitated a uniform notification date where member programs agreed to not make offers prior to a specified date. In 2001, APPCN partnered with National Matching Services to administer a computerized match recruitment system. Presently, not all programs participate in the match. This often results in students applying to 'match' and 'non-match' programs which can lead to significant stress on the part of applicants and program directors. This issue has recently become the focus of journal articles and public discussions. The goals of this paper were to review the history of postdoctoral recruitment in clinical neuropsychology, review the benefits of coordinated recruitment systems, review the structure and function of the computerized match, and explain why the computerized match for postdoctoral recruitment in clinical neuropsychology is beneficial for the specialty of clinical neuropsychology.

  17. Resident Cosmetic Clinic: Practice Patterns, Safety, and Outcomes at an Academic Plastic Surgery Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ali A; Parikh, Rajiv P; Myckatyn, Terence M; Tenenbaum, Marissa M

    2016-10-01

    Comprehensive aesthetic surgery education is an integral part of plastic surgery residency training. Recently, the ACGME increased minimum requirements for aesthetic procedures in residency. To expand aesthetic education and prepare residents for independent practice, our institution has supported a resident cosmetic clinic for over 25 years. To evaluate the safety of procedures performed through a resident clinic by comparing outcomes to benchmarked national aesthetic surgery outcomes and to provide a model for resident clinics in academic plastic surgery institutions. We identified a consecutive cohort of patients who underwent procedures through our resident cosmetic clinic between 2010 and 2015. Major complications, as defined by CosmetAssure database, were recorded and compared to published aesthetic surgery complication rates from the CosmetAssure database for outcomes benchmarking. Fisher's exact test was used to compare sample proportions. Two hundred and seventy-one new patients were evaluated and 112 patients (41.3%) booked surgery for 175 different aesthetic procedures. There were 55 breast, 19 head and neck, and 101 trunk or extremity aesthetic procedures performed. The median number of preoperative and postoperative visits was 2 and 4 respectively with a mean follow-up time of 35 weeks. There were 3 major complications (2 hematomas and 1 infection requiring IV antibiotics) with an overall complication rate of 1.7% compared to 2.0% for patients in the CosmetAssure database (P = .45). Surgical outcomes for procedures performed through a resident cosmetic clinic are comparable to national outcomes for aesthetic surgery procedures, suggesting this experience can enhance comprehensive aesthetic surgery education without compromising patient safety or quality of care. 4 Risk. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  19. Maintaining continuity of care for nursing home residents: effect of states' Medicaid bed-hold policies and reimbursement rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Orna; Schleinitz, Mark; Grabowski, David C; Zinn, Jacqueline; Mor, Vincent

    2009-02-01

    Recent public concern in response to states' intended repeal of Medicaid bed-hold policies and report of their association with higher hospitalization rates prompts examination of these policies in ensuring continuity of care within the broader context of Medicaid policies. Minimum Data Set assessments of long-stay nursing home residents in April-June 2000 linked to Medicare claims enabled tracking residents' hospitalizations during the ensuing 5 months and determining hospital discharge destination. Multinomial multilevel models estimated the effect of state policies on discharge destination controlling for resident, hospitalization, nursing home, and market characteristics. Among 77,955 hospitalizations, 5,797 (7.4 percent) were not discharged back to the baseline nursing home. Bed-hold policies were associated with lower odds of transfer to another nursing home (AOR=0.55, 95 percent CI 0.52-0.58) and higher odds of hospitalization (AOR=1.36), translating to 9.5 fewer nursing home transfers and 77.9 more hospitalizations per 1,000 residents annually, and costing Medicaid programs about $201,311. Higher Medicaid reimbursement rates were associated with lower odds of transfer. Bed-hold policies were associated with greater continuity of NH care; however, their high cost compared with their small impact on transfer but large impact on increased hospitalizations suggests that they may not be effective.

  20. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees' key performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Karen A; Raimo, John; Spielmann, Kelly; Chaudhry, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC) through the creation of a resident dashboard. Program leadership at a large university-based program developed four new end of rotation evaluations based on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and Accreditation Council of Graduated Medical Education's (ACGME) 22 reportable milestones. A resident dashboard was then created to pull together both milestone- and non-milestone-based quantitative data and qualitative data compiled from faculty, nurses, peers, staff, and patients. Dashboards were distributed to the members of the CCC in preparation for the semiannual CCC meeting. CCC members adjudicated quantitative and qualitative data to present their cohort of residents at the CCC meeting. Based on the committee's response, evaluation scores remained the same or were adjusted. Final milestone scores were then entered into the accreditation data system (ADS) on the ACGME website. The process of resident assessment is complex and should comprise both quantitative and qualitative data. The dashboard is a valuable tool for program leadership to use both when evaluating house staff on a semiannual basis at the CCC and to the resident in person.

  1. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees’ key performance indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Friedman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC through the creation of a resident dashboard. Methods: Program leadership at a large university-based program developed four new end of rotation evaluations based on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM and Accreditation Council of Graduated Medical Education's (ACGME 22 reportable milestones. A resident dashboard was then created to pull together both milestone- and non-milestone-based quantitative data and qualitative data compiled from faculty, nurses, peers, staff, and patients. Results: Dashboards were distributed to the members of the CCC in preparation for the semiannual CCC meeting. CCC members adjudicated quantitative and qualitative data to present their cohort of residents at the CCC meeting. Based on the committee's response, evaluation scores remained the same or were adjusted. Final milestone scores were then entered into the accreditation data system (ADS on the ACGME website. Conclusions: The process of resident assessment is complex and should comprise both quantitative and qualitative data. The dashboard is a valuable tool for program leadership to use both when evaluating house staff on a semiannual basis at the CCC and to the resident in person.

  2. Unpacking the Clinical and Participatory Dimensions of the Trump Math-Teacher-Residency-Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanuel-Noy, Dalia; Wagner, Tili

    2016-01-01

    The research presents a Residency Math teacher education program that has been developed in Israel in search of transforming initial teacher preparation on the Clinical-Participatory continuum. It is a "multi-phase" mixed-method research aiming to present the clinical and participatory dimensions of the TMR: the way in which they are…

  3. Marketplace Clinics Complementing Diabetes Care for Urban Residing American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Robert; Hoye, Robert E; Thron, Raymond W; Kumar, Vibha

    2017-10-01

    For several decades, the Minneapolis American Indian population has experienced limited health care access and threefold diabetes health disparity. As part of an urban health initiative, the marketplace clinics located in nearby CVS, Target, and Supervalu stores committed financial support, providers, certified educators, and pharmacy staff for a community-based diabetes support group. To measure the extent to which collaborating marketplace clinics and the community-based support group expanded diabetes care and provided self-management education for this largely urban Indian neighborhood. A controlled quasi-experimental study and 3-years retrospective analysis of secondary data were used to test whether the Minneapolis marketplace clinics and the community diabetes support group participants (n = 48) had improved diabetes health outcomes relative to the comparison group (n = 87). The marketplace complemented intervention group employed motivational interviewing and the patient activation measure (PAM®) in coaching diabetes self-care and behavioral modification. The federally funded comparison group received only basic self-management education. T tests and effect sizes were used to quantify the difference between the study intervention and comparison groups. Statistical significance was determined for the following outcome variables: A1C ( P health complementation were found with regard to improved blood glucose control, weight loss, and healthful lifestyle adaptation. Primary care and community health improvements could be realized by incorporating patient activation with diabetes prevention programs for the urban Indian two-thirds majority of the United States 5 million American Indian population.

  4. Perception of Preparedness for Clinical Work Among New Residents: A Cross-sectional Study from Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Al Sinawi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate new residents’ perceptions of their own preparedness for clinical practice and examine the associated factors. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on August 20−23, 2016. New residents accepted for postgraduate training by Oman Medical Specialty Board were asked to complete the Preparation for Hospital Practice Questionnaire (PHPQ. Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22. Results: A total of 160 residents were invited to participate in this study. Out of 160, 140 residents participated (87.5%, 70.7% were female and 59.3% were graduates from Sultan Qaboos University (SQU. Ninety-nine percent of the graduates were either ‘well prepared’ or ‘fairly well prepared’ for hospital practice. Male residents scored higher in the confidence scale, while residents who did a post-internship general practice placement scored higher in understanding science. Graduates from Oman Medical College felt more prepared compared to graduates from SQU. Conclusions: Most of the new residents were well prepared to clinical work. Factors such as place of undergraduate study, training, and duration of internship significantly influenced the residents’ perception of preparedness. Addressing these factors will enhance residents’ preparedness for clinical work.

  5. Analyzing communication skills of Pediatric Postgraduate Residents in Clinical Encounter by using video recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Attia; Khan, Rehan Ahmed; Jabeen, Uzma; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2017-01-01

    To analyze communication skills of pediatric postgraduate residents in clinical encounter by using video recordings. This qualitative exploratory research was conducted through video recording at The Children's Hospital Lahore, Pakistan. Residents who had attended the mandatory communication skills workshop offered by CPSP were included. The video recording of clinical encounter was done by a trained audiovisual person while the resident was interacting with the patient in the clinical encounter. Data was analyzed by thematic analysis. Initially on open coding 36 codes emerged and then through axial and selective coding these were condensed to 17 subthemes. Out of these four main themes emerged: (1) Courteous and polite attitude, (2) Marginal nonverbal communication skills, (3) Power game/Ignoring child participation and (4) Patient as medical object/Instrumental behaviour. All residents treated the patient as a medical object to reach a right diagnosis and ignored them as a human being. There was dominant role of doctors and marginal nonverbal communication skills were displayed by the residents in the form of lack of social touch, and appropriate eye contact due to documenting notes. A brief non-medical interaction for rapport building at the beginning of interaction was missing and there was lack of child involvement. Paediatric postgraduate residents were polite while communicating with parents and child but lacking in good nonverbal communication skills. Communication pattern in our study was mostly one-way showing doctor's instrumental behaviour and ignoring the child participation.

  6. Development of a pharmacy resident rotation to expand decentralized clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, John D; Williams, Jonathan P; Barnes, Julie F; Greenlee, Katie M; Cardiology, Bcps-Aq; Leonard, Mandy C

    2017-07-15

    The development of a pharmacy resident rotation to expand decentralized clinical pharmacy services is described. In an effort to align with the initiatives proposed within the ASHP Practice Advancement Initiative, the department of pharmacy at Cleveland Clinic, a 1,400-bed academic, tertiary acute care medical center in Cleveland, Ohio, established a goal to provide decentralized clinical pharmacy services for 100% of patient care units within the hospital. Patient care units that previously had no decentralized pharmacy services were evaluated to identify opportunities for expansion. Metrics analyzed included number of medication orders verified per hour, number of pharmacy dosing consultations, and number of patient discharge counseling sessions. A pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of this service and potential resident learning opportunities. A learning experience description was drafted, and feedback was solicited regarding the development of educational components utilized throughout the rotation. Pharmacists who were providing services to similar patient populations were identified to serve as preceptors. Staff pharmacists were deployed to previously uncovered patient care units, with pharmacy residents providing decentralized services on previously covered areas. A rotating preceptor schedule was developed based on geographic proximity and clinical expertise. An initial postimplementation assessment of this resident-driven service revealed that pharmacy residents provided a comparable level of pharmacy services to that of staff pharmacists. Feedback collected from nurses, physicians, and pharmacy staff also supported residents' ability to operate sufficiently in this role to optimize patient care. A learning experience developed for pharmacy residents in a large medical center enabled the expansion of decentralized clinical services without requiring additional pharmacist full-time equivalents. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of

  7. Clinical effect of combined ulinastatin and continuous renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the effect of a combination of ulinastatin and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for the treatment of severe sepsis with acute kidney injury (SAKI). Methods: Clinical data for 106 patients diagnosed with SAKI from April 2013 to May 2015 in the intensive care unit (ICU) of Affiliated Hospital of ...

  8. The OSCE progress test--Measuring clinical skill development over residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Debra; Touchie, Claire; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Wood, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of an objective structured clinical examination for Internal Medicine residents (IM-OSCE) as a progress test for clinical skills. Data from eight administrations of an IM-OSCE were analyzed retrospectively. Data were scaled to a mean of 500 and standard deviation (SD) of 100. A time-based comparison, treating post-graduate year (PGY) as a repeated-measures factor, was used to determine how residents' performance progressed over time. Residents' total IM-OSCE scores (n = 244) increased over training from a mean of 445 (SD = 84) in PGY-1 to 534 (SD = 71) in PGY-3 (p OSCE for all three years of training (n = 46), mean structured oral scores increased from 464 (SD = 92) to 533 (SD = 83) (p OSCE can be used to demonstrate progression of clinical skills throughout residency training. Although most of the clinical skills assessed improved as residents progressed through their training, communication skills did not appear to change.

  9. Plastic surgery training: evaluating patient satisfaction with facial fillers in a resident clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Stolle, Ellen; Brown, Benjamin J; Christian, Cathalene Blake; Baker, Stephen B

    2012-12-01

    Resident cosmetic surgery clinics, or "chief clinics," are arguably the most effective way to provide cosmetic surgery training. Approximately 70 % of plastic surgery training programs utilize a "chief resident clinic" to augment their cosmetic surgery experience, even though a quantitative outcome scale is lacking to guide education. We report the use of the FACE-Q, a novel patient outcome tool, to evaluate patients' satisfaction with nonsurgical facial rejuvenation performed by residents. The FACE-Q "Satisfaction with Facial Appearance Overall Scale" was administered to patients prior to and 1 week after undergoing nonsurgical facial rejuvenation performed by plastic surgery residents. All patients received nonsurgical facial rejuvenation with botulinum toxin A and hyaluronic acid as part of resident facial aesthetics training. Eleven patients completed the pre- and postinjection FACE-Q survey. Average overall facial appearance satisfaction scores of 47.6 pre- and 51.1 postinjection were found (p < 0.037), with a total possible score of 68. Ten patients (91 %) reported feeling satisfied or very satisfied with the overall appearance of their face following injection. Despite resident inexperience and patient awareness that novices were performing the procedures, our experience supports use of the FACE-Q to optimize and endorse resident cosmetic surgery clinics. The learning curve for facial cosmetic procedures can be adversely affected by limited time available or exposure to improvement variables when initially performing the procedure. It is imperative to any technique that direct, and preferably quantitative, feedback is given so that an immediate modification can be generated and successive patient outcomes improved. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  10. [Clinical and radiologic skills for fracture management. Multicenter study at orthopedics residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo-Gómez, E; Pavía-Carrillo, E; Mendoza-Cruz, U

    2011-01-01

    There is a shortcoming in the diagnostic integration of the mechanism of injury and the radiographic findings. This leads to diagnostic errors and a poor surgical planning with labor and legal repercussions. The purpose is to find out which is the prevailing clinical skill in various Orthopedics residencies by applying a measurement tool prepared ex profeso. This is an exploratory study conducted in nine Orthopedics residency sites; a measurement tool was designed with theoretical and empirical adequacy with 0.96 reliability (Kuder-Richardson). It includes ten clinical cases with 200 questions providing only X-ray images of a traumatic event exploring the following aspects: I. Kinematics of trauma, II. Clinical diagnosis, III. Radiographic interpretation, IV. Treatment, and V. Prognosis. It was applied to residents of all grades at each of the participating sites. Most of the sites had a low to intermediate level of clinical skills. Upon assessing the results (82 residents) differences were found in indicators I, II, IV and in the overall skills. No significant differences were seen at the sites in indicators III and V. The assessment of sites by indicators showed that site one had more refined skills for clinical diagnosis, while site six for radiographic interpretation. There are differences in the development level of the clinical skills studied. The low to intermediate skills may be explained by the different educational strategies applied at the sites studied without ruling out the experience acquired in each academic grade. It is possible to improve the results by implementing participative strategies.

  11. Explaining the Learning Experiences of Clinical Procedures of the Internal Medicine Residents at Department of Gastroenterology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Taghavinia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the method and way of learning and teaching are effective in acquiring clinical skills, and identifying the shortcomings of learning and teaching will lead to better planning. The purpose of this study was to explain the experiences of the learning clinical procedures of the internal medicine residents in gastroenterology department. Methods: qualitative study using content thematic analysis was done. Six fourth-year residents were selected and interviewed considering purposive sampling. The data of the interviews were transcribed and analyzed after rereading. Results: the collected data are divided into three categories: learning and experience with the following four categories (learning time and experiencing, leaning and experiencing times, learning and experiencing opportunities, training and the lack of the training of some procedures. These categories are explained by using some quotes derived from the data. Conclusion: the results of this study suggest that the administrative management of internal residency is poor and should get seriously in implementation and application of intended instructions existing in the prepared program of Medical Education and Specialized Council of internal residency period. The attending physicians and residents must be aware of the content of education program at the beginning of the residency periods and the trainers must try to supervise the residents’ education.

  12. Transfer of communication skills to the workplace during clinical rounds: impact of a program for residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Liénard

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds.Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm. Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models.Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median=92 compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median=88 (p=.046. Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR=1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI=1.02-1.34; p=.023. Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR=1.01; 95%CI=1.01-1.02; p=.018 and supportive utterances (RR=0.99; 95%CI=0.98-1.00; p=.042 (respectively 1.15 (RR, 1.08-1.23 (95%CI, p<.001 for empathy and 0.95 (RR, 0.92-0.99 (95%CI, p=.012 for reassurance was proportional to the number of hours of training attendance.The training program improved patients' satisfaction and allowed the transfer of residents' communication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to training attendance but remained limited. Future studies should therefore focus on the improvement of the efficacy of communication skills

  13. Lessons learned from a resident-led clinical trial in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, Dustin J W; Cullimore, Amie J

    2013-08-01

    Completion of a randomised controlled trial is one way by which the resident research requirement can be met in Canadian obstetrics and gynaecology programmes. However, little is known about the specific challenges of performing clinical trials within the specialty, let alone as a resident project. A resident-led randomised controlled trial comparing two methods of labour induction at term was halted due to insufficient patient enrolment. A structured review of the study design and recruitment process was conducted to identify factors contributing to poor recruitment. In addition to completing a literature review and internal review by the research team, we surveyed obstetricians and residents regarding recruitment efforts and barriers to participation. We solicited feedback on trial design and the expectations of clinicians with respect to participation in research studies. Eight obstetricians (67%) and 13 residents (93%) responded to the survey. All were able to identify eligible patients, though only 60% had invited one or more patients to participate during the recruitment period. Failure to consider trial participation and excessive clinical workload were the most commonly cited barriers for clinicians. Resistance to the test intervention was the major barrier to patient participation. Several residents cited a lack of personal incentive to recruit patients as a significant barrier. The research team was unable to contact patients directly, thus limiting the scope of our review to our internal methods and feedback from clinicians. Poor recruitment in a resident-led clinical trial in obstetrics resulted from multiple coexisting factors. A structured review provided valuable insight for the research team. Academic clinicians and trainees in all specialties should be encouraged to share their experiences in the hope of improving the likelihood of success in future research endeavours.

  14. Resident characterization of better-than- and worse-than-average clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydar, Bishr; Charnin, Jonathan; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Baker, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Clinical teachers and trainees share a common view of what constitutes excellent clinical teaching, but associations between these behaviors and high teaching scores have not been established. This study used residents' written feedback to their clinical teachers, to identify themes associated with above- or below-average teaching scores. All resident evaluations of their clinical supervisors in a single department were collected from January 1, 2007 until December 31, 2008. A mean teaching score assigned by each resident was calculated. Evaluations that were 20% higher or 15% lower than the resident's mean score were used. A subset of these evaluations was reviewed, generating a list of 28 themes for further study. Two researchers then, independently coded the presence or absence of these themes in each evaluation. Interrater reliability of the themes and logistic regression were used to evaluate the predictive associations of the themes with above- or below-average evaluations. Five hundred twenty-seven above-average and 285 below-average evaluations were evaluated for the presence or absence of 15 positive themes and 13 negative themes, which were divided into four categories: teaching, supervision, interpersonal, and feedback. Thirteen of 15 positive themes correlated with above-average evaluations and nine had high interrater reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient >0.6). Twelve of 13 negative themes correlated with below-average evaluations, and all had high interrater reliability. On the basis of these findings, the authors developed 13 recommendations for clinical educators. The authors developed 13 recommendations for clinical teachers using the themes identified from the above- and below-average clinical teaching evaluations submitted by anesthesia residents.

  15. Measurement of residence time distribution of liquid phase in an industrial-scale continuous pulp digester using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheoran, Meenakshi; Goswami, Sunil; Pant, Harish J; Biswal, Jayashree; Sharma, Vijay K; Chandra, Avinash; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K; Rao, S Madhukar; Dash, A

    2016-05-01

    A series of radiotracer experiments was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase (alkali) in an industrial-scale continuous pulp digester in a paper industry in India. Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer. Experiments were carried out at different biomass and white liquor flow rates. The measured RTD data were treated and mean residence times in individual digester tubes as well in the whole digester were determined. The RTD was also analyzed to identify flow abnormalities and investigate flow dynamics of the liquid phase in the pulp digester. Flow channeling was observed in the first section (tube 1) of the digester. Both axial dispersion and tanks-in-series with backmixing models preceded with a plug flow component were used to simulate the measured RTD and quantify the degree of axial mixing. Based on the study, optimum conditions for operating the digester were proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of a systems-based approach to prescribing errors in a pediatric resident clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condren, Michelle; Honey, Brooke L; Carter, Sandra M; Ngo, Nelson; Landsaw, Jeremy; Bryant, Cheryl; Gillaspy, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    To measure the difference in prescribing error rates between 2 clinics, 1 with a system in place to reduce errors and 1 with no such system; to determine variables that affect the likelihood of prescription errors. This was a retrospective study at 2 university-based general pediatric clinics utilizing the same electronic medical record (EMR) system. Clinic 1 employed pharmacists who provided daily prescription review, provider feedback and education, and EMR customization to decrease errors. Clinic 2 had no systems in place for reducing prescribing errors. Prescriptions written by resident physicians over 2 months were identified and reviewed. A total of 1361 prescriptions were reviewed, 40.7% from clinic 1 and 59.3% from clinic 2. Errors were found in 201 prescriptions (14.8%). Clinics 1 and 2 had error rates of 11% and 17.5%, respectively (P = .0012). The odds of a prescription error at clinic 2 were 1.7 times the odds of a prescription error at clinic 1. Logistic regression identified clinic, nonpediatric resident, liquid dose forms, and younger patient age as significant predictors of prescription errors. Half of the errors could have been prevented with consistent use of a custom medication list within the EMR. We found 37% fewer prescribing errors in a clinic with systems in place for prescribing error detection and prevention. Pediatric clinics should explore systematic procedures for identifying, resolving, and providing education about prescribing errors to reduce patient risk. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors influencing residents' evaluations of clinical faculty member teaching qualities and role model status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas J; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2012-04-01

      Evaluations of faculty members are widely used to identify excellent or substandard teaching performance. In order to enable such evaluations to be properly interpreted and used in faculty development, it is essential to understand the factors that influence resident doctors' (residents) evaluations of the teaching qualities of faculty members and their perceptions of faculty members as role-model specialists.   We carried out a cross-sectional survey within a longitudinal study of the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ) of clinical teachers. The study sample included 889 residents and 1014 faculty members in 61 teaching programmes spanning 22 specialties in 20 hospitals in the Netherlands. Main outcome measures included residents' (i) global and (ii) specific ratings of faculty member teaching qualities, and (iii) global ratings of faculty members as role-model specialists. Statistical analysis was conducted using adjusted multivariable logistic generalised estimating equations.   In total, 690 residents (77.6%) completed 6485 evaluations of 962 faculty members, 848 (83.6%) of whom also self-evaluated. More recently certified faculty members, those who had attended a teacher training programme, and those who spent more time teaching than seeing patients or conducting research were more likely to score highly on most teaching qualities. However, faculty members who had undergone teacher training were less likely to be seen as role models (odds ratio [OR] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.88). In addition, faculty members were evaluated slightly higher by male than female residents on core teaching domains and overall teaching quality, but were less likely to be seen as role models by male residents (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67-0.97). Lastly, faculty members had higher odds of receiving top scores in specific teaching domains from residents in the first 4 years of residency and were less likely to be considered as role models by more

  18. Factors related to continuous and discontinuous attendance at memory clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishikawa, N; Fukui, Y; Nakano, Y; Morihara, R; Takemoto, M; Sato, K; Yamashita, T; Ohta, Y; Abe, K

    2017-05-01

    Few studies have examined why some patients with dementia stop attending medical consultations. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate factors associated with discontinuous clinic attendance. Participants were 988 patients with dementia from university hospital (UH) clinics and affiliated local hospital (LH) clinics. We compared continuous and discontinuous attenders on cognitive and affective functions and activities of daily living (ADL), and also compared UH and LH patients (UH: continuous, n = 176; discontinuous, n = 207; LH: continuous, n = 418; discontinuous, n = 187). The total annual rate of discontinuation was 8.0%, and the mean period of attendance before discontinuation was 2.2 ± 2.4 years (UH, 2.8 ± 3.0; LH, 1.5 ± 1.3, P attendance at their own discretion (35.3% for LH). We identified the main reasons for discontinuation of attendance as returning to the family doctor and cessation of hospital attendance at their own discretion. The best predictors of discontinuation were ADL decline and worsening BPSD. There were significant differences in discontinuation between UH and LH patients with dementia. © 2017 EAN.

  19. From good to excellent: Improving clinical departments' learning climate in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silkens, Milou E. W. M.; Chahine, Saad; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2017-01-01

    The improvement of clinical departments' learning climate is central to achieving high-quality residency training and patient care. However, improving the learning climate can be challenging given its complexity as a multi-dimensional construct. Distinct representations of the dimensions might

  20. Trends in the Medical Knowledge and Clinical Competence of Graduates of Internal Medicine Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, John J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study assessed the effectiveness of medical resident training programs during 1983-88 by evaluating students' certification scores and comparing them to the program's evaluation of students' clinical competence. Results are reported and analyzed for top-rated, university-affiliated, and non-university-affiliated programs, focusing on trends over…

  1. Identification of Best Practices for Resident Aesthetic Clinics in Plastic Surgery Training: The ACAPS National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scott Hultman, MD, MBA, FACS

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: RACs are an important component of plastic surgery education. Most clinics are financially viable but carry high malpractice risk and consume significant resources. Best practices, to maximize patient safety and optimize resident education, include use of accredited procedural rooms and direct faculty supervision of all components of care.

  2. How medical residents perceive the quality of supervision provided by attending doctors in the clinical setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busari, Jamiu O.; Weggelaar, Nielske M.; Knottnerus, Andrieke C.; Greidanus, Petra-Marie; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.

    2005-01-01

    The supervision of medical residents is a key responsibility of attending doctors in the clinical setting. Most attending doctors, however, are unfamiliar with the principles of effective supervision. Although inconsistent, supervision has been shown to be both important and effective for the

  3. Identification of Best Practices for Resident Aesthetic Clinics in Plastic Surgery Training: The ACAPS National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, C Scott; Wu, Cindy; Bentz, Michael L; Redett, Richard J; Shack, R Bruce; David, Lisa R; Taub, Peter J; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2015-03-01

    Resident aesthetic clinics (RACs) have demonstrated good outcomes and acceptable patient satisfaction, but few studies have evaluated their educational, financial, or medicolegal components. We sought to determine RAC best practices. We surveyed American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeon members (n = 399), focusing on operational details, resident supervision, patient safety, medicolegal history, financial viability, and research opportunities. Of the 96 respondents, 63 reported having a RAC, and 56% of plastic surgery residency program directors responded. RACs averaged 243 patient encounters and 53.9 procedures annually, having been in existence for 19.6 years (mean). Full-time faculty (73%) supervised chief residents (84%) in all aspects of care (65%). Of the 63 RACs, 45 were accredited, 40 had licensed procedural suites, 28 had inclusion/exclusion criteria, and 31 used anesthesiologists. Seventeen had overnight capability, and 17 had a Life Safety Plan. No cases of malignant hyperthermia occurred, but 1 facility death was reported. Sixteen RACs had been involved in a lawsuit, and 33 respondents reported financial viability of the RACs. Net revenue was transferred to both the residents' educational fund (41%) and divisional/departmental overhead (37%). Quality measures included case logs (78%), morbidity/mortality conference (62%), resident surveys (52%), and patient satisfaction scores (46%). Of 63 respondents, 14 have presented or published RAC-specific research; 80 of 96 of those who were surveyed believed RACs enhanced education. RACs are an important component of plastic surgery education. Most clinics are financially viable but carry high malpractice risk and consume significant resources. Best practices, to maximize patient safety and optimize resident education, include use of accredited procedural rooms and direct faculty supervision of all components of care.

  4. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  5. Examination to assess the clinical examination and documentation of spine pathology among orthopedic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglin, Jack M; Zeller, John L; Egol, Kenneth A; Phillips, Donna P

    2017-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) guidelines requires residency programs to teach and evaluate residents in six overarching "core competencies" and document progress through educational milestones. To assess the progress of orthopedic interns' skills in performing a history, physical examination, and documentation of the encounter for a standardized patient with spinal stenosis, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was conducted for 13 orthopedic intern residents, following a 1-month boot camp that included communications skills and curriculum in history and physical examination. Interns were objectively scored based on their performance of the physical examination, communication skills, completeness and accuracy of their electronic medical record (EMR), and their diagnostic conclusions gleaned from the patient encounter. The purpose of this study was to meaningfully assess the clinical skills of orthopedic post-graduate year (PGY)-1 interns. The findings can be used to develop a standardized curriculum for documenting patient encounters and highlight common areas of weakness among orthopedic interns with regard to the spine history and physical examination and conducting complete and accurate clinical documentation. A major orthopedic specialty hospital and academic medical center. Thirteen PGY-1 orthopedic residents participated in the OSCE with the same standardized patient presenting with symptoms and radiographs consistent with spinal stenosis. Videos of the encounters were independently viewed and objectively evaluated by one investigator in the study. This evaluation focused on the completeness of the history and the performance and completion of the physical examination. The standardized patient evaluated the communication skills of each intern with a separate objective evaluation. Interns completed these same scoring guides to evaluate their own performance in history, physical examination, and communications

  6. Clinical ethics in rehabilitation medicine: core objectives and algorithm for resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, J A; McPeak, L; Gittler, M; Bodenheimer, C; King, J; Bowen, J

    2002-09-01

    Described as the balance of values on either side of a moral dilemma, ethics and ethical issues are of increasing importance in the changing practice of rehabilitation medicine. Because the substance of ethics and true ethical issues can be difficult to identify, the education of rehabilitation residents in ethics can similarly be challenging. This article discusses topics pertinent to an understanding of clinical ethics in rehabilitation medicine and provides a method of teaching residents through an algorithm of ethical issues, learning objectives, and illustrative cases.

  7. Comfort level of post graduate residents working in different clinical domains in managing common ophthalmic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffar, S.; Tayyab, A.; Shah, S.S.; Naseem, S.; Ghazanfar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ophthalmological conditions are frequently encountered in almost all clinical specialties. Assessing the adequacy of ophthalmology teaching in undergraduate medical education is important in order to diagnose and manage different ophthalmological conditions. The objective of this study was to determine the comfort level of post graduate residents working in different clinical domains in managing common ophthalmic conditions. Methods: A cross sectional survey involving 277 post graduate residents was carried out over a period of six months in both private and public tertiary care hospital. A questionnaire containing two sections and 17 variables in total were distributed among Medical Residents of different specialties except ophthalmology residents. Participants of the study were selected through consecutive non probability sampling. Results: Mean hours of classroom based ophthalmology instruction during during undergraduate program was 59.38 hours (55.9) and mean hours of clinical based ophthalmology instruction during undergraduate program was 62.73 hours (60.8) 54 percentage were either not comfortable or somewhat comfortable in managing common ophthalmic condition. Conclusion: Teaching hours in under graduate program meet or exceed requisite criteria. However graduating doctors generally feel that the time spent does not provide them with the comfort and skill level required to care for patients with ocular presentations. (author)

  8. The UCLA Health Resident Informaticist Program - A Novel Clinical Informatics Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jennifer S; Cheng, Eric M; Baldwin, Kevin; Pfeffer, Michael A

    2017-07-01

    Few opportunities exist for physician trainees to gain exposure to, and training in, the field of clinical informatics, an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited, recently board-certified specialty. Currently, 21 approved programs exist nationwide for the formal training of fellows interested in pursuing careers in this discipline. Residents and fellows training in medical and surgical fields, however, have few avenues available to gain experience in clinical informatics. An early introduction to clinical informatics brings an opportunity to generate interest for future career trajectories. At University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Health, we have developed a novel, successful, and sustainable program, the Resident Informaticist Program, with the goals of exposing physician trainees to the field of clinical informatics and its academic nature and providing opportunities to expand the clinical informatics workforce. Herein, we provide an overview of the development, implementation, and current state of the UCLA Health Resident Informaticist Program, with a blueprint for development of similar programs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Script concordance testing: assessing residents' clinical decision-making skills for infant lumbar punctures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Todd P; Kessler, David; McAninch, Brett; Fein, Daniel M; Scherzer, D J; Seelbach, Elizabeth; Zaveri, Pavan; Jackson, Jennifer M; Auerbach, Marc; Mehta, Renuka; Van Ittersum, Wendy; Pusic, Martin V

    2014-01-01

    Residents must learn which infants require a lumbar puncture (LP), a clinical decision-making skill (CDMS) difficult to evaluate because of considerable practice variation. The authors created an assessment model of the CDMS to determine when an LP is indicated, taking practice variation into account. The objective was to detect whether script concordance testing (SCT) could measure CDMS competency among residents for performing infant LPs. In 2011, using a modified Delphi technique, an expert panel of 14 attending physicians constructed 15 case vignettes (each with 2 to 4 SCT questions) that represented various infant LP scenarios. The authors distributed the vignettes to residents at 10 academic pediatric centers within the International Simulation in Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education Network. They compared SCT scores among residents of different postgraduate years (PGYs), specialties, training in adult medicine, LP experience, and practice within an endemic Lyme disease area. Of 730 eligible residents, 102 completed 47 SCT questions. They could earn a maximum score of 47. Median SCT scores were significantly higher in PGY-3s compared with PGY-1s (difference: 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-4.9; effect size d = 0.87). Scores also increased with increasing LP experience (difference: 3.3; 95% CI 1.1-5.5) and with adult medicine training (difference: 2.9; 95% CI 0.6-5.0). Residents in Lyme-endemic areas tended to perform more LPs than those in nonendemic areas. SCT questions may be useful as an assessment tool to determine CDMS competency among residents for performing infant LPs.

  10. Identification of Best Practices for Resident Aesthetic Clinics in Plastic Surgery Training: The ACAPS National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cindy; Bentz, Michael L.; Redett, Richard J.; Shack, R. Bruce; David, Lisa R.; Taub, Peter J.; Janis, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Resident aesthetic clinics (RACs) have demonstrated good outcomes and acceptable patient satisfaction, but few studies have evaluated their educational, financial, or medicolegal components. We sought to determine RAC best practices. Methods: We surveyed American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeon members (n = 399), focusing on operational details, resident supervision, patient safety, medicolegal history, financial viability, and research opportunities. Of the 96 respondents, 63 reported having a RAC, and 56% of plastic surgery residency program directors responded. Results: RACs averaged 243 patient encounters and 53.9 procedures annually, having been in existence for 19.6 years (mean). Full-time faculty (73%) supervised chief residents (84%) in all aspects of care (65%). Of the 63 RACs, 45 were accredited, 40 had licensed procedural suites, 28 had inclusion/exclusion criteria, and 31 used anesthesiologists. Seventeen had overnight capability, and 17 had a Life Safety Plan. No cases of malignant hyperthermia occurred, but 1 facility death was reported. Sixteen RACs had been involved in a lawsuit, and 33 respondents reported financial viability of the RACs. Net revenue was transferred to both the residents’ educational fund (41%) and divisional/departmental overhead (37%). Quality measures included case logs (78%), morbidity/mortality conference (62%), resident surveys (52%), and patient satisfaction scores (46%). Of 63 respondents, 14 have presented or published RAC-specific research; 80 of 96 of those who were surveyed believed RACs enhanced education. Conclusions: RACs are an important component of plastic surgery education. Most clinics are financially viable but carry high malpractice risk and consume significant resources. Best practices, to maximize patient safety and optimize resident education, include use of accredited procedural rooms and direct faculty supervision of all components of care. PMID:26146599

  11. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first

  12. Influence of contact with schizophrenia on implicit attitudes towards schizophrenia patients held by clinical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omori Ataru

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with schizophrenia and their families have suffered greatly from stigmatizing effects. Although many efforts have been made to eradicate both prejudice and stigma, they still prevail even among medical professionals, and little is known about how contact with schizophrenia patients affects their attitudes towards schizophrenia. Methods We assessed the impact of the renaming of the Japanese term for schizophrenia on clinical residents and also evaluated the influence of contact with schizophrenia patients on attitudes toward schizophrenia by comparing the attitudes toward schizophrenia before and after a one-month clinical training period in psychiatry. Fifty-one clinical residents participated. Their attitudes toward schizophrenia were assessed twice, before and one month after clinical training in psychiatry using the Implicit Association Test (IAT as well as Link’s devaluation-discrimination scale. Results The old term for schizophrenia, “Seishin-Bunretsu-Byo”, was more congruent with criminal than the new term for schizophrenia, “Togo-Shitcho-Sho”, before clinical training. However, quite opposite to our expectation, after clinical training the new term had become even more congruent with criminal than the old term. There was no significant correlation between Link's scale and IAT effect. Conclusions Renaming the Japanese term for schizophrenia still reduced the negative images of schizophrenia among clinical residents. However, contact with schizophrenia patients unexpectedly changed clinical residents’ attitudes towards schizophrenia negatively. Our results might contribute to an understanding of the formation of negative attitudes about schizophrenia and assist in developing appropriate clinical training in psychiatry that could reduce prejudice and stigma concerning schizophrenia.

  13. Educating chaplains for research literacy: results of a national survey of clinical pastoral education residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, George; Tartaglia, Alexander; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Murphy, Patricia

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that leaders in professional health care chaplaincy recognize the important role of research. The Standards of Practice recently approved by the Association of Professional Chaplains (APC), and especially the standard about research (Standard 12), provide strong evidence that the profession sees research, and research-literate chaplains, as important for its future. The aim of this study was to identify the extent to which Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, Inc (ACPE) accredited clinical pastoral education (CPE) residency programs are preparing their graduates to be the kind of research-literate chaplains described in these Standards. We interviewed CPE supervisors from 26 randomly-selected CPE residency programs. We found 12% of the programs had intentional and substantive research-related curricula, 27% of the programs offered some limited exposure to research, and 62% of the programs provided no education about research. We found also that supervisors often defined "research education" in terms of actually conducting research projects. CPE residency programs potentially play a central role in educating research-literate chaplains. Future research should examine the incentives and barriers that influence the inclusion of research education in CPE residency programs.

  14. Increasing the Number of Adverse Drug Reactions Reporting: the Role of Clinical Pharmacy Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Shadi; Habibi, Maryam; Haghgoo, Roodabeh; Karimi Gamishan, Masoumeh; Dabaghzadeh, Fatemeh; Farasatinasab, Maryam; Farsaei, Shadi; Gharekhani, Afshin; Kafi, Hamidreza; Karimzadeh, Iman; Kharazmkia, Ali; Najmeddin, Farhad; Nikvarz, Naemeh; Oghazian, Mohammad Bagher; Rezaee, Haleh; Sadeghi, Kourosh; Tafazzoli, Ali; Shahsavari, Nahid; Fahimi, Fanak

    2014-01-01

    Detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in hospitals provides an important measure of the burden of drug related morbidity on the healthcare system. Spontaneous reporting of ADRs is scare and several obstacles to such reporting have been identified formerly. This study aimed to determine the role of clinical pharmacy residents in ADR reporting within a hospital setting. Clinical pharmacy residents were trained to report all suspected ADRs through ADR-reporting yellow cards. The incidence, pattern, seriousness, and preventability of the reported ADRs were analyzed. During the period of 12 months, for 8559 patients, 202 ADR reports were received. The most frequently reported reactions were due to anti-infective agents (38.38%). Rifampin accounted for the highest number of the reported ADRs among anti-infective agents. The gastro-intestinal system was the most frequently affected system (21.56%) of all reactions. Fifty four of the ADRs were reported as serious reactions. Eighteen of the ADRs were classified as preventable. Clinical pharmacy residents' involvement in the ADR reporting program could improve the ADR reporting system. PMID:24734083

  15. Psychiatry chief resident opinions toward basic and clinical neuroscience training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey I; Handa, Kamna; Mahajan, Aman; Deotale, Pravesh

    2014-04-01

    The authors queried attendees to a chief resident conference on whether program education and training in neuroscience or in translating neuroscience research into practice is sufficient and what changes are needed. The authors developed and administered a 26-item voluntary questionnaire to each attendee at the Chief Residents' Leadership Conference at the American Psychiatric Association 2013 annual meeting in San Francisco, CA. Out of 94 attendees, 55 completed and returned questionnaires (58.5%). A majority of respondents stated that their program provided adequate training in neuroscience (61.8%); opportunities for neuroscience research existed for them (78.2%), but that their program did not prepare them for translating future neuroscience research findings into clinical practice (78.9%) or educate them on the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (83.3%). A majority of respondents stated that the ACGME should require a specific neuroscience curriculum (79.6%). Chief residents believe that curricular and cultural change is needed in psychiatry residency neuroscience education.

  16. Effect of electric toothbrush on residents' oral hygiene: a randomized clinical trial in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeld, Katrine G; Mowe, Morten; Eide, Hilde; Willumsen, Tiril

    2014-04-01

    A single-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial was performed to investigate the effect of electric toothbrushes (ET) compared with manual toothbrushes (MT) on residents in nursing homes and to evaluate the caregiver's opinion on ET. A sample of 180 nursing-home residents were given either a new ET or a new MT. Oral examinations were performed to measure dental hygiene, using the Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified (OHI-S). Both groups received the same instructions for use. After 2 months participants were re-examined. Questionnaires were then sent to their caregivers. Participants' mean age was 86.1 ± 7.7 yr, and the mean number of remaining teeth was 20 ± 5.6. No specific intervention effect was found for ET. Both groups showed identical improvements in the OHI-S, from 1.27 ± 0.63 at baseline (the mean value for all participants) to 1.01 ± 0.53 after 2 months. Of 152 caregivers who responded to the questionnaire, the majority evaluated ET to be beneficial and less time-consuming compared with MT, also for demented residents. In a frail population, no difference is found in the effect of ET compared with MT. However, the ET appears to be a useful aid for residents who receive assistance with dental hygiene. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. Supervisor continuity or co-location: Which matters in residency education? Findings from a qualitative study of remote supervisor family physicians in Australia and Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wearne, Susan M.; Wearne, Susan M.; Wearne, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    province, participated. The main themes were how remoteness changed the dynamics of care and supervision; the importance of ongoing, holistic, nonhierarchical, supportive supervisory relationships; and that residents learned "clinical courage" through responsibility for patients' care over time. Distance...

  18. Three-dimensional brain arteriovenous malformation models for clinical use and resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Mengqi; Chen, Guangzhong; Li, Jianyi; Qin, Kun; Ding, Xiaowen; Peng, Chao; Zhou, Dong; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2018-01-01

    To fabricate three-dimensional (3D) models of brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) and report our experience with customized 3D printed models of patients with bAVM as an educational and clinical tool for patients, doctors, and surgical residents. Using computerized tomography angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images, the rapid prototyping process was completed with specialized software and "in-house" 3D printing service. Intraoperative validation of model fidelity was performed by comparing to DSA images of the same patient during the endovascular treatment process. 3D bAVM models were used for preoperative patient education and consultation, surgical planning, and resident training. 3D printed bAVM models were successful made. By neurosurgeons' evaluation, the printed models precisely replicated the actual bAVM structure of the same patients (n = 7, 97% concordance, range 95%-99% with average of 3D models was associated shorter time for preoperative patient education and consultation, higher acceptable of the procedure for patients and relatives, shorter time between obtaining intraoperative DSA data and the start of endovascular treatment. Thirty surgical residents from residency programs tested the bAVM models and provided feedback on their resemblance to real bAVM structures and the usefulness of printed solid model as an educational tool. Patient-specific 3D printed models of bAVM can be constructed with high fidelity. 3D printed bAVM models were proven to be helpful in preoperative patient consultation, surgical planning, and resident training. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors contributing to nonadherence to follow-up appointments in a resident glaucoma clinic versus primary eye care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudemberg, Scott J; Lee, Brian; Waisbourd, Michael; Murphy, Rachel A; Dai, Yang; Leiby, Benjamin E; Hark, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the rate of adherence to follow-up appointment recommendations in a resident glaucoma clinic with no mechanism for reminders, compared to a resident cataract and primary eye care (CPEC) clinic in which telephone reminders were used, and to identify factors that contribute to adherence in each patient group. This retrospective cohort study included subjects in the CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders and those in the glaucoma clinic who did not. Each sample was selected to have a similar proportion of follow-up recommendations for 1, 3, and 6 months. Subjects were considered adherent if they returned within a specified timeframe. A total of 144 subjects from the glaucoma clinic and 151 subjects from the CPEC clinic were included. There was no significant difference between follow-up adherence rates of patients who received telephone reminders and those who did not (odds ratio [OR] =1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79-2.32, P=0.28). Patients who were on more than two ocular medications were more likely to return for follow-up (OR=3.11, 95% CI 1.53-6.35, P=0.0018). Subjects between the ages 50 and 80 years were more likely to be adherent compared to their younger and older peers (P=0.02). The follow-up adherence of patients in a CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders was similar to patients in a glaucoma clinic who did not receive any intervention to increase their adherence. Younger (⩽50 years old) and elderly (⩾80 years old) subjects, as well as patients using less than two glaucoma medications, were less likely to adhere to their follow-up appointments.

  20. How Do Emergency Medicine Residency Programs Structure Their Clinical Competency Committees? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Christopher I; Roppolo, Lynn P; Asher, Shellie; Seamon, Jason P; Bhat, Rahul; Taft, Stephanie; Graham, Autumn; Willis, James

    2015-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recently has mandated the formation of a clinical competency committee (CCC) to evaluate residents across the newly defined milestone continuum. The ACGME has been nonproscriptive of how these CCCs are to be structured in order to provide flexibility to the programs. No best practices for the formation of CCCs currently exist. We seek to determine common structures of CCCs recently formed in the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) member programs and identify unique structures that have been developed. In this descriptive study, an 18-question survey was distributed via the CORD listserv in the late fall of 2013. Each member program was asked questions about the structure of its CCC. These responses were analyzed with simple descriptive statistics. A total of 116 of the 160 programs responded, giving a 73% response rate. Of responders, most (71.6%) CCCs are chaired by the associate or assistant program director, while a small number (14.7%) are chaired by a core faculty member. Program directors (PDs) chair 12.1% of CCCs. Most CCCs are attended by the PD (85.3%) and selected core faculty members (78.5%), leaving the remaining committees attended by any core faculty. Voting members of the CCC consist of the residency leadership either with the PD (53.9%) or without the PD (36.5%) as a voting member. CCCs have an average attendance of 7.4 members with a range of three to 15 members. Of respondents, 53.1% of CCCs meet quarterly while 37% meet monthly. The majority of programs (76.4%) report a system to match residents with a faculty mentor or advisor. Of respondents, 36% include the resident's faculty mentor or advisor to discuss a particular resident. Milestone summaries (determination of level for each milestone) are the primary focus of discussion (93.8%), utilizing multiple sources of information. The substantial variability and diversity found in our CORD survey of CCC structure

  1. Continuous intravenous infusions of bromodeoxyuridine as a clinical radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Mitchell, J.B.; Russo, A.; Aiken, M.; Morstyn, G.; Hsu, S.M.; Rowland, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-01-01

    Twelve patients were treated with continuous intravenous (24-hour) infusions of bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) at 650 or 1000 mg/m2/d for up to two weeks. Myelosuppression, especially thrombocytopenia, was the major systemic toxicity and limited the infusion period to nine to 14 days. However, bone marrow recovery occurred within seven to ten days, allowing for a second infusion in most patients. Local toxicity (within the radiation field) was minimal, with the exception of one of four patients, who underwent abdominal irradiation. Pharmacology studies revealed a steady-state arterial plasma level of 6 x 10(-7) mol/L and 1 x 10(-6) mol/L during infusion of 650 and 1000 mg/m2/d, respectively. In vivo BUdR uptake into normal bone marrow was evaluated in two patients by comparison of preinfusion and postinfusion in vitro radiation survival curves of marrow CFUc with enhancement ratios (D0-pre/D0-post) of 1.8 (with 650 mg/m2/d) and 2.5 (with 1000 mg/m2/d). In vivo BUdR incorporation into normal skin and tumor cells using an anti-BUdR monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry was demonstrated in biopsies from three patients revealing substantially less cellular incorporation into normal skin (less than 10%) compared with tumor (up to 50% to 70%). The authors conclude that local and systemic toxicity of continuous infusion of BUdR at 1000 mg/m2/d for approximately two weeks is tolerable. The observed normal tissue toxicity is comparable with previous clinical experience with intermittent (12 hours every day for two weeks) infusions of BUdR. Theoretically, a constant infusion should allow for greater incorporation of BUdR into cycling tumor cells and thus, for further enhancement of radiosensitization

  2. THE CYBERSPACE IN THE CONTINUED CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Martins

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The cybernetic spaces simulate the real world with interactive multimedia. This work  has been applied since January, 2007 on the curricular student’s apprenticeship at high school and graduation, in the site “bioq.educacao.biz/ULAB-HC-UFPE”. It has been developed to provide continuity to the technical-scientific learning of students and professionals, and also to improve their human social relations on the  labour  environment.  It’s comprises a virtual space, destined to communication and collective building of knowledge on the clinical biochemistry.   It’s about an interactive environment which allows the users registered as coordinator professor (professional  or the scientist student (trainee,  unlimited access to  posting contents (classes, texts, presentations, animations, consultations, non-synchronic discussions (on orkut, forums, e-mail and synchronic discussions (on chats, videoconferences. After a few live tutorials  about new  input in this environment, and the use of the new learning tool,  the collective building of knowledge on cyberspace begins. As a trainee’s program task, the scientist student would have to build a space of his own, under guidance and supervision of the coordinator teachers.  The cyberspace efficiency was evaluated from reports collected in February, 2008: the adherence to this  work was satisfactory, regarding this period, with 68 registered users, 870 accesses and 52 contents available on the several sections of the virtual laboratory. Our work is still being applied, and new adhesions are  happening everyday. We intend to amplify this cyber environment in order to make it a  permanent  continued education site on the health area.  From interest contracts and common knowledge,  the technological interfaces constitute an interaction, in which everyone is a potential author.  Keywords: Cyberspace, online biochemistry education, continued education.

  3. Resident physicians' clinical training and error rate: the roles of autonomy, consultation, and familiarity with the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveh, Eitan; Katz-Navon, Tal; Stern, Zvi

    2015-03-01

    Resident physicians' clinical training poses unique challenges for the delivery of safe patient care. Residents face special risks of involvement in medical errors since they have tremendous responsibility for patient care, yet they are novice practitioners in the process of learning and mastering their profession. The present study explores the relationships between residents' error rates and three clinical training methods (1) progressive independence or level of autonomy, (2) consulting the physician on call, and (3) familiarity with up-to-date medical literature, and whether these relationships vary among the specialties of surgery and internal medicine and between novice and experienced residents. 142 Residents in 22 medical departments from two hospitals participated in the study. Results of hierarchical linear model analysis indicated that lower levels of autonomy, higher levels of consultation with the physician on call, and higher levels of familiarity with up-to-date medical literature were associated with lower levels of resident's error rates. The associations varied between internal and surgery specializations and novice and experienced residents. In conclusion, the study results suggested that the implicit curriculum that residents should be afforded autonomy and progressive independence with nominal supervision in accordance with their relevant skills and experience must be applied cautiously depending on specialization and experience. In addition, it is necessary to create a supportive and judgment free climate within the department that may reduce a resident's hesitation to consult the attending physician.

  4. Pricing strategy for aesthetic surgery: economic analysis of a resident clinic's change in fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    1999-02-01

    The laws of microeconomics explain how prices affect consumer purchasing decisions and thus overall revenues and profits. These principles can easily be applied to the behavior aesthetic plastic surgery patients. The UCLA Division of Plastic Surgery resident aesthetics clinic recently offered a radical price change for its services. The effects of this change on demand for services and revenue were tracked. Economic analysis was applied to see if this price change resulted in the maximization of total revenues, or if additional price changes could further optimize them. Economic analysis of pricing involves several steps. The first step is to assess demand. The number of procedures performed by a given practice at different price levels can be plotted to create a demand curve. From this curve, price sensitivities of consumers can be calculated (price elasticity of demand). This information can then be used to determine the pricing level that creates demand for the exact number of procedures that yield optimal revenues. In economic parlance, revenues are maximized by pricing services such that elasticity is equal to 1 (the point of unit elasticity). At the UCLA resident clinic, average total fees per procedure were reduced by 40 percent. This resulted in a 250-percent increase in procedures performed for representative 4-month periods before and after the price change. Net revenues increased by 52 percent. Economic analysis showed that the price elasticity of demand before the price change was 6.2. After the price change it was 1. We conclude that the magnitude of the price change resulted in a fee schedule that yielded the highest possible revenues from the resident clinic. These results show that changes in price do affect total revenue and that the nature of these effects can be understood, predicted, and maximized using the tools of microeconomics.

  5. Should we Google it? Resource use by internal medicine residents for point-of-care clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Nelson, Alisa; Gladding, Sophia; Beattie, Jim; Nixon, L James

    2013-06-01

    To determine which resources residents use at the point-of-care (POC) for decision making, the drivers for selection of these resources, and how residents use Google/Google Scholar to answer clinical questions at the POC. In January 2012, 299 residents from three internal medicine residencies were sent an electronic survey regarding resources used for POC decision making. Resource use frequency and factors influencing choice were determined using descriptive statistics. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine relationships between the independent variables. A total of 167 residents (56%) responded; similar numbers responded at each level of training. Residents most frequently reported using UpToDate and Google at the POC at least daily (85% and 63%, respectively), with speed and trust in the quality of information being the primary drivers of selection. Google, used by 68% of residents, was used primarily to locate Web sites and general information about diseases, whereas Google Scholar, used by 30% of residents, tended to be used for treatment and management decisions or locating a journal article. The findings suggest that internal medicine residents use UpToDate most frequently, followed by consultation with faculty and the search engines Google and Google Scholar; speed, trust, and portability are the biggest drivers for resource selection; and time and information overload appear to be the biggest barriers to resources such as Ovid MEDLINE. Residents frequently used Google and may benefit from further training in information management skills.

  6. Factors contributing to nonadherence to follow-up appointments in a resident glaucoma clinic versus primary eye care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudemberg SJ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scott J Fudemberg,1 Brian Lee,1 Michael Waisbourd,1 Rachel A Murphy,1 Yang Dai,1 Benjamin E Leiby,2 Lisa A Hark1 1Glaucoma Research Center, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Purpose: To determine the rate of adherence to follow-up appointment recommendations in a resident glaucoma clinic with no mechanism for reminders, compared to a resident cataract and primary eye care (CPEC clinic in which telephone reminders were used, and to identify factors that contribute to adherence in each patient group.Methods: This retrospective cohort study included subjects in the CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders and those in the glaucoma clinic who did not. Each sample was selected to have a similar proportion of follow-up recommendations for 1, 3, and 6 months. Subjects were considered adherent if they returned within a specified timeframe.Results: A total of 144 subjects from the glaucoma clinic and 151 subjects from the CPEC clinic were included. There was no significant difference between follow-up adherence rates of patients who received telephone reminders and those who did not (odds ratio [OR] =1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–2.32, P=0.28. Patients who were on more than two ocular medications were more likely to return for follow-up (OR=3.11, 95% CI 1.53–6.35, P=0.0018. Subjects between the ages 50 and 80 years were more likely to be adherent compared to their younger and older peers (P=0.02.Conclusion: The follow-up adherence of patients in a CPEC clinic who received telephone reminders was similar to patients in a glaucoma clinic who did not receive any intervention to increase their adherence. Younger (<50 years old and elderly (>80 years old subjects, as well as patients using less than two glaucoma medications, were less likely to adhere to their follow-up appointments.Keywords: glaucoma, retrospective studies

  7. Simulation in Pre-departure Training for Residents Planning Clinical Work in a Low-Income Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Schwartz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasingly, pediatric and emergency medicine (EM residents are pursuing clinical rotations in low-income countries. Optimal pre-departure preparation for such rotations has not yet been established. High-fidelity simulation represents a potentially effective modality for such preparation. This study was designed to assess whether a pre-departure high-fidelity medical simulation curriculum is effective in helping to prepare residents for clinical rotations in a low-income country. Methods: 43 pediatric and EM residents planning clinical rotations in Liberia, West Africa, participated in a simulation-based curriculum focused on severe pediatric malaria and malnutrition and were then assessed by survey at three time points: pre-simulation, post-simulation, and after returning from work abroad. Results: Prior to simulation, 1/43 (2% participants reported they were comfortable with the diagnosis and management of severe malnutrition; this increased to 30/42 (71% after simulation and 24/31 (77% after working abroad. Prior to simulation, 1/43 (2% of residents reported comfort with the diagnosis and management of severe malaria; this increased to 26/42 (62% after simulation and 28/31 (90% after working abroad; 36/42 (86% of residents agreed that a simulation-based global health curriculum is more useful than a didactic curriculum alone, and 41/42 (98% felt a simulator-based curriculum should be offered to all residents planning a clinical trip to a low-income country. Conclusion: High-fidelity simulation is effective in increasing residents’ self-rated comfort in management of pediatric malaria and malnutrition and a majority of participating residents feel it should be included as a component of pre-departure training for all residents rotating clinically to low-income countries.

  8. [What and how to evaluate clinical-surgical competence. The resident and staff surgeon perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Sánchez, Carlos Roberto; Chávez-Vizcarra, Paola; Barragán-Ávila, María Cristina; Parra-Acosta, Haydee; Herrera-Mendoza, Renzo Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation is a means for significant and rigorous improvement of the educational process. Therefore, competence evaluation should allow assessing the complex activity of medical care, as well as improving the training process. This is the case in the evaluation process of clinical-surgical competences. A cross-sectional study was designed to measure knowledge about the evaluation of clinical-surgical competences for the General Surgery residency program at the Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua (UACH). A 55-item questionnaire divided into six sections was used (perception, planning, practice, function, instruments and strategies, and overall evaluation), with a six level Likert scale, performing a descriptive, correlation and comparative analysis, with a significance level of 0.001. In both groups perception of evaluation was considered as a further qualification. As regards tools, the best known was the written examination. As regards function, evaluation was considered as a further administrative requirement. In the correlation analysis, evaluation was perceived as qualification and was significantly associated with measurement, assessment and accreditation. In the comparative analysis between residents and staff surgeons, a significant difference was found as regards the perception of the evaluation as a measurement of knowledge (Student t test: p=0.04). The results provide information about the concept we have about the evaluation of clinical-surgical competences, considering it as a measure of learning achievement for a socially required certification. There is confusion as regards the perception of evaluation, its function, goals and scopes as benefit for those evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effects of Abortion Training on Family Medicine Residents' Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit, Aleza K; Gold, Marji

    2017-01-01

    RHEDI, Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine, offers technical assistance and funding to family medicine residency programs to support integrated opt-out abortion and reproductive health training for residents. This study assessed the impact of this enhanced training on residents' reproductive health experience. Investigator-developed pre- and post-surveys were administered online to 214 residents at 12 family medicine residency programs before and after their RHEDI training experience. Surveys addressed experience in contraception and abortion, attitudes around abortion provision, and post-residency intentions. Descriptive statistics were generated, and statistical tests were performed to assess changes after training. Surveys had a 90% response rate. After the RHEDI enhanced reproductive health rotation, residents reported increased experience in contraception provision, early pregnancy ultrasound, aspiration and medication abortion, and miscarriage management. After training, residents with experience in IUD insertion increased from 85% to 99%, and contraceptive implant insertion experience rose from 60% to 85%. Residents who had performed any abortions increased from 15% to 79%, and self-rated competency in abortion increased. Finally, almost all residents agreed that early abortion was within the scope of family medicine, and training confirmed residents' intentions to provide reproductive health services after residency. Integrated training in reproductive health, with an emphasis on abortion, increases residents' experience and underscores their understanding of the role of these services in family medicine. Increasing the number of family medicine residency programs that offer this training could help prepare family physicians to meet their patients' needs for reproductive health services.

  10. Evaluating clinical accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring devices: other methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentholt, Iris M. E.; Hart, August A.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2008-01-01

    With more and more continuous glucose monitoring devices entering the market, the importance of adequate accuracy assessment grows. This review discusses pros and cons of Regression Analysis and Correlation Coefficient, Relative Difference measures, Bland Altman plot, ISO criteria, combined curve

  11. Clinical approach to the floppy child | van Toorn | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 8 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Continuing Education in Research Ethics for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Brenda Recchia

    2002-01-01

    Review of professional nursing statements, federal policy, and recommendations for protection of human research subjects resulted in a topic and content outline for research ethics training for nurses. Suggestions for continuing education programs on research ethics were formulated. (SK)

  13. "How To" Videos Improve Residents Performance of Essential Perioperative Electronic Medical Records and Clinical Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Veronica; Caskey, Robert C; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Soegaard Ballester, Jacqueline M; Brooks, Ari D; Morris, Jon B; Dempsey, Daniel T

    The ability to use electronic medical records (EMR) is an essential skill for surgical residents. However, frustration and anxiety surrounding EMR tasks may detract from clinical performance. We created a series of brief, 1-3 minutes "how to" videos demonstrating 7 key perioperative EMR tasks: booking OR cases, placing preprocedure orders, ordering negative-pressure wound dressing supplies, updating day-of-surgery history and physical notes, writing brief operative notes, discharging patients from the postanesthesia care unit, and checking vital signs. Additionally, we used "Cutting Insights"-a locally developed responsive mobile application for surgical trainee education-as a platform for providing interns with easy access to these videos. We hypothesized that exposure to these videos would lead to increased resident efficiency and confidence in performing essential perioperative tasks, ultimately leading to improved clinical performance. Eleven surgery interns participated in this initiative. Before watching the "how to" videos, each intern was timed performing the aforementioned 7 key perioperative EMR tasks. They also underwent a simulated perioperative emergency requiring the performance of 3 of these EMR tasks in conjunction with 5 other required interventions (including notifying the chief resident, the anesthesia team, and the OR coordinator; and ordering fluid boluses, appropriate laboratories, and blood products). These simulations were scored on a scale from 0 to 8. The interns were then directed to watch the videos. Two days later, their times for performing the 7 tasks and their scores for a similar perioperative emergency simulation were once again recorded. Before and after watching the videos, participants were surveyed to assess their confidence in performing each EMR task using a 5-point Likert scale. We also elicited their opinions of the videos and web-based mobile application using a 5-point scale. Statistical analyses to assess for

  14. The Influence of an Orthopedic, Manual Therapy Residency Program on Improved Knowledge, Psychomotor Skills, and Clinical Reasoning in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shala; McFelea, Joni

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency program in Kenya on the development of physical therapists' (PTs) knowledge and clinical reasoning related to the performance of a musculoskeletal examination and evaluation as compared to an experience-matched control group of PTs waiting to enter the program. A cross-sectional design was utilized in which 12 graduating residents and 10 PTs entering the residency program completed a live-patient practical examination to assess the knowledge, clinical reasoning, and psychomotor skills related to the examination and evaluation of musculoskeletal conditions. The assessment utilized was based on the tasks, procedures, and knowledge areas identified as important to advanced clinicians in the US as outlined by the Orthopaedic Description of Specialty Practice. Inclusion criteria included participation in or acceptance to the residency program, practice as a PT between 3 and 25 years, and 50% of workday being involved in direct patient care. Overall pass rates were analyzed using the Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to determine if the graduating residents achieved significantly higher scores than experience-matched controls consisting of PTs entering the residency program. PTs completing a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency in Nairobi, Kenya, achieved higher scores and passing rates compared to their colleagues who had not completed a residency program as determined by a live-patient practical examination. Graduating residents demonstrated statistically significant higher scores in the categories of examination, evaluation, and diagnosis. The average live-patient practical examination score for PTs without residency training was 38.2%, and their pass rate was 0.0%. The average live-patient practical examination score for residency-trained PTs was 83.4%, and their pass rate was 92.3%. These findings are statistically significant ( p

  15. Innovative approach using interprofessional simulation to educate surgical residents in technical and nontechnical skills in high-risk clinical scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicksa, Grace A; Anderson, Cristan; Fidler, Richard; Stewart, Lygia

    2015-03-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies stress nontechnical skills that can be difficult to evaluate and teach to surgical residents. During emergencies, surgeons work in interprofessional teams and are required to perform certain procedures. To obtain proficiency in these skills, residents must be trained. To educate surgical residents in leadership, teamwork, effective communication, and infrequently performed emergency surgical procedures with the use of interprofessional simulations. SimMan 3GS was used to simulate high-risk clinical scenarios (15-20 minutes), followed by debriefings with real-time feedback (30 minutes). A modified Oxford Non-Technical Skills scale (score range, 1-4) was used to assess surgical resident performance during the first half of the academic year (July-December 2012) and the second half of the academic year (January-June 2013). Anonymous online surveys were used to solicit participant feedback. Simulations were conducted in the operating room, intensive care unit, emergency department, ward, and simulation center. A total of 43 surgical residents (postgraduate years [PGYs] 1 and 2) participated in interdisciplinary clinical scenarios, with other health care professionals (nursing, anesthesia, critical care, medicine, respiratory therapy, and pharmacy; mean number of nonsurgical participants/session: 4, range 0-9). Thirty seven surgical residents responded to the survey. Simulation of high-risk clinical scenarios: postoperative pulmonary embolus, pneumothorax, myocardial infarction, gastrointestinal bleeding, anaphylaxis with a difficult airway, and pulseless electrical activity arrest. Evaluation of resident skills: communication, leadership, teamwork, problem solving, situation awareness, and confidence in performing emergency procedures (eg, cricothyroidotomy). A total of 31 of 35 (89%) of the residents responding found the sessions useful. Additionally, 28 of 33 (85%) reported improved confidence

  16. An innovative capstone health care informatics clinical residency: Interprofessional team collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custis, Laura M; Hawkins, Shelley Y; Thomason, Tanna R

    2017-03-01

    Integrated information systems and wireless technology have been increasingly incorporated into health care organizations with the premise that information technology will promote safe, high-quality, cost-effective patient care. With the advancement of technology, the level of expertise necessary to assume health care information technology roles has escalated. The purpose of this article is to describe a clinical residency project whereby students in a graduate degree health care informatics program successfully fulfilled program competencies through a faculty-lead research project focused on the use of home telehealth with a group of heart failure patients. Through the use of Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and outcomes, the health care informatics students completed essential learning activities deemed essential for transition into the role of an informatics specialist. Health care informatics educational leaders are encouraged to adapt this template of applied learning into their practices.

  17. The characteristics of a good clinical teacher as perceived by resident physicians in Japan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikukawa, Makoto; Nabeta, Hiromi; Ono, Maiko; Emura, Sei; Oda, Yasutomo; Koizumi, Shunzo; Sakemi, Takanobu

    2013-07-25

    It is not known whether the characteristics of a good clinical teacher as perceived by resident physicians are the same in Western countries as in non-Western countries including Japan. The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of a good clinical teacher as perceived by resident physicians in Japan, a non-Western country, and to compare the results with those obtained in Western countries. Data for this qualitative research were collected using semi-structured focus group interviews. Focus group transcripts were independently analyzed and coded by three authors. Residents were recruited by maximum variation sampling until thematic saturation was achieved. Twenty-three residents participated in five focus group interviews regarding the perceived characteristics of a good clinical teacher in Japan. The 197 descriptions of characteristics that were identified were grouped into 30 themes. The most commonly identified theme was "provided sufficient support", followed by "presented residents with chances to think", "provided feedback", and "provided specific indications of areas needing improvement". Using Sutkin's main categories (teacher, physician, and human characteristics), 24 of the 30 themes were categorized as teacher characteristics, 6 as physician characteristics, and none as human characteristics. "Medical knowledge" of teachers was not identified as a concern of residents, and "clinical competence of teachers" was not emphasized, whereas these were the two most commonly recorded themes in Sutkin's study. Our results suggest that Japanese and Western resident physicians place emphasis on different characteristics of their teachers. We speculate that such perceptions are influenced by educational systems, educational settings, and culture. Globalization of medical education is important, but it is also important to consider differences in educational systems, local settings, and culture when evaluating clinical teachers.

  18. The characteristics of a good clinical teacher as perceived by resident physicians in Japan: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background It is not known whether the characteristics of a good clinical teacher as perceived by resident physicians are the same in Western countries as in non-Western countries including Japan. The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of a good clinical teacher as perceived by resident physicians in Japan, a non-Western country, and to compare the results with those obtained in Western countries. Methods Data for this qualitative research were collected using semi-structured focus group interviews. Focus group transcripts were independently analyzed and coded by three authors. Residents were recruited by maximum variation sampling until thematic saturation was achieved. Results Twenty-three residents participated in five focus group interviews regarding the perceived characteristics of a good clinical teacher in Japan. The 197 descriptions of characteristics that were identified were grouped into 30 themes. The most commonly identified theme was “provided sufficient support”, followed by “presented residents with chances to think”, “provided feedback”, and “provided specific indications of areas needing improvement”. Using Sutkin’s main categories (teacher, physician, and human characteristics), 24 of the 30 themes were categorized as teacher characteristics, 6 as physician characteristics, and none as human characteristics. Conclusions “Medical knowledge” of teachers was not identified as a concern of residents, and “clinical competence of teachers” was not emphasized, whereas these were the two most commonly recorded themes in Sutkin’s study. Our results suggest that Japanese and Western resident physicians place emphasis on different characteristics of their teachers. We speculate that such perceptions are influenced by educational systems, educational settings, and culture. Globalization of medical education is important, but it is also important to consider differences in educational systems, local settings

  19. Health economic analyses of domiciliary dental care and care at fixed clinics for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, M; Davidson, T; Ordell, S; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M; Sjögren, P

    2015-03-01

    Dental care for elderly nursing home residents is traditionally provided at fixed dental clinics, but domiciliary dental care is an emerging alternative. Longer life expectancy accompanied with increased morbidity, and hospitalisation or dependence on the care of others will contribute to a risk for rapid deterioration of oral health so alternative methods for delivering oral health care to vulnerable individuals for whom access to fixed dental clinics is an obstacle should be considered. The aim was to analyse health economic consequences of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden, compared to dentistry at a fixed clinic. A review of relevant literature was undertaken complemented by interviews with nursing home staff, officials at county councils, and academic experts in geriatric dentistry. Domiciliary dental care and fixed clinic care were compared in cost analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses. The mean societal cost of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents was lower than dental care at a fixed clinic, and it was also considered cost-effective. Lower cost of dental care at a fixed dental clinic was only achieved in a scenario where dental care could not be completed in a domiciliary setting. Domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents has a lower societal cost and is cost-effective compared to dental care at fixed clinics. To meet current and predicted need for oral health care in the ageing population alternative methods to deliver dental care should be available.

  20. Nuclear cardiology in the clinical setting | Libhaber | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 31, No 8 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  1. Communication skills training in surgical residency: a needs assessment and metacognition analysis of a difficult conversation objective structured clinical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, John L; Claxton, René N; Marshall, Gary T

    2014-01-01

    The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) can be used to evaluate the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies of Professionalism and Interpersonal and Communication Skills. The aim of this study was to describe general surgery resident performance on a "difficult conversation" OSCE. In this prospective study, junior and senior residents participated in a 2-station OSCE. Junior stations involved discussing operative risks and benefits and breaking bad news. Senior stations involved discussing goals of care and discussing transition to comfort measures only status. Residents completed post-OSCE checklist and Likert-based self-evaluations of experience, comfort, and confidence. Trained standardized patients (SPs) evaluated residents using communication skill-based checklists and Likert-based assessments. Pearson correlation coefficients were determined between self-assessment and SP assessment. Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted between junior and senior resident variables, using α = 0.05. There were 27 junior residents (age 28.1 ± 1.9 years [29.6% female]) and 27 senior residents (age 32.1 ± 2.5 years [26.9% female]). The correlation of self-assessment and SP assessment of overall communication skills by junior residents was -0.32 on the risks and benefits case and 0.07 on the breaking bad news case. The correlation of self-assessment and SP assessment of overall communication skills by senior residents was 0.30 on the goals of care case and 0.26 on the comfort measures only case. SP assessments showed that junior residents had higher overall communication skills than senior residents (p = 0.03). Senior residents perceived that having difficult conversations was more level appropriate (p skills are correlated, and that skills-based training is needed across all residency levels. This well-received method may be used to observe, document, and provide resident feedback for these important skills. © 2014 Published by

  2. 7 CFR 70.77 - Charges for continuous poultry or rabbit grading performed on a resident basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) VOLUNTARY GRADING OF POULTRY PRODUCTS AND RABBIT PRODUCTS Grading of...

  3. Learners? perspective: where and when pre-residency trainees learn more to achieve their core clinical competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Eusang; Ahn, Ducksun; Lee, Young-Mee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose While it is known that effective clinical education requires active involvement of its participants, regular feedback, communication skills and interprofessional training, limited studies have been conducted in Korea that demonstrate how pre-residency trainees acquire their core clinical skills. This is a cross-sectional study of interns and students across a third-tier university hospital in Korea to examine where and when they acquire core clinical skills. Methods A total of 74 stud...

  4. Heart failure in nursing home residents; a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daamen, Mariëlle A M J; Hamers, Jan P H; Gorgels, Anton P M; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter; Tan, Frans E S; van Dieijen-Visser, Marja P; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-12-16

    Heart failure (HF) is expected to be highly prevalent in nursing home residents, but precise figures are scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HF in nursing home residents and to get insight in the clinical characteristics of residents with HF. The study followed a multi-centre cross-sectional design. Nursing home residents (n = 501) in the southern part of the Netherlands aged over 65 years and receiving long-term somatic or psychogeriatric care were included in the study. The diagnosis of HF and related characteristics were based on data collected from actual clinical examinations (including history, physical examination, ECG, cardiac markers and echocardiography), patient records and questionnaires. A panel of two cardiologists and a geriatrician ultimately judged the data to diagnose HF. The overall prevalence of HF in nursing home residents was 33 %, of which 52 % had HF with preserved ejection fraction. The symptoms dyspnoea and oedema and a cardiac history were more common in residents with HF. Diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were also more prevalent in those with HF. Residents with HF had a higher score on the Mini Mental State Examination. 54 % of those with HF where not known before, and in 31 % with a history of HF, this diagnosis was not confirmed by the expert panel. This study shows that HF is highly prevalent in nursing home residents with many unknown or falsely diagnosed with HF. Equal number of HF patients had reduced and preserved left-ventricular ejection fraction. The Netherlands National Trial Register NTR2663 (27-12-2010).

  5. Mesenteric Infarction: Clinical Outcomes After Restoration of Bowel Continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaba, Franklin; Rajendran, Arun; Patel, Amit; Cheung, Yee-Kee; Grant, Katherine; Vaizey, Carolynne J; Gabe, Simon M; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Nightingale, Jeremy M D

    2015-12-01

    Patients who have a bowel resection for mesenteric infarction may require parenteral nutrition (PN). This study primarily aimed to determine the aetiological factors for a mesenteric infarction and the effects of restoring bowel continuity on the long-term PN requirements. A retrospective review of data on patients treated for mesenteric infarction from 2000 to 2010. A total of 113 patients (61 women, median age 54 years) were identified. Seventy-four (65%) had a superior mesenteric artery thromboembolism, 25 (22%) had a superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, and 4 (3%) had superior mesenteric artery stricture or spasm. Patients younger than 60 years most commonly had a clotting abnormality (n = 23/46, 50%), whereas older patients had a cardiological risk factor (n = 11/17, 65%). All patients with a jejunostomy required long-term PN. Fifty-seven (49%) patients had restoration of bowel continuity (colon brought into circuit). After this, PN was stopped within 1 year in 20 (35%), within 2 years in 29 (50%) patients and within 5 years in 44 (77%) patients (P = 0.001). A thrombotic tendency is the main etiological factor in most patients younger than 60 years. An anastomosis of the remaining jejunum to the colon can allow PN to be stopped.

  6. The effectiveness of holistic diabetic management between Siriraj Continuity of Care clinic and medical out-patient department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermsri, Chalobol; Paisansudhi, Supalerg; Kantachuvesiri, Pitchaporn; Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Washirasaksiri, Chaiwat; Srivanichakorn, Weerachai; Nopmaneejumruslers, Cherdchai; Chouriyagune, Charoen; Pandejpong, Denla; Phisalprapa, Pochamana

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diseases in the Thai population, and it is well known that diabetic complications could be prevented with appropriate management. Despite published guidelines, most Thai patients with diabetes do not achieve treatment goals. Siriraj Continuity of Care clinic (CC clinic) was recently established in order to provide training for medical students and internal medicine residents. It is possible that the training component in the CC clinic may contribute to better overall outcomes in type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) patients when compared with usual care at the medical out-patient department (OPD). To compare the effectiveness of diabetic management in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who attended the CC clinic and the medical OPD. Retrospective chart review was performed in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were treated at either clinic at Siriraj Hospital in 2007-2011. Baseline demographics, treatment strategies and outcomes, and participation in an appropriate health maintenance program were assessed in both groups. Seven hundred and fifty seven medical records were reviewed, including 383 patients in the CC clinic group and 374 in the OPD group. Mean HbA1c was significantly lower in the CC clinic group compared with the OPD group (7.3 +/- 0.9% and 7.8 +/- 1.3%, respectively, 3.0% vs. 7.4%, p < 0.001 for colon cancer). Moreover, significantly more patients in the CC clinic group received recommended immunization (influenza, diphtheria tetanus and pneumococcal vaccine) compared with the control group (p < or = 0.001). Diabetic patients treated at the CC clinic had better clinical outcomes and healthcare maintenance compared with those who received usual care at the medical OPD. Continuity of care and integrated training component may have contributed to the improved outcomes.

  7. Differences in the perception of characteristics of excellence of clinical tutors among residents and consultants at an emergency medicine residency program a qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Saleem Aljahany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Defining exactly what characterizes a clinical tutor as excellent and another less effective, is an important task in assessing the effectiveness of clinical training and guiding faculty development. Aim: We aimed to evaluate those characteristics and measure differences in their perception among accomplished and non-accomplished consultants and residents in the Emergency Department. We also compared perceptions between the different groups of participants. Methods: The characteristics measured were extracted from an extensive search of previously published studies summarized in a review article. A qualitative study was conducted, using a 20 item questionnaire piloted from the refined characteristics (good indicator of reliability; Cronbach′s Alpha = 0.86. The questionnaire was distributed among all consultants and residents in Saudi Board of Emergency Medicine. Results: No significant difference between consultants′ and residents′ perception was found. "Sincere" was an exception 87.8% versus 55.1%, P = 0.013. Consultants′ specifications did not seem to affect perception on overall scores and its component sub-scores. Conclusion: Since results showed no relation between accomplished and non-accomplished consultants in perceiving those qualities, we excluded the lack of knowledge of those characteristics as a cause of being accomplished or non-accomplished. We suggest a greater dedication from program developers towards creating more opportunities to involve more consultants in basic Emergency Medicine training.

  8. Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Anne L; Ahmann, Andrew J; Battelino, Tadej; Evert, Alison; Hirsch, Irl B; Murad, M Hassan; Winter, William E; Wolpert, Howard

    2016-11-01

    To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the use of continuous glucose monitoring and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults with diabetes. The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of seven experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology co-sponsored this guideline. The Task Force developed this evidence-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned one systematic review and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of the Endocrine Society, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring have an important role in the treatment of diabetes. Data from randomized controlled trials are limited on the use of medical devices, but existing studies support the use of diabetes technology for a wide variety of indications. This guideline presents a review of the literature and practice recommendations for appropriate device use.

  9. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents: Five-Year Experience at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Arvind; Hoda, Syed T; Crawford, James M

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and institutional level. Observational participation enabled learning of both the content and principles of leadership and management activities. The active half of the rotation was performance of a project intended to advance the strategic trajectory of the department and laboratory service line. In our program that matriculates 4 residents per year, 20 residents participated from April 2010 through December 2015. Their projects either activated a new priority area or helped propel an existing strategic priority forward. Of the 16 resident graduates who had obtained their first employment or a fellowship position, 9 responded to an assessment survey. The majority of respondents (5/9) felt that the rotation significantly contributed to their ability to compete for a fellowship or their first employment position. The top reported benefits of the rotation included people management; communication with staff, departmental, and institutional leadership; and involvement in department and institutional meetings and task groups. Our 5-year experience demonstrates both the successful principles by which the CLM rotation can be established and the high value of this rotation to residency graduates.

  10. Clinical significance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in residents in community long-term-care facilities in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur, A; De Gopegui, E Ruiz; Dominguez, M; Mariscal, D; Gavalda, L; Perez, J L; Segura, F; Pujol, M

    2012-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is highly prevalent in Spanish hospitals and community long-term-care facilities (LTCFs). This longitudinal study was performed in community LTCFs to determine whether MRSA colonization is associated with MRSA infections and overall mortality. Nasal and decubitus ulcer cultures were performed every 6 months for an 18-month period on 178 MRSA-colonized residents (86 490 patient-days) and 196 non-MRSA carriers (97 470 patient-days). Fourteen residents developed MRSA infections and 10 of these were skin and soft tissue infections. Two patients with respiratory infections required hospitalization. The incidence rate of MRSA infection was 0·12/1000 patient-days in MRSA carriers and 0·05/1000 patient-days in non-carriers (P=0·46). No difference in MRSA infection rate was found according to the duration of MRSA colonization (P=0·69). The mortality rate was 20·8% in colonized residents and 16·8% in non-carriers; four residents with MRSA infection died. Overall mortality was statistically similar in both cohorts. Our results suggest that despite a high prevalence of MRSA colonization in LTCFs, MRSA infections are neither frequent nor severe while colonized residents remain at the facility. The epidemiological impact of an MRSA reservoir is more relevant than the clinical impact of this colonization for an individual resident and supports current recommendations to control MRSA spread in community LTCFs.

  11. The articulation of integration of clinical and basic sciences in concept maps : differences between experienced and resident groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, Sylvia; van Tartwijk, Jan; Verloop, Nico; Gosselink, Manon; Driessen, Erik; Bolk, Jan

    To determine the content of integrated curricula, clinical concepts and the underlying basic science concepts need to be made explicit. Preconstructed concept maps are recommended for this purpose. They are mainly constructed by experts. However, concept maps constructed by residents are

  12. Impact of a Metabolic Screening Bundle on Rates of Screening for Metabolic Syndrome in a Psychiatry Resident Outpatient Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechers, Ilse R.; Viron, Mark; Stoklosa, Joseph; Freudenreich, Oliver; Henderson, David C.; Weiss, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although it is widely acknowledged that second-generation antipsychotics are associated with cardiometabolic side effects, rates of metabolic screening have remained low. The authors created a quality-improvement (QI) intervention in an academic medical center outpatient psychiatry resident clinic with the aim of improving rates of…

  13. The Articulation of Integration of Clinical and Basic Sciences in Concept Maps: Differences between Experienced and Resident Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Sylvia; van Tartwijk, Jan; Verloop, Nico; Gosselink, Manon; Driessen, Erik; Bolk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    To determine the content of integrated curricula, clinical concepts and the underlying basic science concepts need to be made explicit. Preconstructed concept maps are recommended for this purpose. They are mainly constructed by experts. However, concept maps constructed by residents are hypothesized to be less complex, to reveal more tacit basic…

  14. A simple framework for assessing technical skills in a resident observed structured clinical examination (OSCE): vaginal laceration repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Abigail Ford; Lerner, Veronica; Zabar, Sondra R; Szyld, Demian

    2013-01-01

    Educators of trainees in procedure-based specialties need focused assessment tools that are valid, objective, and assess technical skills in a realistic context. A framework for hybrid assessment using standardized patient scenarios and bench skills testing might facilitate evaluation of competency. Seven PGY-1 obstetrics and gynecology residents participated in a hybrid assessment that used observed structured clinical examination (OSCE) by a standardized patient who had sustained a vaginal laceration during vaginal delivery. The residents elicited a history and counseled the patient, and then completed a laceration repair on a pelvic model. The residents were rated on their performance in the scenario, which included issues of cultural competency, rapport-building, patient counseling. The technical skills were videotaped and rated using a modified global assessment form by 2 faculty members on a 3-point scale from "not done" to "partly done" to "well-done." Residents also completed a subjective assessment of the station. Mean technical performance of the residents on the technical skills was 55% "well-done," with a range of 20%-90%. The assessment identified 3 residents as below the mean, and 1 resident with areas of deficiency. Subjective assessment by the residents was that juggling the technical, cognitive, and affective components of the examination was challenging. Technical skills can be included in a case-based assessment using scenarios that address a range of cognitive and affective skills required of physicians. Results may help training programs assess individuals' abilities as well as identify program needs for curricular improvement. This framework might be useful in setting standards for competency and identifying poor performers. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. What Do Clinical Supervisors Require to Teach Residents in Family Medicine How to Care for Seniors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Anik M C; Lebel, Paule; Morin, Michèle; Proust, Françoise; Rodríguez, Charo; Carnovale, Valerie; Champagne, Louise; Légaré, France; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues; Martineau, Bernard; Karazivan, Philippe; Durand, Pierre J

    2018-03-01

    We assessed clinicians' continuing professional development (CPD) needs at family practice teaching clinics in the province of Quebec. Our mixed methodology design comprised an environmental scan of training programs at four family medicine departments, an expert panel to determine priority clinical situations for senior care, a supervisors survey to assess their perceived CPD needs, and interviews to help understand the rationale behind their needs. From the environmental scan, the expert panel selected 13 priority situations. Key needs expressed by the 352 survey respondents (36% response rate) included behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, polypharmacy, depression, and cognitive disorders. Supervisors explained that these situations were sometimes complex to diagnose and manage because of psychosocial aspects, challenges of communicating with patients and families, and coordination of interprofessional teams. Supervisors also reported more CPD needs in long-term and home care, given the presence of caregivers and complexity of senior care in these settings.

  16. Factors influencing residents' evaluations of clinical faculty member teaching qualities and role model status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas J.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Evaluations of faculty members are widely used to identify excellent or substandard teaching performance. In order to enable such evaluations to be properly interpreted and used in faculty development, it is essential to understand the factors that influence resident doctors' (residents)

  17. A Survey of Clinical Skills Evaluation Practices in Internal Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Linda L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The evaluation processes of 75 internal medicine residencies visited by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) in 1978-82 are reviewed. The methods of evaluation used by the residencies are described and compared with the findings from an earlier cycle of visits in 1972-75. (Author/MLW)

  18. Perspectives in medical education 7. Observations on clinical training at a "US-style" residency program at Teine Keijinkai Hospital in Sapporo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Harsha

    2009-06-01

    The residency program at Teine Keijinkai Hospital in Sapporo has successfully implemented a training philosophy that is focused on the development of clinical skills and critical thinking in Japanese residents. Several elements contribute to its success. The first and foremost is visionary physician leadership, beginning with the pioneers who implemented the philosophy, and continuing through the current leadership, which has sustained the original vision. A close second is the administrative and financial commitment to invest in producing more clinically accomplished Japanese physicians, long before that need was officially recognized. Third is the program's explicit aim of adhering to international norms by requiring three years of training, promulgating a benevolent, not paternalistic teaching philosophy and encouraging an interactive and interrogatory learning ethic. Fourth is the year-round presence of a US-trained Physician-in-Residence, to sustain the focus on clinical skills and international norms. Fifth is a long-term relationship with the Internal Medicine Training Program at the University of Pittsburgh, providing a conduit for ongoing academic exchange and programmatic advice. Last, but not least, is its avowed intention of being viewed as an "American-style program" with a preference for English fluent applicants, which acts as a magnet for trainees motivated to acquire clinical skills and competencies, with an eye to future training in the US. All these elements contribute to the program's unique focus on teaching clinical skills and critical thinking. Others who are striving with varying degrees of success to implement a similar philosophy in Japan may benefit from studying its example.

  19. Residents' perception of their skill levels in the clinical management of adolescent health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, C E; Bridge, M D; Nyhuis, A W

    1987-09-01

    Residents in six specialty training programs completed a 126-item questionnaire designed to assess their skill or confidence to manage adolescent health issues. The residency programs studied were family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, and combined medicine/pediatrics. Although almost three-fourths of the residents were at least moderately interested in adolescent health care and 90% expected to care for adolescents, only 26% believed an adolescent rotation should be required during training. Residents generally considered themselves unskilled to manage adolescents in the areas of sexuality, handicapping conditions, and psychosocial problems. Significant differences in perceived skills were found among the specialty programs on 45% of the items presented. Resident training appears to be needed in the areas of adolescent growth and development, counseling, and sexuality.

  20. Abolishment of 24-hour continuous medical call duty in quebec: a quality of life survey of general surgical residents following implementation of the new work-hour restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Fadi T; Deckelbaum, Dan; Sauve, Alexandre; Khwaja, Kosar; Razek, Tarek; Fata, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of work hour restrictions across North America have resulted in decreased levels of self injury and medical errors for Residents. An arbitration ruling in Quebec has led to further curtailment of work hours beyond that proposed by the ACGME. This may threaten Resident quality of life and in turn decrease the educational quality of surgical residency training. We administered a quality of life questionnaire with an integrated education quality assessment tool to all General Surgery residents training at McGill 6 months after the work hour restrictions. Across several strata respondents reveal a decreased sense of educational quality and quality of life. The arbitration argued that work- hour restrictions would be necessary to improve quality of life for trainees and hence improve patient safety. Results from this study demonstrate the exact opposite in a large majority of respondents, who report a poorer quality of life and a self-reported inability on their part to provide continuous and safe patient care. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The clinical utility of eye exam simulator in enhancing the competency of family physician residents in screening for diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Amal A

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the utility of eye exam simulators in the training and assessment of family medicine residents for screening diabetic retinopathy (DR) utilizing direct ophthalmoscopy (DO). This prospective, single arm, cross-sectional study was conducted at King AbdulAziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in April 2013, wherein the final year family medicine residents of the Saudi Board family medicine training program, underwent a practical session on DO using an eye exam simulator. The cognitive and motor skills of the participating family residents in performing DO, and their competency at diagnosing DR was assessed before, and after a practical session with the eye simulator. A total of 14 out of total 20 final year residents consented to join the study. Of these, 57.1% were females. A total of 42.9% (6/14) showed initial motor skill competency, and 35.7% showed cognitive skill competency to diagnose DR. Before the session on the eye simulator, merely 7.1% of the residents expressed confidence in performing DO. After the practical session, 78.6% (11/14) showed motor, and 64.3% (9/13) showed cognitive skill competency, in diagnosing DR. A total of 50% were adequately confident in performing DO. A total of 71.4% (10/14) of the residents preferred learning DO via simulation practical sessions than clinical rotation in ophthalmology clinics. Eye exam simulators are good tools in learning and assessment of DO skills leading to significant improvement in the efficiency and confidence of family physicians in screening for DR.

  2. Accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME annual anesthesiology residency and fellowship program review: a "report card" model for continuous improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Timothy R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires an annual evaluation of all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to assess program quality. The results of this evaluation must be used to improve the program. This manuscript describes a metric to be used in conducting ACGME-mandated annual program review of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology residencies and fellowships. Methods A variety of metrics to assess anesthesiology residency and fellowship programs are identified by the authors through literature review and considered for use in constructing a program "report card." Results Metrics used to assess program quality include success in achieving American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA certification, performance on the annual ABA/American Society of Anesthesiology In-Training Examination, performance on mock oral ABA certification examinations, trainee scholarly activities (publications and presentations, accreditation site visit and internal review results, ACGME and alumni survey results, National Resident Matching Program (NRMP results, exit interview feedback, diversity data and extensive program/rotation/faculty/curriculum evaluations by trainees and faculty. The results are used to construct a "report card" that provides a high-level review of program performance and can be used in a continuous quality improvement process. Conclusions An annual program review is required to assess all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to monitor and improve program quality. We describe an annual review process based on metrics that can be used to focus attention on areas for improvement and track program performance year-to-year. A "report card" format is described as a high-level tool to track educational outcomes.

  3. Residents' and preceptors' perceptions of the use of the iPad for clinical teaching in a family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Douglas; Macdonald, Colla J; Plante, Judith; Hogue, Rebecca J; Fiallos, Javier

    2014-08-20

    As Family Medicine programs across Canada are transitioning into a competency-based curriculum, medical students and clinical teachers are increasingly incorporating tablet computers in their work and educational activities. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify how preceptors and residents use tablet computers to implement and adopt a new family medicine curriculum and to evaluate how they access applications (apps) through their tablet in an effort to support and enhance effective teaching and learning. Residents and preceptors (n = 25) from the Family Medicine program working at the Pembroke Regional Hospital in Ontario, Canada, were given iPads and training on how to use the device in clinical teaching and learning activities and how to access the online curriculum. Data regarding the use and perceived contribution of the iPads were collected through surveys and focus groups. This mixed methods research used analysis of survey responses to support the selection of questions for focus groups. Reported results were categorized into: curriculum and assessment; ease of use; portability; apps and resources; and perceptions about the use of the iPad in teaching/learning setting. Most participants agreed on the importance of accessing curriculum resources through the iPad but recognized that these required enhancements to facilitate use. The iPad was considered to be more useful for activities involving output of information than for input. Participants' responses regarding the ease of use of mobile technology were heterogeneous due to the diversity of computer proficiency across users. Residents had a slightly more favorable opinion regarding the iPad's contribution to teaching/learning compared to preceptors. iPad's interface should be fully enhanced to allow easy access to online curriculum and its built-in resources. The differences in computer proficiency level among users should be reduced by sharing knowledge through workshops led by more skillful i

  4. The impact of residency programs on new nurse graduates' clinical decision-making and leadership skills: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Dossary, Reem; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2014-06-01

    Health care institutions have adapted residency programs to help new graduate nurses to become fully competent and transition from a student nurse to an independent practicing nurse and a bedside leader. The study's aim is to review the literature on the impact of residency programs on new graduate nurses' clinical decision-making and leadership skills. An electronic search was conducted between 1980 and 2013 using databases of the scientific literature in Medline, PubMed, Cochrane EPOC, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature database guide (CINAHL), and PsychInfo using a range of keywords. Information gathered was evaluated for relevance. Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were used in this systematic review. In several studies considered in this review, residency programs were developed to improve new graduates skills and promote their transition into the nursing workforce. In fact, the transition programs reduced turnover in that first year of practice and promoted professional growth of the new graduate such as hand-on nursing skills, clinical decision-making and leadership skills, satisfaction, and retention. There is a need for effective residency programs that are designed to prepare new graduate nurses in providing safe, competent and effective patient care. © 2013.

  5. Reliability and Validity of Objective Structured Clinical Examination for Residents of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Jalilian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE is used for the evaluation of the clinical competence in medicine for which it is essential to measure validity and reliability. This study aimed to investigate the validity and reliability of OSCE for residents of obstetrics and gynecology at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2011.Methods: A descriptive-correlation study was designed and the data of OSCE for obstetrics and gynecology were collected via learning behavior checklists in method stations and multiple choice questions in question stations. The data were analyzed through Pearson correlation coefficient and Cronbach's alpha, using SPSS software (version 16. To determine the criterion validity, correlation of OSCE scores with scores of resident promotion test, direct observation of procedural skills, and theoretical knowledge was determined; for reliability, however, Cronbach's alpha was used. Total sample consisted of 25 participants taking part in 14 stations. P value of less than 0.05 was considered as significant.Results: The mean OSCE scores was 22.66 (±6.85. Criterion validity of the stations with resident promotion theoretical test, first theoretical knowledge test, second theoretical knowledge, and direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS was 0.97, 0.74, 0.49, and 0.79, respectively. In question stations, criterion validity was 0.15, and total validity of OSCE was 0.77.Conclusion: Findings of the present study indicated acceptable validity and reliability of OSCE for residents of obstetrics and gynecology.

  6. Educating doctors in the clinical workplace: Unraveling the process of teaching and learning in the medical resident as teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busari J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, higher medical education has witnessed major changes in the structure and content of postgraduate medical training. Seven professional competencies have been described that address the medical doctors′ ability to effectively communicate and transfer medical information, interact effectively and professionally, and demonstrate a good grasp of clinical knowledge and skills. Proficiency in didactic skills, however, is an important competency that has not received prominent attention. In the clinical setting, attending-physicians and medical residents are responsible for teaching. Consequently, several medical institutions have proposed the need for teacher training programs to improve the teaching skills of attending doctors and medical residents. The supporters of these programs believe that through teaching, medical doctors improve their individual professional and clinical problem-solving abilities. Hence, it is logical to assume that didactic skills′ training would contribute to the professional development of doctors. In this paper, we re-examine the underlying theory of the didactic proficiency, how it relates to the clinical setting, and why it may be beneficial for the professional training of medical residents.

  7. Clinical features of Crohn's disease in Korean patients residing in Busan and Gyeongnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Ji; Kim, Tae Oh; Song, Geun Am; Lee, Jong Hun; Kim, Hyung Wook; Jee, Sam Ryong; Park, Seun Ja; Kim, Hyun Jin; Park, Jong Ha

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that presents with variable features and repeated disease aggravation. The incidence of CD is increasing in Korea. We evaluated the clinical features of CD in a study population in Busan and Gyeongnam, Korea. A hospital-based analysis included 619 patients diagnosed with CD between March 1986 and February 2013 from seven tertiary care hospitals in Busan and Gyeongnam. Individual case records were reviewed with regard to age at diagnosis, sex, disease location, disease behavior, and medical and surgical treatments received during the follow-up period. The cumulative frequency of patients diagnosed with CD revealed a continued increase in the number of cases reported yearly. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5:1 and the median age at diagnosis was 24 years. At diagnosis, 114 (18.4%) had isolated small bowel disease, 144 (23.3%) had isolated colonic disease, and 358 patients (57.8%) presented with disease in the small bowel and colon. The number of patients presenting with stricturing or penetrating disease behavior was 291 (47%) at the final evaluation. In total, 111 (17.9%) patients underwent intestinal resections. A continued increase in the number of patients diagnosed with CD was found in Busan and Gyeongnam as observed in other regions. We report results similar to that of other Korean studies in terms of sex distribution, age, and location of disease.

  8. Religious Affiliation, Religiosity, and Spirituality in Pediatric Residents: Effects on Communication and Self-Efficacy with Adolescents in a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Jennifer L; Hensel, Devon J

    2017-10-20

    Religion and spirituality are known influences on medical providers' care of patients, but no studies have assessed resident beliefs related to patient perception of clinical care. The main objective of our study was to assess resident religious affiliation, religiosity, and spirituality in relation to self-efficacy and communication with patients during adolescent clinic visits. We found that religious affiliation and religiosity appear to affect patient perception of communication with residents during adolescent visits; spirituality had little noted effect. Further research is warranted, especially regarding resident and patient gender correlations and differences in religious affiliation effects on patient perception of care.

  9. Relational continuity of care in integrated maternity and child health clinics improve parents' service experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Miia; Kaljonen, Anne; Ahonen, Pia; Rautava, Päivi

    2014-10-01

    In the Finnish primary health care, relational continuity of care is implemented in integrated maternity and child health clinics where the same nurse takes care of the family from the pregnancy until the child reaches school age. The aim of this study was to clarify the association between this relational continuity of care and the availability, utilisation and selected features of the maternity and child health clinic services, as evaluated by the parents. A comparative, cross-sectional service evaluation survey was used. Eighteen months after their baby's delivery, mothers (N = 987) and fathers (N = 835) from Southwest Finland evaluated specific maternity and child health clinic services. Comparisons were made between the parents who had relational continuity of care in the integrated maternity and child health clinics and those who did not. Home visits were more frequently provided when relational continuity of care in integrated maternity and child health clinics existed. Parents who had this relational continuity of care, evaluated several features of the service, especially provided support, more positively than parents who did not. Relational continuity of care in integrated maternity and child health clinics seems to increase parents' satisfaction with the services and might increase the provision of home visits.

  10. Relational continuity of care in integrated maternity and child health clinics improve parents’ service experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Miia; Kaljonen, Anne; Ahonen, Pia; Rautava, Päivi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the Finnish primary health care, relational continuity of care is implemented in integrated maternity and child health clinics where the same nurse takes care of the family from the pregnancy until the child reaches school age. The aim of this study was to clarify the association between this relational continuity of care and the availability, utilisation and selected features of the maternity and child health clinic services, as evaluated by the parents. Methods A comparative, cross-sectional service evaluation survey was used. Eighteen months after their baby's delivery, mothers (N = 987) and fathers (N = 835) from Southwest Finland evaluated specific maternity and child health clinic services. Comparisons were made between the parents who had relational continuity of care in the integrated maternity and child health clinics and those who did not. Results Home visits were more frequently provided when relational continuity of care in integrated maternity and child health clinics existed. Parents who had this relational continuity of care, evaluated several features of the service, especially provided support, more positively than parents who did not. Conclusions Relational continuity of care in integrated maternity and child health clinics seems to increase parents’ satisfaction with the services and might increase the provision of home visits. PMID:25411571

  11. Association between Continuous Wearable Activity Monitoring and Self-Reported Functioning in Assisted Living Facility and Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilahti, J; Korhonen, I

    2016-01-01

    Physical functioning is a key factor in independent living, and its preclinical state assessment and monitoring during the subject's normal life would be beneficial. The aim of the study is to analyse associations between ambulatory measured physical activity behaviour and sleep patterns (wrist actigraphy) and self-reported difficulties in performing activities of daily living. Participants, setting and design: 36 residents in assisted living facilities and nursing homes (average age=80.4±9.0 years) without dementia in free living conditions participated. Actigraphic monitoring is integrated with the facilities' social alarm system. Indices on activity level, activity rhythm, sleep pattern and external stimuli response of sleep-wake behaviours were extracted from the actigraph data and correlated (Spearman rank-order correlation) with activities of daily living measures. Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Activity level (ρ=-0.49, pliving scores. The similarity of subject-wise activity pattern to facility common activities had a trend with activities of daily living (ρ=-0.44, passisted living facility settings. However, variance between individuals was large in this dataset which decreases the reliability of the results. Furthermore, external stimuli such as weather and facility-related activities can affect subjects' activity and sleep behaviour and should be considered in the related studies as well.

  12. Evaluation of clinical skills for first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and objective structured clinical evaluation as a tool of assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postgraduate specialities require a combination of knowledge and clinical skills. The internship year is less structured. Clinical and practical skills that are picked up during training are not well regulated and the impact is not assessed. In this study, we assessed knowledge and skills using objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Aim: To evaluate the clinical skills of new first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and OSCE as a tool for assessment. Settings and Design: Observational study. Materials and Methods: Twenty new first-year surgical residents (10 each in 2008 and 2009 participated in a detailed structured orientation programme conducted over a period of 7 days. Clinically important topics and skills expected at this level (e.g., suturing, wound care etc. were covered. The programme was preceded by an OSCE to test pre-programme knowledge (the "pre-test". The questions were validated by senior department staff. A post-programme OSCE (the "post-test" helped to evaluate the change in clinical skill level brought about by the orientation programme. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxson matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Passing performance was achieved by all participants in both pre- and post-tests. Following the orientation programme, significant improvement was seen in tasks testing the psychomotor and cognitive domains. (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0401, respectively. Overall reliability of the OSCE was found to be 0.7026 (Cronbach′s coefficient alpha. Conclusions: This study highlighted the lacunae in current internship training, especially for skill-based tasks. There is a need for universal inclusion of structured orientation programmes in the training of first-year residents. OSCE is a reliable, valid and effective method for the assessment of clinical skills.

  13. The need for strong clinical leaders - Transformational and transactional leadership as a framework for resident leadership training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravo, Barbara; Netzel, Janine; Kiesewetter, Jan

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of providing excellent patient care, residents need to be strong, effective leaders. The lack of clinical leadership is alarming given the detrimental effects on patient safety. The objective of the study was to assess whether a leadership training addressing transactional and transformational leadership enhances leadership skills in residents. A volunteer sample of 57 residents from postgraduate year one to four was recruited across a range of medical specialties. The residents took part in an interventional controlled trial. The four-week IMPACT leadership training provided specific strategies for leadership in the clinical environment, addressing transactional (e.g. active control, contingent reward) and transformational leadership skills (e.g. appreciation, inspirational motivation). Transactional and transformational leadership skill performance was rated (1) on the Performance Scale by an external evaluator blinded to the study design and (2) self-assessed transformational and transactional leadership skills. Both measures contained items of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, with higher scores indicating greater leadership skills. Both scores were significantly different between the IMPACT group and the control group. In the IMPACT group, the Performance Scale increased 15% in transactional leadership skill performance (2.10 to 2.86) (intervention effect, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.40 to 1.13; p leadership skill performance (2.26 to 2.94) (intervention effect, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.27 to 1.09; p transactional skills revealed a 4% increase (3.83 to 4.03) (intervention effect, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.33; p leadership skills (3.54 to 3.86) (intervention effect, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.40; ptransactional and transformational leadership framework for graduate leadership training. Future studies should incorporate time-latent post-tests, evaluating the stability of the behavioral performance increase.

  14. The need for strong clinical leaders – Transformational and transactional leadership as a framework for resident leadership training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravo, Barbara; Netzel, Janine

    2017-01-01

    Background For the purpose of providing excellent patient care, residents need to be strong, effective leaders. The lack of clinical leadership is alarming given the detrimental effects on patient safety. The objective of the study was to assess whether a leadership training addressing transactional and transformational leadership enhances leadership skills in residents. Methods A volunteer sample of 57 residents from postgraduate year one to four was recruited across a range of medical specialties. The residents took part in an interventional controlled trial. The four-week IMPACT leadership training provided specific strategies for leadership in the clinical environment, addressing transactional (e.g. active control, contingent reward) and transformational leadership skills (e.g. appreciation, inspirational motivation). Transactional and transformational leadership skill performance was rated (1) on the Performance Scale by an external evaluator blinded to the study design and (2) self-assessed transformational and transactional leadership skills. Both measures contained items of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, with higher scores indicating greater leadership skills. Results Both scores were significantly different between the IMPACT group and the control group. In the IMPACT group, the Performance Scale increased 15% in transactional leadership skill performance (2.10 to 2.86) (intervention effect, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.40 to 1.13; p leadership skill performance (2.26 to 2.94) (intervention effect, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.27 to 1.09; p transactional skills revealed a 4% increase (3.83 to 4.03) (intervention effect, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.33; p leadership skills (3.54 to 3.86) (intervention effect, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.40; ptransactional and transformational leadership framework for graduate leadership training. Future studies should incorporate time-latent post-tests, evaluating the stability of the behavioral performance increase. PMID:28841662

  15. Measuring clinical outcomes of animal-assisted therapy: impact on resident medication usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Elaine; Ryan-Haddad, Ann; Coover, Kelli; Snell, Jeff

    2007-07-01

    To measure changes in medication usage of as-needed, psychoactive medications and other select as-needed medication usage as a result of a therapy dog residing in the rehabilitation facility. Additional measures are participants' thoughts and feelings on quality-of-life factors. One group, pretest, post-test. Residential rehabilitation facility. Convenience sample, N = 58 residents living at the facility. A certified, trained therapy dog. Changes in as-needed medication usage for the following categories: analgesics, psychoactive medications, and laxatives, as well as changes in vital sign measurements of blood pressure, pulse, respiration rate, and body weight. Additionally, changes in the residents' perception of quality-of-life factors. One of the three monitored drug classes, analgesia, revealed a decrease in medication usage (mean = 2.6, standard deviation [SD] +/- 6.90, P = 0.017), and one of four monitored vital signs, pulse, showed a decrease (mean = 5.8, SD +/-7.39, P = 0.000) in study participants exposed to the therapy dog. Positive changes were reported in study participants' quality of life. The benefits to human welfare as a result of the presence of a therapy dog have the potential to decrease medication usage for certain conditions in long-term care patients as well as decrease costs. Pharmacist involvement in animal-assisted therapy has the potential to make unique and measurable improvements to best patient care.

  16. The Effect of Medical Student Volunteering in a Student-Run Clinic on Specialty Choice for Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ashley; Ismail, Rahim; Gookin, Glenn; Hernandez, Caridad; Logan, Grace; Pasarica, Magdalena

    2017-01-09

     Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) are a recent popular addition to medical school education, and a subset of studies has looked at the influence of SRFC volunteering on the medical student's career development. The majority of the research done in this area has focused on understanding if these SRFCs produce physicians who are more likely to practice medicine in underserved communities, caring for the uninsured. The remainder of the research has investigated if volunteering in an SRFC influences the specialty choice of medical school students. The results of these specialty choice studies give no definitive answer as to whether medical students chose primary or specialty care residencies as a result of their SRFC experience. Keeping Neighbors in Good Health through Service (KNIGHTS) is the SRFC of the University of Central Florida College of Medicine (UCF COM). Both primary and specialty care is offered at the clinic. It is the goal of this study to determine if volunteering in the KNIGHTS SRFC influences UCF COM medical students to choose primary care, thereby helping to meet the rising need for primary care physicians in the United States.  A survey was distributed to first, second, and third-year medical students at the UCF COM to collect data on demographics, prior volunteering experience, and specialty choice for residency. Responses were then combined with records of volunteer hours from the KNIGHTS Clinic and analyzed for correlations. We analyzed the frequency and Pearson's chi-squared values. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.  Our survey had a total response rate of 39.8%. We found that neither the act of becoming a KNIGHTS Clinic volunteer nor the hours volunteered at the KNIGHTS Clinic influenced the UCF COM student's choice to enter a primary care specialty (p = NS). Additionally, prior volunteering/clinical experience or the gender of the medical school student did not influence a student's choice to volunteer at

  17. Iranian nurses' experience with applying information from continuing education programs in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Khosravi, Laleh

    2013-12-01

    One goal of continuing education is to improve nurses' performance and the quality of patient care. However, in most cases, nurses do not use the information gained through continuing education in the clinical environment. This study was conducted to explore nurses' experiences with applying new knowledge obtained from these programs in clinical settings. This study used qualitative content analysis. Data were gathered through interviews with participants. After the interviews were transcribed, a coding process was used and continued until categories and subcategories were developed. Five main categories emerged: (1) personal interest and self-confidence; (2) organizational structure and atmosphere; (3) professional nature; (4) opportunity to put education into practice; and (5) design of educational programs. Most of the nurses considered obligatory participation in these classes a way to gain annual educational upgrades. A considerable amount of the annual budget is allocated to continuing education. Therefore, the findings of this study, which described nurses' experience with applying what they learned through continuing education in clinical practice, can offer valuable information to help managers improve continuing education programs and the application of new knowledge in the clinical environment. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. A structured women's preventive health clinic for residents: a quality improvement project designed to meet training needs and improve cervical cancer screening rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta K; Einstadter, Douglas; Lawrence, Renee

    2010-10-01

    Multiple resident-related factors contribute to 'missed opportunities' in providing comprehensive preventive care for female patients, including comfort level, knowledge and experience--all of which are compounded by resident turnover rates. Of particular concern among Internal Medicine (IM) residents is their knowledge and comfort level in performing pelvic exams. To evaluate the impact of a quality improvement project of implementing a Women's Preventive Health Clinic (WPHC) on addressing gaps identified by needs assessments: residents' comfort and knowledge with female preventive care and cervical cancer screening. The WPHC, a multidisciplinary weekly clinic, focused on preventive services for women with chronic conditions. The alternating didactic and clinic sessions emphasised women's preventive health topics for IM residents. Sixty-three IM residents participated in WPHC between 2002 and 2005. Pre- and post-test design was used to assess resident knowledge and comfort levels. Cervical cancer screening rates of residents' patients were assessed pre- and post-WPHC initiation. There was a significant improvement in general knowledge (64% correct at pretest vs 73% at post-test, p=0.0002), resident comfort level in discussing women's health topics and performing gynaecological exams (p<0.0002). Cervical cancer screening rates among IM residents' patients improved from 54% (pre-WPHC initiation) to 65% (post-WPHC initiation period). The results indicate that a focused resident preventive programme can meet gaps identified by education and needs assessments, and simultaneously have a positive impact on cervical cancer screening rates and thus may serve as a model for other residency programmes.

  19. Learners' perspective: where and when pre-residency trainees learn more to achieve their core clinical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eusang; Ahn, Ducksun; Lee, Young-Mee

    2016-12-01

    While it is known that effective clinical education requires active involvement of its participants, regular feedback, communication skills and interprofessional training, limited studies have been conducted in Korea that demonstrate how pre-residency trainees acquire their core clinical skills. This is a cross-sectional study of interns and students across a third-tier university hospital in Korea to examine where and when they acquire core clinical skills. A total of 74 students and 91 interns were asked to participate in a closed-ended questionnaire, and 50 participants (20 students and 30 interns) were involved in semistructured individual interviews. The questionnaire was based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. The majority of core clinical skills were acquired during their rotations in emergency medicine, general surgery, and cardiothoracic surgery. The semistructured interviews revealed that these departments required their trainees to be highly involved and analytical, and participate in clinical discourse. The common factor among the three departments is an environment in which trainees are highly involved in clinical duties, and are expected to make first-contact patient encounters, participate in clinical discourse, interpret investigative results and arrive at their own conclusions. Work-based learning appear to be key to the trends observed, and further study is warranted to determine whether these findings are indicative of true acquisition of clinical competence.

  20. Learners’ perspective: where and when pre-residency trainees learn more to achieve their core clinical competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eusang Ahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose While it is known that effective clinical education requires active involvement of its participants, regular feedback, communication skills and interprofessional training, limited studies have been conducted in Korea that demonstrate how pre-residency trainees acquire their core clinical skills. This is a cross-sectional study of interns and students across a third-tier university hospital in Korea to examine where and when they acquire core clinical skills. Methods A total of 74 students and 91 interns were asked to participate in a closed-ended questionnaire, and 50 participants (20 students and 30 interns were involved in semistructured individual interviews. The questionnaire was based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Results The majority of core clinical skills were acquired during their rotations in emergency medicine, general surgery, and cardiothoracic surgery. The semistructured interviews revealed that these departments required their trainees to be highly involved and analytical, and participate in clinical discourse. Conclusion The common factor among the three departments is an environment in which trainees are highly involved in clinical duties, and are expected to make first-contact patient encounters, participate in clinical discourse, interpret investigative results and arrive at their own conclusions. Work-based learning appear to be key to the trends observed, and further study is warranted to determine whether these findings are indicative of true acquisition of clinical competence.

  1. A Flexible System for Processing Clinical Performance Ratings: Illustrative Applications in a Residency and Four Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Gerald J.; And Others

    The Performance Rating portion of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Objective Test Scoring and Performance Rating (OTS-PR) system is designed to help the clinical teacher evaluate students' clinical performance. The system collects, processes, and reports ratings of learners' performances in clinical settings. The system's 160…

  2. Managing Malnutrition in Older Persons Residing in Care Homes: Nutritional and Clinical Outcomes Following a Screening and Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, Christopher G; Okonkwo, Arthur C O; Hart, Kathryn; Thompson, Nick P

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish prevalence of malnutrition in older adult care home residents and investigate whether a nutritional screening and intervention program could improve nutritional and clinical outcomes. A community-based cohort study was conducted in five Newcastle care homes. 205 participants entered; 175 were followed up. Residents already taking oral nutritional supplements (ONS) were excluded from interventions. Those with Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score of 1 received dietetic advice and ≥2 received dietetic advice and were prescribed ONS (220 ml, 1.5 kcal/ml) twice daily for 12 weeks. Body mass index (BMI), MUST, mini nutritional assessment score (MNA)®, mid upper arm muscle circumference (MAMC), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were recorded at baseline and 12 weeks. Malnutrition prevalence was 36.6% ± 6.6 (95% CI). A higher MUST was associated with greater mortality (p = 0.004). Type of intervention received was significantly associated with change in MUST score (p interventions. Dietitian advice may slow the progression of nutritional decline. In this study oral nutritional supplements over a 3-month period did not significantly improve nutritional status in malnourished care home residents.

  3. Improving critical thinking and clinical reasoning with a continuing education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Dina Monteiro; Pimenta, Cibele Mattos; Lunney, Margaret

    2009-03-01

    Continuing education courses related to critical thinking and clinical reasoning are needed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. This study evaluated a 4-day, 16-hour continuing education course conducted in Brazil.Thirty-nine nurses completed a pretest and a posttest consisting of two written case studies designed to measure the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. There were significant differences in accuracy from pretest to posttest for case 1 (p = .008) and case 2 (p = .042) and overall (p = .001). Continuing education courses should be implemented to improve the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses.

  4. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  5. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  6. Initial impact of a dedicated postgraduate laparoscopic mini-residency on clinical practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, David S; Abdelshehid, Corollos S; Uribe, Carlos A; Khonsari, Sephir S; Eichel, Louis; Boker, John R; Shanberg, Allan M; Ahlering, Thomas E; Clayman, Ralph V; McDougall, Elspeth M

    2005-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgical techniques are difficult to master, especially for surgeons who did not receive this type of training during their residencies. We have established a 5-day mentor-preceptor- proctor-guided postgraduate "mini-residency" (M-R) experience in minimally invasive surgery. The initial results from the first 16 participants in the laparoscopic M-R modules are presented. On the first and the last day of the M-R, all participants underwent surgical skills testing using an open-surgery, standard laparoscopic, and robot-assisted laparoscopic format. A written examination was also administered on the last day. The influence of M-R on the participants' practice pattern was then assessed by a follow-up questionnaire survey 1 to 7 months after their attendance. Data from the first 16 participants were analyzed. Of note, the score was significantly improved for only one of the four tested laparoscopic skills (i.e., threading a suture through loops). Nonetheless, on the follow-up survey, of the 15 respondents, two laparoscopically naïve participants had performed laparoscopic nephrectomy, and of the eight participants who had prior renal-ablative laparoscopic experience, four had performed advanced reconstructive laparoscopic cases. A 5-day dedicated postgraduate M-R in laparoscopy appears to be helpful for urologists wishing to incorporate this surgical approach into their practices. The "take rate" among participants is initially at the 40% level, similar to what has been previously reported after a 1 to 2-day hands-on didactic laparoscopy course.

  7. Electronic Nursing Documentation: Patient Care Continuity Using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenburg, Luann; Meetim, Aunchisa

    2016-01-01

    An innovative nursing documentation project conducted at Bumrungrad International Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand demonstrated patient care continuity between nursing patient assessments and nursing Plans of Care using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC). The project developed a new generation of interactive nursing Plans of Care using the six steps of the American Nurses Association (ANA) Nursing process and the MEDCIN® clinical knowledgebase to present CCC coded concepts as a natural by-product of a nurse's documentation process. The MEDCIN® clinical knowledgebase is a standardized point-of-care terminology intended for use in electronic health record systems. The CCC is an ANA recognized nursing terminology.

  8. Using the Constructivist Tridimensional Design Model for Online Continuing Education for Health Care Clinical Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kay Kyeong-Ju; Engelhard, Chalee

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new paradigm for continuing education of Clinical Instructors (CIs): the Constructivist Tridimensional (CTD) model for the design of an online curriculum. Based on problem-based learning, self-regulated learning, and adult learning theory, the CTD model was designed to facilitate interactive, collaborative, and authentic…

  9. Improving Timely Resident Follow-Up and Communication of Results in Ambulatory Clinics Utilizing a Web-Based Audit and Feedback Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggan, Joel C; Swaminathan, Aparna; Thomas, Samantha; Simel, David L; Zaas, Aimee K; Bae, Jonathan G

    2017-04-01

    Failure to follow up and communicate test results to patients in outpatient settings may lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Residents are less likely than attending physicians to report results to patients, and may face additional barriers to reporting, given competing clinical responsibilities. This study aimed to improve the rates of communicating test results to patients in resident ambulatory clinics. We performed an internal medicine, residency-wide, pre- and postintervention, quality improvement project using audit and feedback. Residents performed audits of ambulatory patients requiring laboratory or radiologic testing by means of a shared online interface. The intervention consisted of an educational module viewed with initial audits, development of a personalized improvement plan after Phase 1, and repeated real-time feedback of individual relative performance compared at clinic and program levels. Outcomes included results communicated within 14 days and prespecified "significant" results communicated within 72 hours. A total of 76 of 86 eligible residents (88%) reviewed 1713 individual ambulatory patients' charts in Phase 1, and 73 residents (85%) reviewed 1509 charts in Phase 2. Follow-up rates were higher in Phase 2 than Phase 1 for communicating results within 14 days and significant results within 72 hours (85% versus 78%, P  audit and feedback quality improvement project can improve rates of resident follow-up and communication of results, although communication gaps remained.

  10. Nurse-led outpatient clinics in oncology care - Patient satisfaction, information and continuity of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Catharina Bau; Gustafsson, Eva; Johansson, Hemming; Bergenmar, Mia

    2015-12-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics, patients' perception of received information and associations between continuity of care and satisfaction with information. Questionnaires on patient satisfaction were sent to consecutive samples of patients after they attended a nurse-led clinic at the Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2013. Patients' perceptions of received information were evaluated in 2011 and 2013, by the EORTC QLQ-INFO25. Data on registered continuity of care were retrieved from the patients' medical record. A total of 962 patients responded (79%) to one of the four surveys. Patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics was stable over time. More than 90% rated nurses' interpersonal manners and the care at the clinic as "good", the waiting time as "acceptable", and the length of appointments as "sufficient". Over 90% responded that it was important to meet the same nurse and 62% reported they actually did so and 52% stated they were assigned a named nurse navigator. More than 75% rated the information at their latest visit at a nurse-led clinic as "completely" sufficient. However, 48% expressed wish for more information "during the current disease". No statistical significant associations were found between "satisfaction with information" and continuity of care. Patients' satisfaction with nurse-led clinics was stable over time with generally high figures with the exception for continuity of care and information, areas in which improvements are needed. The wide variety in information needs might require a person-centred approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Identification of Dysarthria Types among Neurologists, Residents in Neurology and Speech Therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaff, M.; Kuiper, T.; Zwinderman, A.; van de Warrenburg, B.; Poels, P.; Offeringa, A.; van der Kooi, A.; Speelman, H.; de Visser, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Classification of dysarthria types comprises flaccid, spastic, ataxic, hypo- and hyperkinetic and mixed dysarthria. This study focussed on the ability of neurologists to clinically identify the correct type of dysarthria in neurological patients. Methods: Eighteen patients with

  12. Clinical identification of dysarthria types among neurologists, residents in neurology and speech therapists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, M. Van der; Kuiper, T.; Zwinderman, A.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Poels, P.J.E.; Offeringa, A.; Kooi, A. van der; Speelman, H.D.; Visser, M. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classification of dysarthria types comprises flaccid, spastic, ataxic, hypo- and hyperkinetic and mixed dysarthria. This study focussed on the ability of neurologists to clinically identify the correct type of dysarthria in neurological patients. METHODS: Eighteen patients with

  13. The need for strong clinical leaders - Transformational and transactional leadership as a framework for resident leadership training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Saravo

    Full Text Available For the purpose of providing excellent patient care, residents need to be strong, effective leaders. The lack of clinical leadership is alarming given the detrimental effects on patient safety. The objective of the study was to assess whether a leadership training addressing transactional and transformational leadership enhances leadership skills in residents.A volunteer sample of 57 residents from postgraduate year one to four was recruited across a range of medical specialties. The residents took part in an interventional controlled trial. The four-week IMPACT leadership training provided specific strategies for leadership in the clinical environment, addressing transactional (e.g. active control, contingent reward and transformational leadership skills (e.g. appreciation, inspirational motivation. Transactional and transformational leadership skill performance was rated (1 on the Performance Scale by an external evaluator blinded to the study design and (2 self-assessed transformational and transactional leadership skills. Both measures contained items of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, with higher scores indicating greater leadership skills.Both scores were significantly different between the IMPACT group and the control group. In the IMPACT group, the Performance Scale increased 15% in transactional leadership skill performance (2.10 to 2.86 (intervention effect, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.40 to 1.13; p < .001, eta2 = 0.31 and 14% in transformational leadership skill performance (2.26 to 2.94 (intervention effect, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.27 to 1.09; p < .001, eta2 = 0.22. The self-assessed transactional skills revealed a 4% increase (3.83 to 4.03 (intervention effect, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.33; p < .001, eta2 = 0.18 and a 6% increase in transformational leadership skills (3.54 to 3.86 (intervention effect, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.40; p< .001, eta2 = 0.53.These findings support the use of the transactional and transformational leadership framework

  14. Effective clinical education: strategies for teaching medical students and residents in the office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayley, William E

    2011-08-01

    Educating medical students and residents in the office presents the challenges of providing quality medical care, maintaining efficiency, and incorporating meaningful education for learners. Numerous teaching strategies to address these challenges have been described in the medical educational literature, but only a few teaching strategies have been evaluated for their impact on education and office practice. Literature on the impact of office-based teaching strategies on educational outcomes and on office efficiency was selected from a Pub Med search, from review of references in retrieved articles, and from the author's personal files. Two teaching strategies, "one-minute preceptor" (OMP) and "SNAPPS," have been shown to improve educational processes and outcomes. Two additional strategies, "Aunt Minnie" pattern recognition and "activated demonstration," show promise but have not been fully evaluated. None of these strategies has been shown to improve office efficiency. OMP and SNAPPS are strategies that can be used in office precepting to improve educational processes and outcomes, while pattern recognition and activated demonstration show promise but need further assessment. Additional areas of research also are suggested.

  15. [Results of a physical therapy program in nursing home residents: A randomized clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilda-López, Jesús; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Garzón-Moreno, Victor Manuel; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of the physical functionality is a key factor in the care of the elderly. Inactive people have a higher risk of death due to diseases associated with inactivity. In addition, the maintenance of optimal levels of physical and mental activity has been suggested as a protective factor against the development and progression of chronic illnesses and disability. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of an 8-week exercise program with elastic bands, on exercise capacity, walking and balance in nursing home residents. A nursing home sample was divided into two groups, intervention group (n=26) and control group (n=25). The intervention group was included in an 8-week physical activity program using elastic bands, twice a week, while the control group was took part in a walking programme. Outcome measurements were descriptive variables (anthropometric characteristics, quality of life, fatigue, fear of movement) and fundamental variables (exercise capacity, walking and balance). A significant improvement in balance and walking speed was observed after the programme. Additionally, exercise capacity improved significantly (P≤.001), and the patients showed an improvement in perceived dyspnea after the physical activity programme in the intervention group. The exercise program was safe and effective in improving dyspnea, exercise capacity, walking, and balance in elderly. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical analysis of 1629 newly diagnosed malignant lymphomas in current residents of Sichuan province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Mei; Bassig, Bryan A; Wen, Jing-Jing; Li, Gan-di; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Yao, Wen-Xiu; Hu, Wei; Wang, Ying; Li, Ji-Man; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Gan, Mao-Zhou; Wang, Chun-Sen; Xu, Gang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing; Xu, Cai-Gang

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies in other provinces of China (Beijing, Xinjiang, Shanxi, Jiangxi, Shanghai, Guangdong, and Taiwan) suggest that the distributions of lymphoma subtypes differ compared with Western populations. In order to evaluate the characteristics of malignant lymphoma in Sichuan, China, we analyzed case series data from incident lymphoma patients diagnosed in 2008 from three hospitals, including a total of 1629 cases and including only current residents of Sichuan. The median age of diagnosis for cases was 54 years, with a higher proportion of male cases compared with female cases. The most commonly diagnosed subtypes included diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (40.4%), NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL; 11.8%), mixed cellularity Hodgkin lymphoma (7.0%), mantle cell lymphoma (4.8%), and marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (3.9%). Differences in demographic characteristics between Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cases were apparent for median age at diagnosis (HL: 34 years; NHL: 57 years), and NHLs accounted for nearly all (99.3%) of the 931 cases of extranodal lymphoma. These findings indicate a higher proportion of NKTCL cases and a lower proportion of follicular lymphoma cases (2.3%) in these hospitals in Sichuan, relative to reports from some other provinces within China (e.g., Shanghai and Shanxi) and the USA. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Frequency of use and acceptability of clinical prediction rules for pulmonary embolism among Swiss general internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, N; Stalder, O; Limacher, A; Bassetti, S; Beer, J H; Genné, D; Battegay, E; Hayoz, D; Leuppi, J; Mueller, B; Perrier, A; Waeber, G; Rodondi, N; Aujesky, D

    2017-12-01

    Whether clinical prediction rules for pulmonary embolism are accepted and used among general internal medicine residents remains uncertain. We therefore evaluated the frequency of use and acceptability of the Revised Geneva Score (RGS) and the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), and explored which factors were associated with rule use. In an online survey among general internal medicine residents from 10 Swiss hospitals, we assessed rule acceptability using the Ottawa Acceptability of Decision Rules Instrument (OADRI) and explored the association between physician and training-related factors and rule use using mixed logistic regression models. The response rate was 50.4% (433/859). Overall, 61% and 36% of the residents reported that they always or regularly use the RGS and the PESI, respectively. The mean overall OADRI score was 4.3 (scale 0-6) for the RGS and 4.1 for the PESI, indicating a good acceptability. Rule acceptability (odds ratio [OR] 6.19 per point, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.64-10.51), prior training in emergency medicine (OR 5.14, CI 2.20-12.01), and availability of internal guidelines recommending RGS use (OR 4.25, CI 2.15-8.43) were associated with RGS use. Rule acceptability (OR 6.43 per point, CI 4.17-9.92) and rule taught at medical school (OR 2.06, CI 1.24-3.43) were associated with PESI use. The RGS was more frequently used than the PESI. Both rules were considered acceptable. Rule acceptability, prior training in emergency medicine, availability of internal guidelines, and rule taught at medical school were associated with rule use and represent potential targets for quality improvement interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ongoing Evaluation of Clinical Ethics Consultations as a Form of Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Ongoing evaluation of a clinical ethics consultation service (ECS) allows for continuous quality improvement, a process-based, data-driven approach for improving the quality of a service. Evaluations by stakeholders involved in a consultation can provide real-time feedback about what is working well and what might need to be improved. Although numerous authors have previously presented data from research studies on the effectiveness of clinical ethics consultation, few ECSs routinely send evaluations as an ongoing component of their everyday clinical activities. The primary purpose of this article is to equip and encourage others to engage in ongoing evaluation of their own ECS. Toward that end, the following resources are shared: (1) the survey tool used to gather the evaluation data, (2) the procedure used to elicit and collate responses, and (3) how the resulting data are used to support continuous quality improvement and justify the continued financial support of the ECS to hospital administration. Copyright 2017 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  19. Teaching residents to communicate: the use of a telephone triage system in an academic ambulatory clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caralis, Panagiota

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the use of a telephone triage system in an academic primary care clinic and its impact on communication, patient management and satisfaction. A "telephone clinic" was created using a triage nurse to answer patients' calls to an academic primary care clinic, staffed by house staff physicians. Chart reviews were conducted of all medical records of patients who called and were referred to the telephone clinic during a six month period. A total of 1135 patient calls were monitored. Using a random selection process, 366 patient calls were studied and 42% of these patients were called back two weeks after the initial call and were interviewed. Of the 336 calls, 68% of the calls were serious enough to be referred to a house staff physician. Symptom complaints accounted for 64% of the telephone calls; 4% of patients were sent to the emergency room or admitted to the hospital directly based on the information from the call. Telephone calls enhanced patients' access to specialty care consultative services and 14% of patients who called received a new medication prescription. Patients' satisfaction with the communication and the overall care provided by the "telephone clinic" was highly rated. The telephone contact initiated by the patients resulted in expedited access for patients whose symptoms were serious enough to require immediate referral to the emergency room or direct hospital admission. In a primary care practice, the telephone can be a major source of communication for practitioners, office staff and patients. The creation of a "telephone clinic" which utilizes nurses and house staff physicians trained and dedicated to telephone communication directly with patients resulted in more efficient management and greater satisfaction for patients. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Integrated continuous bioprocessing: Economic, operational, and environmental feasibility for clinical and commercial antibody manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, James; Coffman, Jon; Ho, Sa V; Farid, Suzanne S

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a systems approach to evaluating the potential of integrated continuous bioprocessing for monoclonal antibody (mAb) manufacture across a product's lifecycle from preclinical to commercial manufacture. The economic, operational, and environmental feasibility of alternative continuous manufacturing strategies were evaluated holistically using a prototype UCL decisional tool that integrated process economics, discrete-event simulation, environmental impact analysis, operational risk analysis, and multiattribute decision-making. The case study focused on comparing whole bioprocesses that used either batch, continuous or a hybrid combination of batch and continuous technologies for cell culture, capture chromatography, and polishing chromatography steps. The cost of goods per gram (COG/g), E-factor, and operational risk scores of each strategy were established across a matrix of scenarios with differing combinations of clinical development phase and company portfolio size. The tool outputs predict that the optimal strategy for early phase production and small/medium-sized companies is the integrated continuous strategy (alternating tangential flow filtration (ATF) perfusion, continuous capture, continuous polishing). However, the top ranking strategy changes for commercial production and companies with large portfolios to the hybrid strategy with fed-batch culture, continuous capture and batch polishing from a COG/g perspective. The multiattribute decision-making analysis highlighted that if the operational feasibility was considered more important than the economic benefits, the hybrid strategy would be preferred for all company scales. Further considerations outside the scope of this work include the process development costs required to adopt continuous processing. © 2017 The Authors Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:854-866, 2017. © 2017 The

  1. Communication skills of tutors and family medicine physician residents in Primary Care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde Bolívar, Francisco Javier; Pedregal González, Miguel; Pérez Fuentes, María Francisca; Alcalde Molina, María Dolores; Torío Durántez, Jesús; Delgado Rodríguez, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    To determine the communicative profiles of family physicians and the characteristics associated with an improved level of communication with the patient. A descriptive multicentre study. Primary Healthcare Centres in Almeria, Granada, Jaen and Huelva. 119 family physicians (tutors and 4th year resident physicians) filmed and observed with patients. Demographic and professional characteristics. Analysis of the communication between physicians and patients, using a CICAA (Connect, Identify, Understand, Agree and Assist, in English) scale. A descriptive, bivariate, multiple linear regression analysis was performed. There were 436 valid interviews. Almost 100% of physicians were polite and friendly, facilitating a dialogue with the patient and allowing them to express their doubts. However, few physicians attempted to explore the state of mind of the patient, or enquire about their family situation or any important stressful events, nor did they ask open questions. Furthermore, few physicians summarised the information gathered. The mean score was 21.43±5.91 points (maximum 58). There were no differences in the total score between gender, city, or type of centre. The linear regression verified that the highest scores were obtained from tutors (B: 2.98), from the duration of the consultations (B: 0.63), and from the age of the professionals (B: -0.1). Physicians excel in terms of creating a friendly environment, possessing good listening skills, and providing the patient with information. However the ability to empathise, exploring the psychosocial sphere, carrying out shared decision-making, and asking open questions must be improved. Being a tutor, devoting more time to consultations, and being younger, results in a significant improvement in communication with the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Residents' experience of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) as a clinical tool following practical application: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemence, A Jill; Balkoski, Victoria I; Lee, Minsun; Poston, John; Schaefer, Bianca M; Maisonneuve, Isabelle M; Bromley, Nicole; Lukowitsky, Mark; Pieterse, Portia; Antonikowski, Angela; Hamilton, Christopher J; Hall, Schekeva; Glick, Stanley D

    2016-01-01

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), an evidence-based validated system for providing early detection and brief treatment of substance use disorders, has been widely used in the training of medical residents across specialties at a number of sites. This article investigates the effectiveness of SBIRT training during short-term follow-up at Albany Medical Center, one of the initial Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grantees. Training outcomes were measured by training satisfaction following opportunities to apply SBIRT skills in clinical work, the rate at which these techniques were applied in clinical work, and the degree to which residents felt that the SBIRT training provided skills that were applicable to their practice. We examined differences in learning experience by postgraduate year and by program, and conducted a qualitative analysis in a convergent parallel mixed-methods design to elucidate barriers encountered by residents upon using SBIRT techniques in clinical practice. Residents remained highly satisfied with the training at 4-month follow-up, with 80.1% reporting that they had used SBIRT skills in their clinical work. Use of SBIRT techniques was high at 6-month follow-up as well, with 85.9% of residents reporting that they regularly screened their patients for substance use, 74.4% reporting that they had applied brief intervention techniques, and 78.2% indicating that SBIRT training had made them overall more effective in helping patients with substance use issues. Differences in application rates and satisfaction were found by specialty. Qualitative analyses indicated that residents encountered patient readiness and specific contextual factors, such as time constraints, externally imposed values, and clinical norms, as barriers to implementation. Despite encountering obstacles such as time constraints and patient readiness, residents utilized many of the skills they had learned during

  3. To compare PubMed Clinical Queries and UpToDate in teaching information mastery to clinical residents: a crossover randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyah Ensan, Ladan; Faghankhani, Masoomeh; Javanbakht, Anna; Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Baradaran, Hamid Reza

    2011-01-01

    To compare PubMed Clinical Queries and UpToDate regarding the amount and speed of information retrieval and users' satisfaction. A cross-over randomized trial was conducted in February 2009 in Tehran University of Medical Sciences that included 44 year-one or two residents who participated in an information mastery workshop. A one-hour lecture on the principles of information mastery was organized followed by self learning slide shows before using each database. Subsequently, participants were randomly assigned to answer 2 clinical scenarios using either UpToDate or PubMed Clinical Queries then crossed to use the other database to answer 2 different clinical scenarios. The proportion of relevantly answered clinical scenarios, time to answer retrieval, and users' satisfaction were measured in each database. Based on intention-to-treat analysis, participants retrieved the answer of 67 (76%) questions using UpToDate and 38 (43%) questions using PubMed Clinical Queries (PUpToDate compared to 29 min (95% CI: 26 to 32) using PubMed Clinical Queries (PUpToDate and also overall satisfaction were higher among UpToDate users compared to PubMed Clinical Queries users (PUpToDate compared to Pubmed Clinical Queries can lead to not only a higher proportion of relevant answer retrieval within a shorter time, but also a higher users' satisfaction. So, addition of tutoring pre-appraised sources such as UpToDate to the information mastery curricula seems to be highly efficient.

  4. To compare PubMed Clinical Queries and UpToDate in teaching information mastery to clinical residents: a crossover randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Sayyah Ensan

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare PubMed Clinical Queries and UpToDate regarding the amount and speed of information retrieval and users' satisfaction. METHOD: A cross-over randomized trial was conducted in February 2009 in Tehran University of Medical Sciences that included 44 year-one or two residents who participated in an information mastery workshop. A one-hour lecture on the principles of information mastery was organized followed by self learning slide shows before using each database. Subsequently, participants were randomly assigned to answer 2 clinical scenarios using either UpToDate or PubMed Clinical Queries then crossed to use the other database to answer 2 different clinical scenarios. The proportion of relevantly answered clinical scenarios, time to answer retrieval, and users' satisfaction were measured in each database. RESULTS: Based on intention-to-treat analysis, participants retrieved the answer of 67 (76% questions using UpToDate and 38 (43% questions using PubMed Clinical Queries (P<0.001. The median time to answer retrieval was 17 min (95% CI: 16 to 18 using UpToDate compared to 29 min (95% CI: 26 to 32 using PubMed Clinical Queries (P<0.001. The satisfaction with the accuracy of retrieved answers, interaction with UpToDate and also overall satisfaction were higher among UpToDate users compared to PubMed Clinical Queries users (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: For first time users, using UpToDate compared to Pubmed Clinical Queries can lead to not only a higher proportion of relevant answer retrieval within a shorter time, but also a higher users' satisfaction. So, addition of tutoring pre-appraised sources such as UpToDate to the information mastery curricula seems to be highly efficient.

  5. Laboratory evaluation of thermophilic-anaerobic digestion to produce Class A biosolids. 1. Stabilization performance of a continuous-flow reactor at low residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Michael D; Walters, Glenn W; Crunk, Phillip L; Willis, John L; Farrell, Joseph B; Schafer, Perry L; Arnett, Cliff; Turner, Billy G

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the United States in producing biosolids from municipal wastewater treatment that meet the criteria for Class A designation established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Class A biosolids are intended to be free of pathogens and also must meet requirements for reduction of the vector-attraction potential associated with untreated sludge. High-temperature processes are considered to produce Class A biosolids if the combination of operating temperature and treatment time exceeds minimum criteria, but this option is not applicable to mixed, continuous-flow reactors. Such reactors, or any combination of reactors that does not meet the holding time requirement at a specific temperature, must be demonstrated to inactivate pathogens to levels consistent with the Class A criteria. This study was designed to evaluate pathogen inactivation by thermophilic anaerobic digestion in a mixed, continuous-flow reactor followed by batch or plug-flow treatment. In this first of a two-part series, we describe the performance of a continuous-flow laboratory reactor with respect to physical and chemical operating parameters; microbial inactivation in the combined continuous-flow and batch treatment system is described in the second part. Sludges from three different sources were treated at 53 degrees C, while sludge from one of the sources was also treated at 55 and 51 degrees C. Relatively short hydraulic retention times (four to six days) were used to represent a conservative operating condition with respect to pathogen inactivation. Treatment of a fermented primary sludge led to an average volatile-solids (VS) destruction efficiency of 45%, while VS destruction for the other two sources was near or below 38%, the Class A criterion for vector attraction reduction. Consistent with other studies on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sludges at short residence times, effluent concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were relatively high

  6. Travel-associated disease among US residents visiting US GeoSentinel clinics after return from international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Han, Pauline V; Stauffer, William M; Miller, Andy O; Connor, Bradley A; Hale, DeVon C; Coyle, Christina M; Cahill, John D; Marano, Cinzia; Esposito, Douglas H; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2014-12-01

    US residents make 60 million international trips annually. Family practice providers need to be aware of travel-associated diseases affecting this growing mobile population. To describe demographics, travel characteristics and clinical diagnoses of US residents who present ill after international travel. Descriptive analysis of travel-associated morbidity and mortality among US travellers seeking care at 1 of the 22 US practices and clinics participating in the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network from January 2000 to December 2012. Of the 9624 ill US travellers included in the analysis, 3656 (38%) were tourist travellers, 2379 (25%) missionary/volunteer/research/aid workers (MVRA), 1580 (16%) travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs), 1394 (15%) business travellers and 593 (6%) student travellers. Median (interquartile range) travel duration was 20 days (10-60 days). Pre-travel advice was sought by 45%. Hospitalization was required by 7%. Compared with other groups of travellers, ill MVRA travellers returned from longer trips (median duration 61 days), while VFR travellers disproportionately required higher rates of inpatient care (24%) and less frequently had received pre-travel medical advice (20%). Illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract were the most common (58%), followed by systemic febrile illnesses (18%) and dermatologic disorders (17%). Three deaths were reported. Diagnoses varied according to the purpose of travel and region of exposure. Returning ill US international travellers present with a broad spectrum of travel-associated diseases. Destination and reason for travel may help primary health care providers to generate an accurate differential diagnosis for the most common disorders and for those that may be life-threatening. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Clinical Interpretation of Elevated Concentrations of Cardiac Troponin T, but Not Troponin I, in Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinaels, Eline P M; Daamen, Mariëlle A M J; Bekers, Otto; ten Kate, Joop; Niens, Marijke; van Suijlen, Jeroen D E; van Dieijen-Visser, Marja P; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter; Schols, Jos M G A; Mingels, Alma M A

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac troponins T (cTnT) and I (cTnI) are the preferred biomarkers to detect myocardial damage. The present study explores the value of measuring cardiac troponins (cTn) in nursing home residents, by investigating its relation to heart failure and 1-year mortality using 1 cTnT and 2 cTnI assays that are widely used in clinical practice. All participants underwent extensive clinical examinations and echocardiographic assessment for the diagnosis of heart failure. cTn was measured using high-sensitive (hs)- cTnT (Roche), hs-cTnI (Abbott), and sensitive cTnI (Beckman) assays. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR) using serum creatinine and cystatin C concentrations. Data on all-cause mortality were collected at 1-year follow-up. Participants were 495 long-term nursing home residents, older than 65 years, of 5 Dutch nursing home organizations. Median (IQR) concentrations were 20.6 (17.8-30.6), 6.8 (4.1-12.5), and 4.0 (2.0-8.0) ng/L for hs-cTnT, hs-cTnI, and cTnI, respectively. In total, 79% had elevated hs-cTnT concentrations, whereas only 9% and 5% of hs-cTnI and cTnI concentrations were elevated. Most important and independent determinants for higher hs-cTnT and hs-cTnI concentrations were heart failure and renal dysfunction. Whereas both heart failure (odds ratio [OR] 3.4) and eGFR lower than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (OR 3.6) were equal contributors to higher hs-cTnT concentrations (all P cardiac health, hs-cTnT but not hs-cTnI concentrations were elevated in almost all aged nursing home residents, questioning the use of the current diagnostic cutoff in elderly with high comorbidity. Nonetheless, measuring cardiac troponins, especially hs-cTnT, had a promising role in assessing future risk of mortality. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Determinants of continuance intention in a post-adoption satisfaction evaluation of a clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadji, Brahim; Dupuis, Isabelle; Leneveut, Laurence; Heudes, Didier; Wagner, Jean-François; Degoulet, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of end-user satisfaction is an essential part of any clinical information system (CIS) project. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the determinants of CIS continuance intention in a late post-adoption phase at the Georges Pompidou University Hospital (HEGP) in Paris. We designed an electronic survey instrument based on an IT post-adoption model (ITPAM) developed from three previous models, i.e., the Delone and McLean Information Success Model, the Davis TAM model and the Bhattacherjee information system continuance intention model. 419 questionnaires were collected from CIS users directly involved in patient care. The perceived CIS quality, usefulness and user satisfaction are significantly lower for medical professions than other professional groups. Continuance intention is very high within all professional subgroups. In a multiple regression analysis, the global satisfaction (R(2) = .780) was positively and significantly correlated with CIS quality, confirmation of expectations and perceived CIS usefulness. The continuance intention (R(2) = .392) was positively and significantly correlated with perceived CIS usefulness, confirmation of expectations and global satisfaction. In a late post-adoption CIS deployment phase, continuance intention does not significantly depend on individual end user characteristics but is significantly associated with the perceived CIS usefulness, confirmation of expectations and global satisfaction.

  9. Is Lower Quality Clinical Care Ethically Justifiable for Patients Residing in Areas with Infrastructure Deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2018-03-01

    Reproductive health services, including infertility care, are important in countries with infrastructure deficits, such as Lebanon, which now hosts more than one million Syrian refugees. Islamic prohibitions on child adoption and third-party reproductive assistance (donor eggs, sperm, embryos, and surrogacy) mean that most Muslim couples must turn to in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to overcome their childlessness. Attempts to bring low-cost IVF-ICSI to underserved populations might help infertile couples where no other services are available. However, a low-cost IVF-ICSI protocol for male infertility remains technically challenging and thus may result in two standards of clinical care. Nonetheless, low-cost IVF-ICSI represents a form of reproductive justice in settings with infrastructure deficits and is clearly better than no treatment at all. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Motherhood during residency training: challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Allyn; Gold, Michelle; Jensen, Phyllis; Jedrzkiewicz, Michelle

    2005-07-01

    To determine what factors enable or impede women in a Canadian family medicine residency program from combining motherhood with residency training. To determine how policies can support these women, given that in recent decades the number of female family medicine residents has increased. Qualitative study using in-person interviews. McMaster University Family Medicine Residency Program. Twenty-one of 27 family medicine residents taking maternity leave between 1994 and 1999. Semistructured interviews. The research team reviewed transcripts of audiotaped interviews for emerging themes; consensus was reached on content and meaning. NVIVO software was used for data analysis. Long hours, unpredictable work demands, guilt because absences from work increase workload for colleagues, and residents' high expectations of themselves cause pregnant residents severe stress. This stress continues upon return to work; finding adequate child care is an added stress. Residents report receiving less support from colleagues and supervisors upon return to work; they associate this with no longer being visibly pregnant. Physically demanding training rotations put additional strain on pregnant residents and those newly returned to work. Flexibility in scheduling rotations can help accommodate needs at home. Providing breaks, privacy, and refrigerators at work can help maintain breastfeeding. Allowing residents to remain involved in academic and clinical work during maternity leave helps maintain clinical skills, build new knowledge, and promote peer support. Pregnancy during residency training is common and becoming more common. Training programs can successfully enhance the experience of motherhood during residency by providing flexibility at work to facilitate a healthy balance among the competing demands of family, work, and student life.

  11. Using clinical cases to stimulate active learning in a short periodontal continuing professional development course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Thevissen, Eric; Lindén, Ulf; Klinge, Björn; de Bruyn, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    A case-based approach was used in a two-day periodontal continuing professional development course as a strategy to stimulate active learning. The present study investigates the outcome of this course format in terms of feasibility, perceived efficiency as a learning approach and reported individual learning goals. The study was performed in five identical courses entitled'risk analysis and treatment in periodontal patients'at Malmö University between 2011-2014. Before the course, clinical cases were used to activate participants' prior knowledge and to attune their focus on the course content. During the course, cases were discussed to synchronise theory with practical application. A pre- and end-course questionnaire were developed to evaluate participants' characteristics (age, clinical expertise, experience and expectations), perceptions on feasibility and instructiveness and emerged individual learning goals. The participants (39 dentists and 78 dental hygienists) reported an average preparation time of 62 minutes (range 2-190) and had positive perceptions on the accessibility, instructiveness and difficulty of cases. Expectations ranged between refreshing, acquiring new knowledge and mastering the course subject. Most reported learning goals were related to daily clinical practice including the development of a treatment plan, when to continue non-surgical treatment or to extract teeth/perform surgery, the approach to periodontitis, how to motivate non-compliant patients and when to refer. Conclusion: The use of clinical cases to stimulate active learning in a short-term continuing professional development periodontal course was positively perceived by the dentists and dental hygienists in terms of feasibility and learning potential.

  12. Development and dissemination of Web-based clinical simulations for continuing geriatric nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowlowitz, Vicki; Davenport, Carolyn S; Palmer, Mary H

    2009-04-01

    This article describes the process of developing and disseminating a Web-based library of geriatric clinical simulations used in continuing education workshops. Twenty-six peer-reviewed clinical simulations were developed on topics reflecting prevalent acute illnesses, conditions, or sentinel events that, if left undetected or untreated, could cause further comorbidity, hospitalization, or death. Geriatric nursing competencies identified by The John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing were also incorporated. More than 700 workshop attendees and others have used these online clinical simulations. User evaluations of realism, accuracy of the situation or problem portrayed, and relevance to practice were rated as excellent or very good by more than 85% of the users. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Center for Lifelong Learning Web site will offer this library with associated American Nurses Credentialing Center contact hours. This online access provides nurses high-quality continuing education offerings to increase knowledge and improve competence in the care of aging adults.

  13. The relationship between communication scores from the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills examination and communication ratings for first-year internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winward, Marcia L; Lipner, Rebecca S; Johnston, Mary M; Cuddy, Monica M; Clauser, Brian E

    2013-05-01

    This study extends available evidence about the relationship between scores on the Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS) component of the United States Medical Licensing Examination and subsequent performance in residency. It focuses on the relationship between Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores and communication skills ratings that residency directors assign to residents in their first postgraduate year of internal medicine training. It represents the first large-scale evaluation of the extent to which Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores can be extrapolated to examinee performance in supervised practice. Hierarchical linear modeling techniques were used to examine the relationships among examinee characteristics, residency program characteristics, and residency-director-provided ratings. The sample comprised 6,306 examinees from 238 internal medicine residency programs who completed Step 2 CS for the first time in 2005 and received ratings during their first year of internal medicine residency training. Although the relationship is modest, Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores predict communication skills ratings for first-year internal medicine residents after accounting for other factors. The results of this study make a reasonable case that Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores provide useful information for predicting the level of communication skill that examinees will display in their first year of internal medicine residency training. This finding demonstrates some level of extrapolation from the testing context to behavior in supervised practice, thus providing validity-related evidence for using Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores in high-stakes decisions.

  14. Leadership in the clinical workplace: what residents report to observe and supervisors report to display: an exploratory questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Martha A; Scheele, Fedde; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Jaarsma, A Debbie C; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2015-11-02

    Within the current health care system, leadership is considered important for physicians. leadership is mostly self-taught, through observing and practicing. Does the practice environment offer residents enough opportunities to observe the supervisor leadership behaviours they have to learn? In the current study we investigate which leadership behaviours residents observe throughout their training, which behaviours supervisors report to display and whether residents and supervisors have a need for more formal training. We performed two questionnaire studies. Study 1: Residents (n = 117) answered questions about the extent to which they observed four basic and observable Situational Leadership behaviours in their supervisors. Study 2: Supervisors (n = 201) answered questions about the extent to which they perceived to display these Situational Leadership behaviours in medical practice. We asked both groups of participants whether they experienced a need for formal leadership training. One-third of the residents did not observe the four basic Situational Leadership behaviours. The same pattern was found among starting, intermediate and experienced residents. Moreover, not all supervisors showed these 4 leadership behaviours. Both supervisors and residents expressed a need for formal leadership training. Both findings together suggest that current practice does not offer residents enough opportunities to acquire these leadership behaviours by solely observing their supervisors. Moreover, residents and supervisors both express a need for more formal leadership training. More explicit attention should be paid to leadership development, for example by providing formal leadership training for supervisors and residents.

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Continuation of Metformin Titration Instructions with Electronic Prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delate, Thomas; Rader, Nathan; Rawlings, Julia E; Smith, Karen; Herner, Sheryl J

    2015-06-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that metformin titration instructions are not being updated and refill requests are approved without modification of the titration instructions such that the titration instructions is continued for patients newly initiated on metformin. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of adult patients who received newly initiated metformin pharmacotherapy. Patients were followed from their initial metformin purchase through two subsequent metformin refill purchases. Outcomes, including the 3-year incidence rate of patients with at least one set of continued titration instructions and proportions of patients with at least one gastrointestinal adverse effect (AE) and those with an elevated glucose measurement at follow-up, were assessed during the time period between patients' second and third metformin purchases. Analyses were performed comparing the exposure (i.e., patients with continued instructions) group to the control (i.e., patients without continued instructions) group. The exposure group had a higher mean age and chronic disease score but lower metformin starting dose than the control group (all p titration instructions was 60.3 % (95 % CI 58.3-62.3). Gastrointestinal AEs were rare with equivalent proportions of patients in each group experiencing an event (p > 0.05). Control patients (48.7 % of patients with a measurement) were more likely to have had poorly controlled glucose than exposure patients (35.7 % of patients with a measurement) (p titration instructions for patients newly initiated on metformin was observed; however, such continuation did not negatively affect clinical outcomes.

  16. Leadership in the clinical workplace: what residents report to observe and supervisors report to display: an exploratory questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    van der Wal, Martha A.; Scheele, Fedde; Sch?nrock-Adema, Johanna; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Within the current health care system, leadership is considered important for physicians. leadership is mostly self-taught, through observing and practicing. Does the practice environment offer residents enough opportunities to observe the supervisor leadership behaviours they have to learn? In the current study we investigate which leadership behaviours residents observe throughout their training, which behaviours supervisors report to display and whether residents and supervisor...

  17. Clinical audit as a tool of continuous improvement of quality in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathova, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Prikazska, M.

    2009-01-01

    Medical diagnosis and treatment including X -rays, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy , are the largest man-made sources of radiation exposure. The medical use of ionising radiation continues to expand, and is moving towards more complex procedures entailing higher exposures. Directive 97/43/EURATOM, on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposures acknowledged that medical practices using ionizing radiation are developing rapidly and that they are from a radiation protection point of view of regulatory concern. Our contribution summarizes the main recommendations of the Guidelines and the major problems of implementation of Clinical audits in Slovakia, which are: Incomplete national legislation for clinical audit; Methods of financing; Lack of formal framework of auditing; Poor understanding of the purpose and contents of clinical audits; Lack of criteria for the standards of good practices; Difficulty to employ sufficient number of auditors; Insufficient time available for auditors; Lack of specific training of auditors; Need of technological modernization of radiology equipment to meet quality standards. The need for harmonization of clinical audits has been recognized by all countries which replied to the questionnaire, including Slovakia and therefore it should be implemented in radiation protection regulations of Health ministry. (authors)

  18. Clinical audit as a tool of continuous improvement of quality in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathova, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Prikazska, M.

    2008-01-01

    Medical diagnosis and treatment including X -rays, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy , are the largest man-made sources of radiation exposure. The medical use of ionising radiation continues to expand, and is moving towards more complex procedures entailing higher exposures. Directive 97/43/EURATOM, on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposures acknowledged that medical practices using ionizing radiation are developing rapidly and that they are from a radiation protection point of view of regulatory concern. Our contribution summarizes the main recommendations of the Guidelines and the major problems of implementation of Clinical audits in Slovakia, which are: Incomplete national legislation for clinical audit; Methods of financing; Lack of formal framework of auditing; Poor understanding of the purpose and contents of clinical audits; Lack of criteria for the standards of good practices; Difficulty to employ sufficient number of auditors; Insufficient time available for auditors; Lack of specific training of auditors; Need of technological modernization of radiology equipment to meet quality standards. The need for harmonization of clinical audits has been recognized by all countries which replied to the questionnaire, including Slovakia and therefore it should be implemented in radiation protection regulations of Health ministry. (authors)

  19. Doctoral training in clinical psychology across 23 years: Continuity and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Sayette, Michael A; Pomerantz, Andrew M

    2018-03-01

    Doctoral training in clinical psychology has undergone substantial changes in recent decades, especially with the increasing heterogeneity of training models and graduate students. To document these changes, we analyzed program, student, and faculty characteristics of American Psychological Association (APA)-accredited clinical psychology programs over a 23-year span. We surveyed directors of clinical training about their doctoral programs every 2 years from 1991 to 2013, securing 90%-98% response rates. With minimal exceptions, the survey questions remained constant. Percentages of female and racial/ethnic minority students continued to grow, such that women now comprise about three quarters of trainees and ethnic minorities about one quarter. There has been a decisive shift in faculty theoretical orientation toward cognitive/cognitive-behavioral and away from psychodynamic/psychoanalytic. Internship match rates were relatively high and stable until the early 2010s but have recently rebounded. We discuss the limitations of these survey results and their implications for the future of doctoral training in clinical psychology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Resident trainees do not affect patient satisfaction in an outpatient gastroenterology clinic: a prospective study conducted in a Canadian gastroenterology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmania, Mayur; Young, Madison; Muthiah, Chetty; Ilnyckyj, Alexandra; Duerksen, Donald; Moffatt, Dana C

    2015-10-01

    There is little literature regarding how a gastroenterology trainee affects a patient's interpretation of care during outpatient clinic visits. Improving patient satisfaction is desirable and benefits may include enhanced patient compliance as well as providing trainees with areas for improvement. To evaluate patient satisfaction in an outpatient gastroenterology clinic when seen by a trainee and attending physician versus an attending physician alone. The secondary objective was to evaluate physician characteristics that play a role in creating a positive clinical experience. A randomized prospective survey study was conducted over an 11-month period (July 2012 to June 2013) at St Boniface Hospital (Winnipeg, Manitoba). Two gastroenterology fellows (postgraduate year 4 and 5) and nine internal medicine residents (postgraduate year 1 to 3) comprised the 'trainee' role, while three academic clinicians comprised the 'attending' role. Patients included individuals seen for an initial consultation and were >18 years of age. A total of 211 patients comprised the final study group, with 118 in the attending group and 93 in the trainee group. In univariate analysis, patients more often had a very good experience when seen by an attending physician alone versus a trainee and attending physician (73% versus 56%; P=0.016); however, on multivariate analysis, there was no significant difference in patient satisfaction (OR 0.89; P=0.931). Physician factors found to be associated with high patient satisfaction on multivariate analysis included: addressing all patient concerns (OR 27.56; P=0.021); giving the patient a preliminary diagnosis (OR 78.02; P=0.006); and feeling the physician was thorough (OR 72.53; P=0.029). The present study did not reveal a difference in patient satisfaction if a patient sees an attending physician alone or with a trainee. Moreover, to improve patient satisfaction in a gastroenterology clinic, physicians should address all patient concerns, provide a

  1. Acceptability and Impact of a Required Palliative Care Rotation with Prerotation and Postrotation Observed Simulated Clinical Experience during Internal Medicine Residency Training on Primary Palliative Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergo, Maxwell T; Sachs, Sharona; MacMartin, Meredith A; Kirkland, Kathryn B; Cullinan, Amelia M; Stephens, Lisa A

    2017-05-01

    Improving communication training for primary palliative care using a required palliative care rotation for internal medicine (IM) residents has not been assessed. To assess skills acquisition and acceptability for IM residents not selecting an elective. A consecutive, single-arm cohort underwent preobjective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with learner-centric feedback, two weeks of clinical experience, and finally a post-OSCE to crystallize learner-centric take home points. IM second year residents from Dartmouth-Hitchcock were exposed to a required experiential palliative care rotation. Pre- and post-OSCE using a standardized score card for behavioral skills, including patient-centered interviewing, discussing goals of care/code status, and responding to emotion, as well as a confidential mixed qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the experience. Twelve residents were included in the educational program (two were excluded because of shortened experiences) and showed statistically significant improvements in overall communication and more specifically in discussing code status and responding to emotions. General patient-centered interviewing skills were not significantly improved, but prerotation scores reflected pre-existing competency in this domain. Residents viewed the observed simulated clinical experience (OSCE) and required rotation as positive experiences, but wished for more opportunities to practice communication skills in real clinical encounters. A required palliative care experiential rotation flanked by OSCEs at our institution improved the acquisition of primary palliative care communication skills similarly to other nonclinical educational platforms, but may better meet the needs of the resident and faculty as well as address all required ACGME milestones.

  2. [Study of continuous quality improvement for clinical laboratory processes via the platform of Hospital Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenqi; Shen, Ying; Peng, Xiaoxia; Tian, Jian; Wang, Hui; Xu, Lili; Nie, Xiaolu; Ni, Xin

    2015-05-26

    The program of continuous quality improvement in clinical laboratory processes for complete blood count (CBC) was launched via the platform of Beijing Children's Hospital Group in order to improve the quality of pediatric clinical laboratories. Fifteen children's hospitals of Beijing Children's Hospital group were investigated using the method of Chinese adapted continuous quality improvement with PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Action). The questionnaire survey and inter-laboratory comparison was conducted to find the existing problems, to analyze reasons, to set forth quality targets and to put them into practice. Then, targeted training was conducted to 15 children's hospitals and the second questionnaire survey, self examinations by the clinical laboratories was performed. At the same time, the Group's online internal quality control platform was established. Overall effects of the program were evaluated so that lay a foundation for the next stage of PDCA. Both quality of control system documents and CBC internal quality control scheme for all of clinical laboratories were improved through this program. In addition, standardization of performance verification was also improved, especially with the comparable verification rate of precision and internal laboratory results up to 100%. In terms of instrument calibration and mandatory diagnostic rates, only three out of the 15 hospitals (20%) failed to pass muster in 2014 from 46.67% (seven out of the 15 hospitals) in 2013. The abnormal data of intraday precision variance coefficients of the five CBC indicator parameters (WBC, RBC, Hb, Plt and Hct) of all the 15 laboratories accounted for 1.2% (2/165) in 2014, a marked decrease from 9.6% (14/145) in 2013. While the number of the hospitals using only one horizontal quality control object for daily quality control has dropped to three from five. The 15 hospitals organized a total of 263 times of training in 2014 from 101 times in 2013, up 160%. The quality improvement program for

  3. Clinical review: Optimal dose of continuous renal replacement therapy in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowle, John R; Schneider, Antoine; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is the preferred treatment for acute kidney injury in intensive care units (ICUs) throughout much of the world. Despite the widespread use of CRRT, controversy and center-specific practice variation in the clinical application of CRRT continue. In particular, whereas two single-center studies have suggested survival benefit from delivery of higher-intensity CRRT to patients with acute kidney injury in the ICU, other studies have been inconsistent in their results. Now, however, two large multi-center randomized controlled trials - the Veterans Affairs/National Institutes of Health Acute Renal Failure Trial Network (ATN) study and the Randomized Evaluation of Normal versus Augmented Level (RENAL) Replacement Therapy Study - have provided level 1 evidence that effluent flow rates above 25 mL/kg per hour do not improve outcomes in patients in the ICU. In this review, we discuss the concept of dose of CRRT, its relationship with clinical outcomes, and what target optimal dose of CRRT should be pursued in light of the high-quality evidence now available.

  4. Clinical consequences of untreated dental caries assessed using PUFA index and its covariates in children residing in orphanages of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Ramsha; Farooq, Warda; Faisal, Mehreen Riaz; Jahangir, Faisal

    2017-07-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical effects of untreated dental caries in Pakistani children residing in orphanages using the DMFT and PUFA index; association of decay and untreated dental caries with demographics including type of orphanage; behavioural and dental visiting pattern; and association of dental pain experience and type of orphanage with dental visiting. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a total of 753 orphan children belonging to 4-17 years of age group residing in twin cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan. Clinical examination of children was performed using the DMFT and PUFA index for the assessment of dental caries and untreated decay, followed by questionnaire enquiring about eating and oral hygiene habits, dental visiting pattern and dental pain and swelling experience. Association between dental decay, child's dental visiting and pain as a consequence of untreated decay was carried out using chi square test and logistic regression analysis. The overall caries prevalence was 34.8% and overall prevalence of PUFA/pufa was 15.9%. The mean score of DMFT and dmft was 1.18 (SD 0.39) and 1.04 (SD 0.23), and mean PUFA was 1.18 (SD 0.57) and mean pufa score 1.14 (SD 0.35). Untreated caries ratio was found to be 49.1% indicating half the decay had progressed to involve the pulp. No significant association of gender was found with DMFT, dmft, PUFA and pufa (p > 0.05), however, when analysed individually, the 'D' component of DMFT was significantly associated with male gender (p = 0.05). Furthermore, no significant association of DMFT/dmft or PUFA/pufa in either dentition was found with behavioural characteristics such as dietary and oral hygiene habits. Also, 66.2% children who experienced pain had not been to the dentist in the past year (p = 0.013) and 52.6% children who mentioned experiencing pain at night had not been to the dentist in the past year (p = 0.009). Children with decay were more

  5. Axial and centrifugal continuous-flow rotary pumps: a translation from pump mechanics to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Smedira, Nicholas G; Hoercher, Katherine J; Massiello, Alex; Lee, Sangjin; Horvath, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2013-01-01

    The recent success of continuous-flow circulatory support devices has led to the growing acceptance of these devices as a viable therapeutic option for end-stage heart failure patients who are not responsive to current pharmacologic and electrophysiologic therapies. This article defines and clarifies the major classification of these pumps as axial or centrifugal continuous-flow devices by discussing the difference in their inherent mechanics and describing how these features translate clinically to pump selection and patient management issues. Axial vs centrifugal pump and bearing design, theory of operation, hydrodynamic performance, and current vs flow relationships are discussed. A review of axial vs centrifugal physiology, pre-load and after-load sensitivity, flow pulsatility, and issues related to automatic physiologic control and suction prevention algorithms is offered. Reliability and biocompatibility of the two types of pumps are reviewed from the perspectives of mechanical wear, implant life, hemolysis, and pump deposition. Finally, a glimpse into the future of continuous-flow technologies is presented. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Colton H L; Diaconu, Silviu; Alfadil, Sara; Woodall, Jhade; Grant, Michael; Lifchez, Scott; Nam, Arthur; Rasko, Yvonne

    2017-09-01

    Over the past decade, plastic surgery programs have continued to evolve with the addition of 1 year of training, increase in the minimum number of required aesthetic cases, and the gradual replacement of independent positions with integrated ones. To evaluate the impact of these changes on aesthetic training, a survey was sent to residents and program directors. A 37 question survey was sent to plastic surgery residents at all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery training programs in the United States. A 13 question survey was sent to the program directors at the same institutions. Both surveys were analyzed to determine the duration of training and comfort level with cosmetic procedures. Eighty-three residents (10%) and 11 program directors (11%) completed the survey. Ninety-four percentage of residents had a dedicated cosmetic surgery rotation (an increase from 68% in 2015) in addition to a resident cosmetic clinic. Twenty percentage of senior residents felt they would need an aesthetic surgery fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery compared with 31% in 2015. Integrated chief residents were more comfortable performing cosmetic surgery cases compared with independent chief residents. Senior residents continue to have poor confidence with facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  7. Developing leadership competencies among medical trainees: five-year experience at the Cleveland Clinic with a chief residents' training course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, Carol F; Smalling, Susan; Stoller, James K

    2016-10-01

    Challenges in healthcare demand great leadership. In response, leadership training programs have been developed within academic medical centers, business schools, and healthcare organizations; however, we are unaware of any well-developed programs for physicians-in-training. To address this gap, we developed a two-day leadership development course for chief residents (CRs) at the Cleveland Clinic, framed around the concept of emotional intelligence. This paper describes our five-year experience with the CRs leadership program. Since inception, 105 CRs took the course; 81 (77%) completed before-and-after evaluations. Participants indicated that they had relatively little prior knowledge of the concepts that were presented and that the workshop greatly enhanced their familiarity with leadership competencies. Qualitative analysis of open-ended responses indicated that attendees valued the training, especially in conflict resolution and teamwork, and indicated specific action plans for applying these skills. Furthermore, the workshop spurred some participants to express plans to learn more about leadership competencies. This study extends prior experience in offering an emotional intelligence-based leadership workshop for CRs. Though the program is novel, further research is needed to more fully understand the impact of leadership training for CRs and for the institutions and patients they serve. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  8. Attitude of Dental Prostheses Residents of Faculty of Dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences to Objective Structured Clinical Examination(OSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hafezeqoran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE is one of the most authentic ways to evaluate clinical skills. The present study aimed at evaluating the attitude of dental prostheses residents of the faculty of dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences toward this kind of examination. Methods: In this cross sectional-descriptive study, two questionnaires were designed. One questionnaire dealt with nature of OSCE and the other dealt with the attitude of residents about OSCE. After holding the OSCE in July 2012, 2013, and 2014, the questionnaires were delivered to all dental prostheses residents of the Tabriz dental faculty. In total, 40 questionnaires were filled out within three years. Questions included five-choice items based on a Likert scale. Furthermore, the students’ scores in each exam were recorded to evaluate any possible relationship between the acquired grade and the student’s attitude toward the exam. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS17 software (α=5%. Results: Most residents (62.5% referred to the large number of questions as a positive factor. In addition, a majority of residents (90% suffered from high levels of stress during OSCE. There was a close relation between the grade acquired by the residents in the examination and their attitude to OSCE as well as their evaluation about the examination. The students with better grades had more positive attitudes toward OSCE. Conclusion: Considering the satisfaction level of the students in this study, OSCE was held efficiently and may be considered as part of the training program of the residents.

  9. Outcome of percutaneous continuous drainage of psoas abscess: A clinically guided technique

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    Bharat R Dave

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Percutaneous aspiration of abscesses under ultrasonography (USG and computer tomography (CT scan has been well described. With recurrence rate reported as high as 66%. The open drainage and percutaneous continuous drainage (PCD has reduced the recurrence rate. The disadvantage of PCD under CT is radiation hazard and problems of asepsis. Hence a technique of clinically guided percutaneous continuous drainage of the psoas abscess without real-time imaging overcomes these problems. We describe clinically guided PCD of psoas abscess and its outcome. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients with dorsolumbar spondylodiscitis without gross neural deficit with psoas abscess of size >5 cm were selected for PCD. It was done as a day care procedure under local anesthesia. Sequentially, aspiration followed by guide pin-guided trocar and catheter insertion was done without image guidance. Culture sensitivity was done and chemotherapy initiated and catheter kept till the drainage was <10 ml for 48 hours. Outcome assessment was done with relief of pain, successful abscess drainage and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index score at 2 years. Results: PCD was successful in all cases. Back and radicular pain improved in all cases. Average procedure time was 24.30 minutes, drain output was 234.40 ml, and the drainage duration was 7.90 days. One patient required surgical stabilisation due to progression of the spondylodiscitis resulting in instability inspite of successful drainage of abscess. Problems with the procedure were noticed in six patients. Multiple attempts ( n = 2, persistent discharge ( n = 1 for 2 weeks, blocked catheter ( n = 2 and catheter pull out ( n = 1 occurred with no effect on the outcome. The average ODI score improved from 62.47 to 5.51 at 2 years. Conclusions: Clinically guided PCD is an efficient, safe and easy procedure in drainage of psoas abscess.

  10. Residents' narrative feedback on teaching performance of clinical teachers: analysis of the content and phrasing of suggestions for improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leeuw, Renée M.; Schipper, Mirjam P.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2016-01-01

    High-quality teaching performance is important to ensure patient safety and encourage residents' learning. This study aims to explore the content and phrasing of suggestions for improvement that residents provide to support excellent teaching performance of their supervisors. From February 2010 to

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF CORONARY ARTERY CALCIFICATION AND DIAGNOSIS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE BY ABDOMINAL CT; A RESIDENT EDUCATION CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Michael; Hobbs, Stephen; Charnigo, Richard; Embertson, Ryan; Daugherty, Michael; Hall, Michael; Brooks, Michael; Leung, Steve; Sorrell, Vince

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring is an excellent imaging tool for subclinical atherosclerosis detection and risk stratification. We hypothesize that although CAC has been underreported in the past on computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen, specialized resident educational intervention can improve on this underreporting. Materials and Methods Beginning July 2009, a dedicated radiology resident cardiac imaging rotation and curriculum was initiated. A retrospective review of the first 500 abdominal CT reports from January 2009, 2011 and 2013 was performed including studies originally interpreted by a resident as well as primary attending physician interpretations. Each scan was re-evaluated for presence or absence of CAC and coronary artery disease (CAD) by a cardiovascular CT expert reader. These data were then correlated to determine if the presence of CAC had been properly reported initially. The results of the three time periods were compared to assess for improved rates of CAC and CAD reporting after initiation of a resident cardiac imaging curriculum. Results Statistically significant improvements in the reporting of CAC and CAD on CT scans of the abdomen occurred following the initiation of formal resident cardiac imaging training which included two rotations (4 weeks each) of dedicated cardiac CT and cardiac MRI interpretation during the resident's 2nd, 3rd, or 4th radiology training years. The improvement was persistent and increased over time, improving from 1% to 72% after two years and to 90% after four years. Conclusion This single center retrospective analysis shows association between implementation of formal cardiac imaging training into radiology resident education and improved CAC detection and CAD reporting on abdominal CT scans. PMID:25579636

  12. Continuous quality improvement in daily clinical practice: a proof of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Lorch

    Full Text Available Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI is an iterative process of: planning to improve a product or process, plan implementation, analyzing and comparing results against those expected, and corrective action on differences between actual and expected results. It is little used in clinical medicine. Anemia, a complex problem in End Stage Renal Disease patients, served to test the ability of an unique electronic medical record (EMR optimized for daily care to empower CQI in practice. We used data collected during daily care, stored in the EMR, and organized to display temporal relationships between clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic events. Our aims were optimal hemoglobin with minimum epoetin, and maintaining stable hemoglobin and epoetin. The study was done on 250 patients treated by maintenance hemodialysis (HD, receiving epoetin prior to February 1, 2010 and followed to July 31, 2011. Repleting iron, ensuring iron sufficiency, slow epoetin reduction, and decision support tools enabling data display over long periods in patient-centered reports were key elements. Epoetin dose, adjusted 6-8 weekly, was based on current clinical conditions and past responses. Hemoglobin increased by months 1-2; epoetin decreased from month 4. By months 16-18, epoetin had decreased 42% to 9,720 units/week while hemoglobin increased 8% to 123.6 g/L. Hemoglobin and epoetin were stable from month 7 onward. New epoetin orders decreased 83%. Transferrin saturation increased after the study start. Individual patient hemoglobin variation decreased by 23%, range by 27%. Mortality, 11.78 per 100 patient years, was 42% less than United States dialysis patient mortality. Allowable epoetin charges decreased by $15.33 per treatment and were $22.88 less than current Medicare allowance. The study validates the hypothesis that an EMR optimized for daily patient care can empower CQI in clinical medicine and serve to monitor medical care quality and cost.

  13. The use of portfolios for continuing assessment of physiotherapy students in clinical practice settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Naidoo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Many and varied methods of assessment are used to evaluate undergraduate physiotherapy students. Different modes of assessment occur as a result of contrasting educational theories and because the purpose of assessment is variable. In this era of performance assessment related to  the students’ mastery of the core curriculum, portfolios can enhance the assessment process by revealing a range of skills and understandings. This fits snugly into the physiotherapy curriculum for undergraduate continuous assessment purposes. Portfolio assessment can facilitate more reflection on students’ learning, more ownership of learning and more awareness of self-development. This supports the South African Qualifications Authority’s objective for higher education of reflection and life-long learning in our students. This article presents discussion on the use of portfolios in physiotherapy student learning and assessment in clinical practice.

  14. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  15. How Can We Realize the Clinical Benefits of Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjan, Ramzi A

    2017-05-01

    Controlling glycemia in diabetes remains key to prevent complications in this condition. However, glucose levels can undergo large fluctuations secondary to daily activities, consequently creating management difficulties. The current review summarizes the basics of glucose management in diabetes by addressing the main glycemic parameters. The advantages and limitation of HbA1c, the gold standard measure of glucose control, are discussed together with the clinical importance of hypoglycemia and glycemic variability. The review subsequently moves focus to glucose monitoring techniques in diabetes, assessing advantages and limitations. Monitoring glucose levels is crucial for effective and safe adjustment of hypoglycemic therapy, particularly in insulin users. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), based on capillary glucose testing, remains one of the most widely used methods to monitor glucose levels, given the relative accuracy, familiarity, and manageable costs. However, patient inconvenience and the sporadic nature of SMBG limit clinical effectiveness of this approach. In contrast, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) provides a more comprehensive picture of glucose levels, but these systems are expensive and require constant calibration which, together with concerns over accuracy of earlier devices, restrict CGM use to special groups of patients. The newer flash continuous glucose monitoring (FCGM) system, which is more affordable than conventional CGM devices and does not require calibration, offers an alternative glucose monitoring strategy that comprehensively analyzes glucose profile while sparing patients the inconvenience of capillary glucose testing for therapy adjustment or CGM calibration. The fast development of new CGM devices will gradually displace SMBG as the main glucose testing method. Avoiding the inconvenience of SMBG and optimizing glycemia through alternative glucose testing strategies will help to reduce the risk of complications and

  16. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Moretti

    Full Text Available Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs.A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction.Three-hundred and eleven (57% out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72% participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49% declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79% of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%. Overall, 246 residents (79% gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools.The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the access to research opportunity are needed; the

  17. Accuracy of flash glucose monitoring and continuous glucose monitoring technologies: Implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjan, Ramzi A; Cummings, Michael H; Jennings, Peter; Leelarathna, Lalantha; Rayman, Gerry; Wilmot, Emma G

    2018-02-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring and flash glucose monitoring technologies measure glucose in the interstitial fluid and are increasingly used in diabetes care. Their accuracy, key to effective glycaemic management, is usually measured using the mean absolute relative difference of the interstitial fluid sensor compared to reference blood glucose readings. However, mean absolute relative difference is not standardised and has limitations. This review aims to provide a consensus opinion on assessing accuracy of interstitial fluid glucose sensing technologies. Mean absolute relative difference is influenced by glucose distribution and rate of change; hence, we express caution on the reliability of comparing mean absolute relative difference data from different study systems and conditions. We also review the pitfalls associated with mean absolute relative difference at different glucose levels and explore additional ways of assessing accuracy of interstitial fluid devices. Importantly, much data indicate that current practice of assessing accuracy of different systems based on individualised mean absolute relative difference results has limitations, which have potential clinical implications. Healthcare professionals must understand the factors that influence mean absolute relative difference as a metric for accuracy and look at additional assessments, such as consensus error grid analysis, when evaluating continuous glucose monitoring and flash glucose monitoring systems in diabetes care. This in turn will ensure that management decisions based on interstitial fluid sensor data are both effective and safe.

  18. Effect of Continuous Care model on lifestyle modification in patients with hypertension: Randomized clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsane Shahrani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable cardiovascular disease. One of the main factors affecting the risk of hypertension is people’s lifestyle, for which appropriate changes in lifestyle-related factors creating cardiovascular risks need to be developed through new and effective approaches in long-term. Follow-up is an important tool for active participation in treatment and behavior changes; therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous care model on the lifestyle of patients with hypertension. In this two-stage clinical trial, two groups of 64 patients with hypertension at the Isfahan Hypertension Center were selected through simple sampling, who hold the study criteria. The samples were randomly divided into two groups of 32 people as the experimental and control groups. The continuous care in the test group was carried out in the form of a four-stage program including orientation, sensitization, control and evaluation for 3 months. The control patients received usual care. Two questionnaires were employed to collect demographic data and lifestyle inventory data for hypertension used in two stages of pre- and post-intervention. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests such as chisquare, Mann-Whitney, independent and paired t-test and analysis of covariance by SPSS version 20. Statistical tests showed no significant differences between the mean scores of two groups in life style dimensions before the intervention. After the intervention, however, the mean scores of lifestyle and its dimensions were significantly higher in the test group than those in the control group (p <0.001 According to the results, it can be concluded that applying continuous care model has significantly been effective in lifestyle modification of patients with high blood pressure. Training the patients and strengthening by repetition, monitoring and management of nurses can be important factors in promoting

  19. Monoclonal purified F VIII for continuous infusion: stability, microbiological safety and clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, S; Varon, D; Keller, N; Gitel, S; Martinowitz, U

    1994-09-01

    Replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia A postoperatively or for major hemorrhage, administered as a continuous infusion, is efficient and reduces the requirement for factor VIII (F VIII). The convenience of the method is increased by using a minipump and not diluting the concentrate further after reconstitution. A monoclonally purified F VIII concentrate (Monoclate-P), was evaluated for its stability after reconstitution in different infusion systems, for its microbiological safety as well as clinical safety and efficacy in continuous infusion. The F VIII activity was unaffected by 2 of the 3 infusion systems at room temperature during 15 days, whereas in the third (CADD-1) it decreased below 80% of initial value after 3-7 days. Addition of heparin (1 U/ml) or low molecular weight heparin (1 anti-Xa U/ml), which are used to prevent thrombophlebitis at the site of infusion, did not affect the stability. Nine out of 9 samples taken from the infusion systems after 3 days and again after 7 days were sterile. After inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli the bacterial growth in samples of the reconstituted concentrate was not different from that in lidocaine in saline or heparin in saline. F VIII was given in continuous infusion with a minipump (Infu-Med) to 12 patients undergoing major surgery and 8 patients with major hemorrhage for a total of 157 days. A progressive decrease of the clearance was seen during the first 5 days of infusion from 3.0 to 1.7 ml/kg/h. Hemostasis was effectively achieved, and no infectious complications were registered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Quantity and quality analysis of dental prosthodontics among retirement age residents from nursing homes in different regions of Latvia and retirement age patients from dental clinic in Riga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidzis, Aldis; Cema, Ingrida; Brinkmane, Anda; Krasta, Ingrida; Broka, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life is closely related with condition of oral health, influence of subjective factors on the whole human body and patients perception of their oral health. In spite of the fact that the most part of Latvian retirement age residents use low-quality dentures and assess them satisfactory, these patients often have problems associated with quality of dentures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oral health status, prosthodontics indicators and patients satisfaction with oral health among Latvian retirement age residents. There were examined 465 retirement age volunteers (170 men and 295 women), 116 of them in dental clinic Sandent (Riga, 24.9% - control group), 137 (29.5%) in nursing homes in Zemgale and 212 (45.6%) in nursing homes in Kurzeme (Zemgale and Kurzeme are districts of Latvia). There were assessed quantity of prosthodontics among patients with partial defects of dental arches, there were estimated quality of dentures and patients satisfaction with existing prosthodontics. Oral health indicators among Latvian retirement age population are better than the same indicators among elderly residents of nursing homes. Among nursing homes residents with partial edentulousness in most of cases in oral cavities remained only few residual teeth which needed treatment. Removable and fixed dental prostheses used by nursing homes residents do not meet denture's quality criteria. Self-evaluation of dentures quality among retirement age residents of nursing homes is better and not correspond with existing dentures quality. In Latvia the quantity of prosthodontics in respect of partial removable dentures among the retired who regularly visit a dentist does not significantly differ from European retirement age population's dental prosthodontics quantity. Dental prosthodontics indicators of residents of nursing homes in Latvia are unsatisfactory (p<0.001). In retirement age population self-evaluation with quality of dentures is higher than actually

  1. Leadership in the clinical workplace : what residents report to observe and supervisors report to display: an exploratory questionnaire study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martha A.; Scheele, Fedde; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Within the current health care system, leadership is considered important for physicians. leadership is mostly self-taught, through observing and practicing. Does the practice environment offer residents enough opportunities to observe the supervisor leadership behaviours they have to

  2. Leadership in the clinical workplace: what residents report to observe and supervisors report to display: an exploratory questionnaire study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, M.A.; Scheele, F.; Schonrock-Adema, J.; Jaarsma, A.D.C.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Within the current health care system, leadership is considered important for physicians. leadership is mostly self-taught, through observing and practicing. Does the practice environment offer residents enough opportunities to observe the supervisor leadership behaviours they have to

  3. Reconciling disparate information in continuity of care documents: Piloting a system to consolidate structured clinical documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Masoud; Jones, Josette; Faiola, Anthony; Vreeman, Daniel J; Wu, Huanmei; Dixon, Brian E

    2017-10-01

    Due to the nature of information generation in health care, clinical documents contain duplicate and sometimes conflicting information. Recent implementation of Health Information Exchange (HIE) mechanisms in which clinical summary documents are exchanged among disparate health care organizations can proliferate duplicate and conflicting information. To reduce information overload, a system to automatically consolidate information across multiple clinical summary documents was developed for an HIE network. The system receives any number of Continuity of Care Documents (CCDs) and outputs a single, consolidated record. To test the system, a randomly sampled corpus of 522 CCDs representing 50 unique patients was extracted from a large HIE network. The automated methods were compared to manual consolidation of information for three key sections of the CCD: problems, allergies, and medications. Manual consolidation of 11,631 entries was completed in approximately 150h. The same data were automatically consolidated in 3.3min. The system successfully consolidated 99.1% of problems, 87.0% of allergies, and 91.7% of medications. Almost all of the inaccuracies were caused by issues involving the use of standardized terminologies within the documents to represent individual information entries. This study represents a novel, tested tool for de-duplication and consolidation of CDA documents, which is a major step toward improving information access and the interoperability among information systems. While more work is necessary, automated systems like the one evaluated in this study will be necessary to meet the informatics needs of providers and health systems in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP after lung resection: a randomized clinical trial

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    Ligia dos Santos Roceto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation during the postoperative period (PO following lung resection can restore residual functional capacity, improve oxygenation and spare the inspiratory muscles. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP associated with physiotherapy, compared with physiotherapy alone after lung resection. DESIGN AND SETTING: Open randomized clinical trial conducted in the clinical hospital of Universidade Estadual de Campinas. METHOD: Sessions were held in the immediate postoperative period (POi and on the first and second postoperative days (PO1 and PO2, and the patients were reassessed on the discharge day. CPAP was applied for two hours and the pressure adjustment was set between 7 and 8.5 cmH2O. The oxygenation index (OI, Borg scale, pain scale and presence of thoracic drains and air losses were evaluated. RESULTS : There was a significant increase in the OI in the CPAP group in the POi compared to the Chest Physiotherapy (CP group, P = 0.024. In the CP group the OI was significantly lower on PO1 (P = 0,042, than CPAP group. The air losses were significantly greater in the CPAP group in the POi and on PO1 (P = 0.001, P = 0.028, but there was no significant difference between the groups on PO2 and PO3. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding the Borg scale in the POi (P < 0.001, but there were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the pain score. CONCLUSION: CPAP after lung resection is safe and improves oxygenation, without increasing the air losses through the drains. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01285648

  5. Bayesian semiparametric regression models for evaluating pathway effects on continuous and binary clinical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inyoung; Pang, Herbert; Zhao, Hongyu

    2013-01-01

    Many statistical methods for microarray data analysis consider one gene at a time, and they may miss subtle changes at the single gene level. This limitation may be overcome by considering a set of genes simultaneously where the gene sets are derived from prior biological knowledge. Limited work has been carried out in the regression setting to study the effects of clinical covariates and expression levels of genes in a pathway either on a continuous or on a binary clinical outcome. Hence, we propose a Bayesian approach for identifying pathways related to both types of outcomes. We compare our Bayesian approaches with a likelihood-based approach that was developed by relating a least squares kernel machine for nonparametric pathway effect with a restricted maximum likelihood for variance components. Unlike the likelihood-based approach, the Bayesian approach allows us to directly estimate all parameters and pathway effects. It can incorporate prior knowledge into Bayesian hierarchical model formulation and makes inference by using the posterior samples without asymptotic theory. We consider several kernels (Gaussian, polynomial, and neural network kernels) to characterize gene expression effects in a pathway on clinical outcomes. Our simulation results suggest that the Bayesian approach has more accurate coverage probability than the likelihood-based approach, and this is especially so when the sample size is small compared with the number of genes being studied in a pathway. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approaches through its applications to a type II diabetes mellitus data set. Our approaches can also be applied to other settings where a large number of strongly correlated predictors are present. PMID:22438129

  6. An E-learning Module on Chronic Low Back Pain in Older Adults: Effect on Medical Resident Attitudes, Confidence, Knowledge, and Clinical Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Zachary G; Elnicki, D Michael; Perera, Subashan; Weiner, Debra K

    2018-01-05

    To determine 1) the feasibility of implementing an e-learning module on chronic low back pain (CLBP) in an older adult into an existing internal medicine residency curriculum and 2) the impact of this module on resident attitudes, confidence, knowledge, and clinical skills relating to CLBP. Participants were assigned to complete either the online module (N = 73) or the Yale Office-based curriculum on CLBP (N = 70). Attitudes, confidence, and knowledge were evaluated pre- and postintervention via survey. A retrospective blinded chart review of resident clinic encounters was conducted, wherein diagnosis codes and physical exam documentation were rated as basic or advanced. There was no improvement in overall knowledge scores in either group (60% average on both metrics). There were tendencies for greater improvements in the intervention group compared with controls for confidence in managing fibromyalgia (2.4 to 2.9 vs 2.5 to 2.5, P = 0.06) and leg length discrepancy (1.8 to 2.5 vs 1.5 to 1.9, P = 0.05). Those exposed to the online module also showed an increase in the percentage of physical exam documentation rated as advanced following the intervention (13% to 32%, P = 0.006), whereas the control group showed no change (14% to 12%, P = 0.68). An online module on CLBP in the older adult was a feasible addition to an existing curriculum for internal medicine residents. The module positively and substantively impacted resident clinical behaviors, as evidenced by enhanced sophistication in physical exam documentation; it also was associated with improved confidence in certain aspects of chronic pain management. © 2018 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. A Survey on the Attitude of Professors & Residents of Clinical Wards about Disclosing the Results of Diagnoses for Incurable Patients at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Miri Ghaffarzadeh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: One of the most important and complicated problems in medical ethics is to disclose the full truth about diagnosis of incurable diseases which leads to death, and each therapist may be encountered with it during the years of medical profession.

    The aim of this study was to survey on attitude of professors and residents of clinical wards to disclose the diagnosis for incurable patients leading to death.

     

    Methods: In this descriptive study, sampling was carried out by a survey. All faculty members and their residents of teaching hospitals of Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran, were surveyed as sample in 2007. Of 145 subjects, 138 responded to the questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using Pearson and Spearman correlation tests with a p≤0.05 being considered as significant.

     

    Results: In this study, the tendency to disclose the diagnosis among faculty members and residents was 64.63%. Also, there was no significant relation between age, sex, university degree, educational field, years of service of the faculty members and residents of clinical wards with the tendency for telling the truth to incurable patients.

     

    Conclusion: Final analyses revealed that the faculty members and clinical residents of different fields in terms of diagnosis disclosure do not have a definite idea. However, the majority of them agree to disclose the full truth about diagnoses.

     

  8. Effectiveness of a strategy that uses educational games to implement clinical practice guidelines among Spanish residents of family and community medicine (e-EDUCAGUIA project): a clinical trial by clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cura-González, Isabel; López-Rodríguez, Juan A; Sanz-Cuesta, Teresa; Rodríguez-Barrientos, Ricardo; Martín-Fernández, Jesús; Ariza-Cardiel, Gloria; Polentinos-Castro, Elena; Román-Crespo, Begoña; Escortell-Mayor, Esperanza; Rico-Blázquez, Milagros; Hernández-Santiago, Virginia; Azcoaga-Lorenzo, Amaya; Ojeda-Ruiz, Elena; González-González, Ana I; Ávila-Tomas, José F; Barrio-Cortés, Jaime; Molero-García, José M; Ferrer-Peña, Raul; Tello-Bernabé, María Eugenia; Trujillo-Martín, Mar

    2016-05-17

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed with the aim of helping health professionals, patients, and caregivers make decisions about their health care, using the best available evidence. In many cases, incorporation of these recommendations into clinical practice also implies a need for changes in routine clinical practice. Using educational games as a strategy for implementing recommendations among health professionals has been demonstrated to be effective in some studies; however, evidence is still scarce. The primary objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a teaching strategy for the implementation of CPGs using educational games (e-learning EDUCAGUIA) to improve knowledge and skills related to clinical decision-making by residents in family medicine. The primary objective will be evaluated at 1 and 6 months after the intervention. The secondary objectives are to identify barriers and facilitators for the use of guidelines by residents of family medicine and to describe the educational strategies used by Spanish teaching units of family and community medicine to encourage implementation of CPGs. We propose a multicenter clinical trial with randomized allocation by clusters of family and community medicine teaching units in Spain. The sample size will be 394 residents (197 in each group), with the teaching units as the randomization unit and the residents comprising the analysis unit. For the intervention, both groups will receive an initial 1-h session on clinical practice guideline use and the usual dissemination strategy by e-mail. The intervention group (e-learning EDUCAGUIA) strategy will consist of educational games with hypothetical clinical scenarios in a virtual environment. The primary outcome will be the score obtained by the residents on evaluation questionnaires for each clinical practice guideline. Other included variables will be the sociodemographic and training variables of the residents and the teaching unit

  9. An exploration of the midwifery continuity of care program at one Australian University as a symbiotic clinical education model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Linda P; Glover, Pauline

    2013-03-01

    This discussion paper analyses a midwifery Continuity of Care program at an Australian University with the symbiotic clinical education model, to identify strengths and weakness, and identify ways in which this new pedagogical approach can be improved. In 2002 a major change in Australian midwifery curricula was the introduction of a pedagogical innovation known as the Continuity of Care experience. This innovation contributes a significant portion of clinical experience for midwifery students. It is intended as a way to give midwifery students the opportunity to provide continuity of care in partnership with women, through their pregnancy and childbirth, thus imitating a model of continuity of care and continuity of carer. A qualitative study was conducted in 2008/9 as part of an Australian Learning and Teaching Council Associate Fellowship. Evidence and findings from this project (reported elsewhere) are used in this paper to illustrate the evaluation of midwifery Continuity of Care experience program at an Australian university with the symbiotic clinical education model. Strengths of the current Continuity of Care experience are the strong focus on relationships between midwifery students and women, and early clinical exposure to professional practice. Improved facilitation through the development of stronger relationships with clinicians will improve learning, and result in improved access to authentic supported learning and increased provision of formative feedback. This paper presents a timely review of the Continuity of Care experience for midwifery student learning and highlights the potential of applying the symbiotic clinical education model to enhance learning. Applying the symbiotic clinical education framework to evidence gathered about the Continuity of Care experience in Australian midwifery education highlights strengths and weaknesses which may be used to guide curricula and pedagogical improvements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. Tailoring Morning Reports to an Internal Medicine Residency in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousa, Khalid Mohamed Ali; Muneer, Mohammed; Rahil, Ali; Al-Mohammed, Ahmed; AlMohanadi, Dabia; Elhiday, Abdelhaleem; Hamad, Abdelrahman; Albizreh, Bassim; Suliman, Noor; Muhsin, Saif

    2014-12-01

    Morning report, a case-based conference that allows learners and teachers to interact and discuss patient care, is a standard educational feature of internal residency programs, as well as some other specialties. Our intervention was aimed at enhancing the format for morning report in our internal medicine residency program in Doha, Qatar. In July 2011, we performed a needs assessment of the 115 residents in our internal medicine residency program, using a questionnaire. Resident input was analyzed and prioritized using the percentage of residents who agreed with a given recommendation for improving morning report. We translated the input into interventions that enhanced the format and content, and improved environmental factors surrounding morning report. We resurveyed residents using the questionnaire that was used for the needs assessment. Key changes to the format for morning report included improving organization, adding variety to the content, enhancing case selection and the quality of presentations, and introducing patient safety and quality improvement topics into discussions. This led to a morning report format that is resident-driven, and resident-led, and that produces resident-focused learning and quality improvement activities. Our revised morning report format is a dynamic tool, and we will continue to tailor and modify it on an ongoing basis in response to participant feedback. We recommend a process of assessing and reassessing morning report for other programs that want to enhance resident interest and participation in clinical and safety-focused discussions.

  11. Application of continuous positive airway pressure in the delivery room: a multicenter randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Goncalves-Ferri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated whether the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP in the delivery room alters the need for mechanical ventilation and surfactant during the first 5 days of life and modifies the incidence of respiratory morbidity and mortality during the hospital stay. The study was a multicenter randomized clinical trial conducted in five public university hospitals in Brazil, from June 2008 to December 2009. Participants were 197 infants with birth weight of 1000-1500 g and without major birth defects. They were treated according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatrics (APP. Infants not intubated or extubated less than 15 min after birth were randomized for two treatments, routine or CPAP, and were followed until hospital discharge. The routine (n=99 and CPAP (n=98 infants studied presented no statistically significant differences regarding birth characteristics, complications during the prenatal period, the need for mechanical ventilation during the first 5 days of life (19.2 vs 23.4%, P=0.50, use of surfactant (18.2 vs 17.3% P=0.92, or respiratory morbidity and mortality until discharge. The CPAP group required a greater number of doses of surfactant (1.5 vs 1.0, P=0.02. When CPAP was applied to the routine group, it was installed within a median time of 30 min. We found that CPAP applied less than 15 min after birth was not able to reduce the need for ventilator support and was associated with a higher number of doses of surfactant when compared to CPAP applied as clinically indicated within a median time of 30 min.

  12. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  13. [Prevalence and factors associated with clinical counselling on drug use among internal specialists residents of Andalusia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Jiménez, María de la Villa; Pérez-Milena, Alejandro; Valverde-Bolívar, Francisco Javier; Rosa-Garrido, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    To determine the frequency of offering clinical counseling against the consumption of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs by internal specialist residents (EIR) of Andalusia, and the factors related to such advice. Multicenter cross-sectional study by self-administered questionnaire sent by mail. EIR of Andalusia. The questionnaire collected the frequency of counseling against the use of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs (dependent variable). age/gender, specialty, drug consumption and Fagerström test. Out of a total of 4245 participants, 66% responded, 29% did not respond, and 5% poorly completed questionnaires. The mean age was 29.1(±SD 5.1) years, 69% female, 89% Spanish nationality, 84% in medical training (73% hospital, 27% family medicine). The frequency of counseling against tobacco (85%) and alcohol (82%) is higher than illegal drugs (56%, p<.001, χ(2) test). Counseling against alcohol consumption is related to family medicine (OR=2.8; 95% CI [1.4-4.6]) and nursing (OR=2.5 [1.7-4.4]), and the age of first alcohol consumption (OR=1.07 [1.03-1.1]). Counseling against smoking is related to family medicine (OR=12.9;[7.6-21.9]) and nursing (OR=8.4;[4.3-16.5]), personal consumption of tobacco (OR=1.5 [1.2-2.0]), and wine (OR=1.1 [1.04-1.3]), and age of first alcohol consumption (OR=1.06 [1.01-1.1]). Counseling against illegal drugs is related to the age of first alcohol consumption (OR=1.09 [1.05-1.1]) and smoking (OR=.58 [.4-.7]). There is a high frequency of counseling against consumption of tobacco and alcohol by EIR, although remarkably smaller for illegal drugs. The influencing factors are both formative elements of their own specialty such as personal consumption of alcohol and tobacco, which should be considered for improvement of this preventive activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Physical function continues to improve when clinical remission is sustained in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, Helga; Alasti, Farideh; Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel

    2015-08-11

    To investigate the course of functional status assessed by health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with sustained clinical remission (REM). In recent RA clinical trials, we identified patients with subsequent visits of ≥24 weeks in clinical REM according to the disease activity score using 28-joint counts including C-reactive protein (DAS28) (≤2.6), or simplified disease activity index (SDAI) (≤3.3). Area under the curve (AUC) and mean HAQ scores throughout the time in sustained REM were compared using t test, analyses of variance (ANOVA) and adjusted general linear modeling (GLM) with repeated measures. In Cox regression analyses, the time to regain full physical function was modeled. Sensitivity analyses were performed in patients of sustained SDAI low disease activity (LDA; SDAI ≤11). A total of 610 out of 4364 patients achieved sustained DAS28 REM (14%) and 252 SDAI REM (5.8%). ANOVA testing for linear trend showed significant decrease of mean HAQ from week 0 (start of REM) to week 24, regardless of REM criteria used. AUC of HAQ throughout 24 weeks of REM was higher in DAS28 compared to SDAI REM (p ≤0.01). GLM adjusting for covariates showed significant decrease of monthly HAQ scores from week 0 to 24 (DAS28: 0.276, 0.243, 0.229, 0.222, 0.219, 0.209 to 0.199; p = 0.0001; SDAI: 0.147, 0.142, 0.149, 0.129, 0.123, 0.117 to 0.114; p = 0.029). Similarly, a decrease of HAQ over time was found in patients of sustained SDAI LDA. In DAS28 REM, the chance of regaining full physical function was higher for female (hazard ratio HR [95% confidence interval]: 1.41 [1.13-1.76]) and early RA patients (disease duration ≤2 years: HR 1.29 [1.01-1.65]); in SDAI REM no significant differences were found. Physical function continues to improve if the target of REM or LDA is sustained. The stringency of the remission criteria determines achievement of the best possible functional improvement.

  15. [Clinical laboratory medicine: continuous amelioration with a book of objectives and satisfaction survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reix, Nathalie; Agin, Arnaud; Bahram, Seiamak; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Grucker, Daniel; Jaulhac, Benoît; Lepiller, Quentin; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Mauvieux, Laurent; Monier, Laurie; Schramm, Frédéric; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Vallat, Laurent; Ludes, Bertrand; Candolfi, Ermanno; Filisetti, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We report in this publication the use of two educational tools, a questionnaire of satisfaction and a training book, to improve the training of students during their internship in clinical laboratory at the "Pôle de biologie des Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg" in France. First, the ongoing training was assessed by the interns with a questionnaire measuring satisfaction. The analysis of this questionnaire identified four key points to improve: 1) define the teaching objectives, 2) organize the training with a schedule, 3) revise certain teaching methods and 4) ensure better integration of the students in the team of medical biologists. After this assessment, we implemented a training book to answer these four points. Indeed, the training book presents the objectives, the schedule of training, and how to validate the educational objectives. A new assessment was performed again using the same methodology. Results showed an improvement in student satisfaction from 74 to 88 %. The questionnaire of satisfaction and the training book are presented in this article. The aim of the assessment of training combined with the training book is to incite the actors of the training (students and teachers) to continually improve the training. The objectives of the Pôle de Biologie are to obtain an 80 % satisfaction rate during the 6 months trainings and to reduce or eliminate dissatisfaction, and finally to ensure the validation by students of 80 to 100 % of their predetermined objectives.

  16. Impact of continuous quality improvement initiatives on clinical outcomes in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yusheng; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Han; Zhou, Tingting; Li, Qing; Li, Taoyu; Wu, Yan; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the role of a quality improvement initiative in improving clinical outcomes in peritoneal dialysis (PD). In a retrospective analysis of 6 years of data from a hospital registry, the period between 1 July 2005 and 30 June 2008 (control group) provided baseline data from before implementation of systemic outcomes monitoring, and the period between 1 July 2008 and 30 June 2011 [continuous quality improvement (CQI) group] represented the time when a CQI program was in place. Peritonitis incidence, patient and technique survival, cardiovascular status, causes of death, and drop-out were compared between the groups. In the 370 patients of the CQI group and the 249 patients of the control group, the predominant underlying kidney diseases were chronic glomerulonephritis and diabetic nephropathy. After implementation of the CQI initiative, the peritonitis rate declined to 1 episode in 77.25 patient-months from 1 episode in 22.86 patient-months. Ultrasound parameters of cardiac structure were generally unchanged in the CQI group, but significant increases in cardiothoracic ratio and interventricular septal thickness were observed in the control group (both p improve technique survival rates: 95.6%, 92.6%, and 92.6% in the CQI group compared with 89.6%, 79.2%, and 76.8% in the control group (p improve the quality of therapy and its outcomes. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  17. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Continuing Education Programs on Providing Clinical Community Pharmacy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques dos Reis, Tiago; Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Girotto, Edmarlon; Guerra, Marisabelle Lima; de Oliveira Baldoni, André; Leira Pereira, Leonardo Régis

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To summarize the effects of media methods used in continuing education (CE) programs on providing clinical community pharmacy services and the methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. Methods. A systematic review was performed using Medline, SciELO, and Scopus databases. The timeline of the search was 1990 to 2013. Searches were conducted in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. Results. Nineteen articles of 3990 were included. Fourteen studies used only one media method, and the live method (n=11) was the most frequent (alone or in combination). Only two studies found that the CE program was ineffective or partially effective; these studies used only the live method. Most studies used nonrobust, nonvalidated, and nonstandardized methods to measure effectiveness. The majority of studies focused on the effect of the CE program on modifying the knowledge and skills of the pharmacists. One study assessed the CE program’s benefits to patients or clients. Conclusion. No evidence was obtained regarding which media methods are the most effective. Robust and validated methods, as well as assessment standardization, are required to clearly determine whether a particular media method is effective. PMID:27402991

  18. Expectations of clinical teachers and faculty regarding development of the CanMEDS-Family Medicine competencies: Laval developmental benchmarks scale for family medicine residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Théorêt, Johanne; Tessier, Sylvie; Arsenault, Louise

    2014-01-01

    The CanMEDS-Family Medicine (CanMEDS-FM) framework defines the expected terminal enabling competencies (EC) for family medicine (FM) residency training in Canada. However, benchmarks throughout the 2-year program are not yet defined. This study aimed to identify expected time frames for achievement of the CanMEDS-FM competencies during FM residency training and create a developmental benchmarks scale for family medicine residency training. This 2011-2012 study followed a Delphi methodology. Selected faculty and clinical teachers identified, via questionnaire, the expected time of EC achievement from beginning of residency to one year in practice (0, 6, 12, […] 36 months). The 15-85th percentile intervals became the expected competency achievement interval. Content validity of the obtained benchmarks was assessed through a second Delphi round. The 1st and 2nd rounds were completed by 33 and 27 respondents, respectively. A developmental benchmarks scale was designed after the 1st round to illustrate expectations regarding achievement of each EC. The 2nd round (content validation) led to minor adjustments (1.9±2.7 months) of intervals for 44 of the 92 competencies, the others remaining unchanged. The Laval Developmental Benchmarks Scale for Family Medicine clarifies expectations regarding achievement of competencies throughout FM training. In a competency-based education system this now allows identification and management of outlying residents, both those excelling and needing remediation. Further research should focus on assessment of the scale reliability after pilot implementation in family medicine clinical teaching units at Laval University, and corroborate the established timeline in other sites.

  19. Residents and teaching physicians' perception about bedside teaching in non-clinical shift in the emergency department of King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzah Aljabarti

    2018-01-01

    Results: There were 50 participants in this study and 100% filled the questionnaires. All 20 (100% of TP have previous experience with BT vs. only 17 (58% of the learners. The residents and TPs responded to benefits of the BT: on clinical knowledge with mean values of (4.63±0.41 vs. 4.76±0.37 respectively and on data gathering with mean values of (4.73±0.51 vs. 4.24±0.97 respectively. Forty-six percent of the learners and 20% of the TPs responded to the benefits on procedures; however, the mean values of (4.93±1.0 and 5.0±0.01 were reported from the residents and TPs respectively. Regarding communications, we got mean values of (4.65±1.25 vs. 4.18±0.46 respectively. In regards to giving constructive feedback, the two groups' perceptions gave mean values of (4.58±1.01 vs. 4.57±0.8 in the residents group vs. TPs. Conclusion: Based on the review of the learners and the TPs' perception, we concluded that BT in non-clinical shift is very effective to improve the learners' clinical knowledge, data gathering, communication skills and facilitates giving constructive feedback. However, the benefits regarding procedure performance is still an area that needs further investigation.

  20. The price of 'free'. Quantifying the costs incurred by rural residents attending publically funded outpatient clinics in rural and base hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, David; Kerse, Ngaire; Nixon, Garry

    2016-09-01

    INTRODUCTION Rural living is associated with increased costs in many areas, including health care. However, there is very little local data to quantify these costs, and their unknown quantity means that costs are not always taken into account in health service planning and delivery. AIM The aim of this study was to calculate the average time and travel costs of attending rural and base hospital outpatient clinics for rural Central Otago residents. METHODS A survey of 51 people attending rural hospital outpatient clinics. Individual costs in terms of travel and time were quantified and an average cost of both rural and base hospital attendance was calculated. RESULTS The average travel and lost time cost of attending a rural outpatient clinic was NZ$182 and 61% of respondents reported this cost had a significant effect on their weekly budget. The average cost incurred by residents associated with a base hospital attendance in Dunedin was NZ$732. DISCUSSION This study data show that costs are substantial and probably higher than most people might expect for both rural and base hospital attendances. It seems likely that these costs are a potential barrier to service access. However, the full implications of the personal costs incurred by rural residents in accessing health services are largely unstudied and therefore remain unknown in New Zealand.

  1. [Professional competence of the graduates of the clinical residency and internship in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, A V; Romanenko, G Kh; Makarov, I Yu; Zharov, V V; Bereznikov, A V

    The objective of the present study was the definition of the basic professional competences of the graduates of the clinical residency and internship in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise'. The program for the acquirement of the basic knowledge, skills, and professional competences needed to be trained in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise' has been elaborated in the framework of the more extensive program for the clinical residency and internship intended for the training of the highly qualified specialists in this discipline. The preliminary list of basic professional competences of a graduate from the clinical residency and internship has been formulated in accordance with the program for the training of a competitive and highly qualified forensic medical experts. The practical professional activities are considered to be an indispensable component of the training and educational process for a future forensic medical expert. It is believed that the strengthening of this training component will greatly contribute to the improvement of the quality of training of such specialists.

  2. How to assess communication, professionalism, collaboration and the other intrinsic CanMEDS roles in orthopedic residents: use of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Glover Takahashi, Susan; Kennedy Hynes, Melissa; Herold, Jodi; Wasserstein, David; Nousiainen, Markku; Ferguson, Peter; Wadey, Veronica; Murnaghan, M Lucas; Leroux, Tim; Semple, John; Hodges, Brian; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2014-08-01

    Assessing residents' understanding and application of the 6 intrinsic CanMEDS roles (communicator, professional, manager, collaborator, health advocate, scholar) is challenging for postgraduate medical educators. We hypothesized that an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) designed to assess multiple intrinsic CanMEDS roles would be sufficiently reliable and valid. The OSCE comprised 6 10-minute stations, each testing 2 intrinsic roles using case-based scenarios (with or without the use of standardized patients). Residents were evaluated using 5-point scales and an overall performance rating at each station. Concurrent validity was sought by correlation with in-training evaluation reports (ITERs) from the last 12 months and an ordinal ranking created by program directors (PDs). Twenty-five residents from postgraduate years (PGY) 0, 3 and 5 participated. The interstation reliability for total test scores (percent) was 0.87, while reliability for each of the communicator, collaborator, manager and professional roles was greater than 0.8. Total test scores, individual station scores and individual CanMEDS role scores all showed a significant effect by PGY level. Analysis of the PD rankings of intrinsic roles demonstrated a high correlation with the OSCE role scores. A correlation was seen between ITER and OSCE for the communicator role, while the ITER medical expert and total scores highly correlated with the communicator, manager and professional OSCE scores. An OSCE designed to assess the intrinsic CanMEDS roles was sufficiently valid and reliable for regular use in an orthopedic residency program.

  3. Docente-clínico: o complexo papel do preceptor na residência médica Clinical teacher: the complex role of the preceptor in medical residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Henrique de Oliveira Botti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo analisa o papel do preceptor na residência médica, partindo das percepções dos preceptores dos programas de residência em especialidades clínicas de um hospital de ensino. Através de uma pesquisa descritiva, utiliza-se a técnica de entrevista não-diretiva, com o intuito de estudar o fenômeno a partir da fala de 16 desses preceptores. Utiliza-se a análise de conteúdo, tecendo uma relação com as referências da literatura. Percebe-se que o preceptor assume vários papéis. Encontram-se referências a orientador, tutor, supervisor e mentor. Ele planeja, controla, guia; estimula o raciocínio e a postura ativa; analisa o desempenho; aconselha e cuida do crescimento profissional e pessoal; observa e avalia o residente executando suas atividades; atua na formação moral. É grande a importância do preceptor como educador, oferecendo, ao aprendiz, ambientes que lhe permitam construir e reconstruir conhecimentos. O preceptor ensina realizando procedimentos técnicos e moderando a discussão de casos. Assume papel do docente-clínico, um profissional que domina a prática clínica e os aspectos educacionais relacionados a ela, transformando-a em ambiente e momento educacionais propícios. Identificando as oportunidades de aprendizagem e os cenários de exposição, o preceptor da residência médica funciona como uma vitrine de atributos técnicos e relacionais, proporcionando verdadeiras condições de desenvolvimento técnico e ético nos cenários reais de prática profissional.This study examines the role of preceptor in the medical residency program, based on the perceptions of preceptors in clinical specialties of a university hospital. Through a descriptive research, it uses the technique of non-directive interview, to study the phenomenon from the speech of 16 preceptors. It uses the content analysis, weaving a relationship with the literature. It is perceived that the tutor takes on several roles. There are references

  4. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly: A randomized controlled clinical trial (CONSORT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-10-01

    Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients.

  5. A randomized clinical trial of continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollef, M H; Skubas, N J; Sundt, T M

    1999-11-01

    To determine whether the application of continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions (CASS) is associated with a decreased incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Prospective clinical trial. Cardiothoracic ICU (CTICU) of Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, a university-affiliated teaching hospital. Three hundred forty-three patients undergoing cardiac surgery and requiring mechanical ventilation in the CTICU. Patients were assigned to receive either CASS, using a specially designed endotracheal tube (Hi-Lo Evac; Mallinckrodt Inc; Athlone, Ireland), or routine postoperative medical care without CASS. One hundred sixty patients were assigned to receive CASS, and 183 were assigned to receive routine postoperative medical care without CASS. The two groups were similar at the time of randomization with regard to demographic characteristics, surgical procedures performed, and severity of illness. Risk factors for the development of VAP were also similar during the study period for both treatment groups. VAP was seen in 8 patients (5.0%) receiving CASS and in 15 patients (8. 2%) receiving routine postoperative medical care without CASS (relative risk, 0.61%; 95% confidence interval, 0.27 to 1.40; p = 0. 238). Episodes of VAP occurred statistically later among patients receiving CASS ([mean +/- SD] 5.6 +/- 2.3 days) than among patients who did not receive CASS (2.9 +/- 1.2 days); (p = 0.006). No statistically significant differences for hospital mortality, overall duration of mechanical ventilation, lengths of stay in the hospital or CTICU, or acquired organ system derangements were found between the two treatment groups. No complications related to CASS were observed in the intervention group. Our findings suggest that CASS can be safely administered to patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The occurrence of VAP can be significantly delayed among patients undergoing cardiac surgery using this simple-to-apply technique.

  6. Midwifery students׳ experiences of an innovative clinical placement model embedded within midwifery continuity of care in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Wilkes, Elizabeth; Gamble, Jenny; Sidebotham, Mary; Creedy, Debra K

    2015-08-01

    midwifery continuity of care experiences can provide high quality clinical learning for students but can be challenging to implement. The Rural and Private Midwifery Education Project (RPMEP) is a strategic government funded initiative to (1) grow the midwifery workforce within private midwifery practice and rural midwifery, by (2) better preparing new graduates to work in private midwifery and rural continuity of care models. this study evaluated midwifery students׳ experience of an innovative continuity of care clinical placement model in partnership with private midwifery practice and rural midwifery group practices. a descriptive cohort design was used. All students in the RPMEP were invited to complete an online survey about their experiences of clinical placement within midwifery continuity models of care. Responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Correlations between total scale scores were examined. Open-ended responses were analysed using content analysis. Internal reliability of the scales was assessed using Cronbach׳s alpha. sixteen out of 17 completed surveys were received (94% response rate). Scales included in the survey demonstrated good internal reliability. The majority of students felt inspired by caseload approaches to care, expressed overall satisfaction with the mentoring received and reported a positive learning environment at their placement site. Some students reported stress related to course expectations and demands in the clinical environment (e.g. skill acquisition and hours required for continuity of care). There were significant correlations between scales on perceptions of caseload care and learning culture (r=.87 pmidwifery continuity of care models was perceived to be highly beneficial to learning, developed partnerships with women, and provided appropriate clinical skills development required for registration, while promoting students׳ confidence and competence. The flexible academic programme enabled students to

  7. The Graduate Medical Education Scholars Track: Developing Residents as Clinician-Educators During Clinical Training via a Longitudinal, Multimodal, and Multidisciplinary Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, James; Martin, Shannon K; Farnan, Jeanne M; Fromme, H Barrett

    2018-02-01

    Residency clinician-educator tracks have been created; however, they have generally been limited to a single discipline or program and experienced some challenges. The Graduate Medical Education Scholars Track (GMEST), an embedded longitudinal, multimodal, multidisciplinary clinician-educator track for residents, was piloted at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, in academic year 2014-2015. The GMEST is a two-year experience completed during residency training. The goal is to prepare trainees for academic careers as clinician-educators with a focus on medical education scholarship. This track is designed for residents from diverse training programs with variable clinical schedules and blends a live interactive program, asynchronous instruction and discussion, and overarching multimodal mentorship in medical education. Participants are expected to complete a capstone medical education project and submit it to institutional, regional, and/or national venues. Data gathered from the 2014-2016 and 2015-2017 cohorts demonstrated that 21/22 (95%) participants were satisfied with the GMEST curriculum, felt it was important to their development as future clinician-educators, and felt it would positively influence their ability to work in medical education. Further, 18/22 (82%) participants wished to pursue a career as a clinician-educator and in medical education leadership and/or scholarship. The authors will longitudinally track graduates' future career positions, projects, publications, and awards, and cross-match and compare GMEST graduates with non-GMEST residents interested in medical education. Faculty mentors, program directors, and the Medical Education, Research, Innovation, Teaching, and Scholarship community will be asked for feedback on the GMEST.

  8. Prosthetists' perceptions and use of outcome measures in clinical practice: Long-term effects of focused continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Spaulding, Susan E; Salem, Rana; Morgan, Sara J; Gaunaurd, Ignacio; Gailey, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Continuing education is intended to facilitate clinicians' skills and knowledge in areas of practice, such as administration and interpretation of outcome measures. To evaluate the long-term effect of continuing education on prosthetists' confidence in administering outcome measures and their perceptions of outcomes measurement in clinical practice. Pretest-posttest survey methods. A total of 66 prosthetists were surveyed before, immediately after, and 2 years after outcomes measurement education and training. Prosthetists were grouped as routine or non-routine outcome measures users, based on experience reported prior to training. On average, prosthetists were just as confident administering measures 1-2 years after continuing education as they were immediately after continuing education. In all, 20% of prosthetists, initially classified as non-routine users, were subsequently classified as routine users at follow-up. Routine and non-routine users' opinions differed on whether outcome measures contributed to efficient patient evaluations (79.3% and 32.4%, respectively). Both routine and non-routine users reported challenges integrating outcome measures into normal clinical routines (20.7% and 45.9%, respectively). Continuing education had a long-term impact on prosthetists' confidence in administering outcome measures and may influence their clinical practices. However, remaining barriers to using standardized measures need to be addressed to keep practitioners current with evolving practice expectations. Clinical relevance Continuing education (CE) had a significant long-term impact on prosthetists' confidence in administering outcome measures and influenced their clinical practices. In all, approximately 20% of prosthetists, who previously were non-routine outcome measure users, became routine users after CE. There remains a need to develop strategies to integrate outcome measurement into routine clinical practice.

  9. Residents' perceptions of their teachers: facilitative behaviour and the learning value of rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, S B; Simmons, J M; Richards, B F; Roberge, L P

    1993-01-01

    Despite changes in modern medicine the role of the clinical teacher remains central to medical residents' education and rotations continue to be their dominant educational context. Residents have strong positive feelings for clinical teachers who are perceived as interested in teaching and for those rotations that provide a balance of educational opportunities and patient care responsibilities. Research in residency education has focused on teacher behaviours used to teach medical residents clinical information or patient care skills but has neglected teacher behaviours used to facilitate effective learning relationships with residents. To explore the impact of clinical teachers' use of facilitative behaviours on residents' educational experience, we use concepts stemming from the psychologist Carl Rogers' work previously shown to be associated with positive learning outcomes--empathy, unconditional positive regard, and congruence. These constructs are measured by the use of the four scales of the Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory (BLRI)--level of regard, unconditionality of regard, congruence and empathy. Our study measures the correlation between residents' perceptions of clinical teachers' use of facilitative behaviours and residents' evaluation of the learning value of rotations. Thirty-three residents completed the BLRI on a different clinical teacher for each of six monthly rotations. A total of 158 surveys were returned. There were strong positive correlations between three of the BLRI variables and residents' perception of the learning value of rotations. Potential uses of these findings are discussed.

  10. Randomized clinical trial of yoga-based intervention in residents from elderly homes: Effects on cognitive function

    OpenAIRE

    Hariprasad, V. R.; Koparde, V.; Sivakumar, P. T.; Varambally, S.; Thirthalli, J.; Varghese, M.; Basavaraddi, I. V.; Gangadhar, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Elderly have increased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia. Yoga therapy may be helpful in elderly to improve cognitive function. Aims: We examined the benefits of yoga-based intervention compared with waitlist control group on cognitive function in the residents of elderly homes. Settings and Design: Single blind controlled study with block randomization of elderly homes. Materials and Methods: Study sample included yoga group (n=62) and waitlist group (n=58). A total of 87 s...

  11. Pain management intervention targeting nursing staff and general practitioners: Pain intensity, consequences and clinical relevance for nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräger, Dagmar; Budnick, Andrea; Kuhnert, Ronny; Kalinowski, Sonja; Könner, Franziska; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2017-10-01

    Although chronic pain is common in older adults, its treatment is frequently inappropriate. This problem is particularly prevalent in nursing home residents. We therefore developed an intervention to optimize pain management and evaluated its effects on pain intensity and pain interference with function in nursing home residents in Germany. In a cluster-randomized controlled intervention, 195 residents of 12 Berlin nursing homes who were affected by pain were surveyed at three points of measurement. A modified German version of the Brief Pain Inventory was used to assess pain sites, pain intensity and pain interference with function in various domains of life. The intervention consisted of separate training measures for nursing staff and treating physicians. The primary objective of reducing the mean pain intensity by 2 points was not achieved, partly because the mean pain intensity at baseline was relatively low. However, marginal reductions in pain were observed in the longitudinal assessment at 6-month follow up. The intervention and control groups differed significantly in the intensity sum score and in the domain of walking. Furthermore, the proportion of respondents with pain scores >0 on three pain intensity items decreased significantly. Given the multifocal nature of the pain experienced by nursing home residents, improving the pain situation of this vulnerable group is a major challenge. To achieve meaningful effects not only in pain intensity, but especially in pain interference with function, training measures for nursing staff and physicians need to be intensified, and long-term implementation appears necessary. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1534-1543. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Hospital Medicine Resident Training Tracks: Developing the Hospital Medicine Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweigart, Joseph R; Tad-Y, Darlene; Kneeland, Patrick; Williams, Mark V; Glasheen, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-01

    Hospital medicine (HM) is rapidly evolving into new clinical and nonclinical roles. Traditional internal medicine (IM) residency training likely does not optimally prepare residents for success in HM. Hospital medicine residency training tracks may offer a preferred method for specialized HM education. Internet searches and professional networks were used to identify HM training tracks. Information was gathered from program websites and discussions with track directors. The 11 HM tracks at academic medical centers across the United States focus mostly on senior residents. Track structure and curricular content are determined largely by the structure and curricula of the IM residency programs in which they exist. Almost all tracks feature experiential quality improvement projects. Content on healthcare economics and value is common, and numerous track leaders report this content is expanding from HM tracks into entire residency programs. Tracks also provide opportunities for scholarship and professional development, such as workshops on abstract creation and job procurement skills. Almost all tracks include HM preceptorships as well as rotations within various disciplines of HM. HM residency training tracks focus largely on quality improvement, health care economics, and professional development. The structures and curricula of these tracks are tightly linked to opportunities within IM residency programs. As HM continues to evolve, these tracks likely will expand to bridge clinical and extra-clinical gaps between traditional IM training and contemporary HM practice. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:173-176. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  13. Comparison of the Laryngeal View during Tracheal Intubation Using Airtraq and Macintosh Laryngoscopes by Unskillful Anesthesiology Residents: A Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ferrando

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain is a novel tracheal intubation device. Studies, performed until now, have compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, concluding that it reduces the intubation times and increase the success rate at first intubation attempt, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. The aim of the study was to evaluate if, in unskillful anesthesiology residents during the laryngoscopy, the Airtraq compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope improves the laryngeal view, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. Methods. A prospective, randomized, crossed-over trial was carried out on 60 patients. Each one of the patients were intubated using both devices by unskillful (less than two hundred intubations with the Macintosh laryngoscope and 10 intubations using the Airtraq anesthesiology residents. The Cormack-Lehane score, the success rate at first intubation attempt, and the laryngoscopy and intubation times were compared. Results. The Airtraq significantly decreased the Cormack-Lehane score (=0.04. On the other hand, there were no differences in times of laryngoscopy (=0.645; IC 95% 3.1, +4.8 and intubation (=0.62; C95%  −6.1, +10.0 between the two devices. No relevant complications were found during the maneuvers of intubation using both devices. Conclusions. The Airtraq is a useful laryngoscope in unskillful anesthesiology residents improving the laryngeal view and, therefore, facilitating the tracheal intubation.

  14. Comparison of the Laryngeal View during Tracheal Intubation Using Airtraq and Macintosh Laryngoscopes by Unskillful Anesthesiology Residents: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Aguilar, Gerardo; Belda, F Javier

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective. The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain) is a novel tracheal intubation device. Studies, performed until now, have compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, concluding that it reduces the intubation times and increase the success rate at first intubation attempt, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. The aim of the study was to evaluate if, in unskillful anesthesiology residents during the laryngoscopy, the Airtraq compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope improves the laryngeal view, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. Methods. A prospective, randomized, crossed-over trial was carried out on 60 patients. Each one of the patients were intubated using both devices by unskillful (less than two hundred intubations with the Macintosh laryngoscope and 10 intubations using the Airtraq) anesthesiology residents. The Cormack-Lehane score, the success rate at first intubation attempt, and the laryngoscopy and intubation times were compared. Results. The Airtraq significantly decreased the Cormack-Lehane score (P = 0.04). On the other hand, there were no differences in times of laryngoscopy (P = 0.645; IC 95% 3.1, +4.8) and intubation (P = 0.62; C95%  -6.1, +10.0) between the two devices. No relevant complications were found during the maneuvers of intubation using both devices. Conclusions. The Airtraq is a useful laryngoscope in unskillful anesthesiology residents improving the laryngeal view and, therefore, facilitating the tracheal intubation.

  15. The Relationship between Continuing Education and Perceived Competence, Professional Support, and Professional Value among Clinical Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Stacy; Drapeau, Martin; DeStefano, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing education is one of the means by which professionals maintain and increase their level of competence. However, the relationship between continuing education and the professional's sense of personal competence and other practice-related variables remains unclear. This study examined practicing psychologists' continuing…

  16. Continuing Need for Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinics After the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Karen W; Parsell, Bradley W; Leichliter, Jami S; Habel, Melissa A; Tao, Guoyu; Pearson, William S; Gift, Thomas L

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the characteristics of sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients, their reasons for seeking health services in STD clinics, and their access to health care in other venues. In 2013, we surveyed persons who used publicly funded STD clinics in 21 US cities with the highest STD morbidity. Of the 4364 STD clinic patients we surveyed, 58.5% were younger than 30 years, 72.5% were non-White, and 49.9% were uninsured. They visited the clinic for STD symptoms (18.9%), STD screening (33.8%), and HIV testing (13.6%). Patients chose STD clinics because of walk-in, same-day appointments (49.5%), low cost (23.9%), and expert care (8.3%). Among STD clinic patients, 60.4% had access to another type of venue for sick care, and 58.5% had access to another type of venue for preventive care. Most insured patients (51.6%) were willing to use insurance to pay for care at the STD clinic. Despite access to other health care settings, patients chose STD clinics for sexual health care because of convenient, low-cost, and expert care. Policy Implication. STD clinics play an important role in STD prevention by offering walk-in care to uninsured patients.

  17. Can the use of urgent care clinics improve access to care without undermining continuity in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Sally; Krouse, Helene J

    2016-06-01

    There is a niche for urgent care clinics as an alternate source of health care in the United States. This systematic review examines whether the use of urgent care clinics can improve access to care or if these facilities undermine continuity of primary care. Databases used were Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE). Articles from 2004 to 2014 were searched using keywords-access, barriers, continuity of care, nurse practitioner (NP), urgent care, retail clinic, emergency, and primary care. Urgent care clinics can improve access to care, but may also negatively impact continuity of care, preventative services, and ongoing management of chronic conditions. Barriers to primary care and benefits of urgent care are inversely related. Insufficient knowledge regarding navigation of the healthcare system, perceived urgency of medical need, and deflection of care contribute to use of urgent care over primary care. NPs are frontline healthcare providers essential to developing and maintaining successful communication and collaboration among providers across healthcare settings. In both primary care and urgent care facilities, NPs can ensure continuity of care, decreased healthcare costs, and optimized health outcomes for patients. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. The effect of small peer group continuous quality improvement on the clinical practice of midwives in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, Y.; Verheijen, Nicole; Fleuren, M; Mokkink, Henk; Grol, R.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of small group continuous quality improvement (CQI) on the clinical practice of midwives in the Netherlands. DESIGN: Randomised pre-/post-test (balanced block). INTERVENTION: The CQI groups were assigned to either the set of peer review topics including 'perineal

  19. The effect of small peer group continuous quality improvement on the clinical practice of midwives in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, Y.; Verheijen, N.; Fleuren, M.; Mokkink, H.; Grol, R.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of small group continuous quality improvement (CQI) on the clinical practice of midwives in the Netherlands. Design: Randomised pre-/post-test (balanced block). Intervention: The CQI groups were assigned to either the set of peer review topics including 'perineal

  20. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and American Osteopathic Association (AOA, residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE, also assess competency in several clinical domains.The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009.The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component were merged and analyzed for relationships.Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings.A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA and ACGME core competencies.

  1. [The program for the clinical residency and internship in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise' as a component of the integral educational space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, A V; Romanenko, G Kh; Makarov, I Yu; Vladimirov, V Yu; Bereznikov, A V

    The objective of the present study was the development and implementation of the educational program for the training of the highly qualified specialists within the framework the clinical residency and internship in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise' aimed at the adherence to and the maintenance of the systemic approach to the training in compliance with the upgraded regulatory documents at the medical institutions of the Russian Federation authorized to carry out post-graduate educational activities. The residency program for the training of the highly qualified specialists in the speciality 31.08.10 'forensic medical expertise' has been developed and implemented based at the Russian Federal Centre of Forensic Medical Expertise with the extension of the elective part of the working residency program in order to provide the delivery of the lectures and holding seminars on the selected issues of forensic medicine and criminalistics. The ongoing modernization of the healthcare system in this country taking into consideration the public needs and the challenges for practical medicine, the necessity of formation of the integral educational medium, the development of the unique systemic approach to the effective training of the highly qualified specialists in forensic medical expertise, and further optimization of the educational process are intended to propel forensic medical education and the training of the forensic medical experts to the qualitatively new level.

  2. Clinical use of Nintendo Wii bowling simulation to decrease fall risk in an elderly resident of a nursing home: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert; Kraemer, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    Of the estimated 1.7 million residents of nursing homes in the United States, approximately half fall annually; and 11% of these sustain injury. This is twice the rate for persons dwelling in the community. By addressing fall risk, physical therapists have an opportunity to reduce falls which are the leading cause of injury deaths, as well as the most common cause of nonfatal injuries for older adults in the United States. This case report examines the effect of a novel interactive video game intervention to address balance dysfunction in an elderly resident of a nursing home who was at risk for falls. The patient is an 89-year-old resident diagnosed with an unspecified balance disorder and a history of multiple falls. Self reports of gait abnormalities, scores on several clinical measures, and her fall history classified her as having substantial risk for future falls. A nontraditional approach to balance training, employing the Nintendo Wii bowling simulation, was used as intervention for this patient's balance disorder. After 6 one-hour treatment sessions, the patient's Berg Balance Score improved from 48 to 53. On the Dynamic Gait Index, the patient improved her score from 19 to 21. The patient's Timed Up and Go Test improved from 14.9 to 10.5 seconds, all suggesting a reduced risk of falling. The patient's ABC Score improved from 88 to 90%. Physical therapy intervention, using the Nintendo Wii bowling simulation, may have decreased fall risk for this individual.

  3. A 10-Year Longitudinal Study of Effects of a Multifaceted Residency Spiritual Care Curriculum: Clinical Ability, Professional Formation, End of Life, and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Gowri; Roseman, Janet; Lee, Danny; Dhandhania, Nupur

    2016-12-01

    Although spiritual care (SC) is recognized as important in whole-person medicine, physicians infrequently address patients' spiritual needs, citing lack of training. Although many SC curricula descriptions exist, few studies report effects on physicians. To broadly examine immediate and long-term effects of a required, longitudinal, residency SC curriculum, which emphasized inclusive patient-centered SC, compassion, and spiritual self-care. We conducted in-depth individual interviews with 26 physicians (13 intervention; 13 comparison) trained at a 13-13-13 residency. We interviewed intervention physicians three times over 10 years-1) preintervention, as PGY1s, 2) postintervention, as PGY3s, 3) eight-year postintervention, as practicing physicians. We interviewed comparison physicians as PGY3s. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by four researchers. Forty-nine interviews were analyzed. General: Both groups were diverse regarding personal importance of spirituality/religion. All physicians endorsed the value of SC, sharing rich patient stories particularly related to end of life and cultural diversity. Curricular effects: 1) skills/barriers-intervention physicians demonstrated progressive improvements in clinical approach, accompanied by diminishing worries related to SC. PGY3 comparison physicians struggled with SC skills and worries more than PGY3 intervention physicians, 2) physician formation-most physicians described residency as profoundly challenging and transformative. Even after eight years, many intervention physicians noted that reflection on their diverse beliefs and values in safety, coupled with compassion shown to them through this curriculum, had deeply positive effects. High impact training: patient-centered spiritual assessment; chaplain rounds; spiritual self-care workshop/retreats; multicultural SC framework. A longitudinal, multifaceted residency SC curriculum can have lasting positive effects on physicians' SC skills and

  4. Recognizing the Continuous Nature of Expression Heterogeneity and Clinical Outcomes in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaona; Choudhury, Yukti; Lim, Weng Khong; Anema, John; Kahnoski, Richard J; Lane, Brian; Ludlow, John; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Belldegrun, Arie; Kim, Hyung L; Rogers, Craig; Nicol, David; Teh, Bin Tean; Tan, Min-Han

    2017-08-04

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) has been previously classified into putative discrete prognostic subtypes by gene expression profiling. To investigate the robustness of these proposed subtype classifications, we evaluated 12 public datasets, together with a new dataset of 265 ccRCC gene expression profiles. Consensus clustering showed unstable subtype and principal component analysis (PCA) showed a continuous spectrum both within and between datasets. Considering the lack of discrete delineation and continuous spectrum observed, we developed a continuous quantitative prognosis score (Continuous Linear Enhanced Assessment of RCC, or CLEAR score). Prognostic performance was evaluated in independent cohorts from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 414) and EMBL-EBI (n = 53), CLEAR score demonstrated both superior prognostic estimates and inverse correlation with anti-angiogenic tyrosine-kinase inhibition in comparison to previously proposed discrete subtyping classifications. Inverse correlation with high-dose interleukin-2 outcomes was also observed for the CLEAR score. Multiple somatic mutations (VHL, PBRM1, SETD2, KDM5C, TP53, BAP1, PTEN, MTOR) were associated with the CLEAR score. Application of the CLEAR score to independent expression profiling of intratumoral ccRCC regions demonstrated that average intertumoral heterogeneity exceeded intratumoral expression heterogeneity. Wider investigation of cancer biology using continuous approaches may yield insights into tumor heterogeneity; single cell analysis may provide a key foundation for this approach.

  5. A new machine for continuous renal replacement therapy: from development to clinical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Salvatori, Gabriella; Bonello, Monica; Ratanarat, Ranistha; Andrikos, Emilios; Dan, Maurizio; Piccinni, Pasquale; Ronco, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    A new continuous renal replacement therapy machine has been designed to fulfill the expectations of nephrologists and intensivists operating in the common ground of critical care nephrology. The new equipment is called Prismaflex and it is the natural evolution of the PRISMA machine that has been utilized worldwide for continuous renal replacement therapy in the last 10 years. The authors performed a preliminary alpha-trial to establish the usability, flexibility and reliability of the new device. Accuracy was also tested by recording various operational parameters during different intermittent and continuous renal replacement modalities during 62 treatments. This article will describe our first experience with this new device and touch upon the historic and technologic background leading to its development.

  6. Resident physicians as human information systems: sources yet seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Ellen J; DeVoge, Justin Michael; Waggoner-Fountain, Linda A; Borowitz, Stephen M

    2013-01-01

    To characterize question types that residents received on overnight shifts and what information sources were used to answer them. Across 30 overnight shifts, questions asked of on-call senior residents, question askers' roles, and residents' responses were documented. External sources were noted. 158 of 397 questions (39.8%) related to the plan of care, 53 (13.4%) to medical knowledge, 48 (12.1%) to taskwork knowledge, and 44 (11.1%) to the current condition of patients. For 351 (88.4%) questions residents provided specific, direct answers or visited the patient. For 16 of these, residents modeled or completed the task. For 216 questions, residents used previous knowledge or their own clinical judgment. Residents solicited external information sources for 118 questions and only a single source for 77 (65.3%) of them. For the 118, most questions concerned either the plan of care or the patient's current condition and were asked by interns and nurses (those with direct patient care responsibilities). Resident physicians serve as an information system and they often specifically answer the question using previous knowledge or their own clinical judgment, suggesting that askers are contacting an appropriately knowledgeable person. However, they do need to access patient information such as the plan of care. They also serve an educator role and answer many knowledge-related questions. As synchronous verbal communications continue to be important pathways for information flow, informaticians need to consider the relationship between such communications and workflow in the development of healthcare support tools.

  7. A retrospective analysis of clinical characteristics, hospitalization, and functional outcomes in residents with and without Clostridium difficile infection in US long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Howard S; Navaratnam, Prakash; Reardon, Gregory; High, Kevin P; Strauss, Marcie E

    2014-06-01

    Patients in long-term care (LTC) are at increased risk for acquiring Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We compared the characteristics and outcomes of matched cohorts with and without CDI in the LTC setting. Using a retrospective cohort design, demographic characteristics, Minimum Data Set (MDS 2.0) assessments (years 2007-2010), and pharmacy records of residents were analyzed. Residents were required to have a CDI diagnosis, ≥1 MDS 2.0 assessment ≤120 days pre- and post-index event, and receipt of metronidazole (MET) or vancomycin (VAN) within ±7 days of index date. Baseline characteristics were compared between cases and controls matched 1:3 on age, gender, and index year. Cox regression (CR) analysis evaluated the relationship between CDI status, and post-index mortality and hospitalization. A total of 1145 CDI residents were matched with 3488 non-CDI residents. A second sample used propensity score methods. CDI vs. non-CDI residents had a higher baseline comorbidity burden (Charlson score: 3.0 ± 1.9 vs. 2.2 ± 1.8, respectively), and were more likely to have had a recent hospitalization (63% vs. 9%, respectively) and shorter mean pre-index continuous length of stay (cLOS) in the LTC (386.4 d ± 536.3 d vs. 568.3 d ± 567.4 d, respectively), all P hospitalization and mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.3, P = 0.023 and 2.2, P hospitalization and mortality (HR = 0.999 and 0.996, respectively, P hospitalization and mortality. Our reliance on the MDS records for case identification was our chief limitation; misclassification was mitigated by our requirement to include CDI treatment as part of our inclusion criteria. Understanding factors that put LTC patients at risk for CDI can help guide better management and improvement of patient outcomes.

  8. Perceptions of the 2011 ACGME duty hour requirements among residents in all core programs at a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefur, Benjamin J; Shewmaker, Diana M; Lohse, Christine M; Rose, Steven H; Colletti, James E

    2017-11-10

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented revisions to resident duty hour requirements (DHRs) in 2011 to improve patient safety and resident well-being. Perceptions of DHRs have been reported to vary by training stage and specialty among internal medicine and general surgery residents. The authors explored perceptions of DHRs among all residents at a large academic medical center. The authors administered an anonymous cross-sectional survey about DHRs to residents enrolled in all ACGME-accredited core residency programs at their institution. Residents were categorized as medical and pediatric, surgery, or other. In total, 736 residents representing 24 core specialty residency programs were surveyed. The authors received responses from 495 residents (67%). A majority reported satisfaction (78%) with DHRs and believed DHRs positively affect their training (73%). Residents in surgical specialties and in advanced stages of training were significantly less likely to view DHRs favorably. Most respondents believed fatigue contributes to errors (89%) and DHRs reduce both fatigue (80%) and performance of clinical duties while fatigued (74%). A minority of respondents (37%) believed that DHRs decrease medical errors. This finding may reflect beliefs that handovers contribute more to errors than fatigue (41%). Negative perceived effects included diminished patient familiarity and continuity of care (62%) and diminished clinical educational experiences for residents (41%). A majority of residents reported satisfaction with the 2011 DHRs, although satisfaction was significantly less among residents in surgical specialties and those in advanced stages of training.

  9. The hospital mortality project: a tool for using administrative data for continuous clinical quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, S Aqif; Hoffman, Neville E; MacQuillan, Gerry; Semmens, James B

    The increasing demand for greater clinical accountability requires development of convenient tools to measure healthcare safety and quality, which are able to provide information contemporaneously. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of the Hospital Mortality Project, a quality assurance initiative designed to encourage and facilitate clinical accountability for hospital mortality by all clinical departments and clinicians. The project was carried out in two stages. Part 1: After registration of in-hospital patient deaths ( May 1, 2004 to December 31, 2007), the consultant in charge of patient care was notified and requested to assign the death to a predefined category. This categorisation leads to further investigation as appropriate. Part 2: Hospital administrative data from April 1, 1997 to December 31, 2007 were used to assess a defined index, the Hospital Mortality Index (HMI), which was the expressed in the form of an Attribute Control Chart (p-CHART ) and then used as a performance indicator for hospital departments and clinicians. Summary data are reported to the clinical departments and to the hospital executive via the Quality Improvement Committee on quarterly basis. The clinical review was complete for 2,990 of 3,132 (95%) inpatient deaths till December 31, 2007, while a further 142 (5%) deaths are still in the process of being reviewed as of April 7, 2008. The median age of all the cases was 78 years (IQR 67-86) of which 1,657 (53%) were male. The Poisson regression analysis showed that since 1997 departments with a minimum of 100 deaths in total showed no clinically significant change in HMI over time. The Hospital Mortality Project provides a simple and efficient tool to analyse data for clinical managers to facilitate accountability.

  10. Indications and results of labour induction in nulliparous women: an interview among obstetricians, residents and clinical midwives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellekoop, Jorik; Vrouenraets, Francis P. J. M.; van der Steeg, Jan Willem; Mol, Ben W. J.; Roumen, Frans J. M. E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate which clinical factors are important in management decisions that clinicians make in the process of labour induction, and which clinical factors they estimate as predictive of labour outcome after induction. STUDY DESIGN: A written interview was conducted among

  11. Effect of Clinically Discriminating, Evidence-Based Checklist Items on the Reliability of Scores from an Internal Medicine Residency OSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Vijay J.; Bordage, Georges; Gierl, Mark J.; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are used worldwide for summative examinations but often lack acceptable reliability. Research has shown that reliability of scores increases if OSCE checklists for medical students include only clinically relevant items. Also, checklists are often missing evidence-based items that high-achieving…

  12. Applying JIT principles to resident education to reduce patient delays: a pilot study in an academic medical center pain clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kayode A; Chambers, Chester G; Dada, Maqbool; Christo, Paul J; Hough, Douglas; Aron, Ravi; Ulatowski, John A

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effect on patient waiting times, patient/doctor contact times, flow times, and session completion times of having medical trainees and attending physicians review cases before the clinic session. The major hypothesis was that review of cases prior to clinic hours would reduce waiting times, flow times, and use of overtime, without reducing patient/doctor contact time. Prospective quality improvement. Specialty pain clinic within Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Baltimore, MD, United States. Two attending physicians participated in the intervention. Processing times for 504 patient visits are involved over a total of 4 months. Trainees were assigned to cases the day before the patient visit. Trainees reviewed each case and discussed it with attending physicians before each clinic session. Primary measures were activity times before and after the intervention. These were compared and also used as inputs to a discrete event simulation to eliminate differences in the arrival process as a confounding factor. The average time that attending physicians spent teaching trainees while the patient waited was reduced, but patient/doctor contact time was not significantly affected. These changes reduced patient waiting times, flow times, and clinic session times. Moving some educational activities ahead of clinic time improves patient flows through the clinic and decreases congestion without reducing the times that trainees or patients interact with physicians. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A Faculty Development Session or Resident as Teacher Session for Didactic and Clinical Teaching Techniques; Part 1 of 2: Engaging Learners with Effective Didactic Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Boysen-Osborn, Megan; Toohey, Shannon; Gisondi, Michael; Wolff, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Audience: This workshop is intended for faculty members in an emergency medicine (or other) residency program, but is also appropriate for chief residents and medical student educators, including basic science faculty. Introduction: Faculty development sessions are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and enhance the learning environment within residency programs. Resident as teacher sessions are importa...

  14. Effects of Continuous Use of Entonox in Comparison with Intermittent Method on Obstetric Outcomes: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Agah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Entonox (N2O2 which is an inhalational gas for relieving labor pain is commonly used intermittently; however some women are interested in continuous breathing in face mask. So we decided to compare the complications induced by two methods to find out whether it is safe to permit the mothers to use Entonox continuously or not. Patients and Methods. This randomized clinical trial was performed in Mobini Hospital, Sabzevar, Iran. 50 parturients used Entonox intermittently and 50 cases used it continuously during labor. Then obstetrical outcomes were analyzed in two groups by spss 17 software, t-test, and Chi2 while P<0.05 was considered significant. Results. This study showed the mean duration of second stage of labor had no significant difference (P=0.3. Perineal laceration was less in continuous group significantly (P=0.04. Assisted vaginal birth was not different significantly (P=0.4. Uterine atony had no significant difference in two groups (P=0.2. Maternal collaboration in pushing and satisfaction were higher in continuous group significantly (P=0.03, (P<0.0001. Apgar score of neonates at first and fifth minute was acceptable and not different significantly in two groups (P=0.3. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated continuous method is also safe. So, it seems reasonable to set mothers free to choose the desired method of Entonox usage.

  15. [PARAMOUNT trial: clinical meaning of continuous maintenance therapy in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridelli, Cesare

    2015-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide across both sex. Patients with Advanced -NSCLC (A-NSCLC) do not have curative treatment options, so the primary endpoint of every therapeutic decision aims to prolong survival, improving or maintain a good Quality of Life (QoL). Histology could represent a positive predictive factor for patients with Non squamous NSCLC (Nsq-NSCLC) respect to pemetrexed treatment. Pemetrexed is an antifolate that inhibits primarily thymidylate synthase (TS), together with dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. Pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin is approved in the first line setting and as monotherapy in the switch or continuous maintenance of Non Squamous A-NSCLC. Maintenance therapy is a widely used therapeutic option in other solid and hematologic malignancies, but in the A-NSCLC represent an innovative approach. The rationale in this new setting of patients is based on the evidence that patients who benefit from an initial induction therapy platinum based may benefit from maintenance therapy with the third generation agent dropping the platinum drug after four to six cycles. We can define two types of maintenance therapy: continuation maintenance and switch maintenance. Major results in prolonging Overall Survival (OS) was reported with the continuation maintenance strategy as in the PARAMOUNT trial.

  16. Effectiveness of a Simulated Clinical Examination in the Assessment of the Clinical Competencies of Entry-Level Trainees in a Family Medicine Residency Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon R.; Butler, Roger; Duke, Pauline; Eaton, William H.; Moffatt, Scott M.; Sherman, Greg P.; Pottle, Madge

    2012-01-01

    Clinical competence is a multidimensional concept and encompasses a variety of skills including procedural, problem-solving and clinical judgement. The initial stages of postgraduate medical training are believed to be a particularly important time for the development of clinical skill competencies. This study reports on an evaluation of a…

  17. Developing Memory Clinics in Primary Care: An Evidence-Based Interprofessional Program of Continuing Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Weston, W. Wayne; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care is challenged to meet the needs of patients with dementia. A training program was developed to increase capacity for dementia care through the development of Family Health Team (FHT)-based interprofessional memory clinics. The interprofessional training program consisted of a 2-day workshop, 1-day observership, and 2-day…

  18. Needs Assessment and Telecommunications Cost Benefit Analysis for Army Medical Department Continuing Clinical Education Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    Nursing Documentation ---32 Computer Technology Application Diagnosis- Treatment Plan - Restorative Dentistry ---30 *Fixed Prosthodontics 13 Responses B-10 0...Clinical Education Need Assigned by Benefit Delphi Score Multiple Initial Needs N = 42 Legal Issues (Physicians) 45 2.79 Diagnosis/ Treatment Planning 50...Fixed Prosthodontics Oral Surgery Highest Point Totals (when mentioned more than once). 0 Mobilization Planning (Nursing)--- --50 Combat Nrusing

  19. Modification of an OSCE format to enhance patient continuity in a high-stakes assessment of clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatala, Rose; Marr, Sharon; Cuncic, Cary; Bacchus, C Maria

    2011-05-24

    Traditional Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are psychometrically sound but have the limitation of fragmenting complex clinical cases into brief stations. We describe a pilot study of a modified OSCE that attempts to balance a typical OSCE format with a semblance of a continuous, complex, patient case. Two OSCE scenarios were developed. Each scenario involved a single standardized patient and was subdivided into three sequential 10 minute sections that assessed separate content areas and competencies. Twenty Canadian PGY-4 internal medicine trainees were assessed by trained examiner pairs during each OSCE scenario. Paired examiners rated participant performance independent of each other, on each section of each scenario using a validated global rating scale. Inter-rater reliabilities and Pearson correlations between ratings of the 3 sections of each scenario were calculated. A generalizability study was conducted. Participant and examiner satisfaction was surveyed. There was no main effect of section or scenario. Inter-rater reliability was acceptable. The g-coefficient was 0.68; four scenarios would achieve 0.80. Moderate correlations between sections of a scenario suggest a possible halo effect. The majority of examiners and participants felt that the modified OSCE provided a sense of patient continuity. The modified OSCE provides another approach to the assessment of clinical performance. It attempts to balance the advantages of a traditional OSCE with a sense of patient continuity.

  20. Modification of an OSCE format to enhance patient continuity in a high-stakes assessment of clinical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuncic Cary

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs are psychometrically sound but have the limitation of fragmenting complex clinical cases into brief stations. We describe a pilot study of a modified OSCE that attempts to balance a typical OSCE format with a semblance of a continuous, complex, patient case. Methods Two OSCE scenarios were developed. Each scenario involved a single standardized patient and was subdivided into three sequential 10 minute sections that assessed separate content areas and competencies. Twenty Canadian PGY-4 internal medicine trainees were assessed by trained examiner pairs during each OSCE scenario. Paired examiners rated participant performance independent of each other, on each section of each scenario using a validated global rating scale. Inter-rater reliabilities and Pearson correlations between ratings of the 3 sections of each scenario were calculated. A generalizability study was conducted. Participant and examiner satisfaction was surveyed. Results There was no main effect of section or scenario. Inter-rater reliability was acceptable. The g-coefficient was 0.68; four scenarios would achieve 0.80. Moderate correlations between sections of a scenario suggest a possible halo effect. The majority of examiners and participants felt that the modified OSCE provided a sense of patient continuity. Conclusions The modified OSCE provides another approach to the assessment of clinical performance. It attempts to balance the advantages of a traditional OSCE with a sense of patient continuity.

  1. Superstorm Sandy: How the New York University Psychiatry Residency Training Program Weathered the Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Rebecca; Adler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    The teaching hospitals of the New York University psychiatry residency program were evacuated and then closed for a minimum of 3 months in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Faculty and residents were deployed to alternate clinical sites. The authors examine the consequences of Superstorm Sandy and its implications for the New York University psychiatry residency training program. A survey was administered to faculty and residents. The authors tabulated 98 surveys, for which 24 % of faculty and 84 % of residents responded. Among respondents, 61 % believed that being involved in the evacuation of the hospitals was a positive experience. During deployment, most (85 %) found being placed with peers and supervisors to be beneficial, but there were significant disruptions. Despite facing multiple challenges including closed facilities, deployment to nonaffiliated hospitals, and exhausted personal resources, the training program continued to provide accredited clinical experiences, a core curriculum, and supervision for psychiatry residents during and after Superstorm Sandy.

  2. Treatment of Severe Metabolic Alkalosis with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Bicarbonate Kinetic Equations of Clinical Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yessayan, Lenar; Yee, Jerry; Frinak, Stan; Kwon, David; Szamosfalvi, Balazs

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant severe metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, and kidney failure pose a therapeutic challenge. Hemodialysis to correct azotemia and abnormal electrolytes results in rapid correction of serum sodium, bicarbonate, and urea but presents a risk for dialysis disequilibrium and brain edema. We describe a patient with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome with persistent encephalopathy, severe metabolic alkalosis (highest bicarbonate 81 mEq/L), hypernatremia (sodium 157 mEq/L), and kidney failure despite 30 hours of intravenous crystalloids and proton pump inhibitor. We used continuous renal replacement therapy (RRT) with delivered hourly urea clearance of ~3 L/hour (24 hour sustained low efficiency dialysis with regional citrate anticoagulation protocol at blood flow rate 60 ml/min and dialysate flow rate 400 ml/min). To mitigate a pronounced decrease in plasma osmolality while removing urea from this hypernatremic patient, dialysate sodium was set to start at 155 mEq/L then at 150 mEq/L after 6 hours. Serum bicarbonate, urea, and sodium were slowly corrected over 26 hours. This case demonstrates how to regulate and predict the systemic bicarbonate level using single pool kinetic modeling during convective or diffusive RRT. Kinetic modeling provides a valuable tool for systemic blood pH control in future combined use of extracorporeal CO2 removal and continuous RRT systems.

  3. Clinical heterogeneity among people with high functioning autism spectrum conditions: evidence favouring a continuous severity gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodbury-Smith Marc

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASCs are characterized by a high degree of clinical heterogeneity, but the extent to which this variation represents a severity gradient versus discrete phenotypes is unclear. This issue has complicated genetic studies seeking to investigate the genetic basis of the high hereditability observed clinically in those with an ASC. The aim of this study was to examine the possible clustering of symptoms associated with ASCs to determine whether the observed distribution of symptom type and severity supported either a severity or a symptom subgroup model to account for the phenotypic variation observed within the ASCs. Methods We investigated the responses of a group of adults with higher functioning ASCs on the fifty clinical features examined in the Autism Spectrum Quotient, a screening questionnaire used in the diagnosis of higher functioning ASCs. In contrast to previous studies we have used this instrument with no a priori assumptions about any underlying factor structure of constituent items. The responses obtained were analyzed using complete linkage hierarchical cluster analysis. For the members of each cluster identified the mean score on each Autism Spectrum Quotient question was calculated. Results Autism Spectrum Quotient responses from a total of 333 individuals between the ages of 16.6 and 78.0 years were entered into the hierarchical cluster analysis. The four cluster solution was the one that generated the largest number of clusters that did not also include very small cluster sizes, defined as a membership comprising 10 individuals or fewer. Examination of these clusters demonstrated that they varied in total Autism Spectrum Quotient but that the profiles across the symptoms comprising the Autism Spectrum Quotient did not differ independently of this severity factor. Conclusion These results are consistent with a unitary spectrum model, suggesting that the clinical heterogeneity observed

  4. The effect of continuous aerobic exercise on premenstrual syndrome: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosallanejad Z

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome is one of the most incidencial problems in women's during reproductive age. That effect personal performance in family and society status. Varied therapeutic treatment has been studied for its promotion. The main attention was to find a method without complications. This study performed with aim of assessing effect of one period of continuous aerobic exercise on premenstrual syndrome in 18-25 years female students in jahrom medical school."nMethods: This study was a kind of semi experimental study with two group plane. Forty students were assessed for premenstrual syndrome with regular mense, without previous history of Diabetes mellitus and Thyroid, Gynecologic and psychological disease. Twenty subjects (with similar VO2 MAX were selected and randomly divided to two experimental and control groups. Data gathering was from ILPDD questionnaire concluded 11 question about signs and symptoms of mental and physical complain related to premenstrual syndrome that filled by samples. All samples have positive five complain that four of them depend on mental symptoms of premenstrual syndrome. Intensity of quantity of premenstrual syndrome and levels of estrogen and progesterone were measured. Then, exercise regime including continuous aerobic exercise, were performed for eight weeks, with frequency of three sessions every week. At the end of 8th week, posttests were repeated in the situation similar to pretest. Analytic statistic as a Nonparametric Mann-whitney test, and nonparametric Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used for comparing variables."nResults: This study showed that after two method of aerobic exercise, somatic and effective complain was decrease in case group (p>0.05. Hormonal change in two groups was not significant."nConclusion: Releaving aerobic experiences is effective for somatic and affective complains secondary to premenstrual syndrome and this plan can be replace by other methods of medical

  5. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of PTSD in Residents of Battered Women's Shelters: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dawn M.; Zlotnick, Caron; Perez, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to explore the acceptability, feasibility, and initial efficacy of a new shelter-based treatment for victims of intimate partner violence (IPV; i.e., Helping to Overcome PTSD through Empowerment [HOPE]). Method: A Phase I randomized clinical trial comparing HOPE (n = 35) with standard shelter services (SSS) (n =…

  6. Contextual factors and clinical reasoning: differences in diagnostic and therapeutic reasoning in board certified versus resident physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBee, E.; Ratcliffe, T.; Picho, K.; Schuwirth, L.; Artino, A.R.; Yepes-Rios, A.M.; Masel, J.; Vleuten, C. van der; Durning, S.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of context on the complex process of clinical reasoning is not well understood. Using situated cognition as the theoretical framework and videos to provide the same contextual "stimulus" to all participants, we examined the relationship between specific contextual factors on

  7. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3: Continued innovation for clinical trial improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Michael W. [Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Veitch, Dallas P. [Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Aisen, Paul S. [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Beckett, Laurel A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Cairns, Nigel J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Green, Robert C. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Harvey, Danielle [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Jack, Clifford R. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Jagust, William [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Morris, John C. [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Petersen, Ronald C. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Salazar, Jennifer [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Saykin, Andrew J. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shaw, Leslie M. [Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Toga, Arthur W. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Trojanowski, John Q. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-12-05

    Overall, the goal of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is to validate biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials. ADNI-3, which began on August 1, 2016, is a 5-year renewal of the current ADNI-2 study. ADNI-3 will follow current and additional subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, and AD using innovative technologies such as tau imaging, magnetic resonance imaging sequences for connectivity analyses, and a highly automated immunoassay platform and mass spectroscopy approach for cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis. A Systems Biology/pathway approach will be used to identify genetic factors for subject selection/enrichment. Amyloid positron emission tomography scanning will be standardized using the Centiloid method. The Brain Health Registry will help recruit subjects and monitor subject cognition. Multimodal analyses will provide insight into AD pathophysiology and disease progression. Finally, ADNI-3 will aim to inform AD treatment trials and facilitate development of AD disease-modifying treatments.

  8. General practitioners' clinical expertise in managing suicidal young people: implications for continued education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Maria; Tait, Lynda; Churchill, Dick

    2017-09-01

    Aim To examine general practitioners' (GPs) clinical expertise in assessing, communicating with, and managing suicidal young people aged 14-25 to inform the development of an educational intervention for GPs on youth suicide prevention. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people worldwide. GPs are ideally suited to facilitate early identification and assessment of suicide risk. However, GPs' levels of competence, knowledge, and attitudes towards suicidal young people have not yet been explored. A cross-sectional survey on GPs' levels of confidence in assessing and managing young people at risk of suicide; knowledge of risk factors and warning signs of suicide in young people; attitudes towards young suicidal people; and training preferences on managing suicide risk. Findings Seventy GPs completed the survey (30 males). The majority of GPs reported high levels of confidence in assessing and managing suicidality in young people. Experienced GPs demonstrated high levels of knowledge of suicide risk factors in young people but low levels of knowledge of warning signs that might indicate heightened risk. Although 48% of GPs disagreed that maintaining compassionate care is difficult with those who deliberately self-harm, GPs perceived communication with young people to be difficult, with one-third reporting frustration in managing those at risk of suicide. A total of 75% of GPs said they would be interested in receiving further training on assessing and managing young people at risk of suicide. The study has important implications for providing specialist training to support GPs in assessing and managing youth suicide risk and facilitating attitudinal change. GP education on youth suicide risk assessment and management should promote a holistic understanding and assessment of risk and its individual, social and contextual influences in line with clinical recommendations to facilitate therapeutic engagement and communication with young people.

  9. Bridging continual reassessment method for phase I clinical trials in different ethnic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suyu; Pan, Haitao; Xia, Jielai; Huang, Qin; Yuan, Ying

    2015-05-10

    Accumulating evidence shows that the conventional one-size-fits-all dose-finding paradigm is problematic when applied to different ethnic populations. Because of inter-ethnic heterogeneity, the dosage established in a landmark trial for a certain population may not be generalizable to a different ethnic population, and a follow-up bridge trial is often needed to find the maximum tolerated dose for the new population. We propose the bridging continual reassessment method (B-CRM) to facilitate dose finding for such follow-up bridge trials. The B-CRM borrows information from the landmark trial through a novel estimate of the dose-toxicity curve and accommodates the inter-ethnic heterogeneity using the Bayesian model averaging approach. Extensive simulation studies show that the B-CRM has desirable operating characteristics with a high probability to select the target dose. This article focuses on ethnic heterogeneity, but the proposed method can be directly used to handle other types of patient heterogeneity, for example, patient subgroups defined by prognostic factors or biomarkers. The software to implement the B-CRM design is available for free download at http://odin.mdacc.tmc.edu/~yyuan/. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effect of continued oral feeding on clinical and nutritional outcomes of acute diarrhea in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K H; Gastañaduy, A S; Saavedra, J M; Lembcke, J; Rivas, D; Robertson, A D; Yolken, R; Sack, R B

    1988-02-01

    One hundred twenty-eight nonmalnourished male patients between 3 and 36 months of age were randomly assigned to receive one of four lactose-free dietary treatments to determine the effect of dietary therapy on the severity and nutritional outcome of diarrheal illness. Group 1 received a formula diet composed of casein, sucrose, dextrin with maltose (Dextri-Maltose), and vegetable oil to provide 110 kcal/kg body weight/d (CSO-110). Group 2 received CSO to provide 55 kcal/kg/d (CSO-55) for 2 days and then CSO-110. Group 3 received only oral glucose-electrolyte solution (GES) for 2 days, CSO-55 for the next 2 days, and then CSO-110. Group 4 received the same diets as Group 3 except that only intravenous GES was used for the first 2 days. The GES maintenance solutions provided 24 to 30 kcal/kg/d. Therapeutic success rates were similar among dietary groups, ranging from 90% to 97%. Fecal excretion was initially lower in group 4 (P less than 0.05) but was similar initially among groups treated orally and among all four groups beginning on day 3. Net apparent absorption of nitrogen, fat, carbohydrate, and total energy; retention of nitrogen; and increments in body weight, arm circumference, and skin-fold thickness were positively related to the amounts of dietary energy consumed. Thus continued oral feeding with the CSO diets during the early phase of therapy yielded improved nutritional results.

  11. [A clinical experience of continuous warm blood cardioplegia in two cases of repeat aortic valve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, H; In-nami, R; Watanabe, M; Funakoshi, N; Hirooka, K; Fujiwara, A

    1992-11-01

    The continuous warm blood cardioplegia (CWBC) was used for myocardial protection during aortic cross clamping in two cases of repeat aortic valve operations with good results. Case 1: A 46-year-old man, who underwent an aortic valve replacement because of the rheumatic aortic regurgitation (AR) in 1978, have suffered from orthopnea due to para-prosthetic valvular regurgitation since 1983. He was revealed to have bi-ventricular hypertrophy with myocardial damage on ECG, EF 0.27 on UCG, PCWP 20 mmHg and severe AR on cardiac catheterization. Case 2: A 43-year-old man, who had an aortic valvuloplasty for the non-rheumatic incompetency in 1981, have had a recurrent regurgitation, resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy accompanied by chest pain. Both cases were reoperated upon, having aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthetic valves through the re-median sternotomy, utilizing CWBC with good recovery. CWBC provides an ideal circumstances for myocardial oxygen utilization during aortic cross clamping and moreover a benefit that needs not the wide dissection of the heart in a redo case because it has no need of topical cooling and ventricular defibrillation following aortic declamping. In conclusion, CWBC is very useful in a repeat aortic valve surgery.

  12. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version Score of Schizophrenic Patients in a Japanese Clinical Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Koide

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia strongly relates to social outcome and is a good candidate for endophenotypes. When we accurately measure drug efficacy or effects of genes or variants relevant to schizophrenia on cognitive impairment, clinical factors that can affect scores on cognitive tests, such as age and severity of symptoms, should be considered. To elucidate the effect of clinical factors, we conducted multiple regression analysis using scores of the Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version (CPT-IP, which is often used to measure attention/vigilance in schizophrenia. Methods. We conducted the CPT-IP (4-4 digit and examined clinical information (sex, age, education years, onset age, duration of illness, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS scores in 126 schizophrenia patients in Japanese population. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical factors. Results. Age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and PANSS-negative symptom score were associated with mean d′ score in patients. These three clinical factors explained about 28% of the variance in mean d′ score. Conclusions. As conclusion, CPT-IP score in schizophrenia patients is influenced by age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose and PANSS negative symptom score.

  13. DIRECT trial. Diverticulitis recurrences or continuing symptoms: Operative versus conservative Treatment. A MULTICENTER RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Wall Bryan JM

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persisting abdominal complaints are common after an episode of diverticulitis treated conservatively. Furthermore, some patients develop frequent recurrences. These two groups of patients suffer greatly from their disease, as shown by impaired health related quality of life and increased costs due to multiple specialist consultations, pain medication and productivity losses. Both conservative and operative management of patients with persisting abdominal complaints after an episode of diverticulitis and/or frequently recurring diverticulitis are applied. However, direct comparison by a randomised controlled trial is necessary to determine which is superior in relieving symptoms, optimising health related quality of life, minimising costs and preventing diverticulitis recurrences against acceptable morbidity and mortality associated with surgery or the occurrence of a complicated recurrence after conservative management. We, therefore, constructed a randomised clinical trial comparing these two treatment strategies. Methods/design The DIRECT trial is a multicenter randomised clinical trial. Patients (18-75 years presenting themselves with persisting abdominal complaints after an episode of diverticulitis and/or three or more recurrences within 2 years will be included and randomised. Patients randomised for conservative treatment are treated according to the current daily practice (antibiotics, analgetics and/or expectant management. Patients randomised for elective resection will undergo an elective resection of the affected colon segment. Preferably, a laparoscopic approach is used. The primary outcome is health related quality of life measured by the Gastro-intestinal Quality of Life Index, Short-Form 36, EQ-5D and a visual analogue scale for pain quantification. Secondary endpoints are morbidity, mortality and total costs. The total follow-up will be three years. Discussion Considering the high incidence and the

  14. Analgesia with interfascial continuous wound infiltration after laparoscopic colon surgery: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telletxea, S; Gonzalez, J; Portugal, V; Alvarez, R; Aguirre, U; Anton, A; Arizaga, A

    2016-04-01

    For major laparoscopic surgery, as with open surgery, a multimodal analgesia plan can help to control postoperative pain. Placing a wound catheter intraoperatively following colon surgery could optimize the control of acute pain with less consumption of opioids and few adverse effects. We conducted a prospective, randomized, study of patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic colon surgery for cancer in Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were recruited and randomly allocated to wound catheter placement plus standard postoperative analgesia or standard postoperative analgesia alone. A physician from the acute pain management unit monitored all patients for pain at multiple points over the first 48 hours after surgery. The primary outcome variables were verbal numeric pain scale scores and amount of intravenous morphine used via patient controlled infusion. 92 patients were included in the study, 43 had a wound catheter implanted and 49 did not. Statistically significant differences in morphine consumption were observed between groups throughout the course of the treatment period. The mean total morphine consumption at the end of the study was 5.63±5.02mg among wound catheter patients and 21. 86±17.88mg among control patients (P=.0001). Wound catheter patients had lower pain scale scores than control patients throughout the observation period. No adverse effects associated with the wound catheter technique were observed. The wound catheter group showed lower hospital stays with statistically significant difference (P=.02). In patients undergoing laparoscopic colon surgery, continuous infusion of local anaesthetics through interfascial wound catheters during the first 48h aftersurgery reduced the level of perceived pain and also reduced parenteral morphine consumption with no associated adverse effects and lower hospital stays. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor

  15. Nutritional status and clinical outcome of children on continuous renal replacement therapy: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Ana; Santiago, Maria J; López-Herce, Jesús; Montoro, Sandra; López, Jorge; Bustinza, Amaya; Moral, Ramón; Bellón, Jose M

    2012-09-27

    No studies on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) have analyzed nutritional status in children. The objective of this study was to assess the association between mortality and nutritional status of children receiving CRRT. Prospective observational study to analyze the nutritional status of children receiving CRRT and its association with mortality. The variables recorded were age, weight, sex, diagnosis, albumin, creatinine, urea, uric acid, severity of illness scores, CRRT-related complications, duration of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit, and mortality. The sample comprised 174 critically ill children on CRRT. The median weight of the patients was 10 kg, 35% were under percentile (P) 3, and 56% had a weight/P50 ratio of less than 0.85. Only two patients were above P95. The mean age for patients under P3 was significantly lower than that of the other patients (p = 0.03). The incidence of weight under P3 was greater in younger children (p = 0.007) and in cardiac patients and in those who had previous chronic renal insufficiency (p = 0.047). The mortality analysis did not include patients with pre-existing renal disease. Mortality was 38.9%. Mortality for patients with weight P3 (51% vs 33%; p = 0.037). In the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, the only factor associated with mortality was protein-energy wasting (malnutrition) (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.067-4.173; p = 0.032). The frequency of protein-energy wasting in children who require CRRT is high, and the frequency of obesity is low. Protein-energy wasting is more frequent in children with previous end-stage renal disease and heart disease. Underweight children present a higher mortality rate than patients with normal body weight.

  16. Residents’ and preceptors’ perceptions of the use of the iPad for clinical teaching in a family medicine residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As Family Medicine programs across Canada are transitioning into a competency-based curriculum, medical students and clinical teachers are increasingly incorporating tablet computers in their work and educational activities. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify how preceptors and residents use tablet computers to implement and adopt a new family medicine curriculum and to evaluate how they access applications (apps) through their tablet in an effort to support and enhance effective teaching and learning. Methods Residents and preceptors (n = 25) from the Family Medicine program working at the Pembroke Regional Hospital in Ontario, Canada, were given iPads and training on how to use the device in clinical teaching and learning activities and how to access the online curriculum. Data regarding the use and perceived contribution of the iPads were collected through surveys and focus groups. This mixed methods research used analysis of survey responses to support the selection of questions for focus groups. Results Reported results were categorized into: curriculum and assessment; ease of use; portability; apps and resources; and perceptions about the use of the iPad in teaching/learning setting. Most participants agreed on the importance of accessing curriculum resources through the iPad but recognized that these required enhancements to facilitate use. The iPad was considered to be more useful for activities involving output of information than for input. Participants’ responses regarding the ease of use of mobile technology were heterogeneous due to the diversity of computer proficiency across users. Residents had a slightly more favorable opinion regarding the iPad’s contribution to teaching/learning compared to preceptors. Conclusions iPad’s interface should be fully enhanced to allow easy access to online curriculum and its built-in resources. The differences in computer proficiency level among users should be reduced by sharing

  17. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3: Continued innovation for clinical trial improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael W; Veitch, Dallas P; Aisen, Paul S; Beckett, Laurel A; Cairns, Nigel J; Green, Robert C; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Morris, John C; Petersen, Ronald C; Salazar, Jennifer; Saykin, Andrew J; Shaw, Leslie M; Toga, Arthur W; Trojanowski, John Q

    2017-05-01

    The overall goal of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is to validate biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials. ADNI-3, which began on August 1, 2016, is a 5-year renewal of the current ADNI-2 study. ADNI-3 will follow current and additional subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, and AD using innovative technologies such as tau imaging, magnetic resonance imaging sequences for connectivity analyses, and a highly automated immunoassay platform and mass spectroscopy approach for cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis. A Systems Biology/pathway approach will be used to identify genetic factors for subject selection/enrichment. Amyloid positron emission tomography scanning will be standardized using the Centiloid method. The Brain Health Registry will help recruit subjects and monitor subject cognition. Multimodal analyses will provide insight into AD pathophysiology and disease progression. ADNI-3 will aim to inform AD treatment trials and facilitate development of AD disease-modifying treatments. Copyright © 2016 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Clinical study on continuous plasma filtration absorption treatment for burn sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Aihua; Ren, Yong; Yang, Lang; He, Lixin; Zeng, Sheng; Liu, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    To observe the therapeutic effects of continuous plasma filtration absorption (CPFA) treatment on burn sepsis. Thirty burn patients with sepsis hospitalized in Beijing Fengtai You'anmen Hospital from July 2009 to October 2012 were treated by CPFA for twice besides routine treatment. The blood samples were collected at five sites (A, B, C, D, and E, respectively) of blood purification equipment before and after CPFA, before and after hemoabsorption, and before hemofiltration. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR) I , and sTNFR-II from sites A, C, and E were determined with ELISA before CPFA was performed for the first time, and those from sites B and D were determined with ELISA after CPFA was performed for the first time. Plasma levels of the above-mentioned cytokines from sites A and B were determined with ELISA before CPFA and after CPFA was performed for the second time. The data of plasma levels of IL-1βP3, IL-1RA, sTNFR-I, sTNFR-II, and TNF-α before CPFA and after CPFA was performed for the second time were collected for calculation of the ratios of IL-1RA to IL-1β and sTNFR-I plus sTNFR-II to TNF-α. The expression rate of human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) on the CD14 positive monocytes, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score, body temperature, pulse, respiratory rate, and leukocyte count of patients were evaluated or recorded before CPFA and after CPFA was performed for the second time. Patients'condition was observed. Data were processed with paired t test. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 from site B after CPFA was performed for the second time were significantly lower than those from site A before CPFA was performed for the first time (with t values respectively 7.05, 5.23, 4.73, 2.37, P values below 0.01). After CPFA was performed for the first time, the plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 from

  19. A multiple-scenario assessment of the effect of a continuous-care, guideline-based decision support system on clinicians' compliance to clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalom, Erez; Shahar, Yuval; Parmet, Yisrael; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2015-04-01

    To quantify the effect of a new continuous-care guideline (GL)-application engine, the Picard decision support system (DSS) engine, on the correctness and completeness of clinicians' decisions relative to an established clinical GL, and to assess the clinicians' attitudes towards a specific DSS. Thirty-six clinicians, including residents at different training levels and board-certified specialists at an academic OB/GYN department that handles around 15,000 deliveries annually, agreed to evaluate our continuous-care guideline-based DSS and to perform a cross-over assessment of the effects of using our guideline-based DSS. We generated electronic patient records that realistically simulated the longitudinal course of six different clinical scenarios of the preeclampsia/eclampsia/toxemia (PET) GL, encompassing 60 different decision points in total. Each clinician managed three scenarios manually without the Picard DSS engine (Non-DSS mode) and three scenarios when assisted by the Picard DSS engine (DSS mode). The main measures in both modes were correctness and completeness of actions relative to the PET GL. Correctness was further decomposed into necessary and redundant actions, relative to the guideline and the actual patient data. At the end of the assessment, a questionnaire was administered to the clinicians to assess their perceptions regarding use of the DSS. With respect to completeness, the clinicians applied approximately 41% of the GL's recommended actions in the non-DSS mode. Completeness increased to the performance of approximately 93% of the guideline's recommended actions, when using the DSS mode. With respect to correctness, approximately 94.5% of the clinicians' decisions in the non-DSS mode were correct. However, these included 68% of the actions that were correct but redundant, given the patient's data (e.g., repeating tests that had been performed), and 27% of the actions, which were necessary in the context of the GL and of the given scenario

  20. Exploring end-of-residency transitions in a VA Patient Aligned Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Emily S; Conde, Michelle V; Simon, Bret; Leykum, Luci K

    2014-07-01

    End-of-residency transitions create disruptions in primary care continuity. The national implementation of Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) in Veterans Health Administration (VA) primary care clinics creates an opportunity to mitigate this discontinuity through the provision of team-based care. To identify team-based solutions to end-of-residency transitions in a resident PACT continuity clinic by assessing the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of non-physician PACT members and resident PACT physicians. Cross-sectional survey of 27 resident physicians and 24 non-physician PACT members in the Internal Medicine Clinic at the Audie L. Murphy VA Hospital in the South Texas Veterans Health Care System. Twenty-seven residents and 24 non-physician PACT members completed the survey, with response rates of 90 % and 100 %, respectively. All residents and 96 % of non-physician PACT members agreed or strongly agreed that the residents were responsible for informing patients about end-of-residency transitions. Only 38 % of non-physician PACT members versus 52 % of residents indicated that non-physician PACT members should be responsible for this transition. Approximately 80 % of resident physicians and non-physician PACT members agreed there should be a formalized approach to these transitions; 67 % of non-physician PACT members were willing to support this transition. Potential barriers to team-based care transitions were identified. Major themes of write-in suggestions for improving the transition focused on communication and relationships between the patient and PACT and among the PACT members. PACT implementation changes the roles and relationship structures among all team members. While end-of-residency transitions create a disruption in the relationship system, the remainder of the PACT may bridge this transition. Our results demonstrate the importance of a team-based solution that engages all PACT members by improving communication and fostering effective team

  1. The effect of continuous care on the lifestyle of patients with multiple sclerosis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Khodaveisi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis is a common debilitating chronic disease of the central nervous system with a progressive and prolonged nature. Patients need an adjusted lifestyle and continuous care in order to prevent its recurrence and progressive disabilities. This study aimed to assess the effect of continuous care on lifestyle in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted among 72 patients with multiple sclerosis who referred to the Farshchian Educational Hospital in Hamadan, Iran in 2013. The patients were allocated to intervention and control groups using balanced block randomization with blocks of four. The steps of continuous care (orientation, sensitization, control, and evaluation were implemented in the case group for 2 months. The patients' lifestyle was assessed before and 1 and 2 months after continuous care using the researcher-developed Lifestyle Questionnaire. The data were analyzed using the Chi-square test, t-test, and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: The mean score of lifestyle and its dimensions were significantly higher in the intervention group 1 and 2 months after the intervention compared to the baseline (P = 0.001. In contrast, the mean score of lifestyle and its dimensions had no significant difference in the control group 1 and 2 months after routine care compared to the baseline.Conclusions: Continuous care improved the patients' lifestyle. It could be designed as an appropriate care system into the hospitals or other health care centers. This care system could be used widely in order to improve adherence to suitable lifestyle in patients with chronic diseases.

  2. Cost and logistics of implementing a tissue-based American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery surgical skills curriculum for general surgery residents of all clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brandon; Clark, Philip; Sudan, Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    The cost and logistics of deploying the American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) National Technical Skills Curriculum across all training years are not known. This information is essential for residency programs choosing to adopt similar curricula. A task force evaluated the authors' institution's existing simulation curriculum and enhanced it by implementing the ACS/APDS modules. A 35-module curriculum was administered to 35 general surgery residents across all 5 clinical years. The costs and logistics were noted, and resident satisfaction was assessed. The annual operational cost was $110,300 ($3,150 per resident). Cost per module, per resident was $940 for the cadaveric module compared with $220 and $240 for dry simulation and animal tissue-based modules, respectively. Resident satisfaction improved from 2.45 to 4.78 on a 5-point, Likert-type scale after implementing the ACS/APDS modules. The ACS/APDS skills curriculum was implemented successfully across all clinical years. Cadaveric modules were the most expensive. Animal and dry simulation modules were equivalent in cost. The addition of tissue-based modules was associated with high satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors affecting knowledge transfer from continuing professional education to clinical practice: Development and psychometric properties of a new instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasli, Parvaneh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Khosravi, Laleh

    2018-01-01

    Despite the emphasis placed on the implementation of continuing professional education programs in Iran, researchers or practitioners have not developed an instrument for assessing the factors that affect the knowledge transfer from such programs to clinical practice. The aim of this study was to design and validate such instrument for the Iranian context. The research used a three-stage mix method. In the first stage, in-depth interviews with nurses and content analysis were conducted, after which themes were extracted from the data. In the second stage, the findings of the content analysis and literature review were examined, and preliminary instrument options were developed. In the third stage, qualitative content validity, face validity, content validity ratio, content validity index, and construct validity using exploratory factor analysis was conducted. The reliability of the instrument was measured before and after the determination of construct validity. Primary tool instrument initially comprised 53 items, and its content validity index was 0.86. In the multi-stage factor analysis, eight questions were excluded, thereby reducing 11 factors to five and finally, to four. The final instrument with 43 items consists of the following dimensions: structure and organizational climate, personal characteristics, nature and status of professionals, and nature of educational programs. Managers can use the Iranian instrument to identify factors affecting knowledge transfer of continuing professional education to clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Influence of Rotary Instrumentation with Continuous Irrigation on Pain and Neuropeptide Release Levels: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bıçakcı, Hazal; Çapar, İsmail Davut; Genç, Selin; İhtiyar, Alperen; Sütçü, Recep

    2016-11-01

    The first objective was to determine correlation among various experimental and clinical pain measurement procedures. The second objective was to evaluate the influence of rotary instrumentation with continuous irrigation on pain and neuropeptide release levels. Forty patients who had preoperative pain at the levels of 3-8 on the visual analogue scale were included. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups, the standard preparation group and the preparation with continuous irrigation group. Apical fluid samples (AFS) were collected after instrumentation. In the second visit, the patients' pain levels were recorded, and GCF and AFS were obtained. Substance P, calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-10 levels were analyzed from the GCF and AFS samples. For comparison between groups, the Mann-Whitney test was used (P sessions between groups. The IL-10 level obtained from AFS significantly decreased in the second session in both groups (P session) and IL-10 (GCF) (second session) positively correlated with percussion pain (r = 0.425, P < .01) (r = 0.379, P < .05). Rotary preparation with continuous irrigation has not been more effective than the standard preparation method for reducing pain. Because of determination of the correlation between CGRP and IL-10 with percussion pain, these neuropeptides can be used in further studies. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mammary radiotherapy and patients-risks management with continue evaluation of clinical indicators; Radiotherapie mammaire et gestion des risques-patients avec evaluation continue d'indicateurs cliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Untereiner, M.; Frederick, B.; Burie, D.; Cavuto, C.; Rob, L.; Coiffier, N.; Colet, M. [Centre National de Radiotherapie du Luxembourg, Centre Francois-Baclesse (CFB), Esch-sur-Alzette (Luxembourg)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The breast irradiation represents 25% of radiotherapy indication in the radiotherapy centers. The modeling of the management of complications risks and recurrences in relation with mammary irradiation constitutes a methodological base allowing to develop a general concept for any other indication of radiotherapy. The objective of the study was a continuous evaluation of clinical risks to get indicators of the therapy results: for the institution, to get an auto-evaluation tool of the functioning (continuous evaluation of clinical results, identification of sentinel events); for the patients to get precise and detailed information on the risks linked to their treatment (communication of clinical results, comparison with the literature, benchmarking). (N.C.)

  6. Increasing faculty participation in resident education and providing cost-effective self-assessment module credit to faculty through resident-generated didactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Malatesta, Theresa M; Anné, Pramila R; McAna, John; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Dicker, Adam P; Den, Robert B

    Board certified radiation oncologists and medical physicists are required to earn self-assessment module (SAM) continuing medical education (CME) credit, which may require travel costs or usage fees. Data indicate that faculty participation in resident teaching activities is beneficial to resident education. Our hypothesis was that providing the opportunity to earn SAM credit in resident didactics would increase faculty participation in and improve resident education. SAM applications, comprising CME certified category 1 resident didactic lectures and faculty-generated questions with respective answers, rationales, and references, were submitted to the American Board of Radiology for formal review. Surveys were distributed to assess main academic campus physician, affiliate campus physician, physicist, and radiation oncology resident impressions regarding the quality of the lectures. Survey responses were designed in Likert-scale format. Sign-test was performed with P < .05 considered statistically different from neutral. First submission SAM approval was obtained for 9 of 9 lectures to date. A total of 52 SAM credits have been awarded to 4 physicists and 7 attending physicians. Main academic campus physician and affiliate campus physician attendance increased from 20% and 0%, respectively, over the 12 months preceding CME/SAM lectures, to 55.6% and 20%, respectively. Survey results indicated that the change to SAM lectures increased the quality of resident lectures (P = .001), attending physician participation in resident education (P < .0001), physicist involvement in medical resident education (P = .0006), and faculty motivation to attend resident didactics (P = .004). Residents reported an increased amount of time required to prepare lectures (P = .008). We are the first department, to our knowledge, to offer SAM credit to clinical faculty for participation in resident-generated didactics. Offering SAM credit at resident lectures is a cost-effective alternative

  7. 26 CFR 1.82-1 - Payments for or reimbursements of expenses of moving from one residence to another residence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... moving from one residence to another residence attributable to employment or self-employment. 1.82-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.82-1 Payments for or reimbursements of expenses of moving from one residence to another residence attributable to...

  8. Improvement in latent variable indirect response joint modeling of a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanpu; Zhou, Honghui

    2016-02-01

    Improving the quality of exposure-response modeling is important in clinical drug development. The general joint modeling of multiple endpoints is made possible in part by recent progress on the latent variable indirect response (IDR) modeling for ordered categorical endpoints. This manuscript aims to investigate, when modeling a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint, the level of improvement achievable by joint modeling in the latent variable IDR modeling framework through the sharing of model parameters for the individual endpoints, guided by the appropriate representation of drug and placebo mechanism. This was illustrated with data from two phase III clinical trials of intravenously administered mAb X for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, with the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and 20, 50, and 70% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70) disease severity criteria were used as efficacy endpoints. The joint modeling framework led to a parsimonious final model with reasonable performance, evaluated by visual predictive check. The results showed that, compared with the more common approach of separately modeling the endpoints, it is possible for the joint model to be more parsimonious and yet better describe the individual endpoints. In particular, the joint model may better describe one endpoint through subject-specific random effects that would not have been estimable from data of this endpoint alone.

  9. Exemplary Care and Learning Sites: A Model for Achieving Continual Improvement in Care and Learning in the Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, Linda A; Ogrinc, Greg; Hoffman, Kimberly G; Stevenson, Katherine M; Shalaby, Marc; Beard, Albertine S; Thörne, Karin E; Coleman, Mary T; Baum, Karyn D

    2016-03-01

    Current models of health care quality improvement do not explicitly describe the role of health professions education. The authors propose the Exemplary Care and Learning Site (ECLS) model as an approach to achieving continual improvement in care and learning in the clinical setting. From 2008-2012, an iterative, interactive process was used to develop the ECLS model and its core elements--patients and families informing process changes; trainees engaging both in care and the improvement of care; leaders knowing, valuing, and practicing improvement; data transforming into useful information; and health professionals competently engaging both in care improvement and teaching about care improvement. In 2012-2013, a three-part feasibility test of the model, including a site self-assessment, an independent review of each site's ratings, and implementation case stories, was conducted at six clinical teaching sites (in the United States and Sweden). Site leaders reported the ECLS model provided a systematic approach toward improving patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. Most sites found it challenging to incorporate the patients and families element. The trainee element was strong at four sites. The leadership and data elements were self-assessed as the most fully developed. The health professionals element exhibited the greatest variability across sites. The next test of the model should be prospective, linked to clinical and educational outcomes, to evaluate whether it helps care delivery teams, educators, and patients and families take action to achieve better patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development.

  10. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  11. ACGME proposes dropping the 16 hour resident shift limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME is proposing that first-year residents would no longer be limited to 16-hour shifts during the 2017-2018 academic year under a controversial proposal released today (1. Instead, individual residency programs could assign first-year trainees to shifts as long as 28 hours, the current limit for all other residents. The 28-hour maximum includes 4 transitional hours that's designed in part to help residents improve continuity of care. The plan to revise training requirements does not change other rules designed to protect all residents from overwork. including the maximum80 hours per week. The ACGME capped the shifts of first-year residents at 16 hours in 2011 as a part of an ongoing effort to make trainee schedules more humane and avoid clinical errors caused by sleep deprivation. ACGME CEO Thomas Nasca, MD, told Medscape Medical News that the problem arises largely from first-year residents not being ...

  12. A patient safety education program in a medical physics residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric C; Nyflot, Matthew; Spraker, Matthew B; Kane, Gabrielle; Hendrickson, Kristi R G

    2017-11-01

    Education in patient safety and quality of care is a requirement for radiation oncology residency programs according to accrediting agencies. However, recent surveys indicate that most programs lack a formal program to support this learning. The aim of this report was to address this gap and share experiences with a structured educational program on quality and safety designed specifically for medical physics therapy residencies. Five key topic areas were identified, drawn from published recommendations on safety and quality. A didactic component was developed, which includes an extensive reading list supported by a series of lectures. This was coupled with practice-based learning which includes one project, for example, failure modes and effect analysis exercise, and also continued participation in the departmental incident learning system including a root-cause analysis exercise. Performance was evaluated through quizzes, presentations, and reports. Over the period of 2014-2016, five medical physics residents successfully completed the program. Evaluations indicated that the residents had a positive experience. In addition to educating physics residents this program may be adapted for medical physics graduate programs or certificate programs, radiation oncology residencies, or as a self-directed educational project for practicing physicists. Future directions might include a system that coordinates between medical training centers such as a resident exchange program. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. An architecture for a continuous, user-driven, and data-driven application of clinical guidelines and its evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalom, Erez; Shahar, Yuval; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2016-02-01

    Design, implement, and evaluate a new architecture for realistic continuous guideline (GL)-based decision support, based on a series of requirements that we have identified, such as support for continuous care, for multiple task types, and for data-driven and user-driven modes. We designed and implemented a new continuous GL-based support architecture, PICARD, which accesses a temporal reasoning engine, and provides several different types of application interfaces. We present the new architecture in detail in the current paper. To evaluate the architecture, we first performed a technical evaluation of the PICARD architecture, using 19 simulated scenarios in the preeclampsia/toxemia domain. We then performed a functional evaluation with the help of two domain experts, by generating patient records that simulate 60 decision points from six clinical guideline-based scenarios, lasting from two days to four weeks. Finally, 36 clinicians made manual decisions in half of the scenarios, and had access to the automated GL-based support in the other half. The measures used in all three experiments were correctness and completeness of the decisions relative to the GL. Mean correctness and completeness in the technical evaluation were 1±0.0 and 0.96±0.03 respectively. The functional evaluation produced only several minor comments from the two experts, mostly regarding the output's style; otherwise the system's recommendations were validated. In the clinically oriented evaluation, the 36 clinicians applied manually approximately 41% of the GL's recommended actions. Completeness increased to approximately 93% when using PICARD. Manual correctness was approximately 94.5%, and remained similar when using PICARD; but while 68% of the manual decisions included correct but redundant actions, only 3% of the actions included in decisions made when using PICARD were redundant. The PICARD architecture is technically feasible and is functionally valid, and addresses the realistic

  14. Impact of resident participation in a multidisciplinary diabetes team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D L; Langefeld, C D; Golden, M P; Orr, D P

    1993-05-01

    To determine the impact of participation in a multidisciplinary diabetes team on pediatric residents' perceptions of team members' roles. Pediatric residents were assigned to a traditional diabetes clinical rotation (n = 34) or to an ambulatory multidisciplinary diabetes team within their continuity clinic (n = 21). The residents and a small sample of practicing pediatricians (n = 46) completed a Likert-type instrument at the completion of the 18-mo study. Multidisciplinary diabetes team residents were significantly more positive about the roles for endocrinological evaluation in monitoring compliance, for the nurse educator/certified diabetes educator in assisting with sick-day management and school behavioral problems, and for the dietician in helping with cholesterol problems. They were significantly more like practicing pediatricians in their perceptions of pediatric roles in teaching sick-day management, implementing weight reduction, assisting with conflict resolution about diabetes, screening for microvascular complications, and developing behavioral strategies for metabolic control than residents in the traditional rotation. The groups did not differ in their beliefs about patient empowerment. Multidisciplinary diabetes team participation may be useful in modifying specific role perceptions of pediatric residents about diabetes care. It does not appear to alter perceptions favoring greater patient empowerment.

  15. A novel tool for continuous fracture aftercare - Clinical feasibility and first results of a new telemetric gait analysis insole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Benedikt J; Bushuven, Eva; Hell, Rebecca; Veith, Nils T; Buschbaum, Jan; Holstein, Joerg H; Pohlemann, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Weight bearing after lower extremity fractures still remains a highly controversial issue. Even in ankle fractures, the most common lower extremity injury no standard aftercare protocol has been established. Average non weight bearing times range from 0 to 7 weeks, with standardised, radiological healing controls at fixed time intervals. Recent literature calls for patient-adapted aftercare protocols based on individual fracture and load scenarios. We show the clinical feasibility and first results of a new, insole embedded gait analysis tool for continuous monitoring of gait, load and activity. Ten patients were monitored with a new, independent gait analysis insole for up to 3 months postoperatively. Strict 20 kg partial weight bearing was ordered for 6 weeks. Overall activity, load spectrum, ground reaction forces, clinical scoring and general health data were recorded and correlated. Statistical analysis with power analysis, t-test and Spearman correlation was performed. Only one patient completely adhered to the set weight bearing limit. Average time in minutes over the limit was 374 min. Based on the parameters load, activity, gait time over 20 kg weight bearing and maximum ground reaction force high and low performers were defined after 3 weeks. Significant difference in time to painless full weight bearing between high and low performers was shown. Correlation analysis revealed a significant correlation between weight bearing and clinical scoring as well as pain (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Score rs=0.74; Olerud-Molander Score rs=0.93; VAS pain rs=-0.95). Early, continuous gait analysis is able to define aftercare performers with significant differences in time to full painless weight bearing where clinical or radiographic controls could not. Patient compliance to standardised weight bearing limits and protocols is low. Highly individual rehabilitation patterns were seen in all patients. Aftercare protocols should be adjusted to real

  16. Lifelong Learning for Clinical Practice: How to Leverage Technology for Telebehavioral Health Care and Digital Continuing Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M; Turvey, Carolyn; Hwang, Tiffany

    2018-03-12

    Psychiatric practice continues to evolve and play an important role in patients' lives, the field of medicine, and health care delivery. Clinicians must learn a variety of clinical care systems and lifelong learning (LLL) is crucial to apply knowledge, develop skills, and adjust attitudes. Technology is rapidly becoming a key player-in delivery, lifelong learning, and education/training. The evidence base for telepsychiatry/telemental health via videoconferencing has been growing for three decades, but a greater array of technologies have emerged in the last decade (e.g., social media/networking, text, apps). Clinicians are combining telepsychiatry and these technologies frequently and they need to reflect on, learn more about, and develop skills for these technologies. The digital age has solidified the role of technology in continuing medical education and day-to-day practice. Other fields of medicine are also adapting to the digital age, as are graduate and undergraduate medical education and many allied mental health organizations. In the future, there will be more online training, simulation, and/or interactive electronic examinations, perhaps on a monthly cycle rather than a quasi-annual or 10-year cycle of recertification.

  17. Continuous postoperative blood glucose monitoring and control by artificial pancreas in patients having pancreatic resection: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Takehiro; Nishimori, Isao; Yamashita, Koichi; Sugimoto, Takeki; Maeda, Hiromichi; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kohsaki, Takuhiro; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate a closed-loop system providing continuous monitoring and strict control of perioperative blood glucose following pancreatic resection. Prospective, randomized clinical trial. Thirty patients who had pancreatic resection for pancreatic neoplasm. Patients were prospectively randomized. Perioperative blood glucose levels were continuously monitored using an artificial endocrine pancreas (STG-22). Glucose levels were controlled using either the sliding scale method (sliding scale group, n = 13) or the artificial pancreas (artificial pancreas group, n = 17). Incidence of severe hypoglycemia (artificial pancreas. The secondary outcome measure was the total amount of insulin required for glycemic control in the first 18 hours after pancreatic resection in each patient group. In the sliding scale group, postoperative blood glucose levels rose initially before reaching a plateau of approximately 200 mg/dL between 4 and 6 hours after pancreatectomy. The levels remained high for 18 hours postoperatively. In the artificial pancreas group, blood glucose levels reduced steadily, reaching the target zone (80-110 mg/dL) by 6 hours after surgery. The total insulin dose administered per patient during the first postoperative 18 hours was significantly higher in the artificial pancreas group (mean [SD], 107 [109] IU) than the sliding scale group (8 [6] IU; P artificial endocrine pancreas to control pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection is an easy and effective way to maintain near-normal blood glucose levels. The artificial pancreas shows promise for use as insulin treatment for patients with pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection.

  18. Impact of immigration on the clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study of Hispanic patients residing in the USA and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, América G; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Apte, Mandar; Fernández, Mónica; Burgos, Paula I; Reveille, John D; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2009-11-01

    To compare the socio-economic characteristics, clinical features and health-related quality of life in Hispanic SLE patients residing in Mexico and in the Southwest USA (Mexican and Texan, herein). Mexican and Texan SLE patients (fulfilling ACR criteria) participating in separate longitudinal outcome studies were evaluated. Texan patients were randomly chosen to match total disease duration with the Mexican patients. Cross-sectional data for the Mexican patients were obtained by a US-trained investigator who had previously participated in data collection for the cohort to which the Texan patients belonged. Socio-economic and -demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, disease activity (with SLAM-Revised), damage accrual (with SLICC/ACR Damage Index) and self-reported function (with Short Form-36) were compared between the two groups. Seventy Mexican patients were matched with either one or two Texan patients (n = 94) for a total of 164 patients. Mexican patients were younger. In age-adjusted analyses, the Mexican patients were more educated, had better health-related quality of life and overall less systemic SLE manifestations. Mexican patients were exposed more frequently to AZA. Texan patients had more severe disease than the Mexican patients. In multivariable analyses, Texan Hispanic ethnicity was significantly associated with high disease activity, but significance was not reached for damage. The discrepant findings observed between these two Hispanic groups of SLE patients may reflect socio-economic or biological factors. Given the global phenomenon of immigration, rheumatologists should be aware of the overall course and outcome of immigrant SLE patients if undesirable outcomes are to be prevented.

  19. Effects of hospital procedure volume and resident training on clinical outcomes and resource use in radical retropubic prostatectomy surgery in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Tse-Sun; Kane, Christopher J; Sen, Saunak; Henderson, William G; Dudley, R Adams; Cason, Brian A

    2008-01-01

    In this retrospective cohort study we used data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program of the Veterans Health Administration to examine the effect of case volume and resident participation on radical retropubic prostatectomy outcomes. The study population included 5,736 patients who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy in Veterans Administration hospitals between October 1, 2001 and September 30, 2004. Resource related outcomes included operative times and length of stay. Clinical outcomes included blood transfusion, complications, readmissions and reoperations. Hierarchical multivariate regression models were developed to predict outcomes. Risk adjustment was performed using patient chronic health factors and results of preoperative laboratory testing. A total of 5,070 radical retropubic prostatectomy surgeries met inclusion criteria. After adjustment for case mix, academic training institutions had longer operative times (3.2 vs 2.4 hours, p <0.01) but shorter length of stay (3.4 vs 4.2 days, p <0.01). Surgery at academic institutions was not associated with greater risk of transfusion (p = 0.36), reoperation (p = 0.93), complications (p = 0.53) or readmissions (p = 0.97). However, among the academic institutions low vs high hospital radical retropubic prostatectomy volume was associated with longer length of stay (3.7 vs 3.1 days, p = 0.02) and higher transfusion rate (29.6% vs 18.2%, p = 0.02). Substantial clustering of outcomes at the hospital level was observed. Within the Veterans Administration system academic training institutions have longer operative times for radical retropubic prostatectomy, but shorter length of stay. Among the same institutions, high volume hospitals tend to have lower transfusion rates and shorter length of stay. Clustering of outcomes at the hospital level suggests that unmeasured institutional factors are key determinants of clinical and resource related outcomes.

  20. Group assessments of resident physicians improve reliability and decrease halo error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Matthew R; Beckman, Thomas J; Mauck, Karen F; Cha, Stephen S; Thomas, Kris G

    2011-07-01

    Individual faculty assessments of resident competency are complicated by inconsistent application of standards, lack of reliability, and the "halo" effect. We determined whether the addition of faculty group assessments of residents in an ambulatory clinic, compared with individual faculty-of-resident assessments alone, have better reliability and reduced halo effects. This prospective, longitudinal study was performed in the outpatient continuity clinics of a large internal medicine residency program. Faculty-on-resident and group faculty-on-resident assessment scores were used for comparison. Overall mean scores were significantly higher for group than individual assessments (3.92 ± 0.51 vs. 3.83 ± 0.38, p = 0.0001). Overall inter-rater reliability increased when combining group and individual assessments compared to individual assessments alone (intraclass correlation coefficient, 95% CI = 0.828, 0.785-0.866 vs. 0.749, 0.686-0.804). Inter-item correlations were less for group (0.49) than individual (0.68) assessments. This study demonstrates improved inter-rater reliability and reduced range restriction (halo effect) of resident assessment across multiple performance domains by adding the group assessment method to traditional individual faculty-on-resident assessment. This feasible model could help graduate medical education programs achieve more reliable and discriminating resident assessments.

  1. Measuring impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps section on training in US dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Kristina M; Stratman, Erik J

    2013-07-01

    JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries are intended to aid in the interpretation of the literature to make it more practical and applicable to daily patient care. Practice Gaps commentaries have had an impact on physician clinical practice and dermatology residency curricula. To assess the impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries on dermatology residency training programs in the United States, including journal club discussions and local quality improvement activities. A web-based questionnaire of 17 questions was sent via e-mail to US dermatology residency program directors (PDs) in February 2012. Program director report of incorporating Practice Gaps themes and discussions into resident journal club activities, clinical practice, quality improvement activities, or research projects in the residency programs, as a result of a Practice Gaps commentary. Of the 114 surveys distributed to US dermatology residency PDs, 48 were completed (42% response rate). Sixty percent of PDs reported familiarity with the Practice Gaps section of JAMA Dermatology, and 56% discuss these commentaries during resident journal club activities. Quality improvement and research projects have been initiated as a result of Practice Gaps commentaries. Practice Gaps commentaries are discussed during most dermatology residency journal club activities. Practice Gaps have had an impact on physician practice and dermatology residency curricula and can serve as a tool for enhanced continuing medical education and quality improvement initiatives.

  2. Impact of Randomization, Clinic Visits, and Medical and Psychiatric Cormorbidities on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Kushida, Clete A.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Walsh, James K.; Simon, Richard D.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate factors associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) cohort. Methods: The data from a prospective 6-mo multicenter randomized controlled trial with 558 subjects randomized to active CPAP and 547 to sham CPAP were analyzed to assess adherence to CPAP during first 2 mo (early period) and during months 5-6 (late period). Results: Participants randomized to active CPAP had higher hours of nightly adherence compared to the sham CPAP group at both 2 (4.9 ± 2.0 h versus 4.07 ± 2.14 h, p CPAP were more likely to correctly identify their treatment group (70.0% versus 55.2%, p CPAP had higher hours of adherence than those who thought they were in the sham CPAP group at both 2 mo (4.91 ± 2.01 versus 4.17 ± 2.17, p CPAP, older age was significantly related to CPAP use > 4 h per night. Presence of cardiovascular disorders was associated with higher hours of CPAP use, whereas presence of anxiety was associated with a trend toward lower hours of CPAP use. Presence of nasal congestion was associated with a decrease in mean daily CPAP use between the early and the late adherence period. The adherence during the week prior to a clinic visit was higher than the average adherence during the 2-mo period prior to the visit. Conclusions: Randomization to active therapy, belief that one is in the active treatment group, older age, and possibly presence of cardiovascular disorders are positively linked to CPAP adherence. Nasal congestion and anxiety are negatively associated with CPAP adherence. CPAP nightly usage increases as clinic visits approach. Citation: Budhiraja R, Kushida CA, Nichols DA, Walsh JK, Simon RD, Gottlieb DJ, Quan SF. Impact of randomization, clinic visits, and medical and psychiatric cormorbidities on continuous positive airway pressure adherence in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016

  3. Continual reassessment method for dose escalation clinical trials in oncology: a comparison of prior skeleton approaches using AZD3514 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Gareth D; Symeonides, Stefan N; Marshall, Jayne; Young, Julia; Clack, Glen

    2016-08-31

    The continual reassessment method (CRM) requires an underlying model of the dose-toxicity relationship ("prior skeleton") and there is limited guidance of what this should be when little is known about this association. In this manuscript the impact of applying the CRM with different prior skeleton approaches and the 3 + 3 method are compared in terms of ability to determine the true maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and number of patients allocated to sub-optimal and toxic doses. Post-hoc dose-escalation analyses on real-life clinical trial data on an early oncology compound (AZD3514), using the 3 + 3 method and CRM using six different prior skeleton approaches. All methods correctly identified the true MTD. The 3 + 3 method allocated six patients to both sub-optimal and toxic doses. All CRM approaches allocated four patients to sub-optimal doses. No patients were allocated to toxic doses from sigmoidal, two from conservative and five from other approaches. Prior skeletons for the CRM for phase 1 clinical trials are proposed in this manuscript and applied to a real clinical trial dataset. Highly accurate initial skeleton estimates may not be essential to determine the true MTD, and, as expected, all CRM methods out-performed the 3 + 3 method. There were differences in performance between skeletons. The choice of skeleton should depend on whether minimizing the number of patients allocated to suboptimal or toxic doses is more important. NCT01162395 , Trial date of first registration: July 13, 2010.

  4. Appraising Medical Literature: The Effect of a Structured Journal Club Curriculum Using The Lancet Handbook of Essential Concepts in Clinical Research on Resident Self-Assessment and Knowledge in Milestone-Based Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentscher, Jessica A; Batig, Alison L

    2017-11-01

    Training in literature appraisal and statistical interpretation is one of the residency training requirements outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Frequently, a journal club format is used to teach this competency although this teaching modality is not standardized or well studied in regard to its efficacy. This study sought to determine the effect of a structured journal club curriculum that incorporated The Lancet Handbook of Essential Concepts in Clinical Research on objective and self-assessed knowledge pertaining to study design and interpretation. The study was a retrospective observational study evaluating the effect of a structured journal club curriculum using the Lancet text with pre- and postimplementation assessment using a resident self-assessment survey. The study examined a monthly journal club curriculum that covered 1 topic/chapter from the assigned text, paired with a contemporary article to highlight the chapter topic. Resident self-assessed and objective knowledge was evaluated and compared using a survey taken before and after the curriculum change. The study was completed during 1 academic year at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington, an academic military medical training and tertiary care center. Study surveys were distributed to all 17 obstetrics and gynecology residents throughout the 4 residency training years. Of the 17 potential participants, 13 (76%) participated in the precurriculum assessment and 14 (82%) participated after its completion. There was no significant improvement in resident self-assessed knowledge following curriculum implementation. There was a trend toward improved objective knowledge pertaining to study design and interpretation after curriculum completion, but this was not statistically significant. There is a lack of standardized and well-studied methods to teach residents how to evaluate and appraise medical literature and research. The Lancet Handbook of Essential

  5. Prostate tumor alignment and continuous, real-time adaptive radiation therapy using electromagnetic fiducials: clinical and cost-utility analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Martin M; Mate, Timothy P; Sylvester, John E

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy, utility, and cost effectiveness of a new electromagnetic patient positioning and continuous, real-time monitoring system, which uses permanently implanted resonant transponders in the target (Calypso 4D Localization System and Beacon transponders, Seattle, WA) to continuously monitor tumor location and movement during external beam radiation therapy of the prostate. This clinical trial studied 43 patients at 5 sites. All patients were implanted with 3 transponders each. In 41 patients, the system was used for initial alignment at each therapy session. Thirty-five patients had continuous monitoring during their radiation treatment. Over 1,000 alignment comparisons were made to a commercially available kV X-ray positioning system (BrainLAB ExacTrac, Munich, Germany). Using decision analysis and Markov processes, the outcomes of patients were simulated over a 5-year period and measured in terms of costs from a payer's perspective and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). All patients had satisfactory transponder implantations for monitoring purposes. In over 75% of the treatment sessions, the correction to conventional positioning (laser and tattoos) directed by an electromagnetic patient positioning and monitoring system was greater than 5 mm. Ninety-seven percent (34/35) of the patients who underwent continuous monitoring had target motion that exceeded preset limits at some point during the course of their radiation therapy. Exceeding preset thresholds resulted in user intervention at least once during the therapy in 80% of the patients (28/35). Compared with localization using ultrasound, electronic portal imaging devices (EPID), or computed tomography (CT), localization with the electromagnetic patient positioning and monitoring system yielded superior gains in QALYs at comparable costs. Most patients positioned with conventional tattoos and lasers for prostate radiation therapy were found by use of the electromagnetic patient positioning

  6. Medical Trainee Continuity of Care Following Emergency Department Consultations in a Pediatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Kim; Eismann, Emily A; Cornwall, Roger

    2016-02-01

    The importance of continuity of care in training is widely recognized; however, a broad-spectrum assessment across all specialties has not been performed. We assessed the continuity of care provided by trainees, following patient consultations in the emergency department (ED) across all specialties at a large pediatric tertiary care center. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients seen in consultation by a resident or fellow trainee in the ED over a 1-year period, and to determine if the patient followed up with the same trainee for the same condition during the next 6 months. Resident and fellow trainees from 33 specialties participated in 3400 ED consultations. Approximately 50% (1718 of 3400) of the patients seen in consultation by a trainee in the ED followed up with the same specialty within 6 months, but only 4.1% (70 of 1718) followed up with the same trainee for the same condition. Trainee continuity of care ranged from 0% to 21% among specialties, where specialties with resident clinics (14.4%) have a greater continuity of care than specialties without resident clinics (2.7%, P Continuity of care did not differ between fellows (4.2%) and residents (4.0%, P = .87), but did differ between postgraduate years for residents (P continuity of care for ED consultations was low across all specialties and levels of training. If continuity of care is important for patient well-being and trainee education, efforts to improve continuity for trainees must be undertaken.

  7. A new model for accreditation of residency programs in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroll, Allan H; Sirio, Carl; Duffy, F Daniel; LeBlond, Richard F; Alguire, Patrick; Blackwell, Thomas A; Rodak, William E; Nasca, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    A renewed emphasis on clinical competence and its assessment has grown out of public concerns about the safety, efficacy, and accountability of health care in the United States. Medical schools and residency training programs are paying increased attention to teaching and evaluating basic clinical skills, stimulated in part by these concerns and the responding initiatives of accrediting, certifying, and licensing bodies. This paper, from the Residency Review Committee for Internal Medicine of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, proposes a new outcomes-based accreditation strategy for residency training programs in internal medicine. It shifts residency program accreditation from external audit of educational process to continuous assessment and improvement of trainee clinical competence.

  8. Gender-Based Differences in Surgical Residents' Perceptions of Patient Safety, Continuity of Care, and Well-Being: An Analysis from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Kristen A; Chung, Jeanette W; Matulewicz, Richard S; Kelz, Rachel R; Shea, Judy A; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Yang, Anthony D; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about gender differences in residency training experiences and whether duty hour policies affect these differences. Using data from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial, we examined gender differences in surgical resident perceptions of patient safety, education, health and well-being, and job satisfaction, and assessed whether duty hour policies affected gender differences. We compared proportions of male and female residents expressing dissatisfaction or perceiving a negative effect of duty hours on aspects of residency training (ie patient safety, resident education, well-being, job satisfaction) overall and by PGY. Logistic regression models with robust clustered SEs were used to test for significant gender differences and interaction effects of duty hour policies on gender differences. Female PGY2 to 3 residents were more likely than males to be dissatisfied with patient safety (odds ratio [OR] = 2.50; 95% CI, 1.29-4.84) and to perceive a negative effect of duty hours on most health and well-being outcomes (OR = 1.51-2.10; all p gender differences in career dissatisfaction among interns (p = 0.028), but widened gender differences in negative perceptions of duty hours on patient safety (p job satisfaction (p Gender differences exist in perceptions of surgical residency. These differences vary across cohorts and can be influenced by duty hour policies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcutaneous PCO2 Measurement at Low Temperature for Reliable and Continuous Free Flap Monitoring: Experimental and Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yoshiro; Goishi, Keiichi; Kashiwagi, Keisuke; Yamano, Masahiro; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Measurement of transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure (TcPCO2) has been used for free flap monitoring. Because these values are obtained with sensor probes heated to 44°C, there is potential for low-temperature burns on skin flaps. We measured TcPO2 and TcPCO2 at 37°C in both animals and humans to determine the feasibility and safety of the procedure as a postoperative flap monitoring method. Methods: Twelve epigastric island flaps were elevated in rabbits, and TcPO2 and TcPCO2 were measured at 37°C before and after ligation of the pedicles. In addition, TcPO2 and TcPCO2 at 37°C were measured in healthy men. Subsequently, the method was applied to postoperative monitoring of free flaps in 49 clinical cases. Results: TcPO2 and TcPCO2 values were significantly affected by the experimental flap elevation. A rapid increase in TcPCO2 was observed with both arterial and venous occlusion. In the healthy men, TcPO2 and TcPCO2 were measurable at all skin surface sites. In the clinical cases of free flap transfer, TcPO2 values remained very low for at least 72 hours. TcPCO2 values ranged from 40 to 70 mm Hg for 72 hours in more than 80% of cases. In 2 cases, TcPCO2 values increased to more than 90 mm Hg, and exploration surgery was performed. These compromised flaps were saved by reanastomosis of the veins. Conclusions: Continuous monitoring of TcPCO2 at 37°C can provide objective information and alert doctors and nurses to the need for checking the free flap. PMID:25289213

  10. Cost-effectiveness evaluations of spinal neuromodulation with ziconotide continuous infusion in cancer pain in a real clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orietta Zaniolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: ziconotide is the first-in-class drug of selective N-type voltage-sensitive calcium-channel blockers used to control severe chronic pain. The present study is developed in order to analyze clinical and economical outcomes of spinal neuromodulation with ziconotide continuous infusion in cancer pain in a real clinical practice.Methods: costs and effects of ziconotide are compared with those of traditional neuromodulation with morphine and adjuvant drugs, administered by intrathecal infusion.Effectiveness and resources consumption data were retrospectively collected in 22 patients with severe complex cancer pain followed by one Italian centre from the day of port implantation to drop-out , due to death or consent withdrawal. 11 patients received morphine regimens and the other 11 were treated with ziconotide. The evaluation of the number of days with controlled pain (i.e., with an at least 30% reduction on the Numeric Rating Scale-Pain Intensity, NRSPI is the primary outcome of the analysis. The evaluated consumed health resources include drugs, visits, port maintenance, and pump recharge and amortization. Current Italian prices, real practice acquisition and remuneration costs borne by the third payer are applied.Results: patients receiving ziconotide lived significantly more days with controlled pain (78% vs 40%; p < 0.05. Average weekly cost is about 232 € for ziconotide and 120 € for morphine; the main driver being the pharmaceutical cost (respectively 81% and 65% of the total. Higher ziconotide acquisition costs are partially offset by minor expenses for adjuvant therapies, as ziconotide-treated patients on average receive a lower number of drugs than those receiving a traditional regimen. The incremental cost for one further day with controlled pain resulted of 42,30 €.Conclusions: ziconotide permits effective treatment of extremely difficult-to-manage pain, with a mild increment of cost, as compared to

  11. Association Between Patient- Centered Medical Home Features and Satisfaction With Family Medicine Residency Training in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A; Waller, Elaine; Dexter, Eve; Marino, Miguel; Rosener, Stephanie E; Green, Larry A; Jones, Geoffrey; M Keister, J Drew; Dostal, Julie A; Jones, Samuel M; Eiff, M Patrice

    2016-11-01

    Primary care residencies are undergoing dramatic changes because of changing health care systems and evolving demands for updated training models. We examined the relationships between residents' exposures to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) features in their assigned continuity clinics and their satisfaction with training. Longitudinal surveys were collected annually from residents evaluating satisfaction with training using a 5-point Likert-type scale (1=very unsatisfied to 5=very satisfied) from 2007 through 2011, and the presence or absence of PCMH features were collected from 24 continuity clinics during the same time period. Odds ratios on residents' overall satisfaction were compared according to whether they had no exposure to PCMH features, some exposure (1-2 years), or full exposure (all 3 or more years). Fourteen programs and 690 unique residents provided data to this study. Resident satisfaction with training was highest with full exposure for integrated case management compared to no exposure, which occurred in 2010 (OR=2.85, 95% CI=1.40, 5.80). Resident satisfaction was consistently statistically lower with any or full exposure (versus none) to expanded clinic hours in 2007 and 2009 (eg, OR for some exposure in 2009 was 0.31 95% CI=0.19, 0.51, and OR for full exposure 0.28 95% CI=0.16, 0.49). Resident satisfaction for many electronic health record (EHR)-based features tended to be significantly lower with any exposure (some or full) versus no exposure over the study period. For example, the odds ratio for resident satisfaction was significantly lower with any exposure to electronic health records in continuity practice in 2008, 2009, and 2010 (OR for some exposure in 2008 was 0.36; 95% CI=0.19, 0.70, with comparable results in 2009, 2010). Resident satisfaction with training was inconsistently correlated with exposure to features of PCMH. No correlation between PCMH exposure and resident satisfaction was sustained over time.

  12. The mental health status of refugees and asylum seekers attending a refugee health clinic including comparisons with a matched sample of Australian-born residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawyer, Frances; Enticott, Joanne C; Block, Andrew A; Cheng, I-Hao; Meadows, Graham N

    2017-02-21

    The aim of this study was to survey refugees and asylum-seekers attending a Refugee Health Service in Melbourne, Australia to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders based on screening measures and with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specifically highlighted. A secondary aim was to compare the prevalence findings with Australian-born matched comparators from the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 135 refugees and asylum-seeker participants using instruments including Kessler-10 (K10) and PTSD-8 to obtain estimates of the prevalence of mental disorders. We also performed a comparative analysis using matched sets of one participant and four Australian-born residents, comparing prevalence results with conditional Poisson regression estimated risk ratios (RR). The prevalence of mental illness as measured by K10 was 50.4%, while 22.9% and 31.3% of participants screened positive for PTSD symptoms in the previous month and lifetime, respectively. The matched analysis yielded a risk ratio of 3.16 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.30, 4.34] for abnormal K10, 2.25 (95% CI: 1.53, 3.29) for PTSD-lifetime and 4.44 (95% CI: 2.64, 7.48) for PTSD-month. This information on high absolute and relative risk of mental illness substantiate the increased need for mental health screening and care in this and potentially other refugee clinics and should be considered in relation to service planning. While the results cannot be generalised outside this setting, the method may be more broadly applicable, enabling the rapid collection of key information to support service planning for new waves of refugees and asylum-seekers. Matching data with existing national surveys is a useful way to estimate differences between groups at no additional cost, especially when the target group is comparatively small within a population.

  13. A continuous-flow, high-throughput, high-pressure parahydrogen converter for hyperpolarization in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Bär, Sébastien; Leupold, Jochen; Jenne, Klaus; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hennig, Jürgen; Duckett, Simon B; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Pure parahydrogen (pH(2) ) is the prerequisite for optimal pH(2) -based hyperpolarization experiments, promising approaches to access the hidden orders of magnitude of MR signals. pH(2) production on-site in medical research centers is vital for the proliferation of these technologies in the life sciences. However, previously suggested designs do not meet our requirements for safety or production performance (flow rate, pressure or enrichment). In this article, we present the safety concept, design and installation of a pH(2) converter, operated in a clinical setting. The apparatus produces a continuous flow of four standard liters per minute of ≈98% enriched pH(2) at a pressure maximum of 50 bar. The entire production cycle, including cleaning and cooling to 25 K, takes less than 5 h, only ≈45 min of which are required for actual pH(2) conversion. A fast and simple quantification procedure is described. The lifetimes of pH(2) in a glass vial and aluminum storage cylinder are measured to be T(1C) (glass vial) =822 ± 29 min and T(1C) (Al cylinder) =129 ± 36 days, thus providing sufficiently long storage intervals and allowing the application of pH(2) on demand. A dependence of line width on pH(2) enrichment is observed. As examples, (1) H hyperpolarization of pyridine and (13) C hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate are presented. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Understanding how residents' preferences for supervisory methods change throughout residency training: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Vega, Francisco; Dolmans, Diana; Donkers, Jeroen; Stalmeijer, Renée E

    2015-10-16

    A major challenge for clinical supervisors is to encourage their residents to be independent without jeopardising patient safety. Residents' preferences according to level of training on this regard have not been completely explored. This study has sought to investigate which teaching methods of the Cognitive Apprenticeship (CA) model junior, intermediate and senior residents preferred and why, and how these preferences differed between groups. We invited 301 residents of all residency programmes of Javeriana University, Bogotá, Colombia, to participate. Each resident was asked to complete a Maastricht Clinical Teaching Questionnaire (MCTQ), which, being based on the teaching methods of CA, asked residents to rate the importance to their learning of each teaching method and to indicate which of these they preferred the most and why. A total of 215 residents (71 %) completed the questionnaire. All concurred that all CA teaching methods were important or very important to their learning, regardless of their level of training. However, the reasons for their preferences clearly differed between groups: junior and intermediate residents preferred teaching methods that were more supervisor-directed, such as modelling and coaching, whereas senior residents preferred teaching methods that were more resident-directed, such as exploration and articulation. The results indicate that clinical supervision (CS) should accommodate to residents' varying degrees of development by attuning the configuration of CA teaching methods to each level of residency training. This configuration should initially vest more power in the supervisor, and gradually let the resident take charge, without ever discontinuing CS.

  15. A Faculty Development Session or Resident as Teacher Session for Didactic and Clinical Teaching Techniques; Part 1 of 2: Engaging Learners with Effective Didactic Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This workshop is intended for faculty members in an emergency medicine (or other residency program, but is also appropriate for chief residents and medical student educators, including basic science faculty. Introduction: Faculty development sessions are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and enhance the learning environment within residency programs. Resident as teacher sessions are important in helping residents transition from junior learners to supervisors of medical students and junior residents. Part I of this two-part workshop introduces learners to effective techniques to engaging learners during didactic sessions. Objectives: By the end of this workshop, the learner will: 1 describe eight teaching techniques that encourage active learning during didactic sessions; 2 plan a didactic session using at least one of eight new teaching techniques for didactic instruction. Methods: This educational session is uses several blended instructional methods, including team-based learning (classic and modified, the flipped classroom, audience response systems, pause procedures in order to demonstrate effective didactic teaching techniques.

  16. Developing Abilities to Navigate Through the Grey Zones in Complex Environments: Nurses' Reasons for Applying to a Clinical Ethics Residency for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurchak, Martha; Grace, Pamela J; Lee, Susan M; Willis, Danny G; Zollfrank, Angelika A; Robinson, Ellen M

    2017-07-01

    Nurses face complex ethical issues in practice and have to determine appropriate actions. An inability to conceptualize or follow a preferred course of action can give rise to moral uncertainty or moral distress. Both moral uncertainty and moral distress are problematic for nurses and their patients. A program designed to increase nurse confidence in moral decision making, the clinical ethics residency for nurses (CERN), was offered selectively to nurses affiliated with two academic medical centers. This is a report of the analysis of their application essays. Over a 3-year period, 67 application essays were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Applicants comprised one third advanced practice nurses (APNs) and two thirds staff nurses. They were asked to describe their reasons for interest in the CERN and how they would apply the knowledge gained. For conventional content analyses, no theoretical presumptions are used; rather, codes are identified from the data in an iterative manner and eventually collapsed into themes. Initially, broad themes were identified by the CERN team. Subsequently, in-depth and recursive readings were completed by a subset of three members, resulting in refinement of themes and subthemes. The overarching theme identified was "developing abilities to navigate through the 'grey zones' in complex environments." Three subthemes were: (a) nurses encountering patients who are chronically critically ill, culturally diverse, and presenting with complex circumstances; (b) nurses desiring enhanced ethics knowledge and skills to improve quality of care, understand different perspectives, and act as a resource for others; and (c) nurses supporting and facilitating patient-centered ethical decision making. Findings are consistent with those appearing in the international literature but provide a more cohesive and comprehensive account than previously, and hold promise for the development of educational and policy strategies to address moral

  17. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  18. Development and Implementation of a Novel HIV Primary Care Track for Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, David A; Huang, Grace C; Potter, Jennifer; Baker, Joseph J; Libman, Howard

    2017-03-01

    Declining mortality has led to a rising number of persons living with HIV (PLWH) and concerns about a future shortage of HIV practitioners. To develop an HIV Primary Care Track for internal medicine residents. Academic hospital and community health center with a history of caring for PLWH and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. Internal medicine residents. We enrolled four residents annually in a 3-year track with the goal of having each provide continuity care to at least 20 PLWH. The curriculum included small group learning sessions, outpatient electives, a global health opportunity, and the development of a scholarly project. All residents successfully accrued 20 or more PLWH as continuity patients. Senior residents passed the American Academy of HIV Medicine certification exam, and 75 % of graduates took positions in primary care involving PLWH. Clinical performance of residents in HIV care quality measures was comparable to those reported in published cohorts. We developed and implemented a novel track to train medical residents in the care of PLWH and LGBT patients. Our results suggest that a designated residency track can serve as a model for training the next generation of HIV practitioners.

  19. National continuous surveys on internal quality control for HbA1c in 306 clinical laboratories of China from 2012 to 2016: Continual improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Haijian; He, Falin; Zhong, Kun; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Zhiguo

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the quality performance of clinical laboratories in China has been greatly improved and whether Internal Quality Control (IQC) practice of HbA1c has also been changed since National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL) of China organized laboratories to report IQC data for HbA1c in 2012. Internal Quality Control information of 306 External Quality Assessment (EQA) participant laboratories which kept reporting IQC data in February from 2012 to 2016 were collected by Web-based EQA system. Then percentages of laboratories meeting four different imprecision specifications for current coefficient of variations (CVs) of HbA1c measurements were calculated. Finally, we comprehensively analyzed analytical systems and IQC practice of HbA1c measurements. The current CVs of HbA1c tests have decreased significantly from 2012 to 2016. And percentages of laboratories meeting four imprecision specifications for CVs all showed the increasing tendency year by year. As for analytical system, 52.1% (159/306) laboratories changed their systems with the change in principle of assay. And many laboratories began to use cation exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (CE-HPLC) instead of Immunoturbidimetry, because CE-HPLC owed a lower intra-laboratory CVs. The data of IQC practice, such as IQC rules and frequency, also showed significant variability among years with overall tendency of meeting requirements. The imprecision performance of HbA1c tests has been improved in these 5 years with the change in IQC practice, but it is still disappointing in China. Therefore, laboratories should actively find existing problems and take action to promote performance of HbA1c measurements. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Improving quality in an internal medicine residency program through a peer medical record audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Mansi, Ishak A; Banks, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a quality improvement project of a limited didactic session, a medical record audit by peers, and casual feedback within a residency program. Residents audited their peers' medical records from the clinic of a university hospital in March, April, August, and September 2007. A 24-item quality-of-care score was developed for five common diagnoses, expressed from 0 to 100, with 100 as complete compliance. Audit scores were compared by month and experience of the resident as an auditor. A total of 469 medical records, audited by 12 residents, for 80 clinic residents, were included. The mean quality-of-care score was 89 (95% CI = 88-91); the scores in March, April, August, and September were 88 (95% CI = 85-91), 94 (95% CI = 90-96), 87 (95% CI = 85-89), and 91 (95% CI = 89-93), respectively. The mean score of 58 records of residents who had experience as auditors was 94 (95% CI = 89-96) compared with 89 (95% CI = 87-90) for those who did not. The score significantly varied (P = .0009) from March to April and from April to August, but it was not significantly associated with experience as an auditor with multivariate analysis. Residents' compliance with the standards of care was generally high. Residents responded to the project well, but their performance dropped after a break in the intervention. Continuation of the audit process may be necessary for a sustained effect on quality.

  1. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical and histologic effects of facial skin rejuvenation with pulsed- and continuous-wave flash-scanned CO(2) lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelles, M A; Pardo, L; Trelles, O; Velez, M; García-Solana, L; Rigau, J; Chamorro, T J

    2001-09-01

    The reader is presumed to have some understanding of the use of lasers in skin resurfacing. After studying the article, the participant should be able to: Physicians may earn 1 hour of Category 1 CME credit by successfully completing the examination based on material covered in this article. The examination begins on page 409. The selection of the ideal laser for facial resurfacing is debatable. The purpose of the study was to determine whether any clinical and histologic differences existed in short- and long-term results after treatment with the Coherent UltraPulse 5000G laser (a pulsed laser; PL) and the Sharplan Silk Touch laser (a continuous-wave laser [CWL] with a flash scanner). Eight patients underwent facial resurfacing treatment on different areas. In each case, one side was treated with the PL and the other with the CWL. The condition of the patients and the treated tissue were monitored periodically after treatment. Histologic assessment of punch biopsies was performed 3 months and 1 year after treatment with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichromic, and Verhoeff's stains. The areas treated with the PL achieved earlier epithelialization with a good appearance. Longer-lasting erythema was observed on the side treated with the CWL. On a histologic level, although the PL-treated tissue epithelialized more quickly, at 3 months and 1 year the collagen was better compacted and better aligned in the CWL-treated tissue, and the macroscopic appearance of the CWL-treated areas was more enhanced. The more active vascularization seen in the CWL-treated tissue, associated with the longer-lasting erythema and possibly greater collateral thermal injury, is possibly the reason for the better collagenization and remodeling of collagen and elastin fibers as compared with the results with the PL-treated tissue. This may explain the longer effect associated with CWL treatment. The clinician would do well to bear in mind the histologic findings as well as the macroscopic

  3. Effect of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Infants With Meconium Aspiration Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandita, Aakash; Murki, Srinivas; Oleti, Tejo Pratap; Tandur, Baswaraj; Kiran, Sai; Narkhede, Sachin; Prajapati, Amrut

    2018-02-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) as a primary respiratory therapy in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) has not been studied extensively. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure, when applied in newborns with MAS, may resolve atelectasis by sufficiently expanding partially obstructed small airways and stabilizing the collapsing terminal airways to enhance oxygen exchange. To compare NCPAP vs standard care in neonates with moderate to severe respiratory failure due to MAS in reducing the need for invasive ventilation. This multicenter open-label, parallel-group (1:1 ratio) randomized clinical trial was conducted from August 5, 2014, to May 26, 2016. Data were collected from 3 tertiary care neonatal intensive care units. All infants admitted with respiratory distress, defined as Downe score greater than 4 and peripheral capillary oxygen saturation less than 90%, were assessed for study eligibility if the chest radiograph was suggestive of MAS and they met the other inclusion criteria: gestation longer than 35 weeks, a birth weight greater than 2000 g, and born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid. Infants were randomly assigned to either NCPAP or standard care (5-10 L/min hood oxygen). The primary outcome was the need for mechanical ventilation in the first 7 days of life. After excluding 14 infants, 67 infants were randomized to bubble NCPAP and 68 infants to standard care. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Infants randomized to the bubble NCPAP group needed mechanical ventilation less frequently in the first 7 days of life compared with standard care (2 [3.0%] vs 17 [25.0%]); odds ratio, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.02-0.43; P = .002). The need for surfactant (3 [4.5%] vs 11 [16.2%]; odds ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.05-0.87) and culture-positive sepsis (4 [6.0%] vs 13 [19.0%]; odds ratio, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.09-0.93) were higher in the standard care group. There was an increased duration of oxygen therapy (median [interquartile range

  4. Beta-lactams in continuous infusion for Gram-negative bacilli osteoarticular infections: an easy method for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Alba; Soldevila, Laura; Rigo-Bonnin, Raul; Tubau, Fe; Padullés, Ariadna; Gómez-Junyent, Joan; Ariza, Javier; Murillo, Oscar

    2018-01-23

    Continuous infusion (CI) of beta-lactams could optimize their pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices, especially in difficult-to-treat infections. To validate an easy-to-use method to guide beta-lactams dosage in CI (formula). A retrospective analysis was conducted of a prospectively collected cohort (n = 24 patients) with osteoarticular infections caused by Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) managed with beta-lactams in CI. Beta-lactams dose was calculated using a described formula (daily dose = 24 h × beta-lactam clearance × target "steady-state" concentration) to achieve concentrations above the MIC. We correlated the predicted concentration (C pred  = daily dose/24 h × beta-lactam clearance) with the patient's observed concentration (C obs ) measured by UPLC-MS/MS (Spearman's coefficient). The most frequent microorganism treated was P. aeruginosa (21 cases; 9 MDR). Beta-lactams in CI were ceftazidime (n = 14), aztreonam (7), and piperacillin/tazobactam (3), mainly used in combination (12 with colistin, 5 with ciprofloxacin) and administered without notable side effects. The plasma C obs was higher overall than C pred ; the Spearman correlation between both concentrations was rho = 0.6 (IC 95%: 0.2-0.8) for all beta-lactams, and rho = 0.8 (IC 95%: 0.4-1) for those treated with ceftazidime. The formula may be useful in clinical practice for planning the initial dosage of beta-lactams in CI, while we await a systematic therapeutic drug monitoring. The use of beta-lactams in CI was safe.

  5. Exploring Staff Clinical Knowledge and Practice with LGBT Residents in Long-Term Care: A Grounded Theory of Cultural Competency and Training Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Weston V; Vacha-Haase, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    Existing literature shows that LGBT residents are likely to face suboptimal care in LTC facilities due to prejudice and discriminatory policies. The aim of this project was to assess the LGBT cultural competency of staff working in LTC facilities, identify their current training needs, and develop a framework for understanding LGBT cultural competency among LTC staff and providers. This grounded theory study comprised data from focus groups of interdisciplinary staff from three LTC facilities. Results suggested that LTC staff struggle with how to be sensitive to LGBT residents' needs. Tension appeared to exist between wanting to provide an equal standard of care to all LTC residents and fearing they would show "favoritism" or "special treatment," which might be viewed as unprofessional. Participants indicated training could help to address the ambivalence they experience about providing sensitive care to subpopulations of residents who face stigma and oppression. LTC staff stand to benefit from cultural competency training focused on LGBT residents. Training should be not only informational in nature, but also facilitate greater self-awareness and self-efficacy with respect to providing care to LGBT people.

  6. Broadcasting studios Radio Bremen becomes residence rehabilitation clinic. Energy efficient retrofitting with economic building services technology; Funkhaus Radio Bremen wird Residenz Reha-Klinik. Energieeffiziente Sanierung mit wirtschaftlicher Gebaeudetechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinz, Thomas [Siemens AG, Bremen (Germany). Building Technologies Div.

    2012-07-01

    Hardly any building project is as sustainable as the rededication of a building. A recent example: The former site of Radio Bremen in the district Schwachhausen with approximately 10,000 square meters of studios, production facilities and offices were committed to the residence rehabilitation clinic with 200 beds and 100 outpatient rehab places. In order to support the economic efficiency of this measure, the existing infrastructure of the heating technology, ventilation technology and air conditioning technology was adopted and modernized.

  7. Is the Front Line Prepared for the Changing Faces of Patients? Predictors of Cross-Cultural Preparedness Among Clinical Nurses and Resident Physicians in Lausanne, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Alejandra; Paroz, Sophie; Green, Alexander R; Wolff, Hans; Weber, Orest; Faucherre, Florence; Ninane, Françoise; Bodenmann, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Assuring quality medical care for all persons requires that healthcare providers understand how sociocultural factors affect a patient's health beliefs/behaviors. Switzerland's changing demographics highlight the importance of provider cross-cultural preparedness for all patients-especially those at risk for social/health precarity. We evaluated healthcare provider cross-cultural preparedness for commonly encountered vulnerable patient profiles. A survey on cross-cultural care was mailed to Lausanne University hospital's "front-line healthcare providers": clinical nurses and resident physicians at our institution. Preparedness items asked "How prepared do you feel to care for … ?" (referring to example patient profiles) on an ascending 5-point Likert scale. We examined proportions of "4 - well/5 - very well prepared" and the mean composite score for preparedness. We used linear regression to examine the adjusted effect of demographics, work context, cultural-competence training, and cross-cultural care problem awareness, on preparedness. Of 885 questionnaires, 368 (41.2%) were returned: 124 (33.6%) physicians and 244 (66.4%) nurses. Mean preparedness composite was 3.30 (SD = 0.70), with the lowest proportion of healthcare providers feeling prepared for patients "whose religious beliefs affect treatment" (22%). After adjustment, working in a sensitized department (β = 0.21, p = .01), training on the history/culture of a specific group (β = 0.25, p = .03), and awareness regarding (a) a lack of practical experience caring for diverse populations (β = 0.25, p = .004) and (b) inadequate cross-cultural training (β = 0.18, p = .04) were associated with higher preparedness. Speaking French as a dominant language and physician role (vs. nurse) were negatively associated with preparedness (β = -0.26, p = .01; β = -0.22, p = .01). INSIGHTS: The state of cross-cultural care preparedness among Lausanne's front-line healthcare providers leaves room for

  8. The challenges of implementing advanced access for residents in family medicine in Quebec. Do promising strategies exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Malham, Sabina; Touati, Nassera; Maillet, Lara; Breton, Mylaine

    2018-12-01

    The advanced access (AA) model is a highly recommended innovation to improve timely access to primary healthcare. Despite that many studies have shown positive impacts for healthcare professionals, and for patients, implementing this model in clinics with a teaching mission for family medicine residents poses specific challenges. To identify these challenges within these clinics, as well as potential strategies to address them. The authors adopted a qualitative multiple case study design, collected data in 2016 using semi-structured interviews (N = 40) with healthcare professionals and clerical staff in four family medicine units in Quebec, and performed a thematic analysis. They validated results through a discussion workshop, involving many family physicians and residents practicing in different regions Results: Five challenges emerged from the data: 1) choosing, organizing residents' patient; 2) managing and balancing residents' appointment schedules; 3) balancing timely access with relational continuity; 4) understanding the AA model; 5) establishing collaborative practices with other health professionals. Several promising strategies were suggested to address these challenges, including clearly defining residents' patient panels; adopting a team-based care approach; incorporating the model into academic curriculum and clinical training; proactive and ongoing education of health professionals, residents, and patients; involving residents in the change process and in adjustment strategies. To meet the challenges of implementing AA, decision-makers should consider exposing residents to AA during academic training and clinical internships, involving them in team work on arrival, engaging them as key actors in the implementation and in intra- and inter-professional collaborative models.

  9. Needs Assessment for Incoming PGY-1 Residents in Neurosurgical Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, David M; Haji, Faizal A; Matte, Marie C; Clarke, David B

    2015-01-01

    Residents must develop a diverse range of skills in order to practice neurosurgery safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the foundational skills required for neurosurgical trainees as they transition from medical school to residency. Based on the CanMEDS competency framework, a web-based survey was distributed to all Canadian academic neurosurgical centers, targeting incoming and current PGY-1 neurosurgical residents as well as program directors. Using Likert scale and free-text responses, respondents rated the importance of various cognitive (e.g. management of raised intracranial pressure), technical (e.g. performing a lumbar puncture) and behavioral skills (e.g. obtaining informed consent) required for a PGY-1 neurosurgical resident. Of 52 individuals contacted, 38 responses were received. Of these, 10 were from program directors (71%), 11 from current PGY-1 residents (58%) and 17 from incoming PGY-1 residents (89%). Respondents emphasized operative skills such as proper sterile technique and patient positioning; clinical skills such as lesion localization and interpreting neuro-imaging; management skills for common scenarios such as raised intracranial pressure and status epilepticus; and technical skills such as lumbar puncture and external ventricular drain placement. Free text answers were concordant with the Likert scale results. We surveyed Canadian neurosurgical program directors and PGY-1 residents to identify areas perceived as foundational to neurosurgical residency education and training. This information is valuable for evaluating the appropriateness of a training program's goals and objectives, as well as for generating a national educational curriculum for incoming PGY-1 residents.

  10. Cirurgia do estapédio na residência: experiência do Hospital de Clínicas/UFPR Stapes surgery in residency: the ufpr clinical hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Ulisses Caldart

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A cirurgia do estapédio permanece como tratamento consagrado para a otosclerose. Recentes publicações têm demonstrado que o sucesso cirúrgico nas cirurgias realizadas por médicos residentes tem diminuído e que os resultados audiológicos tem sido piores que os obtidos por cirurgiões experientes. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a experiência do serviço de otorrinolaringologia do Hospital de Clínicas/UFPR na realização de cirurgias do estapédio no programa de residência médica. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo de 114 cirurgias do estapédio realizadas nos últimos 9 anos, em 96 pacientes. Os resultados audiométricos foram analisados conforme orientação do Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium e através do Amsterdam Hearing Evaluation Plots, considerando a melhora do gap pós-operatório e de limiares da via aérea. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 96 pacientes, na maioria adultos, do sexo feminino (67,7% e caucasianos (93,7%. Em 50,9% dos casos foi realizada estapedectomia, sendo a grande maioria sob anestesia local e sedação (96,5% e utilizando principalmente a prótese de Teflon (37,7%. A taxa de sucesso cirúrgico foi de 50,88%, com 11,4% de complicações. CONCLUSÃO: Os ganhos de audição pós-operatórios considerados como sucesso cirúrgico foram inferiores aos publicados na literatura por cirurgiões experientes.Surgery of the stapedius remains the established treatment for otosclerosis. Recent publications have showed that success in surgeries done by residents have decreased and hearing results are worse than those obtained by experienced otologic surgeons. AIM: To evaluate the experience of the otorhinolaryngology unit, Parana University, relative to stapes surgery done in the residency training program. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A retrospective study of 114 stapes surgeries done in the past 9 years in 96 patients. Audiometric results were analysed according to the Commitee on Hearing and Equilibrium guidelines and the Amsterdam

  11. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  12. Pediatric Program Leadership's Contribution Toward Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Savanna L; Perkins, Kate; Reilly, Maura R; Sim, Myung-Shin; Li, Su-Ting T

    2018-02-27

    Residency program leaders are required to support resident well-being, but often do not receive training in how to do so. Determine frequency in which program leadership provides support for resident well-being, comfort in supporting resident well-being, and factors associated with need for additional training in supporting resident well-being. National cross-sectional web-based survey of pediatric program directors, associate program directors, and coordinators in June 2015, on their experience supporting resident well-being. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics compared responses between groups. Generalized linear modeling, adjusting for program region, size, program leadership role, and number of years in role determined factors associated with need for additional training. 39.3% (322/820) of participants responded. Most respondents strongly agreed that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their role, but few reported supporting resident well-being as part of their job description. Most reported supporting residents' clinical, personal, and health issues at least annually, and in some cases weekly, with 72% spending >10% of their time on resident well-being. Most program leaders desired more training. After adjusting for level of comfort in dealing with resident well-being issues, program leaders more frequently exposed to resident well-being issues were more likely to desire additional training (pProgram leaders spend a significant amount of time supporting resident well-being. While they feel that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their job, opportunities exist for developing program leaders through including resident wellness on job descriptions and training program leaders how to support resident well-being. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Clinical Impact of Continuing to Prescribe Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients with Advanced AIDS Who Manifest No Virologic or Immunologic Benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohl, David A.; Kendall, Michelle A.; Feinberg, Judith; Alston-Smith, Beverly; Owens, Susan; Chafey, Suzette; Marco, Michael; Maxwell, Sharon; Benson, Constance; Keiser, Philip; van der Horst, Charles; Jacobson, Mark A.; Hoffman, J.; Cahill, S.; Petersen, T.; Keiser, P.; Putnam, B.; Levinson, R.; Feinberg, J.; Baer, J.; Zelasky, C.; Pedersen, S.; Nicotera, J.; Bailey, V.; Nichols, C.; Quinn, J.; Norris, J.; Valle, S.; Moe, A.; Johiro, A.; Jacobson, M.; Volinski, J.; Storey, S.; Schouten, J. [=Judith; Mildvan, D.; Revuelta, M.; Hutt, R.; Vasquez, M.; Greisberger, C.; Reichman, R.; Riddler, S.; Rutecki, B.; Koletar, S. L.; Gochnour, D.; Salata, R. A.; Walton, P.; Rodriguez, M.; Kessels, L.; Coleman, K.; Lyons, A.; Tashima, K. T.; Sousa, H.; O'Brien, W. A.; Mogridge, C.; Connor, J. Noel; Crawford, M.; Palmore, M.; Patrick, E. R.; Bolivar, H. H.; Fischl, M. A.; Jacobson, Mark; Alston-Smith, Beverly L.; Foutes, Marilyn; Andersen, Janet; Jabs, Douglas; Walker, David; Ferguson, Elaine; Crumpacker, Clyde S.; Griffiths, Paul; Spector, Stephen A.; Kerkau, Melissa; Webb, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the efficacy and tolerability of modern antiretroviral therapy (ART), many patients with advanced AIDS prescribed these regimens do not achieve viral suppression or immune reconstitution as a result of poor adherence, drug resistance, or both. The clinical outcomes of continued

  14. Grand Rounds: A Method for Improving Student Learning and Client Care Continuity in a Student-Run Physical Therapy Pro Bono Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jill D.; Bauer, Kyle N.; Spano, Georgia E.; Voelkel, Sarah A.; Palombaro, Kerstin M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Grand Rounds is a teaching methodology that has existed in various forms in medical education for centuries. When a student-run pro bono clinic identified a growing challenge of providing continuity of care for clients and a lack of preparedness in students, they implemented a Grand Rounds model of case presentation within…

  15. The effect of relational continuity of care in maternity and child health clinics on parenting self-efficacy of mothers and fathers with loneliness and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Miia; Junttila, Niina; Ahonen, Pia; Rautava, Päivi

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the parenting self-efficacy of the parents of 18-month-old children in the context of Finnish maternity and child health clinics. This parenting self-efficacy was observed in relation with the relational continuity of care and parents' experienced loneliness and depressive symptoms. The relational continuity of care was provided by a public health nurse in maternity and child health clinics. The participating parents were drawn from the STEPS study that is being carried out by the Institute for Child and Youth Research at the University of Turku. The results showed that relational continuity of care provided by the same public health nurse in the maternity and child health clinics was associated with mothers' higher emotional loneliness and with lower scores on three dimensions of parents' parenting self-efficacy. Loneliness and depressive symptoms negatively influenced parents' parenting self-efficacy - however, in the case where the family had experienced relational continuity of care, the parents' higher levels of depressive symptoms had not weakened their parenting self-efficacy beliefs. These results are discussed in terms of organizing maternity and child health clinic services. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. 20th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Even in difficult economic times, colleges and universities continue to invest in residence hall construction projects as a way to attract new students and keep existing ones on campus. According to data from "American School & University"'s 20th annual Residence Hall Construction Report, the median new project completed in 2008 was…

  17. Association of volume of patient encounters with residents' in-training examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Christopher P; Stenerson, Matthew B; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Homme, Jason H; McDonald, Furman S

    2013-08-01

    Patient care and medical knowledge are Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. The correlation between amount of patient contact and knowledge acquisition is not known. To determine if a correlation exists between the number of patient encounters and in-training exam (ITE) scores in internal medicine (IM) and pediatric residents at a large academic medical center. Retrospective cohort study Resident physicians at Mayo Clinic from July 2006 to June 2010 in IM (318 resident-years) and pediatrics (66 resident-years). We tabulated patient encounters through review of clinical notes in an electronic medical record during post graduate year (PGY)-1 and PGY-2. Using linear regression models, we investigated associations between ITE score and number of notes during the previous PGY, adjusted for previous ITE score, gender, medical school origin, and conference attendance. For IM, PGY-2 admission and consult encounters in the hospital and specialty clinics had a positive linear association with ITE-3 % score (β = 0.02; p = 0.004). For IM, PGY-1 conference attendance is positively associated with PGY-2 ITE performance. We did not detect a correlation between PGY-1 patient encounters and subsequent ITE scores for IM or pediatric residents. No association was found between IM PGY-2 ITE score and inpatient, outpatient, or total encounters in the first year of training. Resident continuity clinic and total encounters were not associated with change in PGY-3 ITE score. We identified a positive association between hospital and subspecialty encounters during the second year of IM training and subsequent ITE score, such that each additional 50 encounters were associated with an increase of 1 % correct in PGY-3 ITE score after controlling for previous ITE performance and continuity clinic encounters. We did not find a correlation for volume of encounters and medical knowledge for IM PGY-1 residents or the pediatric cohort.

  18. Clinical usefulness and economic implications of continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy in a Spanish National Health System public hospital: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto; Bagney, Alexandra; Torio, Iosune; Caballero, Montserrat; Ruiz, Pedro; Rivas, Francisco de Paula Jose; Jimenez-Arriero, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy has been shown to be effective for prevention of relapse in affective and psychotic disorders. However, there is a limited nubber of studies that investigate clinical management, associated costs, and perceived quality variables. A series of 8 cases included during the first 18 months of the Continuation/Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy Program of the Psychiatry Department at 12 de Octubre University Hospital is presented. Clinical variables (Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, length of hospitalization, number of Emergency Department visits, number of urgent admissions) before and after inclusion in the continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy program were compared for each patient, as well as associated costs and perceived quality. After inclusion in the program, 50.0% of patients reported feeling « much better » and 37.5% « moderately better » in the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale. In addition, after inclusion in the continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy program, patients were hospitalized for a total of 349 days, visited the Emergency Department on 3 occasions, and had 2 urgent admissions, compared to 690 days of hospitalization (P = .012), 26 Emergency Department visits (P = .011) and 22 urgent admissions (P = .010) during the same period before inclusion in the program. Associated direct costs per day of admission were reduced to 50.6% of the previous costs, and costs associated with Emergency Department visits were reduced to 11.5% of the previous costs. As regards perceived quality, 87.5% of patients assessed the care and treatment received as being « very satisfactory », and 12.5% as « satisfactory ». This continuation/maintenance electroconvulsive therapy program has shown to be clinically useful and to have a favourable economic impact, as well as high perceived quality. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights

  19. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada

  20. Sleep Quality Among Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Aguiar Melo, Matias; das Chagas Medeiros, Francisco; Meireles Sales de Bruin, Veralice; Pinheiro Santana, José Abraão; Bastos Lima, Alexandre; De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Medical residency programs are traditionally known for long working hours, which can be associated with a poor quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness. However, few studies have focused on this theme. Our objective was to investigate sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and their relation with anxiety, social phobia, and depressive symptoms. This cross-sectional observational study involved 59 psychiatry residents. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure the quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness ([EDS] and ESS > 10), respectively. Among the 59 psychiatry residents, 59.3% had poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) and 28.8% had EDS. Poor sleep quality was associated with higher EDS (P = 0.03) and the year of residency program (P = 0.03). Only 20% of residents with poor sleep had consulted at least once for sleep problems; 54.2% had used medications for sleep; and 16.9% were using medications at the time of interview. Only 30% obtained medication during medical consultations. Poor sleep was associated with irregular sleep hours (P = 0.001) and long periods lying down without sleep (P = 0.03). Poor sleep quality was also associated with high scores of anxiety symptoms (P Psychiatry residents frequently have poor sleep quality and EDS. Considering that sleep disorders can affect quality of life, predispose to metabolic syndrome, and be associated with worse performance at work, attention to this clinical problem is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Analysis of the multidimensionality of hallucination-like experiences in clinical and nonclinical Spanish samples and their relation to clinical symptoms: implications for the model of continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Alvaro I; Cangas, Adolfo J; Serper, Mark

    2011-02-01

    Numerous studies have found that hallucinatory experiences occur in the general population. But to date, few studies have been conducted to compare clinical and nonclinical groups across a broad array of clinical symptoms that may co-occur with hallucinations. Likewise, hallucination-like experiences are measured as a multidimensional construct, with clinical and subclinical components related to vivid daydreams, intrusive thoughts, perceptual disturbance, and clinical hallucinatory experiences. Nevertheless, these individual subcomponents have not been examined across a broad spectrum of clinically disordered and nonclinical groups. The goal of the present study was to analyze the differences and similarities in the distribution of responses to hallucination-like experience in clinical and nonclinical populations and to determine the relation of these hallucination-like experiences with various clinical symptoms. These groups included patients with schizophrenia, non-psychotic clinically disordered patients, and a group of individuals with no psychiatric diagnoses. The results revealed that hallucination-like experiences are related to various clinical symptoms across diverse groups of individuals. Regression analysis found that the Psychoticism dimension of the Symptom Check List (SCL-90-R) was the most important predictor of hallucination-like experiences. Additionally, increased auditory and visual hallucination was the only subcomponent that differentiated schizophrenic patients from other groups. This distribution of responses in the dimensions of hallucination-like experiences suggests that not all the dimensions are characteristic of people hearing voices. Vivid daydreams, intrusive thoughts, and auditory distortions and visual perceptual distortions may represent a state of general vulnerability that does not denote a specific risk for clinical hallucinations. Overall, these results support the notion that hallucination-like experiences are closer to a

  2. Should we continue temozolomide beyond six cycles in the adjuvant treatment of glioblastoma without an evidence of clinical benefit? A cost analysis based on prescribing patterns in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balañá, C; Vaz, M A; Lopez, D; de la Peñas, R; García-Bueno, J M; Molina-Garrido, M J; Sepúlveda, J M; Cano, J M; Bugés, C; Sanz, S M; Arranz, J L; Perez-Segura, P; Rodriguez, A; Martin, J M; Benavides, M; Gil, M

    2014-03-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment for glioblastoma is temozolomide concomitant with radiotherapy, followed by a further six cycles of temozolomide. However, due to the lack of empirical evidence and international consensus regarding the optimal duration of temozolomide treatment, it is often extended to 12 or more cycles, even in the absence of residual disease. No clinical trial has shown clear evidence of clinical benefit of this extended treatment. We have explored the economic impact of this practice in Spain. Spanish neuro-oncologists completed a questionnaire on the clinical management of glioblastomas in their centers. Based on their responses and on available clinical and demographic data, we estimated the number of patients who receive more than six cycles of temozolomide and calculated the cost of this extended treatment. Temozolomide treatment is continued for more than six cycles by 80.5 % of neuro-oncologists: 44.4 % only if there is residual disease; 27.8 % for 12 cycles even in the absence of residual disease; and 8.3 % until progression. Thus, 292 patients annually will continue treatment beyond six cycles in spite of a lack of clear evidence of clinical benefit. Temozolomide is covered by the National Health Insurance System, and the additional economic burden to society of this extended treatment is nearly 1.5 million euros a year. The optimal duration of adjuvant temozolomide treatment merits investigation in a clinical trial due to the economic consequences of prolonged treatment without evidence of greater patient benefit.

  3. A web-based simulation of a longitudinal clinic used in a 4-week ambulatory rotation: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lochnan Heather A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residency training takes place primarily on inpatient wards. In the absence of a resident continuity clinic, internal medicine residents rely on block rotations to learn about continuity of care. Alternate methods to introduce continuity of care are needed. Methods A web-based tool, Continuity of Care Online Simulations (COCOS, was designed for use in a one-month, postgraduate clinical rotation in endocrinology. It is an interactive tool that simulates the continuing care of any patient with a chronic endocrine disease. Twenty-three residents in internal medicine participated in a study to investigate the effects of using COCOS during a clinical rotation in endocrinology on pre-post knowledge test scores and self-assessment of confidence. Results Compared to residents who did the rotation alone, residents who used COCOS during the rotation had significantly higher improvements in test scores (% increase in pre-post test scores +21.6 [standard deviation, SD, 8.0] vs. +5.9 [SD 6.8]; p Conclusion A stand-alone web-based tool can be incorporated into an existing clinical rotation to help residents learn about continuity of care. It has the most potential to teach residents about topics that are less commonly seen during a clinical rotation. The adaptable, web-based format allows the creation of cases for most chronic medical conditions.

  4. Pediatric dermatology training during residency: a survey of the 2014 graduating residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Alaleh; Murphy-Chutorian, Blair; Friedman, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of pediatric dermatology is considered a core competency of dermatology training and should be expected of all practicing dermatologists. While the numbers of both pediatric dermatology fellowships and board certified pediatric dermatologists in the workforce have increased over the years, recent reports suggest that there is a gap in pediatric dermatology education during dermatology residency. The goal of this study is to assess the current state of pediatric education during residency, as well as the clinical experience, satisfaction and expectations of graduating dermatology residents. A 31-question self-report survey was distributed electronically to 294 third-year dermatology residents with questions pertaining to demographics, didactic education, resident experience in pediatric dermatology training, satisfaction with pediatric training and future plans. One hundred and twenty-three residents responded (41.8% response rate) representing approximately 29.1% of the total number of graduating residents. 69 (56.1%) residents reported academic time specifically devoted to pediatric dermatology, the majority (79.7%) of which was led by pediatric dermatologists. 82% of residents reported dedicated pediatric dermatology clinics at their program. 86.8% of respondents felt that their training in pediatric dermatology will allow them to confidently see pediatric dermatology patients in practice. This survey highlights a promising state of pediatric dermatology training among current graduating dermatology residents. The majority of current graduating dermatology residents are satisfied with their pediatric dermatology education, feel confident treating pediatric patients, and plan to see pediatric patients in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Intermittent versus continuous renal replacement therapy in acute methanol poisoning: comparison of clinical effectiveness in mass poisoning outbreaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zakharov, S.; Rulíšek, J.; Nurieva, O.; Kotíková, K.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Komarc, M.; Pelclová, D.; Hovda, K. E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 77. ISSN 2110-5820 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Mass poisoning outbreak * Continuous renal replacement therapy * Intermittent hemodialysis Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 3.656, year: 2016

  6. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  7. Predictors of continuous tobacco smoking in a clinical cohort study of Danish laryngeal cancer patients smoking before treated with radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pia Krause; Tolstrup, Janne S; Olsen, Maja H

    2015-01-01

    -year follow-up. Tumor stage and the average number of cigarettes smoked per day before radiotherapy were not associated with being a continuous smoker. CONCLUSION: Younger patients, who had an early smoking initiation, a poor performance status, low income and lived alone, were most likely to continue smoking......% still smoked one year after radiotherapy similar to the percentage of smokers during treatment. Being younger than 60 years (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.00-1.91), commenced smoking before the age of 15 (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.32-2.38), having a poor WHO Performance status (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.71-5.61), low income (OR 2...

  8. Do intermittent diets provide physiological benefits over continuous diets for weight loss? A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seimon, Radhika V; Roekenes, Jessica A; Zibellini, Jessica; Zhu, Benjamin; Gibson, Alice A; Hills, Andrew P; Wood, Rachel E; King, Neil A; Byrne, Nuala M; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2015-12-15

    Energy restriction induces physiological effects that hinder further weight loss. Thus, deliberate periods of energy balance during weight loss interventions may attenuate these adaptive responses to energy restriction and thereby increase the efficiency of weight loss (i.e. the amount of weight or fat lost per unit of energy deficit). To address this possibility, we systematically searched MEDLINE, PreMEDLINE, PubMed and Cinahl and reviewed adaptive responses to energy restriction in 40 publications involving humans of any age or body mass index that had undergone a diet involving intermittent energy restriction, 12 with direct comparison to continuous energy restriction. Included publications needed to measure one or more of body weight, body mass index, or body composition before and at the end of energy restriction. 31 of the 40 publications involved 'intermittent fasting' of 1-7-day periods of severe energy restriction. While intermittent fasting appears to produce similar effects to continuous energy restriction to reduce body weight, fat mass, fat-free mass and improve glucose homeostasis, and may reduce appetite, it does not appear to attenuate other adaptive responses to energy restriction or improve weight loss efficiency, albeit most of the reviewed publications were not powered to assess these outcomes. Intermittent fasting thus represents a valid--albeit apparently not superior--option to continuous energy restriction for weight loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A clinical audit in a multidisciplinary care path for thoracic surgery: An instrument for continuous quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Numan, Rachel C.; Klomp, Houke M.; Li, Wilson; Buitelaar, Dick R.; Burgers, Jacobus A.; van Sandick, Johanna W.; Wouters, Michel W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although it is advocated that (major) surgical procedures should be embedded in clinical pathways, the efficacy of such pathways is hardly ever systematically evaluated. The objective of our study was to assess the results of a multidisciplinary care path for patients undergoing thoracic

  10. CLINICAL AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE LONG-TERM MAINTENANCE THERAPY BY COMBINED DRUGS OF BRONCHIAL ASTHMA IN SCHOOL CHILDREN, RESIDENTS OF THE RURAL REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Ermakova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study: selection of the supporting anti-asthma therapy (SAAT of the moderate asthma in school children, residents of the village with the lowest ratio of price and efficiency. The maximum frequency of achieving control of asthma was 64%. The spectrum of asthma medicines (drugs used in outpatient phase is represented. For 7 years, the proportion of the inhaled corticosteroid (ICS therapy in children with asthma has increased moderately by 5.5 times and was 66%, of which 2/3 was the combination of inhaled glucocorticosteroids. When using the combined drug salmeterol/fluticasone propionate (50/100 mkg during 3 months, after that fluticasone proionat during next 3 months as a level-controlled asthma the SAAT controlling BA increased 2 times. The cost of drugs accounted for 86% of direct medical costs (DMC, the cost of hospitalization decreased from 80 to 56% (DMC savings — 24%. The results of the analysis of «cost–effectiveness» SAAT allow to review the financial resources for health in favor of providing children with mild asthma inhaled high-performance combination that will improve the quality of medical care for children, residents of the rural regions.Key words: asthma, children, inhaled glucocorticosteriods, combined therapies, pharmacoeconomic analysis.

  11. Nivel de conocimiento que poseen médicos residentes sobre la Norma oficial Mexicana del Expediente Clínico Medical Residents' Level of Knowledge of Mexican Regulations for Clinical Files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo G Rillo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El conocimiento de la NOM-168 constituye un aspecto importante en la formación médica de posgrado, pues la integración adecuada del expediente clínico optimiza la relación médico-paciente y es el referente objetivo y concreto ante problemas médico-legales; por lo que el estudio se realizó con el propósito de identificar el nivel de conocimiento que poseen los médicos residentes sobre la NOM-168. Material y métodos: El estudio fue observacional, transversal, prospectivo y descriptivo. Incluyó 56 residentes de Cirugía General, Traumatología, Medicina Interna, Anestesiología y Radiología. Se aplicó un cuestionario de 40 preguntas relacionadas a 5 áreas: generalidades, expediente clínico, expediente en consulta externa, notas médicas en hospitalización y otros documentos. Se utilizaron las pruebas de Kruskal Wallis y U de Mann-Whitney. Resultados: En escala de 0 a 10, el nivel de conocimiento sobre la NOM-168 de la población en estudio fue de 7.88±0.85 (IC95=7.65;8.11. La mayor puntuación se obtuvo en Cirugía General (8.55±0.52; IC95=8.18;8.92 y el segundo año de residencia (8.06±0.84; IC95=7.61;8.50. Los residentes de Cirugía General poseen un mayor conocimiento que los de Medicina Interna y Radiología (p0.05 en relación al año de residencia que se cursa o al conocimiento previo de la NOM-168. Discusión: Los médicos residentes participantes en el estudio poseen en promedio un conocimiento regular de la NOM-168 lo que destaca la importancia de promover su difusión desde los estudios de licenciatura.Introduction: Knowing the Mexican Regulations for Clinical Files (NOM - 168 has become an important aspect in postgraduate medical formation because an appropriate integration of the clinical file optimizes the doctor-patient relation and is a concrete objective reference for legally medical problems. This investigation is aimed at identifying medical residents' knowledge level of NOM - 168. Material and

  12. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  13. [Server World-Wide Web on the Internet for the provision of clinical cases and digital radiologic images for training and continuing education in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparacia, G; Tartamella, M; Finazzo, M; Bartolotta, T; Brancatelli, G; Banco, A; Lo Casto, A; La Tona, G; Bentivegna, E

    1997-06-01

    The Internet, as a global computer network, provides opportunities to make available multimedia educational materials, such as teaching files and image databases, that can be accessed using "World-Wide Web" client browser to provide continuing medical education. Since August, 1995, at the Institute of Radiology-University of Palermo, we developed a World-Wide Web server on the Internet to provide a collection of interactive radiology educational resources such as teaching files and image database for continuing medical education in radiology. Our server is based on a UNIX workstation connected to the Internet via our campus Ethernet network and reachable at the uniform resource locator (URL) address: http:/(/)mbox.unipa.it/approximately radpa/ radpa.html. Digital CT and MR images for teaching files and image database are downloaded through an Ethernet local area network from a GE Advantage Windows workstation. US images will be acquired on-line through a video digitizing board. Radiographs will be digitized by means of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) scanner. To set up teaching files, image database and all other documents, we use the standard "HyperText Markup Language" (HTML) to edit the documents, and the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) or Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) format to store the images. Nine teaching files are presently available on the server, together with 49 images in the database, a list of international radiological servers, a section devoted to the museum of radiology hosted by our Institute, the electronic version of the Journal Eido Electa. In the first 12 months of public access through the Internet, 12,280 users accessed the server worldwide: 45% of them to retrieve teaching files; 35% to retrieve images from the database; the remaining 20% to retrieve other documents. Placing teaching files and image database on a World-Wide Web server makes these cases more available to residents and radiologists to provide continuing medical

  14. [Heart failure in nursing home residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daamen, M A M J; Hamers, J P H; Brunner-la Rocca, H P; Schols, J M G A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of heart failure (HF) in nursing home residents and to gain insight into the clinical characteristics of residents with heart failure. Multi-centre, observational, cross-sectional study. 501 nursing home residents aged 65 years and over, in a department for chronic somatic diseases or a psychogeriatric department, participated in this study. The diagnosis of HF and the related characteristics were based on data collected from clinical examinations for heart failure (including history, physical examination, ECG, cardiac markers and echocardiography), patient records and questionnaires. A panel of two cardiologists and an internist-geriatrician made the final diagnosis of HF. The prevalence of HF in nursing home residents was 33%. Dyspnoea, oedema and a history of cardiac disease were more common in residents with heart failure. Diabetes mellitus and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease also appeared to be more prevalent in this group. In 54% of the residents with HF, the diagnosis had not previously been made. Diagnosis of HF was not confirmed by the expert panel in 31% of residents with a history of HF. Heart failure does indeed appear to be very prevalent in nursing home residents. Heart failure had not been previously diagnosed in many cases but also a previous diagnosis of heart failure could be disproved in many participants. It is therefore important that the diagnostic process for heart failure in nursing home residents be improved.

  15. Comparison of continuous infusion and intermittent bolus administration of cisatracurium in cardiac surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirinejad, M.; Yaghoubi, A.R.; Azarfarin, R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare continuous infusion and intermittent bolus administration of cisatracurium (CA) with respect to total intraoperative dose and time of recovery from neuromuscular blockade after cardiac surgery. From June 2005 to April 2006 sixty patients who undergoing coronary bypass graft and valve replacement surgery were randomized to receive either intermittent bolus (Group A, n=30) or continuous infusion (Group B, n=30) of CA in Madni heart center in Tabriz, Iran.Total intraoperative dose of CA and time to trainoffour (TOF) ratio=0.8 after operation were measured. Anesthesia technique in two groups was the same. Intensity of neuromuscular blockade maintained on one TOF twitch response of adductor pollicis during operation. Mean received dose of CA was 32.8+-20.6 meu/kg/hr in Group A and 89.7+-39.4 meu/kg/hr in Group B (p=0.003). Total intraoperative dose of CA was 23.6+-4.9 mg in Group A and 39.2+-10.1 mg in Group B (p=0.001). Spontaneous recovery from neuromuscular blockade in ICU (TOF ratio=0.8) was reached in 43.8+-9.2 min in Group A, and 64.2+-15.1 min in Group B (p=0.0001). Intubation time in ICU was not significantly different (Group A=8.3+-5.1 hrs vs. Group B=10.2+-6.2 hrs, p=0.256). Intermittent bolus administration of cisatracurium in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass used lower intraoperative dose and gave shorter postoperative recovery time as compared to continuous infusion. (author)

  16. What is an anesthesiology resident worth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Marisa H; Beaman, Shawn T; Metro, David G; Handley, Linda J; Walker, James E

    2009-08-01

    To determine the cost of replacing an anesthesiology resident with a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) for equal operating room (OR) work. Retrospective financial analysis. Academic anesthesiology department. Clinical anesthesia (CA)-1 through CA-3 residents. Cost of replacing anesthesiology residents with CRNAs for equal OR work was determined. The cost of replacing one anesthesiology resident with a CRNA for the same number of OR hours ranged from $9,940.32 to $43,300 per month ($106,241.68 to $432,937.50 per yr). Numbers varied depending on the CRNA pay scale and whether the calculations were based on the number of OR hours worked at our residency program or OR hours worked in a maximum duty hour model. A CRNA is paid substantially more per OR hour worked, at all pay levels, than an anesthesiology resident.

  17. High Dose Monthly Vitamin D for Prevention of Acute Respiratory Infection in Older Long-Term Care Residents: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginde, Adit A.; Blatchford, Patrick; Breese, Keith; Zarrabi, Lida; Linnebur, Sunny A.; Wallace, Jeffrey I.; Schwartz, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Determine the efficacy and safety of high dose vitamin D supplementation for ARI prevention in older long-term care residents. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled trial investigating high dose vs standard dose vitamin D conducted from 2010–2014. Participants were older residents (≥60 years) of Colorado long-term care facilities. Interventions 1) The high dose group received monthly supplement of 100,000 IU vitamin D3; 2) The standard dose group received either a monthly placebo (for participants taking 400–1,000 IU/day as part of usual care) or a monthly supplement of 12,000 IU of vitamin D3 (for participants taking <400 IU/day as part of usual care). Main Outcomes Incidence of ARI during the 12-month intervention. Secondary outcomes included falls/fractures, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones. Results We randomized 107 participants (55 high dose, 52 standard dose) and included all in the final analysis. The high dose group had 0.67 ARIs per person-year compared to 1.11 in the standard dose group (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.60; 95%CI 0.38–0.94; p= 0.02). Falls were more common in the high dose group (1.47 per person-year) compared to 0.63 in the standard dose group (IRR 2.33; 95%CI 1.49–3.63; p<0.001). Fractures were uncommon and similar in both groups (high dose 0.10 vs standard dose 0.19 per person-year; p=0.31). The mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D level during the trial was 32.6 ng/mL in the high dose group and 25.1 ng/mL in the standard dose group. There was no hypercalcemia or kidney stones in either group. Conclusion Monthly high dose vitamin D3 supplementation reduced the incidence of ARI in older long-term care residents but was associated with a higher rate of falls without an increase in fractures. PMID:27861708

  18. High-Dose Monthly Vitamin D for Prevention of Acute Respiratory Infection in Older Long-Term Care Residents: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginde, Adit A; Blatchford, Patrick; Breese, Keith; Zarrabi, Lida; Linnebur, Sunny A; Wallace, Jeffrey I; Schwartz, Robert S

    2017-03-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of high-dose vitamin D supplementation for prevention of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in older long-term care residents. Randomized controlled trial investigating high-dose vs standard-dose vitamin D from 2010 to 2014. Colorado long-term care facilities. Long-term care residents aged 60 and older (n = 107). The high-dose group received monthly supplement of vitamin D 3 100,000 IU, the standard-dose group received a monthly placebo (for participants taking 400-1,000 IU/d as part of usual care) or a monthly supplement of 12,000 IU of vitamin D 3 (for participants taking <400 IU/d as part of usual care). The primary outcome was incidence of ARI during the 12-month intervention. Secondary outcomes were falls and fractures, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones. Participants (55 high dose, 52 standard dose) were randomized and included in the final analysis. The high-dose group had 0.67 ARIs per person-year and the standard-dose group had 1.11 (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38-0.94, P = .02). Falls were more common in the high-dose group (1.47 per person-year vs 0.63 in standard-dose group; IRR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.49-3.63, P < .001). Fractures were uncommon and similar in both groups (high dose 0.10 vs standard dose 0.19 per person-year; P = .31). Mean trough 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels during the trial were 32. ng/mL in the high-dose group and 25.1 ng/mL in the standard-dose group. There was no hypercalcemia or kidney stones in either group. Monthly high-dose vitamin D 3 supplementation reduced the incidence of ARI in older long-term care residents but was associated with a higher rate of falls without an increase in fractures. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. A Default Method to Specify Skeletons for Bayesian Model Averaging Continual Reassessment Method for Phase I Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haitao; Yuan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The Bayesian model averaging continual reassessment method (BMA-CRM) is an extension of the continual reassessment method (CRM) for dose finding. The BMA-CRM improves the robustness and overall performance of the CRM by specifying multiple skeletons (or models) and then using Bayesian model averaging to automatically favor the best fitting model for robust decision making. Specifying multiple skeletons, however, can be challenging for practitioners. In this paper, we propose a default way to specify skeletons for the BMA-CRM. We show that skeletons that appear rather different may actually lead to equivalent models. Motivated by this, we define a nonequivalence measure to index the difference among skeletons. Using this measure, we extend the model calibration method of Lee and Cheung (2009) to choose the optimal skeletons that maximize the average percentage of correct selection of the maximum tolerated dose and ensure sufficient nonequivalence among the skeletons. Our simulation study shows that the proposed method has desirable operating characteristics. We provide software to implement the proposed method. PMID:26991076

  20. A default method to specify skeletons for Bayesian model averaging continual reassessment method for phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haitao; Yuan, Ying

    2017-01-30

    The Bayesian model averaging continual reassessment method (CRM) is a Bayesian dose-finding design. It improves the robustness and overall performance of the continual reassessment method (CRM) by specifying multiple skeletons (or models) and then using Bayesian model averaging to automatically favor the best-fitting model for better decision making. Specifying multiple skeletons, however, can be challenging for practitioners. In this paper, we propose a default way to specify skeletons for the Bayesian model averaging CRM. We show that skeletons that appear rather different may actually lead to equivalent models. Motivated by this, we define a nonequivalence measure to index the difference among skeletons. Using this measure, we extend the model calibration method of Lee and Cheung (2009) to choose the optimal skeletons that maximize the average percentage of correct selection of the maximum tolerated dose and ensure sufficient nonequivalence among the skeletons. Our simulation study shows that the proposed method has desirable operating characteristics. We provide software to implement the proposed method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. 26 CFR 1.871-3 - Residence of alien seamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Residence of alien seamen. 1.871-3 Section 1.871... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.871-3 Residence of alien seamen. In order to determine whether an alien seaman is a resident of the United States for purposes of the income...

  2. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly efficient and fragmented, with the majority of all activities requiring 4 minutes or less. Residents spent a large portion of their time waiting for other services. In light of these data, we

  3. Understanding resident ratings of teaching in the workplace: a multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluit, C.R.M.G.; Feskens, R.; Bolhuis, S.; Grol, R.; Wensing, M.; Laan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Providing clinical teachers with feedback about their teaching skills is a powerful tool to improve teaching. Evaluations are mostly based on questionnaires completed by residents. We investigated to what extent characteristics of residents, clinical teachers, and the clinical environment influenced

  4. Study protocol for a randomized clinical trial of a fatherhood intervention for African American non-resident fathers: Can we improve father and child outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julion, Wrenetha A; Sumo, Jen'nea; Bounds, Dawn T; Breitenstein, Susan M; Schoeny, Michael; Gross, Deborah; Fogg, Louis

    2016-07-01

    African American (AA) fathers who live apart from their children face multiple obstacles to consistent and positive involvement with their children. Consequently, significant numbers of children are bereft of their father's positive involvement. Intervention research that is explicitly focused on promoting the positive involvement of non-resident AA fathers with their young children is limited. The purpose of this article is to describe the study protocol of a randomized trial (RCT) designed to test the Building Bridges to Fatherhood program against a financial literacy comparison condition; and discuss early implementation challenges. Fathers (n=180) are recruited to attend 10 group meetings, reimbursed for transportation, given dinner and activity vouchers for spending time with their child, and incentivized with a $40 gift card at each data collection time point. Mothers are incentivized ($40 gift card) at data collection and must be amenable to father child interaction. Intervention targets include father psychological well-being, parenting competence, communication, problem-solving ability; father-mother relationship quality; and child behavioral and emotional/social development. To date, 57 fathers have been randomized to study condition. Recruitment has been influenced by father and mother hesitancy and the logistics of reaching and maintaining contact with participants. Strategies to surmount challenges to father and mother recruitment and engagement have been developed. The prospective benefits of positive father involvement to children, fathers and families outweigh the challenges associated with community-based intervention research. The findings from this RCT can inform the body of knowledge on engaging AA non-resident fathers in culturally relevant fatherhood programming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Outcomes and Testosterone Levels Following Continuous Androgen Deprivation in Patients with Relapsing or Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Post Hoc Analysis of the ICELAND Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Cornel, Erik B; Persad, Raj; Stari, Anny; Gómez Veiga, Francisco; Schulman, Claude

    2017-11-01

    Lower serum testosterone levels correlate with improved cause specific survival and longer time to progression in year 1 of continuous androgen deprivation in men with prostate cancer. ICELAND was a large European study demonstrating the efficacy of leuprorelin (Eligard®) during continuous androgen deprivation. In this post hoc analysis we investigated serum testosterone levels within year 1 of continuous androgen deprivation to determine survival and time to progression. In ICELAND (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00378690) patients with locally advanced or relapsing nonmetastatic prostate cancer and with prostate specific antigen 1 ng/ml or less following 6-month induction with leuprorelin 3-month depot 22.5 mg (plus bicalutamide 50 mg per day for 1 month) were randomized 1:1 to continuous androgen deprivation (361) or intermittent androgen deprivation (340) with leuprorelin for 36 months. Patients receiving continuous androgen deprivation were stratified by minimum, median and maximum testosterone levels during year 1 of therapy into 20 or less, greater than 20 to 50 and greater than 50 ng/dl subgroups. Cause specific survival and time to prostate specific antigen (castrate resistant prostate cancer) progression were analyzed. A total of 90.1%, 83.5% and 74.5% of patients receiving continuous androgen deprivation achieved minimum, median and maximum serum testosterone levels of 20 ng/dl or less, respectively. Cause specific survival rates and time to prostate specific antigen progression did not differ among the testosterone subgroups. In patients receiving continuous androgen deprivation cause specific survival and time to prostate specific antigen progression did not differ according to testosterone levels in year 1 of therapy. This finding may in part be due to the induction period and the effectiveness of leuprorelin in lowering testosterone. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ECAT ART - a continuously rotating PET camera: performance characteristics, initial clinical studies, and installation considerations in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.; Young, H.; Bloomfield, P.M.; Meikle, S.R.; Glass, D.; Myers, M.J.; Spinks, T.J.; Watson, C.C.; Luk, P.; Peters, A.M.; Jones, T.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in image reconstruction techniques have permitted the development of a commercial, rotating, partial ring, fully 3D scanner, the ECAT ART. The system has less than one-half the number of bismuth germanate detectors compared with a full ring scanner with the equivalent field of view, resulting in reduced capital cost. The performance characteristics, implications for installation in a nuclear medicine department, and clinical utility of the scanner are presented in this report. The sensitivity (20 cm diameter x 20 cm long cylindrical phantom, no scatter correction) is 11400 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 . This compares with 5800 and 40500 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 in 2D and 3D respectively for the equivalent full ring scanner (ECAT EXACT). With an energy window of 350-650 keV the maximum noise equivalent count (NEC) rate was 27 kcps at a radioactivity concentration of ∝15 kBq .ml -1 in the cylinder. Spatial resolution is ∝6 mm full width at half maximum on axis degrading to just under 8 mm at a distance of 20 cm off axis. Installation and use within the nuclear medicine department does not appreciably increase background levels of radiation on gamma cameras in adjacent rooms and the dose rate to an operator in the same room is 2 μSv .h -1 for a typical fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) study with an initial injected activity of 370 MBq. The scanner has been used for clinical imaging with 18 F-FDG for neurological and oncological applications. Its novel use for imaging iron-52 transferrin for localising erythropoietic activity demonstrates its sensitivity and resolution advantages over a conventional dual-headed gamma camera. The ECAT ART provides a viable alternative to conventional full ring PET scanners without compromising the performance required for clinical PET imaging. (orig.). With 9 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Burnout, anxiety, depression, and social skills in medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Lima, K; Loureiro, S R

    2015-01-01

    The medical residency is recognized as a risk period for the development of burnout and mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression, which have impact on the physician and clientele alike. There is a need for studies that address conditions of risk and protection for the development of such problems. This study aimed to verify the rates of burnout, anxiety, and depression presented by resident physicians, as well as the associations of these problems with social skills, as potential protective factors. The hypothesis was defined that the problems (burnout, anxiety, and depression) would be negatively associated with social skills. A total of 305 medical residents, of both genders, of different specialties, from clinical and surgical areas of a Brazilian university hospital were evaluated using the following standardized self-report instruments: Burnout Syndrome Inventory, Social Skills Inventory, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. High rates of burnout and mental health problems were verified and social skills were negatively associated with burnout dimensions such as emotional exhaustion, emotional detachment, and dehumanization, but positively associated with personal accomplishment. Furthermore, residents with indicators of problems presented significantly lower social skills means than those of residents without indicators of burnout, anxiety, or depression. More studies are needed, which include other types of instruments in addition to self-report ones and evaluate not only social skills but also social competence in the professional practice. These should adopt intervention and longitudinal designs that allow the continuity or overcoming of the problems to be verified. Since social skills can be learned, the results of the study highlight the importance of developing the interpersonal skills of the professionals during the training of resident physicians in order to improve their practice.

  8. Numerical and clinical precision of continuous glucose monitoring in Colombian patients treated with insulin infusion pump with automated suspension in hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Ana M; Marín Sánchez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Oscar M; Colón Peña, Christian Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Insulin pump therapy associated with continuous glucose monitoring has shown a positive clinical impact on diabetes control and reduction of hypoglycemia episodes. There are descriptions of the performance of this device in other populations, but its precision and accuracy in Colombia and Latin America are unknown, especially in the routine outpatient setting. Data from 33 type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients with sensor-augmented pump therapy with threshold suspend automation, MiniMed Paradigm® Veo™ (Medtronic, Northridge, California), managed at Hospital Universitario San Ignacio (Bogotá, Colombia) and receiving outpatient treatment, were analyzed. Simultaneous data from continuous glucose monitoring and capillary blood glucose were compared, and their precision and accuracy were calculating with different methods, including Clarke error grid. Analyses included 2,262 continuous glucose monitoring -reference paired glucose values. A mean absolute relative difference of 20.1% was found for all measurements, with a value higher than 23% for glucose levels ≤75mg/dL. Global compliance with the ISO criteria was 64.9%. It was higher for values >75mg/dl (68.3%, 1,308 of 1,916 readings), than for those ≤ 75mg/dl (49.4%, 171 of 346 readings). Clinical accuracy, as assessed by the Clarke error grid, showed that 91.77% of data were within the A and B zones (75.6% in hypoglycemia). A good numerical accuracy was found for continuous glucose monitoring in normo and hyperglycemia situations, with low precision in hypoglycemia. The clinical accuracy of the device was adequate, with no significant safety concerns for patients. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling and evaluating evidence-based continuing education program in nursing home dementia care (MEDCED)--training of care home staff to reduce use of restraint in care home residents with dementia. A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testad, Ingelin; Mekki, Tone Elin; Førland, Oddvar; Øye, Christine; Tveit, Eva Marie; Jacobsen, Frode; Kirkevold, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a tailored 7-month training intervention "Trust Before Restraint," in reducing use of restraint, agitation, and antipsychotic medications in care home residents with dementia. This is a single-blind cluster randomized controlled trial in 24 care homes within the Western Norway Regional Health Authority 2011-2013. From 24 care homes, 274 residents were included in the study, with 118 in the intervention group and 156 in the control group. Use of restraint was significantly reduced in both the intervention group and the control group despite unexpected low baseline, with a tendency to a greater reduction in the control group. There was a significant reduction in Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory score in both the intervention group and the follow-up group with a slightly higher reduction in the control group, although this did not reach significance and a small nonsignificant increase in use of antipsychotics (14.1-17.7%) and antidepressants (35.9-38.4%) in both groups. This study reports on the statistically significant reduction in use of restraint in care homes, both prior and during the 7-month intervention periods, in both intervention and control groups. When interpreted within the context of the current climate of educational initiatives to reduce restraint and a greater focus on the importance of person-centered care, the study also highlights the potential success achieved with national training programs for care staff and should be further evaluated to inform future training initiatives both in Norway and internationally. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Are Graduating Residents Trained and Prepared to Engage in Medical Home Activities in Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Dana; Frintner, Mary Pat; Narayan, Aditee; Turchi, Renee M

    2018-02-01

    A national, random sample of 1000 graduating pediatric residents was surveyed in 2014 on receipt of training in medical home activities and preparedness to engage in same in practice. Of 602 survey respondents (60% response), 71.8% reported being very/fairly knowledgeable about medical homes. Most residents (70.0% to 91.3%) reported they received training in 6 medical home activities; more than one fourth wished for more training in 4 of 6 activities. The majority (62.5% to 77.3%) reported very good/excellent perceived preparedness. Residents with continuity clinic experiences at 2 or more sites and with continuity clinic experience at a community health center were more likely to report very good/excellent preparedness in multiple medical home activities. Overall, residents feel knowledgeable, trained, and prepared to engage in medical home activities as they are leaving residency. Opportunities exist to further explore the influence of additional training in specific activities and the number and type of training site experiences on perceived preparedness.

  11. A randomized clinical trial investigating the performance of two commercially available posterior pediatric preveneered stainless steel crowns: a continuation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratunova, Evelina; O'Connell, Anne C

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the clinical and radiographic success of preveneered posterior NuSmile® and Kinder Krowns® over one year and to assess the level of parental satisfaction with their esthetics. Three trained operators placed 120 crowns in a split-mouth design with a random allocation for 36 participants (mean age: 5.8 years) who received two, four, six, or eight crowns. Blind assessment of the clinical and radiographic performance of the restorations was performed by four calibrated examiners after one year. Results were analyzed by Fisher's exact test and McNemar test. Examiner reliability was determined by Cohen's kappa score. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess the level of parental satisfaction. All crowns but one were retained, and the majority (83 percent) had no facing fractures. Parental satisfaction was high (9.4/10 on the VAS). Primary maxillary first molar crowns had more occlusal facing fractures than their mandibular counterparts (P=.02). Primary mandibular second molar crowns showed more facing fractures than their maxillary counterparts (P=.008). Both types showed no statistical difference in most categories, but Kinder Krowns had more facing fractures (Pcrowns have predictable durability at 12 months while offering natural appearance to restored teeth.

  12. Residents' perceived barriers to communication skills learning: comparing two medical working contexts in postgraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eertwegh, Valerie; van Dalen, Jan; van Dulmen, Sandra; van der Vleuten, Cees; Scherpbier, Albert

    2014-04-01

    Contextual factors are known to influence the acquisition and application of communication skills in clinical settings. Little is known about residents' perceptions of these factors. This article aims to explore residents' perceptions of contextual factors affecting the acquisition and application of communication skills in the medical workplace. We conducted an exploratory study comprising seven focus groups with residents in two different specialities: general practice (n=23) and surgery (n=18). Residents perceive the use of summative assessment checklists that reduce communication skills to behavioural components as impeding the learning of their communication skills. Residents perceive encouragement to deliberately practise in an environment in which the value of communication skills is recognised and support is institutionalised with appropriate feedback from role models as the most important enhancing factors in communication skills learning. To gradually realise a clinical working environment in which the above results are incorporated, we propose to use transformative learning theory to guide further studies. Provided it is used continuously, an approach that combines self-directed learning with observation and discussion of resident-patient consultations seems an effective method for transformative learning of communication skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of the team objective structured clinical encounter (TOSCE) for continuing professional development amongst postgraduate health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Morris; Uppal, Elaine; Holt, Kath; Lythgoe, Jeanne; Mitchell, Allison; Hollins-Martin, Caroline

    2013-03-01

    Educators in healthcare face significant challenges trying to improve interprofessional teamworking skills, with a lack of clarity on how to teach and evaluate such skills. Previously, the team objective structured clinical encounter (TOSCE) has been reported as a teaching and assessment tool, but it has been used primarily in homogenous groups of undergraduates. An interprofessional team of educators set out to evaluate the TOSCE as a teaching intervention amongst a large interprofessional group of postgraduate nurses and midwives. After the TOSCE, 83% of participants reported that they were more aware of potential weaknesses in teamworking and 60% felt more able to work in a team. Mean Likert scale ratings were 4/5 for usefulness, enjoyment and relevance. The TOSCE is a feasible tool for teamwork skill assessment in the demanding postgraduate interprofessional setting and requires further investigation to ascertain its potential for formative and summative assessment of skills.

  14. Short-term clinical, nutritional, and functional effects of continuous elemental enteral alimentation in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, J M; Morin, C L; Lasalle, R; Patrick, J; Coates, A L

    1984-01-01

    Ten children with cystic fibrosis, aged 3.5 to 12 years, whose weights were lower than 90% of the expected weight for height, received high-calorie elemental enteral alimentation for four weeks. Clinical, anthropometric, and biochemical evaluations as well as blood gas analyses and chest radiograph scoring were performed in all. Pulmonary function tests were performed in the five older children, and progressive exercise tests in three. These evaluations were done before, immediately after, and two months after termination of therapy. Nutritional therapy resulted in an increase of caloric intake and in dramatic weight gain, which persisted only for a short time and was mainly related to adipose tissue accretion. No functional improvement accompanied the amelioration in nutritional status. This short-term nutritional therapy in malnourished children with cystic fibrosis was effective in increasing relative weight and energy stores, but there was no evidence of any long-term functional benefit.

  15. A multicenter, longitudinal, interventional, double blind randomized clinical trial in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients residing in remote areas: Lessons learned from the late cytomegalovirus prevention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise E. Kimball

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Complex randomized, double-blind, multicenter interventional trials with treatment decisions made at a central coordinating site can be conducted safely and effectively according to Good Clinical Practice (GCP guidelines over a large geographic area.

  16. On the transition from a nurse-led hypertension clinic to hypertension control in primary care: identifying barriers to and factors acting against continuous hypertension control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard Andersen, Ulla; Ibsen, Hans; Tobiassen, Minja

    2016-08-01

    Many hypertensive patients are not treated to target and hence do not benefit fully from the blood pressure-related improvements in cardiovascular health. Hypertensive patients who had primarily been treated to a target goal in a nurse-led hypertension clinic were re-examined to evaluate whether their target goal blood pressure was maintained after their discharge from the hypertension clinic for further control in primary care, and to evaluate potential barriers to and factors acting against continuous hypertension control. The median observation time was 3.6 years (range 3 months to 7.9 years). Only 45.2% of the patients were well controlled at the time of re-examination. No patient-related factors (age, body mass index, gender, attitudes towards medication) predicted the outcome. Two factors were significant in the reduction in continuous hypertension control: the cooperation between the patient and health personnel and the shared commitment towards the target goal were discontinued; and many patients did not make control visits to the general practitioner's office. In conclusion, maintained strict control of hypertension requires both continued close collaboration between the patient and health personnel, with an emphasis on treatment goals, and systematic control visits.

  17. Visão do paciente quanto à participação do residente no exame proctológico em ambulatório Patient view about the proctological exam assisted by the resident in outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Pessoa Elias

    2006-12-01

    patientes and their participation in the examination is essential for the learning of colorectal surgery specialty. Patients may be reluctant to have residents present in outpatient colorectal clinics. This study evalueted patients' attitudes towards resident' s involvement in an outpatient colorectal clinic of a private institution. METHODS: One hundred consecutive patients answered voluntarily and anonymously a questionnaire after the physical examination with the involmement of residents. The examination consisted of anal inspection, palpation, anoscopy, rigid proctosigmoidoscopy and abdominal examination. Age, gender, race, marital, educational and social status were evaluated, as well as the patients' attitudes towards resident's involvement in the outpatient setting. The reasons for acceptance or refusal of resident' involvement werw also evaluated. For statistical analysis the [chi]² os Fisher test and t Student test were used. RESULTS: The acceptance rate of residents during the rectal examination was 87 per cent and the refusal rate was 1 per cent. Eleven per cent reported tha resident's involvement was indifferent for them and 1 patient did not answer this question. There was no significant difference among the studied variables regarding resident's involvement, except for the marital status, since married patients accepted the resident better than single patients. The main reason for acceptance was cooperatin for medical training, while for refusal was loss of privacy. CONCLUSION: Patients accept resident's involvement during rectal examination in outpatient setting. Knowledge of the reasons for their acceptance and refusal by patients may emphasize positive attiyudes in order to improve this acceptance and minimize the refusal.

  18. Clinical and demographic profile of users of a mental health system for medical residents and other health professionals undergoing training at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fagnani Neto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A postgraduate and resident trainee mental health assistance center was created in September 1996 within our university. OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical and demographic profile of its users. TYPE OF STUDY: Retrospective. SETTING: Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina (Unifesp-EPM. METHODS: The study was carried between September 1996 and November 2002, when 233 semi-structured registration forms were filled out either by the psychologist or the psychiatrist during their first contact with the trainees, who were medical and nursing residents, and postgraduate students at specialization, master or doctoral levels. The registration forms included demographic, occupational and clinical data. RESULTS: The trainees were predominantly young (mean of 27 years old, single (82.0% of cases, women (79.4%, seeking help especially during the first year of training (63.1%. In 70.8% of the cases, they came to the service spontaneously. Such individuals showed greater adherence to the treatment than those who were referred by supervisors (p < 0.05. In 30% of the cases, the trainee sought psychological guidance or support at the service due to specific situational conflicts. Depression and anxiety disorders were the most frequent diagnoses; 22.3% of the trainees followed up mentioned a tendency towards suicidal thoughts. In comparison with other trainees, there was a higher prevalence of males among the medical residents (p < 0.01, with more cases of sleep disorders (p < 0.05, a smaller number of individuals refraining from the use of alcohol (p < 0.05 and a higher number of trainees requiring leave of absence (p < 0.001. DISCUSSION: The first year of training in health sciences is the most stressful, especially for women. Depression and anxiety symptoms are common, reflecting transitory self-limited deadaptation. However, the severity of the cases can also be evaluated in view of the large number of trainees who mentioned

  19. Further examination of embedded performance validity indicators for the Conners' Continuous Performance Test and Brief Test of Attention in a large outpatient clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharland, Michael J; Waring, Stephen C; Johnson, Brian P; Taran, Allise M; Rusin, Travis A; Pattock, Andrew M; Palcher, Jeanette A

    2018-01-01

    Assessing test performance validity is a standard clinical practice and although studies have examined the utility of cognitive/memory measures, few have examined attention measures as indicators of performance validity beyond the Reliable Digit Span. The current study further investigates the classification probability of embedded Performance Validity Tests (PVTs) within the Brief Test of Attention (BTA) and the Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II), in a large clinical sample. This was a retrospective study of 615 patients consecutively referred for comprehensive outpatient neuropsychological evaluation. Non-credible performance was defined two ways: failure on one or more PVTs and failure on two or more PVTs. Classification probability of the BTA and CPT-II into non-credible groups was assessed. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were derived to identify clinically relevant cut-off scores. When using failure on two or more PVTs as the indicator for non-credible responding compared to failure on one or more PVTs, highest classification probability, or area under the curve (AUC), was achieved by the BTA (AUC = .87 vs. .79). CPT-II Omission, Commission, and Total Errors exhibited higher classification probability as well. Overall, these findings corroborate previous findings, extending them to a large clinical sample. BTA and CPT-II are useful embedded performance validity indicators within a clinical battery but should not be used in isolation without other performance validity indicators.

  20. Simulation Activity in Otolaryngology Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Wiet, Gregory J; Seidman, Michael; Hussey, Heather M; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Fried, Marvin P

    2015-08-01

    Simulation has become a valuable tool in medical education, and several specialties accept or require simulation as a resource for resident training or assessment as well as for board certification or maintenance of certification. This study investigates current simulation resources and activities in US otolaryngology residency programs and examines interest in advancing simulation training and assessment within the specialty. Web-based survey. US otolaryngology residency training programs. An electronic web-based survey was disseminated to all US otolaryngology program directors to determine their respective institutional and departmental simulation resources, existing simulation activities, and interest in further simulation initiatives. Descriptive results are reported. Responses were received from 43 of 104 (43%) residency programs. Simulation capabilities and resources are available in most respondents' institutions (78.6% report onsite resources; 73.8% report availability of models, manikins, and devices). Most respondents (61%) report limited simulation activity within otolaryngology. Areas of simulation are broad, addressing technical and nontechnical skills related to clinical training (94%). Simulation is infrequently used for research, credentialing, or systems improvement. The majority of respondents (83.8%) expressed interest in participating in multicenter trials of simulation initiatives. Most respondents from otolaryngology residency programs have incorporated some simulation into their curriculum. Interest among program directors to participate in future multicenter trials appears high. Future research efforts in this area should aim to determine optimal simulators and simulation activities for training and assessment as well as how to best incorporate simulation into otolaryngology residency training programs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  1. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement.

  2. Efficacy of an integrated continuing medical education (CME) and quality improvement (QI) program on radiation oncologist (RO) clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Cheng Nang; Shakespeare, Thomas Philip; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Back, Michael F.; Lee, Khai Mun; Lu, Jiade Jay; Wynne, Christopher J.; Lim, Keith; Tang, Johann; Zhang Xiaojian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: There has been little radiation oncologist (RO)-specific research in continuing medical education (CME) or quality improvement (QI) program efficacy. Our aim was to evaluate a CME/QI program for changes in RO behavior, performance, and adherence to department protocols/studies over the first 12 months of the program. Methods and Materials: The CME/QI program combined chart audit with feedback (C-AWF), simulation review AWF (SR-AWF), reminder checklists, and targeted CME tutorials. Between April 2003 and March 2004, management of 75 patients was evaluated by chart audit with feedback (C-AWF) and 178 patients via simulation review audit (SR-AWF) using a validated instrument. Scores were presented, and case management was discussed with individualized educational feedback. RO behavior and performance was compared over the first year of the program. Results: Comparing the first and second 6 months, there was a significant improvement in mean behavior (12.7-13.6 of 14, p = 0.0005) and RO performance (7.6-7.9 of 8, p = 0.018) scores. Protocol/study adherence significantly improved from 90.3% to 96.6% (p = 0.005). A total of 50 actions were generated, including the identification of learning needs to direct CME tutorials, the systematic change of suboptimal RO practice, and the alteration of deficient management of 3% of patients audited during the program. Conclusion: An integrated CME/QI program combining C-AWF, SR-AWF, QI reminders, and targeted CME tutorials effectively improved targeted RO behavior and performance over a 12-month period. There was a corresponding increase in departmental protocol and study adherence

  3. Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature within the Process of Vascular Remodeling: Cellular Basis, Clinical Relevance, and Implications for Stem Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Klein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Until some years ago, the bone marrow and the endothelial cell compartment lining the vessel lumen (subendothelial space were thought to be the only sources providing vascular progenitor cells. Now, the vessel wall, in particular, the vascular adventitia, has been established as a niche for different types of stem and progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into both vascular and nonvascular cells. Herein, vascular wall-resident multipotent stem cells of mesenchymal nature (VW-MPSCs have gained importance because of their large range of differentiation in combination with their distribution throughout the postnatal organism which is related to their existence in the adventitial niche, respectively. In general, mesenchymal stem cells, also designated as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, contribute to the maintenance of organ integrity by their ability to replace defunct cells or secrete cytokines locally and thus support repair and healing processes of the affected tissues. This review will focus on the central role of VW-MPSCs within vascular reconstructing processes (vascular remodeling which are absolute prerequisite to preserve the sensitive relationship between resilience and stability of the vessel wall. Further, a particular advantage for the therapeutic application of VW-MPSCs for improving vascular function or preventing vascular damage will be discussed.

  4. Introducing "optimal challenges" in resident training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anette Bagger; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    Background: Residents are often caught between two interests: the resident’s desire to participate in challenging learning situations and the department’s work planning. However, these interests may clash if they are not coordinated by the senior doctors, and challenging learning situations risk...... that the residents benefit from the intervention because they experienced more optimal challenges than before the intervention. However, the matching of resident and case seems to work against the established culture in the department: The daily work has for many years been organized so that senior doctors have...... relationships in order to meet the health system’s and the patients’ call for continuity in the treatment. Take-home message: The matching of resident and case stimulates optimal learning situations, but cultural and organizational values concerning the doctor-patient continuity are challenged....

  5. A clinical nurse specialist-led intervention to enhance medication adherence using the plan-do-check-act cycle for continuous self-improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Cynthia L

    2010-01-01

    A clinical nurse specialist-led intervention to improve medication adherence in chronically ill adults using renal transplant recipients as an exemplar population is proposed. Meta-analyses and systematic reviews of chronically ill and transplant patients indicate that patient-specific characteristics not only are poor and inconsistent predictors for medication nonadherence but also are not amenable to intervention. Adherence has not meaningfully improved, despite meta-analyses and systematic narrative reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) dealing with medication nonadherence in acutely and chronically ill persons and RCTs dealing with transplant patients. Interventions with a superior potential to enhance medication adherence must be developed. Use of a clinical nurse specialist-led continuous self-improvement intervention with adult renal transplant recipients is proposed. Continuous self-improvement focuses on improving personal systems thinking and behavior using the plan-do-check-act process. Electronic medication monitoring reports, one of several objective measures of medication adherence, are used by the clinician to provide patient feedback during the check process on medication-taking patterns. Continuous self-improvement as an intervention holds promise in supporting patient self-management and diminishing the blame that clinicians place on patients for medication nonadherence. Using an objective measure of medication adherence such as an electronic monitoring report fosters collaborative patient-clinician discussions of daily medication-taking patterns. Through collaboration, ideas for improving medication taking can be explored. Changes can be followed and evaluated for effectiveness through the continuous self-improvement process. Future studies should include RCTs comparing educational and/or behavioral interventions to improve medication adherence.

  6. Continuous DC-CIK infusions restore CD8+ cellular immunity, physical activity and improve clinical efficacy in advanced cancer patients unresponsive to conventional treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Jie; Jiang, Ni; Song, Qing-Kun; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Song, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Xin-Na; Yang, Hua-Bing; Ren, Jun; Lyerly, Herbert Kim

    2015-01-01

    There are few choices for treatment of advanced cancer patients who do not respond to or tolerate conventional anti-cancer treatments. Therefore this study aimed to deploy the benefits and clinical efficacy of continuous dendritic cell-cytokine induced killer cell infusions in such patients. A total of 381 infusions (from 67 advanced cases recruited) were included in this study. All patients underwent peripheral blood mononuclear cell apheresis for the following cellular therapy and dendritic cells-cytokine induced killer cells were expanded in vitro. Peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets were quantified through flow cytometry to address the cellular immunity status. Clinical efficacy and physical activities were evaluated by RECIST criteria and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scores respectively. Logistic regression model was used to estimate the association between cellular infusions and clinical benefits. An average of 5.7±2.94x10(9) induced cells were infused each time and patients were exposed to 6 infusions. Cellular immunity was improved in that cytotoxic CD8+CD28+T lymphocytes were increased by 74% and suppressive CD8+CD28-T lymphocytes were elevated by 16% (p<0.05). Continuous infusion of dendritic cells-cytokine induced killer cells was associated with improvement of both patient status and cellular immunity. A median of six infusions were capable of reducing risk of progression by 70% (95%CI 0.10-0.91). Every elevation of one ECOG score corresponded to a 3.90-fold higher progression risk (p<0.05) and 1% increase of CD8+CD28- T cell proportion reflecting a 5% higher risk of progression (p<0.05). In advanced cancer patients, continuous dendritic cell-cytokine induced killer cell infusions are capable of recovering cellular immunity, improving patient status and quality of life in those who are unresponsive to conventional cancer treatment.

  7. The Development of a Postgraduate Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Residency Program in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shala; Jackson, Richard; Muli, Daniel Kangutu; McFelea, Joni

    2017-01-01

    There are very few opportunities for long-term, comprehensive postgraduate education in developing countries because of fiscal and human resource constraints. Therefore, physiotherapists have little opportunity following graduation to advance their skills through the improvement of clinical reasoning and treatment planning and application. To address the need for sustainable advanced instruction in physiotherapy within the country, a postgraduate Residency program was initiated in Nairobi, Kenya in 2012. The mission of the program is to graduate advanced orthopedic practitioners who can lead their communities and local profession in the advancement of clinical care and education. Since its inception, six cohorts have been initiated for a total of 90 resident participants. In addition, six program graduates are being trained to continue the Residency program and are serving as teaching assistants for the on campus modules. This training will result in a self-sustaining program by 2020. The manual therapy Residency education model allowed for advancement of the participating physiotherapists professional development utilizing evidence-based practice. This was done without altering the current education system within the country, or accessing expensive equipment. The Residency program was developed and established with the cooperation of a local education institution and a non-profit corporation in the United States. This collaboration has facilitated the advancement of orthopedic clinical standards in the country and will, hopefully, one day serve an as a template for future programs.

  8. The Development of a Postgraduate Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Residency Program in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shala Cunningham

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThere are very few opportunities for long-term, comprehensive postgraduate education in developing countries because of fiscal and human resource constraints. Therefore, physiotherapists have little opportunity following graduation to advance their skills through the improvement of clinical reasoning and treatment planning and application.BackgroundTo address the need for sustainable advanced instruction in physiotherapy within the country, a postgraduate Residency program was initiated in Nairobi, Kenya in 2012. The mission of the program is to graduate advanced orthopedic practitioners who can lead their communities and local profession in the advancement of clinical care and education. Since its inception, six cohorts have been initiated for a total of 90 resident participants. In addition, six program graduates are being trained to continue the Residency program and are serving as teaching assistants for the on campus modules. This training will result in a self-sustaining program by 2020.DiscussionThe manual therapy Residency education model allowed for advancement of the participating physiotherapists professional development utilizing evidence-based practice. This was done without altering the current education system within the country, or accessing expensive equipment.Concluding remarksThe Residency program was developed and established with the cooperation of a local education institution and a non-profit corporation in the United States. This collaboration has facilitated the advancement of orthopedic clinical standards in the country and will, hopefully, one day serve an as a template for future programs.

  9. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  10. Integrating the NAS Milestones and handheld technology to improve residency training and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Carisa M; Redett, Richard J; Dorafshar, Amir H; Zarrabi, Bahar; Lifchez, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    To incorporate the use of an intuitive and robust assessment tool in conjunction with the Next Accreditation System Milestones to maximize opportunities for trainee performance feedback and continuous trainee assessment, with the long-term goal of increasing the rate of performance improvement and mastery of knowledge and surgical skills. Pilot study. Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Primary, tertiary, and quaternary clinical care; institutional environment. Experimental group: two randomly selected postgraduate year-1 integrated training program residents per year for 2 consecutive years from the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. traditionally trained residents from the integrated training program in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Study duration: 7 years (until residents complete residency training). This assessment strategy would create large amounts of informative data on trainees, which can be cross-referenced to determine trainee progress. Assessment data would be collected continuously from all faculty surgeons. Comparisons of faculty and resident self-assessments would facilitate resident evaluations. Ease of use of the data collection structure would improve faculty evaluation compliance and timely resident case report completion. Improving the efficiency and efficacy of competency documentation is critical. Using portable technologies is an intuitive way to improve the trainee assessment process. We anticipate that this 2-pronged approach to trainee assessments would quickly provide large amounts of informative data to better assess trainee progress and inform Milestone assessments in a manner that facilitates immediate feedback. Assessments of faculty and resident satisfaction would help us further refine the assessment process as needed. If successful, this format could easily be implemented by other training programs. Innovations in Surgical Education: Milestones. © 2013 Published by Association of Program

  11. Continuity of clinical management and information across care levels: perceptions of users of different healthcare areas in the Catalan national health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waibel, Sina; Vargas, Ingrid; Aller, Marta-Beatriz; Coderch, Jordi; Farré, Joan; Vázquez, M Luisa

    2016-09-02

    The integration of health care has become a priority in most health systems, as patients increasingly receive care from several professionals in various different settings and institutions, particularly those with chronic conditions and multi-morbidities. Continuity of care is defined as one patient experiencing care over time as connected and coherent with his or her health needs and personal circumstances. The objective is to analyse perceptions of continuity of clinical management and information across care levels and the factors influencing it, from the viewp