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Sample records for reserve shutdown system

  1. CANDU passive shutdown systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, R S; Olmstead, R A [AECL CANDU, Sheridan Park Research Community, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-01

    CANDU incorporates two diverse, passive shutdown systems, independent of each other and from the reactor regulating system. Both shutdown systems function in the low pressure, low temperature, moderator which surrounds the fuel channels. The shutdown systems are functionally different, physically separate, and passive since the driving force for SDS1 is gravity and the driving force for SDS2 is stored energy. The physics of the reactor core itself ensures a degree of passive safety in that the relatively long prompt neutron generation time inherent in the design of CANDU reactors tend to retard power excursions and reduces the speed required for shutdown action, even for large postulated reactivity increases. All passive systems include a number of active components or initiators. Hence, an important aspect of passive systems is the inclusion of fail safe (activated by active component failure) operation. The mechanisms that achieve the fail safe action should be passive. Consequently the passive performance of the CANDU shutdown systems extends beyond their basic modes of operation to include fail safe operation based on natural phenomenon or stored energy. For example, loss of power to the SDS1 clutches results in the drop of the shutdown rods by gravity, loss of power or instrument air to the injection valves of SDS2 results in valve opening via spring action, and rigorous self checking of logic, data and timing by the shutdown systems computers assures a fail safe reactor trip through the collapse of a fluctuating magnetic field or the discharge of a capacitor. Event statistics from operating CANDU stations indicate a significant decrease in protection system faults that could lead to loss of production and elimination of protection system faults that could lead to loss of protection. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the passive shutdown systems employed by CANDU. (author). 4 figs, 3 tabs.

  2. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  3. Reliability analysis of shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, C. Senthil; John Arul, A.; Pal Singh, Om; Suryaprakasa Rao, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of reliability analysis of Shutdown System (SDS) of Indian Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. Reliability analysis carried out using Fault Tree Analysis predicts a value of 3.5 x 10 -8 /de for failure of shutdown function in case of global faults and 4.4 x 10 -8 /de for local faults. Based on 20 de/y, the frequency of shutdown function failure is 0.7 x 10 -6 /ry, which meets the reliability target, set by the Indian Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. The reliability is limited by Common Cause Failure (CCF) of actuation part of SDS and to a lesser extent CCF of electronic components. The failure frequency of individual systems is -3 /ry, which also meets the safety criteria. Uncertainty analysis indicates a maximum error factor of 5 for the top event unavailability

  4. Backup passive reactivity shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurko, Yu.M.; Kuznetsov, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The paper reviews self-actuated shutdown systems (SASSs) for liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs). Principles of operation are described, advantages and drawbacks analyzed, and prospects for application in advanced fast reactors examined. Ways to improve reactor self-protection via reactivity feedback amplification and related problems are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 12 figs

  5. Backup passive reactivity shutdown systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashurko, Yu M; Kuznetsov, L A [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01

    The paper reviews self-actuated shutdown systems (SASSs) for liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs). Principles of operation are described, advantages and drawbacks analyzed, and prospects for application in advanced fast reactors examined. Ways to improve reactor self-protection via reactivity feedback amplification and related problems are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 12 figs.

  6. Control rod shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Higashigawa, Yuichi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a control rod terminating system in a BWR type nuclear power plant, which stops an induction electric motor as rapidly as possible to terminate the control rods. Namely, the control rod stopping system controls reactor power by inserting/withdrawing control rods into a reactor by driving them by the induction electric motor. The system is provided with a control device for controlling the control rods and a control device for controlling the braking device. The control device outputs a braking operation signal for actuating the braking device during operation of the control rods to stop the operation of the control rods. Further, the braking device has at least two kinds of breaks, namely, a first and a second brakes. The two kinds of brakes are actuated by receiving the brake operation signals at different timings. The brake device is used also for keeping the control rods after the stopping. Even if a stopping torque of each of the breaks is small, different two kinds of brakes are operated at different timings thereby capable of obtaining a large stopping torque as a total. (I.S.)

  7. Simulation of Darlington shutdown and regulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This report describes the development of a simulation of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station shutdown and regulating systems, DARSIM. The DARSIM program simulates the spatial neutron dynamics, the regulation of the reactor power, and Shutdown System 1, SDS1, and Shutdown System 2, SDS2, software. The DARSIM program operates in the interactive simulation (INSIM) program environment

  8. Design philosophy of PFBR shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan Babu, V.; Vijayashree, R.; Govindarajan, S.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Muralikrishna, G.; Shanmugam, T.K.; Chetal, S.C.; Raghavan, K.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the overall design philosophy of shutdown system of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). It discusses design criteria, parameters calling for safety action, different safety actions and the concepts conceived for shutdown systems. In tune with the philosophy of defence-in-depth, additional passive shutdown features, viz., Self Actuating Device (SADE) and Curie Point Magnetic (CPM) switch and protective feature like absorber rod Stroke Limiting Device (SLD) are contemplated. It also discusses about suitability of Gas Expansion Module (GEM) as one of the safety devices in PFBR. (author). 3 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  9. Proceedings of workshop on reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    India has gained considerable experience in design, development, construction and operation of research and power reactors during the last four decades. Reactor shutdown system (RSS) is the most important engineered safety system of any reactor. A lot of technological developments have taken place to improve the reactor shutdown systems, particularly with advancement in reliability analysis and instrumentation and control. If the reactor is not shutdown, the fuel may melt, releasing radioactivity and possibly reactivity addition as in the case of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). Apart from radiological safety consequences, large investment has to be written off. The function of the RSS is to stop fission chain reaction and prevent breach of fuel. The design of RSS is multidisciplinary. It requires reactor physics analysis, design of absorber rods, drive mechanisms, safety logic to order shutdown and instrumentation to detect unsafe conditions. High reliability is essential and this requires two independent shutdown systems. This book contains the proceedings of the workshop on reactor shutdown system and papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. On line testing of shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramnath, S.; Swaminathan, P.; Sreenivasan, P.

    1997-01-01

    For ensuring high reliability and availability, safety related Instrumentation channels are triplicated. Solid state electronics can fail in safe or unsafe mode. Hence, it is necessary to supervise the safety related Instrumentation channels from sensor to final shutdown system. Microprocessor/ Microcontroller/ ASIC based online supervision systems are detailed in this paper. (author)

  11. LMFBR self-activated shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.S.; Barthold, W.P.; Eggen, D.T.; Huebotter, P.R.; Josephson, J.; Pizzica, P.A.; Turski, R.B.; van Erp, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    Self-actuated shutdown systems (SASSs), fully contained within the dimensions of a fuel subassembly and installed in the core in judiciously chosen locations, can provide an important additional safety feature for LMFBRs. If actuated by phenomena inherent to the system and its immediate environment, these systems can contribute considerably to the total reliability of the overall plant protection system, in particular as regards protection against human error. It was shown that this type of shutdown system is capable of inserting a substantial amount of negative reactivity into the core with a relatively small impact on plant performance. Furthermore, it was shown that a coolable geometry can be maintained in LMFBRs of current design for a wide spectrum of accident initiators, and for a range of response times and insertion rates which appear to be achievable within practical design limits. Experiments showed that Curie-point-operated devices have considerable promise for application in self-actuated shutdown systems, in particular as regards meeting the requirements of testability and resettability

  12. Reserves for shutdown/dismantling and disposal in nuclear technology. Theses and recommendations on reform options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    The study on reserves for shutdown, dismantling and disposal of nuclear facilities covers the following topics: cost for shutdown, dismantling and disposal and amount and transparency of nuclear reserves, solution by y stock regulated by public law for long-term liabilities, and improvement of the protection in the event of insolvency for the remaining EVU reserves for short- and intermediate-term liabilities. The appendix includes estimations and empirical values for the cost of shutdown and dismantling, estimation of disposal costs, and a summary of Swiss studies on dismantling and disposal and transfer to Germany.

  13. The use of digital computers in CANDU shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, R.S.; Komorowski, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the application of computers in CANDU shutdown systems. A general description of systems that are already in service is presented along with a description of a fully computerized shutdown system which is scheduled to enter service in 1987. In reviewing the use of computers in the shutdown systems there are three functional areas where computers have been or are being applied. These are (i) shutdown system monitoring, (ii) parameter display and testing and (iii) shutdown initiation. In recent years various factors (References 1 and 2) have influenced the development and deployment of systems which have addressed two of these functions. At the present time a system is also being designed which addresses all of these areas in a comprehensive manner. This fully computerized shutdown system reflects the previous design, and licensing experience which was gained in earlier applications. Prior to describing the specific systems which have been designed a short summary of CANDU shutdown system characteristics is presented

  14. Rodded shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Govi, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A top mounted nuclear reactor diverse rodded shutdown system utilizing gas fed into a pressure bearing bellows region sealed at the upper extremity to an armature is described. The armature is attached to a neutron absorber assembly by a series of shafts and connecting means. The armature is held in an uppermost position by an electromagnet assembly or by pressurized gas in a second embodiment. Deenergizing the electromagnet assembly, or venting the pressurized gas, causes the armature to fall by the force of gravity, thereby lowering the attached absorber assembly into the reactor core

  15. Reactor shutdown back-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Seizo; Sakashita, Motoaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent back flow of poison upon injection to a moderator recycling pipeway. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor comprising a moderator recycling system for recycling and cooling moderator through a control rod guide pipe and a rapid poison injection system for rapidly injecting a poison solution at high density into the moderator by way of the same control rod guide pipe as a reactor shutdown back-up system, a mechanism is provided for preventing the back flow of a poison solution at high density into the moderator recycling system upon rapid injection of poison. An orifice provided in the joining pipeway to the control rod guide pipe on the side of the moderator recycling system is utilized as the back flow preventing device for the poison solution and the diameter for the orifice is determined so as to provide a constant ratio between the pressure loss in the control rod guide pipe and the pressure loss in the moderator recycling system pipe line upon usual reactor operation. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Supplementary shutdown system of 220 MWe standard PHWR in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muktibodh, U.C.

    1997-01-01

    The design objective of the shutdown system is to make the reactor subcritical and hold it in that state for an extended period of time. This objective must be realised under all anticipated operational occurrences and postulated abnormal conditions even during most reactive state of the core. PHWR design criteria for shutdown stipulates requirement of two independent diverse and fast acting shutdown systems, either of which acting alone should meet the above objectives. This requirement would normally call for a large number of reactivity mechanism penetrations into the calandria. From the point of view of space availability at the reactivity mechanism area on top of calandria, for the relatively small core of 220 MWe PHWRs, and ease of maintenance realisation of the total worth by either of the shutdown systems acting alone was difficult. To overcome this engineering constraint and at the same time to satisfy the design criteria, a unique approach to meet the reactivity demands for shutdown was adopted. The reactivity requirements of the shutdown consists of fast and slow reactivity changes. For the shutdown system of 220 MWe PHWRs, the approach of realizing fast reactivity changes with dual redundant, diverse, fast acting shutdown systems aided by a slow acting shutdown system to counter delayed reactivity changes was conceived. The supplementary slow acting shutdown system is called upon to act after actuation of either of the two redundant fast acting systems and is referred to as Liquid Poison Injection System (LPIS). The system adds bulk amount of neutron poison (boric acid), equivalent to 45 mk, directly into the moderator through two nozzles in calandria using pneumatic pressure. This paper describes the design of LPIS as envisaged for the standardised 220 MWe PHWRs. (author)

  17. CANDU 6 liquid injection shutdown system waterhammer analysis using PTRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Deuk Yoon; Kim, Eun Ki; Ko, Yong Sang; Park, Byung Ho; Kim, Seok Bum

    1996-06-01

    An in-core LOCA could result in flooding of the helium header in the liquid injection shutdown system. Flooding of the helium header will result in severe pressure transients (waterhammer) in the liquid injection shutdown system when the shutdown signal is initiated. To evaluate the impact of the dynamic effects of this event, a pressure transient analysis has been performed. This analysis is performed using PTRAN, which is a computer program based on the method of characteristics. The results of this analysis are used in the stress analysis of the piping and pipe supports to ensure that the liquid injection shutdown system can withstand the pressure transient loadings. This analysis report documents the results of waterhammer analysis performed for the liquid injection shutdown system for the Wolsung nuclear power plant unit 2, 3 and 4. 4 tabs., 11 figs., 15 refs. (Author)

  18. CANDU 6 liquid injection shutdown system waterhammer analysis using PTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Deuk Yoon; Kim, Eun Ki; Ko, Yong Sang; Park, Byung Ho; Kim, Seok Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    An in-core LOCA could result in flooding of the helium header in the liquid injection shutdown system. Flooding of the helium header will result in severe pressure transients (waterhammer) in the liquid injection shutdown system when the shutdown signal is initiated. To evaluate the impact of the dynamic effects of this event, a pressure transient analysis has been performed. This analysis is performed using PTRAN, which is a computer program based on the method of characteristics. The results of this analysis are used in the stress analysis of the piping and pipe supports to ensure that the liquid injection shutdown system can withstand the pressure transient loadings. This analysis report documents the results of waterhammer analysis performed for the liquid injection shutdown system for the Wolsung nuclear power plant unit 2, 3 and 4. 4 tabs., 11 figs., 15 refs. (Author).

  19. Letter report seismic shutdown system failure mode and effect analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KECK, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Supply Ventilation System Seismic Shutdown ensures that the 234-52 building supply fans, the dry air process fans and vertical development calciner are shutdown following a seismic event. This evaluates the failure modes and determines the effects of the failure modes

  20. CAREM-25 Reactor Second Shutdown System Consolidation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, Marcelo; Zanocco, Pablo; Schlamp, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    CAREM Reactor Second Shutdown System (SSS) injects boron into the primary circuit in case of First Shutdown System failure in order to stop the nuclear reaction and to maintain the core in a safe condition during cold shutdown.It also has another safety function which is to inject water in the primary system at any pressure in case of LOCA.Different system requirements are analyzed during a SSS spurious trip and LOCA's transients.Two different alternatives are presented for the stand by condition pressurized system, they are solid mode and hot water layer. Both cases fulfill the design requirements from the safety point of view

  1. Reactor shutdown system of prototype fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindarajan, S.; Singh, Om Pal; Kasinathan, N.; Paramasivan Pillai, C.; Arul, A.J.; Chetal, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The shutdown system of PFBR is designed to assure a very high reliability by employing well known principles of redundancy, diversity and independence. The failure probability of the shutdown system limited to -6 / ry. Salient features of the shutdown system are: Two independent shutdown systems, each of them able to accommodate an additional single failure and made up of a trip system and an associated absorber rod group. Diversity between trip systems, rods and mechanisms. Initiation of SCRAM by two diverse physical parameters of the two shutdown systems for design events leading potentially to unacceptable conditions is the core. The first group of nine rods called control and safety rods (CSR) is used for both shutdown as well as power regulation. The second group consisting of three rods known as diverse safety rods (DSR) is used only for shutdown. Diversity between the two groups is ensured by varying the operating conditions of the electromagnets and the configurations of the mobile parts. The reactivity worth of the absorber rods have been chosen such that each group of rods would ensure cold shutdown on SCRAM even when the most reactive rod of the group fails to drop. Together the two groups ensure a shutdown margin of 5000 pcm. The speed and individual rod worth of the CSR is chosen from operational and safety considerations during reactor start up and raising of power. Required drop time of rods during SCRAM depends on the incident considered. For a severe reactivity incident of 3 $/s this has to be limited to 1s and is ensured by limiting electromagnet response time and facilitating drop by gravity. Design safety limits for core components have been determined and SCRAM parameters have been identified by plant dynamic analysis to restrict the temperatures of core components within the limits. The SCRAM parameters are distributed between the two systems appropriately. Fault tree analysis of the system has been carried out to determine the

  2. FPGA Implementation of the stepwise shutdown system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotjonen, L.

    2012-07-01

    This report elaborates the design process of applications for field-programmable gate array (FPGA) devices. Brief introductions to EPGA technology and the design process are first given and then the design phases are walked through with the aid of a case study. FPGA is a programmable logic device that is programmed by the customer rather than the manufacturer. They are also usually re-programmable which enables updating their programming and otherwise modifying the design. There are also one-time programmable FPGAs that can be used when security issues require it. FPGA is said to be 'hardware designed like software', which means that the design process resembles software development but the end-product is considered a hardware application because the execution of the functions is entirely different from a microprocessor. This duality can give both the flexibility of software and the reliability of hardware. The FPGA design and verification and validation (V and V) methods for NPP safety systems have not yet matured because the technology is rather new in the field. Software development methods and stanfards can be used to some extent but the hardware aspects bring new challenges that cannot be tacled using purely software methods. International efforts are being made to development formal and consistent design and V and V methodology regulations for FPGA devices. A preventive safety function called Stepwise Shutdown System (SWS) was implemented on an Actel M1 IGLOO field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device. SWS is used to drive a process into a normal state if the process measurements deviate from the desired operating values. This can happen in case of process disturbances. The SWS implementation processfrom the reguirements to the functional device is elaborated. The design is tested via simulation and hardware testing. The case study is to be further expanded as a part of a master's thesis. (orig.)

  3. FPGA Implementation of the stepwise shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotjonen, L.

    2012-01-01

    This report elaborates the design process of applications for field-programmable gate array (FPGA) devices. Brief introductions to EPGA technology and the design process are first given and then the design phases are walked through with the aid of a case study. FPGA is a programmable logic device that is programmed by the customer rather than the manufacturer. They are also usually re-programmable which enables updating their programming and otherwise modifying the design. There are also one-time programmable FPGAs that can be used when security issues require it. FPGA is said to be 'hardware designed like software', which means that the design process resembles software development but the end-product is considered a hardware application because the execution of the functions is entirely different from a microprocessor. This duality can give both the flexibility of software and the reliability of hardware. The FPGA design and verification and validation (V and V) methods for NPP safety systems have not yet matured because the technology is rather new in the field. Software development methods and standards can be used to some extent but the hardware aspects bring new challenges that cannot be tackled using purely software methods. International efforts are being made to development formal and consistent design and V and V methodology regulations for FPGA devices. A preventive safety function called Stepwise Shutdown System (SWS) was implemented on an Actel M1 IGLOO field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device. SWS is used to drive a process into a normal state if the process measurements deviate from the desired operating values. This can happen in case of process disturbances. The SWS implementation process from the requirements to the functional device is elaborated. The design is tested via simulation and hardware testing. The case study is to be further expanded as a part of a master's thesis. (orig.)

  4. Primary shutdown system monitoring unit for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Tahir Kamal; Balasubramanian, R.; Agilandaeswari, K.

    2013-01-01

    Shut off rods made up of neutron absorbing material are used as Primary Shutdown System. To reduce the power of the reactor under certain abnormal operating conditions, these rods must go down into the core within a specified time. Any malfunctioning in the movement of rods cannot be tolerated and Secondary Shutdown System (SSS) must be actuated within stipulated time to reduce the reactor power. A special safety critical, hardwired electronics unit has been designed to detect failure of PSS Shut off rods movements and generate trip signals for initiating SSS. (author)

  5. Study on secondary shutdown systems in Tehran research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, H.R.; Fadaei, A.H., E-mail: Fadaei_amir@aut.ac.ir; Gharib, M.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A study was undertaken to summarize the techniques for secondary shutdown systems (SSS). • Neutronic calculation performed for proposed systems as SSS. • Dumping the heavy water stored in the reflector vessel is capable to shut down reactor. • Neutronic and transient calculation was done for validating the selected SSS. • All calculation shown that this system has advantages in safety and neutron economy. - Abstract: One important safety aspect of any research reactor is the ability to shut down the reactor. Usually, research reactors, currently in operation, have a single shutdown system based on the simultaneous insertion of the all control rods into the reactor core through gravity. Nevertheless, the International Atomic Energy Agency currently recommends use of two shutdown systems which are fully independent from each other to guarantee secure shutdown when one of them fails. This work presents an investigative study into secondary shutdown systems, which will be an important safety component in the research reactor and will provide another alternative way to shut down the reactor emergently. As part of this project, a study was undertaken to summarize the techniques that are currently used at world-wide research reactors for recognizing available techniques to consider in research reactors. Removal of the reflector, removal of the fuels, change in critical shape of reactor core and insertion of neutron absorber between the core and reflector are selected as possible techniques in mentioned function. In the next step, a comparison is performed for these methods from neutronic aspects. Then, chosen method is studied from the transient behavior point of view. Tehran research reactor which is a 5 MW open-pool reactor selected as a case study and all calculations are carried out for it. It has 5 control rods which serve the purpose of both reactivity control and shutdown of reactor under abnormal condition. Results indicated that heavy

  6. Seismic qualification of SPX1 shutdown systems - tests and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.; Buland, P.

    1988-01-01

    The SUPERPHENIX 1 shutdown system is composed of two main systems: the Complementary Shutdown System SAC (Systeme d'Arret Complementaire) and the Primary Shutdown System (SCP) (Systeme de Commande Principal). In case of a seismic event, the insertability of the different shutdown systems has to be demonstrated. Tests have been performed on the SAC and have shown that this system was not sensitive to the seismic excitation (the drop time increases of 10% at SSE level). For the SCP, as an analytical demonstration was felt difficult to achieve, it was decided to perform a full scale testing program. These tests have been performed for the two types of SCP which are present in Superphenix: SCP 1 (Creusot Loire design), SCP 2 (Novatome design). As there was no existing facility in France to test this kind of slender structure (21 metres high) a new facility named VESUBIE was designed and installed in an existing pit located at the Saclay nuclear research center. The objectives of the tests were the following: to demonstrate insertability of control rod; to demonstrate absence of seismic induced damage to the SCP; to measure increase of scram time; to measure seismic induced stresses; to obtain data for code correlation. After completion of the tests, measurements have been correlated with results obtained from a non-linear finite element model. Time history correlations were achieved for SCP 1. Afterwards a calculation was performed in hot condition to find if there was some effect of temperature on SCP seismic response. 2 refs, 8 figs

  7. Fluid shut-down system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barclay, F.W.; Frey, J.R.; Wilson, J.N.; Besant, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor shut-down system is described which comprises a fluidic vortex valve for releasably maintaining a liquid neutron poison outside of the reactor core, the poison being contained by a reservoir and biased by pressure for flow into poison tubes within the reactor. The upper ends of the poison tubes communicate with the supply port of the vortex valve. A continuous gas flow into the control port maintains normal controlled operation. Shut-down is effected by interruption of the control input. One embodiment comprises three groups of poison tubes and one vortex valve associated with each group wherein shut-down is effected by poison release in two out of the three groups. Preferably, each vortex valve comprises three control ports which operate on a ''voting'' or two-out-of-three basis. (Official Gazette)

  8. Reactor Shutdown Mechanism by Top-mounted Hydraulic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Haun; Cho, Yeong Garp; Choi, Myoung Hwan; Lee, Jin Haeng; Huh, Hyung; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    There are two types of reactor shutdown mechanisms in HANARO. One is the mechanism driven by a hydraulic system, and the other is driven by a stepping motor. In HANARO, there are four Control Rod Drive Mechanisms (CRDMs) with an individual step motor and four Shutoff (SO) Units with an individual hydraulic system located at the top of reactor pool. The absorber rods in SO units are poised at the top of the core by the hydraulic force during normal operation. The rods of SO units drop by gravity as the first reactor showdown mechanism when a trip is commended by the reactor protection system (RPS). The rods in CRDMs also drop by gravity together as a redundant shutdown mechanism. When a trip is commended by the reactor regulating system (RRS), the absorber rods of CRDM only drop; while the absorber rods of SO units stay at the top of the core by the hydraulic system. The reactivity control mechanisms of in JRTR, one of the new research reactor with plate type fuels, consist of four CRDMs driven by an individual step motor and two second shutdown drive mechanisms (SSDMs) driven by an individual hydraulic system as shown in Fig. 1. The CRDMs act as the first reactor shutdown mechanism and reactor regulating as well. The top-mounted SSDM driven by the hydraulic system for the JRTR is under design in KAERI. The SSDM provides an alternate and independent means of reactor shutdown. The second shutdown rods (SSRs) of the SSDM are poised at the top of the core by the hydraulic system during the normal operation and drop by gravity for the reactor trip. Based on the proven technology of the design, operation and maintenance for HANARO, the SSDM for the JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement from the experience and test. This paper aims for the introduction of the SSDM in the process of the basic design. The major differences of the shutdown mechanisms by the hydraulic system are compared between HANARO and JRTR, and the design features, system, structure and

  9. Operating and maintenance experience of Dhruva secondary shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, U.L.; Bharathan, R.

    1997-01-01

    Nine numbers of cadmium shut-off rods are used as primary fast acting shutdown devices while moderator dumping is used as secondary shutdown system. The secondary shutdown system in Dhruva reactor comprises of 3 dump valves and 3 control valves. Under normal operations, the control valves are used to control the moderator level and thereby the reactor power. Under Trip conditions the dump valves as well as the control valves open fully, dumping the moderator to the dump tank, thereby acting as secondary shutdown devices. While the failure of any of these valves to close fully is an incident, the failure of any of these valves to open on a demand is a safety related unusual occurrence and needs to be viewed seriously. During the last 11 years of operation of these valves, there was one incidence of a valve not closing fully and there were two instances of a valve not opening fully on demand. The possible causes, the corrective action taken to rehabilitate these valves and the elaborate system preparations undertaken to enable maintenance jobs are described. (author)

  10. Reactor protection and shut-down system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klar

    1980-01-01

    The reactor protection system being a part of the reactor safety system. The requirements on the reactor protection system are: high safety with regard to signal processing, high availability, self-reporting of faults etc. The functional sections of the reactor protection system are the analog section, the logic section and the generating of output signals. Description of the operation characteristics and of the extension of function. (orig.)

  11. Shutdown Chemistry Process Development for PWR Primary System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K.B. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This study report presents the shutdown chemistry of PWR primary system to reduce and remove the radioactive corrosion products which were deposited on the nuclear fuel rods surface and the outside of core like steam generator channel head, RCS pipings etc. The major research results are the follows ; the deposition radioactive mechanism of corrosion products, the radiochemical composition, the condition of coolant chemistry to promote the dissolution of radioactive cobalt and nickel ferrite, the control method of dissolved hydrogen concentration in the coolant by the mechanical and chemical methods. The another part of study is to investigate the removal characteristics of corrosion product ions and particles by the demineralization system to suggest the method which the system could be operate effectively in shut-down purification period. (author). 19 refs., 25 figs., 48 tabs.

  12. Reliability modeling of Clinch River breeder reactor electrical shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, R.A.; Duetsch, K.L.

    1974-01-01

    The initial simulation of the probabilistic properties of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) electrical shutdown systems is described. A model of the reliability (and availability) of the systems is presented utilizing Success State and continuous-time, discrete state Markov modeling techniques as significant elements of an overall reliability assessment process capable of demonstrating the achievement of program goals. This model is examined for its sensitivity to safe/unsafe failure rates, sybsystem redundant configurations, test and repair intervals, monitoring by reactor operators; and the control exercised over system reliability by design modifications and the selection of system operating characteristics. (U.S.)

  13. Reliability analysis of self-actuated shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itooka, S.; Kumasaka, K.; Okabe, A.; Satoh, K.; Tsukui, Y.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical study was performed for the reliability of a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) under the unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) event in a typical loop-type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) by the use of the response surface Monte Carlo analysis method. Dominant parameters for the SASS, such as Curie point characteristics, subassembly outlet coolant temperature, electromagnetic surface condition, etc., were selected and their probability density functions (PDFs) were determined by the design study information and experimental data. To get the response surface function (RSF) for the maximum coolant temperature, transient analyses of ULOF were performed by utilizing the experimental design method in the determination of analytical cases. Then, the RSF was derived by the multi-variable regression analysis. The unreliability of the SASS was evaluated as a probability that the maximum coolant temperature exceeded an acceptable level, employing the Monte Carlo calculation using the above PDFs and RSF. In this study, sensitivities to the dominant parameter were compared. The dispersion of subassembly outlet coolant temperature near the SASS-was found to be one of the most sensitive parameters. Fault tree analysis was performed using this value for the SASS in order to evaluate the shutdown system reliability. As a result of this study, the effectiveness of the SASS on the reliability improvement in the LMFBR shutdown system was analytically confirmed. This study has been performed as a part of joint research and development projects for DFBR under the sponsorship of the nine Japanese electric power companies, Electric Power Development Company and the Japan Atomic Power Company. (author)

  14. Modelling of liquid injection shutdown system (LISS) in ACR-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boubcher, M.; Colton, A.; Donnelly, J.V.

    2008-01-01

    Modelling of the Liquid Injection Shutdown System (LISS) in the ACR-1000 reactor core must account for the major phenomena that occur following its activation, namely the moderator hydraulics and core neutronics. The former requires modelling of the poison volumes, their time of entry into the reactor, and their propagation into the moderator after emission from the nozzle. The latter requires the reactivity worth of varying volumes and geometries of poisoned moderator fluid in order to simulate the reactivity effect of the injected poison. The time-dependent poison map is generated from hydraulic calculations, and then the neutronics data for standard geometries and concentrations is constructed using DRAGON. (author)

  15. Failure and Reliability Analysis for the Master Pump Shutdown System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEVINS, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Master Pump Shutdown System (MPSS) will be installed in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site to monitor and control the transfer of liquid waste between tank farms and between the 200 West and 200 East areas through the Cross-Site Transfer Line. The Safety Function provided by the MPSS is to shutdown any waste transfer process within or between tank farms if a waste leak should occur along the selected transfer route. The MPSS, which provides this Safety Class Function, is composed of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), interconnecting wires, relays, Human to Machine Interfaces (HMI), and software. These components are defined as providing a Safety Class Function and will be designated in this report as MPSS/PLC. Input signals to the MPSS/PLC are provided by leak detection systems from each of the tank farm leak detector locations along the waste transfer route. The combination of the MPSS/PLC, leak detection system, and transfer pump controller system will be referred to as MPSS/SYS. The components addressed in this analysis are associated with the MPSS/SYS. The purpose of this failure and reliability analysis is to address the following design issues of the Project Development Specification (PDS) for the MPSS/SYS (HNF 2000a): (1) Single Component Failure Criterion, (2) System Status Upon Loss of Electrical Power, (3) Physical Separation of Safety Class cables, (4) Physical Isolation of Safety Class Wiring from General Service Wiring, and (5) Meeting the MPSS/PLC Option 1b (RPP 1999) Reliability estimate. The failure and reliability analysis examined the system on a component level basis and identified any hardware or software elements that could fail and/or prevent the system from performing its intended safety function

  16. FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] reactor shutdown system reliability reevaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, B.F.

    1986-07-01

    The reliability analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor shutdown system was reevaluated. Failure information based on five years of plant operating experience was used to verify original reliability numbers or to establish new ones. Also, system modifications made subsequent to performance of the original analysis were incorporated into the reevaluation. Reliability calculations and sensitivity analyses were performed using a commercially available spreadsheet on a personal computer. The spreadsheet was configured so that future failures could be tracked and compared with expected failures. A number of recommendations resulted from the reevaluation including both increased and decreased surveillance intervals. All recommendations were based on meeting or exceeding existing reliability goals. Considerable cost savings will be incurred upon implementation of the recommendations

  17. The search of the best mode of the reserve power supply consumption during the nuclear reactor’s emergency shutdown procedures in case of force majeure circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebaev, A. M.; Trifonenkov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the problem of the control mode choice for a power supply system in case of force majeure circumstances. It is not known precisely, when a force majeure incident occurs, but the threatened period is given, when the incident is expected. It is supposed, that force majeure circumstances force nuclear reactor shutdown at the moment of threat coming. In this article the power supply system is considered, which consists of a nuclear reactor and a reserve power supply, for example, a hydroelectric pumped storage power station. The reserve power supply has limited capacity and it doesn’t undergo the threatened incident. The problem of the search of the best reserve supply time-distribution in case of force majeure circumstances is stated. The search is performed according to minimization of power loss and damage to the infrastructure. The software has been developed, which performs automatic numerical search of the approximate optimal control modes for the reserve power supply.

  18. Station blackout with failure of wired shutdown system for AHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.; Contractor, A.D.; Chatterjee, B.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. This reactor has several advance safety features. One of the important passive design features of this reactor is that the heat removal is achieved through natural circulation of primary coolant at all power level without primary coolant pumps. Station blackout (SBO) scenario has become very important in aftermath of Fukushima event. The existing reactor has to demonstrate that design features are sufficient to mitigate the scenario whereas the new reactor design are adding specific features to tackle such scenario for prolonged period. The present study demonstrates the design features of AHWR to mitigate the SBO scenario along with failure of wired shutdown system. SBO event leads to feed water pump trip and loss of condenser vacuum which in turn results into loss of feed water and turbine trip on low condenser vacuum signal. Stoppage of steam flow to the turbine and bypass to the condenser lead to bottling up of the system, causing MHT pressure to rise. In the absence of reactor scram, the pressure continues to rise. Isolation Condenser (IC) valve starts opening at a pressure of 7.65 MPa. The pressure continues to rise as IC system is designed for decay heat removal and reactor power is brought down to decay power level through Passive Poison Injection System (PPIS) when the pressure reaches 8.4 MPa. The analysis shows that the event do not lead to undesirable clad surface temperature rise due to reactor trip by PPIS and decay heat removal for prolonged time by IC system. Thermal hydraulic response of different parameters like pressure, temperatures, and flows in MHT system is analyzed for this scenario. Pressure during transient is found to be well below the system pressure criteria of 110% of design pressure. This analysis highlights the design robustness of AHWR. (author)

  19. Operating experiences of reactor shutdown system at MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotteeswaran, T.J.; Subramani, V.A.; Hariharan, K.

    1997-01-01

    The reactors in Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), Kalpakkam are Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) similar to RAPS, Kota. The moderator heavy water is pumped into the calandria from dump tank to make the reactor critical. Later with the calandria level held constant at 92% FT, the further power changes are being done with the movement of adjuster rods. The moderator is held in calandria by means of helium gas pressure differential between top of calandria and dump tank located below. The shutdown of the reactor is effected by dumping the moderator water to dump tank by fast equalizing of helium gas pressure. In the revised mode of operation of moderator circuit after the moderator inlet manifold failure, the dump timing was observed to be more compared to the normal value. This was investigated and observed to be due to accumulation of D 2 O in the gas space above dump valves, which was affecting the helium equalizing flow. Also some of Indicating Alarm Meters (IAM) in protective system initiating the trip signals have failed in the unsafe mode. They have been modified to avoid the recurrence of the failures. (author)

  20. Optimal test intervals for shutdown systems for the Cernavoda nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negut, Gh.; Laslau, F.

    1993-01-01

    Cernavoda nuclear power station required a complete PSA study. As a part of this study, an important goal to enhance the effectiveness of the plant operation is to establish optimal test intervals for the important engineering safety systems. The paper presents, briefly, the current methods to optimize the test intervals. For this reason it was used Vesely methods to establish optimal test intervals and Frantic code to survey the influence of the test intervals on system availability. The applications were done on the Shutdown System no. 1, a shutdown system provided whit solid rods and on Shutdown System no. 2 provided with injecting poison. The shutdown systems receive nine total independent scram signals that dictate the test interval. Fault trees for the both safety systems were developed. For the fault tree solutions an original code developed in our Institute was used. The results, intended to be implemented in the technical specifications for test and operation of Cernavoda NPS are presented

  1. Updating of the program for simulation of Darlington shutdown and regulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This report describes the current status of the developments of a simulation of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station shutdown and regulating systems, DARSIM done under contract to the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The DARSIM program simulates the spatial neutron dynamics, the regulation of the reactor power, and shutdown system 1 and shutdown system 2 software. The DARSIM program operates in the interactive simulation program environment. DARSIM was installed on the APOLLO computer at the AECB and a version for an IBM-PC was also provided for the exclusive use of the AECB. Shutdown system software was updated to incorporate the latest revisions in the functional specifications. Additional developments have been provided to assist in the use and interpretation of the DARSIM results

  2. The Intelligent Safety System: could it introduce complex computing into CANDU shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.A.; Hinds, H.W.; Pensom, C.F.; Barker, C.J.; Jobse, A.H.

    1984-07-01

    The Intelligent Safety System is a computerized shutdown system being developed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) for future CANDU nuclear reactors. It differs from current CANDU shutdown systems in both the algorithm used and the size and complexity of computers required to implement the concept. This paper provides an overview of the project, with emphasis on the computing aspects. Early in the project several needs leading to an introduction of computing complexity were identified, and a computing system that met these needs was conceived. The current work at CRNL centers on building a laboratory demonstration of the Intelligent Safety System, and evaluating the reliability and testability of the concept. Some fundamental problems must still be addressed for the Intelligent Safety System to be acceptable to a CANDU owner and to the regulatory authorities. These are also discussed along with a description of how the Intelligent Safety System might solve these problems

  3. Design of shutdown system no.2 liquid poison injection system for 500 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, S.; Balasubrahmanian, A.K.; Pillai, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    Defence in depth and two group system concepts form the basic design philosophy for the shutdown systems. There are two independent, diverse and fast acting shutdown systems provided for the 500 MWe PHWR. The design is based on fail-safe principle, sufficient component redundancy and on-line testing. Liquid poison injection system, as shutdown system 2, is newly developed for the 500 MWe PHWRs. The system operates by rapidly injecting gadolinium nitrate solution into bulk moderator using stored helium pressure thereby inserting negative reactivity. A high pressure helium supply tank which provides the energy for system actuation, is connected, through an array of fast acting valves in series-parallel arrangement, to the individual poison tanks storing gadolinium nitrate solution. The valves, belonging to three different channels of reactor Protection System 2, are the only active components in the system. The valves are fail safe and are periodically tested on-line without actually firing the system. The system comprising of in-core assemblies and the external process system has been engineered. Experimental work is being carried out by BARC for design validation and data generation. This paper describes the conceptual development, design basis, design parameters and detailed engineering of the system. (author)

  4. Experimental and analytical studies of a passive shutdown heat removal system for advanced LMRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, J.; Kraimer, M.; Lottes, P.; Pedersen, D.; Stewart, R.; Tessier, J.

    1988-01-01

    A facility designed and constructed to demonstrate the viability of natural convection passive heat removal systems as a key feature of innovative LMR Shutdown Heat Removal (SHR) systems is in operation at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) is being used to investigate the heat transfer performance of the GE/PRISM and the RI/SAFR passive designs. This paper presents a description of the NSTF, the pretest analysis of the Radiant Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) in support of the GE/PRISM IFR concept, and experiment results for the RVACS simulation. Preliminary results show excellent agreement with predicted system performance

  5. Experimental and analytical studies of a passive shutdown heat removal system for advanced LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heineman, J.; Kraimer, M.; Lottes, P.; Pedersen, D.; Stewart, R.; Tessier, J.

    1988-01-01

    A facility designed and constructed to demonstrate the viability of natural convection passive heat removal systems as a key feature of innovative LMR Shutdown Heat Removal (SHR) systems is in operation at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) is being used to investigate the heat transfer performance of the GE/PRISM and the RI/SAFR passive designs. This paper presents a description of the NSTF, the pretest analysis of the Radiant Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) in support of the GE/PRISM IFR concept, and experiment results for the RVACS simulation. Preliminary results show excellent agreement with predicted system performance.

  6. Effect of dc-power-system reliability on reactor-shutdown cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Baranowsky, P.W.; Hickman, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The DC power systems in a nuclear power plant provide control and motive power to valves, instrumentation, emergency diesel generators, and many other components and systems during all phases of plant operation including abnormal shutdowns and accident situations. A specific area of concern is the adequacy of the minimum design requirements for DC power systems, particularly with regard to multiple and common cause failures. This concern relates to the application of the single failure criterion for assuring a reliable DC power supply which may be required for the functionability of shutdown cooling systems. The results are presented of a reliability based study performed to assess the adequacy of DC power supply design requirements for currently operating light water reactors with particular attention to shutdown cooling requirements

  7. Improvements of primary coolant shutdown chemistry and reactor coolant system cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudard, G.; Gilles, B.; Mesnage, F.; Cattant, F.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a radiation exposure management program entitled >, EDF aims at decreasing the mass dosimetry of nuclear power plants workers. So, the annual dose per unit, which has improved from 2.44 m.Sv in 1991 to 1.08 in 2000, should target 0.8 mSv in the year 2005 term in order to meet the results of the best nuclear operators. One of the guidelines for irradiation source term reduction is the optimization of operation parameters, including reactor coolant system (RCS) chemistry in operation, RCS shutdown chemistry and RCS cleanup improvement. This paper presents the EDF strategy for the shutdown and start up RCS chemistry optimization. All the shutdown modes have been reviewed and for each of them, the chemical specifications will be fine tuned. A survey of some US PWRs shutdown practices has been conducted for an acid and reducing shutdown chemistry implementation test at one EDF unit. This survey shows that deviating from the EPRI recommended practice for acid and reducing shutdown chemistry is possible and that critical path impact can be minimized. The paper also presents some investigations about soluble and insoluble species behavior and characterization; the study focuses here on 110m Ag, 122 Sb, 124 Sb and iodine contamination. Concerning RCS cleanup improvement, the paper presents two studies. The first one highlights some limited design modifications that are either underway or planned, for an increased flow rate during the most critical periods of the shutdown. The second one focuses on the strategy EDF envisions for filters and resins selection criteria. Matching the study on contaminants behavior with the study of filters and resins selection criteria should allow improving the cleanup efficiency. (authors)

  8. Identification of passive shutdown system parameters in a metal fueled LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilim, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    This document discusses periodic testing of the passive shutdown system in a metal fueled liquid metal reactor which has been proposed as a Technical Specification requirement. In the approach to testing considered in this paper, perturbation experiments performed at normal operation are used to predict an envelope that bounds reactor response to flowrate, inlet temperature and external reactivity forcing functions. When the envelope for specific upsets lies within safety limits, one concludes that the passive shutdown system is operation properly for those upsets. Simulation results for the EBR-II reactor show that the response envelope for loss of flow and rod reactivity insertion events does indeed bound these events

  9. Tricon hardware controller implementation of CANDU nuclear power plant shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the implementation of logic functions associated with the shutdown systems of CANDU nuclear power plants. The experimental aspects of this work include development of control program embedded in shutdown systems of CANDU based NPPs. A physical test environment is designed to simulate the measurements of in-core flux detector (ICFD) and ion chamber (I/C) signals. The programmable logic used in this experimentation provides Triple Modular Redundant (TMR) architecture as well as a voting mechanism used upon execution of control program on each independent channel. (author)

  10. Technical Meeting on Passive Shutdown Systems for Liquid Metal-Cooled Fast Reactors. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    A major focus of the design of modern fast reactor systems is on inherent and passive safety. Specific systems to improve reactor safety performance during accidental transients have been developed in nearly all fast reactor programs, and a large number of proposed systems have reached various stages of maturity. This Technical Meeting on Passive Shutdown Systems for Fast Reactors, which was recommended by the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), addressed Member States’ expressed need for information exchange on projects and programs in the field, as well as for the identification of priorities based on the analysis of technology gaps to be covered through R&D activities. This meeting was limited to shutdown systems only, and did not include other passive features such as natural circulation decay heat removal systems etc.; however the meeting catered to passive shutdown safety devices applicable to all types of fast neutron systems. It was agreed to initiate a new study and produce a Nuclear Energy Series (NES) Technical Report to collect information about the existing operational systems as well as innovative concepts under development. This will be a useful source for member states interested in gaining technical expertise to develop passive shutdown systems as well as to highlight the importance and development in this area

  11. TRACG-CFD analysis of ESBWR reactor water cleanup shutdown cooling system mixing coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, J.; Marquino, W.; Mistreanu, A.; Yang, J.

    2015-09-01

    The ESBWR is a 1520 nominal [M We] Generation III+ natural circulation boiling water reactor designed to high levels of safety utilizing features that have been successfully used before in operating BWRs, as well as standard features common to A BWR. In September of 2014, the US NRC has certified the ESBWR design for use in the USA. The RWCU/Sdc is an auxiliary system for the ESBWR nuclear island. Basic functions it performs include purifying the reactor coolant during normal operation and shutdown and providing shutdown cooling and cooldown to cold shutdown conditions. The performance of the RWCU system during shutdown cooling is directly related to the temperature of the water removed through the outlets, which is coupled with the vessel and F W temperatures through a thermal mixing coefficient. The complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the BWR downcomer and lower plenum has a great impact on the flow mixing. Only a fine mesh technique like CFD can predict the 3-D temperature distribution in the RPV during shutdown and provide the RWCU/Sdc system inlet temperature. Plant shutdown is an unsteady event by nature and was modeled as a succession of CFD steady-state simulations. It is required to establish the mixing coefficient (which is a function of the heat balance and the core flow) during the operation of the RWCU system in the multiple shutdown cooling modes, and therefore a range of core flows needs to be estimated using quasi steady states obtained with TRACG. The lower end of that range is obtained from a system with minimal power decay heat and core flow; while the higher end corresponds to the power at the beginning of RWCU/Sdc operation when the cooldown is transferred to the RWCU/Sdc after the initial depressurization via the turbine bypass valves. Because the ESBWR RWCU/Sdc return and suction designs provide good mixing, the uniform mixing energy balance was found to be an adequate alternative for deriving the mixing coefficient. The CFD mass flow

  12. TRACG-CFD analysis of ESBWR reactor water cleanup shutdown cooling system mixing coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Marquino, W.; Mistreanu, A.; Yang, J., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [General Electric Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, 28401 North Carolina (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The ESBWR is a 1520 nominal [M We] Generation III+ natural circulation boiling water reactor designed to high levels of safety utilizing features that have been successfully used before in operating BWRs, as well as standard features common to A BWR. In September of 2014, the US NRC has certified the ESBWR design for use in the USA. The RWCU/Sdc is an auxiliary system for the ESBWR nuclear island. Basic functions it performs include purifying the reactor coolant during normal operation and shutdown and providing shutdown cooling and cooldown to cold shutdown conditions. The performance of the RWCU system during shutdown cooling is directly related to the temperature of the water removed through the outlets, which is coupled with the vessel and F W temperatures through a thermal mixing coefficient. The complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the BWR downcomer and lower plenum has a great impact on the flow mixing. Only a fine mesh technique like CFD can predict the 3-D temperature distribution in the RPV during shutdown and provide the RWCU/Sdc system inlet temperature. Plant shutdown is an unsteady event by nature and was modeled as a succession of CFD steady-state simulations. It is required to establish the mixing coefficient (which is a function of the heat balance and the core flow) during the operation of the RWCU system in the multiple shutdown cooling modes, and therefore a range of core flows needs to be estimated using quasi steady states obtained with TRACG. The lower end of that range is obtained from a system with minimal power decay heat and core flow; while the higher end corresponds to the power at the beginning of RWCU/Sdc operation when the cooldown is transferred to the RWCU/Sdc after the initial depressurization via the turbine bypass valves. Because the ESBWR RWCU/Sdc return and suction designs provide good mixing, the uniform mixing energy balance was found to be an adequate alternative for deriving the mixing coefficient. The CFD mass flow

  13. Inherently safe SNR shutdown system with Curie point controlled sensor/switch unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, K.; Norajitra, P.; Reiser, H.

    1987-02-01

    Inherent shutdown due to increase in the sodium temperature at the core outlet is triggered by interruption of the current supply to the electromagnet coupling of absorber elements via curie point controlled sensor/switch units. These switches are arranged above suitable fuel element positions and spatially independent of the shutdown elements. Compared with other similar systems very short response times are achieved. A prototype switch unit has already undergone extensive testing. These tests have confirmed that switching takes place in a very narrow temperature range. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Republic of Korea: Design Study for Passive Shutdown System of the PGSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    There have been no experiences of implementing a passive shutdown system in operating or operated SFRs around the world. However, new SFRs are considered to adopt a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) in the future to provide an alternate means of passively shutting down the reactor. The Prototype Gen-IV SFR (PGSFR) developed by KAERI also adopts this system for the same reason. This passive shutdown design concept is combined with a group of secondary control rod drive mechanisms (SCRDM). The system automatically releases the control rod assembly (CRA) around the set temperature, and then drops the CRA by gravity without any external control signals and any actuating power in an emergency of the reactor. This paper describes the parametric design study of a passive shutdown system, which consists of a thermal expansion device, an electromagnet, and a secondary control rod assembly head. The conceptual design values of each component are also suggested. Parametric calculations are performed to check the suitability of the performance requirements of the thermal expansion device and electromagnets

  15. Development of self-actuated shutdown system using curie point electromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Ryong; Park, Jin Ho

    1999-01-01

    An innovative concept for a passive reactor shutdown system, so called self-actuated shutdown system (SASS), is inevitably required for the inherent safety in liquid metal reactor, which is designed with the totally different concept from the usual reactor shutdown system in LWR. SASS using Curie point electromagnet (CPEM) was selected as the passive reactor shutdown system for KALIMER (Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor). A mock-up of the SASS was designed, fabricated and tested. From the test it was confirmed that the mockup was self-actuated at the Curie point of the temperature sensing material used in the mockup. An articulated control rod was also fabricated and assembled with the CPEM to confirm that the control rod can be inserted into core even when the control rod guide tube is deformed due to earthquake. The operability of SASS in the actual sodium environment should be confirmed in the future. All the design and test data will be applied to the KALIMER design. (author)

  16. Skyline Reservation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Flight reservation application used for in-country flights by USAID and DoS staff in Afghanistan. The application is managed and maintained by the vendor and USAID...

  17. Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) Methodology and Application to the Shutdown Cooling System for APR-1400 Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faragalla, Mohamed M.; Emmanuel, Efenji; Alhammadi, Ibrahim; Awwal, Arigi M.; Lee, Yong Kwan [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Shutdown Cooling System (SCS) is a safety-related system that is used in conjunction with the Main Steam and Main or Auxiliary Feedwater Systems to reduce the temperature of the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) in post shutdown periods from the hot shutdown operating temperature to the refueling temperature. In this paper RCM methodology is applied to (SCS). RCM analysis is performed based on evaluation of Failure Modes Effects and Criticality Analysis (FME and CA) on the component, system and plant. The Logic Tree Analysis (LTA) is used to determine the optimum maintenance tasks. The main objectives of RCM is the safety, preserve the System function, the cost-effective maintenance of the plant components and increase the reliability and availability value. The RCM methodology is useful for improving the equipment reliability by strengthening the management of equipment condition, and leads to a significant decrease in the number of periodical maintenance, extended maintenance cycle, longer useful life of equipment, and decrease in overall maintenance cost. It also focuses on the safety of the system by assigning criticality index to the various components and further selecting maintenance activities based on the risk of failure involved. Therefore, it can be said that RCM introduces a maintenance plan designed for maximum safety in an economical manner and making the system more reliable. For the SCP, increasing the number of condition monitoring tasks will improve the availability of the SCP. It is recommended to reduce the number of periodic maintenance activities.

  18. Uncertainty evaluation of reliability of shutdown system of a medium size fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeliang, Chireuding; Singh, Om Pal, E-mail: singhop@iitk.ac.in; Munshi, Prabhat

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Uncertainty analysis of reliability of Shutdown System is carried out. • Monte Carlo method of sampling is used. • The effect of various reliability improvement measures of SDS are accounted. - Abstract: In this paper, results are presented on the uncertainty evaluation of the reliability of Shutdown System (SDS) of a Medium Size Fast Breeder Reactor (MSFBR). The reliability analysis results are of Kumar et al. (2005). The failure rate of the components of SDS are taken from International literature and it is assumed that these follow log-normal distribution. Fault tree method is employed to propagate the uncertainty in failure rate from components level to shutdown system level. The beta factor model is used to account different extent of diversity. The Monte Carlo sampling technique is used for the analysis. The results of uncertainty analysis are presented in terms of the probability density function, cumulative distribution function, mean, variance, percentile values, confidence intervals, etc. It is observed that the spread in the probability distribution of SDS failure rate is less than SDS components failure rate and ninety percent values of the failure rate of SDS falls below the target value. As generic values of failure rates are used, sensitivity analysis is performed with respect to failure rate of control and safety rods and beta factor. It is discovered that a large increase in failure rate of SDS rods is not carried to SDS system failure proportionately. The failure rate of SDS is very sensitive to the beta factor of common cause failure between the two systems of SDS. The results of the study provide insight in the propagation of uncertainty in the failure rate of SDS components to failure rate of shutdown system.

  19. Preliminary aseismic analysis on bolts of driving mechanism in absorption sphere shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Li Tianjin; Zhang Zhengming; Huang Zhiyong; Bo Hanliang

    2012-01-01

    The absorption sphere shutdown system performs an important role in reactivity regulating and control. Driving mechanism is a set of key mechanical moving parts which is used to control falling of absorption spheres in absorption sphere shutdown system. It is about 5 m for driving mechanism with the slim structure, which is connected with the upper supported plate of metal reactor internals through storage vessel with bolts. Both the storage vessel and driving mechanism are equipment of seismic classification I. It is significant to calculate and check the bolts strength of driving mechanism. In this paper, complicate structure of driving mechanism was simplified to three variable cross sections and statically indeterminate problem was solved. The bolts at the bottom and on the top of the storage vessel were calculated and checked. The preliminary results indicate that the bolts strength is reliable and safe, and the supporting force at the most weak point of driving mechanism is as well obtained. (authors)

  20. Advances in the physics modelling of CANDU liquid injection shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.; Robinson, R.; Guertin, C.

    1993-01-01

    The physics modelling of liquid poison injection shutdown systems in CANDU reactors accounts for the major phenomena taking place by combining the effects of both moderator hydraulics and neutronics. This paper describes the advances in the physics modelling of liquid poison injection shutdown systems (LISS), discusses some of the effects of the more realistic modelling, and briefly describes the automation methodology. Modifications to the LISS methodology have improved the realism of the physics modelling, showing that the previous methodology significantly overestimated energy deposition during the simulation of a loss of coolant transient in Bruce A, by overestimating the reactivity transient. Furthermore, the automation of the modelling process has reduced the time needed to carry put LISS evaluations to the same level as required for shutoff-rod evaluations, while at the same time minimizing the amount of input, and providing a method for tracing all files used, thus adding a level of quality assurance to the calculation. 5 refs., 11 figs

  1. Development and validation of the shutdown cooling system CATHENA model for Gentilly-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuyer, H.; Hasnaoui, C.; Sabourin, G.; Chapados, S.

    2008-01-01

    A CATHENA representation of the Gentilly-2 Shutdown Cooling system has been developed for Hydro-Quebec. The model includes the SDCS circuit piping, valves, pumps and heat exchangers. The model is integrated in the G2 CATHENA overall plant model and coupled with the plant control software simulator TROLG2 to allow the simulation of various plant operational modes using the SDCS. Results have been obtained for normal cooling of the primary heat transport system following a planned shut down (transition from full power to shutdown) and for two special SDCS configurations that were used on September 14 and 15, 2006 at Gentilly-2. The results show close match with values measured at Gentilly-2 during either steady or transient states. (author)

  2. Development and validation of the shutdown cooling system CATHENA model for Gentilly-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecuyer, H.; Hasnaoui, C. [Nucleonex Inc., Westmount, Quebec (Canada); Sabourin, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Chapados, S. [Hydro-Quebec, Unite Analyse et Fiabilite, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    A CATHENA representation of the Gentilly-2 Shutdown Cooling system has been developed for Hydro-Quebec. The model includes the SDCS circuit piping, valves, pumps and heat exchangers. The model is integrated in the G2 CATHENA overall plant model and coupled with the plant control software simulator TROLG2 to allow the simulation of various plant operational modes using the SDCS. Results have been obtained for normal cooling of the primary heat transport system following a planned shut down (transition from full power to shutdown) and for two special SDCS configurations that were used on September 14 and 15, 2006 at Gentilly-2. The results show close match with values measured at Gentilly-2 during either steady or transient states. (author)

  3. Shutdown reactivity meter system for nuclear fuel storage cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for determining whether a self-sustaining neutron chain reaction (I.E., criticality) may occur as each successive nuclear fuel element is added to a liquid-filled tank. This is accomplished by determining whether a multiplication factor, k, approaches unity after each element is added to the tank in accordance with the equation: cr ( Alpha s)/(1-k) where: S is the emission rate of the neutron source; alpha is a term that reflects the detector sensitivity as well as the attenuation of the neutron between source and detector and various geometric considerations in the tank; cr is the counting rate from a neutron detector; and K is a multiplication factor of the assembly at any given time for any given element configuration

  4. Self-actuated shutdown system for a commercial size LMFBR. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupen, C.F.G.

    1978-08-01

    A Self-Actuated Shutdown System (SASS) is defined as a reactor shutdown system in which sensors, release mechanisms and neutron absorbers are contained entirely within the reactor core structure, where they respond inherently to abnormal local process conditions, by shutting down the reactor, independently of the plant protection system (PPS). It is argued that a SASS, having a response time similar to that of the PPS, would so reduce the already very low probability of a failure-to-scram event that costly design features, derived from core disruptive accident analysis, could be eliminated. However, the thrust of the report is the feasibility and reliability of the in-core SASS hardware to achieve sufficiently rapid shutdown. A number of transient overpower and transient undercooling-responsive systems were investigated leading to the selection of a primary candidate and a backup concept. During a transient undercooling event, the recommended device is triggered by the associated rate of change of pressure, whereas the alternate concept responds to the reduction in core pressure drop and requires calibration and adjustment by the operators to accommodate changes in reactor power.

  5. Evaluation of slow shutdown system flux detectors in Point Lepreau Generating Station - I: dynamic response characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, V.N.P. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Comeau, D. [New Brunswick Power Nuclear, Point Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada); McKay, J.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Taylor, D. [New Brunswick Power Nuclear, Point Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    CANDU reactors are protected against reactor overpower by two independent shutdown systems: Shut Down System 1 and 2 (SDS1 and SDS2). At the Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS), the shutdown systems can be actuated by measurements of the neutron flux by Platinum-clad Inconel In-Core Flux Detectors (ICFDs). These detectors have a complex dynamic behaviour, characterized by 'prompt' and 'delayed' components with respect to immediate changes in the in-core neutron flux. The dynamic response components need to be determined accurately in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the detectors for actuating the shutdown systems. The amplitudes of the prompt and the delayed components of individual detectors were estimated over a period of several years by comparison of archived detector response data with the computed local neutron flux evolution for SDS1 and SDS2 reactor trips. This was achieved by custom-designed algorithms. The results of this analysis show that the dynamic response of the detectors changes with irradiation, with the SDS2 detectors having 'prompt' signal components that decreased significantly with irradiation. Some general conclusions about detector aging effects are also drawn. (author)

  6. Self-actuated shutdown system for a commercial size LMFBR. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupen, C.F.G.

    1978-08-01

    A Self-Actuated Shutdown System (SASS) is defined as a reactor shutdown system in which sensors, release mechanisms and neutron absorbers are contained entirely within the reactor core structure, where they respond inherently to abnormal local process conditions, by shutting down the reactor, independently of the plant protection system (PPS). It is argued that a SASS, having a response time similar to that of the PPS, would so reduce the already very low probability of a failure-to-scram event that costly design features, derived from core disruptive accident analysis, could be eliminated. However, the thrust of the report is the feasibility and reliability of the in-core SASS hardware to achieve sufficiently rapid shutdown. A number of transient overpower and transient undercooling-responsive systems were investigated leading to the selection of a primary candidate and a backup concept. During a transient undercooling event, the recommended device is triggered by the associated rate of change of pressure, whereas the alternate concept responds to the reduction in core pressure drop and requires calibration and adjustment by the operators to accommodate changes in reactor power

  7. Design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system to ensure limitation of core damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deane, N.A.; Atcheson, D.B.

    1981-09-01

    Safety-based functional requirements and design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) are derived in accordance with LOA-2 success criteria and reliability goals. The design basis transients have been defined and evaluated for the CDS Phase II design, which is a 2550 MWt mixed oxide heterogeneous core reactor. A partial set of reactor responses for selected transients is provided as a function of SASS characteristics such as reactivity worth, trip points, and insertion times

  8. Reserves for shutdown/dismantling and disposal in nuclear technology. Theses and recommendations on reform options; Rueckstellungen fuer Stilllegung/Rueckbau und Entsorgung im Atombereich. Thesen und Empfehlungen zu Reformoptionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Bettina [Forum Oekologisch-Soziale Marktwirtschaft e.V. (FOeS), Berlin (Germany). Green Budget Germany (GBG)

    2012-04-11

    The study on reserves for shutdown, dismantling and disposal of nuclear facilities covers the following topics: cost for shutdown, dismantling and disposal and amount and transparency of nuclear reserves, solution by y stock regulated by public law for long-term liabilities, and improvement of the protection in the event of insolvency for the remaining EVU reserves for short- and intermediate-term liabilities. The appendix includes estimations and empirical values for the cost of shutdown and dismantling, estimation of disposal costs, and a summary of Swiss studies on dismantling and disposal and transfer to Germany.

  9. The Upgrade of the CMS RPC System during the First LHC Long Shutdown

    CERN Document Server

    Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Zaganidis, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Sultanov, G.; Assran, Y.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M.; Colafranceschi, S.; Felli, F.; Piccolo, D.; Saviano, G.; Carrillo, C.; Berzano, U.; Gabusi, M.; Vitulo, P.; Kang, M.; Lee, K.S.; Park, S.K.; Shin, S.; Sharma, A.

    2012-01-01

    The CMS muon system includes in both the barrel and endcap region Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC). They mainly serve as trigger detectors and also improve the reconstruction of muon parameters. Over the years, the instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider gradually increases. During the LHC Phase 1 (~first 10 years of operation) an ultimate luminosity is expected above its design value of 10^34/cm^2/s at 14 TeV. To prepare the machine and also the experiments for this, two long shutdown periods are scheduled for 2013-2014 and 2018-2019. The CMS Collaboration is planning several detector upgrades during these long shutdowns. In particular, the muon detection system should be able to maintain a low-pT threshold for an efficient Level-1 Muon Trigger at high particle rates. One of the measures to ensure this, is to extend the present RPC system with the addition of a 4th layer in both endcap regions. During the first long shutdown, these two new stations will be equipped in the region |eta|<1.6 with...

  10. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.williams@oxfordtechnologies.co.uk [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sanders, Stephen [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Weder, Gerard [Tree-C Technology BV, Buys Ballotstraat 8, 6716 BL Ede (Netherlands); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  11. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Adrian; Sanders, Stephen; Weder, Gerard; Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  12. Fractional Reserve in Banking System

    OpenAIRE

    Valkonen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to provide understanding of the role of the fractional reserve in the mod-ern banking system worldwide and particularly in Finland. The fractional reserve banking is used worldwide, but the benefits of this system are very disputable. On the one hand, experts say that the fractional reserve is a necessary instrument for the normal business and profit making. On the other hand, sceptics openly criticize the fractional reserve system and blame it for fiat money (money n...

  13. Design and analysis of hot internals for the reactivity control and reserve shutdown units under test at the helium test facility - HTR2008-58159

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, E. J. J.; Craig, K. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design process followed by Westinghouse Electric South Africa for the insertion of hot internals into the Reactivity Control System (RCS) and Reserve Shutdown System (RSS) Units Under Test (UUTs) at the Helium Test Facility (HTF) at Pelindaba (South Africa)). The aim of the UUTs is to allow the validation of the high temperature operation of the RCS and RSS systems for implementation into the proposed Demonstration Power Plant of the PBMR. The units use electrical heaters to obtain pebble-bed reactor thermal conditions for both the control rods and small absorber spheres (SAS) under a pressurized helium environment. Design challenges include providing for strength under elevated temperatures (900 deg. C maximum); pressure boundary integrity (9 MPa maximum); separation of different volumes (representing core barrel, reactor citadel and other Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) volumes); thermal protection of carbon steel vessels by using thermal insulation; allowing for diverse thermal expansion coefficients of different materials; allowing for de-pressurization events within the insulation and internals having access for temperature, pressure, stress and proximity sensors and electrical wiring through high pressure penetrations; and provision for assembly of the hot internals both on and off-site. thermal analyses using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) were performed to evaluate both worst-case and operational conditions of the UUTs. Factors that were considered include thermal insulation properties, heat transfer modes (internal radiation, external radiation and natural convection, forced internal convection for cooling) and operating pressure (ranging from 1 to 9 MPa). The thermal design uses elements originally proposed for hot gas duct design. The results obtained show that the proposed design satisfies ASME VIII requirements of the pressure boundary and that all challenges are successfully met. (authors)

  14. Preliminary Calculations of Shutdown Dose Rate for the CTS Diagnostics System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkby, Esben Bryndt; Nonbøl, Erik; Lauritzen, Bent

    2015-01-01

    DTU and IST 2 are partners in the design of a collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) diagnostics for ITER through a contract with F4E. The CTS diagnostic utilizes probing radiation of ~60 GHz emitted into the plasma and, using a mirror, collects the scattered radiation by an array of receivers. Having...... on supplying input which affect the system design. Examples include: - Heatloads on plasma facing mirrors and preliminary stress and thermal analysis - Port plug cooling requirements and it's dependence on system design (in particular blanket cut-out) - Shutdown dose-rate calculations (relative analysis...

  15. Novel hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic technique for shutdown dose rate analyses of fusion energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Grove, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Develop the novel Multi-Step CADIS (MS-CADIS) hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic method for multi-step shielding analyses. •Accurately calculate shutdown dose rates using full-scale Monte Carlo models of fusion energy systems. •Demonstrate the dramatic efficiency improvement of the MS-CADIS method for the rigorous two step calculations of the shutdown dose rate in fusion reactors. -- Abstract: The rigorous 2-step (R2S) computational system uses three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport simulations to calculate the shutdown dose rate (SDDR) in fusion reactors. Accurate full-scale R2S calculations are impractical in fusion reactors because they require calculating space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes everywhere inside the reactor. The use of global Monte Carlo variance reduction techniques was suggested for accelerating the R2S neutron transport calculation. However, the prohibitive computational costs of these approaches, which increase with the problem size and amount of shielding materials, inhibit their ability to accurately predict the SDDR in fusion energy systems using full-scale modeling of an entire fusion plant. This paper describes a novel hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic methodology that uses the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method but focuses on multi-step shielding calculations. The Multi-Step CADIS (MS-CADIS) methodology speeds up the R2S neutron Monte Carlo calculation using an importance function that represents the neutron importance to the final SDDR. Using a simplified example, preliminary results showed that the use of MS-CADIS enhanced the efficiency of the neutron Monte Carlo simulation of an SDDR calculation by a factor of 550 compared to standard global variance reduction techniques, and that the efficiency enhancement compared to analog Monte Carlo is higher than a factor of 10,000

  16. Test rig overview for validation and reliability testing of shutdown system software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, M.; McDonald, A.; Dick, P.

    2007-01-01

    The test rig for Validation and Reliability Testing of shutdown system software has been upgraded from the AECL Windows-based test rig previously used for CANDU6 stations. It includes a Virtual Trip Computer, which is a software simulation of the functional specification of the trip computer, and a real-time trip computer simulator in a separate chassis, which is used during the preparation of trip computer test cases before the actual trip computers are available. This allows preparation work for Validation and Reliability Testing to be performed in advance of delivery of actual trip computers to maintain a project schedule. (author)

  17. Requirements Analysis Study for Master Pump Shutdown System Project Development Specification [SEC 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEVINS, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    This document has been updated during the definitive design portion of the first phase of the W-314 Project to capture additional software requirements and is planned to be updated during the second phase of the W-314 Project to cover the second phase of the Project's scope. The objective is to provide requirement traceability by recording the analysis/basis for the functional descriptions of the master pump shutdown system. This document identifies the sources of the requirements and/or how these were derived. Each requirement is validated either by quoting the source or an analysis process involving the required functionality, performance characteristics, operations input or engineering judgment

  18. Lithium Hideout and Return in the CANDU Heat Transport System during Shutdown and Start-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, L.; Snaglewski, A.P.

    2012-09-01

    Lithium hydroxide is used to control the pH a (pH apparent) of the Heat Transport System (HTS) coolant in CANDU R reactors. The recommended range of the lithium concentration in the coolant is between 0.38 ppm (5.5x10 -5 m) and 0.60 ppm (8.7x10 -5 m) to minimize carbon steel corrosion in the HTS and magnetite deposition in the core during normal operation; this corresponds to pH a values between 10.2 and 10.4. Similar pH a and lithium concentrations should be maintained during shutdown and start-up. However, maintaining the pH a of the HTS coolant within specification during shutdown and start-up has been difficult for some CANDU stations, especially when the HTS is taken to a Low Level Drain State (LLDS), because of lithium hideout and return. This paper presents the results from lithium adsorption and desorption studies on iron oxides under relevant shutdown and start-up chemistry conditions performed to elucidate the mechanisms of the observed lithium hideout and return. The results show that lithium hideout and return are driven largely by changes in the solubility of magnetite as the HTS coolant chemistry changes during shutdown; changes in lithium concentration were inversely correlated with the solubility of magnetite. When the HTS system is de-pressurized and drained to a low coolant level, the ingress of air rapidly oxidizes the dissolved Fe (II) in the coolant, 2Fe +2 + 1 / 2 O 2 + 3 H 2 = 2FEOOH + 4 H + , resulting in the formation of lepidocrocite or maghemite, which have much lower solubilities but larger surface areas than does magnetite. The large surface area of the Fe (III) oxides can adsorb significant quantities of lithium from the coolant, leading to lithium hideout and a pH a decrease. During start-up, the chemistry of the coolant changes from oxidizing to reducing, and lepidocrocite and other Fe (III) oxides are reduced to Fe (II), gradually dissolving as their solubility increases with increasing temperature. The adsorbed lithium is released

  19. Ultrasonic measurement of gap between calandria tube and liquid injection shutdown system tube in PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Ryong; Sohn, Seok Man; Lee, Jun Shin; Lee, Sun Ki; Lee, Jong Po

    2001-01-01

    Sag of CT or liquid injection shutdown system tubes in pressurized heavy water reactor is known to occur due to irradiation creep and growth during plant operation. When the sag of CT is big enough, the CT tube possibly comes in contact with liquid injection shutdown system tube (LIN) crossing beneath the CT, which subsequently may prevent the safe operation. It is therefore necessary to check the gap between the two tubes in order to confirm no contacts when using a proper measure periodically during the plant life. An ultrasonic gap measuring probe assembly which can be fed through viewing port installed on the calandria was developed and utilized to measure the sags of both tubes in a pressurized heavy water reactor in Korea. It was found that the centerlines of CT and LIN can be precisely detected by ultrasonic wave. The gaps between two tubes were easily obtained from the relative distance of the measured centerline elevations of the tubes. But the measured gap data observed at the viewing port were actually not the data at the crossing point of CT and LIN. To get the actual gap between two tubes, mathematical modeling for the deflection curves of two tubes was used. The sags of CT and LIN tubes were also obtained by comparison of the present centerlines with the initial elevations at the beginning of plant operation. The gaps between two tubes in the unmeasurable regions were calculated based on the measurement data and the channel power distribution

  20. Development of Risk Assessment Technology for Low Power, Shutdown and Digital I and C System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seung Cheol; Kang, Hyun Gook; Lim, Ho Gon; Park, Jin Hee; Kang, Dae Il; Eom, Heung Sub; Kim, Man Cheol; Lee, Ho Joong; Kim, Jae Whan; Ha, Jae Joo

    2007-06-01

    There are two technical areas to deal with in the project: the low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), and the digital I and C PSA. The scope and contents of each area could be summarized as follows: The LPSD PSA Area Ο Quality improvement of the KSNP LPSD PSA model in the following four technical areas; human reliability analysis (HR), system analysis (SY), data analysis (DA) and accident sequence quantification (QU) Ο Development of the LPSD configuration risk management(CRM) model - Study on the methodology for developing a CRM model, so-called ASLOC (Autonomous Shutdown LOgic Creation) - Development of the LPSD CRM model for the units of Ulchin 3 and 4 The Digital I and C PSA Area Ο Development of impact model of ESF-CCS on plant risks - Unavailability analysis of ESF-CCS for APR-1400 - Digital plant risk models for evaluating core damage frequency (CDF) Ο Study on the methodologies for treating digital-specific problems in the digital I and C PSA - Study on the methodology for evaluating safety-critical SW reliability by BBN techniques, including a feasibility study of reliability growth model - Study on the methodology for the safety-critical network system by Markov chain

  1. Brief account of the design philosophy for third Qinshan NPP shutdown safety system based on practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Weihua

    2005-01-01

    Qinshan CANDU power plant is uses the Canadian proven CANDU6 nuclear power technology. It has two characteristic: 1. heavy water-as moderator and coolant; 2. natural uranium as the fuel and change fuel during normal operating. CANDU6 include four special safety system: the No.1 shutdown system (SDS No.1), the No.2 shutdown system (SDS No.2), the containment system, the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). QinShan CANDU power plant is the first commercial PHWR nuclear power plant in China. And some aspect is not similar to everybody. The intention of the article is to introduce the basic design and functions. (authors)

  2. CERN Vacuum-System Activities during the Long Shutdown 1: The LHC Beam Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V; Chiggiato, P; Jimenez, JM; Lanza, G

    2014-01-01

    After the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) and the consolidation of the magnet bus bars, the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will operate with nominal beam parameters. Larger beam energy, beam intensities and luminosity are expected. Despite the very good performance of the beam vacuum system during the 2010-12 physics run (Run 1), some particular areas require attention for repair, consolidation and upgrade. Among the main activities, a large campaign aiming at the repair of the RF bridges of some vacuum modules is conducted. Moreover, consolidation of the cryogenic beam vacuum systems with burst disk for safety reasons is implemented. In addition, NEG cartridges, NEG coated inserts and new instruments for the vacuum system upgrade are installed. Besides these activities, repair, consolidation and upgrades of other beam equipment such as collimators, kickers and beam instrumentations are carried out. In this paper, the motivation and the description for such activities, together with the expected beam vacuum performa...

  3. Evolution of the ATLAS Distributed Computing system during the LHC Long shutdown

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing project (ADC) was established in 2007 to develop and operate a framework, following the ATLAS computing model, to enable data storage, processing and bookkeeping on top of the WLCG distributed infrastructure. ADC development has always been driven by operations and this contributed to its success. The system has fulfilled the demanding requirements of ATLAS, daily consolidating worldwide up to 1PB of data and running more than 1.5 million payloads distributed globally, supporting almost one thousand concurrent distributed analysis users. Comprehensive automation and monitoring minimized the operational manpower required. The flexibility of the system to adjust to operational needs has been important to the success of the ATLAS physics program. The LHC shutdown in 2013-2015 affords an opportunity to improve the system in light of operational experience and scale it to cope with the demanding requirements of 2015 and beyond, most notably a much higher trigger rate and event pileu...

  4. An analysis on water hammer in liquid injection shutdown system of CANDU-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. H.; Heo, J.; Han, S. K.; Choi, H. Y.; No, T. S.

    2000-01-01

    The water hammer analysis code, PTRAN, is used for computation of transient pressures and pressure differentials in the Liquid Injection Shutdown System(LISS) piping network of CANDU-9 to ensure that the design allowables for LEVEL C Service Limit are met for the water hammer loads resulting from the water hammer. The LISS piping network of CANDU-9 has incorporated design improvement in considering the water hammer, such as declining the horizontal part of helium header, and raising the elevation of the overall system piping configuration, etc. The maximum pressure in the LISS piping network is found to be 7.92 MPa(a) at the closed valve in the vent line, which is below the allowable working pressure and the valve design pressure under Level C service conditions. And it is also shown that the maximum pressure in CANDU-9 is much lower than that in CANDU-6

  5. Thermosyphon Phenomenon as an alternate heat sink of Shutdown Cooling System for the CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonghyun [GNEST, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwangho; Oh, Haechol; Jun, Hwangyong [KEPRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    During the outage(overhaul) of the CANDU plant, there is a period when the coolant is partially drained to the reactor header level and the coolant is cooled and depressurized by Shutdown Cooling System(SDCS) other than PHTS pump. In the postulated accident of the loss of SDCS-the PHTS pump failure, the primary coolant system should be cooled by the alternate heat sink using the thermosyphon pheonomenon(TS) through the steam generator(SG) This study was aimed at verification and analyzing the core cooling ability of the TS. And the sensitivity analysis was done for the number of SGs used in the TS. As an analysis tool, RELAP5/CANDU was used.

  6. Requirements Analysis Study for Master Pump Shutdown System Project Development Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEVINS, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    This study is a requirements document that presents analysis for the functional description for the master pump shutdown system. This document identifies the sources of the requirements and/or how these were derived. Each requirement is validated either by quoting the source or an analysis process involving the required functionality, performance characteristics, operations input or engineering judgment. The requirements in this study apply to the first phase of the W314 Project. This document has been updated during the definitive design portion of the first phase of the W314 Project to capture additional software requirements and is planned to be updated during the second phase of the W314 Project to cover the second phase of the project's scope

  7. Design of emergency shutdown system for the Tehran Research Reactor; Part I: Neutronics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarinia, M.; Faghihi, F.; Mirvakili, S.M.; Fakhraei, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An emergency shutdown system for the TRR is carried out based on a heavy water tank. • The performance of the heavy water tank are carried out based on “first and equilibrium cores”. • Heavy water discharging flow rate is also studied in the current research. • Thermal flux in the radioisotope channel with and without the heavy water tank are studied. • A core with and without the heavy water tank for the cases of 5 × 6, 5 × 5, 5 × 4, and 4 × 4 fuel assemblies are investigated (for two types of fuel loading—first and equilibrium cores). - Abstract: In this paper, a neutronics design of the secondary (i.e., emergency) shutdown system for the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) is carried out based on a heavy water tank design. The heavy water tank in a cylindrical shape is around the core, and calculations for the optimized radius and height of the tank are performed. The performance of the heavy water tank calculations are carried out based on two types of fuel loading, which are called the “first and equilibrium cores” of the TRR. For both cases, neutronics and standard safety analysis are taken into account, benchmarked, and described herein. Heavy water discharging flow rate is also studied in the current research, and the results are compared with the IAEA criteria. Moreover, thermal flux in the radioisotope channel with and without the heavy water tank (as the reflector) are studied herein. Specifically, a core with and without the heavy water tank for the cases of 5 × 6, 5 × 5, 5 × 4, and 4 × 4 fuel assemblies are investigated (for two types of fuel loading—first and equilibrium cores). Based on our optimization, the 5 × 5 fuel assembly, which is called “B configuration,” has better performance and efficiency than that of the other described layouts.

  8. Potential improvement of CANDU NPP safety margins by shortening the response time of shutdown systems using FPGA based implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingke She, E-mail: jshe2@uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Jin Jiang, E-mail: jjiang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative analysis of the safety margin improvement through thermalhydraulic simulation and analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of realizing the improvement by an FPGA-based SDS1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Verification of potential operating power upgrade without endangering the plant safety. - Abstract: The relationship between the peak values of critical reactor variables, such as neutronic power, inside a CANDU reactor and the speed of the response of its shutdown system has been analyzed in the event of a large loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The advantage of shortening the response time of the shutdown action has been demonstrated in term of the improved safety margin. A field programmable gate array (FPGA) platform has been chosen to implement such a shutdown system. Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulations have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept. Furthermore, connections between the speed of response of the shutdown system and the nominal operating power level of the reactor have been drawn to support for potential power upgrade for existing power plants.

  9. Development of Risk Assessment Technology for Low Power, Shutdown and Digital I and C Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seung Cheol; Kang, Hyung Gook; Lim, Ho Gon; Park, Jin Hee; Eom, Heung Sub; Kim, Tae Woon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2005-04-01

    There are two technical areas to deal with in the project; the low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), and the digital I and C PSA. The scope and contents of each area could be summarized as follows: Quality assessment of a LPSD PSA model for a Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP), Quality improvement of the KSNP LPSD PSA model in the following four technical areas; plant operating status (POS), initiating event analysis, determination of success criteria, accident sequence analysis, Development of the LPSD risk management technologies, Unavailability analysis of Digital safety systems such as Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) and Digital Engineered Safety Feature Actuation System (DESFAS), Impact analysis of the digital safety systems on plant risks throughout of the digital plant risk models for evaluating core damage frequency (CDF) and large early release frequency (LERF), Study on the methodologies for treating digital-specific problems in the digital I and C PSA such as reliability of safety-critical software, common cause failure (CCF) of digital components, fault coverage, etc

  10. Development of Risk Assessment Technology for Low Power, Shutdown and Digital I and C Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seung Cheol; Kang, Hyung Gook; Lim, Ho Gon; Park, Jin Hee; Eom, Heung Sub; Kim, Tae Woon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2005-04-15

    There are two technical areas to deal with in the project; the low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), and the digital I and C PSA. The scope and contents of each area could be summarized as follows: Quality assessment of a LPSD PSA model for a Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP), Quality improvement of the KSNP LPSD PSA model in the following four technical areas; plant operating status (POS), initiating event analysis, determination of success criteria, accident sequence analysis, Development of the LPSD risk management technologies, Unavailability analysis of Digital safety systems such as Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) and Digital Engineered Safety Feature Actuation System (DESFAS), Impact analysis of the digital safety systems on plant risks throughout of the digital plant risk models for evaluating core damage frequency (CDF) and large early release frequency (LERF), Study on the methodologies for treating digital-specific problems in the digital I and C PSA such as reliability of safety-critical software, common cause failure (CCF) of digital components, fault coverage, etc.

  11. An analysis of multiple particle settling for LMR backup shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, R.W.

    1992-05-01

    Backup shutdown systems proposed for future LMRs may employ discreet absorber particles to provide the negative reactivity insertion. When actuated, these systems release a dense packing of particles from an out-of-core region to settle into an in-core region. The multiple particle settling behavior is analyzed by the method of continuity waves. This method provides predictions of the dynamic response of the system including the average particle velocity and volume fraction of particles vs. time. Although hindered settling problems have been previously analyzed using continuity wave theory, this application represents an extension of the theory to conditions of unrestrained settling. Typical cases are analyzed and numerical results are calculated based on a semi-empirical drift-flux model. For 1/4-inch diameter boron-carbide particles in hot liquid sodium, the unrestrained settling problem assumes a steady-state solution when the average volume fraction of particles is 0.295 and the average particle velocity is 26.0 cm/s

  12. Seismic design margin evaluation of systems and equipment required for safe shutdown of North Anna, Units 1 and 2, following an SSE (safe-shutdown earthquake) event. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, K.D.

    1981-06-01

    The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards recommended that the NRC staff review in detail the capability and available seismic design margin of fluid systems and equipment used in North Anna, Units 1 and 2 to achieve safe shutdown following a site-design safe-shutdown earthquake (SSE). The staff conducted a series of plant visits and meetings with the licensee to view and discuss the seismic design methodology used for systems, equipment and their supports. The report is a description and evaluation of the seismic design criteria, design conservatisms and seismic design margin for North Anna, Units 1 and 2

  13. Magnetic disconnect for secondary shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessor, D.L.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of studies to develop a magnetic holding clutch in the control rod drive line as an alternate shutdown device for the FFTF. Results indicate that a three-phase disconnect, hold, and backup shutdown system can be designed to operate satisfactorily. (U.S.)

  14. Evolution of the ATLAS distributed computing system during the LHC long shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, S.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing project (ADC) was established in 2007 to develop and operate a framework, following the ATLAS computing model, to enable data storage, processing and bookkeeping on top of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) distributed infrastructure. ADC development has always been driven by operations and this contributed to its success. The system has fulfilled the demanding requirements of ATLAS, daily consolidating worldwide up to 1 PB of data and running more than 1.5 million payloads distributed globally, supporting almost one thousand concurrent distributed analysis users. Comprehensive automation and monitoring minimized the operational manpower required. The flexibility of the system to adjust to operational needs has been important to the success of the ATLAS physics program. The LHC shutdown in 2013-2015 affords an opportunity to improve the system in light of operational experience and scale it to cope with the demanding requirements of 2015 and beyond, most notably a much higher trigger rate and event pileup. We will describe the evolution of the ADC software foreseen during this period. This includes consolidating the existing Production and Distributed Analysis framework (PanDA) and ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS), together with the development and commissioning of next generation systems for distributed data management (DDM/Rucio) and production (Prodsys-2). We will explain how new technologies such as Cloud Computing and NoSQL databases, which ATLAS investigated as R&D projects in past years, will be integrated in production. Finally, we will describe more fundamental developments such as breaking job-to-data locality by exploiting storage federations and caches, and event level (rather than file or dataset level) workload engines.

  15. Evolution of the ATLAS distributed computing system during the LHC long shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campana, S

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing project (ADC) was established in 2007 to develop and operate a framework, following the ATLAS computing model, to enable data storage, processing and bookkeeping on top of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) distributed infrastructure. ADC development has always been driven by operations and this contributed to its success. The system has fulfilled the demanding requirements of ATLAS, daily consolidating worldwide up to 1 PB of data and running more than 1.5 million payloads distributed globally, supporting almost one thousand concurrent distributed analysis users. Comprehensive automation and monitoring minimized the operational manpower required. The flexibility of the system to adjust to operational needs has been important to the success of the ATLAS physics program. The LHC shutdown in 2013-2015 affords an opportunity to improve the system in light of operational experience and scale it to cope with the demanding requirements of 2015 and beyond, most notably a much higher trigger rate and event pileup. We will describe the evolution of the ADC software foreseen during this period. This includes consolidating the existing Production and Distributed Analysis framework (PanDA) and ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS), together with the development and commissioning of next generation systems for distributed data management (DDM/Rucio) and production (Prodsys-2). We will explain how new technologies such as Cloud Computing and NoSQL databases, which ATLAS investigated as R and D projects in past years, will be integrated in production. Finally, we will describe more fundamental developments such as breaking job-to-data locality by exploiting storage federations and caches, and event level (rather than file or dataset level) workload engines.

  16. Pilot Operation of Ex-core Neutron Sensors of Divers Shutdown System (DSS) Unit 2 Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakshtonis, Z.; Krivoshei, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Ignalina Safety Assessment, which was completed in December 1996, recommended the installation of a diverse shutdown system on the 2nd unit at Ignalina. During the PPR-2004 in the DSS project are created two independent shutdown systems by separating the absorber rods into two independent groups as follows: 1. One system (designated AZ) consists of the existing 24 BAZ rods and 49 AZ/BSM rods that together are used for reliable reactor shutdown (including Control and Protection System (CPS) circuit voiding accident). This system performs the emergency protection function. 2. The other system (designated BSM) comprises the remaining absorber rods and the 49 AZ/BSM rods. Thus 49 AZ/BSM rods are actuated from AZ initiating equipment as well as from BSM initiating equipment. The BSM system performs the normal reactor shutdown function and is able to ensure long-term maintenance of the reactor in the sub-critical state. Along with implementation of DSS was modernized existing Emergency Process Protection System, which was divided into two independent Sets of initiating equipment. The DSS is independent and diverse initiating equipment from the existing 1st Set equipment; with each set having its own independent in-core and ex-core sensors for measurement of neutron flux and process parameters. The 2nd Set of initiating equipment for measuring ex-core neutron flux, was modernized with new design of 4 Ex-Core detectors each have a single low level neutron flux detector and two high range neutron detectors. They are comprising: 1. A fission chamber which operates in pulse mode to cover the low flux levels. 2. A compensated ionisation chamber in current mode to operate at high flux level. This detector is doubled to give a measurement of the axial deviation. Two detectors are enough to produce the axial power deviation. The results of testing and analysis of pilot operation of ex-core neutron sensors of DSS will be shown on the Report. (author)

  17. On the speed of response of an FPGA-based shutdown system in CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She Jingke, E-mail: jshe2@uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B9 (Canada); Jiang Jin, E-mail: jjiang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Design and implementation of an FPGA-based CANDU SDS1. > Hardware-in-the-loop simulation for performance evaluation involved with an NPP simulator. > Comparison of the response time between FPGA-based trip channel and software-based PLC. - Abstract: Several issues in an FPGA based implementation of shutdown systems in CANDU nuclear power plants have been investigated in this paper. A particular attention is on the response time of an FPGA implementation of safety shutdown systems in comparison with operating system based software solutions as in existing CANDU plants. The trip decision logic under 'steam generator (SG) level low' condition has been examined in detail. The design and implementation of this logic on an FPGA platform have been carried out. The functionality tests are performed in a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) environment by connecting the FPGA based system to an NPP simulator, and replacing one channel of Shutdown System Number 1 (SDS1) in the simulator by the FPGA implementation. The response time of the designed system is also measured through multiple tests under different conditions, and statistical data analysis has been performed. The results of the response time tests are compared against those of a software-based implementation of the same trip logic.

  18. LHC Detector Vacuum System Consolidation for Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) in 2013-2014

    CERN Document Server

    Gallilee, M; Cruikshank, P; Gallagher, J; Garion, C; Jimenez, J M; Kersevan, R; Kos, H; Leduc, L; Lepeule, P; Provot, N; Rambeau, H; Veness, R

    2012-01-01

    The LHC has ventured into unchartered territory for Particle Physics accelerators. A dedicated consolidation program is required between 2013 and 2014 to ensure optimal physics performance. The experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, will utilise this shutdown, along with the gained experience of three years of physics running, to make optimisations to their detectors. New vacuum technologies have been developed for the experimental areas, to be integrated during this first phase shutdown. These technologies include bellows, vacuum chambers and ion pumps in aluminium, new beryllium vacuum chambers, and composite mechanical supports. An overview of this first phase consolidation program for the LHC experiments is presented.

  19. Behavior of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Mercier, J.P.; Gue, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30,000 MWday.t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: - ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation, - for a final temperature limited to 160 0 C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%, in the presence of H 2 0, HN0 3 , N0 x and 0 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source

  20. Behavior of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Mercier, J.P.; Gue, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30,000 MW day·t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small-volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation; for a final temperature limited to 160 degree C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%; in the presence of H 2 O, HNO 3 , NO x and O 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide (probably RuO 2 ) on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source

  1. Evaluation of slow shutdown system flux detectors in Point Lepreau Generating Station - II: dynamic compensation error analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, V.N.P.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Taylor, D. [New Brunswick Power Nuclear, Point Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    CANDU reactors are protected against reactor overpower by two independent shutdown systems: Shut Down System 1 and 2 (SDS1 and SDS2). At the Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS), the shutdown systems can be actuated by measurements of the neutron flux from Platinum-clad Inconel In-Core Flux Detectors. These detectors have a complex dynamic behaviour, characterized by 'prompt' and 'delayed' components with respect to immediate changes in the in-core neutron flux. It was shown previously (I: Dynamic Response Characterization by Anghel et al., this conference) that the dynamic responses of the detectors changed with irradiation, with the SDS2 detectors having 'prompt' signal components that decreased significantly. In this paper we assess the implication of these changes for detector dynamic compensation errors by comparing the compensated detector response with the power-to-fuel and the power-to-coolant responses to neutron flux ramps as assumed by previous error analyses. The dynamic compensation error is estimated at any given trip time for all possible accident flux ramps. Some implications for the shutdown system trip set points, obtained from preliminary results, are discussed. (author)

  2. Maintenance of shutdown system in the reactor core to minimize the radioactive waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, P.; Fernandes, V.B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper recommends a modification on the actual strategy of going from Cold-Shutdown to Critical, that will save about 6000 liter of boric acid and 30,000 liters of demineralized water for each reactor criticalization. This strategy will reduce the radioactive waste disposal volume to only about 5% of what would be generated following the actual strategy. (author) [pt

  3. Behaviour of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Gue, J.P.; Mercier, J.P.

    1990-12-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30.000 MW day ·t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small-volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: - ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation, - for a final temperature limited to 160 deg. C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%, - in the presence of H 2 O, HNO 3 , NO x and O 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide (probably RuO 2 ) on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source. It is probable that, in an industrial storage tank, the heat losses from the tank and the offgas discharge ducts will cause recondensation and internal reflux, which will commensurately delay

  4. CERN Vacuum-System Activities during the Long Shutdown 1: The LHC’s Injector Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, J A

    2014-01-01

    During the long shutdown 1 (LS1), several maintenance, consolidation and upgrade activities have been carried out in LHC’s injector chain. Each machine has specific vacuum requirements and different history, which determine the present status of the vacuum components, their maintenance and consolidation needs. The present work presents the priorities agreed at the beginning of the LS1 period and their implementation. Of particular relevance are the interventions in radioactive controlled areas where several leaks due to stress corrosions stopped the operations in the past years. The strategy to reduce the collective dose is presented, in particular the use of remote controlled robots. An important part of the work performed during this period involves supporting other teams (acceptance tests, new equipment installation, etc.). Finally, as a result of the LS1 experience, a medium to long term strategy is depicted, focusing on the preparation of the next shutdown (LS2) and the integration of LINAC4 in the in...

  5. Report on the use of programmable digital computers in the shutdown systems of the Darlington G.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    This report considers the use of large, programmable computers in the shutdown system at the planned Darlington Generating Station. After a review of the document submitted to the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. Engineering Company in support of gaining AECB's agreement in principle to such a system, the ACNS concludes that no fundamental principle will be challenged by the introduction of computer technology into safety systems. It cautions, however, that the AECB should ensure that existing principles particularly those of independence and redundancy, will not be compromised in the application

  6. Reservation system with graphical user interface

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Mahmoud A. Abdelhamid; Jamjoom, Hani T.; Podlaseck, Mark E.; Qu, Huiming; Shae, Zon-Yin; Sheopuri, Anshul

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for providing a reservation system are provided. The techniques include displaying a scalable visualization object, wherein the scalable visualization object comprises an expanded view element of the reservation system depicting

  7. Fuse and application of said fuse to the construction of an emergency shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taulier, H.H.L.; Brugeille, G.

    1978-01-01

    A fuse device for an automatic emergency shutdown system in fast reactors provides a coupling between a casing tube placed within a fuel can and a series of neutron-absorbing masses held together above the reactor core under normal operating conditions but released in free fall to the lower portion of the casing tube at the level of the reactor core as a result of melting of the fuse when operating characteristics such as temperature or neutron flux attain a level which exceeds a predetermined threshold

  8. Calculation of the negative reactivity inserted by the shutdown system number two (SDS2) of a CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, B [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The secondary shutdown system (SDS2) of a CANDU reactor consists of liquid poison injection through nozzles disposed horizontally across the core. The nominal concentration of gadolinium nitrate poison is 8000 ppm. With the methods available to the nuclear industry for calculating the negative reactivity inserted by the SDS2, some approximations are needed, and a simplified model of poison propagation has to be used to calculate the differential cross sections. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the errors introduced by the approximations in the supercell and core calculations. The MULTICELL and EXCELL codes gave different power distributions, and further work was recommended. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Fuse and application of said fuse to the construction of an emergency shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taulier, H.H.L.; Brugeilles, G.

    1976-01-01

    A fuse device for an automatic emergency shutdown system in fast reactors provides a coupling between a casing tube placed within a fuel can and a series of neutron-absorbing masses held together above the reactor core under normal operating conditions. They are released in free fall to the lower portion of the casing tube at the level of the reactor core as a result of melting of the fuse when operating characteristics such as temperature or neutron flux attain a level which exceeds a predetermined threshold

  10. On line test of trip channels and actuators in primary shutdown system for RAPP-3,4/KAIGA-1,2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramanik, M.; Gupta, P.K.; Ravi Prakash

    1997-01-01

    Several types of system design and logic arrangements have been used for reactor shutdown systems to avoid the possibility that a single failure within the trip channels/shutdown system actuators can prevent a shutdown system actuation. The trip channels and the logic arrangements associated with the shutdown systems use redundancy to allow them to continue to operate successfully even after having a certain number of failures. A periodic test is thus needed to detect and repair/replace failed elements to prevent accumulation and eventual system failure. The test must be capable of detecting the first failure. The design initiates shutdown system actuation by deenergising the logic relays and turning off the power to the final electrical actuators. Thus, the systems are fail safe with respect to loss of electrical power to the instruments, logic channels and the actuators. Several system/logic arrangements are used to reduce the chances of spurious actuation caused by the loss of a single power supply and other single failures. In general, the systems use coincidence of instrument channel trips and have separate power supplies for the individual instrument channel and dual power supplies where a single final control element is used. These features also permit on line test of instrument channels and logic train. On line test detects component failures not found by other means. The test determines whether gross failure has occurred rather than perform a calibration. As far as practicable the whole channel from sensors to logic and final control element is to be tested. (author)

  11. A Study on the Risk Reduction Effect by MLCS (Mid-loop Level Control System) of EUAPR using the Low-Power and Shutdown PSA Result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Keunsung; Choi, Sunmi; Kim, Eden

    2016-01-01

    The EU-APR design has been developed in order to expand and diversify the global nuclear power market of APR1400. For the improvement of shutdown risk for the EUAPR, the mid-loop level control system (MLCS) is considered during mid-loop operation for the EU-APR, which is not incorporated into SKN 3 and 4 (APR1400 Type) in Korea. Commonly, the risk associated with the NPP can be identified through the PSA. Thus, this paper discusses the low power and shutdown (LPSD) risk reduction effect by MLCS using the Low-Power and Shutdown PSA Result. LPSD level 1 PSA models for EU-APR have been developed. The risk reduction effect by MLCS is discussed. Because the loss of shutdown cooling function during mid-loop is one of the most vulnerable events, the MLCS have a significant influence on CDF in LPSD PSA. The shutdown risk of domestic power plants would likely be reduced if the MLCS is adopted in all operating NPPs in Korea during the mid-loop operation. It is expected that this work will contribute to reduce shutdown risk of domestic power plants

  12. The application and design of distributed control system in reactor shutdown system of Qinshan phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Guoquan; Liu Wangtian; Yu Yijun; Xiong Weihua

    2006-03-01

    The design, commissioning and running of the reactor trip parameter monitoring system used in Qinshan Phase III are introduced. The applying technology of Distributed Control System realized trip parameter monitoring and realized the function of trip parameters quick data acquisitioning, transferring, saving, alarm, query. The applying of trip parameters monitoring system improved the abilities of plant status monitoring and event analyzing, and increased the security and economy of nuclear power plant. (authors)

  13. Reservation system with graphical user interface

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Mahmoud A. Abdelhamid

    2012-01-05

    Techniques for providing a reservation system are provided. The techniques include displaying a scalable visualization object, wherein the scalable visualization object comprises an expanded view element of the reservation system depicting information in connection with a selected interval of time and a compressed view element of the reservation system depicting information in connection with one or more additional intervals of time, maintaining a visual context between the expanded view and the compressed view within the visualization object, and enabling a user to switch between the expanded view and the compressed view to facilitate use of the reservation system.

  14. Evaluation system of minerals reserve at Nuclebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.; Guerra, P.A.G.; Vinha, C.A.G. da.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the methodology used for the reserve evaluation of minerals, particularly of uranium, as used world wide, and specially at Nuclebras. The paper discusses a series of procedures envolving basic definitions, reserve evaluation methods (Conventional, Statistical and Geoestatistical), data management, use of computer systems, classification of reserves as well as the results achieved [pt

  15. Anode protection system for shutdown of solid oxide fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bob X; Grieves, Malcolm J; Kelly, Sean M

    2014-12-30

    An Anode Protection Systems for a SOFC system, having a Reductant Supply and safety subsystem, a SOFC anode protection subsystem, and a Post Combustion and slip stream control subsystem. The Reductant Supply and safety subsystem includes means for generating a reducing gas or vapor to prevent re-oxidation of the Ni in the anode layer during the course of shut down of the SOFC stack. The underlying ammonia or hydrogen based material used to generate a reducing gas or vapor to prevent the re-oxidation of the Ni can be in either a solid or liquid stored inside a portable container. The SOFC anode protection subsystem provides an internal pressure of 0.2 to 10 kPa to prevent air from entering into the SOFC system. The Post Combustion and slip stream control subsystem provides a catalyst converter configured to treat any residual reducing gas in the slip stream gas exiting from SOFC stack.

  16. Development and validation of a model for high pressure liquid poison injection for CANDU-6 shutdown system no.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, B.-W.; Jeong, C.J.; Choi, J.H.; Yoo, S.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    In CANDU reactor one of the two reactor shutdown systems is the liquid poison injection system which injects the highly pressurized liquid neutron poison into the moderator tank via small holes on the nozzle pipes. To ensure the safe shutdown of a reactor it is necessary for the poison curtains generated by jets provide quick, and enough negative reactivity to the reactor during the early stage of the accident. In order to produce the neutron cross section necessary to perform this work, the poison concentration distribution during the transient is necessary. In this study, a set of models for analyzing the transient poison concentration induced by this high pressure poison injection jet activated upon the reactor trip in a CANDU-6 reactor moderator tank has been developed and used to generate the poison concentration distribution of the poison curtains induced by the high pressure jets injected into the vacant region between the calandria tube banks. The poison injection rate through the jet holes drilled on the nozzle pipes is obtained by a 1-D transient hydrodynamic code called, ALITRIG, and this injection rate is used to provide the inlet boundary condition to a 3-D CFD model of the moderator tank based on CFX4.3, an AEA Technology CFD code, to simulate the formation and growth of the poison jet curtain inside the moderator tank. For validation, the current model is validated against a poison injection experiment performed at BARC, India and another poison jet experiment for Generic CANDU-6 performed at AECL, Canada. In conclusion this set of models is considered to predict the experimental results in a physically reasonable and consistent manner. (author)

  17. U.S. Federal Reserve Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset is comprised of forty-five entities that are part of the United States Federal Reserve System according to the United States Department of Treasury. The...

  18. Shutdown risk monitoring in TEPCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroki; Masuda, Takahiro; Denda, Yasutaka; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Imai, Shun-ichi; Miyata, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    At present, we are introducing risk monitors into our all three nuclear power stations; Fukushima Daiichi, Fukushima Daini and Kashiwazaki Kariwa, with technical support of TEPSYS. By monitoring shutdown risk of each unit, we are trying to optimize risks during outage inspection, and raising staff's awareness for reactor safety. This paper presents our recent shutdown risk monitoring activities in Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Shutdown risk monitoring has been carried out for the past five outages of Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Daily-changing shutdown risk is evaluated in the form of core damage frequency (CDF [/day/reactor]). We also examine high-risk point of outage plan if CDF is greater than the threshold at anytime of outage. The results are delivered to operational and maintenance staff before outage. The threshold value is set ten times as much as CDF of unit in operation. As CDF exceeds the threshold, we try to either change the system configuration, or let workers pay more attention to their works during the high-risk period. We already have some examples of outage plan modification to reduce CDF using the risk monitoring information. Greater number of station staff tends to pay more attention to shutdown risk thanks to these activities. (author)

  19. Technical Specification action statements requiring shutdown. A risk perspective with application to the RHR/SSW systems of a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankamo, T. [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    When safety systems fail during power operation, the limiting conditions for operation (LCOs) and associated action statements of technical specifications typically require that the plant be shut down within the limits of allowed outage time (AOT). However, when a system needed to remove decay heat, such as the residual heat removal (RHR) system, is inoperable or degraded, shutting down the plant may not necessarily be preferable, from a risk perspective, to continuing power operation over a usual repair time, giving priority to the repairs. The risk impact of the basic operational alternatives, i.e., continued operation or shutdown, was evaluated for failures in the RHR and standby service water (SSW) systems of a boiling-water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant. A complete or partial failure of the SSW system fails or degrades not only the RHR system but other front-line safety systems supported by the SSW system. This report presents the methodology to evaluate the risk impact of LCOs and associated AOT; the results of risk evaluation from its application to the RHR and SSW systems of a BWR; the findings from the risk-sensitivity analyses to identify alternative operational policies; and the major insights and recommendations to improve the technical specifications action statements.

  20. Reserve valuation in electric power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Pablo Ariel

    Operational reliability is provided in part by scheduling capacity in excess of the load forecast. This reserve capacity balances the uncertain power demand with the supply in real time and provides for equipment outages. Traditionally, reserve scheduling has been ensured by enforcing reserve requirements in the operations planning. An alternate approach is to employ a stochastic formulation, which allows the explicit modeling of the sources of uncertainty. This thesis compares stochastic and reserve methods and evaluates the benefits of a combined approach for the efficient management of uncertainty in the unit commitment problem. Numerical studies show that the unit commitment solutions obtained for the combined approach are robust and superior with respect to the traditional approach. These robust solutions are especially valuable in areas with a high proportion of wind power, as their built-in flexibility allows the dispatch of practically all the available wind power while minimizing the costs of operation. The scheduled reserve has an economic value since it reduces the outage costs. In several electricity markets, reserve demand functions have been implemented to take into account the value of reserve in the market clearing process. These often take the form of a step-down function at the reserve requirement level, and as such they may not appropriately represent the reserve value. The value of reserve is impacted by the reliability, dynamic and stochastic characteristics of system components, the system operation policies, and the economic aspects such as the risk preferences of the demand. In this thesis, these aspects are taken into account to approximate the reserve value and construct reserve demand functions. Illustrative examples show that the demand functions constructed have similarities with those implemented in some markets.

  1. Design and implementation of land reservation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yurong; Gao, Qingqiang

    2009-10-01

    Land reservation is defined as a land management policy for insuring the government to control primary land market. It requires the government to obtain the land first, according to plan, by purchase, confiscation and exchanging, and then exploit and consolidate the land for reservation. Underlying this policy, it is possible for the government to satisfy and manipulate the needs of land for urban development. The author designs and develops "Land Reservation System for Eastern Lake Development District" (LRSELDD), which deals with the realistic land requirement problems in Wuhan Eastern Lake Development Districts. The LRSELDD utilizes modern technologies and solutions of computer science and GIS to process multiple source data related with land. Based on experiments on the system, this paper will first analyze workflow land reservation system and design the system structure based on its principles, then illustrate the approach of organization and management of spatial data, describe the system functions according to the characteristics of land reservation and consolidation finally. The system is running to serve for current work in Eastern Lake Development Districts. It is able to scientifically manage both current and planning land information, as well as the information about land supplying. We use the LRSELDD in our routine work, and with such information, decisions on land confiscation and allocation will be made wisely and scientifically.

  2. Emergency reactor shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Morihiko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To smoothen the emergency operation of the control rod in a BWR type reactor and to eliminate the external discharge of radioactively contaminated water. Constitution: A drain receiving tank is connected through a scram valve to the top of a cylinder which is containing a hydraulic piston connected to a trombone-shaped control rod and an accumulator is connected through another scram valve to the bottom of the cylinder. The respective scram valves are constructed to be opened by the reactor emergency shutdown signal from a reactor control system in such a manner that drain valve and a vent valve of the tank normally opened at the standby time are closed after approx. 10 seconds from the opening of the scram valves. In this manner, back pressure is not applied to the hydraulic piston at the emergency time, thereby smoothly operating the control rod. (Sikiya, K.)

  3. Assessment of shutdown management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, A.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been a number of events that have occurred during nuclear plant outages. These events included losses of AC power, losses of decay heat removal capability, reductions in shutdown margin, and losses of reactor coolant system inventory. Individually, these events have not posed nor indicated an undue risk to public health and safety. Collectively however, they contributed to a perception that outage activities are not being controlled effectively. This paper reports that for many of these same reasons, events that occur during outages have also been of concern to the industry. These events can have a significant economic impact on a company in addition to their being disruptive to the conduct of an efficient outage. And while we have expended industry resources reviewing these events, we have not been fully effective at addressing the root cause of the problem

  4. Study on Online Hotel Reservation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Alleweldt, Frank; Tonner, Klaus; McDonald, Marc

    2009-01-01

    This study, conducted by Civic Consulting, looks at both pre-contractual and contractual matters concerning online hotel reservation systems, examines relevant Community rules, identifies gaps and, where needed, discusses possible policy options. Key conclusions The study shows that the impact of Community law on online hotel

  5. Experience in ultrasonic gap measurement between calandria tubes and liquid injection shutdown systems nozzles in Bruce Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abucay, R.C.; Mahil, K.S.; Goszczynski, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The gaps between calandria tubes (CT) and Liquid Injection Shutdown System (LISS) nozzles at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station ''A'' (Bruce A) are known to decrease with time due to radiation induced creep/sag of the calandria tubes. If this gap decreases to a point where the calandria tubes come into contact with the LISS nozzle, the calandria tubes could fail as a result of fretting damage. Proximity measurements were needed to verify the analytical models and ensure that CT/LISS nozzle contact does not occur earlier than predicted. The technique used was originally developed at Ontario Hydro Technologies (formerly Ontario Hydro Research Division) in the late seventies and put into practical use by Research and Productivity Council (RPC) of New Brunswick, who carried out similar measurements at Point Lepreau NGS in 1989 and 1991. The gap measurement was accomplished y inserting an inspection probe, containing four ultrasonic transducers (2 to measure gaps and 2 to check for probe tilt) and a Fredericks electrolytic potentiometer as a probe rotational sensor, inside LISS Nozzle number-sign 7. The ultrasonic measurements were fed to a system computer that was programmed to convert the readings into fully compensated gaps, taking into account moderator heavy water temperature and probe tilt. Since the measured gaps were found to be generally larger than predicted, the time to CT/LISS nozzle contact is now being re-evaluated and the planned LISS nozzle replacement will likely be deferred, resulting in considerable savings

  6. On the functional failures concept and probabilistic safety margins: challenges in application for evaluation of effectiveness of shutdown systems - 15318

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serghiuta, D.; Tholammakkil, J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of level-3 reliability approach and the concept of functional failure probability could provide the basis for defining a safety margin metric which would include a limit for the probability of functional failure, in line with the definition of a reliability-based design. It can also allow a quantification of level of confidence, by explicit modeling and quantification of uncertainties, and provide a better framework for representation of actual design and optimization of design margins within an integrated probabilistic-deterministic model. This paper reviews the attributes and challenges in application of functional failure concept in evaluation of risk-informed safety margins using as illustrative example the case of CANDU reactors shutdown systems effectiveness. A risk-informed formulation is first introduced for estimation of a reasonable limit for the functional failure probability using a Swiss cheese model. It is concluded that more research is needed in this area and a deterministic - probabilistic approach may be a reasonable intermediate step for evaluation of functional failure probability at the system level. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of CNSC, or any part thereof. (authors)

  7. Regulatory Considerations for the Long Term Cooling Safe Shutdown Requirements of the Passive Residual Heat Removal Systems in Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, S. K.; Bae, S. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Hwang, Min Jeong; Bang, Young Seok; Hwang, Taesuk

    2016-01-01

    USNRC approved safe shutdown at 215.6 .deg. C for a safe and long term cooling state for the redundant passive RHRSs by SECY-94-084. USNRC issued COLA(Combined Construction and Operating License) for the Levy County NP Unit-1/2 for the AP1000 passive RHRSs in 2014. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power(KHNP) is developing APR+ and adopted Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System(PAFS) as a new passive RHRS design. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety(KINS) has been developing regulatory guides for the advanced safety design features of the advanced ALWRs which has plan to construct in near future in Korea[5]. Safety and regulatory issues as well as the safe shut down requirements of the passive RHRS are discussed and considerations in developing regulatory guides for the passive RHRS are presented herein. Passive RHRSs have been introduced as new safety design features for the advanced reactors under development in Korea. These passive RHRSs have potential advantages over existing active RHRS, however, their functions are limited due to inherent ability of passive heat removal processes. It is high time to evaluate the performance of the passive PRHRs and develop regulatory guides for the safety as well as the performance analyses of the passive RHRS

  8. Shutdown of the River Water System at the Savannah River Site: Draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) evaluates alternative approaches to and environmental impacts of shutting down the River Water System at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Five production reactors were operated at the site.to support these facilities, the River Water System was constructed to provide cooling water to pass through heat exchangers to absorb heat from the reactor core in each of the five reactor areas (C, K, L, P, and R). The DOE Savannah River Strategic Plan directs the SRS to find ways to reduce operating costs and to determine what site infrastructure it must maintain and what infrastructure is surplus. The River Water System has been identified as a potential surplus facility. Three alternatives to reduce the River Water System operating costs are evaluated in this EIS. In addition to the No-Action Alternative, which consists of continuing to operate the River Water System, this EIS examines one alternative (the Preferred Alternative) to shut down and maintain the River Water System in a standby condition until DOE determines that a standby condition is no longer necessary, and one alternative to shut down and deactivate the River Water System. The document provides background information and introduces the River Water System at the SRS; sets forth the purpose and need for DOE action; describes the alternatives DOE is considering; describes the environment at the SRS and in the surrounding area potentially affected by the alternatives addressed and provides a detailed assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives; and identifies regulatory requirements and evaluates their applicability to the alternatives considered

  9. Shutdown risk analysis for a BWR plant (residual heat removal systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo Garcia, C.; Merino Teillet, A.; Cerezo, L.

    1994-01-01

    This report analyses the different risk situations which may arise during refuelling outage at Cofrentes NPP. The most critical situations are determined in terms of the small amount of coolant available and the lowest number of heat removal and water make-up systems available. The available times before the boiling point of the coolant is reached and the subsequent moment when the fuel elements are left uncovered in the event of the failure of the normal heat removal functions are determined. The analysis identifies the alternative systems which can be used besides those required by the technical specification and their capacity for residual heat removal and coolant make-up functions. (Author)

  10. Nuclear reactor unit shutdown planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardais, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize the reactor maintenance shutdown efficiency and the reactor availability, an audit had been performed on the shutdown organization at EDF: management, skills, methods and experience feedback have been evaluated; several improvement paths have been identified: project management, introduction of shutdown management professionals, shutdown permanent industrialization, and experience feedback engineering

  11. In reactor measurements, modeling and assessments to predict liquid injection shutdown system nozzle to Calandria tube time to contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirstein, K.; Kalenchuk, D.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years there has been an expanding effort to assess the potential for Calandria Tubes (CTs) coming into contact with Liquid Injection Shutdown System (LISS) Nozzles to ensure continued contact-free operation as required by CSA N285.4. LISS Nozzles (LINs), which run perpendicular to and between rows of fuel channels, sag at a slower rate than the fuel channels. As a result certain LINs may come in contact with CTs above them. The CT/LIN gaps can be predicted from calculated CT sag, LIN sag and a number of component and installation tolerances. This method however results in very conservative predictions when compared to measurements, confirmed with the in reactor measurements initiated in 2000, when gaps were successfully measured the first time using images obtained from a camera-assisted measurement tool inserted into the calandria. To reduce the conservatism of the CT/LIN gap predictions, statistical CT/LIN gap models are used instead. They are derived from a comparison between calculated gaps based on nominal dimensions and the visual image based measured gaps. These reactor specific (typically 95% confidence level) CT/LIN gap models account for all uncertainties and deviations from nominal values. Prediction error margins reduce as more in-reactor gap measurements become available. Each year more measurements are being made using this standardized visual CT/LIN proximity method. The subsequently prepared reactor-specific models have been used to provide time to contact for every channel above the LINs at these stations. In a number of cases it has been used to demonstrate that the reactor can be operated to its end of life before refurbishment with no predicted contact, or specific at-risk channels have been identified for which appropriate remedial actions could be implemented in a planned manner. (author)

  12. Mobility problems at the KNK II shut-down systems, cause investigations and valuation in comparison with the experience at other plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, B.

    1992-12-01

    During the operation of the second core of the fast test reactor KNK II the shutdown systems showed repeatedly problems with their mobility, which also caused to be reported events. The present report gives a summary description of the events in chronological order. The investigations to remove the mobility problems and the resulting design modifications are described together with the comments of the licensing authorities on the way to the restart of the plant. The results of the post-irradiation investigations in the hot cells and of sodium-chemical investigations are also described. In addition to the comparison of the events at the KNK plant itself and a review of the experiences at comparable plants it will be shown that all known cases of mobility problems did only influence the availability of the plant but that the safe shut-down of the plant was never at risk [de

  13. Reactor shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toyokazu.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a highly reliable reactor shutdown device capable of checking its function irrespective of the state whether shutdown or operation in a gas-cooled type reactor. Constitution: A hopper is disposed above a guide tube inserted into the reactor core and particulate neutron absorbers are contained in the hopper. An opening for falling particles is disposed to the bottom of the hopper in opposition to the upper end of the guide pipe and the opening is closed by a plug suspended by way of a weld line so as to be capable of dropping. A power source for supplying electrical current to the weld line is disposed. Accordingly, if the current is supplied to the weld line, the line is cut by welding to fall the plug so that the neutron-absorbing particles fall from the opening into the guide pipe to shutdown the reactor, whereby high reliability is obtained for the operation. (Seki, T.)

  14. Safety shutdown separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Steven Allen; Anakor, Ifenna Kingsley; Farrell, Greg Robert

    2015-06-30

    The present invention pertains to electrochemical cells which comprise (a) an anode; (b) a cathode; (c) a solid porous separator, such as a polyolefin, xerogel, or inorganic oxide separator; and (d) a nonaqueous electrolyte, wherein the separator comprises a porous membrane having a microporous coating comprising polymer particles which have not coalesced to form a continuous film. This microporous coating on the separator acts as a safety shutdown layer that rapidly increases the internal resistivity and shuts the cell down upon heating to an elevated temperature, such as 110.degree. C. Also provided are methods for increasing the safety of an electrochemical cell by utilizing such separators with a safety shutdown layer.

  15. Reserve requirement systems in OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Yueh-Yun C. O’Brien

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares the reserve requirements of OECD countries. Reserve requirements are the minimum percentages or amounts of liabilities that depository institutions are required to keep in cash or as deposits with their central banks. To facilitate monetary policy implementation, twenty-four of the thirty OECD countries impose reserve requirements to influence their banking systems’ demand for liquidity. These include twelve OECD countries that are also members of the European Economic and...

  16. Plasma shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosogane, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Takahide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent concentration of plasma currents to the plasma center upon plasma shutdown in a torus type thermonuclear device by the injection of fuels to the plasma center thereby prevent plasma disruption at the plasma center. Constitution: The plasma shutdown device comprises a plasma current measuring device that measures the current distribution of plasmas confined within a vacuum vessel and outputs a control signal for cooling the plasma center when the plasma currents concentrate to the plasma center and a fuel supply device that supplies fuels to the plasma center for cooling the center. The fuels are injected in the form of pellets into the plasmas. The direction and the velocity of the injection are set such that the pellets are ionized at the center of the plasmas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Defense Travel System: an analysis of the system's reservation module

    OpenAIRE

    Logan, Anita Guevara

    2008-01-01

    MBA Professional Report The purpose of this project is to determine if the DTS reservation module is in compliance based with the standards set by the DOD. By examining flights given in DTS and comparing them to a commercial online travel company (Expedia) will determine whether the implementation of ITA software in 2007, as part of the renovation process is effective and that the reservation module currently meeting standards. Another purpose is to determine if the system has improved...

  18. 78 FR 50038 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ....33(c), the revised plan meets the reserve's requirements for compliance. The Wells Reserve Management... Reserve System AGENCY: Estuarine Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management.... ACTION: Notice of Public Comment Period for the Wells, Maine National Estuarine Research Reserve...

  19. TRIGA forced shutdowns analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negut, Gheorghe; Laslau, Florica

    2008-01-01

    The need for improving the operation leads us to use new methods and strategies. Probabilistic safety assessments and statistical analysis provide insights useful for our reactor operation. This paper is dedicated to analysis of the forced shutdowns during the first reactor operation period, between 1980 to 1989. A forced shutdown data base was designed using data on forced shutdowns collected from the reactor operation logbooks. In order to sort out the forced shutdowns the records have the following fields: - current number, date, equipment failed, failure type (M for mechanical, E for electrical, D for irradiation device, U for human factor failure; - scram mode, SE for external scram, failure of reactor cooling circuits and/or irradiation devices, SR for reactor scram, exceeding of reactor nuclear parameters, SB for reactor scram by control rod drop, SM for manual scram required by the abnormal reactor status; - scram cause, giving more information on the forced shutdown. This data base was processed using DBase III. The data processing techniques are presented. To sort out the data, one of the criteria was the number of scrams per year, failure type, scram mode, etc. There are presented yearly scrams, total operation time in hours, total unavailable time, median unavailable time period, reactor availability A. There are given the formulae used to calculate the reactor operational parameters. There are shown the scrams per year in the 1980 to 1989 period, the reactor operation time per year, the reactor shutdown time per year and the operating time versus down time per year. Total number of scrams in the covered period was 643 which caused a reactor down time of 4282.25 hours. In a table the scrams as sorted on the failure type is shown. Summarising, this study emphasized some problems and difficulties which occurred during the TRIGA reactor operation at Pitesti. One main difficulty in creating this data base was the unstandardized scram record mode. Some times

  20. Method for calculating the forces and deformations in the fast reactor fuel assembly accounting for the effects of reactor control system elements and shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhachev, Yu.I.; Vashlyaev, Yu.N.; Kravchenko, I.N.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for calculating deformations and interaction forces of heat-generating assemblies (HGA) of fast reactor core with account for the effect of control and protection system (CPS) elements at the reactor operation and change of interaction efforts between HGA at the reactor shutdown, are described. The results of testing the suggested methods on example of estimate of HGA behaviour of the BN-350 reactor are presented. For estimating the effect of CPS elements on HGA bending the sector model has been used. It is assumed that HGA deformation inside each sector is independent of HGA deformation of other sectors. A higher calculation accuracy is attained by means of laying out of sectors into regions of preferable influence of emergency protection elements and compensating packets. When determining deformation and interaction efforts between HGA caused by temperature change in the course of shutdown it is supposed that the HGA deformation is purely elastic. The methods described are realized in the form of ABRI-CPS and ABRI-HOL programs written in FORTRAN for the BESM-6 computer. The results of HGA calculations of the BN-350 reactor core show that CPS elements decrease contact efforts in the middle of the central packet, increase contact efforts in the peak of the central packet, increase contact efforts in the peaks of packets from the eight row to the periphery and increase contact efforts in the middles of packets from the 5th to 9th row [ru

  1. Shutdown Safety in NEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluhak, Mario; Senegovic, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Industry performance analysis since 2004 has revealed that 23% of the events reported to WANO occurred during outage periods. Given the fact that a plant is in the outage only 5 percent of the time, this emphasizes the importance of shutdown safety and measures station staffs undertake to maintain effective barriers to safety margins during the outage. Back in 1990s, the industry adopted guidance to meet safety requirements by focusing on safety functions. Both WANO and INPO released various documents, reports and guidelines to help accomplish those requirements. However, in the last decade inadequate 'defence in depth' has led to several events affecting shutdown safety and challenging one of the most important nuclear safety principles: 'The special characteristics of nuclear technology are taken into account in all decisions and actions. Reactivity control, continuity of core cooling, and integrity of fission product barriers are valued as essential, distinguishing attributes of nuclear station work environment'. NEK has recognized the importance of 'defence in depth'Industry performance analysis since 2004 has revealed that 23% of the events reported to WANO occurred during outage periods. Given the fact that a plant is in the outage only 5 percent of the time, this emphasizes the importance of shutdown safety and measures station staffs undertake to maintain effective barriers to safety margins during the outage. Back in 1990s, the industry adopted guidance to meet safety requirements by focusing on safety functions. Both WANO and INPO released various documents, reports and guidelines to help accomplish those requirements. However, in the last decade inadequate 'defence in depth' has led to several events affecting shutdown safety and challenging one of the most important nuclear safety principles: 'The special characteristics of nuclear technology are taken into account in all decisions and actions. Reactivity

  2. Reactor shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumiya, Hirohito; Endo, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yasushi.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor shutdown device capable of suppressing change of a core insertion amount relative to temperature change during normal operation and having a great extension amount due to thermal expansion and high mechanical strength. A control rod main body is contained vertically movably in a guide tube disposed in a reactor core. An extension member extends upward from the upper end of a control rod main body and suspends the control rod main body. A shrinkable member intervenes at a midway of the extension member and is made shrinkable. A temperature sensitive member contains coolants at the inside and surrounds the shrinkable member. Thus, if the temperature of external coolants rises abruptly, the shrinkable member is extended by thermal expansion of the coolants in the temperature sensitive member. Upon usual reactor startup, the coolants in the temperature sensitive member cause no substantial thermal expansion by temperature elevation from a cold shutdown temperature to a rated power operation temperature, and the shrinkable member maintains its original state, so that the control rod main body is not inserted into the reactor core. However, upon abrupt temperature elevation, the control rod main body is inserted into the reactor core. (I.S.)

  3. Safety aspects of unplanned shutdowns and trips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The issue of unplanned shutdowns and trips is receiving increased attention worldwide in view of its importance to plant safety and availability. There exists significant variation in the number of forced shutdowns for nuclear power plants of the same type operating worldwide. The reduction of the frequency of these events will have safety benefits in terms of reducing the frequency of plant transients and the challenges to the safety systems, and the risks of possible incidents. This report provides an insight into the causes of unplanned shutdowns experienced in operating nuclear power plants worldwide, the good practices that have been found effective in minimizing their occurrence, and the measures that have been taken to reduce these events. Specific information on the experiences, approaches and practices of some countries in dealing with this issue is presented in Appendix A

  4. Shutdown problems in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    Some of the problems connected with a normal shutdown at the end of the burn phase (soft shutdown) and with a shutdown caused by disruptive instability (hard shutdown) have been considered. For a soft shutdown a cursory literature search was undertaken and methods for controlling the thermal wall loading were listed. Because shutdown computer codes are not widespread, some of the differences between start-up codes and shutdown codes were discussed along with program changes needed to change a start-up code to a shutdown code. For a hard shutdown, the major problems are large induced voltages in the ohmic-heating and equilibrium-field coils and high first wall erosion. A literature search of plasma-wall interactions was carried out. Phenomena that occur at the plasma-wall interface can be quite complicated. For example, material evaporated from the wall can form a virtual limiter or shield protecting the wall from major damage. Thermal gradients that occur during the interaction can produce currents whose associated magnetic field also helps shield the wall

  5. An Online Evaluation of Operating Reserve for System Security

    OpenAIRE

    Le-Ren Chang-Chien; Yin-Juin Lin; Chin-Chung Wu

    2007-01-01

    Utilities use operating reserve for frequency regulation.To ensure that the operating frequency and system security are well maintained, the operating grid codes always specify that the reserve quantity and response rate should meet some prescribed levels. This paper proposes a methodology to evaluate system's contingency reserve for an isolated power network. With the presented algorithm to estimate system's frequency response characteristic, an online allocation of contingency reserve would...

  6. Certificate for Safe Emergency Shutdown of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Svenstrup, Mikael; Pedersen, Andreas Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    To avoid damage to a wind turbine in the case of a fault or a large wind gust, a detection scheme for emergency shutdown is developed. Specifically, the concept of a safety envelope is introduced. Within the safety envelope, the system can be shutdown without risking structural damage to the turb...

  7. The Chernobyl plant shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The Chernobylsk-1 reactor, operational in september 1977 has been stopped in november 1996; the Chernobylsk-2 reactor started in november 1978 is out of order since 1991 following a fire. The Chernobylsk-3 reactor began in 1981. During the last three years it occurs several maintenance operations that stop it. In june 2000, the Ukrainian authorities decided to stop it definitively on the 15. of december (2000). This file handles the subject. it is divided in four chapters: the first one gives the general context of the plant shutdown, the second chapter studies the supporting projects to stop definitively the nuclear plant, the third chapter treats the question of the sarcophagus, and the fourth and final chapter studies the consequences of the accident and the contaminated territories. (N.C.)

  8. Reactor shutdown device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Aono, Hidehiro [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Fujita, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi

    1996-02-20

    The present invention concerns a reactor shutdown device of a LMFBR type reactor, and provides a magnetic circuit having a sharp changing property of holding force relative to temperature change. Namely, a magnetic bridge is attached to a portion of the magnetic circuit. Then, required conditions are satisfied. Alternatively, even if the temperature dependent change of magnetic saturation of a temperature sensing alloy itself is somewhat moderated, the holding force from an erroneous dropping preventive temperature to a separating temperature can be abruptly reduced while keeping the holding force at a temperature lower than the erroneous dropping preventive temperature. Provision of the magnetic bridge increases the temperature dependent change of the holding force of the entire magnetic circuit. As a result, margin for the design of the temperature sensing alloy is extended. Actual design is enabled, and the range for selecting the temperature sensing alloy can be enlarged. (I.S.).

  9. Reactor shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Aono, Hidehiro; Fujita, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor shutdown device of a LMFBR type reactor, and provides a magnetic circuit having a sharp changing property of holding force relative to temperature change. Namely, a magnetic bridge is attached to a portion of the magnetic circuit. Then, required conditions are satisfied. Alternatively, even if the temperature dependent change of magnetic saturation of a temperature sensing alloy itself is somewhat moderated, the holding force from an erroneous dropping preventive temperature to a separating temperature can be abruptly reduced while keeping the holding force at a temperature lower than the erroneous dropping preventive temperature. Provision of the magnetic bridge increases the temperature dependent change of the holding force of the entire magnetic circuit. As a result, margin for the design of the temperature sensing alloy is extended. Actual design is enabled, and the range for selecting the temperature sensing alloy can be enlarged. (I.S.)

  10. 77 FR 60107 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... awareness and community involvement in stewardship, incompatible use by visitors, and ecological impacts of... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Estuarine Research Reserve System AGENCY: Estuarine Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management...

  11. Controlled shutdown of a fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Keskula, Donald H.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for the shutdown of a fuel cell system to relieve system overpressure while maintaining air compressor operation, and corresponding vent valving and control arrangement. The method and venting arrangement are employed in a fuel cell system, for instance a vehicle propulsion system, comprising, in fluid communication, an air compressor having an outlet for providing air to the system, a combustor operative to provide combustor exhaust to the fuel processor.

  12. 76 FR 40338 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... coastal issues of the reserve related to water quality (non-point source pollution), invasive species... Reserve System AGENCY: Estuarine Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management.... ACTION: Notice of Approval and Availability for Revised Management Plans for ACE Basin, SC National...

  13. Optimal shutdown management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottasso, C L; Croce, A; Riboldi, C E D

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a novel approach for the synthesis of the open-loop pitch profile during emergency shutdowns. The problem is of interest in the design of wind turbines, as such maneuvers often generate design driving loads on some of the machine components. The pitch profile synthesis is formulated as a constrained optimal control problem, solved numerically using a direct single shooting approach. A cost function expressing a compromise between load reduction and rotor overspeed is minimized with respect to the unknown blade pitch profile. Constraints may include a load reduction not-to-exceed the next dominating loads, a not-to-be-exceeded maximum rotor speed, and a maximum achievable blade pitch rate. Cost function and constraints are computed over a possibly large number of operating conditions, defined so as to cover as well as possible the operating situations encountered in the lifetime of the machine. All such conditions are simulated by using a high-fidelity aeroservoelastic model of the wind turbine, ensuring the accuracy of the evaluation of all relevant parameters. The paper demonstrates the capabilities of the novel proposed formulation, by optimizing the pitch profile of a multi-MW wind turbine. Results show that the procedure can reliably identify optimal pitch profiles that reduce design-driving loads, in a fully automated way

  14. Optimal shutdown management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottasso, C. L.; Croce, A.; Riboldi, C. E. D.

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents a novel approach for the synthesis of the open-loop pitch profile during emergency shutdowns. The problem is of interest in the design of wind turbines, as such maneuvers often generate design driving loads on some of the machine components. The pitch profile synthesis is formulated as a constrained optimal control problem, solved numerically using a direct single shooting approach. A cost function expressing a compromise between load reduction and rotor overspeed is minimized with respect to the unknown blade pitch profile. Constraints may include a load reduction not-to-exceed the next dominating loads, a not-to-be-exceeded maximum rotor speed, and a maximum achievable blade pitch rate. Cost function and constraints are computed over a possibly large number of operating conditions, defined so as to cover as well as possible the operating situations encountered in the lifetime of the machine. All such conditions are simulated by using a high-fidelity aeroservoelastic model of the wind turbine, ensuring the accuracy of the evaluation of all relevant parameters. The paper demonstrates the capabilities of the novel proposed formulation, by optimizing the pitch profile of a multi-MW wind turbine. Results show that the procedure can reliably identify optimal pitch profiles that reduce design-driving loads, in a fully automated way.

  15. Reactor shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masahiko

    1990-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to reliably shutdown an LMFBR type reactor upon accident of the reactor. That is, curie point magnetic member is made annular so that it can be moved between the outer circumference of an electromagnet and the position above the electromagnet. This enables to enlarge the curie point magnetic member since it is no more necessary to be inserted it in a guide tube. Accordingly, attracting force upon normal operation is increased to remarkably improve the reliability against erronerous scram, etc. Further, since a required gap is formed between the curie point magnetic member and the electromagnet and the heat of coolants is efficiently transmitted to the curie point magnetic member, rapid scram is possible. Further, a position support mechanism is disposed to a part of a control element or at the inner side of the guiding tube for urging and actuating the armature to make it protrude above the top of the guiding tube. With such a constitution, since the armature can be adsorbed without inserting the curie point magnetic member and the electromagnet guide tube, the same effect as in the case of inserting them can be obtained. (I.S.)

  16. BWR startup and shutdown activity transport control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, A.J., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com, E-mail: ajarvis@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper summarizes BWR industry experience on good practices for controlling the transport of corrosion product activity during shutdowns, particularly refueling outages, and for startup chemistry control to minimize IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking). For shutdown, overall goals are to minimize adverse impacts of crud bursts and the time required to remove activated corrosion products from the reactor coolant during the shutdown process prior to refueling, and to assist plants in predicting and controlling radiation exposure during outages. For startup, the overall goals are to highlight conditions during early heatup and startup when sources of reactor coolant oxidants are high, when there is a greater likelihood for chemical excursions associated with refueling outage work activities, and when hydrogen injection is not available to mitigate IGSCC due to system design limitations. BWR water chemistry has changed significantly in recent years with the adoption of hydrogen water chemistry, zinc addition and noble metal chemical applications. These processes have, in some instances, resulted in significant activity increases during shutdown evolutions, which together with reduced time for cleanup because of shorter outages, has consequently increased outage radiation exposure. A review several recent outages shows that adverse effects from these conditions can be minimized, leading to the set of good practice recommendations for shutdown chemistry control. Most plants lose the majority of their hydrogen availability hours during early startup because feedwater hydrogen injection systems were not originally designed to inject hydrogen below 20% power. Hydrogen availability has improved through modifications to inject hydrogen at lower power levels, some near 5%. However, data indicate that IGSCC is accelerated during early startup, when dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide levels are high and reactor coolant temperatures are in the 300 to 400 {sup o

  17. Effects of different international fiscal systems on reserves reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMichael, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of international fiscal systems on oil and gas reserves evaluation and reporting, was reviewed. The movement in reserves estimates with changing technical, political and economic conditions, was described. Difficulties associated with the evaluation and booking of reserves is largely due to the confusing duplication of terms. For example, explorationists refer to reserves as an undrilled prospect, while engineers refer to them as producing property. The financial analyst refers to reserves of a company, while governments refer to the reserves of the country. The importance of defining reserves with full knowledge of the specific regulations that govern the reporting of reserves externally, and the internal reporting requirements for business planning purposes, was stressed. 2 refs

  18. Startup, Shutdown, & Malfunction (SSM) Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA issued a final action to ensure states have plans in place that are fully consistent with the Clean Air Act and recent court decisions concerning startup, shutdown and malfunction (SSM) operations.

  19. Italy: Analysis of Solutions for Passively Actuated Safety Shutdown Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgazzi, L.

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at different special shutdown systems specifically engineered for prevention of severe accidents, to be implemented on Fast Reactors, with main focus on the investigation of the performance of the self-actuated shutdown systems in Sodium Fast Reactors. The passive shut-down systems are designed to shut-down system only by inherent passive reactivity feedback mechanism, under unprotected accident conditions, implying failure of reactor protection system. They are conceived to be self-actuated without any signal elaboration, since the actuation of the system is triggered by the effects induced by the transient like material dilatation, in case of overheating of the coolant for instance, according to Fast Reactor design to meet the safety requirements

  20. A Bayesian reliability study on motorized valves for the emergency core cooling, heat transport isolation and shutdown cooling systems at Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.E.; Rennick, D.F.; Nainer, A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this is to examine operational data on 32 motorized valves in the emergency core cooling, shutdown cooling and heat transport isolation systems and determine if the evidence would support a reduction in testing frequency of these valves. The methodology used is to examine the data which has accumulated on motorized valve failures since Gentilly-2 first entered service, compare these data with similar data from other sources, and determine whether the evidence indicate that demand-based, wear out type failure mechanisms play a significant role in the recorded failures. The statistical data are then updated, using a Bayesian updating procedure, to obtain revised time based failure rates and demand based probabilities of failure on demand for the motorized valves. The revised failure rates and probabilities are then applied to the fault tree models for the systems of interest to determine what effects there would be, with the current test intervals and with extended test intervals, on the probability of failure of the systems. (author)

  1. Evolution of shutdown mechanism for PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Manjit; Govindarajan, G.

    1997-01-01

    In 500 MWe PHWR, there are two independent fast acting shutdown systems namely (1) mechanical shut-off rod system and (2) liquid poison injection system. Both systems are independently capable of keeping the reactor in sub-critical condition during long shutdown. Mechanical shut-off rod system being primary shutdown system calls for a very high reliability of operation as well as effectiveness, which are mainly governed by its ability to operate within a very short time and the magnitude of negative reactivity worth it can provide. Mechanical shut-off rods are normally parked above the core by shut-off rod drive mechanism. On receiving a scram signal, shut-off rods are released from the holding electromagnetic clutch and fall under gravity into the core. This paper discusses the salient features of mechanical shut-off rod system. A brief account of detailed design and development of sub-assemblies of shut-off rod drive mechanism is also presented. (author)

  2. Quantitative Safety Impact of Severe Accident Management Systems for EU-APR during Low Power Shutdown Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Keunsung; Hwang, Do Hun; Chang, Hyun-bin

    2016-01-01

    In order to enlarge and to diversify the export market of APR1400, the EU-APR design was developed based on the APR1400 design to comply with the latest version of the European Utility Requirements (EUR) revision D. The EU-APR design has the distinguished and advanced severe accident management systems taken from the APR1400 to obtain a containment integrity for the beyond design basis accident, such as the Passive Ex-vessel retaining and Cooling System (PECS), the Severe Accident Containment Spray System (SACSS) and the Containment Filtered Vent System (CFVS). The risk associated with the nuclear power plant can be identified through the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). In the EUR chapter 1 and 17 of volume 2, the Criteria for Limited Impact (CLI) should be applied to the Level 2 PSA as a risk metrics. The fraction of exceeding CLI for the EU-APR during LPSD operation was calculated as 4.52% of the CDF under the condition that all severe accident management systems are credited. The PECS, SACSS and CFVS are considered as the severe accident management system which is EU-APR dedicated system. The exemption of each system leads to increase the fraction of exceeding CLI to 54.18%, 89.74% and 21.32% respectively. In case if all these systems are unavailable, the fraction of exceeding CLI is increased to 100%. The most effective system is the SACSS that the system reduces containment pressure and temperature

  3. Quantitative Safety Impact of Severe Accident Management Systems for EU-APR during Low Power Shutdown Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keunsung; Hwang, Do Hun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun-bin [Future and Challenge Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In order to enlarge and to diversify the export market of APR1400, the EU-APR design was developed based on the APR1400 design to comply with the latest version of the European Utility Requirements (EUR) revision D. The EU-APR design has the distinguished and advanced severe accident management systems taken from the APR1400 to obtain a containment integrity for the beyond design basis accident, such as the Passive Ex-vessel retaining and Cooling System (PECS), the Severe Accident Containment Spray System (SACSS) and the Containment Filtered Vent System (CFVS). The risk associated with the nuclear power plant can be identified through the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). In the EUR chapter 1 and 17 of volume 2, the Criteria for Limited Impact (CLI) should be applied to the Level 2 PSA as a risk metrics. The fraction of exceeding CLI for the EU-APR during LPSD operation was calculated as 4.52% of the CDF under the condition that all severe accident management systems are credited. The PECS, SACSS and CFVS are considered as the severe accident management system which is EU-APR dedicated system. The exemption of each system leads to increase the fraction of exceeding CLI to 54.18%, 89.74% and 21.32% respectively. In case if all these systems are unavailable, the fraction of exceeding CLI is increased to 100%. The most effective system is the SACSS that the system reduces containment pressure and temperature.

  4. Definition and means of maintaining the supply ventilation system seismic shutdown portion of the PFP safety envelope. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the modifications to the ventilation system for the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Topics discussed in this report include; system functional requirements, evaluations of equipment, a list of drawings showing the safety envelope boundaries; list of safety envelope equipment, functional requirements for individual safety envelope equipment, and a list of the operational, maintenance and surveillance procedures necessary to operate and maintain the system equipment

  5. Classification system of the mineral reserves and resources of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovinyukov, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the system used to classify the resources and reserves of all minerals and fuels in Ukraine. The classification system is part of an official procedure determined by the Ukrainian State Commission on Reserves. Following preparation of resource estimates the results are registered with the State, which maintains an official inventory of all mineral resources. This paper compares the Ukrainian system to, and finds it compatible with the United Nations International Framework of resource classification. The UN system is based on economics of production and mineability. (author)

  6. Classification system of the mineral reserves and resources of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovyunikov, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the system used to classify the resources and reserves of all minerals and fuels in Ukraine. The classification system is part of an official procedures determined by the Ukrainian State Commission on Reserves. Following preparation of resource estimates the results are registered with the State, which maintains an official inventory of all mineral resources. This paper compares the Ukrainian system to, and finds it compatible with the United Nations International Framework of resources classification. The UN system is based on economics of production and mineability. (author). 1 tab

  7. The design and development of GRASS file reservation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qiulan; Zhu Suijiang; Cheng Yaodong; Chen Gang

    2010-01-01

    GFRS (GRASS File Reservation System) is designed to improve the file access performance of GRASS (Grid-enabled Advanced Storage System) which is a Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM) system developed at Computing Center, Institute of High Energy Physics. GRASS can provide massive storage management and data migration, but the data migration policy is simply based factors such as pool water level, the intervals for migration and so on, so it is short of precise control over files. As for that, we design GFRS to implement user-based file reservation which is to reserve and keep the required files on disks for High Energy physicists. CFRS can improve file access speed for users by avoiding migrating frequently accessed files to tapes. In this paper we first give a brief introduction of GRASS system and then detailed architecture and implementation of GFRS. Experiments results from GFRS have shown good performance and a simple analysis is made based on it. (authors)

  8. Safety analysis of Ignalina NPP during shutdown conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliatka, A.; Uspuras, E.

    2000-01-01

    The accident analysis for the Ignalina NPP with RBMK-1500 reactors at normal operating conditions and at minimum controlled power level (during startup of the reactor) has been performed in the frame of the project I n-Depth Safety Assessment of the Ignalina NPP , which was completed in 1996. However, the plant conditions during the reactor shutdown differ from conditions during reactor operation at full power (equipment status in protection systems, set points for actuation of safety and protection systems, etc.). Results of RELAP5 simulation of two worst initiating events during reactor shutdown - Pressure Header rupture in case of steam reactor cooldown as well as Pressure Header rupture in case of water reactor cooldown are discussed in the paper. Results of analysis shown that reactor are reliably cooled in both cases. Further analysis for all range of initial events during reactor shutdown and at shutdown conditions is recommended. (author)

  9. Technical Assessment: WRAP 1 HVAC Passive Shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.E.; Nash, C.R.; Stroup, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    As the result of careful interpretation of DOE Order 6430.lA and other DOE Orders, the HVAC system for WRAP 1 has been greatly simplified. The HVAC system is now designed to safely shut down to Passive State if power fails for any reason. The fans cease functioning, allowing the Zone 1 and Zone 2 HVAC Confinement Systems to breathe with respect to atmospheric pressure changes. Simplifying the HVAC system avoided overdesign. Construction costs were reduced by eliminating unnecessary equipment. This report summarizes work that was done to define the criteria, physical concepts, and operational experiences that lead to the passive shutdown design for WRAP 1 confinement HVAC systems

  10. Managing and operating the reserve market as one insurance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Youfei; Cai, Bin; Wu, F.F.; Ni, Y.X.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, it is suggested that the preference of an individual consumer for its power supply reliability should be considered when scheduling the system reserve. The mechanism of 'provider insurance' is introduced and the reserve market is to be managed as an insurance system. In our modeling, the generator who provides the insurance of reliable power supply via its reserve, should always collect the payment (the premium), and be rewarded with the spot market price for its called reserve. The consumer who buys the insurance, pays premium and thus obtains a reliable power supply (the claim). It is argued that such a market mechanism will result in the maximum social welfare. Moreover, it is shown that there is a kind of 'moral hazard in reverse' fact that will further improve the market efficiency. Later on, discussions on implementing the proposed method are given, and an illustrative example is provided to show basic features of the proposed method. (author)

  11. Pricing of reserves. Valuing system reserve capacity against spot prices in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, Sebastian; Weber, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    This paper models the interdependencies between markets for secondary reserve capacity and spot electricity to derive the pricing of reserves under equilibrium conditions. Starting with the indifference condition between offering in both markets, the reservation price is derived from the opportunity cost consideration and the unit commitment conditions in a fundamental interrelated market framework. The reserve market examined compares widely to the German market for secondary reserves, but the general approach may also be used to investigate other reserve markets. The approach explores and formalizes the influence of reserve capacity on the spot market supply function. A numerical solution procedure is provided to this non-trivial case of market interaction. The model is used to estimate the expected reservation price development over the last years in Germany. (author)

  12. Wind power variability and power system reserves in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Litong-Palima, Marisciel; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2017-01-01

    Variable renewable generation, primarily from wind and solar, introduces new uncertainties in the operation of power systems. This paper describes and applies a method to quantify how wind power development will affect the use of short-term automatic reserves in the future South African power sys...

  13. Intelligent Lane Reservation System for Highway(s)

    OpenAIRE

    Dobre, Ciprian

    2012-01-01

    Highways tend to get congested because of the increase in the number of cars travelling on them. There are two solutions to this. The first one, which is also expensive, consists in building new highways to support the traffic. A much cheaper alternative consists in the introduction of advanced intelligent traffic control systems to manage traffic and increase the efficiency of the already existing highways. Intelligent lane reservation system for highways (ILRSH) is such a software control s...

  14. Simulation of an SBLOCA Test of Shutdown Cooling System Line Break with the SMARTITL Facility using the MARS-KS Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yeon-Sik; Suh, Jae-Seung [System Engineering and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Hwang; Ryu, Sung-Uk; Yi, Sung-Jae; Park, Hyun-Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    An LBLOCA (Large-Break Loss of Coolant Accident) was inherently eliminated in the design stage. The SMART design has a thermal power of 330MW. Its core exit temperature and pressurizer pressure are 323 .deg. C and 15MPa during normal operating conditions, respectively. An integral-effect test loop for SMART (SMARTITL), called FESTA (Facility for Experimental Simulation of Transients and Accidents), was designed to simulate the integral thermal-hydraulic behavior of SMART. The objectives of SMART-ITL are to investigate and understand the integral performance of reactor systems and components, and the thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring in the system during normal, abnormal, and emergency conditions, and to verify the system safety during various design basis events of SMART. SMART-ITL with four steam generators and PRHRS, has an advantage for a multi-loop effect compared with VISTA-ITL with a single loop. The integral-effect test data will also be used to validate the related thermal-hydraulic models of the safety analysis code such as TASS/SMR-S which is used for a performance and accident analysis of the SMART design. In addition, a scoping analysis on the scaling difference between the standard design of SMART and the basic design of SMART-ITL was performed for an SBLOCA (Small-Break Loss of Coolant Accident) scenario using a best-estimate safety analysis code, MARS-KS. This paper introduces a comparison of an SBLOCA test of a shutdown cooling system line break using SMART-ITL with its post-test calculation using the MARS-KS code. An SBLOCA test and its post-test calculation were successfully performed using the SMART-ITL facility and MARS-KS code. The SBLOCA break is a guillotine break, and its location is on the SCS line (nozzle part of the RCP suction). The steady-state conditions were achieved to satisfy the initial test conditions presented in the test requirement and its boundary conditions were properly simulated.

  15. User's guide for the Uranium Ore Reserve Calculation System (URAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The URAD (Uranium Reserves and Data) system consists of four computer programs designed to facilitate the evaluation of uranium ore reserves analysis and the handling of basic uranium assay data. URAD is designed specifically as a training tool for anyone unfamiliar with the methodology, data requirements, and/or general computer applications in the field of uranium ore reserves analysis. However, it can effectively be used in a 'production' environment involving considerable amounts of data. The resulting programs are written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 3.1) and may be run on any IBM-compatible microcomputer under DOS 2.1 (or later). Only a basic working knowledge of DOS 2.1 is needed to maintain the system and run the programs. This guide includes the overview of the URAD system, the review of sample data and a complete description of the file structure and sample type formats of the basic sample data files. Program URDAT explains the initial processing of the primary UDAT files to obtain standard output listings and gamma-log interpretations of radiometric data, and to create intermediate UDAT files which are used by the ore reserves programs - RESUV, ORSAC, and SCOR. Figs and tabs

  16. Development of retrieval, reservation and management system for measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Kenzo; Ito, Emi.

    1985-08-01

    In order to computerize the lending and management of measuring instruments, at first, the specification of the software was examined, but thereafter, the development was begun. The largest aim of the computerization was the automation and labor saving of the lending works of diverse measuring instruments and the automatic management. From user side, it is desirable to know the specification and the state of use and reservation of measuring instruments and to be able to easily make reservation based on the information. Besides, from management side, it is desirable to know the location and the state of use and reservation of measuring instruments, to immediately prepare for lending and returning, and to automate the recording of lending and returning. So as to satisfy those conditions, the automatic reservation and management system for measuring instruments was developed. At the same time, the means to simply input required data such as specification, names of manufacturers and equipment number was developed. The input of data was carried out for three months from October, 1984, and the system was almost completed in December, 1984. The full scale operation was started in Junuary, 1985. (Kako, I.)

  17. BWR shutdown analyzer using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype alarm system for detecting abnormal reactor shutdowns based on artificial intelligence technology is described. The system incorporates knowledge about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant design and component behavior, as well as knowledge required to distinguish normal, abnormal, and ATWS accident conditions. The system was developed using a software tool environment for creating knowledge-based applications on a LISP machine. To facilitate prototype implementation and evaluation, a casual simulation of BWR shutdown sequences was developed and interfaced with the alarm system. An intelligent graphics interface for execution and control is described. System performance considerations and general observations relating to artificial intelligence application to nuclear power plant problems are provided

  18. Oak Ridge Reservation Public Warning Siren System Annual Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. F. Gee

    2000-01-01

    The full operational test of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Public Warning Siren System (PWSS) was successfully conducted on September 27, 2000. The annual test is a full-scale sounding of the individual siren systems around each of the three Department of Energy (DOE) sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the annual test is to demonstrate and validate the siren systems' ability to alert personnel outdoors in the Immediate Notification Zones (INZ) (approximately two miles) around each site. The success of this test is based on two critical functions of the siren system. The first function is system operability. The system is considered operable if 90% of the sirens are operational. System diagnostics and direct field observations were used to validate the operability of the siren systems. Based on the diagnostic results and field observations, greater than 90% of the sirens were considered operational. The second function is system audibility. The system is considered audible if the siren could be heard in the immediate notification zones around each of the three sites. Direct field observations, along with sound level measurements, were used to validate the audibility of the siren system. Based on the direct field observations and sound level measurements, the siren system was considered audible. The combination of field observations, system diagnostic status reports, and sound level measurements provided a high level of confidence that the system met and would meet operational requirements upon demand. As part of the overall system test, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) activated the Emergency Alerting System (EAS), which utilized area radio stations to make announcements regarding the test and to remind residents of what to do in the event of an actual emergency

  19. SCPR: Secure Crowdsourcing-Based Parking Reservation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsheng Wan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The crowdsourcing-based parking reservation system is a new computing paradigm, where private owners can rent their parking spots out. Security is the main concern for parking reservation systems. However, current schemes cannot provide user privacy protection for drivers and have no key agreement functions, resulting in a lot of security problems. Moreover, current schemes are typically based on the time-consuming bilinear pairing and not suitable for real-time applications. To solve these security and efficiency problems, we present a novel security protocol with user privacy called SCPR. Similar to protocols of this field, SCPR can authenticate drivers involved in the parking reservation system. However, different from other well-known approaches, SCPR uses pseudonyms instead of real identities for providing user privacy protection for drivers and designs a novel pseudonym-based key agreement protocol. Finally, to reduce the time cost, SCPR designs several novel cryptographic algorithms based on the algebraic signature technique. By doing so, SCPR can satisfy a number of security requirements and enjoy high efficiency. Experimental results show SCPR is feasible for real world applications.

  20. A Fast Shutdown Technique for Large Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.; Schmidt, G.L.; Hill, K.; Jardin, S.C.

    1999-01-01

    A practical method is proposed for the fast shutdown of a large ignited tokamak. The method consists of injecting a rapid series of 30-50 deuterium pellets doped with a small ( 0.0005%) concentration of Krypton impurity, and simultaneously ramping the plasma current and shaping fields down over a period of several seconds using the poloidal field system. Detailed modeling with the Tokamak Simulation Code using a newly developed pellet mass deposition model shows that this method should terminate the discharge in a controlled and stable way without producing significant numbers of runaway electrons. A partial prototyping of this technique was accomplished in TFTR

  1. National monetary policy by regional design: the evolving role of the Federal Reserve banks in Federal Reserve System policy

    OpenAIRE

    David C. Wheelock

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the history of Federal Reserve Bank input into Federal Reserve System monetary policymaking. From the Fed's founding in 1914 through the Great Depression, the Reserve Banks held the balance of power. Dissatisfaction with the Fed's performance, however, led to a wholesale reorganization in 1935 that greatly enhanced the authority of the Federal Reserve Board, but retained a role for the Federal Banks through the membership of their presidents on the FOMC, as well as in sett...

  2. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nativ, R.; Hunley, A.E.

    1993-07-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation contains some areas contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater at that depth is saline and has previously been considered stagnant. On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of flow of the saline groundwater and its potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial temperature variations, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. In addition, chemical analyses of brine in adjacent areas in Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia were compared with the deep water underlying the reservation to help assess the origin of the brine. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and freshwater-bearing units. The confined water (along with dissolved solutes) moves along open fractures (or man-made shortcuts) at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow probably are small

  3. LHC Report: The shutdown work nearing completion

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The work planned for the LHC injector chain during the winter shutdown is nearing completion. The PS Booster (PSB) and PS will be closed to access next week, and the control of machine access will be transferred to the CERN Control Centre in preparation for the resumption of machine operation. Hardware tests are being performed in all the machines.   Tests are under way in the LHC tunnel. The technical teams are putting the finishing touches to the work planned for the winter shutdown. At the Linac2, the PS Booster and the PS, work will be completed next week and hardware tests will be carried out soon after. POPS, the new powering system for the PS, will be commissioned for the first time in the coming days after the necessary preliminary tests have been carried out. At the SPS, various magnets have been replaced over recent weeks and the performance tests on the main power supply and other hardware tests will be able to start shortly. After that, the machine will be ready for operation with b...

  4. Oak Ridge Research reactor shutdown maintenance and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, G.H.; Laughlin, D.L.

    1991-05-01

    The Department of Energy ordered the Oak Ridge Research Reactor to be placed in permanent shutdown on July 14, 1987. The paper outlines routine maintenance activities and surveillance tests performed April through September, 1990, on the reactor instrumentation and controls, process system, and the gaseous waste filter system. Preparations are being made to transfer the facility to the Remedial Action Program. 6 tabs

  5. Structure and Functions of the Federal Reserve System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smale, Pauline

    2005-01-01

    .... The Federal Reserve formulates the nation's monetary policy, supervises and regulates banks, and provides a variety of financial services to depository financial institutions and the federal government...

  6. Multi-unit shutdown due to boiler feedwater chemical excursion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebel, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'B' consists of four 935 W CANDU units located on the east shore of Lake Huron in the province of Ontario, Canada. On July 25 and 26, 1989 three of the four operating units were shutdown due to boiler feedwater chemical excursions initiated by a process upset in the Water Treatment Plant that provides demineralized make-up water to all four units. The chemicals that escaped from an ion exchange vessel during a routine regeneration very quickly spread through the condensate make-up system and into the boiler feedwater systems. This resulted in boiler sulfate levels exceeding shutdown limits. A total of 260 GWH of electrical generation was unexpectedly made unavailable to the grid at a time of peak seasonal demand. This event exposed several unforeseen deficiencies and vulnerabilities in the automatic demineralized water make-up quality protection scheme, system designs, operating procedures and the ability of operating personnel to recognize and appropriately respond to such an event. The combination of these factors contributed towards turning a minor system upset into a major multi-unit shutdown. This paper provides the details of the actual event initiation in the Water Treatment Plant and describes the sequence of events that led to the eventual shutdown of three units and near shutdown of the fourth. The design inadequacies, procedural deficiencies and operating personnel responses and difficulties are described. The process of recovering from this event, the flushing out of system piping, boilers and the feedwater train is covered as well as our experiences with setting up supplemental demineralized water supplies including trucking in water and the use of rental trailer mounted demineralizing systems. System design, procedural and operational changes that have been made and that are still being worked on in response to this event are described. The latest evidence of the effect of this event on boiler tube

  7. Problem of the necessary power reserve in interconnected systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin, K W [Verband Deutscher Elektrotechniker (VDE) e.V. (Germany, F.R.); Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl und Inst. fuer Elektrische Anlagen und Energiewirtschaft); Kochs, H D [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl und Inst. fuer Elektrische Anlagen und Energiewirtschaft

    1978-10-01

    After some introductory remarks on the main tasks of electric power generation, the model of reserve use, extension planning, and the task of load distribution are discussed. The theoretical-mathematical text is illustrated by examples of application.

  8. Technical Specification action statements requiring shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, T.; Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.

    1993-11-01

    When safety systems fail during power operation, the limiting conditions for operation (LCOs) and associated action statements of technical specifications typically require that the plant be shut down within the limits of allowed outage time (AOT). However, when a system needed to remove decay heat, such as the residual heat removal (RHR) system, is inoperable or degraded, shutting down the plant may not necessarily be preferable, from a risk perspective, to continuing power operation over a usual repair time, giving priority to the repairs. The risk impact of the basic operational alternatives, i.e., continued operation or shutdown, was evaluated for failures in the RHR and standby service water (SSW) systems of a boiling-water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant. A complete or partial failure of the SSW system fails or degrades not only the RHR system but other front-line safety systems supported by the SSW system. This report presents the methodology to evaluate the risk impact of LCOs and associated AOT; the results of risk evaluation from its application to the RHR and SSW systems of a BWR; the findings from the risk-sensitivity analyses to identify alternative operational policies; and the major insights and recommendations to improve the technical specifications action statements

  9. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheras, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Best, Ralph E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buxton, Kenneth A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); England, Jeffery L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Massaro, Lawrence M. [Fermi Research Alliance (FRA), Batavia, IL (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    important source of information used to identify the transportation mode options for the sites. Especially important in conducting the evaluation were site visits, through which information was obtained that would not have been available otherwise. Extensive photographs taken during the site visits proved to be particularly useful in documenting the current conditions at or near the sites. Additional conclusions from this evaluation include: The 13 shutdown sites use designs from 4 different suppliers involving 11 different (horizontal and vertical) dry storage systems that would require the use of 9 different transportation cask designs to remove the SNF and GTCC waste from the shutdown sites. Although some changes to transportation certificates of compliance will be required, the SNF at the initial 9 shutdown sites (Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion) is in dual purpose dry storage canisters that can be transported, including a small amount of high-burnup fuel. Most sites indicated that 2-3 years of advance time would be required for its preparations before shipments could begin. Some sites could be ready in less time. As additional sites such as Fort Calhoun, Clinton, Quad Cities, Pilgrim, Oyster Creek, and Diablo Canyon shut down, these sites will be included in updates to the evaluation.

  10. Safety considerations for research reactors in extended shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    According to the IAEA Research Reactor Database, in the last 20 years, 367 research reactors have been shut down. Of these, 109 have undergone decommissioning and the rest are in extended shutdown with no clear definition about their future. Still other research reactors are infrequently operated with no meaningful utilization programme. These two situations present concerns related to safety such as loss of corporate memory, personnel qualification, maintenance of components and systems and preparation and maintenance of documentation. There are many reasons to shut down a reactor; these may include: - the need to carry out modifications in the reactor systems; - the need for refurbishment to extend the lifetime of the reactor; - the need to repair reactor structures, systems, or components; - the need to remedy technical problems; - regulatory or public concerns; - local conflicts or wars; - political convenience; - the lack of resources. While any one of these reasons may lead to shutdown of a reactor, each will present unique problems to the reactor management. The large variations from one research reactor to the next also will contribute to the uniqueness of the problems. Any option that the reactor management adopts will affect the future of the facility. Options may include dealing with the cause of the shutdown and returning to normal operation, extending the shutdown period waiting a future decision, or decommissioning. Such options are carefully and properly analysed to ensure that the solution selected is the best in terms of reactor type and size, period of shutdown and legal, economic and social considerations. This publication provides information in support of the IAEA safety standards for research reactors

  11. Experience with after-shutdown decay heat removal - BWRs and PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugh, J.J.; Mollerus, F.J.; Booth, H.R.

    1992-01-01

    Boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) make use of residual heat removal systems (RHRSs) during reactor shutdown. RHRS operational events involving an actual loss or significant degradation of an RHRS during shutdown heat removal are often prompted or aggravated by complex, changing plant conditions and by concurrent maintenance operations. Events involving loss of coolant inventory, loss of decay heat removal capability, or inadvertent pressurization while in cold shutdown have occurred. Because fewer automatic protective fetures are operative during cold shutdowns, both prevention and termination of events depend heavily on operator action. The preservation of RHRS cooling should be an important priority in all shutdown operations, particularly where there is substantial decay heat and a reduced water inventory. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  12. 76 FR 16620 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ..., water quality, community resilience, and public access. Since the last approved management plan in 1992... quality, and invasive species. In addition to programmatic and staffing advances, the reserve has... maritime forest, coastal shrub, wetlands, tidal marshes and sand beaches. The property provides important...

  13. 75 FR 65613 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... based on priority issues defined by the reserve. The objectives described in this plan are designed to... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Estuarine Research..., National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce...

  14. Reactor shut-down device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Fumio; Horikawa, Yuji.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an externally disposed reactor shut-down device for an FBR type reactor using liquid sodium as coolants. An introducing pipe having an outlet port disposed at an upper portion thereof is disposed at a lower end of an upper guide tube. An extension tube, an L-shaped measuring wire support and a measuring wire are disposed at the inside of the guide tube. With such a constitution, low temperature coolants flown out from the lower guide tube of a control rod and a great amount of high temperature coolants flown out from the lower guide tube of a fuel assembly are introduced smoothly to the introducing tube having the measuring wire support disposed therein. Accordingly, the high temperature coolants can be prevented from flowing out to the outside of the introducing tube and coolants after mixing can be flown and hit against a curie point electromagnet efficiently. This can make the response to abnormal temperature rise of coolants satisfactory and can provide reliable reactor scram. (I.N.)

  15. Perspectives on Low Power and Shutdown Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, Allen L.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Lehner, John; Chu, Tsong-Lun; Lois, Erasmai; Drouin, Mary

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results from a program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to examine the risks from low power and shutdown operations. Significant progress has been made by the industry in reducing such risks; however, important operational events continue to occur. Current perceptions of low power and shutdown risks are discussed in the paper along with an assessment of the current methods for understanding important events and quantifying their associated risk

  16. Risks Associated with Shutdown in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    1996-01-01

    The selected set of risks associated with reactor shutdown in PWRs are outlined and discussed (e. g. outage planning, residual heat removal capability, rapid boron dilution, containment integrity, fire protection). The contribution of different outage strategies to overall core damage risk during shutdown is assessed for a particular basic outage plan. The factors which increase or minimize the probability of reactor coolant boiling or core damage are analysed. (author)

  17. ORNL Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, S.M.; Patton, B.D.; Sears, M.B.

    1990-10-01

    This plan presents the results of a technical and economic assessment for shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) isotopes production and distribution facilities. On December 11, 1989, the Department of Energy (DOE), Headquarters, in a memorandum addressed to DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), gave instructions to prepare the ORNL isotopes production and distribution facilities, with the exception of immediate facility needs for krypton-85, tritium, and yttrium-90, for safe shutdown. In response to the memorandum, ORNL identified 17 facilities for shutdown. Each of these facilities is located within the ORNL complex with the exception of Building 9204-3, which is located at the Y-12 Weapons Production Plant. These facilities have been used extensively for the production of radioactive materials by the DOE Isotopes Program. They currently house a large inventory of radioactive materials. Over the years, these aging facilities have inherited the problems associated with storing and processing highly radioactive materials (i.e., facilities' materials degradation and contamination). During FY 1990, ORNL is addressing the requirements for placing these facilities into safe shutdown while maintaining the facilities under the existing maintenance and surveillance plan. The day-to-day operations associated with the surveillance and maintenance of a facility include building checks to ensure that building parameters are meeting the required operational safety requirements, performance of contamination control measures, and preventative maintenance on the facility and facility equipment. Shutdown implementation will begin in FY 1993, and shutdown completion will occur by the end of FY 1994

  18. Maintenance, repair and operation (MRO) of shutdown facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, S.

    2006-01-01

    What level of maintenance does one apply to a shutdown facility? Well it depends on who you ask. Operations staff sees facilities that have completed their useful life cycle as a cost drain while Decommissioning staff sees this as the start of a new life cycle. Based on the decommissioning plan for the particular facility the building could complete another full life cycle while under decommissioning whether it is in storage with surveillance mode or under active decommissioning. This paper will explore how you maintain a facility and systems for many years after its useful life until final decommissioning is completed. When a building is declared redundant, who looks after it until the final decommissioning end state is achieved? At the AECL, Chalk River Labs site the safe shutdown and turnover process is one key element that initiates the decommissioning process. The real trick is orchestrating maintenance, repair and operation plans for a facility that has been poorly invested in during its last years of useful life cycle. To add to that usually shutdowns are prolonged for many years beyond the expected turnover period. During this presentation I will cover what AECL is doing to ensure that the facilities are maintained in a proper state until final decommissioning can be completed. All facilities or systems travel through the same life cycle, design, construction, commissioning, operation, shutdown and demolition. As we all know, nuclear facilities add one more interesting twist to this life cycle called Decommissioning that lands between shutdown and demolition. As a facility nears the shutdown phase, operations staff loose interest in the facility and stop investing in upgrades, repairs and maintenance but continue to invest and focus on maximizing operations. Facility maintenance standards produced by the International Facility Maintenance Association (IFMA) based on a survey done every year state that 2.2% of the total operating costs for the site should be

  19. Wind Farms’ Spatial Distribution Effect on Power System Reserves Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The wind power development during last millennium was typically based on small wind turbines dispersed over large areas, leading to a significant smoothing of the wind power fluctuations in a power system balancing area. The present development goes towards much larger wind farms, concentrated...

  20. Classification of reserve capacity in future power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frunt, J.; Kling, W.L.; Myrzik, J.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    In electrical power systems must always be a balance between supply and demand. Any imbalance will result in a frequency deviation. To reduce the imbalance to zero, ancillary services for balancing are in use. Ancillary services are characterised by their deployment time and their capacity. By using

  1. Probabilistic analysis of 900 MWe PWR. Shutdown technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattei, J.M.; Bars, G.

    1987-11-01

    During annual shutdown, preventive maintenance and modifications which are made on PWRs cause scheduled unavailabilities of equipment or systems which might harm the safety of the installation, in spite of the low level of decay heat during this period. The pumps in the auxiliary feedwater system, component cooling water system, service water system, the water injection arrays (LPIS, HPIS, CVCS), and the containment spray system may have scheduled unavailability, as well as the power supply of the electricity boards. The EDF utility is aware of the risks related to these situations for which accident procedures have been set up and hence has proposed limiting downtime for this equipment during the shutdown period, through technical specifications. The project defines the equipment required to ensure the functions important for safety during the various shutdown phases (criticality, water inventory, evacuation of decay heat, containment). In order to be able to judge the acceptability of these specifications, the IPSN, the technical support of the Service Central de Surete des Installations Nucleaires, has used probabilistic methodology to analyse the impact on the core melt probability of these specifications, for a French 900 MWe PWR

  2. Evaluation of the safety margins during shutdown for NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencik, V.; Sadek, S.; Bajs, T.

    2004-01-01

    In the paper the results of RELAP5/mod3.3 calculations of critical parameters during shutdown for NPP Krsko are presented. Conservative evaluations have been performed at NPP Krsko to determine the minimum configuration of systems required for the safe shutdown operation. Critical parameters in these evaluations are defined as the time to start of the boiling and the time of the core dry-out. In order to have better insight into the available margins, the best estimate code RELAP5/mod3.3 has been used to calculate the same parameters. The analyzed transient is the loss of the Residual Heat Removal (RHR) system, which is used to remove decay heat during shutdown conditions. Several configurations that include open and closed Reactor Coolant System (RCS) were considered in the evaluation. The RELAP5/mod3.3 analysis of the loss of the RHR system has been performed for the following cases: 1) RCS closed and water solid, 2) RCS closed and partially drained, 3) Pressurizer manway open, Steam Generator (SG) U tubes partially drained, 4) Pressurizer and SG manways open, SG U tubes completely drained, 5) Pressurizer manway open, SGs drained, SG nozzle dams installed and 6) SG nozzle dams installed, pressurizer manway open, 1 inch break at RHR pump discharge in the loop with pressurizer. Both RHR trains were assumed in operation prior to start of the transient. The maximum average steady state temperature for all analyzed cases was limited to 333 K. (author)

  3. Shutdowns/scrams at BWRs reported under new 1984 LER rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Operating experience data from nuclear power plants are essential for safety and reliability analyses. The Licensee Event Reports (LERs), submitted to the NRC by nuclear power plant utilities, contain much of this data. One of the significant aspects of the new LER rule includes the requirement to report all plant shutdowns whereas prior to 1984, not all shutdowns were reported as LERs. This paper reviews the shutdowns and scrams occurring during the first six months of 1984 at BWRs as reported under the new LER rule. The review focused on systems involved, causes, and personnel interactions

  4. Development and study of a control and reactor shutdown device for FBR-type reactors with a modified open core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, S.

    1983-01-01

    The doctoral thesis at hand presents a newly designed control and shutdown device to be used for output control and fast shutdown of modified open core FBR-type reactors. The task was the design of a new control and shutdown device having economic and operation advantages, using reactor components time-tested under reactor conditions. This control and shutdown device was adapted to the specific needs concerning dimensions and design. The actuation is based on the magnetic-jack principle, which has been upgraded for the purpose. The principle is now combined with pneumatic acceleration. The improvements mainly concern a smaller number of piece parts and system simplification. (orig./RW) [de

  5. Changing nuclear plant operating limits during startup and shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, E.C.; Carlson, R.W.; Ray, N.K.; Roarty, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    During startup and shutdown operation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants, a low pressure decay heat removal system is used to maintain core cooling. During these phases of operation, there are numerous operating practices and design limits to meet special and sometimes conflicting requirements unique to these operations. This paper evaluates the impact and interdependencies of recent issues on plant operation and design

  6. Passive shut-down of ITER plasma by Be evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Tsuneo.

    1996-02-01

    In an accident event where the cooling system of first wall of the ITER fails, the first wall temperature continues to rise as long as the ignited state of the core plasma persists. In this paper, a passive shut-down scheme of the ITER from this accident by evaporated Be from the first wall is examined. It is shown the estimated Be influx 5 10 24 /sec is sufficient to quench the ignition. (author)

  7. Improving Deterministic Reserve Requirements for Security Constrained Unit Commitment and Scheduling Problems in Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyu

    Traditional deterministic reserve requirements rely on ad-hoc, rule of thumb methods to determine adequate reserve in order to ensure a reliable unit commitment. Since congestion and uncertainties exist in the system, both the quantity and the location of reserves are essential to ensure system reliability and market efficiency. The modeling of operating reserves in the existing deterministic reserve requirements acquire the operating reserves on a zonal basis and do not fully capture the impact of congestion. The purpose of a reserve zone is to ensure that operating reserves are spread across the network. Operating reserves are shared inside each reserve zone, but intra-zonal congestion may block the deliverability of operating reserves within a zone. Thus, improving reserve policies such as reserve zones may improve the location and deliverability of reserve. As more non-dispatchable renewable resources are integrated into the grid, it will become increasingly difficult to predict the transfer capabilities and the network congestion. At the same time, renewable resources require operators to acquire more operating reserves. With existing deterministic reserve requirements unable to ensure optimal reserve locations, the importance of reserve location and reserve deliverability will increase. While stochastic programming can be used to determine reserve by explicitly modelling uncertainties, there are still scalability as well as pricing issues. Therefore, new methods to improve existing deterministic reserve requirements are desired. One key barrier of improving existing deterministic reserve requirements is its potential market impacts. A metric, quality of service, is proposed in this thesis to evaluate the price signal and market impacts of proposed hourly reserve zones. Three main goals of this thesis are: 1) to develop a theoretical and mathematical model to better locate reserve while maintaining the deterministic unit commitment and economic dispatch

  8. Heuristic Optimization Techniques for Determining Optimal Reserve Structure of Power Generating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yi; Goel, Lalit; Wang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    cost of the system will also increase. The reserve structure of a MSS should be determined based on striking a balance between the required reliability and the reserve cost. The objective of reserve management for a MSS is to schedule the reserve at the minimum system reserve cost while maintaining......Electric power generating systems are typical examples of multi-state systems (MSS). Sufficient reserve is critically important for maintaining generating system reliabilities. The reliability of a system can be increased by increasing the reserve capacity, noting that at the same time the reserve...... the required level of supply reliability to its customers. In previous research, Genetic Algorithm (GA) has been used to solve most reliability optimization problems. However, the GA is not very computationally efficient in some cases. In this chapter a new heuristic optimization technique—the particle swarm...

  9. First LHC Shutdown: Coordination and Schedule Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Coupard, J; Grillot, S

    2010-01-01

    The first LHC shutdown started in fall 2008, just after the incident on the 19th of September 2008. In addition to the typical work of a shutdown, a large number of interventions, related to the “consolidation after the incident” were performed in the LHC loop. Moreover the amount of work increased during the shutdown, following the recommendations and conclusions of the different working groups in charge of the safety of the personnel and of the machine. This paper will give an overview of the work performed, the organization of the coordination, emphasizing the new safety risks (electrical and cryogenic), and how the interventions were implemented in order to ensure both the safety of personnel and a minimized time window.

  10. Failure of PWR-RHRS under cold shutdown conditions: Experimental results from the PKL test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, R.M.; Umminger, K.J.; Logt, J.V.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) of a PWR is designed to transfer thermal energy from the core after plant shutdown and maintain the plant in cold shutdown or refuelling conditions for extended periods of time. Initial reactor cooling after shutdown is achieved by dissipating heat through the steam generators (SGs) and discharging steam to the condenser by means of the Turbine Bypass System (TBS). When the reactor coolant temperature has dropped to about 160C and pressure has been reduced to 30 bar the RHRS is placed into operation. it reduces the coolant temperature to 50C within 20 hours after shutdown. The time margin for establishing alternate methods of heat removal following a failure of the RHRS depends on the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) temperature, the decay heat rate and the amount of RCS inventory. During some shutdown operations the RCS may be partially drained (e. g. to perform SG inspections). Decreased primary system inventory can significantly reduce the time available to recover the RHRS's function prior to bulk boiling and possible core uncovery. In the PKL test facility, which simulates a 1,300 MWe 4-loop PWR on a scale 1:145, a failure of RHRS under cold shutdown conditions was performed. This presentation gives a brief description of the test facility followed by the test objectives and results of this experiment

  11. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheras, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Best, Ralph E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buxton, Kenneth A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); England, Jeffery L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McConnell, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Massaro, Lawrence M. [Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    visits. Every site was found to have at least one off-site transportation mode option for removing its UNF and GTCC waste; some have multiple options. Experience removing large components during reactor decommissioning provided an important source of information used to identify the transportation mode options for the sites. Especially important in conducting the evaluation were site visits, through which information was obtained that would not have been available otherwise. Extensive photographs taken during the site visits proved to be particularly useful in documenting the current conditions at or near the sites. Additional conclusions from this evaluation include: The 12 shutdown sites use designs from 4 different suppliers involving 9 different (horizontal and vertical) dry storage systems that would require the use of 8 different transportation cask designs to remove the UNF and GTCC waste from the shutdown sites; Although there are common aspects, each site has some unique features and/or conditions; Although some regulatory actions will be required, all UNF at the initial 9 shutdown sites (Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion) is in licensed systems that can be transported, including a small amount of high-burnup fuel; Each site indicated that 2-3 years of advance time would be required for its preparations before shipments could begin; Most sites have more than one transportation option, e.g., rail, barge, or heavy haul truck, as well as constraints and preferences. It is expected that additional site visits will be conducted to add to the information presented in the evaluation.

  12. Alternative Shutdown Panel. Amaraz Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenz de Santa Maria Valin, J.

    2016-07-01

    Between 2010 and 2014 the Nuclear Power Plant of Almaraz conducted one of the most complex projects in its history: The installation of an Alternative Shutdown Panel with the capability to stop the plant in case of fire in the Control room or in the Cable room. This project represented a great economic and organizational effort for the plant, but at the same time has been a great improvement in the safety of the installation, which was demonstrated by the achievement of a major milestone in the history of Almaraz: The actual shutdown from outside of the Control room. (Author)

  13. The accidents during shutdown conditions Temelin NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, M.; Mlady, O.

    1996-01-01

    Two parallel activities oriented for the accidents during shutdown conditions are performed at Temelin NPP: Development of symptom based emergency operating procedures (EOPs) applicable for the accidents which could occur during operational modes 1 through 4; independent evaluation of plant safety as part of the Temelin Shutdown probabilistic assessment to define the accidents which could occur during mode 5 and 6 for which the EOPs must be extended. Both these activities are in progress now because Temelin plant is still in the construction phase

  14. Comparison of Qualitative and Quantitative Risk Results for Shutdown Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Hae Cheol; Kim, Myung Ki; Chung, Bag Soon; Seo, Mi Ro; Hong, Sung Yull

    2006-01-01

    The Defense-In-Depth philosophy is a fundamental concept of nuclear safety. The objective of Defense-In- Depth (DID) evaluation is to assess the level of Defense- In-Depth maintained during the various plant maintenance activities. Especially for shutdown and outage operations, the Defense-In-Depth might be challenged due to the reduction in redundancy and diversity resulting from the maintenance. The qualitative defense-in-depth evaluation using deterministic trees such as SFAT (Safety Function Assessment Tree), can provide 'Safety' related information on the levels of defense-in-depth according to the plant configuration including the levels of redundancy and diversity. For the more reasonable color decision of SFAT, it is necessary to identify the risk impact of degradation of redundancy and diversity of mitigation systems. The probabilistic safety analysis for the shutdown status can provide risk information related on the degradation of redundancy and diversity level for the safety functions during outage. Insights from the both methods for the plant status can be the same or different. The results of DID approach and PSA for the shutdown state are compared in this paper

  15. Post Fire Safe Shutdown Analysis Using a Fault Tree Logic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Hyun Tae; Park, Jun Hyun

    2005-01-01

    Every nuclear power plant should have its own fire hazard analysis including the fire safe shutdown analysis. A safe shutdown (SSD) analysis is performed to demonstrate the capability of the plant to safely shut down for a fire in any given area. The basic assumption is that there will be fire damage to all cables and equipment located within a common fire area. When evaluating the SSD capabilities of the plant, based on a review of the systems, equipment and cables within each fire area, it should be determined which shutdown paths are either unaffected or least impacted by a postulated fire within the fire area. Instead of seeking a success path for safe shutdown given all cables and equipment damaged by a fire, there can be an alternative approach to determine the SSD capability: fault tree analysis. This paper introduces the methodology for fire SSD analysis using a fault tree logic model

  16. Probabilities of inherent shutdown of unprotected events in innovative liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.; Wade, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The uncertainty in predicting the effectiveness of inherent shutdown in innovative liquid metal cooled reactors with metallic fuel results from three broad contributing areas of uncertainty: (1) the inability to exactly predict the frequency of ATWS events with potential to challenge the safety systems and require inherent shutdown; (2) the approximation of representing all such events by a selected set of ''generic scenarios''; and (3) the inability to exactly calculate the core response to the selected generic scenarios. This paper discusses the work being done to address each of these contributing areas, identifies the design and research approaches being used at Argonne National Laboratory to reducing the key contributions to uncertainties in inherent shutdown, and presents results. The conditional probabilities (given ATWS initiation) of achieving temperatures capable of defeating inherent shutdown are shown to range from /approximately/0.1% to negligible for current designs

  17. Component failures that lead to manual shutdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The data for this report are taken from a population of thirty-five LWRs, al of which differ appreciably in size, design, and age. Appendix A provides a graphical display of the number of manual shutdowns per operating year as a function of plant age, with the frequency adjusted to reflect plant availability

  18. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) Analysis Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 1: with Beam Shutdown and Active RHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report

  19. CCF analysis of BWR reactor shutdown systems based on the operating experience at the TVO I/II in 1981-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, T.

    1996-04-01

    The work constitutes a part of the project conducted within the research program of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SKI, aimed to develop the methods and data base for the Common Cause Failure (CCF) analysis of highly redundant reactor scram systems. The data analysis for the TVO I/II plant is focused on the hydraulic scram system, and control rods and drives. It covers operating experiences from 1981 through 1993. (9 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.)

  20. Analysis of solutions for passively activated safety shutdown devices for SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgazzi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Innovative systems for emergency shut down of fast reactors are proposed. • The concepts of inherent and passive safety are put forward. • The relative analysis in terms of safety and reliability is presented. • A comparative assessment among the concepts is performed. • Path forward is tracked. -- Abstract: In order to enhance the inherent safety of fast reactors, innovative reactivity control systems have been proposed for intrinsic ultimate shut-down instead of conventional scram rods, to cope with the potential consequences of severe unprotected transient accidents, such as an energetic core disruptive accident, as in case of sodium fast reactors. The passive shut-down systems are designed to shut-down system only by inherent passive reactivity feedback mechanism, under unprotected accident conditions, implying failure of reactor protection system. They are conceived to be self-actuated without any signal elaboration, since the actuation of the system is triggered by the effects induced by the transient like material dilatation, in case of overheating of the coolant for instance, according to fast reactor design to meet the safety requirements. This article looks at different special shutdown systems specifically engineered for prevention of severe accidents, to be implemented on fast reactors, with main focus on the investigation of the performance of the self-actuated shutdown systems in sodium fast reactors

  1. Loss of benefits resulting from mandated nuclear plant shutdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerenboom, J.P.; Buehring, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper identifies and discusses some of the important consequences of nuclear power plant unavailability, and quantifies a number of technical measures of loss of benefits that result from regulatory actions such as licensing delays and mandated nuclear plant outages. The loss of benefits that accompany such regulatory actions include increased costs of systems generation, increased demand for nonnuclear and often scarce fuels, and reduced system reliability. This paper is based on a series of case studies, supplemented by sensitivity studies, on hypothetical nuclear plant shutdowns. These studies were developed by Argonne in cooperation with four electric utilities

  2. Quality assurance program plan fuel supply shutdown project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program plan (QAPP) describes how the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) project organization implements the quality assurance requirements of HNF-MP-599, Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the B and W Hanford Company Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), FSP-MP-004. The QAPP applies to facility structures, systems, and components and to activities (e.g., design, procurement, testing, operations, maintenance, etc.) that could affect structures, systems, and components. This QAPP also provides a roadmap of applicable Project Hanford Policies and Procedures (PHPP) which may be utilized by the FSS project organization to implement the requirements of this QAPP

  3. The management of the state reserving system in the aspect of the regional economic security supporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Yefimovich Zemskov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role of the state material reserve system to ensure economic security of the region. A classification of reserves ensuring economic security of the region was elaborated. A scheme of systematic and structural representation of the state material reserve in order to improve the economic security of the region was suggested. Optimization of operational control of the territorial offices, factories, and settlements of custody within the framework of the state material reserve is one of the most effective instruments to enhance the functioning of the whole system. To solve the problem of technological processes optimization of products acquisition and storage in manufacturings, plants and points of consignment storage of the state material reserve, a static economic-mathematical model was developed. The results can be used to develop appropriate computer systems for support of effective management decisions in the system of state of material reserve.

  4. A Sensorless Power Reserve Control Strategy for Two-Stage Grid-Connected PV Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sangwongwanich, Ariya; Yang, Yongheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Due to the still increasing penetration of grid-connected Photovoltaic (PV) systems, advanced active power control functionalities have been introduced in grid regulations. A power reserve control, where namely the active power from the PV panels is reserved during operation, is required for grid support. In this paper, a cost-effective solution to realize the power reserve for two-stage grid-connected PV systems is proposed. The proposed solution routinely employs a Maximum Power Point Track...

  5. 40 CFR 52.271 - Malfunction, startup, and shutdown regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Malfunction, startup, and shutdown..., startup, and shutdown regulations. (a) The following regulations are disapproved because they would permit... malfunctions and/or fail to sufficiently limit startup and shutdown exemptions to those periods where it is...

  6. Reliability/Cost Evaluation on Power System connected with Wind Power for the Reserve Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Go-Eun; Cha, Seung-Tae; Shin, Je-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Wind power is ideally a renewable energy with no fuel cost, but has a risk to reduce reliability of the whole system because of uncertainty of the output. If the reserve of the system is increased, the reliability of the system may be improved. However, the cost would be increased. Therefore...... the reserve needs to be estimated considering the trade-off between reliability and economic aspects. This paper suggests a methodology to estimate the appropriate reserve, when wind power is connected to the power system. As a case study, when wind power is connected to power system of Korea, the effects...

  7. Kinetic analyses on startup and shutdown chemistry of BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domae, Masafumi; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Inagaki, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    During startup and shutdown of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants, temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of reactor water change in a wide range. The changes result in variation of conductivity and pH of the reactor water. It has been speculated that the water chemistry change is due to dissolution of the oxides on fuel claddings and structural materials. However, detailed mechanism is not known. In the present paper, trend of recent water chemistry in several BWR plants during startup and shutdown is presented. Conductivity and pH are convenient indication of coolant purity. We tried to clarify the mechanism of the change in the conductivity and the pH value during startup and shutdown, based on the water chemistry data measured. In the water chemistry data, change in chromate concentration and Ni 2+ concentration is rather large. It is assumed that change in the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration results in the time variation of the conductivity and the pH value. It is reasonable to consider that the increase in the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration is ascribed to dissolution of Cr oxides and Ni oxides, respectively. A model of dissolution of the Cr oxides and the Ni oxides is proposed. A concept of finite inventory of the Cr oxides and the Ni oxides in the coolant system is introduced. The model is as follows. Chromate is generated by oxidation of the Cr oxides and the Cr dissolution rate depends on the DO concentration. The dissolution rate of chromate is in proportion to DO concentration, the inventory of Cr and difference between solubility limit and the chromate concentration. On the other hand, Ni 2+ is formed by dissolution of the Ni oxides, and DO is not necessary in this process. The dissolution rate of Ni 2+ is in proportion to the inventory of Ni and difference between solubility limit and the Ni 2+ concentration. Coolant is continuously purified, and the chromate concentration and the Ni 2+ concentration

  8. 22 CFR 308.7 - Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved] 308.7 Section 308.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 308.7 Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved] ...

  9. Day-ahead optimal dispatch for wind integrated power system considering zonal reserve requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fan; Bie, Zhaohong; Liu, Shiyu; Ding, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Analyzing zonal reserve requirements for wind integrated power system. • Modeling day-ahead optimal dispatch solved by chance constrained programming theory. • Determining optimal zonal reserve demand with minimum confidence interval. • Analyzing numerical results on test and large-scale real-life power systems. - Abstract: Large-scale integration of renewable power presents a great challenge for day-ahead dispatch to manage renewable resources while provide available reserve for system security. Considering zonal reserve is an effective way to ensure reserve deliverability when network congested, a random day-ahead dispatch optimization of wind integrated power system for a least operational cost is modeled including zonal reserve requirements and N − 1 security constraints. The random model is transformed into a deterministic one based on the theory of chance constrained programming and a determination method of optimal zonal reserve demand is proposed using the minimum confidence interval. After solving the deterministic model, the stochastic simulation is conducted to verify the validity of solution. Numerical tests and results on the IEEE 39 bus system and a large-scale real-life power system demonstrate the optimal day-ahead dispatch scheme is available and the proposed method is effective for improving reserve deliverability and reducing load shedding after large-capacity power outage.

  10. Oak Ridge Research Reactor shutdown maintenance and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, G.H.; Laughlin, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The Department of Energy ordered the Oak Ridge Research Center Reactor to be placed in permanent shutdown on July 14, 1987. Maintenance activities, both mechanical and instrument, were essentially routine in nature. The performance of the instrumentation for the facility was satisfactory, and maintenance required is provided. The performance of the process system was satisfactory, and maintenance required is indicated. The results of efficiency tests of the various gaseous-waste filters have been summarized and preparations for transfer of the facility to the remedial action program is also indicated

  11. Shutdown chemistry optimization at Maanshan NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuanlung; Chuang Benjamin; Su Kouhwa; Kao Jueiting

    2009-01-01

    At Maanshan PWRs, a significant piping radiation buildup caused by crud burst from fuel surface in the beginning of RFO used to be blamed as a contribution to high personal exposures during outage. Therefore, several modifications on shutdown chemistry procedures such as, early lithium removal, rapid boration, dissolved hydrogen removal, extended RCP operation, and maintaining maximum let down flow, have been consecutively conducted since no.1RFO-16, 2006. The important operational and chemical parameters of modified shutdown chemistry procedures adopted in no.2 RFO-17, 2008 and superiority in low reading (2 mSv/hr) from let down heat exchangers area radiation monitor over 11mSv/hr of no.1 RFO-16 at the same area will be addressed in this paper. At the end of no.2 RFO-17, low personal exposures of 765 man-mSv (TLD)verified the absence of crud burst during shutdown chemistry process and broke records of Maanshan NPP as well. Even with a new job on PZR pre-emptive dissimilar weld overlay which exhausting 17.37% of total 797 man-mSv(TLD) in the latest no.1 RFO-18, 659 man-mSv (TLD) made another record low in the history of Maanshan. (author)

  12. 25 CFR 226.28 - Shutdown, abandonment, and plugging of wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Cessation of Operations § 226.28 Shutdown, abandonment... production of oil and/or gas has been demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Superintendent. Lessee shall... the means by which the well bore is to be protected, and the contemplated eventual disposition of the...

  13. Safe shutdown analysis for submerged equipment inside containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Dong Soo; Lee, Seung Chan; Yoon, Duk Joo; Ha, Sang Jun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze internal flooding effects on the submerged safety-related components inside containment building. Safe shutdown analysis has been performed based on the criteria, assumptions and guideline provided in ANSI/ANS-56.11-1988 and ANSI/ANS-58.11-1988. Flooding can be postulated from a failure of several systems located inside the containment. Loss of coolant accident (LOCA), Feed water line break (FWLB), and other pipe breaks/cracks are assumed. The worst case flooding scenario is a large break LOCA. The maximum flood level for a large break LOCA is calculated based on the combined inventory of the reactor coolant system, the three accumulators, the boron injection tank (BIT), the chemical additive tank (CAT), and the refueling water storage tank (RWST) flooding the containment. The maximum flood level that could occur from all of the water which is available in containment is 2.3 m from the base elevation. A detailed flooding analysis for the components has been performed to demonstrate that internal flooding resulting from a postulated initiating event does not cause the loss of equipment required to achieve and maintain safe shutdown of the plant, emergency core cooling capability, or equipment whose failure could result in unacceptable offsite radiological consequences. The flood height can be calculated as h = (dh/dt) x (t-t 0 ) + h 0 , where h = time dependent flood height and subscript 0 means the initial value and height slope dh/dt. In summary, the submerged components inside containment are acceptable because they complete the mission of safety injection (SI) prior to submeregency or have no safe shutdown function including containment isolation during an accident. (author)

  14. Theoretical and methodological approaches to the diagnosis of the region's state material reservation system status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Anatol'evich Kuklin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the structural components of the state reserve theory with elements of decomposition and tools for studies in separate directions. The system of state material reserve, which includes the following components: economy - people - natural environment - is a necessary and sufficient reserve for their operation and development which is having the ability to respond to short-, medium- and long-term fluctuations in the economy and consider the risks of adverse factors appliance. It was determined that a necessary and sufficient reserve for the operation and development of the region is a major factor in ensuring its economic security. A method of diagnostics for the state material reserve system within the economic security of the region is presented and described. The approbation of the methodological apparatus for the assessment of the state material reserve by the example on the Ural Federal District was done.

  15. Design and analysis of shutdown mechanisms of PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayashree, R.; Rajan Babu, V.; Puthiyavinayagam, P.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is equipped with two independent, fast acting and diverse shutdown systems. The absorber rod of the first system is called Control and Safety Rod (CSR) and that of the second system is called Diverse Safety Rod (DSR). The respective drive mechanisms are called Control and Safety Rod Drive Mechanism (CSRDM) and Diverse Safety Rod Drive Mechanism (DSRDM). The conceptual features of the Absorber Rods (ARs) and Absorber Rod Drive Mechanisms (ARDMs) are given in the figures. The functions and design specifications of the ARDMs are listed. The theoretical results of the performance of the shutdown systems during scram are presented. The design was always backed up with testing and design validation. The individual subassemblies testing and the design have proceeded side by side, the efforts finally culminated into the manufacturing of 1:1 scale prototype ARDMs and ARs. The prototypes were extensively tested in air, water and sodium to qualify them for reactor application. A companion paper in this conference gives the details of design validation by testing. This paper gives a brief account of the design of ARDMs and ARs. (author)

  16. Balancing reserves within a decarbonized European electricity system in 2050. From market developments to model insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Casimir

    2017-01-01

    This paper expands the discussion about future balancing reserve provision to the long-term perspective of 2050. Most pathways for a transformation towards a decarbonized electricity sector rely on very high shares of fluctuating renewables. This can be a challenge for the provision of balancing reserves, although their influence on the balancing cost is unclear. Apart from the transformation of the generation portfolio, various technical and regulatory developments within the balancing framework might further influence balancing costs: i) dynamic dimensioning of balancing reserves, ii) provision by fluctuating renewables or new (battery) storage technologies, and iii) exchange of balancing reserves between balancing zones. The first part of this paper discusses and transforms these developments into quantitative scenario definitions. The second part applies these scenarios to dynELMOD (dynamic Electricity Model), an investment model of the European electricity system that is extended to include balancing reserve provision. In contrast to other models applied in most papers on balancing reserves, this model is capable of evaluating the interdependencies between developments in balancing reserve provision and high shares of fluctuating renewables jointly. The results show that balancing reserve cost can be kept at current levels for a renewable electricity system until 2050, when using a dynamic reserve sizing horizon. Apart from the sizing horizon, storage capacity withholding duration and additional balancing demand from RES are the main driver of balancing costs. Renewables participation in balancing provision is mainly important for negative reserves, while storages play an important role for the provision of positive reserves. However, only on very few occasions, additional storage investments are required for balancing reserve provision, as most of the time sufficient storage capacities are available in the electricity system.

  17. Balancing reserves within a decarbonized European electricity system in 2050. From market developments to model insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Casimir [German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Energy, Transportation, Environment; Univ. of Technology, Berlin (Germany). Workgroup for Infrastructure Policy (WIP)

    2017-03-30

    This paper expands the discussion about future balancing reserve provision to the long-term perspective of 2050. Most pathways for a transformation towards a decarbonized electricity sector rely on very high shares of fluctuating renewables. This can be a challenge for the provision of balancing reserves, although their influence on the balancing cost is unclear. Apart from the transformation of the generation portfolio, various technical and regulatory developments within the balancing framework might further influence balancing costs: i) dynamic dimensioning of balancing reserves, ii) provision by fluctuating renewables or new (battery) storage technologies, and iii) exchange of balancing reserves between balancing zones. The first part of this paper discusses and transforms these developments into quantitative scenario definitions. The second part applies these scenarios to dynELMOD (dynamic Electricity Model), an investment model of the European electricity system that is extended to include balancing reserve provision. In contrast to other models applied in most papers on balancing reserves, this model is capable of evaluating the interdependencies between developments in balancing reserve provision and high shares of fluctuating renewables jointly. The results show that balancing reserve cost can be kept at current levels for a renewable electricity system until 2050, when using a dynamic reserve sizing horizon. Apart from the sizing horizon, storage capacity withholding duration and additional balancing demand from RES are the main driver of balancing costs. Renewables participation in balancing provision is mainly important for negative reserves, while storages play an important role for the provision of positive reserves. However, only on very few occasions, additional storage investments are required for balancing reserve provision, as most of the time sufficient storage capacities are available in the electricity system.

  18. The impact of residential demand response on the costs of a fossil-free system reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Jonas; Balyk, Olexandr; Hevia Koch, Pablo Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve a better understanding of the system value of residential demand response, we study the potential impact of flexible demand on the costs of system reserves in a fossil-free electricity supply. Comparing these costs with traditional means of regulation our analysis aims...... to contribute to determining the least-cost options for regulation in a fossil-free power system. We extend an existing energy system model with demand response and reserve modelling and analyse the impact for the case of Denmark in 2035 to reflect a system based on renewable resources for electricity...

  19. A Decision Support System for the Location of Naval Surface Reserve Units

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venable, Laura

    1998-01-01

    .... The research suggests the feasibility of a PC based Decision Support System to assist Commander, Naval Surface Reserve Force improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the unit location decision...

  20. War Reserve Analysis and Secondary Item Procureability Assessment of the AMCOM Supported Weapon Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maddux, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... IOD evaluates the impacts of nonavailability of secondary items on the life cycle supportability of AMCOM weapon systems and evaluates the producibility of secondary items for war reserve requirements...

  1. Social Network Analysis of the Caste-Based Reservation System in India

    OpenAIRE

    Iyengar, S. R. S.; Parasuram, Aishwarya; Saini, Jaspal Singh

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that the reservation system in India, which has existed since the time of Indian Independence (1947), has caused more havoc and degradation than progress. This being a popular public opinion, these notions have not been based on any rigorous scientific study or research. In this paper, we revisit the cultural divide among the Indian population from a purely social networks based approach. We study the reservation system in detail, starting from its past and observing its ef...

  2. Global shutdown dose rate maps for a DEMO conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leichtle, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sanz, J.; Catalan, J.P.; Juarez, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Application of R2S-method on high-resolution full torus sector mesh for DEMO. • Absorbed dose rates after shutdown for a variely of RH equipment at typical locations. • Idenification of radiation levels at several port based locations. - Abstract: For the calculations of highly reliable shutdown dose rate (SDR) maps in fusion devices like a DEMO plant, the Rigorous-2-step (R2S) method is nowadays routinely applied using high-resolution decay gamma sources from initial high-resolution neutron flux meshes activating all materials in the system. This approach has been utilized in the present paper with the objective to provide SDR results relevant for RH systems of a conceptual DEMO design developed in the EU. The primary objective was to assess specific locations of interest for RH equipment inside the vessel and along the extension of maintenance ports. To this end, a provisional DEMO MCNP model has been used, featuring HCLL-type blankets, tungsten/copper divertor, manifolds, vacuum vessel with ports and toroidal field coils. The operational scenario assumed 2.1 GW fusion power and a life-time of 20 years with plant availability of 30%, where removable parts will be extracted after 5.2 years. Results of absorbed dose rate distributions for several relevant materials are presented and discussed in terms of the different contributions from the various activated components.

  3. Global shutdown dose rate maps for a DEMO conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leichtle, D., E-mail: dieter.leichtle@f4e.europa.eu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanz, J.; Catalan, J.P.; Juarez, R. [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia(UNED), E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, C/ Juan del Rosal 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Application of R2S-method on high-resolution full torus sector mesh for DEMO. • Absorbed dose rates after shutdown for a variely of RH equipment at typical locations. • Idenification of radiation levels at several port based locations. - Abstract: For the calculations of highly reliable shutdown dose rate (SDR) maps in fusion devices like a DEMO plant, the Rigorous-2-step (R2S) method is nowadays routinely applied using high-resolution decay gamma sources from initial high-resolution neutron flux meshes activating all materials in the system. This approach has been utilized in the present paper with the objective to provide SDR results relevant for RH systems of a conceptual DEMO design developed in the EU. The primary objective was to assess specific locations of interest for RH equipment inside the vessel and along the extension of maintenance ports. To this end, a provisional DEMO MCNP model has been used, featuring HCLL-type blankets, tungsten/copper divertor, manifolds, vacuum vessel with ports and toroidal field coils. The operational scenario assumed 2.1 GW fusion power and a life-time of 20 years with plant availability of 30%, where removable parts will be extracted after 5.2 years. Results of absorbed dose rate distributions for several relevant materials are presented and discussed in terms of the different contributions from the various activated components.

  4. Robust Allocation of Reserve Policies for a Multiple-Cell Based Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Junjie; Lan, Tian; Heussen, Kai

    2018-01-01

    modifications. The LDR method can effectively adapt the participation factors of reserve providers to respond to system imbalance signals. The policies considered the covariance of historic system imbalance signals to reduce the overall reserve cost. When applying this method to the cell-based power system...... for a certain horizon, the influence of different time resolutions on policy-making is also investigated, which presents guidance for its practical application. The main results illustrate that: (a) the LDR-based method shows better performance, by producing smaller reserve costs compared to the costs given...... by a reference method; and (b) the cost index decreases with increased time intervals, however, longer intervals might result in insufficient reserves, due to low time resolution. On the other hand, shorter time intervals require heavy computational time. Thus, it is important to choose a proper time interval...

  5. A Sensorless Power Reserve Control Strategy for Two-Stage Grid-Connected PV Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangwongwanich, Ariya; Yang, Yongheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Due to the still increasing penetration of grid-connected Photovoltaic (PV) systems, advanced active power control functionalities have been introduced in grid regulations. A power reserve control, where namely the active power from the PV panels is reserved during operation, is required for grid...... support. In this paper, a cost-effective solution to realize the power reserve for two-stage grid-connected PV systems is proposed. The proposed solution routinely employs a Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) control to estimate the available PV power and a Constant Power Generation (CPG) control...... performed on a 3-kW two-stage single-phase grid-connected PV system, where the power reserve control is achieved upon demands....

  6. Hazard Classification for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Final hazard classification for the 300 Area N Reactor fuel storage facility resulted in the assignment of Nuclear Facility Hazard Category 3 for the uranium metal fuel and feed material storage buildings (303-A, 303-B, 303-G, 3712, and 3716). Radiological for the residual uranium and thorium oxide storage building and an empty former fuel storage building that may be used for limited radioactive material storage in the future (303-K/3707-G, and 303-E), and Industrial for the remainder of the Fuel Supply Shutdown buildings (303-F/311 Tank Farm, 303-M, 313-S, 333, 334 and Tank Farm, 334-A, and MO-052)

  7. Development of Abnormal Operating Strategies for Station Blackout in Shutdown Operating Mode in Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Lee, Seung-Chan; Sung, Je-Joong; Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Su-Hyun [FNC Tech. Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Loss of all AC power is classified as one of multiple failure accident by regulatory guide of Korean accident management program. Therefore we need develop strategies for the abnormal operating procedure both of power operating and shutdown mode. This paper developed abnormal operating guideline for loss of all AC power by analysis of accident scenario in pressurized water reactor. This paper analyzed the loss of ultimate heat sink (LOUHS) in shutdown operating mode and developed the operating strategy of the abnormal procedure. Also we performed the analysis of limiting scenarios that operator actions are not taken in shutdown LOUHS. Therefore, we verified the plant behavior and decided operator action to taken in time in order to protect the fuel of core with safety. From the analysis results of LOUHS, the fuel of core maintained without core uncovery for 73 minutes respectively for opened RCS states after the SBO occurred. Therefore, operator action for the emergency are required to take in 73 minutes for opened RCS state. Strategy is to cooldown by using spent fuel pool cooling system. This method required to change the plant design in some plant. In RCS boundary closed state, first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is to remove the residual heat of core by steam dump flow and auxiliary feedwater of SG.

  8. Liberating and regulating of active effect reserves in the Norwegian power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, Bjoern H.

    2000-01-01

    This report is a summary of the work done in the project ''Active reserves and current control of the effect situation'' in the period 1997 - 99. The project is one of the 7 partial projects in the project '' Operational safety planning and control'' in the Norges forskningsraad's (The Research Council of Norway) EFFEKT program. The aim of the project has been to study and test methods for liberating and regulating active reserves in the Norwegian power system. Traditionally Norway has been rich in effect reserves but in the present deregulated system it will no longer obvious that these reserves are available as the micro economy is more focussed upon in an increasingly pressured operational situation. In the recent years the margins between the available generator effects and the systems maximum load have become increasingly smaller. With the various problems discussed in this report in mind, recommendations may be given with respect to specific measures in order to improve the systems operator possibilities for current control of the effect situation as well as recommendations regarding interesting concepts that ought to be continued in new research projects. The systems operators have implemented some of the proposed measures while others are being studied further. The following specific measures are proposed to the systems operators: 1) To implements graphical survey of the production and the reported reserves in the systems operator EMS tool. 2) To implement tools of the type ''gradual load flow'' in order to prepare possible regulations in critical periods. 3) Reserved instantaneous reserves are introduced as a systems service. 4) The systems operator can reserve effect up to the operational time. 5) Introduce incentives in order to activate the end user more strongly in the ''RK'' market. 5) To modify the methodology corresponding to ''Simultaneous load'' for forecasting bottlenecks in future operation weeks. 6) The systems service ''ramping'' is

  9. Selection of Non-Restorable Reserved Energy Process Control and Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Anischenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems pertaining to selection of non-restorable continuously reserved discrete control and management systems of electric and heat and power processes. Two problems concerning system optimization on the basis of the following criteria – their reliability and cost have been solved in the paper. 

  10. Sensorless Reserved Power Control Strategy for Two-Stage Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangwongwanich, Ariya; Yang, Yongheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    Due to still increasing penetration level of grid-connected Photovoltaic (PV) systems, advanced active power control functionalities have been introduced in grid regulations. A reserved power control, where the active power from the PV panels is reserved during operation, is required for grid...... support. In this paper, a cost-effective solution to realize the reserved power control for grid-connected PV systems is proposed. The proposed solution routinely employs a Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) control to estimate the available PV power and a Constant Power Generation (CPG) control...... to achieve the power reserve. In this method, the irradiance measurements that have been used in conventional control schemes to estimate the available PV power are not required, and thereby being a sensorless solution. Simulations and experimental tests have been performed on a 3-kW two-stage single...

  11. Sequential bidding in day-ahead auctions for spot energy and power systems reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swider, Derk J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a novel approach for sequential bidding on day-ahead auction markets for spot energy and power systems reserve is presented. For the spot market a relatively simple method is considered as a competitive market is assumed. For the reserve market one bidder is assumed to behave strategically and the behavior of the competitors is summarized in a probability distribution of the market price. This results in a method for sequential bidding, where the bidding prices and capacities on the spot and reserve markets are calculated by maximizing a stochastic non-linear objective function of expected profit. With an exemplary application is shown that the trading sequence leads to increasing bidding capacities and prices in the reverse rank number of the markets. Hence, the consideration of a defined trading sequence greatly influences the mathematical representation of the optimal bidding behavior under price uncertainty in day-ahead auctions for spot energy and power systems reserve. (Author)

  12. The value of electricity and reserve services in low carbon electricity systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijay, Avinash; Fouquet, Nicolas; Staffell, Iain; Hawkes, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A power dispatch model is used to simulate electricity and reserve prices. •Good agreement is observed between modelled and historic prices in 2015. •Higher renewables and CCS with lower fossil fuels leads to lower electricity prices. •Contrary to expectation, gone green scenario leads to lowest increase in reserve price. •Flexible aggregated demand response likely to offer significant economic benefits. -- Abstract: Decarbonising electricity systems is essential for mitigating climate change. Future systems will likely incorporate higher penetrations of intermittent renewable and inflexible nuclear power. This will significantly impact on system operations, particularly the requirements for flexibility in terms of reserves and the cost of such services. This paper estimates the interrelated changes in wholesale electricity and reserve prices using two novel methods. Firstly, it simulates the short run marginal cost of generation using a unit commitment model with post-processing to achieve realistic prices. It also introduces a new reserve price model, which mimics actual operation by first calculating the day ahead schedules and then letting deviations from schedule drive reserve prices. The UK is used as a case study to compare these models with traditional methods from the literature. The model gives good agreement with and historic prices in 2015. In a 2035 scenario, increased renewables penetration reduces mean electricity prices, and leads to price spikes due to expensive plants being brought online briefly to cope with net load variations. Contrary to views previously held in literature, a renewable intensive scenario does not lead to a higher reserve price than a fossil fuel intensive scenario. Demand response technology is shown to offer sizeable economic benefits when maintaining system balance. More broadly, this framework can be used to evaluate the economics of providing reserve services by aggregating decentralised energy

  13. International Reserves Crises, Monetary Integration and the Payments System during the International Gold Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Hernandez-Verme

    2009-01-01

    I model an international payments system with a financial center and periphery to reproduce various aspects of the International Gold Standard. This period was characterized by frequent crises associated with scarce stocks of reserves, high short-term interest rates with subsequent gold inflows and transmission of output contractions across countries. I find that a common international currency and no legal restrictions on exchange help the periphery share reserves with the financial center, ...

  14. Impact of marine reserve on maximum sustainable yield in a traditional prey-predator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Prosenjit; Kar, T. K.; Ghorai, Abhijit

    2018-01-01

    Multispecies fisheries management requires managers to consider the impact of fishing activities on several species as fishing impacts both targeted and non-targeted species directly or indirectly in several ways. The intended goal of traditional fisheries management is to achieve maximum sustainable yield (MSY) from the targeted species, which on many occasions affect the targeted species as well as the entire ecosystem. Marine reserves are often acclaimed as the marine ecosystem management tool. Few attempts have been made to generalize the ecological effects of marine reserve on MSY policy. We examine here how MSY and population level in a prey-predator system are affected by the low, medium and high reserve size under different possible scenarios. Our simulation works shows that low reserve area, the value of MSY for prey exploitation is maximum when both prey and predator species have fast movement rate. For medium reserve size, our analysis revealed that the maximum value of MSY for prey exploitation is obtained when prey population has fast movement rate and predator population has slow movement rate. For high reserve area, the maximum value of MSY for prey's exploitation is very low compared to the maximum value of MSY for prey's exploitation in case of low and medium reserve. On the other hand, for low and medium reserve area, MSY for predator exploitation is maximum when both the species have fast movement rate.

  15. Effects of Computer Reservation System in the Operations of Travel Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevillia S. Felicen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In travel industry, the main tool used is the computerized booking systems and now known as Global Distribution Systems or GDS. This paper aimed to determine the effect of using Computer Reservation System among Travel Agencies in terms of technical, human and financial aspect. This will help the Internship office to include the identified travel agencies in their linkages where the students will be deployed for internship. The result of this study will also be helpful and can be utilized in the course travel and tour operations with computer reservation system. The descriptive method of research was used with managers and users/staff of 20 travel agencies as participants of the study. Questionnaire was used as main data gathering instrument utilizing percentage, frequency and weighted mean as statistical tool. Abacus System is the computer reservation system used by all travel agencies in Batangas. All travel agencies offered services such as domestic and international hotel reservation, domestic and international ticketing and package tour. The CRS can connect guest to all forms of travel; it has installed built in system security features that can improve agency’s efficiency and productivity.

  16. Probabilities of inherent shutdown of unprotected events in innovative liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The uncertainty in predicting the effectiveness of inherent shutdown (ISD) in innovative designs results from three broad contributing areas of uncertainty: (1) the inability to exactly predict the frequency of ATWS events with potential to challenge the safety systems and require ISD; (2) the approximation of representing all such ATWS events by a selected set of ''generic scenarios''; and (3) the inability to exactly calculate the core response to the selected generic scenarios. In this summary, the methodology and associated results of work used to establish probabilities of failure of inherent shutdown of innovative LMRs to the unprotected loss-of-flow (LOF) accident are discussed

  17. Effects of Computer Reservation System in the Operations of Travel Agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Sevillia S. Felicen; Alex P. Ylagan

    2016-01-01

    In travel industry, the main tool used is the computerized booking systems and now known as Global Distribution Systems or GDS. This paper aimed to determine the effect of using Computer Reservation System among Travel Agencies in terms of technical, human and financial aspect. This will help the Internship office to include the identified travel agencies in their linkages where the students will be deployed for internship. The result of this study will also be helpful and can be ...

  18. Economic-environmental energy and reserve scheduling of smart distribution systems: A multiobjective mathematical programming approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakariazadeh, Alireza; Jadid, Shahram; Siano, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental/economical scheduling of energy and reserve. • Simultaneous participation of loads in both energy and reserve scheduling. • Aggregate wind generation and demand uncertainties in a stochastic model. • Stochastic scheduling of energy and reserve in a distribution system. • Demand response providers’ participation in energy and reserve scheduling. - Abstract: In this paper a stochastic multi-objective economical/environmental operational scheduling method is proposed to schedule energy and reserve in a smart distribution system with high penetration of wind generation. The proposed multi-objective framework, based on augmented ε-constraint method, is used to minimize the total operational costs and emissions and to generate Pareto-optimal solutions for the energy and reserve scheduling problem. Moreover, fuzzy decision making process is employed to extract one of the Pareto-optimal solutions as the best compromise non-dominated solution. The wind power and demand forecast errors are considered in this approach and the reserve can be furnished by the main grid as well as distributed generators and responsive loads. The consumers participate in both energy and reserve markets using various demand response programs. In order to facilitate small and medium loads participation in demand response programs, a Demand Response Provider (DRP) aggregates offers for load reduction. In order to solve the proposed optimization model, the Benders decomposition technique is used to convert the large scale mixed integer non-linear problem into mixed-integer linear programming and non-linear programming problems. The effectiveness of the proposed scheduling approach is verified on a 41-bus distribution test system over a 24-h period

  19. Magnetic latch trigger for inherent shutdown assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.S.

    1976-01-01

    An inherent shutdown assembly for a nuclear reactor is provided. A neutron absorber is held ready to be inserted into the reactor core by a magnetic latch. The latch includes a magnet whose lines of force are linked by a yoke of material whose Curie point is at the critical temperature of the reactor at which the neutron absorber is to be inserted into the reactor core. The yoke is in contact with the core coolant or fissionable material so that when the coolant or the fissionable material increase in temperature above the Curie point the yoke loses its magnetic susceptibility and the magnetic link is broken, thereby causing the absorber to be released into the reactor core. 6 claims, 3 figures

  20. Order concerning a nuclear reactor shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Judgment of the State Administrative Court of Baden Wuerttemberg in head notes including: The authority of the Minister-President to give general guidelines includes the right to issue single directives; in matters of prime political significance he can take measures to realize such aims. - It is no extraneous consideration for the supervisory board under atomic energy law to point out in an order concerning a nuclear reactor shutdown that the disallowed operation of a nuclear plant conflicts with the obligation of the state to provide protection and constitutes a penal offence. Further a discourse on the assignment of discretionary powers under Paragraph 19 Section 3 Clause 2 No. 3 of the Atomic Energy Law. (HSCH) [de

  1. COMPUTING SERVICES DURING THE ANNUAL CERN SHUTDOWN

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    As in previous years, computing services run by IT division will be left running unattended during the annual shutdown. The following points should be noted. No interruptions are scheduled for local and wide area networking and the ACB, e-mail and unix interactive services. Maintenance work is scheduled for the NICE home directory servers and the central Web servers. Users must, therefore, expect service interruptions. Unix batch services will be available but without access to HPSS or to manually mounted tapes. Dedicated Engineering services, general purpose database services and the Helpdesk will be closed during this period. An operator service will be maintained and can be reached at extension 75011 or by email to: computer.operations@cern.ch Users should be aware that, except where there are special arrangements, any major problems that develop during this period will most likely be resolved only after CERN has reopened. In particular, we cannot guarantee backups for Home Directory files for eithe...

  2. Integration of Lithium-Ion Battery Storage Systems in Hydroelectric Plants for Supplying Primary Control Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Bignucolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever-growing diffusion of renewables as electrical generation sources is forcing the electrical power system to face new and challenging regulation problems to preserve grid stability. Among these, the primary control reserve is reckoned to be one of the most important issues, since the introduction of generators based on renewable energies and interconnected through static converters, if relieved from the primary reserve contribution, reduces both the system inertia and the available power reserve in case of network events involving frequency perturbations. In this scenario, renewable plants such as hydroelectric run-of-river generators could be required to provide the primary control reserve ancillary service. In this paper, the integration between a multi-unit run-of-river power plant and a lithium-ion based battery storage system is investigated, suitably accounting for the ancillary service characteristics as required by present grid codes. The storage system is studied in terms of maximum economic profitability, taking into account its operating constraints. Dynamic simulations are carried out within the DIgSILENT PowerFactory 2016 software environment in order to analyse the plant response in case of network frequency contingencies, comparing the pure hydroelectric plant with the hybrid one, in which the primary reserve is partially or completely supplied by the storage system. Results confirm that the battery storage system response to frequency perturbations is clearly faster and more accurate during the transient phase compared to a traditional plant, since time delays due to hydraulic and mechanical regulations are overpassed. A case study, based on data from an existing hydropower plant and referring to the Italian context in terms of operational constraints and ancillary service remuneration, is presented.

  3. The Shutdown Dissociation Scale (Shut-D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalinski, Inga; Schauer, Maggie; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary model of the defense cascade by Schauer and Elbert (2010) provides a theoretical frame for a short interview to assess problems underlying and leading to the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder. Based on known characteristics of the defense stages “fright,” “flag,” and “faint,” we designed a structured interview to assess the vulnerability for the respective types of dissociation. Most of the scales that assess dissociative phenomena are designed as self-report questionnaires. Their items are usually selected based on more heuristic considerations rather than a theoretical model and thus include anything from minor dissociative experiences to major pathological dissociation. The shutdown dissociation scale (Shut-D) was applied in several studies in patients with a history of multiple traumatic events and different disorders that have been shown previously to be prone to symptoms of dissociation. The goal of the present investigation was to obtain psychometric characteristics of the Shut-D (including factor structure, internal consistency, retest reliability, predictive, convergent and criterion-related concurrent validity). A total population of 225 patients and 68 healthy controls were accessed. Shut-D appears to have sufficient internal reliability, excellent retest reliability, high convergent validity, and satisfactory predictive validity, while the summed score of the scale reliably separates patients with exposure to trauma (in different diagnostic groups) from healthy controls. The Shut-D is a brief structured interview for assessing the vulnerability to dissociate as a consequence of exposure to traumatic stressors. The scale demonstrates high-quality psychometric properties and may be useful for researchers and clinicians in assessing shutdown dissociation as well as in predicting the risk of dissociative responding. PMID:25976478

  4. The Shutdown Dissociation Scale (Shut-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Schalinski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary model of the defense cascade by Schauer and Elbert (2010 provides a theoretical frame for a short interview to assess problems underlying and leading to the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder. Based on known characteristics of the defense stages “fright,” “flag,” and “faint,” we designed a structured interview to assess the vulnerability for the respective types of dissociation. Most of the scales that assess dissociative phenomena are designed as self-report questionnaires. Their items are usually selected based on more heuristic considerations rather than a theoretical model and thus include anything from minor dissociative experiences to major pathological dissociation. The shutdown dissociation scale (Shut-D was applied in several studies in patients with a history of multiple traumatic events and different disorders that have been shown previously to be prone to symptoms of dissociation. The goal of the present investigation was to obtain psychometric characteristics of the Shut-D (including factor structure, internal consistency, retest reliability, predictive, convergent and criterion-related concurrent validity.A total population of 225 patients and 68 healthy controls were accessed. Shut-D appears to have sufficient internal reliability, excellent retest reliability, high convergent validity, and satisfactory predictive validity, while the summed score of the scale reliably separates patients with exposure to trauma (in different diagnostic groups from healthy controls.The Shut-D is a brief structured interview for assessing the vulnerability to dissociate as a consequence of exposure to traumatic stressors. The scale demonstrates high-quality psychometric properties and may be useful for researchers and clinicians in assessing shutdown dissociation as well as in predicting the risk of dissociative responding.

  5. Adequacy of operating reserves for power systems in future european wind power scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Kaushik; Litong-Palima, Marisciel; Maule, Petr

    2015-01-01

    operating reserves. To study the effects of these imbalances, anticipated wind scenarios for European power systems are modelled for 2020 and 2030. Wind power forecasts for different time scales and real-time available wind power are modelled. Based on these studies, this paper qualitatively analyzes......Wind power generation is expected to increase in Europe by large extent in future. This will increase variability and uncertainty in power systems. Imbalances caused due to uncertainty in wind power forecast can trigger frequency instability in the system. These imbalances are handled using...... the adequacy of primary and secondary reserves requirements for future European power systems. This paper also discusses the challenges due to the uncertainty in wind power forecasts and their possible solutions for wind installation scenarios for 2020 and 2030....

  6. Assessment of operation reserves in hydrothermal electric systems with high wind generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, Andres; Rivier, Michel; García-González, Javier; Latorre, Jesus M.; Morales Espana, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to analyze the amount of operation reserves procured in a system based on two stages. The first stage is a detailed hourly unit commitment and the second stage is a simulation model with a shorter time period. The method is applied to the Spanish hydrothermal

  7. Study of Demand as Frequency Controlled Reserve in Nordic Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Haoran; Wu, Qiuwei; Huang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the efficacy of Demand Frequency Reserve (DFR) in Nordic power system. Heat pump, due to its switching flexibility, less disturbing impacts to customers and promising future in application, is used to represent DFR in the study. Thermodynamics of the heat pump unit...

  8. Repeatability of fractional flow reserve despite variations in systemic and coronary hemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, N.P.; Johnson, D.T.; Kirkeeide, R.L.; Berry, C.; de Bruyne, B.; Fearon, W.F.; Oldroyd, K.G.; Pijls, N.H.J.; Gould, K. Lance

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study classified and quantified the variation in fractional flow reserve (FFR) due to fluctuations in systemic and coronary hemodynamics during intravenous adenosine infusion. Background Although FFR has become a key invasive tool to guide treatment, questions remain regarding its

  9. Reservation Application System Of Private Lesson At Easyspeak Denpasar Based On Web And Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry yudhitama putra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract— English Private lessons institutes are now widely facilitates a person to develop English skills in speaking and writing. Currently the service users private lessons English book private lessons manually, that is by coming directly to the place as well as through the telephone service, but with the operator even then still have difficulties in user validation that requires a long time. To facilitate the user in terms of the reservation, then the system will be built based on web and Android. Development of private lessons reservation application built with PHP and Java programming language using CodeIgniter framework on the web side , while on the Android using Eclipse tools , and MySQL as database storage media . Applications reservation private lessons has several functions to make a reservation time and tutor can be done by the student of Easyspeak and on the side of the tutor application can provide information about the student will be taught , as well as on the side of the operator to provide ease in setting booking private lessons because it computerized not manually as before. Applications reservation private lessons are also equipped with a reminder or reminders are made on the side of Android apps , using alarmmanager system.

  10. Multi-objective market clearing of joint energy and reserves auctions ensuring power system security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghaei, J.; Shayanfar, H.; Amjady, N.

    2009-01-01

    A model and solution approach to day-ahead market clearing of joint energy and reserves auctions is proposed in this paper. The model represents the clearing system used by ISO in charge of both the market operation and system security. A Multiobjective Mathematical Programming (MMP) formulation is implemented for provision of ancillary services (Automatic Generation Control or AGC, Spinning, Non-spinning and operational reserves) as well as energy in simultaneous auctions by pool-based aggregated market scheme. System security is taken into account in the market clearing procedure as the extra objective functions of the optimization problem. So, in the MMP formulation of the market clearing process, the objective functions (generation cost and security indices) are optimized while meeting AC power flow constraints, system reserve requirements and lost opportunity cost (LOC) considerations. The model is applied to the IEEE 24-bus Reliability Test System (IEEE 24-bus RTS), and simulation studies are carried out to examine the effectiveness of the proposed method

  11. Electric Drive Discrete Control System with Automatic Switching-On Reserve for Autonomous Settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsytovich L.I.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at developing of control the water supply system’s electric drives for autonomous settlement. The system provides automatic switching to a reserve control channel at refusal of any of the functional elements of the working regulation channel. Usually, such systems have a test signal generator and analyzer to system response to their impact. This result to an increase in the structural redundancy of the system, increase its cost and increase the requirements for the staff qualification. A specific feature of the system is its ability to self-diagnosis of catastrophic malfunctions of scheme’s components and an automatic switching-on the reserve control channels, without applying any test signals to the whole complex of electrical equipment. Multi-zone integrating regulator with frequency-pulse-width modulation realizes this technical solution. Control system structure and signals timing diagrams are presented. The construction principle of adaptive interval-code synchronization device with improved noise stability to control the voltage regulators serving for smooth start-up of asynchronous motors of water pumps is considered as well. Such solution allowing increase noise stability and reliability work of the system in conditions of limited power electrical networks, which is characteristic for the autonomous settlements. The article may be of interest to specialists in the field of power electronics and information electronics, electric drives and process automation.

  12. Waste management systems model for energy systems sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, B.R.; Nehls, J.W. Jr.; Rivera, A.L.; Pechin, W.H.; Genung, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    There is a model on the Oak Ridge Reservation which provides requirements for determining capacities and capabilities related to low-level, hazardous, and mixed wastes. In FY 1987, the model will be sufficiently advanced to provide various waste management scenarios. These scenarios will be compared technically, operationally, and financially by use of waste characterization data and process simulators that are currently under development. The results of the process simulations will be used to help identify waste treatment, storage, and disposal technologies that need to be demonstrated prior to full-scale development for DOE use. The information derived from this effort will be made available to all DOE facilities

  13. System-Level Value of a Gas Engine Power Plant in Electricity and Reserve Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Alahäivälä

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Power systems require a certain amount of flexibility to meet varying demand and to be able to cope with unexpected events, and this requirement is expected to increase with the emergence of variable power generation. In this paper, we focus on gas engine power plant technology and the beneficial influence its flexible operation can have on a power system. The study introduces the concept of a combined-cycle gas engine power plant (CCGE, which comprises a combination of several gas-fired combustion engines and a steam turbine. The operation of CCGE is then comprehensively analyzed in electricity and reserve production in the South African power system and compared with combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT technology. Even though CCGE is a form of technology that has already been commercialized, it is rarely considered as a source of flexibility in the academic research. That is the notion providing the motivation for this study. Our core contribution is to show that the flexibility of CCGE can be valuable in power systems. The methodology is based on the unit-level model of the studied system and the solving of a day-ahead unit commitment problem for each day of the simulated 11-year period. The simulation studies reveal how a CCGE is able to offer system flexibility to follow hourly load variations and capacity to provide reserve power effectively.

  14. An Analytical Solution for Probabilistic Guarantees of Reservation Based Soft Real--Time Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Palopoli, Luigi; Fontanelli, Daniele; Abeni, Luca; Villalba Frias, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    We show a methodology for the computation of the probability of deadline miss for a periodic real-time task scheduled by a resource reservation algorithm. We propose a modelling technique for the system that reduces the computation of such a probability to that of the steady state probability of an infinite state Discrete Time Markov Chain with a periodic structure. This structure is exploited to develop an efficient numeric solution where different accuracy/computation time trade-offs can be...

  15. Document status for 1 and 2 Kozloduy NPP decommissioning activities -Phase 'Final Shutdown'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vangev, A.; Boyadjiev, Z.

    1997-01-01

    Decommissioning process (D and D) is the final phase of each nuclear reactor life cycle. The first nuclear reactor generation has reached his expiration life date. Decommissioning working documentation had not been taken into account at the project and construction stage. The decommissioning activities, planning and legislation has to develop along their operation. Most of developed nuclear energetic countries have gathered good experience and have create their own decommissioning strategy. This report represents in brief an overview of different country's approaches and the Kozloduy NPP decommissioning activity intention in near future and reviews the D and D working document status for 1 and 2 Kozloduy NPP Units decommissioning. Kozloduy NPP D and D task to the moment is to plan the first stage of the decommissioning process - 'The Final Shutdown' and to prepare the working documents for the phase execution. The Final Shutdown of Kozloduy NPP - 1 is the termination of operation of the Units 1 and 2 and the electricity production cessation after their useful life exhaust. In accordance with the legal legislation in Bulgaria only the normal planned termination of operation on units 1 and 2 should be prescribed. The project results concern the initial condition of the equipment and systems, their preparation and sequence for defueling, decontamination and dismantling. A plan for activities' organization for D and D and Complex Characterization of the Site under consideration will contain the following documents: 1. Time-schedule for the sequence of activities during the stages of the Final Shutdown and Safe Enclosure preparation. Technical project for organization of work related to Final Shutdown; 2. Complex Characterization Programme for a condition investigation of the Units 1 and 2 equipment and systems. 3. Technical project for design modifications and dismantling of equipment and systems which violate the radiation and nuclear safety during the Final Shutdown

  16. Impacts of Contingency Reserve on Nodal Price and Nodal Reliability Risk in Deregulated Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    The deregulation of power systems allows customers to participate in power market operation. In deregulated power systems, nodal price and nodal reliability are adopted to represent locational operation cost and reliability performance. Since contingency reserve (CR) plays an important role...... in reliable operation, the CR commitment should be considered in operational reliability analysis. In this paper, a CR model based on customer reliability requirements has been formulated and integrated into power market settlement. A two-step market clearing process has been proposed to determine generation...

  17. Reorienting India's financial system: In conversation with Dr Duvvuri Subbarao, Governor, Reserve Bank of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Moorthy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Confronted by a slowing economy, the Reserve Bank of India has undertaken steps to revive it. These measures, however, run the risk of worsening current high levels of inflation. This paper examines certain aspects of India's financial system that have contributed to this situation. It argues that unduly low yields on Government bonds have prevented a healthy financial system from developing, with adverse impact upon inflation and other macroeconomic outcomes. It suggests that India should focus far more on domestic, and less on external, financial liberalisation. Specifically, yields on non-market borrowing, such as Provident Fund deposits, should be benchmarked to a low frequency measure of consumer price inflation.

  18. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilibin, K.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor having a reactor core and a reactor coolant flowing therethrough, a temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly, comprising: an upper drive line terminating at its lower end with a substantially cylindrical wall member having inner and outer surfaces; a lower drive line having a lower end adapted to be attached to a neutron absorber; a ring movable disposed about the outer surface of the wall member of the upper drive line; thermal actuation means adapted to be in heat exchange relationship with coolant in an associated reactor core and in contact with the ring, and balls located within the openings in the upper drive line. When reactor coolant approaches a predetermined design temperature the actuation means moves the ring sufficiently so that the balls move radially out from the recess and into the space formed by the second portion of the ring thereby removing the vertical support for the lower drive line such that the lower drive line moves downwardly and inserts an associated neutron absorber into an associated reactor core resulting in automatic reduction of reactor power

  19. COMPUTING SERVICES DURING THE ANNUAL CERN SHUTDOWN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    As in previous years, computing services run by IT division will be left running unattended during the annual shutdown. The following points should be noted. No interruptions are scheduled for local and wide area networking and the ACB, e-mail and unix interactive services. Unix batch services will be available but without access to manually mounted tapes. Dedicated Engineering services, general purpose database services and the Helpdesk will be closed during this period. An operator service will be maintained and can be reached at extension 75011 or by Email to computer.operations@cern.ch. Users should be aware that, except where there are special arrangements, any major problems that develop during this period will most likely be resolved only after CERN has reopened. In particular, we cannot guarantee backups for Home Directory files (for Unix or Windows) or for email folders. Any changes that you make to your files during this period may be lost in the event of a disk failure. Please note that all t...

  20. Utility Test Results of a 2-Megawatt, 10-Second Reserve-Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BALL,GREG J.; NORRIS,BENJAMIN L.

    1999-10-01

    This report documents the 1996 evaluation by Pacific Gas and Electric Company of an advanced reserve-power system capable of supporting 2 MW of load for 10 seconds. The system, developed under a DOE Cooperative Agreement with AC Battery Corporation of East Troy, Wisconsin, contains battery storage that enables industrial facilities to ''ride through'' momentary outages. The evaluation consisted of tests of system performance using a wide variety of load types and operating conditions. The tests, which included simulated utility outages and voltage sags, demonstrated that the system could provide continuous power during utility outages and other disturbances and that it was compatible with a variety of load types found at industrial customer sites.

  1. A Bilevel Model for Participation of a Storage System in Energy and Reserve Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrolahpour, Ehsan; Kazempour, Jalal; Zareipour, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    We develop a decision-making tool based on a bilevel complementarity model for a merchant price-maker energy storage system to determine the most beneficial trading actions in pool-based markets, including day-ahead (as joint energy and reserve markets) and balancing settlements. The uncertainty...... of net load deviation in real-time is incorporated into the model using a set of scenarios generated from the available forecast in the day-ahead. The objective of this energy storage system is to maximize its expected profit. The day-ahead products of energy storage system include energy as well...... system into clearing process of multiple markets and enables such a facility to possibly affect the outcomes of those markets to its own benefit through strategic price and quantity offers. The validity of the proposed approach is evaluated using a numerical study....

  2. Concepts in developing technical means of accident shutdown of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionajtis, R.R.; Mikhajlov, M.P.; Cherkashov, Yu.M.

    1992-01-01

    Logic for realization of multistage (echelon) reactor accident shutdown system (ASS) is proposed on the basis of general safety concepts (OPB-88). ASS includes the basis stage with traditional composition of member systems (executive, control, providing ones), auxiliary (doubling) on the other principle of action and insuring (with direct action). Structural schemes of the system as a whole and member subsystems are presented. Recommendations on developing executive and control subsystems are given

  3. Criteria for remote shutdown for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This Standard provides design criteria which require that: (1) specific controls and monitoring equipment shall be provided for achieving and maintaining the plant in a safe shutdown condition; (2) these controls be installed at a location (or locations) that is physically remote from the control room and cable spreading areas; (3) simultaneous control from both locations shall be prevented by administrative controls or devices for transfer of control from the control room to the remote location(s); and (4) the remote controls be used as defense-in-depth measure in addition to the control room shutdown controls and as a minimum shall provide for one complete channel of shutdown equipment

  4. ANALYSIS OF RELIABILITY OF RESERVED AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS OF INDUSTRIAL POWER PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Anishchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the comparative analysis of the main structural schemes for reserved automatic control and regulation devices of important objects of power supply with increased reliability requirements. There were analyzed schemes of passive and active doubling with control device, passive and active tripling, combined redundancy and majority redundancy according to schemes: “two from three” and “three from five”. On the results of calculations fulfilled there was made comparison of these schemes for ideal devices of built-in control and ideal majority elements. Scales of preferences of systems according to criterion of average time maximum and average probability of no-failure operation were built. These scales have variable character, depending on intervals in which there is a parameter obtained by multiplication of failure rate and time. The sequence of systems’ preferences is changing and is depending on each system failures and in moments of curves crossing of average probability of no-failure operation of systems. Analysis of calculation results showed the advantages of tripling systems and combined redundancy in reliability and this is achieved by a great amount of expenses for these systems creation. Under definite conditions the reliability of system of passive tripling is higher compared to system of active doubling. The majority schemes allow determining not only the full but also single (metrological failures. Boundary value of unreliability of built-in control device is determined, and this allows making a perfect choice between systems of active and passive redundancy.

  5. RECAP, Replacement Energy Cost for Short-Term Reactor Plant Shut-Down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Daun, C.J.; Jusko, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: RECAP (Replacement Energy Cost Analysis Package) determines the replacement energy costs associated with short-term shutdowns or de-ratings of one or more nuclear reactors. Replacement energy cost refers to the change in generating-system production cost that results from shutting down a reactor. The cost calculations are based on the seasonal, unit-specific cost estimates for 1988-1991 for all 117 nuclear electricity-generating units in the U.S. RECAP is menu-driven, allowing the user to define specific case studies in terms of parameters such as the units to be included, the length and timing of the shutdown or de-rating period, the unit capacity factors, and the reference year for reporting cost results. In addition to simultaneous shutdown cases, more complicated situations, such as overlapping shutdown periods or shutdowns that occur in different years, can be examined through use of a present-worth calculation option. 2 - Method of solution: The user selects a set of units for analysis, defines a shutdown (or de-rating) period, and specifies any planned maintenance outages, delays in unit start-ups, or changes in default capacity factors. The program then determines which seasonal cost numbers to apply, estimates total and daily costs, and makes the appropriate adjustments for multiple outages if they are encountered. The change in production cost is determined from the difference between the total variable costs (variable fuel cost, variable operation and maintenance cost, and purchased energy cost) when the reactor is available for generation and when it is not. Changes in reference-year dollars are based on gross national product (GNP) price deflators or on optional use inputs. Once RECAP has completed the initial cost estimates for a case study (or series of case studies), present-worth analysis can be conducted using different reference-year dollars and discount rates, as specified by the user. The program uses

  6. Analysis of shutdown and aftercooling cycles of the A-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, V.; Vopatril, M.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept is described of the emergency shut-down and after-cooling of the A-1 reactor based on the elimination of pressure shock and minimization of thermal shock. After-cooling is effected by all circulators which had not been defective before shut-down. During shut-down the pumps run at reduced speed. A diesel generator is used as a self-contained power supply. The after-cooling is classified into three types depending on the machinery power consumption, i.e., normal, emergency and super-emergency. The selection of the power supply and the after-cooling conditions proceeds automatically. A mathematical model is described of A-1 reactor behaviour during different accidents requiring the shut-down and after-cooling. Computer programmes are briefly indicated for the analysis of transients in the primary coolant circuit (ZVJE-73-23, SHOCK A-1), for the analysis of transients resulting from a neutron power controller failure or from a circulator failure (HAZARD), for the analysis of after-cooling processes (DENDEL), and programme SAULIS as an auxiliary programme for processing the results and for the print-out of the DENDEL programme. Steady-state parameters before the failure were found as initial conditions for the calculation of transients. The mathematical model was solved using a system of three computer programmes linked by interprogramme communication. The analysis is described of the cooperation of reactor safety circuits and of the automatic equipment for the reduction of thermal shock in the primary coolant circuit, as is the analysis of reactor accidents related to reactor control and to the safety circuits. Theoretical results are compared with experimental values obtained during the experimental A-1 reactor shut-down and after-cooling. The accuracy of the calculated value for the cooling gas temperature at the central and marginal channel outputs is -10 to +15% during the first 30 s of after-cooling. (J.P.)

  7. A socio-environmental monitoring system for a UNESCO biosphere reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Kim

    2017-11-03

    To identify potentially critical changes in an area's ongoing ability to produce multiple ecosystem services, a monitoring system was designed and implemented for the Mornington Peninsula and Westernport Biosphere Reserve in southeast Australia. The system is underpinned by an "environmental vital signs" (EVS) approach that was adopted to provide early warning of critical changes in human and natural characteristics of the area. The six themes monitored are non-coastal water, land including vegetation, biodiversity, natural heritage, built environment (including human population and economic activity), and coasts. These are monitored for the entire area, and each of its five constituent town council areas. After a critical change in any of these is identified, further investigation is required to identify causal factors and, if required, determine an appropriate response. The system relies on data available from external (third-party) organisations to monitor the natural and human characteristics of the area that were important in its designation as a UNESCO biosphere reserve. Strengths and weaknesses associated with the use of third-party data are discussed. These include adoption of baseline years and data reporting periods for different factors, costs, and data quality.

  8. Power system reliability impacts of wind generation and operational reserve requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Gil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its variability, wind generation integration presents a significant challenge to power system operators in order to maintain adequate reliability levels while ensuring least cost operation. This paper explores the trade-off between the benefits associated to a higher wind penetration and the additional operational reserve requirements that they impose. Such exploration is valued in terms of its effect on power system reliability, measured as an amount of unserved energy. The paper also focuses on how changing the Value of Lost Load (VoLL can be used to attain different reliability targets, and how wind power penetration and the diversity of the wind energy resource will impact quality of supply (in terms of instances of unserved energy. The evaluation of different penetrations of wind power generation, different wind speed profiles, wind resource diversity, and different operational reserve requirements, is conducted on the Chilean Northern Interconnected System (SING using statistical modeling of wind speed time series and computer simulation through a 24-hour ahead unit commitment algorithm and a Monte Carlo simulation scheme. Results for the SING suggest that while wind generation can significantly reduce generation costs, it can also imply higher security costs to reach acceptable reliability levels.

  9. Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility Interim Operational Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements for the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management of administrative controls to ensure safe operation of the facility

  10. Startup, Shutdown, & Malfunction (SSM) Emissions at Industrial Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA issued a final action to ensure states have plans in place that are fully consistent with the Clean Air Act and recent court decisions concerning startup, shutdown and malfunction (SSM) operations.

  11. Loss of shutdown cooling during degassing in Doel 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The presentation describes loss of shutdown cooling event during degassing in Doel 1 reactor, including description of Doel 1 features,status of plant prior to incident, event sequence and incident causes

  12. Monetary Policy of the Federal Reserve System from the Perspective of Exit Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Nocoń

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Central banks, after the experience of the global financial crisis, are now starting the implementation of the exit strategies, which are the process of normalization of monetary policy. The pace of monetary policy normalization process depends on the market reaction to central bank's decisions and macroeconomic conditions, in which they will be implemented. The main aim of the study is to present the principles of the exit strategy of the Federal Reserve System (Fed, on the background of the changes that have occurred in the United States within the monetary policy during the global financial crisis.

  13. Waste management systems model for energy systems sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, B.R.; Nehls, J.W. Jr.; Rivera, A.L.; Pechin, W.H.; Genung, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Model (ORM) is a DOE/Oak Ridge Operations (DOE/ORO) initiative which involves regulators and the public at the problem definition stage to attempt to reach a consensus on acceptable approaches to the solution of waste management problems. Once the approaches have been defined, the private sector participates in identifying and demonstrating the technologies to be employed. The Waste Management Systems Model (WSM), a major part of the ORM, is discussed in this paper. It can be generically described as employing a number of computer models to: 1. determine waste management requirements (e.g., capabilities and capacities); 2. develop scenarios that respond to changes in requirements and that evaluate alternatives as they become available; 3. compare these scenarios technically, operationally, and financially; and 4. select the most promising technologies for demonstration. 12 figures

  14. Risk impact of BWR technical specifications requirements during shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staple, B.D.; Kirk, H.K.; Yakle, J.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents an application of probabilistic models and risk based criteria for determining the risk impact of the Limiting Conditions of Operations (LCOs) in the Technical Specifications (TSs) of a boiling water reactor during shutdown. This analysis studied the risk impact of the current requirements of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) and Surveillance Test Intervals (STIs) in eight Plant Operational States (POSs) which encompass power operations, shutdown, and refueling. This report also discusses insights concerning TS action statements

  15. Startup and shutdown of the PULSAR Tokamak Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.; Bathke, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    Start-up conditions are examined for a pulsed tokamak reactor that uses only inductive plasma current drive for startup, burn and shutdown. A zero-dimensional (profile-averaged) model that describes plasma power and particle balance equations is used to study several aspects of plasma startup and shutdown, including optimization of the startup pathway tradeoff of auxiliary startup heating power versus startup time, volt-second consumtion, thermal stability and partial-power operations

  16. Fundamentals of Using Battery Energy Storage Systems to Provide Primary Control Reserves in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of stationary battery storage systems to German electrical grids can help with various storage services. This application requires controlling the charge and discharge power of such a system. For example, photovoltaic (PV home storage, uninterruptible power supply, and storage systems for providing ancillary services such as primary control reserves (PCRs represent battery applications with positive profitability. Because PCRs are essential for stabilizing grid frequency and maintaining a robust electrical grid, German transmission system operators (TSOs released strict regulations in August 2015 for providing PCRs with battery storage systems as part of regulating the International Grid Control Cooperation (IGCC region in Europe. These regulations focused on the permissible state of charge (SoC of the battery during nominal and extreme conditions. The concomitant increased capacity demand oversizing may result in a significant profitability reduction, which can be attenuated only by using an optimal parameterization of the control algorithm for energy management of the storage systems. In this paper, the sizing optimization is achieved and a recommendation for a control algorithm that includes the appropriate parameters for the requirements in the German market is given. Furthermore, the storage cost is estimated, including battery aging simulations for different aging parameter sets to allow for a realistic profitability calculation.

  17. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.

    2013-09-30

    This report fulfills the M2 milestone M2FT-13PN0912022, “Stranded Sites De-Inventorying Report.” In January 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013). Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses (BRC 2012). Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the nuclear power reactors have been shut down and the site has been decommissioned or is undergoing decommissioning. In this report, a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel from 12 shutdown sites was conducted. The shutdown sites were Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. These sites have no other operating nuclear power reactors at their sites and have also notified the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that their reactors have permanently ceased power operations and that nuclear fuel has been permanently removed from their reactor vessels. Shutdown reactors at sites having other operating reactors are not included in this evaluation.

  18. Measurement of the power trasient and valve closing time, for the zone control system, during a programmed shutdown in August 1989 and its relation with the class IV partial loss event occurred on 27/12/88 in CNE (Embalse nuclear power plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, A.O. de; Moreno, C.A.; Vinez, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    A description is made of a number of measurements performed during the programmed shutdown on Embalse nuclear power plant (CNE) (August 1989) to validate the existance of a reactivity insertion owing to the emptying of the liquid zone control system. In the event occurred on 27/12/88 when there was a partial loss Cl IV. Once the existance of this contribution was confirmed, the pertinent corrective measures were taken and the test was repeated to verify the effectiveness of the latter. The temporal evolution of a number of neutronic variables and process variables of the liquid zone system were stored in an IBM-PC XT equipped with analog-to-digital converters, for later analysis. (Author) [es

  19. Investigating Power System Primary and Secondary Reserve Interaction under High Wind Power Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingchen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Jin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Krad, Ibrahim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Rui [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gevorgian, Vahan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ela, Erik [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Power system frequency needs to be maintained close to its nominal value at all times to successfully balance load and generation and maintain system reliability. Adequate primary frequency response and secondary frequency response are the primary forces to correct an energy imbalance at the second-to-minute level. As wind energy becomes a larger portion of the world's energy portfolio, there is an increased need for wind to provide frequency response. This paper addresses one of the major concerns about using wind for frequency regulation: the unknown factor of the interaction between primary and secondary reserves. The lack of a commercially available tool to model this has limited the energy industry's understanding of when the depletion of primary reserves will impact the performance of secondary response or vice versa. This paper investigates the issue by developing a multi-area frequency response integration tool with combined primary and secondary capabilities. The simulation is conducted in close coordination with economical energy scheduling scenarios to ensure credible simulation results.

  20. Carbon stock assessment of two agroforestry systems in a tropical forest reserve in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasco, R.D.; Sales, R.F.; Estrella, R.; Saplaco, S.R.; Castillo, A.S.A.; Cruz, R.V.O.; Pulhin, F.B. [University of Philippines Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines). College of Forestry & Natural Resources Environmental Forestry Programme

    2001-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is the most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG) that causes global warming. Thus, land uses such as an agroforestry system have a significant role in moderating climate change since they can be sources and sinks of carbon. The aim of the study was to generate data on the carbon stocks of two agroforestry systems, specifically a Gmelina arborea-Theobroma cacao multistorey system and an alley cropping system with Gliricidia sepium hedges at the agroforestry research and demonstration area inside a forest reserve in Southern Luzon, Philippines. The multistorey system had a mean biomass of 258 Mg C ha{sup -1} and a carbon density of 185 Mg C ha{sup -1}. Carbon was stored in the various pools in the following order of magnitude: soil > tree biomass (above-ground) > necromass > understorey vegetation > roots. The Gliricidia hedgerow had a biomass density of 3.8 Mg C ha{sup -1}; total carbon density was 93 Mg C ha{sup -1}, of which 92 Mg C ha{sup -1} was in the soil.

  1. The analysis of pressurizer safety valve stuck open accident for low power and shutdown PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ho Gon; Park, Jin Hee; Jang, Seong Chul; Kim, Tae Woon

    2005-01-01

    The PSV (Pressurizer Safety Valve) popping test carried out practically in the early phase of a refueling outage has a little possibility of triggering a test-induced LOCA due to a PSV not fully closed or stuck open. According to a KSNP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant) low power and shutdown PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment), the failure of a HPSI (High Pressure Safety Injection) following a PSV stuck open was identified as a dominant accident sequence with a significant contribution to low power and shutdown risks. In this study, we aim to investigate the consequences of the NPP for the various accident sequences following the PSV stuck open as an initiating event through the thermal-hydraulic system code calculations. Also, we search the accident mitigation method for the sequence of HPSI failure, then, the applicability of the method is verified by the simulations using T/H system code.

  2. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  3. Carbon sequestration and nutrient reserves under differen t land use systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ivanilda Aguiar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the contribution of agroforestry (AFS and traditional systems to carbon sequestration and nutrient reserves in plants, litter and soil. The study was carried out in the semiarid region of Brazil in a long-term experiment on an experimental farm of the goat and sheep section of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa. Two agroforestry systems were investigated: agrosilvopastoral (ASP and forest-pasture areas (SP as well as traditional agriculture management (TM, two areas left fallow after TM (six fallow years - F6 and nine fallow years - F9 and one area of preserved Caatinga vegetation (CAT. Soil, litter and plants were sampled from all areas and the contents of C, N, P, K, Ca and Mg per compartment determined. The AFS (ASP and SP had higher nutrient stocks than the traditional and intermediate stocks compared to the preserved Caatinga. In the ASP, a relevant part of the nutrients extracted by crops is returned to the system by constant inputs of litter, weeding of herbaceous vegetation and cutting of the legume crops. After fallow periods of six and nine years, carbon and nutrient stocks in the compartments soil, litter and herbaceous plants were similar to those of the preserved Caatinga (CAT, but still lower than under natural conditions in the woody vegetation.

  4. Simulation of the regional groundwater-flow system of the Menominee Indian Reservation, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.; Dunning, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    A regional, two-dimensional, steady-state groundwater-flow model was developed to simulate the groundwater-flow system and groundwater/surface-water interactions within the Menominee Indian Reservation. The model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, to contribute to the fundamental understanding of the region’s hydrogeology. The objectives of the regional model were to improve understanding of the groundwater-flow system, including groundwater/surface-water interactions, and to develop a tool suitable for evaluating the effects of potential regional water-management programs. The computer code GFLOW was used because of the ease with which the model can simulate groundwater/surface-water interactions, provide a framework for simulating regional groundwater-flow systems, and be refined in a stepwise fashion to incorporate new data and simulate groundwater-flow patterns at multiple scales. Simulations made with the regional model reproduce groundwater levels and stream base flows representative of recent conditions (1970–2013) and illustrate groundwater-flow patterns with maps of (1) the simulated water table and groundwater-flow directions, (2) probabilistic areas contributing recharge to high-capacity pumped wells, and (3) estimation of the extent of infiltrated wastewater from treatment lagoons.

  5. Water quality data collected by the the National Estuarine Research Reserve System's System-wide Monitoring Program (NERRS SWMP), 1996 - 1998 (NODC Accession 0000789)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Estuarine Research Reserve System's System-wide Monitoring Program (NERRS SWMP) collected water quality data in 22 reserves in the United States and...

  6. Watersheds of the Oak Ridge Reservation in a geographic information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauxe, J.

    1998-05-01

    This work develops a comprehensive set of watershed definitions for the entire Oak Ridge Reservation and surrounding area. A stream-ordering system is defined based upon the method proposed by Strahler (1952) and using 1:24,000 scale US Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps and the locally standard S-16A Map (USGS 1987) as sources for topographic contours and locations of streams as recommended by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS 1995). For each ordered stream, a contributing watershed or catchment area is delineated and digitized into a geographic information system (GIS), generating over 900 watershed polygons of various orders. This new dataset complements a growing database of georeferenced environmental and cultural data which exist for the Oak Ridge area and are routinely used for socioeconomic and environmental analyses. Because these watersheds are now available in a GIS format, they may be used in a variety of hydrologic analyses, including rainfall/runoff modeling, development of geomorphological parameters, and the modeling of contaminant transport in surface waters. An understanding of the relationships of watersheds to sources of contamination and to administrative and political boundaries is also essential in land use planning and the organization of environmental restoration and waste management activities

  7. Spinning reserve quantification by a stochastic–probabilistic scheme for smart power systems with high wind penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazali, Amirhossein; Kalantar, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A stochastic–probabilistic approach is proposed for spinning reserve quantification. • A new linearized formulation integrating reliability metrics is presented. • The framework manages the reserve provided by responsive loads and storage systems. • The proposed method is capable of detaching the spinning reserve for different uses. - Abstract: This paper introduces a novel spinning reserve quantification scheme based on a hybrid stochastic–probabilistic approach for smart power systems including high penetration of wind generation. In this research the required spinning reserve is detached into two main parts. The first part of the reserve is procured to overcome imbalances between load and generation in the system. The second part of the required spinning reserve is scheduled according to the probability of unit outages. In order to overcome uncertainties caused by wind generation and load forecasting errors different scenarios of wind generation and load uncertainties are generated. For each scenario the reserve deployed by different components are taken account as the first part of the required reserve which is used to overcome imbalances. The second part of the required reserve is based on reliability constraints. The total expected energy not supplied (TEENS) is the reliability criterion which determines the second part of the required spinning reserve to overcome unit outage possibilities. This formulation permits the independent system operator to purchase the two different types of reserve with different prices. The introduced formulation for reserve quantification is also capable of managing and detaching the reserve provided by responsive loads and energy storage devices. The problem is formulated as a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) problem including linearized formulations for reliability metrics. Obtained results show the efficiency of the proposed approach compared with the conventional stochastic and deterministic

  8. Analysis of failure dependent test, repair and shutdown strategies for redundant trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uryasev, S.; Samanta, P.

    1994-09-01

    Failure-dependent testing implies a test of a redundant components (or trains) when failure of one component has been detected. The purpose of such testing is to detect any common cause failures (CCFs) of multiple components so that a corrective action such as repair or plant shutdown can be taken to reduce the residence time of multiple failures, given a failure has been detected. This type of testing focuses on reducing the conditional risk of CCFs. Formulas for calculating the conditional failure probability of a two train system with different test, repair and shutdown strategies are developed. A methodology is presented with an example calculation showing the risk-effectiveness of failure-dependent strategies for emergency diesel generators (EDGs) in nuclear power plants (NPPs)

  9. Management of individual and collective dosimetry at Fessenheim nuclear plant. Evaluation after refueling shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarre, D.; Waller, A.

    1980-01-01

    The principle of dosimetry management chosen by Fessenheim nuclear power station was originally consisted of two phases: - an automatic acquisition of individual doses realized by stylodosimeter readers; - a deferred data processing by computer. The whole system has not been used during the shutdown for the first refuelling of unit number one in view of encountered difficulties with perfecting of automatic readers prototype, this last phase has been replaced by a manual acquisition of doses. The dosimetry data processing has two main objects: - supervision of individual dosimetry for people who work in the nuclear power station; - knowledge of doses assigned for each working and equipment. Moreover, a first dosimetric result of the shutdown for refuelling of unit number one, enables to notice the workings which doses are the most important and written in percentage of total doses: regulatory controls: about 19%; - steam generators working: 16%; - working decontamination and making health physics screen (lock chamber) 10% [fr

  10. Study on the Post-Fire Safe-Shutdown Analysis for CANDU NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Hwan; Kim, Yun Jung; Park, Mun Hee [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to study a method of the Post-Fire Safe-Shutdown Analysis in order to apply to CANDU NPPs when one group of the Safety Structures, Systems and Components(SCCs) is failed by Fire. The purpose of Fire Protection is prevention, suppression of the fire and mitigation of the effect on the Nuclear Safety. When fire takes place at the Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs), the reactor should achieve and maintain safe shut-down condition and minimize radioactive material release to an environment. The purpose of the Post-Fire SSA process is an evaluation process during a fire at NPPs. At this study, the process was conceptually adopted for control room complex of CANDU NPPs. The Core Damage Frequency of the Reactor will be evaluated more accurately if the SSA is adopted adequately at a fire.

  11. SNR 2 core dynamics and shut-down signals in a protected loss-of-flow incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a 1300 MWe Core during a loss-of-flow incident has been analyzed by use of the SAS3D code for a given pump coast down characteristic and constant core inlet temperature. Emphasis was placed on the questions: How fast and via which monitored parameters can the incident be recognized by the reactor protection system. What is the tolerable time span for the shut-down action without exceeding safety limits. Key prameters and limit values as well as conceivable reactivity feed-back effects are discussed. The result is, that three out of four choosen monitored parameters are capable of initiating a shut-down action in time. In addition, the amount of shut-down reactivity required for a successful scram was briefly investigated

  12. Retrofit of AECL CAN6 seals into the Pickering shutdown cooling pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.; Metcalfe, R.; Brown, G.

    1997-01-01

    The existing mechanical seals in the shutdown cooling (SDC) pumps at the eight-unit Pickering Nuclear Generating Station have caused as least seven forced outages in the last fifteen years. The SDC pumps were originally intended to run only during shutdowns, mostly at low pressure, except for short periods during routine testing of SDC isolation valves while the plant is operating at full pressure to verify that the emergency core injection system is available. Unfortunately, in practice, some SDC pumps must be run much more frequently than this to prevent overheating or freezing of components in the system while the plant is at power. This more severe service has decreased seal lifetime from about 8000 running hours to about 3000 running hours. Rather than tackling the difficult task of eliminating on-power running of the pumps, Pickering decided to install a more robust seal design that could withstand this. Through the process of competitive tender, AECL's CAN6 seal was chosen. This seal has a successful history in similarly demanding conditions in boiling water reactors in the USA. To supplement this and demonstrate there would be no 'surprises,' a 2000-hour test program was conducted. Testing consisted of simulating all the expected conditions, plus some special tests under abnormal conditions. This has given assurance that the seal will operate reliably in the Pickering shutdown cooling pumps. (author)

  13. Retrofit of AECL CAN6 seals into the Pickering shutdown cooling pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.; Metcalfe, R.; Brown, G.; Kiameh, P.; Burchett, P.

    1997-01-01

    The existing mechanical seals in the shutdown cooling (SDC) pumps at the eight-unit Pickering Nuclear Generating Station have caused at least seven forced outages in the last fifteen years. The SDC pumps were originally intended to run only during shutdowns, mostly at low pressure, except for short periods during routine testing of SDC isolation valves while the plant is operating at full pressure to verify that the emergency core injection system is available. Unfortunately, in practice, some SDC pumps must be run much more frequently than this to prevent overheating or freezing of components in the system while the plant is at power. This more severe service has decreased seal lifetime from about 8000 running hours to about 3000 running hours. Rather than tackling the difficult task of eliminating on-power running of the pumps, Pickering decided to install a more robust seal design that could withstand this. Through the process of competitive tender, AECL's CAN6 seal was chosen. This seal has a successful history in similarly demanding conditions in boiling water reactors in the USA. To supplement this and demonstrate there would be no 'surprises,' a 2000-hour test program was conducted. Testing consisted of simulating all the expected conditions, plus some special tests under abnormal conditions. This has given assurance that the seal will operate reliably in the Pickering shutdown cooling pumps. (author)

  14. Application of PSA to reduce frequency of unplanned shutdown of the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanipanichskul, P.

    1988-08-01

    The relative importance of all the operating and safety systems of the reactor TRR-1/M1 as well as the major failure modes of the systems are pointed out. The average unavailability of the reactor is 3·3 E-2 per cycle of operation which is in the range value of the actual reactor shutdown recorded during normal operation. Some guidance for annual maintenance and also suggestions for system development to increase safety systems reliability are determined. PSA was applied to improve the safety systems reliability of an operating research reactor. Refs, tabs

  15. PSA for the shutdown mode for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The meeting, which was attended by more than 75 participants from 20 countries, provided a broad discussion forum where all the currently active major shutdown PSA programmes were reviewed. The meeting also addressed the issues related to actual performance of shutdown PSA studies as well as insight gained from the studies. This document, which was prepared during the TCM, contains the results of extensive discussions which were held in specific working groups. The papers presented at the meeting provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art of shutdown risk assessment and remedial measures taken to reduce the risk in outages. It is hoped that this document will be very useful to all individuals with interest in increasing safety during outages at NPPs. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Study of methodology for low power/shutdown fire PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhen; Li Zhaohua; Li Lin; Song Lei

    2014-01-01

    As a risk assessment technology based on probability, the fire PSA is accepted abroad by nuclear industry in its application in the risk assessment for nuclear power plants. Based on the industry experience, the fire-induced impact on the plant safety during low power and shutdown operation cannot be neglected, therefore fire PSA can be used to assess the corresponding fire risk. However, there is no corresponding domestic guidance/standard as well as accepted analysis methodology up to date. Through investigating the latest evolvement on fire PSA during low power and shutdown operation, and integrating its characteristic with the corresponding engineering experience, an engineering methodology to evaluate the fire risk during low power and shutdown operation for nuclear power plant is established in this paper. In addition, an analysis demonstration as an example is given. (authors)

  17. The Alternative Design Features for Safety Enhancement in Shutdown Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Hae Cheol; Kim, Myung Ki; Chung, Bag Soon; Seo, Mi Ro

    2009-01-01

    PSA can be used to confirm that the new plant design is complied with the applicable safety goals, and to select among the alternate design options. A shutdown PSA provides insight for outage planning schedule, outage management practices, and design modifications. Considering the results of both LPSD PSA studies and operating experiences for low power and shutdown, the improvements can be proposed to reduce the high risk contribution. The improvements/enhancements during shutdown operation may be divided into categories such as hardware, administrative management, and operational procedure. This paper presents on an example how the risk related to an accidental situation can be reduced, focusing the hardware design changes for the newly designed NPPs

  18. CV activities on the LHC complex during the long shutdown

    CERN Document Server

    Deleval, S; Body, Y; Obrecht, M; Moccia, S; Peon, G

    2011-01-01

    The presentation gives an overview of the major projects and work foreseen to be performed during next long shutdown on cooling and ventilation plants. Several projects are needed following the experience of the last years when LHC was running, in particular the modifications in the water cooling circuits presently in overflow. Some other projects are linked to the CV consolidation plan. Finally, most of the work shall be done to respond to additional requests: SR buildings air conditioning, the need to be able to clean and maintain the LHC cooling towers without a complete stop of cooling circuits, the upgrade of the air conditioning of the CCC rack room cooling etc. For all these activities, the author will detail constraints and the impact on the schedule and on the operation of the plants that will however need to run for most of the shutdown duration. The consequence of postponing the long shutdown from 2012 to 2013 will be also covered.

  19. Evaluation of reactivity shutdown margin for nuclear fuel reload optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Hing-Ip; Maldonado, G.I.

    1995-01-01

    The FORMOSA-P code is a nuclear fuel management optimization package that combines simulated annealing (SA) and nodal generalized perturbation theory (GPT). Recent studies at Electricite de France (EdF-Clamart) have produced good results for power-peaking minimizations under multiple limiting control rod configurations. However, since the reactivity shutdown margin is not explicitly treated as an objective or constraint function, then any optimal loading patterns (LPs) are not guaranteed to yield an adequate shutdown margin (SDM). This study describes the implementation of the SDM calculation within a FORMOSA-P optimization. Maintaining all additional computational requirements to a minimum was a key consideration

  20. Evaluation of reactivity shutdown margin for nuclear fuel reload optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engrand, P.; Wong, H. I.; Maldonado, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    The FORMOSA-P code is a nuclear fuel management optimization package which combines simulated annealing (SA) and nodal generalized perturbation theory (GPT). Recent studies at Electricite de France have produced good results for power peaking minimizations under multiple limiting control rod configurations. However, since the reactivity shutdown margin is not explicitly treated as an objective or constraint function, then any optimal loading patterns (LPs) are not guaranteed to yield an adequate shutdown margin (SDM). This study describes the implementation of the SDM calculation within a FORMOSA-P optimization. Maintaining all additional computational requirements to a minimum was a key consideration. (authors). 4 refs., 2 figs

  1. Elementary calculation of the shutdown delay of a pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvon, J.

    1949-04-01

    This study analyzes theoretically the progress of the shutdown of a nuclear pile (reactor) when a cadmium rod is introduced instantaneously. For simplification reasons, the environment of the pile is considered as homogenous and only thermal neutrons are considered (delayed neutrons are neglected). Calculation is made first for a plane configuration (plane vessel, plane multiplier without reflector, and plane multiplier with reflector), and then for a cylindrical configuration (multiplier without reflector, multiplier with infinitely thick reflector, finite cylindrical piles without reflector and with reflector). The self-sustain conditions are calculated for each case and the multiplication length and the shutdown delay are deduced. (J.S.)

  2. Core shutdown report: Subcycle K-14.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, S.T.

    1992-05-01

    When a reactor is shut down, there is a set of rules that must be followed to guarantee that the reactor remains in a safe shutdown state. Some of these rules involve the cooling of heat generating assemblies before, during, and after charge-discharge (C ampersand D) operations. These rules ensure that C ampersand D operations will not endanger the integrity of the fuel or targets by allowing them to overheat. DPSOL 105-1225, Assembly Discharge and Forced Cooling Requirements, is the primary operations procedure that governs these cooling rules. The specific shutdown cooling limits that are input into this procedure are contained within this report

  3. The Bulgaria before shut-down of next two blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobak, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Ministry of Trade and Industry of United Kingdom in the frame of realization of programmes for the Middle and East Europe in the area of nuclear energetics during October 5 - 7, 2005 in Kozloduj has organized the Second International Conference on the theme 'Liquidation, social and economic changes'. In this paper author informs about Kozloduj NPP and plans for shut-down of this NPP as well as consequences of the shut-down. One of them the increase of unemployment and social impact for this region are presented

  4. Plant operational states analysis in low power and shutdown PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jiandong; Qiu Yongping; Zhang Qinfang; An Hongzhen; Li Maolin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of Plant Operational States (POS) analysis is to disperse the continuous and dynamic process of low power and shutdown operation, which is the basis of developing event tree models for accident sequence analysis. According to the design of a 300 MW Nuclear Power Plant Project, operating experience and procedures of the reference plant, a detailed POS analysis is carried out based on relative criteria. Then, several kinds of POS are obtained, and the duration of each POS is calculated according to the operation records of the reference plant. The POS analysis is an important element in low power and shutdown PSA. The methodology and contents provide reference for POS analysis. (authors)

  5. Basis for Interim Operation for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    This document establishes the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) for the Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility (FSS) as managed by the 300 Area Deactivation Project (300 ADP) organization in accordance with the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract procedure (PHMC) HNF-PRO-700, ''Safety Analysis and Technical Safety Requirements''. A hazard classification (Benecke 2003a) has been prepared for the facility in accordance with DOE-STD-1027-92 resulting in the assignment of Hazard Category 3 for FSS Facility buildings that store N Reactor fuel materials (303-B, 3712, and 3716). All others are designated Industrial buildings. It is concluded that the risks associated with the current and planned operational mode of the FSS Facility (uranium storage, uranium repackaging and shipment, cleanup, and transition activities, etc.) are acceptable. The potential radiological dose and toxicological consequences for a range of credible uranium storage building have been analyzed using Hanford accepted methods. Risk Class designations are summarized for representative events in Table 1.6-1. Mitigation was not considered for any event except the random fire event that exceeds predicted consequences based on existing source and combustible loading because of an inadvertent increase in combustible loading. For that event, a housekeeping program to manage transient combustibles is credited to reduce the probability. An additional administrative control is established to protect assumptions regarding source term by limiting inventories of fuel and combustible materials. Another is established to maintain the criticality safety program. Additional defense-in-depth controls are established to perform fire protection system testing, inspection, and maintenance to ensure predicted availability of those systems, and to maintain the radiological control program. It is also concluded that because an accidental nuclear criticality is not credible based on the low uranium enrichment

  6. Prevention device for rapid reactor core shutdown in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji; Karatsu, Hiroyuki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To surely prevent rapid shutdown of a nuclear reactor upon partial load interruption due to rapid increase in the system frequency. Constitution: If a partial load interruption greater than the sum of the turbine by-pass valve capacity and the load setting bias portion is applied in a BWR type power plant, the amount of main steams issued from the reactor is decreased, the thermal input/output balance of the reactor is lost, the reactor pressure is increased, the void is collapsed, the neutron fluxes are increased and the reactor power rises to generate rapid reactor shutdown. In view of the above, the turbine speed signal is compared with a speed setting value in a recycling flowrate control device and the recycling pump is controlled to decrease the recycling flowrate in order to compensate the increase in the neutron fluxes accompanying the reactor power up. In this way, transient changes in the reactor core pressure and the neutron fluxes are kept within a setting point for the rapid reactor shutdown operation thereby enabling to continue the plant operation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Electricity-market price and nuclear power plant shutdown: Evidence from California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.K.; Ho, T.; Zarnikau, J.; Olson, A.; Jones, R.; Chait, M.; Horowitz, I.; Wang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Japan's Fukushima nuclear disaster, triggered by the March 11, 2011 earthquake, has led to calls for shutting down existing nuclear plants. To maintain resource adequacy for a grid's reliable operation, one option is to expand conventional generation, whose marginal unit is typically fueled by natural-gas. Two timely and relevant questions thus arise for a deregulated wholesale electricity market: (1) what is the likely price increase due to a nuclear plant shutdown? and (2) what can be done to mitigate the price increase? To answer these questions, we perform a regression analysis of a large sample of hourly real-time electricity-market price data from the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) for the 33-month sample period of April 2010–December 2012. Our analysis indicates that the 2013 shutdown of the state's San Onofre plant raised the CAISO real-time hourly market prices by $6/MWH to $9/MWH, and that the price increases could have been offset by a combination of demand reduction, increasing solar generation, and increasing wind generation. - Highlights: • Japan's disaster led to calls for shutting down existing nuclear plants. • We perform a regression analysis of California's real-time electricity-market prices. • We estimate that the San Onofre plant shutdown has raised the market prices by $6/MWH to $9/MWH. • The price increases could be offset by demand reduction and renewable generation increase

  8. Systemic methotrexate to treat ectopic pregnancy does not affect ovarian reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Bárbara; Barrio, Ana; Pacheco, Alberto; Serna, José; Zuzuarregui, José Luis; Garcia-Velasco, Juan A

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate whether methotrexate (MTX) compromises ovarian reserve and future reproductive outcome in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART), when it is used as first-line treatment for ectopic pregnancy (EP). Prospective, observational study. University-affiliated private IVF unit. Twenty-five women undergoing IVF-ICSI who were treated with MTX (1 mg/kg IM) for an EP after ART. Evaluation of reproductive outcome and serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels. Serum AMH was evaluated before administering MTX and >or=1 week after the resolution of the EP. Reproductive outcome was evaluated by comparing subsequent IVF-ICSI cycles after EP resolution. Serum AMH levels, cycle length, gonadotropin dose required, peak serum E(2) level, oocytes collected, and embryos obtained. Serum AMH levels before MTX were not statistically significantly different from those after treatment (3.7 +/- 0.3 ng/mL vs. 3.9 +/- 0.3 ng/mL). Patients undergoing a subsequent cycle after systemic treatment for EP had similar cycle durations (10.3 vs. 10.8 d), gonadotropin requirements (2,775 vs. 2,630.3 IU), peak E(2) levels (1,884.3 vs. 1,523.6 pg/mL), number of oocytes retrieved (12.1 vs. 10.5), and total number of embryos obtained (7.1 vs. 6.5). Single-dose MTX is a safe first-treatment choice that does not compromise future reproductive outcomes in women who are diagnosed with EP after ART.

  9. Systemic effects of Leucaena leucocephala ingestion on ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at Berenty Reserve, Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Graham; Puschner, Birgit; Affolter, Verena; Stalis, Ilse; Davidson, Autumn; Baker, Tomas; Tahara, John; Jolly, Alison; Ostapak, Susan

    2015-06-01

    Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala) is a leguminous tree that is nutritious forage for domestic livestock when ingested in limited amounts. Unfortunately, leucaena contains mimosine, a plant amino acid, that can be toxic when ingested at higher concentrations. Reported toxic effects include alopecia (fur loss), poor body condition, infertility, low birth weight, thyroid gland dysfunction, and organ toxicity. Originally native to Mexico and Central America, leucaena has been introduced throughout the tropics, including Berenty Reserve, Madagascar where it was planted as supplemental browse for livestock. In Berenty, a seasonal syndrome of alopecia in ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta) is associated with eating leucaena. Although much is known about the toxic effects of leucaena and mimosine on domestic animals and humans, the systemic effects on wildlife had not been studied. In a comparison of lemurs that include leucaena in their diet and those that do not, we found that animals that ingest leucaena absorb mimosine but that ingestion does not affect body condition, cause kidney or liver toxicity, or affect the intestinal tract. Alopecia is due to mimosine's interference of the hair follicle cycle. Leucaena ingestion is associated with higher serum albumin, α-tocopherol, and thyroxine concentrations, suggesting that leucaena may provide some nutritional benefit and that lemurs can detoxify and convert mimosine to a thyroid stimulating metabolite. The primary conservation consequence of leucaena ingestion at Berenty may be increased infant mortality due to the infants' inability cling to their alopecic mothers. The widespread introduction of leucaena throughout the tropics and its rapid spread in secondary forest conditions mean that many other leaf-eating mammals may be including this tree in their diet. Thus, exposure to leucaena should be considered when wildlife health is being evaluated, and the potential effects on wildlife health should be considered when

  10. Fuel supply shutdown facility interim operational safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besser, R.L.; Brehm, J.R.; Benecke, M.W.; Remaize, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    These Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSR) for the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls to ensure safe operation. The IOSRs apply to the fuel material storage buildings in various modes (operation, storage, surveillance)

  11. Safety and regulation aspects of nuclear facilities shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, B.

    1977-01-01

    Technical dispositions that safety authorities will accept after shutdown of a nuclear installation and reglementation to use are examined. The different solutions from surveillance and maintenance, after removal of fissile materials and radioactive fluids, to dismantling are discussed especially for reactors. In each case the best solution has to be studied to ensure protection of public health and environment [fr

  12. Method of disposing of shut-down nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiser, H.

    1984-01-01

    A shut-down atomic power plant or a section thereof, particularly the nuclear reactor, is disposed of by sinking it to below ground level by constructing a caisson with cutting edges from the foundations of said plant or section or by excavating a pit therebelow

  13. 300 Area fuel supply shutdown facility hazards assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 300 Area Fuel Supply Shutdown Facilities on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone, is demonstrated

  14. SEPRA - shutdown PSA for the OLKILUOTO nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himanen, R.

    1995-01-01

    The utility TVO has extended the PSA study to the analysis of refueling, shutdown and startup. The Shutdown Event PRA (SEPRA) was reported to the authority in September 1992. The study consists of the analysis of leaks and loss of decay heat removal in the planned shutdown conditions. Special studies were performed for the cold pressurization, for local criticality events, for heavy load transport and for the transients during startup and shutdown. A remarkable effort was put to identify risks, i.e. to the qualitative analysis. The regular preventive maintenance tasks in the refueling outages were analyzed and the important tasks were selected for further studies. Besides the severe core damage risk the utility was interested in less grave consequences, e.g. the economic risks, causing significant extension of outages. The plant specific screening of initiators consisted of a study on the incident history and of interviewing the plant personnel on selected tasks. A number of thermohydraulic calculations were carried out to support the analysis of accident sequences. The operator actions after an initiating event were verified with the operating staff. The annual core damage risk from the refueling outage is about one forth of the total annual risk. The modifications decreased significantly the core damage frequency. It is foreseen that the SEPRA will form a basis of the procedure enhancement for the low power states. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs

  15. Small leak shutdown, location, and behavior in LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandusky, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes an experimental study of small leaks tested under LMFBR steam generator conditions. Defected tubes were exposed to flowing sodium and steam. The observed behavior of the defected tubes is reported along with test results of shutdown methods. Leak location methods were investigated. Methods were identified to open plugged defects for helium leak testing and detect plugged leaks by nondestructive testing

  16. Summary of Session 5 and 6 'Long Shutdown 1'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordry, F; Foraz, K [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarizes the sessions devoted to Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) in the LHC, injectors and experiments. The time frame and start date were discussed, with the main activities from powering tests prior to warm-up up to physics were presented. The session finished with a discussion on the maximum reasonable energy. (author)

  17. Effect of the Online Game Shutdown Policy on Internet Use, Internet Addiction, and Sleeping Hours in Korean Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiyun; Cho, Hyunseok; Lee, Seungmin; Kim, Juyeong; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2018-05-01

    Internet addiction has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. In November 2011, the South Korean government implemented an online game shutdown policy, lasting from 12:00 to 6:00 am, as a means of preventing Internet addiction in adolescents aged 15 or below. This study analyzed the effect of this shutdown policy on adolescent Internet use, addiction, and sleeping hours. We analyzed data collected from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey from 2011 to 2015. Respondents were divided into two groups by age: aged 15 or below (male = 76,048, female = 66,281) and aged 16 or above (male = 52,568, female = 49,060). A difference-in-difference analysis was used to evaluate the effect of this shutdown policy. In 2012, which is immediately following policy enforcement, daily amount of Internet use (in minutes) decreased more in adolescents affected by the policy (i.e., the aged 15 or below group). However, it steadily increased in 2013, 2014, 2015, and showed no meaningful long-term improvements 4 years after policy implementation (-3.648 minutes in 2012 [p = .001], -3.204 minutes in 2013 [p = .011], -1.140 minutes in 2014 [p = .384], and 2.190 minutes in 2015 [p = .107]). The shutdown policy did not alter Internet addiction or sleeping hours. Interestingly, female adolescents, adolescents with low academic performance, and adolescents with low exercise levels exhibited comparatively stronger and longer lasting initial declines in Internet usage. The shutdown policy had practically insignificant effects in reducing Internet use for target adolescents. Thus, policymakers aiming to reduce or prevent Internet addiction should use different strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Provision of frequency restoration reserves by possible energy storage systems in Germany and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassheim, A.; Haan, de J.E.S.; Gibescu, M.; Kling, W.L.

    2014-01-01

    Current developments in generation portfolios and market design urge the need to attract additional balancing services in the form of frequency restoration reserves (FRR). This work elaborates on the opportunities and constraints of current balancing markets in the Netherlands and Germany to harness

  19. Task Mapping and Bandwidth Reservation for Mixed Hard/Soft Fault-Tolerant Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saraswat, Prabhat Kumar; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    reserved for the servers determines the quality of service (QoS) for soft tasks. CBS enforces temporal isolation, such that soft task overruns do not affect the timing guarantees of hard tasks. Transient faults in hard tasks are tolerated using checkpointing with rollback recovery. We have proposed a Tabu...

  20. Power-system-wide analysis of the benefits of reserve provision from solar photovoltaics in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bischof-Niemz, T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available . However, South Africa has abundant solar resources and has seen a dramatic decline in solar PV tariffs over the past few years. The value of reserve provision to the system from solar PV was determined by simulating the South African power system...

  1. Replacing reserve requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Edward J. Stevens

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the fading significance of the Federal Reserve System's reserve requirements and the recent flowering of required clearing balances, a rapidly growing feature of Reserve Bank operations.

  2. 77 FR 75198 - Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0299] Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown... regulatory guide (DG), DG-1272, ``Standard Format and Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities... Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report,'' which was issued in July 2000. DG-1271...

  3. 77 FR 73968 - Reconsideration of Certain New Source and Startup/Shutdown Issues: National Emission Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ...; FRL-9762-1] RIN 2060-AR62 Reconsideration of Certain New Source and Startup/Shutdown Issues: National... Source and Startup/Shutdown Issues: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal... November 30, 2012, proposed ``Reconsideration of Certain New Source and Startup/Shutdown Issues: National...

  4. Shutdown cooling temperature perturbation test for analysis of potential flow blockages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handbury, J.; Newman, C.; Shynot, T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper details the methods and results of the 'shutdown cooling test' in October 1995. This novel test was conducted at PLGS while the reactor was shutdown and shutdown cooling (SDC) waster was recirculating to find potential channel blockages resulting from the introduction of wood debris. This test discovered most of the channels that contained major wood and metal debris. (author)

  5. Management of accidental scenarios involving the loss of RHRS under shutdown conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serradell, V.; Villanueva, J.F.; Martorell, S.; Carlos, S.; Pelayo, F.; Mendizabal, R.; Sol, I.

    2009-01-01

    Results from current Probabilistic Safety Assessment studies of Nuclear Power Plants show the importance of some risky scenarios with the plant at low power and shutdown conditions as compared to the accident scenarios with the plant operating at full power. Technical Specifications establish the Limiting Conditions for operation to assure the plant integrity in each Plant Operational State (POS). Moreover, the plant configuration may differ from the beginning to the end of a certain Plant Operational State, so the Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCO) established could be revised as, depending on the plant configuration, the transient evolution may be slightly different. For a PWR plant, one of the most risky accidental sequences in shutdown is the loss of the residual heat removal system, Using the information provided by the plant low power probabilistic safety analysis (LPSA), which should address the Limiting Conditions for Operation imposed by the current Technical Specification, two situations are distinguished: Main Reactor Cooling System (RCS) fully filled with water and RCS partially filled. In addition, while the primary system is partially filled in Cold Shutdown, two different plant configurations can be distinguished, which depend on the particular POS: RCS open and closed. For each case, the corresponding Technical Specification establishes the path to evacuate the residual heat generated. This paper explores the possibility of having alternative or complementary sources for heat removal others than the ones established in the Technical Specification. Especial attention is paid to the role of Steam Generators as an effective heat sink and the possibility of restart of the redundant RHR train. Such alternatives will influence LPSA implementation results. To perform this analysis the loss of the RHR system in a PWR plant has been simulated using RELAP-5 considering the plant in different plant operational states. One of the main results of this work

  6. The Federal Reserve System Balance Sheet; What Happened and Why it Matters

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Stella

    2009-01-01

    The recent expansion of the balance sheet of the consolidated Federal Reserve Banks (FRB) is analyzed in an historical context. The analysis reveals that the nature of Fed involvement in U.S. financial markets has changed dramatically and its expansion is several orders of magnitude beyond what is usually reported. The associated fiscal risks and potential exit strategies are then considered. Although risks are considerable in certain unlikely scenarios, FRB capital, earnings capacity, and re...

  7. Increasing efficiency of TPP fuel suply system due to LNG usage as a reserve fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhigulina, E. V.; Khromchenkov, V. G.; Mischner, J.; Yavorovsky, Y. V.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the analysis of fuel economy efficiency increase possibility at thermal power plants (TPP) due to the transition from the use of black oil as a reserve fuel to liquefied natural gas (LNG) produced at the very station. The work represents the technical solution that allows to generate, to store and to use LNG as the reserve fuel TPP. The annual amounts of black oil and natural gas that are needed to ensure the reliable operation of several power plants in Russia were assessed. Some original schemes of the liquefied natural gas production and storing as alternative reserve fuel generated by means of application of expansion turbines are proposed. The simulation results of the expansion process for two compositions of natural gas with different contents of high-boiling fractions are presented. The dependences of the condensation outlet and power generation from the flow initial parameters and from the natural gas composition are obtained and analysed. It was shown that the choice of a particular circuit design depends primarily on the specific natural gas composition. The calculations have proved the effectiveness and the technical ability to use liquefied natural gas as a backup fuel at reconstructed and newly designed gas power station.

  8. Type and timing of childhood maltreatment and severity of shutdown dissociation in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Schalinski

    Full Text Available Dissociation, particularly the shutting down of sensory, motor and speech systems, has been proposed to emerge in susceptible individuals as a defensive response to traumatic stress. In contrast, other individuals show signs of hyperarousal to acute threat. A key question is whether exposure to particular types of stressful events during specific stages of development can program an individual to have a strong dissociative response to subsequent stressors. Vulnerability to ongoing shutdown dissociation was assessed in 75 inpatients (46 M/29 F, M = 31 ± 10 years old with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and related to number of traumatic events experienced or witnessed during childhood or adulthood. The Maltreatment and Abuse Chronology of Exposure (MACE scale was used to collect retrospective recall of exposure to ten types of maltreatment during each year of childhood. Severity of shutdown dissociation was related to number of childhood but not adult traumatic events. Random forest regression with conditional trees indicated that type and timing of childhood maltreatment could predictably account for 31% of the variance (p < 0.003 in shutdown dissociation, with peak vulnerability occurring at 13-14 years of age and with exposure to emotional neglect followed by various forms of emotional abuse. These findings suggest that there may be windows of vulnerability to the development of shutdown dissociation. Results support the hypothesis that experienced events are more important than witnessed events, but challenge the hypothesis that "life-threatening" events are a critical determinant.

  9. COMPUTING SERVICES DURING THE ANNUAL CERN SHUTDOWN

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    CERN will close on Friday 17th December at 17:30, and will reopen on Monday 3rd January at 08:30. As in recent years the Computing Services provided by IT Division will remain available as of Friday 17th at 17:30 but running unattended. The exceptions are the database and dedicated engineering services, which will not be available following agreement with their user communities.This year, however, is rather special because of the Y2K issue and as such an interruption is scheduled.This was decided in order to ensure that services are not affected by any unforeseen Y2K bugs at a time when support is not easily available, and to ensure that all systems can be started cleanly in the year 2000. All user services will be closed at 18:00 on Wednesday 29th December after which backups will be taken overnight, then checked and the systems closed down. NO Computing Services will be available again until CERN reopens at 08:30 on Monday 3rd January. The only exceptions are the networking infrastructure, and the email gat...

  10. Water quality, meteorological, and nutrient data collected by the the National Estuarine Research Reserve System's System-wide Monitoring Program (NERRS SWMP), 1994 - 2005 (NODC Accession 0019215)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Estuarine Research Reserve System's System-wide Monitoring Program (NERRS SWMP) collected water quality, meteorological, and nutrient data in 25...

  11. On the startup and shutdown of a tandem mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, F.R.; DeCanio, F.T.; Fisher, J.L.; Madden, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    The startup and shutdown of a fusion reactor must be performed in such a way that the plasma remains MHD stable. In a tandem mirror the stability depends on a sufficiently high pressure ratio between the plugs and the central cell, of the order of 100. Control of the neutral beam input to the plugs by means of active feedback has been investigated to achieve an acceptable pressure ratio throughout the entire startup/shutdown transient. An algorithm to control the beam input power has been developed. The control law was subsequently tested in a tandem mirror simulation code. This paper describes the basic models incorporated in the simulation, as well as the derivation of the control algorithm. The simulation results are presented and the practicality of implementing the algorithm is discussed. 4 refs

  12. Transient fission-product release during reactor shutdown and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.; Lewis, B.J.; Dickson, L.W.

    1997-12-01

    Sweep-gas experiments performed at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories from 1979 to 1985 have been further analysed to determine the fraction of the gaseous fission-product inventory that is released on reactor shutdown and startup. Empirical equations were derived and applied to calculate the stable xenon release from companion fuel elements and from a well-documented experimental fuel bundle irradiated in the NRU reactor. The calculated gas release could be matched to the measured values within about a factor of two for an experimental irradiation with a burnup of 217 MWh/kgU. There was also limited information on the fraction of the radioactive iodine that was exposed, but not released, on reactor shutdown. An empirical equation is proposed for calculating this fraction. (author)

  13. 235U Holdup Measurement Program in support of facility shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Lien, O.G.; McElroy, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    In 1989, the Department of Energy directed shutdown of an enriched uranium processing facility at Savannah River Site. As part of the shutdown requirements, deinventory and cleanout of process equipment and nondestructive measurement of the remaining 235 U holdup were required. The holdup measurements had safeguards, accountability, and nuclear criticality safety significance; therefore, a technically defensible and well-documented holdup measurement program was needed. Appropriate standards were fabricated, measurement techniques were selected, and an aggressive schedule was followed. Early in the program, offsite experts reviewed the measurement program, and their recommendations were adopted. Contact and far-field methods were used for most measurements, but some process equipment required special attention. All holdup measurements were documented, and each report was subjected to internal peer review. Some measured values were checked against values obtained by other methods; agreement was generally good

  14. Toward Coordinated Robust Allocation of Reserve Policies for a Cell-based Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Junjie; Heussen, Kai; Claessens, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Conventional regulation reserves have fixed participation factors and are thus not well suited to utilize differentiated capabilities of ancillary service providers. This study applies linear decision rules-based (LDR) control policies, which effectively adapt the present participation factor...... in dependence of the imbalance signal of previous time steps. The LDR-policies are centrally computed using a robust optimization approach which takes into account both the covariances of historic imbalance signals and the operational flexibility of ancillary service providers. The concept is then extended...... to the cooperation of multiple cells. Two illustrating examples are presented to show the functioning of the proposed LDR method....

  15. The shutdown reactor: Optimizing spent fuel storage cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that the most prudent way to store fuel at a shutdown reactor site safely and economically is through the use of a dry storage facility licensed under 10CFR72. While such storage is certainly safe, is it true that the dry ISFSI represents the safest and most economical approach for the utility? While no one is really able to answer that question definitely, as yet, Holtec has studied this issue for some time and believes that both an economic and safety case can be made for an optimization strategy that calls for the use of both wet and dry ISFSI storage of spent fuel at some plants. For the sake of brevity, this paper summarizes some of Holtec's findings with respect to the economics of maintaining some fuel in wet storage at a shutdown reactor. The safety issue, or more importantly the perception of safety of spent fuel in wet storage, still varies too much with the eye of the beholder, and until a more rigorous presentation of safety analyses can be made in a regulatory setting, it is not practically useful to argue about how many angels can sit on the head of a safety-related pin. Holtec is prepared to present such analyses, but this does not appear to be the proper venue. Thus, this paper simply looks at certain economic elements of a wet ISFSI at a shutdown reactor to make a prima facie case that wet storage has some attractiveness at a shutdown reactor and should not be rejected out of hand. Indeed, an optimization study at certain plants may well show the economic vitality of keeping some fuel in the pool and converting the NRC licensing coverage from 10CFR50 to 10CFR72. If the economics look attractive, then the safety issue may be confronted with a compelling interest

  16. Uncertainty reduction requirements in cores designed for passive reactivity shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to describe the changed focus of neutronics accuracy requirements existing in the current US advanced LMR development program where passive shutdown is a major design goal. The second purpose is to provide the background and rationale which supports the selection of a formal data fitting methodology as the means for the application of critical experiment measurements to meet these accuracy needs. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Primary circuit water chemistry during shutdown period at Kalinin NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatenko, S.; Otchenashev, G.; Yurmanov, V.

    2005-01-01

    The primary circuit water chemistry feature at Kalinin NPP is using of special up-dated regime during the period of unit shutdown for refueling. The main objective of up-dated regime is removing from the circuit long time living corrosion products on SVO-2 ion exchange filters with the purpose of dose rates reduction from the equipment and in such a way reduction of maintenance personnel overexposure. (N.T.)

  18. LHC Report: finalizing the shutdown activities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance work and other activities scheduled for the LHC technical stop have now been completed and the electrical, quality assurance and powering tests are in full swing.   These hardware tests, or hardware re-commissioning as it is known in the CERN Control Centre, are complete for Sectors 5-6 and 6-7. The re-commissioning process is almost complete in Sectors 7-8 and 8-1, but a problem with the emergency stop safety system last week, and the failure of a turbine in the cryogenic plant at Point 8, mean that the final part of the re-commissioning for these two sectors has been delayed and will be completed this week. Preparations for the re-commissioning in the other 4 sectors are going well, and everything is on schedule for the LHC to restart with beam as planned on 18 February. At the SPS, all the technical stop work and magnet changes have been completed and the machine has been handed over to the Operations Group for the usual set of hardware tests and preparations for beam operation. ...

  19. Modeling startup and shutdown transient of the microlinear piezo drive via ANSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azin, A. V.; Bogdanov, E. P.; Rikkonen, S. V.; Ponomarev, S. V.; Khramtsov, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    The article describes the construction-design of the micro linear piezo drive intended for a peripheral cord tensioner in the reflecting surface shape regulator system for large-sized transformable spacecraft antenna reflectors. The research target -the development method of modeling startup and shutdown transient of the micro linear piezo drive. This method is based on application software package ANSYS. The method embraces a detailed description of the calculation stages to determine the operating characteristics of the designed piezo drive. Based on the numerical solutions, the time characteristics of the designed piezo drive are determined.

  20. Sizing of an Energy Storage System for Grid Inertial Response and Primary Frequency Reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Vaclav; Chaudhary, Sanjay Kumar; Stroe, Daniel Loan

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale integration of renewable energy sources in power system leads to the replacement of conventional power plants (CPPs) and consequently challenges in power system reliability and security are introduced. This study is focused on improving the grid frequency response after a contingency ...

  1. Enhancing a Dependable Multiserver Operating System with Temporal Protection via Resource Reservations

    OpenAIRE

    Mancin , Antonio; Lipari , Giuseppe; Herder , Jorrit N.; Gras , Ben; Tanenbaum , Andrew S.

    2008-01-01

    International audience; MINIX 3 is a microkernel-based, multiserver operating system for uniprocessors that is designed to be highly dependable. Servers are restricted according to the principle of least privilege. For example, access to resources such as system memory and device I/O is fully protected. Although MINIX 3 is a potential candidate for embedded platforms, it currently cannot safeguard processes with stringent timing requirements, such as real-time applications. In this paper, we ...

  2. Certain aspects of determining reserves of static stability of electricity systems in a minimum mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, S; Popovic, D

    1982-01-01

    Results are described from analyzing static stability of the minimum modes for needs of planning electricity systems of Serbia (Socialist Federated Republic of Yugoslovia) up to 1985 with regard for development of the power transmission line network 400 kV, and introduction of turbogenerators of high output. Studies were made of the institute ''Nikola Tesla'' using computers for a digital computer using a mathematical model of multiple-machine electricity systems.

  3. Optimization of startup and shutdown operation of simulated moving bed chromatographic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suzhou; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki; Raisch, Jörg; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2011-06-24

    This paper presents new multistage optimal startup and shutdown strategies for simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatographic processes. The proposed concept allows to adjust transient operating conditions stage-wise, and provides capability to improve transient performance and to fulfill product quality specifications simultaneously. A specially tailored decomposition algorithm is developed to ensure computational tractability of the resulting dynamic optimization problems. By examining the transient operation of a literature separation example characterized by nonlinear competitive isotherm, the feasibility of the solution approach is demonstrated, and the performance of the conventional and multistage optimal transient regimes is evaluated systematically. The quantitative results clearly show that the optimal operating policies not only allow to significantly reduce both duration of the transient phase and desorbent consumption, but also enable on-spec production even during startup and shutdown periods. With the aid of the developed transient procedures, short-term separation campaigns with small batch sizes can be performed more flexibly and efficiently by SMB chromatography. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Review of occupational radiation exposures in all biennial shutdown maintenance of Kaiga generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murukan, E.K.; Vinod Kumar, T.; Austine, N.X.; Soumia Menon, M.; Girish Kumar, K.; Rao, M.M.L.N.; Venkataramana, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Kaiga generating station 1 and 2 consists of twin units of 220 M We pressurized heavy water reactors located in Karnataka, India. Major maintenance activities of one of the twin units are taken up once in two years (biennial shutdown) to execute system maintenance, system up gradation, surveillance and in-service inspection (ISI) jobs. BSDs are mandatory activities to comply with regulatory requirement to ensure the safety and reliability of plant system equipment. More than 65% of the station collective dose is contributed by biennial shutdown (BSD) jobs. It is observed that the man rem consumed during normal operation of the plant is less than 35% of the total man rem consumed. Since BSD jobs contributes significantly to station collective dose, an effective implementation of radiation protection programme specific to BSD is the key to control the occupational exposure. Various improvements in the field of radiation protection practices and process systems are adopted to achieve lowest collective dose at par with international standards. The key areas identified for application of various strategies to achieve ALARA were Man rem budgeting, Radiological condition monitoring, Radiation protection practices, Identification of critical jobs and Work groups, Work planning and execution, and Radioactive waste management. Review of collective doses of all the BSD jobs performed in the station since year 2004 and various measures incorporated to achieve ALARA exposures to plant personnel are briefly discussed in this paper. (author)

  5. Extending reactor time-to-poison and reducing poison shutdown time by pre-shutdown power alterations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, Edward

    1963-10-15

    Manipulation of reactor power prior to shutdown and increasing the time- to-poison a sufficient amount to enable the required maintenance work to be completed and the reactor immediately restarted are discussed. The method employed in the NRU Reactor to gain the maximum timeto-poison with the least production loss is outlined. The method is based on intuition and is described by means of an analog of the iodine--xenon equations rather than the equations themselves. (C.E.S.)

  6. Analysis of Multiserver Queueing System with Opportunistic Occupation and Reservation of Servers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a multiserver queueing system with two input flows. Type-1 customers have preemptive priority and are lost during arrival only if all servers are occupied by type-1 customers. If all servers are occupied, but some provide service to type-2 customers, service of type-2 customer is terminated and type-1 customer occupies the server. If the number of busy servers is less than the threshold M during type-2 customer arrival epoch, this customer is accepted. Otherwise, it is lost or becomes a retrial customer. It will retry to obtain service. Type-2 customer whose service is terminated is lost or moves to the pool of retrial customers. The service time is exponentially distributed with the rate dependent on the customer’s type. Such queueing system is suitable for modeling cognitive radio. Type-1 customers are interpreted as requests generated by primary users. Type-2 customers are generated by secondary or cognitive users. The problem of optimal choice of the threshold M is the subject of this paper. Behavior of the system is described by the multidimensional Markov chain. Its generator, ergodicity condition, and stationary distribution are given. The system performance measures are obtained. The numerical results show the effectiveness of considered admission control.

  7. Enhancing a Dependable Multiserver Operating System with Temporal Protection via Resource Reservation,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mancina, A.; Herder, J.N.; Gras, B.J.; Tanenbaum, A.S.; Lipari, G

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, microkernel-based systems are getting studied and adopted with a renewed interest in a wide number of IT scenarios. Their advantages over classical monolithic solutions mainly concern the dependability domain. By being capable of dynamically detect and solve non-expected behaviours within

  8. Improving the action requirements of technical specifications: A risk-comparison of continued operation and plant shutdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mankamo, T.

    1995-04-01

    When the systems needed to remove decay heat are inoperable or degraded, the risk of shutting down the plant may be comparable to, or even higher than, that of continuing power operation with the equipment inoperable while giving priority to repairs. This concern arises because the plant may not have sufficient capability for removing decay heat during the shutdown. However, Technical Specifications (TSs) often require {open_quotes}immediate{close_quotes} shutdown of the plant. In this paper, we present risk-based analyses of the various operational policy alternatives available in such situations, with an example application to the standby service water (SSW) system of a BWR. These analyses can be used to define risk-effective requirements for those standby safety systems under discussion.

  9. Improving the action requirements of technical specifications: A risk-comparison of continued operation and plant shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    When the systems needed to remove decay heat are inoperable or degraded, the risk of shutting down the plant may be comparable to, or even higher than, that of continuing power operation with the equipment inoperable while giving priority to repairs. This concern arises because the plant may not have sufficient capability for removing decay heat during the shutdown. However, Technical Specifications (TSs) often require ''immediate'' shutdown of the plant. In this paper, the authors present risk-based analyses of the various operational policy alternatives available in such situations, with an example application to the standby service water (SSW) system of a BWR. These analyses can be used to define risk-effective requirements for those standby safety systems under discussion

  10. Modelling the fluid structure interaction produced by a waterhammer during shutdown of high-pressure pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erath, W.; Nowotny, B.; Maetz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of an experiment in a pipe system with pump shutdown and valve closing have been performed in the nuclear power plant KRB II (Gundremmingen, Germany). Comparative calculations of fluid and structure including interaction show an excellent agreement with the measured results. Theory and implementation of the fluid structure interaction (FSI) and the results of the comparison are described. The following measurements have been compared with calculations: (1) experiments in Delft, Netherlands to analyse the FSI; and (2) experiment with pump shutdown and valve closing in the nuclear power plant KRB II has been performed. It turns out, that the consideration of the FSI is necessary for an exact calculation of 'soft' piping systems. It has significant application in current waterhammer problems. For example, water column closure, vapour collapse, check valve slamming continues to create waterhammers in the energy industry. An important consequence of the FSI is mostly a significant increase of the effective structural damping. This mitigates - so far in all KED's calculations the FSI has taken into account - an amplification of pipe movements due to pressure waves in resonance with structural eigenvalues. To investigate the integrity of pipe systems pipe stresses are calculated. Taking FSI into account they are reduced by 10-40% in the actual case. (orig.)

  11. Organic coal reserves in field and forest systems vs. Avifauna biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szyszko-Podgórska Katarzyna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the occurrence of birds depending on the use of the area and the content of organic coal in field-and-forest systems. The research demonstrated a great diversity of bird species and great differences in the content of organic coal in individual areas. According to the conducted analyses, human economic activity can influence the content of organic coal and, therefore, it also influences the occurrence of specific bird species. In connection with the fact that the entire area covered with the research has been modelled by humans, the content of organic coal, the composition of bird species and their functioning in spatial systems are derivatives of such an activity.

  12. HOW THE MILITARY CAN INTEGRATE UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS IN THE CIVIL RESERVE AIR FLEET

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    park preservation, agriculture, and precision mapping.4 Online shopping giant Amazon began researching UAS options for package delivery in 2013 and...stationary position, tethered to the ground while providing surveillance and environmental data. The CBP Tethered Aerostat Radar System (TARS) enables...readiness, and have equipment issued for deployment scenarios.84 Despite concerns of heavy involvement in contingencies and the risk of unlawful combatant

  13. Neutron physical investigations on the shutdown effect of small boronated absorbing spheres for pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouridis, S.; Schurrer, F.; Muller, H.; Ninaus, W.; Oswald, K.; Neef, R.D.; Schaal, H.

    1987-01-01

    An emergency shutdown system for high-temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactors is proposed in addition to the common absorber rod shutdown system. This system is based on the strongly absorbing effect of small boronated graphite spheres (called KLAK), which trickle in case of emergency by gravity from the top reflector into the reactor core. The inner reflector of the Siemens-Argonaut reactor was substituted by an assembly of spherical Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor fuel elements, and the shutdown effect was examined by installing well-defined KLAK nests inside this assembly. The purpose was to develop and prove a calculational procedure for determining criticality values for assemblies of large fuel spheres and small absorbing spheres

  14. 40 CFR 60.1695 - What happens to the operating requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? 60.1695 Section 60.1695 Protection of... Requirements § 60.1695 What happens to the operating requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and... municipal waste combustion unit startup, shutdown, or malfunction. (b) Each startup, shutdown, or...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1220 - What happens to the emission limits during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? 60.1220 Section 60.1220 Protection of Environment... Emission Limits § 60.1220 What happens to the emission limits during periods of startup, shutdown, and... waste combustion unit startup, shutdown, or malfunction. (b) Each startup, shutdown, or malfunction must...

  16. 40 CFR 62.15150 - What happens to the operating requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? 62.15150 Section 62.15150 Protection of... § 62.15150 What happens to the operating requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and... municipal waste combustion unit startup, shutdown, or malfunction. (b) Each startup, shutdown, or...

  17. Using dew points to estimate savings during a planned cooling shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlein, Matthew T.; Changnon, David; Musselman, Eric; Zielinski, Jeff

    2005-12-01

    In an effort to save money during the summer of 2003, Northern Illinois University (NIU) administrators instituted a four-day working week and stopped air conditioning buildings for the three-day weekends (Friday through Sunday). Shutting down the air conditioning systems caused a noticeable drop in electricity usage for that part of the campus that features in our study, with estimated total electricity savings of 1,268,492 kilowatt-hours or 17% of the average usage during that eight-week period. NIU's air conditioning systems, which relied on evaporative cooling to function, were sensitive to dew point levels. Greatest savings during the shutdown period occurred on days with higher dew points. An examination of the regional dew point climatology (1959 2003) indicated that the average summer daily dew point for 2003 was 14.9°C (58.8°F), which fell in the lowest 20% of the distribution. Based on the relationship between daily average dew points and electrical usage, a predictive model that could estimate electrical daily savings was created. This model suggests that electrical savings related to any future three-day shutdowns over summer could be much greater in more humid summers. Studies like this demonstrate the potential value of applying climatological information and of integrating this information into practical decision-making.

  18. Inventory of radioactive corrosion products on the primary surfaces and release during shutdown in Ringhals 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronsson, O.

    1994-01-01

    In Ringhals 2 a retrospective study using gamma scans of system surfaces, fuel crud sampling and reactor coolant analyses during operation and shutdown has been done. The data have been used to prepare a balance of activity inventory. The inventory has been fairly stable from 1986 to 1993, expressed as a gamma source term. The steam generator replacement in 1989 removed some 40-50% of the Co-60 inventory in the reactor system. After the steam generator replacement, the gamma source term has got an increasing contribution from Co-58, absolutely as well as relatively. The reason for this is probably the switch from high pH operation to modified pH operation. Corrosion from fresh alloy 690 surfaces in the new steam generators is probably another contributing factor. The inventory and production rate of Co-60 is decreasing over the years. It has also been found that clean-up of the reactor coolant during start-up, operation, and shutdown as well as the fuel pool during refuelling removes about the same amounts of Co-60. (author). 11 figs., 15 refs

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheras, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Best, Ralph E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buxton, Kenneth A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); England, Jeffery L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McConnell, Paul E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Massaro, Lawrence M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    A preliminary evaluation of removing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from 13 shutdown nuclear power reactor sites was conducted. At these shutdown sites the nuclear power reactors have been permanently shut down and the sites have been decommissioned or are undergoing decommissioning. The shutdown sites were Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, San Onofre, and Vermont Yankee. The evaluation was divided into four components: (1) characterization of the SNF and greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC waste) inventory, (2) a description of the on-site infrastructure and conditions relevant to transportation of SNF and GTCC waste, (3) an evaluation of the near-site transportation infrastructure and experience relevant to shipping transportation casks containing SNF and GTCC waste, including identification of gaps in information, and (4) an evaluation of the actions necessary to prepare for and remove SNF and GTCC waste. Every site was found to have at least one off-site transportation mode option for removing its SNF and GTCC waste; some have multiple options. Experience removing large components during reactor decommissioning provided an important source of information used to identify the transportation mode options for the sites. Especially important in conducting the evaluation were site visits, through which information was obtained that would not have been available otherwise. Extensive photographs taken during the site visits proved to be particularly useful in documenting the current conditions at or near the sites. It is expected that additional site visits will be conducted to add to the information presented in the evaluation.

  20. Transient fission product release during reactor shutdown and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.; Lewis, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    Sweep gas experiments performed at CRL from 1979 to 1985 have been analysed to determine the fraction of the fission product gas inventory that is released on reactor shutdown and startup. Empirical equations were derived and applied to calculate the xenon release from companion fuel elements and from a well documented experimental fuel bundle irradiated in the NRU reactor. The measured gas release could be matched to within about a factor of two for an experimental irradiation with a burnup of 217 MWh/kgU. (author)

  1. Shutdown channels and fitted interlocks in atomic reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furet, J.; Landauer, C.

    1968-01-01

    This catalogue consists of tables (one per reactor) giving the following information: number and type of detectors, range of the shutdown channels, nature of the associated electronics, thresholds setting off the alarms, fitted interlocks. These cards have been drawn up with a view to an examination of the reactors safety by the 'Reactor Safety Sub-Commission', they take into account the latest decisions. The reactors involved in this review are: Azur, Cabri, Castor-Pollux, Cesar-Marius-2, Edf-2, EL3, EL4, Eole, G1, G2-G3, Harmonie, Isis, Masurca, Melusine, Minerve, Osiris, Pegase, Peggy, PAT, Rapsodie, SENA, Siloe, Siloette, Triton-Nereide, and Ulysse. (authors) [fr

  2. Preliminary review of critical shutdown heat removal items for common cause failure susceptibility on LMFBR's. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, L.T.; Elerath, J.G.

    1976-02-01

    This document presents a common cause failure analysis for Critical LMFBR Shutdown Heat Removal Systems. The report is intended to outline a systematic approach to defining areas with significant potential for common causes of failure, and ultimately provide inputs to the reliability prediction model. A preliminary evaluation of postulatd single initiating causes resulting in multiple failures of LMFBR-SHRS items is presented in Appendix C. This document will be periodically updated to reflect new information and activity.

  3. Study on the performance of the Particle Identification Detectors at LHCb after the LHC First Long Shutdown (LS1)

    CERN Document Server

    Fontana, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    During the First Long Shutdown (LS1), the LHCb experiment has introduced major modification in the data-processing procedure and modified part of the detector to deal with the increased energy and the increased heavy-hadron production cross-section. In this contribution we review the performance of the particle identification detectors at LHCb, Rich, Calorimeters, and Muon system, after the LS1

  4. Long-Term Reserve Expansion of Power Systems With High Wind Power Penetration Using Universal Generating Function Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DING, YI; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2010-01-01

    from long term planning point of view utilizing universal generating function (UGF) methods. The reliability models of wind farms and conventional generators are represented as the correspondin UGFs and the special operators for these UGFs are defined to evaluate the customer and the system...... reliabilities. The effect of transmission network on customer reliabilities is also considered in the system UGF. The power output models of wind turbine generators in a wind farm considering wind speed correlation and un-correlation are developed, respectively. A reliability-based reserve expansion method...

  5. Containment closure time following the loss of shutdown cooling event of YGN Units 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seul, Kwang Won; Bang, Young Seok; Kim, Hho Jung

    1999-01-01

    The YGN Units 3 and 4 plant conditions during shutdown operation were reviewed to identify the possible event scenarios following the loss of shutdown cooling (SDC) event. For the five cases of typical reactor coolant system (RCS) configurations under the worst event sequence, such as unavailable secondary cooling and no RCS inventory makeup, the thermal hydraulic analyses were performed using the RELAP5/MOS3.2 code to investigate the plant behavior following the event. The thermal hydraulic analyses include the estimation of time to boil, time to core uncovery, and time to core heat up to determine the containment closure time to prevent the uncontrolled release of fission products to atmosphere. The result indicates that the containment closure is recommended to be achieved within 42 minutes after the loss of SDC for the steam generator (SG) inlet plenum manway open case or the large cold leg open case under the worst event sequence. The containment closure time is significantly dependent on the elevation and size of the opening and the SG secondary water level condition. It is also found that the containment closure needs to be initiated before the boiling time to ensure the survivability of the workers in the containment. These results will provide using information to operators to cope with the loss of SDC event. (Author). 15 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  6. Safety shutdowns and failures of the RA reactor equipment; Sigurnosna zaustavljanja i kvarovi opreme na reaktoru RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrovic, S [Institut za nuklearne nauke ' Boris Kidric' , Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-07-01

    This report is an attempt of statistical analysis of the failures occurred during RA reactor operation. A list of failures occurred on the RA equipment during 1965 is included. Failures were related to the following systems: dosimetry system (22%), safety and control system (7%), heavy water system (2%), technical water (4%), helium system (2%), measuring instruments (30%), transport, ventilation, power supply systems (32%). A review of safety shutdowns from 1962 to 1966 is included as well, as a comparison with three similar reactors. Although the number of events used for statistical analysis was not adequate, it has been concluded that RA reactor operation was stable and reliable.

  7. Low Power Shutdown PSA for CANDU Type Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yeon Kyoung; Kim, Myung Su [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    KHNP also have concentrated on full power PSA. Some recently constructed OPR1000 type plants and APR1400 type plants have performed the low power and shutdown (LPSD) PSA. The purpose of LPSD PSA is to identify the main contributors on the accident sequences of core damage and to find the measure of safety improvement. After the Fukushima accident, Korean regulatory agency required the shutdown severe accident management guidelines (SSAMG) development for safety enhancement. For the reliability of SSAMG, KHNP should develop the LPSD PSA. Especially, the LPSD PSA for CANDU type plant had developed for the first time in Korea. This paper illustrates how the LPSD PSA for CANDU type developed and the core damage frequency (CDF) is different with that of full power PSA. KHNP performed LPSD PSA to develop the SSAMG after the Fukushima accidents. The results show that risk at the specific operation mode during outage is higher than that of full power operation. Also, the results indicated that recovery failure of class 4 power at the POS 5A, 5B contribute dominantly to the total CDF from importances analysis. LPSD PSA results such as CDF with initiating events and POSs, risk results with plant damage state, and containment failure probability and frequency with POSs can be used by inputs for developing the SSAMG.

  8. Runaway electron generation during plasma shutdown by killer pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, K; Feher, T; Smith, H; Fueloep, T; Helander, P

    2008-01-01

    Tokamak discharges are sometimes terminated by disruptions that may cause large mechanical and thermal loads on the vessel. To mitigate disruption-induced problems it has been proposed that 'killer' pellets could be injected into the plasma in order to safely terminate the discharge. Killer pellets enhance radiative energy loss and thereby lead to rapid cooling and shutdown of the discharge. But pellets may also cause runaway electron generation, as has been observed in experiments in several tokamaks. In this work, runaway dynamics in connection with deuterium or carbon pellet-induced fast plasma shutdown is considered. A pellet code, which calculates the material deposition and initial cooling caused by the pellet is coupled to a runaway code, which determines the subsequent temperature evolution and runaway generation. In this way, a tool has been created to test the suitability of different pellet injection scenarios for disruption mitigation. If runaway generation is avoided, the resulting current quench times are too long to safely avoid large forces on the vessel due to halo currents

  9. Development of an Active Power Reserve Management Method for DC Applied Wave-Wind Combined Generation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmin Jung

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A system that combines a wind turbine and a wave generator can share the off-shore platform and therefore mix the advantages of the transmission system construction and the power conversion system. The current hybrid generation system considers output limitation according to the instructions of the transmission system operator (TSO, and controls the profile using wind turbine pitch control. However, the integrated wave generation system utilizing a DC network does not adapt a power limitation scheme due to its mechanical constraints. In this paper, a control plan focusing on the electrical section of wave generators is formed in order to effectively manage the output profile of the hybrid generation system. The plan pays attention to power reserve flexibility for the utility grid using the analysis of the controllable elements. Comparison with the existing system is performed based on real offshore conditions. With the help of power system computer aided design (PSCAD simulation, the ability of the novel technique is estimated by proposing the real power control based on the reference signal of TSO and the reactive power capacity it produces.

  10. Standardization of the time for the execution of HANARO start-up and shutdown procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H. Y.; Lim, I. C.; Hwang, S. R.; Kang, T. J.; Youn, D. B.

    2003-01-01

    For the standardization of the time to execute HANARO start-up and shutdown procedures, code names were assigned to the individual procedures and the work time were investigated. The data recorded by the operators during start-up and shutdown were statistically analyzed. The analysis results will be used for the standardization of start-up and shutdown procedures and it will be reflected in the procedure document

  11. Analysis of HFETR shut-down state caused by loss of off-site power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinghu

    1997-01-01

    During the last 15 years, there are more than 40 unplanned shut-downs caused by loss of off-site power in HFETR. Because HFETR is a special research reactor, the author describes the shut-down state as three period. The author also discusses the influence of the number of shut-down due to loss of off-site power supply on the reactor safety, and propose some suggestions and measures to reduce the effects

  12. Accident Tolerant Reactor Shutdown for NTP Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In brief, USNC's accident submersion safe drums are control drums where a small amount of fuel is added opposite to the neutron absorber and the drums impinge on the...

  13. Self powered platinum flux detector application for shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Guoquan

    2005-01-01

    This article introduce Neutron Flux Detector application in Candu Power Plant, including: design purpose, location in the site, dynamic compensation, differential compensation, detector assembly pressurized with high pure helium etc. And shielding grounding improvement is suggested because of detector signal and setpoint signal noise. (authors)

  14. Questions and answers about the reactor shutdown at the Barsebaeck plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    At a scram at the Barsebaeck 2 reactor on July 28 1992, a safety valve open unintentionally, and steam was released from the reactor vessel into the containment. The emergency spray system started sprinkling the vessel (the core spray system was also active for a short while). After one hour, the sprinkling was interupted, and at about the same time it was found that the steam jet had tore off insulation material (from the containment walls) which started to clog the sieves for the emergency sprinkling water, disturbing the pumping. The clogging appeared much more rapidly than expected (1 h in stead of 10 h). Five Swedish reactors for similar design have been shutdown pending a reconstruction of the emergency spray feed system. This pamphlet is directed to the general public, explaining the problems and commenting on nuclear safety issues

  15. Evolution of the ATLAS Distributed Computing during the LHC long shutdown

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing project (ADC) was established in 2007 to develop and operate a framework, following the ATLAS computing model, to enable data storage, processing and bookkeeping on top of the WLCG distributed infrastructure. ADC development has always been driven by operations and this contributed to its success. The system has fulfilled the demanding requirements of ATLAS, daily consolidating worldwide up to 1PB of data and running more than 1.5 million payloads distributed globally, supporting almost one thousand concurrent distributed analysis users. Comprehensive automation and monitoring minimized the operational manpower required. The flexibility of the system to adjust to operational needs has been important to the success of the ATLAS physics program. The LHC shutdown in 2013-2015 affords an opportunity to improve the system in light of operational experience and scale it to cope with the demanding requirements of 2015 and beyond, most notably a much higher trigger rate and event pileu...

  16. Performance of Resistive Plate Chambers installed during the first long shutdown of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Shopova, M.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Sultanov, G.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Assran, Y.; Sayed, A.; Radi, A.; Aly, S.; Singh, G.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Van Doninck, W.; Colafranceschi, S.; Sharma, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Rios, A.A.O.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Gul, M.; Fagot, A.; Bhatnagar, V.; Singh, J.; Kumari, R.; Mehta, A.; Ahmad, A.; Awan, I.M.; Shahzad, H.; Hoorani, H.; Asghar, M.I.; Muhammad, S.; Ahmed, W.; Shah, M.A.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.Y.; Hong, B.; Kang, M.H.; Lee, K.S.; Lim, J.H.; Park, S.K.; Kim, M.S.; Laktineh, I.B.; Lagarde, F.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Pedraza, I.; Bernardino, S. Carpinteyro; Estrada, C. Uribe; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Valencia, F. Vazquez; Pant, L.M.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Fabozzi, F.; Orso, I.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Thyssen, F.; Lanza, G.; Esposito, M.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Montagna, P.; Ban, Y.; Qian, S.J.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Petkov, P.; Pavlov, B.; Bagaturia, I.; Lomidze, D.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Sanabria, J.C.; Crotty, I.; Vaitkus, J.

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment, located at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, has a redundant muon system composed by three different detector technologies: Cathode Strip Chambers (in the forward regions), Drift Tubes (in the central region) and Resistive Plate Chambers (both its central and forward regions). All three are used for muon reconstruction and triggering. During the first long shutdown (LS1) of the LHC (2013-2014) the CMS muon system has been upgraded with 144 newly installed RPCs on the forth forward stations. The new chambers ensure and enhance the muon trigger efficiency in the high luminosity conditions of the LHC Run2. The chambers have been successfully installed and commissioned. The system has been run successfully and experimental data has been collected and analyzed. The performance results of the newly installed RPCs will be presented.

  17. Analysis of Gamma Dose Rate Caused by Corrosion Products inside the Containment Building of Yonngwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 During Shutdown Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Occupational radiation exposure(ORE) of nuclear power plant(NPP) workers mainly occurs during the shutdown period. Major radioactive sources are the corrosion products released from the reactor coolant system(RCS). The corrosion products consist of circulating crud and deposited crud. Major radioactive corrosion products, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co, are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. In this study, the corrosion products regarding cobalt were evaluated during the shutdown period, and gamma dose rates caused by them were calculated at the main working area inside the containment building of the Yonggwang NPP Unit 3.

  18. Shutdown risk management applied at Philadelphia Electric Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagan, William J.; True, Douglas E.; Wilson, Thomas; Truax, William

    2004-01-01

    The development and implementation of an effective risk management program requires basic risk or safety knowledge and the conversion of such information into effective management tools. ERIN Engineering and Research, Inc., under contract to the Electric Power Research Institute, has developed an effective program. Outage Risk Assessment and Management (ORAM), to provide plant and management personnel with understandable results of shutdown risk studies. With this tool, the impact of plans and decision options can be readily determined and displayed for the decision maker. This paper describes these methods and their application to the Limerick Nuclear Station of Philadelphia Electric Company. It also sets forth a broader application of these methods to include support of management decisions at-power and following forced outages. The result is an integrated risk management framework which can allow management and technical personnel to utilize readily available and understandable risk insights to optimize each activity. This paper addresses the resolution of several key issues in detail: How was the ORAM risk management method employed to represent the existing plant shutdown procedures and policies? How did the ORAM risk management method enhance the decision-making ability of the outage management staff? How was the ORAM software efficiently integrated with the outage scheduling software? How is quantitative risk information generated and used for outage planning and control? The ORAM risk management philosophy utilizes a series of colors to depict various risk configurations. Each such configuration has associated with it clear guidance. By modifying the conditions existing in the plant it is possible to impact the type of risk being encountered as well as the guidance which is appropriate for that period. In addition, the duration of a particular configuration can be effectively managed to reduce the overall risk impact. These are achieved with minimal

  19. CORAL and COOL during the LHC long shutdown.

    CERN Document Server

    Valassi, Andrea; Dulstra, D; Goyal, N; Salnikov, A; Trentadue, R; Wache, M

    2014-01-01

    CORAL and COOL are two software packages used by the LHC experiments for managing detector conditions and other types of data using relational database technologies. They have been developed and maintained within the LCG Persistency Framework, a common project of the CERN IT department with ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. This presentation reports on the status of CORAL and COOL at the time of CHEP2013, covering the new features and enhancements in both packages, as well as the changes and improvements in the software process infrastructure. It also reviews the usage of the software in the experiments and the outlook for ongoing and future activities during the LHC long shutdown (LS1) and beyond.

  20. CORAL and COOL during the LHC long shutdown

    CERN Multimedia

    Valassi, A; Dykstra, D; Goyal, N; Salnikov, A; Trentadue, R; Wache, M

    2013-01-01

    CORAL and COOL are two software packages used by the LHC experiments for managing detector conditions and other types of data using relational database technologies. They have been developed and maintained within the LCG Persistency Framework, a common project of the CERN IT department with ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. This presentation reports on the status of CORAL and COOL at the time of CHEP2013, covering the new features and enhancements in both packages, as well as the changes and improvements in the software process infrastructure. It also reviews the usage of the software in the experiments and the outlook for ongoing and future activities during the LHC long shutdown (LS1) and beyond.

  1. High level waste facilities - Continuing operation or orderly shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, L.A.

    1998-04-01

    Two options for Environmental Impact Statement No action alternatives describe operation of the radioactive liquid waste facilities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The first alternative describes continued operation of all facilities as planned and budgeted through 2020. Institutional control for 100 years would follow shutdown of operational facilities. Alternatively, the facilities would be shut down in an orderly fashion without completing planned activities. The facilities and associated operations are described. Remaining sodium bearing liquid waste will be converted to solid calcine in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) or will be left in the waste tanks. The calcine solids will be stored in the existing Calcine Solids Storage Facilities (CSSF). Regulatory and cost impacts are discussed

  2. Shielding optimisation of the ITER ICH&CD antenna for shutdown dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Andrew; Leichtle, Dieter; Lamalle, Philippe; Levesy, Bruno; Meunier, Lionel; Polunovskiy, Eduard; Sartori, Roberta; Shannon, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronics analysis on the ITER ICH&CD system conducted to reduce shutdown dose rate. • Several designs for shielding the port plug gaps were modelled. • Shielding significantly reduced interspace dose rate but still exceed project requirements. • Design optimisation of the ICH port is continuing. • Significant contributions from other ports require an integrated modelling approach. - Abstract: The Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ICH&CD) system will reside in ITER equatorial port plugs 13 and 15. Shutdown dose rates (SDDR) within the port interspace are required to be less than 100 μSv/h at 10 6 s cooling. A significant contribution to the SDDR results from neutrons streaming down gaps around the port frame, and the mitigation of this streaming is the main subject of these analyses. An updated MCNP model of the antenna was created and integrated into an ITER reference model. Shielding plates were defined in the port gaps, and scoping studies conducted to assess their effectiveness in several configurations, based on which a front dog-leg arrangement was selected for high resolution 3-D activation analysis using MCR2S. It was concluded that the selected configuration reduced the SDDR from ∼500 μSv/h to 220 μSv/h but were still in excess of dose rate requirements. Approximately 30% of this was due to cross-talk from neighbouring ports. In addition, increased dose rates were observed in the port interspace along the lines of sight of the removable vacuum transmission lines. Design optimisation is continuing, however an integrated approach is needed with regard to ITER port plug design and the shielding of surrounding systems.

  3. Shielding optimisation of the ITER ICH&CD antenna for shutdown dose rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.turner@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Leichtle, Dieter [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Lamalle, Philippe; Levesy, Bruno [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St., Paul-lez-Durance (France); Meunier, Lionel [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Polunovskiy, Eduard [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St., Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sartori, Roberta [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Shannon, Mark [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Neutronics analysis on the ITER ICH&CD system conducted to reduce shutdown dose rate. • Several designs for shielding the port plug gaps were modelled. • Shielding significantly reduced interspace dose rate but still exceed project requirements. • Design optimisation of the ICH port is continuing. • Significant contributions from other ports require an integrated modelling approach. - Abstract: The Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ICH&CD) system will reside in ITER equatorial port plugs 13 and 15. Shutdown dose rates (SDDR) within the port interspace are required to be less than 100 μSv/h at 10{sup 6} s cooling. A significant contribution to the SDDR results from neutrons streaming down gaps around the port frame, and the mitigation of this streaming is the main subject of these analyses. An updated MCNP model of the antenna was created and integrated into an ITER reference model. Shielding plates were defined in the port gaps, and scoping studies conducted to assess their effectiveness in several configurations, based on which a front dog-leg arrangement was selected for high resolution 3-D activation analysis using MCR2S. It was concluded that the selected configuration reduced the SDDR from ∼500 μSv/h to 220 μSv/h but were still in excess of dose rate requirements. Approximately 30% of this was due to cross-talk from neighbouring ports. In addition, increased dose rates were observed in the port interspace along the lines of sight of the removable vacuum transmission lines. Design optimisation is continuing, however an integrated approach is needed with regard to ITER port plug design and the shielding of surrounding systems.

  4. 78 FR 49553 - Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-320; NRC-2013-0183] Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of receipt... Shutdown Decommissioning Activity Report (PSDAR) for Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2). The PSDAR provides...

  5. 77 FR 10576 - Methodology for Low Power/Shutdown Fire PRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0295] Methodology for Low Power/Shutdown Fire PRA AGENCY.../Shutdown Fire PRA.'' In response to request from members of the public, the NRC is extending the public... risk assessment (PRA) method for quantitatively analyzing fire risk in commercial nuclear power plants...

  6. 76 FR 81998 - Methodology for Low Power/Shutdown Fire PRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0295] Methodology for Low Power/Shutdown Fire PRA AGENCY..., ``Methodology for Low Power/Shutdown Fire PRA--Draft Report for Comment.'' DATES: Submit comments by March 01... risk assessment (PRA) method for quantitatively analyzing fire risk in commercial nuclear power plants...

  7. Stabilization and shutdown of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Radioisotopes Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eversole, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the production and distribution of a variety of radioisotopes for medical, scientific and industrial applications since the late 1940s. Production of these materials was concentrated in a number of facilities primarily built in the 1950s and 1960s. Due to the age and deteriorating condition of these facilities, it was determined in 1989 that it would not be cost effective to upgrade these facilities to bring them into compliance with contemporary environmental, safety and health standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to halt the production of isotopes in these facilities and maintain the facilities in safe standby condition while preparing a stabilization and shutdown plan. The goal was to place the former isotope production facilities in a radiologically and industrially safe condition to allow a 5-year deferral of the initiation of environmental restoration (ER) activities. In response to DOE's instructions, ORNL identified 17 facilities for shutdown, addressed the shutdown requirements for each facility, and prepared and implemented a three-phase, 4-year plan for shutdown of the facilities. The Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program (IFSP) office was created to execute the stabilization and shutdown plan. The program is entering its third year in which the actual shutdown of the facilities is initiated. Accomplishments to date have included consolidation of all isotopes inventory into one facility, DOE approval of the IFSP Environmental Assessment (EA), and implementation of a detailed management plan for the shutdown of the facilities

  8. 78 FR 38739 - Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0299] Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide; issuance..., ``Standard Format and Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report.'' This guide describes a...

  9. 40 CFR 63.310 - Requirements for startups, shutdowns, and malfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for startups, shutdowns, and malfunctions. 63.310 Section 63.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Coke Oven Batteries § 63.310 Requirements for startups, shutdowns...

  10. 40 CFR 62.14645 - What happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens during periods of startup... Limits § 62.14645 What happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? (a) The emission limitations and operating limits apply at all times except during periods of CISWI unit startup, shutdown, or...

  11. 40 CFR 60.2918 - What happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens during periods of startup... of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? The emission limitations and operating limits apply at all times except during OSWI unit startups, shutdowns, or malfunctions. Performance Testing ...

  12. 40 CFR 63.2852 - What is a startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What is a startup, shutdown, and... Production Compliance Requirements § 63.2852 What is a startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan? You must...)(2) malfunction period, or the § 63.2850(c)(2) or (d)(2) initial startup period. The SSM plan must...

  13. 40 CFR 60.2685 - What happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens during periods of startup... happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? (a) The emission limitations and operating limits apply at all times except during CISWI unit startups, shutdowns, or malfunctions. (b) Each...

  14. 40 CFR 65.6 - Startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Startup, shutdown, and malfunction... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE General Provisions § 65.6 Startup... Group 2A or Group 2B process vents. (b) Startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan—(1) Description and...

  15. 40 CFR 60.3025 - What happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens during periods of startup... during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? The emission limitations and operating limits apply at all times except during OSWI unit startups, shutdowns, or malfunctions. Model Rule—Performance...

  16. 30 CFR 57.8534 - Shutdown or failure of auxiliary fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shutdown or failure of auxiliary fans. 57.8534... Ventilation Underground Only § 57.8534 Shutdown or failure of auxiliary fans. (a) Auxiliary fans installed and... fan maintenance or fan adjustments where air quality is maintained in compliance with the applicable...

  17. Replacement energy, capacity, and reliability costs for permanent nuclear reactor shutdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanKuiken, J.C., Buehring, W.A.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Cavallo, J.D.; Veselka, T.D.; Willing, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    Average replacement power costs are estimated for potential permanent shutdowns of nuclear electricity-generating units. Replacement power costs are considered to include replacement energy, capacity, and reliability cost components. These estimates were developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating regulatory issues that potentially affect changes in serious reactor accident frequencies. Cost estimates were derived from long-term production-cost and capacity expansion simulations of pooled utility-system operations. Factors that affect replacement power cost, such as load growth, replacement sources of generation, and capital costs for replacement capacity, were treated in the analysis. Costs are presented for a representative reactor and for selected subcategories of reactors, based on estimates for 112 individual reactors

  18. The radiation asymmetry in MGI rapid shutdown on J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Ruihai; Chen, Zhongyong; Huang, Duwei; Cheng, Zhifeng; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ge; J-TEXT Team

    2017-10-01

    Disruptions, the sudden termination of tokamak fusion plasmas by instabilities, have the potential to cause severe material wall damage to large tokamaks like ITER. The mitigation of disruption damage is an essential part of any fusion reactor system. Massive gas injection (MGI) rapid shutdown is a technique in which large amounts of noble gas are injected into the plasma in order to safely radiate the plasma energy evenly over the entire plasma-facing first wall. However, the radiated energy during the thermal quench (TQ) in massive gas injection (MGI) induced disruptions is found toroidal asymmetric, and the degrees of asymmetry correlate with the gas penetration and MGI induced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) activities. A toroidal and poloidal array of ultraviolet photodiodes (AXUV) has been developed to investigate the radiation asymmetry on J-TEXT tokamak. Together with the upgraded mirnov probe arrays, the relation between MGI triggered MHD activities with radiation asymmetry is studied.

  19. The management of large cabling campaigns during the Long Shutdown 1 of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Meroli, Stefano; Formenti, Fabio; Frans, Marten; Guillaume, Jean Claude; Ricci, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN entered into its first 18 month-long shutdown period in February 2013. During this period the entire CERN accelerator complex will undergo major consolidation and upgrade works, preparing the machines for LHC operation at nominal energy (7 TeV/beam). One of the most challenging activities concerns the cabling infrastructure (copper and optical fibre cables) serving the CERN data acquisition, networking and control systems. About 1000 kilometres of cables, distributed in different machine areas, will be installed, representing an investment of about 15 MCHF. This implies an extraordinary challenge in terms of project management, including resource and activity planning, work execution and quality control. The preparation phase of this project started well before its implementation, by defining technical solutions and setting financial plans for staff recruitment and material supply. Enhanced task coordination was further implemented by deploying selected competences to form a ...

  20. Loss-of-benefits analysis for nuclear power plant shutdowns: methodology and illustrative case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerenboom, J.P.; Buehring, W.A.; Guziel, K.A.

    1983-11-01

    A framework for loss-of-benefits analysis and a taxomony for identifying and categorizing the effects of nuclear power plant shutdowns or accidents are presented. The framework consists of three fundamental steps: (1) characterizing the shutdown; (2) identifying benefits lost as a result of the shutdown; and (3) quantifying effects. A decision analysis approach to regulatory decision making is presented that explicitly considers the loss of benefits. A case study of a hypothetical reactor shutdown illustrates one key loss of benefits: net replacement energy costs (i.e., change in production costs). Sensitivity studies investigate the responsiveness of case study results to changes in nuclear capacity factor, load growth, fuel price escalation, and discount rate. The effects of multiple reactor shutdowns on production costs are also described

  1. Industry shutdown rates and permanent layoffs: evidence from firm-worker matched data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim P. Huynh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Firm shutdown creates a turbulent situation for workers as it leads directly to layoffs for its workers. An additional consideration is whether a firm’s shutdown within an industry creates turbulence for workers at other continuing firms. Using data drawn from the Longitudinal Worker File, a Canadian firm-worker matched employment database, we investigate the impact of industry shutdown rates on workers at continuing firm. This paper exploits variation in shutdown rates across industries and within an industry over time to explain the rate of permanent layoffs and the growth of workers’ earnings. We find an increase in industry shutdown rates increases the probability of permanent layoffs and decreases earnings growth for workers at continuing firms.

  2. Adjustment of the Kompleks Titan-2 monitoring computerized system at the Rovno NPP third unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigaev, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    Information signal origin and processing processes in the monitoring computerized system 'Komplex Titan-2' at the Rovno NPP third unit are considered. The system exercises control over the following production equipment parameters: the state of keys of control of lock fittings, mechanisms, regulators, reserve mechanism automatic shut-down circuit; the state of lock fittings, mechanisms, regulators, reserve mechanism automated switching on; parameter deviation from permissible values; interlock operation; protection system state; the state of autonomous units and devices

  3. Shutdown dose rate contribution from diagnostics in ITER upper port 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, M.S., E-mail: munseong@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Pak, S.; An, Y.H.; Seon, C.R.; Lee, H.G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bertalot, L.; Krasilnikov, V. [ITER Organization, St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Zvonkov, A. [Agency ITER-RF, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The Shutdown Dose Rate in the interspace of ITER upper port 18 was evaluated. • VUV spectrometer is the dominant contributor to the average SDR. • The existence and size of the blanket cooling pipes impacts significantly on SDR. - Abstract: D-T operation of ITER plasma will produce high-energy fusion neutrons those can activate materials around the place where human-access is necessary. The interspace of the diagnostic port is one of the area where human-access is necessary for the maintenance of diagnostic systems installed at the port, so it is important to evaluate a dose rate of the interspace area in order to comply with ALARA principle. The shutdown dose rate (SDR) in the interspace of ITER upper port 18 was evaluated by the Direct 1-Step (D1S) method using MCNP5 code. This port contains three diagnostics: Vacuum Ultra-Violet (VUV) Spectrometer, Neutron Activation System (NAS), and Upper Vertical Neutron Camera (UVNC). The contribution of each diagnostic in the port was evaluated by running separate upper port MCNP models those contain individual diagnostic only, and the total dose rate contribution was evaluated with the model which was fully integrated with all the diagnostics. The effect of the opening around the upper port plug and of the other ports was also investigated. The purpose of this assessment is to provide the shielding design basis for the preliminary design of the diagnostic integration in the port. The method and result of the calculation will be presented in this paper.

  4. Shutdown dose rate analysis with CAD geometry, Cartesian/tetrahedral mesh, and advanced variance reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondo, Elliott D.; Davis, Andrew; Wilson, Paul P.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A CAD-based shutdown dose rate analysis workflow has been implemented. • Cartesian and superimposed tetrahedral mesh are fully supported. • Biased and unbiased photon source sampling options are available. • Hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques accelerate photon transport. • The workflow has been validated with the FNG-ITER benchmark problem. - Abstract: In fusion energy systems (FES) high-energy neutrons born from burning plasma activate system components to form radionuclides. The biological dose rate that results from photons emitted by these radionuclides after shutdown—the shutdown dose rate (SDR)—must be quantified for maintenance planning. This can be done using the Rigorous Two-Step (R2S) method, which involves separate neutron and photon transport calculations, coupled by a nuclear inventory analysis code. The geometric complexity and highly attenuating configuration of FES motivates the use of CAD geometry and advanced variance reduction for this analysis. An R2S workflow has been created with the new capability of performing SDR analysis directly from CAD geometry with Cartesian or tetrahedral meshes and with biased photon source sampling, enabling the use of the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) variance reduction technique. This workflow has been validated with the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG)-ITER SDR benchmark using both Cartesian and tetrahedral meshes and both unbiased and biased photon source sampling. All results are within 20.4% of experimental values, which constitutes satisfactory agreement. Photon transport using CADIS is demonstrated to yield speedups as high as 8.5·10"5 for problems using the FNG geometry.

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Nine Shutdown Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul

    2013-04-30

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses. In this report, a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel from nine shutdown sites was conducted. The shutdown sites included Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion. At these sites a total of 7649 used nuclear fuel assemblies and a total of 2813.2 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of used nuclear fuel are contained in 248 storage canisters. In addition, 11 canisters containing greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste are stored at these sites. The evaluation was divided in four components: • characterization of the used nuclear fuel and GTCC low-level radioactive waste inventory at the shutdown sites • an evaluation of the onsite transportation conditions at the shutdown sites • an evaluation of the near-site transportation infrastructure and experience relevant to the shipping of transportation casks containing used nuclear fuel from the shutdown sites • an evaluation of the actions necessary to prepare for and remove used nuclear fuel and GTCC low-level radioactive waste from the shutdown sites. Using these evaluations the authors developed time sequences of activities and time durations for removing the used nuclear fuel and GTCC low-level radioactive waste from a single shutdown site, from three shutdown sites located close to each other, and from all nine shutdown sites.

  6. Subclinical impairment of ovarian reserve in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with normal menstruation not using alkylating therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenhong; Zhan, Zhongping; Liang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jianhui; Huang, Xingfang; Liao, Caiyun

    2013-12-01

    Disease activity is a major factor in menstrual disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients not receiving alkylating therapy. However, the ovarian reserve of SLE women with normal menstruation is still unclear. Twenty-three SLE patients naïve to cytotoxic agents (SLE group) and nineteen SLE patients receiving current or previous cyclophosphamide (CTX) therapy (without other cytotoxic agents; SLE-CTX group) were enrolled. Twenty-one age-matched healthy women served as controls. All patients and controls had a regular menstrual cycle. Basal hormone levels, including follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), and antral follicle count (AFC) were analyzed in the two study groups and compared with the control group. No significant differences were found between the SLE, SLE-CTX, and control groups in age, body mass index (BMI), and basal FSH and LH levels. The E2 (P=0.023) levels were high and the AMH (P=0.000) values and AFC (P=0.001) were significantly lower in the SLE and SLE-CTX groups compared to control. However, these values were similar between the SLE and SLE-CTX groups. SLE patients not receiving alkylating therapy who had normal menstruation and short illness duration still had an impaired ovarian reserve.

  7. The Development of the State Labour Reserve System in the Lower Volga Region in Postwar Period (1945-1952

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova Nadezhda Vasilyevna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two stages are revealed in the development of state labour reserves. The first period lasted from 1945 to 1948, and the second period – from 1949 to 1952. The distinctions of these two stages were determined. The author analyzes the dynamics of quantity and the structure of institutions in the system of state labour reserves in the Astrakhan, Saratov and Stalingrad regions in postwar years. The social and economical factors that had influence on this system were identified. The characters of principal patterns of SSLR’s education institutions is provided, the common lines and singularities, significance changes were denoted. The share of young ones from the childish houses into the industrial, handicraft and railways schools in Low Volga River is exposed. The criteria of entering into the education institutions were determined. The interaction of SSLR with children houses was exhibited. The author highlights the status of stuff basis of SSLR in postwar years: shortage of educational buildings and student’s homes, equipment’s deficiency in industrial workshops and textbooks. The positive changes in staff-technical guarantee of educational institutions to the end of learning period are opening; their causes were analyzed. The author reveals the alterations in staff structure of SSLR and calculates the number of preparing workmen from factory and plant instruct schools; industrial, handicraft and railways schools for enterprises of the Lower Volga region in the fourth five-year plan. The article marks the significance of SSLR in the solution of economic and social problems in postwar society. The author distinguishes the common and the individual in the development of SSLR in the Lower Volga region and in Russia on whole.

  8. An investigation of scramming the outer shutdown rods of the ANS with no reversal of flow in the manifold inlet lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsk, K.

    1992-10-01

    This report provides calculations and calculation checks on the outer shutdown system, consisting of eight shutdown rods located on the outside of the core. The function of the system is to scram the reactor, or to break the chain reaction of the fission process. The shutdown rods are clad with a neutron-absorbing material (i.e., hafnium) to achieve scram. During normal operation, the outer shutdown rods (Fig. 1) are in a nonscram, withdrawn position. This means that they are not close enough to the core to absorb a significant number of the neutrons that cause the fission process. In the case of a malfunction or an emergency, the outer control rods are moved to a position near the core. The outer shutdown system is operated with the use of springs and hydraulics. During normal operation, a constant flow of heavy water is circulated through the reflector vessel. A part of this flow provides a pressure high enough to keep the rods in their withdrawn or upper position, a nonscram status. If any signs of abnormal operation occur, the valves in the hydraulic system cut off the flow, and the springs push the rods into the scram position, stopping the chain reaction. Once the flow is restarted, the rods can be withdrawn to the nonscram position. Calculations of the mass of the outer control rod, the scram spring data, and the hydraulic pressure to hold the rods in the withdrawn position have been checked. In the case of a malfunction of the flow/pressure relief valves, a calculation was needed to show that the scram time would not exceed the time allowed. The scram time has been determined based on different values of the rod insertion length and the outside radius of the annulus was calculated. The effective force pushing the rod into the scram position, the rate of acceleration, and the actual scram time was then determined

  9. Evaluation of Pressure Changes in HANARO Reactor Hall after a Reactor Shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Geeyang; Han, Jaesam; Ahn, Gukhoon; Jung, Hoansung

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of this work is intended to evaluate the characteristics of the thermal behavior regarding how the decay heat will be affected by the reactor hall pressure change and the increase of pool water temperature induced in the primary coolant after a reactor shutdown. The particular reactor pool water temperature at the surface where it is evaporated owing to the decay heat resulting in the local heat transfer rate is related to the pressure change response in the reactor hall associated with the primary cooling system because of the reduction of the heat exchanger to remove the heat. The increase in the pool water temperature is proportional to the heat transfer rate in the reactor pool. Consequently, any limit on the reactor pool water temperature imposes a corresponding limit on the reactor hall pressure. At HANARO, the decay heat after a reactor shutdown is mainly removed by the natural circulation cooling in the reactor pool. This paper is written for the safety feature of the pressure change related leakage rate from the reactor hall. The calculation results show that the increase of pressure in the reactor hall will not cause any serious problems to the safety limits although the reactor hall pressure is slightly increased. Therefore, it was concluded that the pool water temperature increase is not so rapid as to cause the pressure to vary significantly in the reactor hall. Furthermore, the mathematical model developed in this work can be a useful analytical tool for scoping and parametric studies in the area of thermal transient analysis, with its proper representation of the interaction between the temperature and pressure in the reactor hall

  10. Evaluation of flexible demand-side load-following reserves in power systems with high wind generation penetration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paterakis, N.G.; Catalao, J.P.S.; Ntomaris, A.V.; Erdinc, O.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a two-stage stochastic programming joint energy and reserve day-ahead market structure is proposed in order to procure the required load-following reserves to tackle with wind power production uncertainty. Reserves can be procured both from generation and demand-side. Responsive

  11. Best estimate analysis of the thermal expansion scenario during shutdown in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macian, R.; Nechvatal, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we examine the consequences following the hypothetical failure of the Residual Heat Removal (RHR) system during the shutdown operating mode in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). If the RHR system decay heat removal capability cannot be ensured, then the decay heat released in the core will heat up the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) inventory and will cause it to expand. If the thermal expansion is such that the entire RCS becomes ''water-solid'', that is, completely filled with water, then further expansion will result in a rapid increase of the RCS pressure. Such a situation could threaten the integrity of the RCS pressure boundary and lead to a dangerous break in the primary system or in the lines of the systems connected to it, e.g. RHR system. The pressure increase can be arrested by the opening of the pressurizer relief valves (PORVs) or, in those PWRs in which the RHR system is not isolated after it fails, by the opening of the pressure relief valve in the RHR system line. The purpose of the analyses presented in this paper is to determine whether mitigating measures, such as the opening of only one of the PORV and the RHR relief valve, are capable of preventing a fast pressure increase. (author)

  12. Reserve, thin form-factor, hypochlorite-based cells for powering portable systems: Manufacture (including MEMS processes), performance and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas-Valencia, Andres M.; Langebrake, Larry [Center for Ocean Technology, University of South Florida, 140 Seventh Ave. S., St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Biver, Carl J. [Center for Ocean Technology, University of South Florida, 140 Seventh Ave. S., St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave. Tampa, FL (United States)

    2007-03-30

    This work focuses on fabrication routes and performance evaluation of thin form-factors, reserve cells, as a powering alternative for expendable and/or remotely operated systems. The catalytic decomposition of sodium hypochlorite solutions is revisited herein with two cost-effective anodes: zinc and aluminum. Aluminum, even though the most expensive of the utilized anodes, constituted cells with double the energy content (up to 55 Wh kg{sup -1}) than those fabricated with zinc. Even though the hypochlorite concentration in the solution limits the cells' operational life, attractive performances (1.0 V with a current of 10 mA) for the manufactured cells are obtained. It is shown that micro fabrication processes, allowing for close electrodes interspacing, provided high faradic and columbic efficiencies of up to 70 and 100%, respectively. Obtained specific energies (50-120 Wh kg{sup -1}) are in the same order of magnitude than batteries currently used for powering deployable systems. Experimental results show that a simple model that linearly relates over potentials and the electrical load, adequately describe all the cell designs. A mathematical model based on a kinetic-mechanistic scheme that relates the current output as a function of time agrees fairly well with results obtained activating cells with various concentrations of NaOCl solutions. (author)

  13. Diagnostic performance of a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera system assessed using fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Chikamori, Taishiro; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hida, Satoshi; Igarashi, Yuko; Yamashita, Jun; Ogawa, Masashi; Shiba, Chie; Usui, Yasuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Although the novel cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera system provides excellent image quality, its diagnostic value using thallium-201 as assessed on coronary angiography (CAG) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) has not been validated. METHODS AND RESULTS: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the CZT ultrafast camera system (Discovery NM 530c), 95 patients underwent stress thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and then CAG within 3 months. Image acquisition was performed in the supine and prone positions after stress for 5 and 3 min, respectively, and in the supine position at rest for 10 min. Significant stenosis was defined as ≥90% diameter narrowing on visual estimation, or a lesion with <90% and ≥50% stenosis and FFR ≤0.75. To detect individual coronary stenosis, the respective sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 90%, 64%, and 78% for left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis, 78%, 84%, and 81% for left circumflex stenosis, and 83%, 47%, and 60% for right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis. The combination of prone and supine imaging had a higher specificity for RCA disease than supine imaging alone (65% vs. 47%), with an improvement in accuracy from 60% to 72%. Using thallium-201 with short acquisition time, combined with prone imaging, CZT SPECT had a high diagnostic yield in detecting significant coronary stenosis as assessed using FFR.

  14. 40 CFR 60.1710 - What happens to the emission limits during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? 60.1710 Section 60.1710 Protection of Environment... during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? (a) The emission limits of this subpart apply at all times except during periods of municipal waste combustion unit startup, shutdown, or malfunction...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15165 - What happens to the emission limits during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? 62.15165 Section 62.15165 Protection of Environment... emission limits during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? (a) The emission limits of this subpart apply at all times except during periods of municipal waste combustion unit startup, shutdown, or...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1205 - What happens to the operating requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? 60.1205 Section 60.1205 Protection of... requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction? (a) The operating requirements of this subpart apply at all times except during periods of municipal waste combustion unit startup, shutdown, or...

  17. Energy of the LHC after the 2013-2014 shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todesco, E.; Lorin, C.; Bajko, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 all the LHC main dipole circuits were trained to 5 TeV, two sectors to 6 TeV, and one sector was pushed up to 6.6 TeV. In the 5-6 TeV range, a few quenches were needed to retrain the LHC dipoles, and none for the quadrupoles. On the other hand, in the 6- 7 TeV range a larger than expected number of quenches was observed in the main dipoles. Using this limited set of data, tentative estimates were given to guess the number of quenches needed to reach nominal energy. After three years, the only additional experimental data are the retraining of the magnets individually tested at SM18, either coming from the spares or from the 3-4 sector. After presenting this additional information, we will consider the different scenarios that can be envisaged to train the LHC main magnets after the Long Shut-down 1 (LS1), the expected energy, the impact on the commissioning time and the associated risk. (authors)

  18. Sensitivity of BWR shutdown margin tests to local reactivity anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cokinos, D.M.; Carew, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Successful shutdown margin (SDM) demonstration is a required procedure in the startup of a newly configured boiling water reactor (BWR) core. In its most reactive condition throughout a cycle, a BWR core must be capable of being made subcritical by a specified margin with the highest worth control rod fully withdrawn and all other rods at their fully inserted positions. Two different methods are used to demonstrate SDM: (a) the adjacent-rod test and (b) the in-sequence test. In the adjacent-rod test, the strongest rod is fully withdrawn and an adjacent rod is withdrawn to reach criticality. In the in-sequence test, control rods spread throughout the core are withdrawn in a predetermined sequence of withdrawals. Larger than expected core k/sub eff/ values have been observed during the performance of BWR SDM tests. The purpose of the work summarized in this paper has been to investigated and quantify the sensitivity of both the adjacent-rod and in-sequence SDM tests to local reactivity anomalies. This was accomplished by introducing reactivity perturbations at selected four-bundle cell locations and by evaluating their effect on core reactivity in each of the two tests

  19. Quality of the current low power and shutdown PSA practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seung Cheol; Park, Jin Hee; Lim, Ho Gon; Kim, Tae Woon

    2004-01-01

    A probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for the low-power and shutdown (LPSD) modes in a Korea standard nuclear power plant (KSNP) has been performed for the purpose of estimating the LPSD risk and identifying the vulnerabilities of LPSD operations. Both the operational experience and PSA results indicate that the risks from LPSD operations could be comparable with those from power operations. However, the application of the LPSD risk insights to risk-informed decision making has been slow to be adopted in practice. It is largely due to the question of whether the current LPSD PSA practice is appropriate for application to risk-informed decision making or not. Such a question has to do with the quality of the current LPSD PSA practice. In this paper, we have performed self-assessment of the KSNP LPSD PSA quality based on the ANS Standard (draft as of 13 Sep. 2002). The aims of the work are to find the LPSD PSA technical areas insufficient for application to risk-informed decision making and to efficiently allocate the limited research resources to improve the LPSD PSA model quality. Many useful findings regarding the current LPSD PSA quality are presented in this paper

  20. Reactivity initiated accidents and loss of shutdown - 20 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxat, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    A review of the safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors was conducted in 1987 after the Chernobyl accident. As part of this review an analysis was performed of a Loss of Coolant Accident in a Pickering A unit with coincident failure to shutdown. This analysis showed that the power excursion was halted by channel and calandria vessel failures leading to moderator fluid displacement. The containment structure did not fail and, at worst might suffer minor cracking at the top of the dome of the reactor building. Overall the dose consequences of such an accident were no worse than the limiting design basis dual failure event. In the intervening twenty years following this analysis, Significant experimental information has been obtained that relates to power pulse behaviour. This information, together with conservatisms in he original analysis, are reviewed and assessed in this paper. In addition, the issue of reactivity initiated events in other reactor types is reviewed to identify the reactor design characteristics that are of importance in these events. Contrary to popular belief the existence of positive coolant void reactivity is not as significant a factor as it is sometimes stated to be. On balance, with appropriate design measures, no one reactor type can be claimed to be 'more safe' than another. The underlying basis for this statement is articulated in this paper. (author)

  1. Advanced wind turbine with lift-destroying aileron for shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Clint; Juengst, Theresa M.; Zuteck, Michael D.

    1996-06-18

    An advanced aileron configuration for wind turbine rotors featuring an aileron with a bottom surface that slopes upwardly at an angle toward the nose region of the aileron. The aileron rotates about a center of rotation which is located within the envelope of the aileron, but does not protrude substantially into the air flowing past the aileron while the aileron is deflected to angles within a control range of angles. This allows for strong positive control of the rotation of the rotor. When the aileron is rotated to angles within a shutdown range of deflection angles, lift-destroying, turbulence-producing cross-flow of air through a flow gap, and turbulence created by the aileron, create sufficient drag to stop rotation of the rotor assembly. The profile of the aileron further allows the center of rotation to be located within the envelope of the aileron, at or near the centers of pressure and mass of the aileron. The location of the center of rotation optimizes aerodynamically and gyroscopically induced hinge moments and provides a fail safe configuration.

  2. Reliability of Offshore Wind Turbine Drivetrains based on Measured Shut-down Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Anand; Buhl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    by initiating blade pitching to feather and also sometimes using the generator torqueas a brake mechanism. The shutdowns due to wind speed variation nearcut-out are predicted using an Inverse First Order Reliability Model(IFORM) whereby an expected annual frequency of normal shutdownsat cut-out is put forth...... normal operation and with shutdowns. The maximum coefficient of variation (CoV) due to varying wind conditions was found on the low speed shaft torsion, but the shutdowns by themselves were not seento significantly change the fatigue loads....

  3. Accident sequence analysis for a BWR [Boiling Water Reactor] during low power and shutdown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, D.W.; Hake, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Most previous Probabilistic Risk Assessments have excluded consideration of accidents initiated in low power and shutdown modes of operation. A study of the risk associated with operation in low power and shutdown is being performed at Sandia National Laboratories for a US Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). This paper describes the proposed methodology for the analysis of the risk associated with the operation of a BWR during low power and shutdown modes and presents preliminary information resulting from the application of the methodology. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Francis-99: Transient CFD simulation of load changes and turbine shutdown in a model sized high-head Francis turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mössinger, Peter; Jester-Zürker, Roland; Jung, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    With increasing requirements for hydropower plant operation due to intermittent renewable energy sources like wind and solar, numerical simulations of transient operations in hydraulic turbo machines become more important. As a continuation of the work performed for the first workshop which covered three steady operating conditions, in the present paper load changes and a shutdown procedure are investigated. The findings of previous studies are used to create a 360° model and compare measurements with simulation results for the operating points part load, high load and best efficiency. A mesh motion procedure is introduced, allowing to represent moving guide vanes for load changes from best efficiency to part load and high load. Additionally an automated re-mesh procedure is added for turbine shutdown to ensure reliable mesh quality during guide vane closing. All three transient operations are compared to PIV velocity measurements in the draft tube and pressure signals in the vaneless space. Simulation results of axial velocity distributions for all three steady operation points, during both load changes and for the shutdown correlated well with the measurement. An offset at vaneless space pressure is found to be a result of guide vane corrections for the simulation to ensure similar velocity fields. Short-time Fourier transformation indicating increasing amplitudes and frequencies at speed-no load conditions. Further studies will discuss the already measured start-up procedure and investigate the necessity to consider the hydraulic system dynamics upstream of the turbine by means of a 1D3D coupling between the 3D flow field and a 1D system model. (paper)

  5. Francis-99: Transient CFD simulation of load changes and turbine shutdown in a model sized high-head Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mössinger, Peter; Jester-Zürker, Roland; Jung, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    With increasing requirements for hydropower plant operation due to intermittent renewable energy sources like wind and solar, numerical simulations of transient operations in hydraulic turbo machines become more important. As a continuation of the work performed for the first workshop which covered three steady operating conditions, in the present paper load changes and a shutdown procedure are investigated. The findings of previous studies are used to create a 360° model and compare measurements with simulation results for the operating points part load, high load and best efficiency. A mesh motion procedure is introduced, allowing to represent moving guide vanes for load changes from best efficiency to part load and high load. Additionally an automated re-mesh procedure is added for turbine shutdown to ensure reliable mesh quality during guide vane closing. All three transient operations are compared to PIV velocity measurements in the draft tube and pressure signals in the vaneless space. Simulation results of axial velocity distributions for all three steady operation points, during both load changes and for the shutdown correlated well with the measurement. An offset at vaneless space pressure is found to be a result of guide vane corrections for the simulation to ensure similar velocity fields. Short-time Fourier transformation indicating increasing amplitudes and frequencies at speed-no load conditions. Further studies will discuss the already measured start-up procedure and investigate the necessity to consider the hydraulic system dynamics upstream of the turbine by means of a 1D3D coupling between the 3D flow field and a 1D system model.

  6. Inspection maintenance and planning of shutdown in thermal electric generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezordi, W.L.; Correa, D.A.; Kina, M.

    1984-01-01

    The schedule shutdown of an industrial plant and, more specifically, of an electrical generating station, is becoming increasingly important. The major parameters to be taken into account for the planning of such a shutdown are basically of economic-financial nature such as costs of the related services (materials, equipment, manpower, etc), loss of revenue caused by the station's shutdown as well as by the station availability, and other requirements expected from it by the Load Dispatch and consumers. Improving the equipment's performances and the station's availability are the fundamental objectives to be strived for. The authors present in this paper, in an abridged form, the planning tools used for thermal electric generating plants shutdowns for inspections, maintenance and design changes implementation. (Author) [pt

  7. Reload safety evaluation of boron dilution accident related to shutdown margin proportional to boron concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Kyun; Lee, Ki Bog; Song, Jae Woong

    1993-06-01

    This report investigates the efficient safety evaluation method and analysis procedure on Boron Dilution Accident(BDA) under the proportional shutdown margin to boron concentration. Also investigated are problems caused by applying this shutdown margin limit. Through this investigation, the safety of Kori-3 Cycle-8, Yonggwang-2 Cycle-7, Kori-4 Cycle-8 and Yonggwang-1 Cycle-8 with respect to BDA is verified. In order to satisfy the shutdown margin requirement in the Technical Specifications, it is shown that the High Flux Alarm at Shutdown Setting for Kori-4 Cycle-8 and Yonggwang-1 Cycle-8 at Mode 5 should be set at 2 or the Technical Specification should be revised. (Author)

  8. Probabilistic safety assessments of nuclear power plants for low power and shutdown modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    Within the past several years the results of nuclear power plant operating experience and performance of probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) for low power and shutdown operating modes have revealed that the risk from operating modes other than full power may contribute significantly to the overall risk from plant operations. These early results have led to an increased focus on safety during low power and shutdown operating modes and to an increased interest of many plant operators in performing shutdown and low power PSAs. This publication was developed to provide guidance and insights on the performance of PSA for shutdown and low power operating modes. The preparation of this publication was initiated in 1994. Two technical consultants meetings were conducted in 1994 and one in February 1999 in support of the development of this report

  9. Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The report contains the results of the NRC Staff's evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements

  10. Despite the Shutdown, Rescheduled NIH Research Festival Brings Science to the Forefront | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Although it was delayed by almost a month because of the federal shutdown, the NIH Research Festival still took place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., and attendance was high.

  11. Effects of shutdown chemistry on steam generator radiation levels at Point Beach Unit 2. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormuth, J.W.

    1982-05-01

    A refueling shutdown chemistry test was conducted at a PWR, Point Beach Unit 2. The objective was to yield reactor coolant chemistry data during the cooldown/shutdown process which might establish a relationship between shutdown chemistry and its effects on steam generator radiation fields. Of particular concern were the effects of the presence of hydrogen in the coolant as contrasted to an oxygenated coolant. Analysis of reactor coolant samples showed a rapid soluble release (spike) in Co-58, Co-60, and nickel caused by oxygenation of the coolant. The measurement of radioisotope specific activities indicates that the material undergoing dissolution during the shutdown originated from different sources which had varying histories of activation. The test program developed no data which would support theories that oxygenation of the coolant while the steam generators are full of water contributes to increased steam generator radiation levels

  12. Benefits of actinide-only burnup credit for shutdown PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, D.; Fuentes, E.; Kang, C.; Rivard, D.

    1998-02-01

    Owners of PWRs that are shutdown prior to resolution of interim storage or permanent disposal issues have to make difficult decisions on what to do with their spent fuel. Maine Yankee is currently evaluating multiple options for spent fuel storage. Their spent fuel pool has 1,434 assemblies. In order to evaluate the value to a utility of actinide-only burnup credit, analysis of the number of canisters required with and without burnup credit was made. In order to perform the analysis, loading curves were developed for the Holtec Hi-Star 100/MPC-32. The MPC-32 is hoped to be representative of future burnup credit designs from many vendors. The loading curves were generated using the actinide-only burnup credit currently under NRC review. The canister was analyzed for full loading (32 assemblies) and with partial loadings of 30 and 28 assemblies. If no burnup credit is used the maximum capacity was assumed to be 24 assemblies. this reduced capacity is due to the space required for flux traps which are needed to sufficiently reduce the canister reactivity for the fresh fuel assumption. Without burnup credit the 1,343 assemblies would require 60 canisters. If all the fuel could be loaded into the 32 assembly canisters only 45 canisters would be required. Although the actinide-only burnup credit approach is very conservative, the total number of canisters required is only 47 which is only two short of the minimum possible number of canisters. The utility is expected to buy the canister and the storage overpack. A reasonable cost estimate for the canister plus overpack is $500,000. Actinide-only burnup credit would save 13 canisters and overpacks which is a savings of about $6.5 million. This savings is somewhat reduced since burnup credit requires a verification measurement of burnup. The measurement costs for these assemblies can be estimated as about $1 million. The net savings would be $5.5 million

  13. Derivation of main drivers affecting the possibility of human errors during low power and shutdown operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun; Park, Jin Kyun; Kim, Jae Whan

    2016-01-01

    In order to estimate the possibility of human error and identify its nature, human reliability analysis (HRA) methods have been implemented. For this, various HRA methods have been developed so far: techniques for human error rate prediction (THERP), cause based decision tree (CBDT), the cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM) and so on. Most HRA methods have been developed with a focus on full power operation of NPPs even though human performance may more largely affect the safety of the system during low power and shutdown (LPSD) operation than it would when the system is in full power operation. In this regard, it is necessary to conduct a research for developing HRA method to be used in LPSD operation. For the first step of the study, main drivers which affect the possibility of human error have been developed. Drivers which are commonly called as performance shaping factors (PSFs) are aspects of the human's individual characteristics, environment, organization, or task that specifically decrements or improves human performance, thus respectively increasing or decreasing the likelihood of human errors. In order to estimate the possibility of human error and identify its nature, human reliability analysis (HRA) methods have been implemented. For this, various HRA methods have been developed so far: techniques for human error rate prediction (THERP), cause based decision tree (CBDT), the cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM) and so on. Most HRA methods have been developed with a focus on full power operation of NPPs even though human performance may more largely affect the safety of the system during low power and shutdown (LPSD) operation than it would when the system is in full power operation. In this regard, it is necessary to conduct a research for developing HRA method to be used in LPSD operation. For the first step of the study, main drivers which affect the possibility of human error have been developed. Drivers which

  14. Derivation of main drivers affecting the possibility of human errors during low power and shutdown operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Kyun; Kim, Jae Whan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In order to estimate the possibility of human error and identify its nature, human reliability analysis (HRA) methods have been implemented. For this, various HRA methods have been developed so far: techniques for human error rate prediction (THERP), cause based decision tree (CBDT), the cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM) and so on. Most HRA methods have been developed with a focus on full power operation of NPPs even though human performance may more largely affect the safety of the system during low power and shutdown (LPSD) operation than it would when the system is in full power operation. In this regard, it is necessary to conduct a research for developing HRA method to be used in LPSD operation. For the first step of the study, main drivers which affect the possibility of human error have been developed. Drivers which are commonly called as performance shaping factors (PSFs) are aspects of the human's individual characteristics, environment, organization, or task that specifically decrements or improves human performance, thus respectively increasing or decreasing the likelihood of human errors. In order to estimate the possibility of human error and identify its nature, human reliability analysis (HRA) methods have been implemented. For this, various HRA methods have been developed so far: techniques for human error rate prediction (THERP), cause based decision tree (CBDT), the cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM) and so on. Most HRA methods have been developed with a focus on full power operation of NPPs even though human performance may more largely affect the safety of the system during low power and shutdown (LPSD) operation than it would when the system is in full power operation. In this regard, it is necessary to conduct a research for developing HRA method to be used in LPSD operation. For the first step of the study, main drivers which affect the possibility of human error have been developed. Drivers

  15. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, T.; Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested

  16. Optimization of reactor coolant shutdown chemistry practices for crud inventory management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellers, B.; Barnette, J.; Stevens, J.; Perkins, D.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes reactor coolant shutdown chemistry control practices at Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES, TXU-Generation, USA). The shutdown evolution is managed from a process control perspective to achieve conditions most favorable to crud decomposition and to avoiding re-precipitation of metals. The report discusses the evolution of current industry practices and the necessity for greater emphasis on shutdown chemistry control in response to Axial Offset Anomaly and growth of ex-core radiation fields during outage conditions. Nuclear Industry experience with axial offset anomaly (AOA), radiation field growth and unexpected behavior of crud during reactor shutdowns has encouraged the refinement of chemistry control practices during plant shutdown and startup. The strong implication of nickel rich crud as a cause of AOA and unexpected crud behavior has resulted in a focus on nickel inventory management. The goals for Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) include maintaining solubility of metals and radioisotopes, maximizing nickel removal and effective cleanup with demineralizers. This paper provides results and lessons learned from long term efforts to optimize the shutdown process. (authors)

  17. Current status of experimental breeder reactor-II [EBR-II] shutdown planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, M. D.; Griffin, C. D.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Earle, O. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor--II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory--West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was shutdown in September, 1994 as mandated by the US Department of Energy. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the Sodium Process Facility. The sodium environment and the EBR-II configuration, combined with the radiation and contamination associated with thirty years of reactor operation, posed problems specific to liquid metal reactor deactivation. The methods being developed and implemented at EBR-II can be applied to other similar situations in the US and abroad

  18. Chlorophyll a and turbidity patterns over coral reefs systems of La Parguera Natural Reserve,Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Otero

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies of temporal and spatial changes in phytoplankton biomass and turbidity provide essential information on coral reef ecosystem function and health.Fluctuation of phytoplankton biomass responds to several factors including nutrient inputs,both anthropogenic and natural,while turbidity is mostly affected by sediment resuspension or transport from terrestrial systems.These parameters can be used as sentinels of significant environmental factors "modifying "coral reef systems.A chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a and turbidity (Turbin situ logger was installed at 10 stations from June 4 to July 7,2003 in La Parguera Natural Reserve (Southwestern Puerto Ricoto assess short-term temporal and geographic variation in patterns of phytoplankton biomass and turbidity at pre-selected sites as part of an interdisciplinary long-term study.Average station Chl a variation was 0.17-1.12 µg l -1 and 0.2-23.4 NTU for Turb.Results indicate that the western near-coastal stations had higher levels of Turb and Chl a .The easternmost mid shelf station,Romero reef,was similar to coastal stations probably due to nutrient and suspended sediment inputs from a source external to our study area to the east,Guánica Bay.Comparisons between different sampling days indicate significant differences between days for most stations suggesting that one-time discrete sampling may not be representative of average water column conditions and illustrate the dynamic nature of coral reef systems.Further work is warranted to assess seasonal changes that integrate short-term (dailyvariability in both Turb and Chl a .Los estudios sobre cambios temporales y espaciales de biomasa fitoplanctónica y de urbidad, proveen información esencial sobre la función y salud de los sistemas arrecifales.Fluctuaciones de la biomasa de fitoplancton responden a factores como entradas de nutrientes de fuentes antropogénicas y/o naturales,mientras que la turbidez responde mayormente a la resuspensi

  19. An SBLOCA Test for Shutdown Cooling Line Break Using the SMART-ITL Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hwang; Kim, Dong Eok; Ryu, Sung Uk; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Yung Joo; Yi, Sung Jae; Park, Hyun Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The objectives of SMART-ITL are to investigate and understand the integral performance of the reactor systems and components, and the thermalhydraulic phenomena occurring in the system during normal, abnormal, and emergency conditions, and to verify the system safety during various design basis events of SMART. Its height was preserved and its area and volume were scaled down to 1/49 compared with the SMART prototype plant. The SMART-ITL consists of a primary system including a reactor pressure vessel with a pressurizer, four steam generators and four main coolant pumps, a secondary system, a safety system, and an auxiliary system. The SMART was installed at KAERI and several transient tests were recently finished. In this paper, the test results for a steady-state operation and a transient of the small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) are discussed. An SBLOCA test simulating the shutdown cooling line break was performed using SMART-ITL properly. All parameters were in good agreement with the target values during the steady-state operation period. The pressures and temperatures show reasonable behaviors during the SBLOCA test. SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) which was designed by KAERI is an integral type reactor. The standard design approval for the SMART design was issued on July 4th of 2012 by a Korean regulatory body, the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC). The main components including a pressurizer, steam generators, and reactor coolant pumps are installed in a reactor pressure vessel, and there are no large-size pipes. The safety systems could be simplified as an LBLOCA (Large-Break Loss of Coolant Accident) scenario is inherently excluded. An integral-effect test loop for SMART (SMART-ITL, or FESTA) was designed to simulate the integral thermal-hydraulic behavior of SMART. The SMART-ITL has been designed using a volume scaling methodology.

  20. Understanding the hydrologic impacts of wastewater treatment plant discharge to shallow groundwater: Before and after plant shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Laura E.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Barber, Larry B.; Duris, Joseph W.; Hutchinson, Kasey J.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Effluent-impacted surface water has the potential to transport not only water, but wastewater-derived contaminants to shallow groundwater systems. To better understand the effects of effluent discharge on in-stream and near-stream hydrologic conditions in wastewater-impacted systems, water-level changes were monitored in hyporheic-zone and shallow-groundwater piezometers in a reach of Fourmile Creek adjacent to and downstream of the Ankeny (Iowa, USA) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Water-level changes were monitored from approximately 1.5 months before to 0.5 months after WWTP closure. Diurnal patterns in WWTP discharge were closely mirrored in stream and shallow-groundwater levels immediately upstream and up to 3 km downstream of the outfall, indicating that such discharge was the primary control on water levels before shutdown. The hydrologic response to WWTP shutdown was immediately observed throughout the study reach, verifying the far-reaching hydraulic connectivity and associated contaminant transport risk. The movement of WWTP effluent into alluvial aquifers has implications for potential WWTP-derived contamination of shallow groundwater far removed from the WWTP outfall.

  1. 77 FR 21846 - Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions: Reserves Simplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... Requirements of Depository Institutions: Reserves Simplification AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Board is amending Regulation D, Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions, to simplify the administration of reserve requirements. The final rule creates a...

  2. Shutdown decay heat removal analysis: Plant case studies and special issues: Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Cramond, W.R.; Sanders, G.A.; Hatch, S.W.

    1989-04-01

    Shutdown Decay Heat Removal Requirements has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-45. The overall objectives of the USI A-45 program were to evaluate the safety adequacy of decay heat removal (DHR) systems in existing light water reactor nuclear power plants and to assess the value and impact (benefit-cost) of alternative measures for improving the overall reliability of the DHR function. To provide the technical data required to meet these objectives a program was developed that examined the state of DHR system reliability in a sample of existing plants. This program identified potential vulnerabilities and identified and established the feasibility of potential measures to improve the reliability of the DHR function. A value/impact (V/I) analysis of the more promising of such measures was conducted and documented. This report summarizes those studies. In addition, because of the evolving nature of V/I analyses in support of regulation, a number of supporting studies related to appropriate procedures and measures for the V/I analyses were also conducted. These studies are also summarized herein. This report only summarizes findings of technical studies performed by Sandia National Laboratories as part of the program to resolve this issue. 46 refs., 7 figs., 124 tabs

  3. Spent fuel acceptance scenarios devoted to shutdown reactors: A preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, T.W.; Plummer, A.M.; Dippold, D.G.; Short, S.M.

    1989-10-01

    Spent fuel acceptance schedules and the allocation of federal acceptance capacity among commercial nuclear power reactors have important operational and cost consequences for reactor operators. Alternative allocation schemes were investigated to some extent in DOE's MRS Systems Study. The current study supplements these analyses for a class of acceptance schemes in which the acceptance capacity of the federal radioactive waste management system is allocated principally to shutdown commercial power reactors, and extends the scope of analysis to include considerations of at-reactor cask loading rates. The operational consequences of these schemes for power reactors, as measured in terms of quantity of spent fuel storage requirement above storage pool capacities and number of years of pool operations after last discharge, are estimated, as are the associated utility costs. This study does not attempt to examine the inter-utility equity considerations involved in departures from the current oldest-fuel-first (OFF) allocation rule as specified in the ''Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste.'' In the sense that the alternative allocations are more economically efficient than OFF, however, they approximate the allocations that could result from free exchange of acceptance rights among utilities. Such a process would result in the preservation of inter-utility equity. 13 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  4. Control of radio-iodine at the German reprocessing plant WAK during operation and after shutdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, F.J.; Herrmann, B.; Kuhn, K.D. [Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (Germany)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    During 20 years of operation 207 metric tons of oxide fuel from nuclear power reactors with 19 kg of iodine-129 had been reprocessed in the WAK plant near Karlsruhe. In January 1991 the WAK Plant was shut down. During operation iodine releases of the plant as well as the iodine distribution over the liquid and gaseous process streams had been determined. Most of the iodine is evolved into the dissolver off-gas in volatile form. The remainder is dispersed over many aqueous, organic and especially gaseous process and waste streams. After shut down of the plant in January 1991, iodine measurements in the off-gas streams have been continued up to now. Whereas the iodine-129 concentration in the dissolver off-gas dropped during six months after shutdown by three orders of magnitude, the iodine concentrations in the vessel ventilation system of the PUREX process and the cell vent system decreased only by a factor of 10 during the same period. Iodine-129 releases of the liquid high active waste storage tanks did not decrease distinctly. The removal efficiencies of the silver impregnated iodine filters in the different off-gas streams of the WAK plant depend on the iodine concentration in the off-gas. The reason of the observed dependence of the DF on the iodine-129 concentration might be due to the presence of organic iodine compounds which are difficult to remove. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Improvement on models associated with LOCA and loss of RHR accidents during shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W. P.; Chung, Y. J.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, K. D.; Lee, S. J.; Jung, J. J.; Ha, G. S.; Son, Y. S.; Chung, B. D.; Han, D. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Hwang, T. S.; Lee, S. Y.; Park, C. Y.; Choi, H. R.; Lee, S. Y.; Choi, J. H.; Ban, C. H.; Bae, G. H.

    1997-07-01

    The characteristics of the best estimate codes available in Korea have been studied through literature surveys for the reliability on LOCA analyses and then, a feasibility study on reduction of capacities of existing safety systems in YGN 3/4 have been carried out using the codes. Since it has been expected to adopt DVI + 4 -Train HPSI in the next generation reactor, the core uncoveries under one DVI line break and 6 cold leg break, which is a requirement for advance d reactor by EPRI, in addition to LBLOCA for reduction effect of SIT capacity, have been analyzed. Finally, an effort on finding the way how the system could be simplified, has been made through the analysis of SIT injection characteristics. On the other hand, the best estimate methodology consisting of uncertainties of the code itself, bias, and application have been developed first and quantification of the uncertainty has been made the case of KORI unit 3 afterward. The prediction capabilities of the best estimate codes and major physical models on the accident under loss of RHR during shutdown have been assessed suing the large scale experimental data delivered from France and then, the assessed codes have been used to provide essential data required for description of operation procedures in YGN 3/4. (author). 64 refs., 45 figs

  6. Reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    The reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) consists of a control rod system and a reserve shutdown system. During normal operation, reactivity is controlled by the control rod system, which consists of 32 control rods (16 pairs) and 16 control rod drive mechanisms except for the case when the center control rods are removed to perform an irradiation test. In an unlikely event that the control rods fail to be inserted, reserve shutdown system is provided to insert pellets of neutron-absorbing material into the core. Alloy 800H is chosen for the metallic parts of the control rods. Because the maximum temperature of the control rods reaches about 900 deg. C at reactor scrams, structural design guideline and design material data on Alloy 800H are needed for the high temperature design. The design guideline for the HTTR control rod is based on ASME Code Case N-47-21. Design material data is also determined and shown in this paper. Observing the guideline, temperature and stress analysis were conducted; it can be confirmed that the target life of the control rods of 5 years can be achieved. Various tests conducted for the control rod system and the reserve shutdown system are also described

  7. Developing desired future conditions with the landscape management system: A case study of the Gotchen Late Successional Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Mendez-Treneman; S. Hummel; G. Porterie; C. D. Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Changing public values have led to federal land management direction like the Northwest Forest Plan with major land allocations for late successional forest habitat. Restoration silviculture is a tool for maintaining optimum habitat despite risk of catastrophic disturbance due to the combined impact of fire, insects and disease. The Gotchen Late Successional Reserve (...

  8. A Feasibility Study of Sustainable Distributed Generation Technologies to Improve the electrical System on the Duck Valley Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman Atkins, Shoshone-Paiute; Mark Hannifan, New West Technologies

    2005-06-30

    A range of sustainable energy options were assessed for feasibility in addressing chronic electric grid reliability problems at Duck Valley IR. Wind power and building energy efficiency were determined to have the most merit, with the Duck Valley Tribes now well positioned to pursue large scale wind power development for on- and off-reservation sales.

  9. 76 FR 2085 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System; North Inlet-Winyah Bay, SC and San Francisco Bay, CA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... integration based on priority issues defined by the reserve. The objectives described in this plan address the... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Estuarine Research..., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of final...

  10. Shutdown dose rate analysis of European test blanket modules shields in ITER Equatorial Port #16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez, Rafael, E-mail: rjuarez@ind.uned.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sauvan, Patrick; Perez, Lucia [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Panayotov, Dobromir; Vallory, Joelle; Zmitko, Milan; Poitevin, Yves [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear analysis for European TBMs and shields, in ITER Equatorial Port #16, has been conducted in support of the ‘Concept Design Review’ from ITER. • The objective of the work is the characterization of the Shutdown Dose Rates at Equatorial Port #16 interspace. • The role played by the TBM and TBM shields, the equatorial port gaps and the vacuum vessel permeation, in terms of neutron flux transmission is assessed. • The role played by the TBM, TBM shields, Port Plug Frame, Pipe Forest and the machine in terms of activation is also investigated. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). An essential element of the Conceptual Design Review (CDR) of these TBSs is the demonstration of capability of Test Blanket Modules (TBM) and their shields to fulfil their function and comply with the design requirements. One of the TBM shields highly relevant design aspects is the project target for shutdown dose rates (SDDR) in the interspace. We investigated two functions of the TBMs and TBM shields—the neutron flux attenuation along the shields, and the reduction of the activation of the components contributing to SDDR. It is shown that TBMs and TBM shields reduce significantly the neutron flux in the port plug (PP). In terms of neutron flux attenuation, the TBM shield provides sufficient neutron flux reduction, being responsible for 5 × 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2} s at port interspace, while the EPP gaps and BSM gaps are responsible for 5 × 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} s each. When considering closed upper, lower and lateral neighbour equatorial ports (thus, excluding the cross-talk between ports), a SDDR of 121 μSv/h averaged near the port closure flange was obtained, out of which, only 4 μSv/h are due to the activation of TBMs and TBM shields. Maximum SDDR in the range

  11. Reliability of functioning and reserves of system, controlling movements with different coordination structure of special health group girl students in physical education process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Pryimakov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study reliability of functioning and reserves of system, controlling movements with different coordination structure of special health group girl students (low health level in physical education process. Material: in the research special health group girl students (n=136, age 17-19 participated. They were divided into 2 groups - control and experimental. The program, directed to increase reliability and reserves of system controlling movements, was realized. It was based on physical exercises of complicated coordination with novelty elements, which were fulfilled under musical accompaniment. The research continued one academic year. Results: in girl students with health problems we registered higher differential thresholds, when reproducing local movements in complicated conditions. They used visual and hearing feedback channels for informing brain’s programming areas about made mistakes. They were worse teachable in training accurate movements. These girl students have less expressed compensation reserves under impact of hindering factors and interferences. It can be interpreted as non-specific crisscross negative response to motor functional system in case of health problems. All these determine reduction of reserve potentials of motor control system. Conclusions: The main reserve potentials’ criteria of control over different coordination structure movements are: quickness of passing to program mechanism of fine movements’ regulation in stable conditions of functioning; power and effectiveness of compensatory reactions, ensuring interference immunity of system, controlling movements under interfering factors; reliability of maintaining movements’ qualitative parameters in optimal range under interfering factors; reduction of sensor interconnections in stable functioning conditions.

  12. Fuel Cooling in Absence of Forced Flow at Shutdown Condition with PHTS Partially Drained

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parasca, L.; Pecheanu, D.L., E-mail: laurentiu.parasca@cne.ro, E-mail: doru.pecheanu@cne.ro [Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Cernavoda (Romania)

    2014-09-15

    During the plant outage for maintenance on primary side (e.g. for the main Heat Transport System pumps maintenance, the Steam Generators inspection), there are situations which require the primary heat transport system (HTS) drainage to a certain level for opening the circuit. The primary fuel heat sink for this configuration is provided by the shutdown cooling system (SDCS). In case of losing the forced cooling (e.g. due to the loss of SDCS, design basis earthquake-DBE), flow conditions in the reactor core may become stagnant. Inside the fuel channels, natural circulation phenomena known as Intermittent Buoyancy Induced Flow (IBIF) will initiate, providing an alternate heat sink mechanism for the fuel. However, this heat sink is effective only for a limited period of time (recall time). The recall time is defined as the elapsed time until the water temperature in the HTS headers exceeds a certain limit. Until then, compensatory measures need to be taken (e.g. by re-establishing the forced flow or initiate Emergency Core Cooling system injection) to preclude fuel failures. The present paper briefly presents the results of an analysis performed to demonstrate that fuel temperature remains within acceptable limits during IBIF transient. One of the objectives of this analysis was to determine the earliest moment since the reactor shut down when maintenance activities on the HTS can be started such that IBIF is effective in case of losing the forced circulation. The resulting peak fuel sheath and pressure tube temperatures due to fuel heat up shall be within the acceptable limits to preclude fuel defect or fuel channel defects.Thermalhydraulic circuit conditions were obtained using a CATHENA model for the primary side of HTS (drained to a certain level), an ECC system model and a system model for SDCS. A single channel model was developed in GOTHIC code for the fuel assessment analysis. (author)

  13. Evaluation of power behavior during startup and shutdown procedures of the IPR-R1 Triga Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangirolami, Dante M.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Ferreira, Andrea V.

    2009-01-01

    The IPR-R1 nuclear reactor of Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN/CNEN is a TRIGA Mark I pool type reactor cooled by natural circulation of light water. In the IPR-R1, the power is measured by four nuclear channels, neutron-sensitive chambers, which are mounted around the reactor core: the Startup Channel for power indication during reactor startup; the Logarithmic Wide Range Power Monitoring Channel; the Linear Multi-Range Power Monitoring Channel and the Percent Power Safety Channel. A data acquisition system automatically does the monitoring and storage of all the reactor operational parameters including the reactor power. The startup procedure is manual and the time to reach the desired reactor power level is different on each irradiation which may introduces differences in induced activity of samples irradiated in different irradiations. In this work, the power evolution during startup and shutdown periods of IPR-R1 operation was evaluated and the mean values of reactor energy production in these operational phases were obtained. The analyses were performed on basis of the Linear Multi-Range Channel data. The results show that the sum of startup and shutdown periods corresponds to 1% of released energy for irradiations during 1h at 100kW. This value may be useful to correct experimental data in neutron activation experiments. (author)

  14. A methodology for Level 2 PSA evaluation with consideration of specific features for Low Power Shutdown Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Gab; Seok, Ho [KEPCO-ENC, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The primary objective of the Level 2 PSA during Lower Power/Shutdown (LPSD) operation is to provide insights into potential plant vulnerabilities with regard to accident progression. The shutdown risk information can be used to provide the information to develop outage risk management guidelines. The LPSD Level 2 analysis utilizes much of the at-power Level 2 analysis for bounding, conservative treatment of severe accident phenomena. But, for some portions of the analysis including Plant Operational States (POSs), LPSD-specific evaluations such as UPC related to the containment Equipment Hatch (E/H) with 4 bolts, Reactor Coolant System (RCS) Not Intact for severe accident phenomena are desired for realistic evaluation. All POSs are evaluated for their Large Release Frequency (LRF). Some POSs are evaluated conservatively utilizing the at-power models, and other POSs are evaluated in specific analysis. The overall LPSD Level 2 model is evaluated. If the containment E/H and one of the two doors on each of the personal air locks are closed as containment is operable at reduced RCS inventory operation, LRF is expected to be less than 10% of LPSD CDF.

  15. MCR2S unstructured mesh capabilities for use in shutdown dose rate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eade, T.; Stonell, D.; Turner, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Advancements in shutdown dose rate calculations will be needed as fusion moves from experimental reactors to full scale demonstration reactors in order to ensure the safety of personnel. • The MCR2S shutdown dose rate tool has been modified to allow shutdown dose rates calculations using an unstructured mesh. • The unstructured mesh capability of MCR2S was used on three shutdown dose rate models, a simple sphere, the ITER computational benchmark and the DEMO computational benchmark. • The results showed a reasonable agreement between an unstructured mesh approach and the CSG approach and highlighted the need to carefully choose the unstructured mesh resolution. - Abstract: As nuclear fusion progresses towards a sustainable energy source and the power of tokamak devices increases, a greater understanding of the radiation fields will be required. As well as on-load radiation fields, off-load or shutdown radiation field are an important consideration for the safety and economic viability of a commercial fusion reactor. Previously codes such as MCR2S have been written in order to predict the shutdown dose rates within, and in regions surrounding, a fusion reactor. MCR2S utilises a constructive solid geometry (CSG) model and a superimposed structured mesh to calculate 3-D maps of the shutdown dose rate. A new approach to MCR2S calculations is proposed and implemented using a single unstructured mesh to replace both the CSG model and the superimposed structured mesh. This new MCR2S approach has been demonstrated on three models of increasing complexity. These models were: a sphere, the ITER computational shutdown dose rate benchmark and the DEMO computational shutdown dose rate benchmark. In each case the results were compared to MCR2S calculations performed using MCR2S with CSG geometry and a superimposed structured mesh. It was concluded that the results from the unstructured mesh implementation of MCR2S compared well to the CSG structured mesh

  16. Fire protection of safe shutdown capability at commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, K.

    1993-01-01

    The comprehensive industrial safety standards and codes that exist today have evolved from lessons learned through past experience, research results, and improvements in technological capabilities. The current requirements for fire safety features of commercial nuclear power stations operated in the U.S. are a notable example of this practice. Although fire protection has always been an important design requirement, from the aftermath of a serious fire that occurred in 1975 at the Browns Ferry plant, it was learned that the life safety and property protection concerns of the major fire insurance underwriters may not sufficiently encompass nuclear safety issues, particularly with regard to the potential for fire damage to result in the common mode failure of redundant trains of systems, and composites important to the safe shutdown of the reactor. Following its investigations into the Browns Ferry fire, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) promulgated guidance documents, which ultimately developed into mandatory regulations, necessary to assure the implementation of a fire protection program that would address nuclear safety concerns. The new criteria that evolved, contain prescriptive design features, as well as personnel and administrative requirements the Commission determined to be necessary to provide a defense-in-depth level of protection against the hazards of fire and its associated effects on safety related equipment. These criteria are primarily contained in Appendix R of Title 10 to the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50)

  17. Development of Start-up and Shutdown Procedure for the HANARO Fuel Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. K.; Sim, B. S.; Chi, D. Y.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, C. Y.; Ahn, S. H.

    2009-06-01

    A start-up and shutdown procedure for the HANARO fuel test loop has been developed. This is a facility for fuel and material irradiation tests. The facility provides experimental conditions similar to the normal operational pressures and temperatures of commercial PWR and CANDU plants. The normal operation modes of the HANARO fuel test loop are classified into loop shutdown, cold stand-by 1, cold stand-by 2, hot stand-by, and hot operation. The operation modes depend on the fission power of test fuels and the coolant temperature at the inlet of the in-pile test section. The HANARO must maintain a shutdown mode if the HANARO fuel test loop is loop shutdown, cold stand-by 1, cold stand-by 2, or hot stand-by. As the HANARO becomes power operation mode, the operation mode of the HANARO fuel test loop comes to hot operation from hot stand-by. The procedure for the HANARO fuel test loop consists of four main parts such as check of initial conditions, stat-up operation procedure, shutdown operation procedure, and check lists for operations. Several hot test operations ensure that the procedure is appropriate

  18. A Study on Fire Ignition Frequency of UCN 3 during Shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kilyoo; Kang, DaeIl; Jang, Seung-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    A fire ignition frequency of UCN 3 during shutdown, i.e., during POS 3, 4, 5, 6 was calculated by using the new fire PSA method suggested in NUREG/CR-7114. As the fire ignition frequency during full power is calculated by the fixed ignition source and the transient ignition source, the one during shutdown is also calculated by the fixed and the transient ignition source. Since the fixed ignition source was already verified through the walkdown although the walkdown is for the fixed ignition source during full power, additional walkdown for the one during shutdown is not necessary. In the paper, how the fire ignition frequency of UCN 3 during shutdown was calculated is described. A fire ignition frequency of UCN 3 during shutdown, i.e., during POS 3, 4, 5, 6 was calculated by using the new fire PSA method suggested in NUREG/CR-7114. We make the transient ignition fire frequency of each BIN vary according to the daily work order of each POS

  19. Training simulator for advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) shutdown sequence equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankland, J.P.; Nixon, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    Successful shutdown of nuclear plant is of prime importance for both safety and economic reasons and large sums of money are spent on equipment to make shutdowns fully automatic, thus removing the possibility of operator errors. While this aim can largely be realized, one must consider the possibility of automatic equipment or plant failures when operators are required to take manual action, and off-line training facilities should be available to operating staff to minimize the risk of incorrect actions being taken. This paper presents the practice adopted at Hunterston 'B' Nuclear Power Station to solve this problem and concerns the computer-based training simulator for the Reactor Shutdown Sequence Equipment (RSSE) which was commissioned in January 1977. The plant associated with shutdown is briefly described and the reasoning which shows the need for a simulator is outlined. The paper also gives details of the comprehensive facilities available on the simulator and goes on to describe the form that shutdown training takes and the experience gained at this time. (author)

  20. A Multi-Period Optimization Model for Service Providers Using Online Reservation Systems: An Application to Hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Jiao, Yan; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-period optimization model for high margin and zero salvage products in online distribution channels with classifying customers based on number of products required. Taking hotel customers as an example, one is regular customers who reserve rooms for one day, and the other is long term stay (LTS) customers who reserve rooms for a number of days. LTS may guarantee a specific amount of demand and generate opportunity income for a certain number of periods, meanwhile with risk of punishment incurred by overselling. By developing an operational optimization model and exploring the effects of parameters on optimal decisions, we suggest that service providers should make decisions based on the types of customers, number of products required, and duration of multi-period to reduce the loss of reputation and obtain more profit; at the same time, multi-period buying customers should buy products early. Finally, the paper conducts a numerical experiment, and the results are consistent with prevailing situations.

  1. A Multi-Period Optimization Model for Service Providers Using Online Reservation Systems: An Application to Hotels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Jiao, Yan; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-period optimization model for high margin and zero salvage products in online distribution channels with classifying customers based on number of products required. Taking hotel customers as an example, one is regular customers who reserve rooms for one day, and the other is long term stay (LTS) customers who reserve rooms for a number of days. LTS may guarantee a specific amount of demand and generate opportunity income for a certain number of periods, meanwhile with risk of punishment incurred by overselling. By developing an operational optimization model and exploring the effects of parameters on optimal decisions, we suggest that service providers should make decisions based on the types of customers, number of products required, and duration of multi-period to reduce the loss of reputation and obtain more profit; at the same time, multi-period buying customers should buy products early. Finally, the paper conducts a numerical experiment, and the results are consistent with prevailing situations. PMID:26147663

  2. Analysis of activation and shutdown contact dose rate for EAST neutral beam port

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuqing; Wang, Ji; Zhong, Guoqiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinfang; Xie, Yahong; Wu, Bin; Hu, Chundong

    2017-12-01

    For the safe operation and maintenance of neutral beam injector (NBI), specific activity and shutdown contact dose rate of the sample material SS316 are estimated around the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) neutral beam port. Firstly, the neutron emission intensity is calculated by TRANSP code while the neutral beam is co-injected to EAST. Secondly, the neutron activation and shutdown contact dose rates for the neutral beam sample materials SS316 are derived by the Monte Carlo code MCNP and the inventory code FISPACT-2007. The simulations indicate that the primary radioactive nuclides of SS316 are 58Co and 54Mn. The peak contact dose rate is 8.52 × 10-6 Sv/h after EAST shutdown one second. That is under the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design values 1 × 10-5 Sv/h.

  3. Human Reliability Analysis. Applicability of the HRA-concept in maintenance shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenius, Aino

    2007-08-01

    Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) is performed for Swedish nuclear power plants in order to make predictions and improvements of system safety. The analysis of the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents contributed to broaden the approach to nuclear power plant safety. A system perspective focusing on the interaction between aspects of Man, Technology and Organization (MTO) emerged in addition to the development of Human Factors knowledge. To take the human influence on the technical system into consideration when performing PSAs, a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is performed. PSA is performed for different stages and plant operating states, and the current state of Swedish analyses is Low power and Shutdown (LPSD), also called Shutdown PSA (SPSA). The purpose of this master's thesis is to describe methods and basic models used when analysing human reliability for the LPSD state. The following questions are at issue: 1. How can the LPSD state be characterised and defined? 2. What is important to take into consideration when performing a LPSD HRA? 3. How can human behaviour be modelled for a LPSD risk analysis? 4. According to available empirical material, how are the questions above treated in performed analysis of human operation during LPSD? 5. How does the result of the questions above affect the way methods for analysis of LPSD could and/or should be developed? The procedure of this project has mainly consisted of literature studies of available theory for modelling of human behaviour and risk analysis of the LPSD state. This study regards analysis of planned outages when maintenance, fuel change, tests and inspections are performed. The outage period is characterised by planned maintenance activities performed in rotating 3-shifts, around the clock, as well as many of the persons performing work tasks on the plant being external contractors. The working conditions are characterised by stress due to heat, radiation and physically demanding or monotonous

  4. Application of Systems Engineering to U.S. Department of Energy Privatization Project Selection at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layman, John Scott

    1999-01-01

    The privatization efforts at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Nuclear Reservation have been very successful primarily due to a disciplined process for project selection and execution. Early in the development of Privatization at Hanford, the Department of Energy determined that a disciplined alternatives generation and analysis (AGA) process would furnish the candidate projects with the best probability for success. Many factors had to be considered in the selection of projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company was assigned to develop this process and facilitate the selection of the first round of candidate privatization projects. Team members for the AGA process were assembled from all concerned organizations and skill groups. Among the selection criteria were legal, financial and technical considerations which had to be weighed

  5. Impacts of reactivity feedback uncertainties on inherent shutdown in innovative designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of inherent shutdown is emphasized in the approach to the design of innovative, small pool-type liquid-metal reactors (LMRs). This paper reports an evaluation of reactivity feedback uncertainties used in the analyses of anticipated transients without scram for innovative LMRs, and the associated impacts on safety margins and inherent shutdown success probabilities on unprotected loss-of-flow (LOF) events. It then assesses the ultimate importance of these uncertainties on LOF and transient overpower events in evolving metal and oxide innovative designs

  6. Dynamic Analysis of a Floating Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Under Emergency Shutdown Using Hydrodynamic Brake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, K.; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, T.

    2014-01-01

    Emergency shutdown is always a challenge for an operating vertical axis wind turbine. A 5-MW vertical axis wind turbine with a Darrieus rotor mounted on a semi-submersible support structure was examined in this study. Coupled non-linear aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulations of the floating vertical...... axis wind turbine were carried out for emergency shutdown cases over a range of environmental conditions based on correlated wind and wave data. When generator failure happens, a brake should be applied to stop the acceleration of the rotor to prevent the rotor from overspeeding and subsequent disaster...

  7. Causes of extended shutdown state of 'RA' research reactor in Vinca Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Kolundzija, V.; Ljubenov, V.; Cupac, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the causes and reasons for extended shutdown state of RA research reactor in the 'Vinca' Institute of Nuclear Sciences. Technical and legal matters that led to decision to stop RA reactor operation in 1984 and further problems related to maintenance and preparation for continuation of operation are given. Influence of nuclear policy of Yugoslav government and the 'Vinca' Institute at prolongation of the reactor shutdown state, as consequence of changing of nuclear programme in the country and the world are discussed and underlined. An overview of the legislation in the field of nuclear safety and regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Yugoslavia is presented. (author)

  8. Impact of shutdown risk on risk-based assessment of technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deriot, S.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the current work performed by the Research and Development Division of EDF concerning risk-based assessment of Operating Technical Specifications (OTS). The current risk-based assessment of OTS at EDF is presented. Then, the level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment of unit 3 of the Paluel nuclear power station (called PSA 1300) is described. It is fully computerized and takes into account the risk in shutdown states. A case study is presented. It shows that the fact of considering shutdown risk suggests that the current OTS should be modified

  9. Impacts of reactivity feedback uncertainties on inherent shutdown in innovative designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of ''inherent shutdown'' is emphasized in the approach to the design of innovative, small pool-type liquid metal reactors (LMRs). This paper reports an evaluation of reactivity feedback uncertainties used in the analyses of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) for innovative LMRs, and the associated impacts on safety margins and inherent shutdown success probabilities on unprotected loss-of-flow (LOF) events. It then assesses the ultimate importance of these uncertainties on LOF and transient overpower (TOP) events in evolving metal and oxide innovative designs

  10. A loss-of -RHR event under the various plant configurations in low power or shutdown conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seul, Kwang Won; Bang, Young Seok; Lee, Suk Ho; Kim, Hho Jung

    1997-01-01

    A present study addresses a loss-of-RHR event as an initiating event under specific low power of shutdown conditions. Two typical plant configurations, cold leg opening case with water-filled steam generators and pressurizer opening case with emptied steam generators, were evaluated using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code. The calculation was compared with the experiment conducted at ROSA-IV/LSTF in Japan. As a result, the code was capable of simulating the system transient behavior following the event. Especially, thermal hydraulic transport processes including non-condensable gas behavior were reasonably predicted with an appropriate time step and CPU time. However, there were some code deficiencies such as too large system mass errors and severe flow oscillations in core region

  11. Water quality, meteorological, and nutrient data collected by the the National Estuarine Research Reserve System's System-wide Monitoring Program (NERRS SWMP) from January 1, 1995 to August 1, 2011 (NODC Accession 0052765)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Estuarine Research Reserve System's System-wide Monitoring Program (NERRS SWMP) collected water quality, meteorological, and nutrient data in 26...

  12. Knowledge-based time management in the planning of plant shut-downs; WISENT: Wissensbasiertes Zeitmanagement bei der Planung von Anlagenstillstaenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verweyen-Frank, H.

    1996-12-31

    At STEAG of Essen, an operator of hard-coal-fired power stations, the WISENT system distributes the necessary shut-down times in order to permit precautionary maintenance work to be carried out. This expert system, developed in cooperation with the company ALBIT, has a particular trait. It is not only based on ``if``-statements, as is typical of expert systems, but makes use also of fuzzy methods in order to optimize overall distribution. In other words, this system is the first to add to the strict yes-or-no logic a weighting component for each criterion of optimization. (orig.)

  13. State adaptation reserves cardiorespiratory system first-year students with varying degrees of physical fitness in terms of treadmill test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Levchenko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to examine the state of the cardiorespiratory system in terms of the stress test in first-year students with different levels of fitness. Material : the study involved 43 students, of which 18 boys and 25devushek basic medical group. The study used a treadmill, a pulse oximeter, spirometer. Results : more adjustment disorders were detected in students that are not involved in physical education at school. Decreased ability of the cardiorespiratory system to maintain proper oxygen supply of the organism in the stress test. This is not observed in students who were attending school in addition sports clubs. Found that students with low tolerance to physical exercise need a separate program of physical training, the dynamic control of the teachers and the need for additional medical examination. Conclusions : the treadmill test is an ideal way of revealing hidden maladjustment cardiorespiratory system in adolescence.

  14. Development of Information and Knowledge Architectures and an Associated Framework and Methodology for System Management of a Global Reserve Currency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardullo, Mario W.

    2013-01-01

    The global financial system appears to be heading for a major financial crisis. This crisis is being driven by a growing global debt. This crisis is not limited to nations that are heavily in debt such as Greece, Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Italy or Cyprus but to such others as the United States. While there has been a great deal of emphasis on…

  15. Medical surveillance of nuclear power plant workers during reactor shutdown using whole-body counting and excretion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux-Desmis, C.

    1987-01-01

    After a review of radioactivity basis and radiation protection principles, the various aspects of medical surveillance of nuclear power plant workers during reactor shutdown, are presented. Internal contamination incidents that happened during 1986-1987 shutdown of Paluel reactor are exposed. Internal contamination levels are evaluated using whole-body counting and radionuclide determination in feces and urine and compared with dose limits [fr

  16. 78 FR 60260 - Order of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Relating to the Continuation, Shutdown, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ..., cyber security incidents or financial emergencies throughout a lapse in appropriations. C. Extension of...) price discovery; (4) sound risk management practices; and (5) other public interest considerations. The... malfunctions, cyber-security incidents, and financial emergencies shall continue during a shutdown. The...

  17. Estimation of shutdown heat generation rates in GHARR-1 due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fission products decay power and residual fission power generated after shutdown of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) by reactivity insertion accident were estimated by solution of the decay and residual heat equations. A Matlab program code was developed to simulate the heat generation rates by fission product ...

  18. 77 FR 72294 - Reconsideration of Certain New Source and Startup/Shutdown Issues: National Emission Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 60 and 63 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2009-0234; EPA-HQ-OAR-2011-0044; FRL-9733-2] RIN 2060-AR62 Reconsideration of Certain New Source and Startup/Shutdown Issues: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2120 - What happens during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens during periods of startup... 1, 2001 Emission Limitations and Operating Limits § 60.2120 What happens during periods of startup... during CISWI unit startups, shutdowns, or malfunctions. (b) Each malfunction must last no longer than 3...

  20. 78 FR 38001 - Reconsideration of Certain Startup/Shutdown Issues: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ..., FRL-9827-1] RIN 2060-AR62 Reconsideration of Certain Startup/Shutdown Issues: National Emission... published in the Federal Register the proposed rule, ``Reconsideration of Certain New Source and Startup....'' That proposal opened for reconsideration certain issues, including those related to startup and...