WorldWideScience

Sample records for researching career academies

  1. Planning Guide for Career Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, Charles

    2010-01-01

    A career academy is a small learning community within a high school, which selects a subset of students and teachers for a two-, three-, or four-year period. Students enter through a voluntary process; they must apply and be accepted, with parental knowledge and support. A career academy involves teachers from different subjects working together…

  2. Career Advancement, Career Enhancement, and Personal Growth of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy Graduate Program Alumni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Ruth I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was two-fold: (a) to explore and describe the perceived impact of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy (ELA) on 2003-2006 ELA graduates' career advancement, career enhancement, and personal growth; and (b) to obtain ELA graduates' suggestions for ELA program improvement to better prepare…

  3. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2013-11-30

    Nov 30, 2013 ... Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for. Students and Teachers – 2014. Sponspored by. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi. The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad. The three national science academies offer ...

  4. Enhancing international collaboration among early-career researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jennifer K; Albada, Akke; Farahani, Mansoureh; Lithner, Maria; Neumann, Melanie; Sandhu, Harbinder; Shepherd, Heather L

    2010-01-01

    Objective The European Association of Communication in Healthcare (EACH) Early Career Researchers Network (ECRN) aims are to (1) promote international collaboration among young investigators and (2) provide a support network for future innovative communication research projects. In October 2009, Miami, USA at a workshop facilitated by the ECRN at the International Conference on Communication in Healthcare (ICCH) hosted by the American Academy of Communication in Healthcare we explored common facilitators and challenges faced by early career researchers in health communication research. Methods Attendees introduced themselves, their research area(s) of interest, and listed one facilitator and one barrier for their career development. EACH ECRN members then led a discussion of facilitators and challenges encountered in communication research projects and career development. We discussed potential collaboration opportunities, future goals, and activities. Results Having supportive collegial relationships, institutional support, job security, and funding are critical facilitators for early career investigators. Key challenges include difficulty with time management and prioritizing, limited resources, and contacts. Conclusion International collaboration among early career researchers is a feasible and effective means to address important challenges, by increasing opportunities for professional support and networking, problem-solving, discussion of data, and ultimately publishing. Practice Implications Future AACH-EACH Early Career Researcher Networks should continue to build collaborations by developing shared research projects, papers, and other scholarly products. PMID:20663630

  5. Training early career researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Ayris, Paul; Labastida i Juan, Ignasi, 1970-

    2017-01-01

    Research – blue sky and applied – is fundamental to the mission of research-intensive universities. As such, it is enunciated in the Mission Statements of such institutions. The University of Barcelona for example, a research-intensive university in the Catalan region, states that ‘The University of Barcelona is a public institution committed to the environment, whose mission is to provide a quality public service of higher education primarily through the study, teaching, research...

  6. ARDENT ignites research careers

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The ARDENT (Advanced Radiation Dosimetry European Network Training) project passed its mid-term review exercise with flying colours. At the recent workshop at the Politecnico of Milan, the ARDENT researchers again took full advantage of the networking and training opportunities offered by the project.   “The EU officer and the accompanying expert from the Norwegian Research Council congratulated us on the work done and the progress we are making with the programme,” says CERN’s Marco Silari, ARDENT scientist-in-charge. “All the researchers involved in ARDENT presented their work and we were able to confirm that we are keeping on schedule and delivering the expected results. In some cases, the research programme has even been extended to include new research developments.” An example is the GEMPIX detector, a sensor for radiation detection that uses a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) gaseous detector with a MediPix read-out system. “GEM...

  7. Trends in Career and Technical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Asunda, Paul; Kim, Soo Jung

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to identify current trends and issues in research focusing on career and technical education (CTE). The primary sources of literature for this review included all research articles published in three refereed scholarly journals--"Career and Technical Education Research," "Journal of Career and Technical…

  8. The CSI Academy: Encouraging Diverse Students to Consider Science Careers and Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Karen; Turner, John F.; Emigh, James

    2011-01-01

    The CSI academies employed a multi-layered, collaborative approach to encourage diverse students to consider STEM careers, including science teaching. The academies recruited a diverse group of high school students. This was due, in large part, to the creation of a unique selection process that identified students with unrealized potential. The…

  9. Careers research in Europe: Identity and contribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khapova, S.N.; Vinkenburg, C.J.; Arnold, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This guest editorial introduces the special section of the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology 'Careers research in Europe'. Contributing to the aim of the special section to highlight the value of the European careers research for the benefit of the global community of career

  10. Research Institute for Technical Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Ronald L.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA research grant to Wilberforce University enabled us to establish the Research Institute for Technical Careers (RITC) in order to improve the teaching of science and engineering at Wilberforce. The major components of the research grant are infrastructure development, establishment of the Wilberforce Intensive Summer Experience (WISE), and Joint Research Collaborations with NASA Scientists. (A) Infrastructure Development. The NASA grant has enabled us to improve the standard of our chemistry laboratory and establish the electronics, design, and robotics laboratories. These laboratories have significantly improved the level of instruction at Wilberforce University. (B) Wilberforce Intensive Summer Experience (WISE). The WISE program is a science and engineering bridge program for prefreshman students. It is an intensive academic experience designed to strengthen students' knowledge in mathematics, science, engineering, computing skills, and writing. (C) Joint Collaboration. Another feature of the grant is research collaborations between NASA Scientists and Wilberforce University Scientists. These collaborations have enabled our faculty and students to conduct research at NASA Lewis during the summer and publish research findings in various journals and scientific proceedings.

  11. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 11. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for Students and Teachers - 2018. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 11 November 2017 pp 1100-1100 ...

  12. Research Needs: Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosloski, Michael F., Jr.; Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Research is an important component of each professional field. This study sought to determine topics that needed further research in the school subjects known as career and technical education. It determined topics that needed to be researched related to high school career and technical education (CTE) and the preparation for teaching CTE in…

  13. Faculty for the Engaged Campus: Advancing Community-Engaged Careers in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifer, Sarena D.; Blanchard, Lynn W.; Jordan, Catherine; Gelmon, Sherril; McGinley, Piper

    2012-01-01

    Community-Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH) is a national membership organization that promotes health equity and social justice through partnerships between communities and higher education institutions. In response to faculty concerns about the institutional barriers to community-engaged careers in the academy, CCPH embarked on a series of…

  14. Creating a Comprehensive School Reform Model: The Talent Development High School with Career Academies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Will J.; McPartland, James M.; Legters, Nettie E.; Balfanz, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need for comprehensive reforms in school organization, curriculum and instruction, and professional development to address the problems of large urban high schools. Describes the Talent Development High School with Career Academies model being developed to meet the needs of such schools. (SLD)

  15. Career pathways in research: support and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkre, J E; Foxcroft, D R

    This article, the third in the series on career pathways, highlights support and management careers open to nurses working in the NHS and research and development, or people working for funding bodies or charitable organisations. These roles involve ensuring that the right infrastructure is in place to support research projects, and the correct decisions are made about which research projects should be supported and commissioned.

  16. Achieving equity through critical science agency: An ethnographic study of African American students in a health science career academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun-Frank, Julie

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of a High School Health Science Career Academy to support African American students' science career trajectories. I used three key theoretical tools---critical science agency (Basu, 2007; Calabrese Barton & Tan, 2008), power (Nespor, 1994), and cultural production (Carlone, 2004; Eisenhart & Finkel, 1998) to highlight the intersections between the career trajectory implied by the Academy (its curriculum, classroom activities, and clinical experiences) and the students' pursued career trajectories. Data was collected over five months and included individual student interviews, group interviews, parent and administrator interviews, field notes from a culminating medical course and clinical internship, and Academy recruitment documents. The results of this study suggest that participants pursued a health science career for altruistic purposes and the Academy was a resource they drew upon to do so. However, the meanings of science and science person implied by the Academy hindered the possibility for many participants' to advance their science career trajectories. While the Academy promised to expose students to a variety of high-status health care roles, they were funneled into feminine, entry-level positions. This study adds to previous underrepresentation literature by contextualizing how identity-related factors influence African American students' career attainment.

  17. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  18. Practice and Research in Career Counseling and Development--2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, Marie F. Shoffner

    2011-01-01

    This review of the 2010 career counseling and development research presents the breadth and depth of topics published in the field ranging from children's conceptions of career to employee burnout. The review covers topics in the career literature on professional issues, career theory and concepts, career development, the world of work, career…

  19. Making It Happen: How Career Academies Can Build College and Career Exploration Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visher, Mary G.; Altuna, Jacklyn N.; Safran, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The phrase "preparing students for college and career" has become so ubiquitous that it has become almost a mantra in educators' discourse in recent years. Whether mentioned in the Common Core State Standards, in the mission statements of high schools, or in political campaigns, improving the college and career readiness of young people…

  20. Urban Teacher Academy Project Toolkit: A Guide to Developing High School Teaching Career Academies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrigan, Anne; Schwartz, Shirley

    There is an urgent need not only to attract more people into the teaching profession but also to build a more diverse, highly qualified, and culturally sensitive teaching force that can meet the needs of a rapidly changing school-age population. This Toolkit takes best practices from high school teacher academies around the United States and…

  1. Chemistry without Borders: Careers, Research, and Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book is based on two symposia of the American Chemical Society (ACS): 1) “The Transnational Practice of Chemistry and Allied Sciences and Engineering: Study, Research and Careers without Borders” held at the Spring National Meeting in Denver in March 2015, and 2) “International Entrepreneurship...

  2. 100 years of applied psychology research on individual careers: From career management to retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Wanberg, Connie R

    2017-03-01

    This article surveys 100 years of research on career management and retirement, with a primary focus on work published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. Research on career management took off in the 1920s, with most attention devoted to the development and validation of career interest inventories. Over time, research expanded to attend to broader issues such as the predictors and outcomes of career interests and choice; the nature of career success and who achieves it; career transitions and adaptability to change; retirement decision making and adjustment; and bridge employment. In this article, we provide a timeline for the evolution of the career management and retirement literature, review major theoretical perspectives and findings on career management and retirement, and discuss important future research directions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Career Insight | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian journals like Current Science, Indian Journal of Medical Research provide ... Dept. of Science & Technology provides scholarships to Women Scientists and ... An article published in "The Guardian" on 10 best unsung female scientists.

  4. Perception of research and predictors of research career: a study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Acquisition of research experience by medical students is associated with good research pathway at the postgraduate level and also in the pursuit of a research career. Also, it assists the physician to make evidence based decisions in clinical practice. Objectives: Aim of study was to determine the perception of ...

  5. Developing research career indicators using open data: the RISIS infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cañibano, C.; Woolley, R.; Iversen, E.; Hinze, S.; Hornbostel, S.; Tesch, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces the research infrastructure for rsearch and innovation policy studies (RISIS) and its ongoing work on the development of indicators for research careers. The paper first describes the rationale for developing an information system on research careers. It then uses and example to demonstratate the possibilities arising from aggregating open data from different datasets within the RISIS platform to create new information and monitoring possibilies with regard to research careers. (Author)

  6. Is Mixed Methods Research Used in Australian Career Development Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Roslyn

    2010-01-01

    Mixed methods research has become a substantive and growing methodological force that is growing in popularity within the human and social sciences. This article reports the findings of a study that has systematically reviewed articles from the "Australian Journal of Career Development" from 2004 to 2009. The aim of the study was to…

  7. Qualitative Research in Career Development: Exploring the Center and Margins of Discourse About Careers and Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustein, David L.; Kenna, Alexandra C.; Murphy, Kerri A.; DeVoy, Julia E.; DeWine, David B.

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the contributions of qualitative research to the study of career development and the psychology of working. Epistemological perspectives (logical positivism, postpositivism, and social constructionism) are discussed as they relate to historical context, career theories, and the various methods used within qualitative…

  8. Promoting sustainable excellence through diversity in research careers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Dr. Vinkenburg, Claartje; Guinot, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Excellence is a non-negotiable in science, a necessary condition for a successful careers as well as the funding of research projects. Scientific excellence is the sole criterion used by the European Research Council (ERC) to award frontier research grants. However, statistics show that there are still persistent inequalities between men and women scientists in ERC funding success as well as other career outcomes. Dr. Claartje Vinkenburg, of the VU University of Amsterdam, will illustrate two projects commissioned by the ERC Gender Balance Working Group to uncover and address this phenomenon. The first project [ERCAREER (Vinkenburg PI, 2012-2014)] is about unconventional careers and career breaks, and studies the gendered nature of career paths of ERC applicants. Findings show that “conventional careers” in science are inextricably tied to normative beliefs about the ideal academic, mobility, independence, and excellence. Allowing unconventional careers to address the issue results in ir...

  9. Research on English course based on career planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available For the current higher vocational English education way, this paper researches English course on the basis of the need of English competence in career planning, and determines four main objectives to be accomplished in English teaching through the research of the need of English in career planning, and establishes the principle of course design. This paper proposes four kinds of teaching mode according to the career development and career demands, and establishes the hierarchical analysis structure on the basis of the teaching objectives as criteria, analyzes the weight of four objectives, and gives out the quantifiable results for matching with the teaching programs. The results show that, the way of theory and practice education is the most effective, and the academic language competence in career planning is the most important demand. The optimization ratio of English course teaching way based on career planning is 0.26: 0.29: 0.22: 0.23.

  10. The Effect of the Involvement within Career Academies by Elective Participation of Eleventh and Twelfth Grade High School Students during the Implementation Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of elective participation in one of three implementation year Career Academies, Education, Entrepreneurship, or Finance, on upper-class high school academic grades, Grade Point Average, and school academy participation measures. Significance of the junior and senior year of high school, the…

  11. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2015-09-10

    Sep 10, 2015 ... A copy of the application format, instructions to applicants including eligibility criteria, and a list of names of scientists/faculty who have consented to guide students/ teachers to work on short-term projects is displayed at the websites of the Academies [www.ias.ac.in; www.insaindia.org and www.nasi.org.in].

  12. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    students/teachers (studying/teaching in India) to work with scientists associated with the three. Academies during 2015. A copy of the ... about 150¯250 words) as to what the applicant wants to learn and achieve; (c) the guide with whom the applicant would like to work. ... 10 September 2014. Professor K.L. Sebastian.

  13. Project-Based Learning in a STEM Academy: Student Engagement and Interest in STEM Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misher, Pamela Henry

    This case study explored the utilization of project-based learning (PBL) and how it affected student engagement and interest in STEM careers. Sixty-seven students and nine teachers participated in this case study. Three research questions addressed student engagement, perceptions, and challenges during PBL implementation. This study was designed to understand the experiences teachers and students had when they participated in a PBL environment. This research investigated how to develop a globally skilled workforce utilizing a PBL approach and the challenges teachers encountered during implementation. The survey data and informal focus-group sessions with staff and students were utilized, analyzed, and summarized in order to obtain insight on perceptions, challenges, and implementation of PBL. PBL is an instructional approach that was designed to encourage more engaged learning. This approach was built upon realistic learning activities that stimulated student interest and motivation. This research discovered that PBL did teach content and 21st century skills as students worked collaboratively toward a common goal while responding to a question or problem. This study revealed that rigorous projects were carefully planned to aid students in learning important academic content. This study displayed how PBL allowed students to reflect on their projects and ideas with the opportunity to voice their decisions and findings. This instructional approach provided opportunities for students to investigate and strengthen interest in future STEM careers. The driving force of America's future economy and maintaining the competitive edge will be through more innovation, mainly derived from advances in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) careers. As business and industry leaders stressed the importance of improving STEM education, there continued to be a need to better prepare students to fill STEM-related careers. This research adds to the current body of research

  14. Who Participates in High School Career Academies? A Descriptive Analysis of Six-Year Enrollment Trends in a Southeastern School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, E. Daniel; Hernández-Gantes, Victor; Fletcher, Edward C., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    In response to increasing high school graduation requirements along with emerging skills in the workforce, the focus of career academies has evolved from one of keeping students enrolled in high school through graduation to a more robust preparation for college and careers for all students. This new focus may have resulted in a demographic shift…

  15. The Meaning of Career Success among Job-Hopper in The Boundaryless Career (Phenomenological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcham Darokah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This phenomenology qualitative research was conducted in order to examine the dynamics of career success among job hopper and how did job hoppers interpret the meaning career success in boundaryless career. This research used in-depth interview for collecting the data and supported by the data from the documents. The respondents involved in this research were fours job hoppers in the level of manager, five significant others, such as family, workmate, and a steady career. The findings revealed that: the job-hoppers individuals who frequently movement of job from one place to another place because of intrinsic factors (financial, interpersonal conflict, alternative employment opportunities, etc., extrinsic factors (challenges, willing to learn, personal characteristics, family, etc., proponent factors (networking, family support, and media. The meanings of career success among job-hopper in the boundaryless career namely; self-fulfillment (job satisfaction, life satisfaction, meeting personal goals, adding value to others, and work/life balance (family satisfaction and quality time with family. This study showed that being a job-hopper was a tool for pursuing the meaning of career success

  16. Children's Career Development: A Research Review from a Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Mark; McMahon, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in career theory have resulted in widespread acceptance of the lifespan perspective on development. However, a review of research and practice conducted during 2001 revealed that little attention has been paid to the career development of children (Whiston & Brecheisen, 2002). In response to calls for a greater concentration on…

  17. Research Productivity by Career Stage among Korean Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study explores Korean academics' changes in research productivity by career stage. Career stage in this study is defined as a specific cohort based on one's length of job experience, with those in the same stage sharing similar interests, values, needs, and tasks; it is categorized into fledglings, maturing academics, established academics,…

  18. Department of Energy - Office of Science Early Career Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, James

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science Early Career Program began in FY 2010. The program objectives are to support the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and to stimulate research careers in the disciplines supported by the DOE Office of Science. Both university and DOE national laboratory early career scientists are eligible. Applicants must be within 10 years of receiving their PhD. For universities, the PI must be an untenured Assistant Professor or Associate Professor on the tenure track. DOE laboratory applicants must be full time, non-postdoctoral employee. University awards are at least 150,000 per year for 5 years for summer salary and expenses. DOE laboratory awards are at least 500,000 per year for 5 years for full annual salary and expenses. The Program is managed by the Office of the Deputy Director for Science Programs and supports research in the following Offices: Advanced Scientific and Computing Research, Biological and Environmental Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics. A new Funding Opportunity Announcement is issued each year with detailed description on the topical areas encouraged for early career proposals. Preproposals are required. This talk will introduce the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research program and describe opportunities for research relevant to the condensed matter physics community. http://science.energy.gov/early-career/

  19. Career Plans of Novice University Teachers: The Research Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiegerová Adriana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The career trajectories of young university teachers have been a relatively frequent research target in North American and Western European countries but an entirely neglected topic of the Czech and Slovak educational research. This paper’s ambition is to narrow the gap. The research goal is to describe one aspect of career advancement of young university teachers - their professional plans after their entry to an academic position at a university after completion of their doctoral studies.

  20. MDRC Research on Career Pathways. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazis, Richard

    2016-01-01

    As postsecondary credentials have become increasingly important to accessing higher-quality employment, a growing number of education and workforce programs are implementing "career pathways" approaches to help both youth and adults prepare for further education and better jobs. In recent years, the Manpower Demonstration Research…

  1. THE MEANING OF CAREER SUCCESS AMONG JOB-HOPPER IN THE BOUNDARYLESS CAREER (Phenomenological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcham Darokah Danita Irianti Malute

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This  phenomenology  qualitative  research  was  conducted  in  order  to  know  the dynamics of career success among job hopper and how did job hoppers interpret the  meaning  career  success  in  boundaryless  career. This  research  used  in-depth interview  for  collecting  the  data  and  supported  by the  data  from  the  documents. The  respondents  involved in  this  research  were  fours job  hoppers in  the level  of manager,  five  significant  others,  such  as  family,  workmate,  and  a  steady  career. The findings revealed that: the job-hoppers individuals who frequently movement of  job  from  one  place  to  another  place  because  of  intrinsic  factors  (financial, interpersonal  conflict,  alternative  employment  opportunities,  etc.,  extrinsic factors  (challenges,  willing  to  learn,  personal  characteristics,  family,  etc., proponent  factors  (networking,  family  support,  and media.  The  meanings  of career  success  among  job-hopper  in  the  boundaryless  career  namely;  self-fulfillment (job satisfaction, life satisfaction, meeting personal goals, adding value to  others,  and  work/life  balance  (family  satisfaction  and  quality  time  with family.  This  study  showed  that  being  a  job-hopper was  a  tool  for  pursuing  the meaning of career success. Keywords: Job-hopper, career success, boundaryless career, qualitative.

  2. Career boundarylessness and career success : a review, integration and guide to future research.

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Arthur, M. B.; Khapova, S. N.; Hall, R.; Lord, R.

    2018-01-01

    The concept of boundaryless careers characterizes emerging career patterns that are less dependent on traditional organizational career management. Based on an evidence-based review of literature on the relationship between career boundarylessness and career success published from 1994 to 2018, we found that boundaryless careers have mixed effects on the various indictors of career success, and these effects depend on the operationalization of career boundarylessness, the motives (voluntary v...

  3. The Academy for Future Science Faculty: randomized controlled trial of theory-driven coaching to shape development and diversity of early-career scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Bhoomi K; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle E; Richardson, Jennifer L; Williams, Simon N; McGee, Richard

    2014-08-02

    Approaches to training biomedical scientists have created a talented research community. However, they have failed to create a professional workforce that includes many racial and ethnic minorities and women in proportion to their representation in the population or in PhD training. This is particularly true at the faculty level. Explanations for the absence of diversity in faculty ranks can be found in social science theories that reveal processes by which individuals develop identities, experiences, and skills required to be seen as legitimate within the profession. Using the social science theories of Communities of Practice, Social Cognitive Career Theory, identity formation, and cultural capital, we have developed and are testing a novel coaching-based model to address some of the limitations of previous diversity approaches. This coaching intervention (The Academy for Future Science Faculty) includes annual in-person meetings of students and trained faculty Career Coaches, along with ongoing virtual coaching, group meetings and communication. The model is being tested as a randomized controlled trial with two cohorts of biomedical PhD students from across the U.S., one recruited at the start of their PhDs and one nearing completion. Stratification into the experimental and control groups, and to coaching groups within the experimental arms, achieved equal numbers of students by race, ethnicity and gender to the extent possible. A fundamental design element of the Academy is to teach and make visible the social science principles which highly influence scientific advancement, as well as acknowledging the extra challenges faced by underrepresented groups working to be seen as legitimate within the scientific communities. The strategy being tested is based upon a novel application of the well-established principles of deploying highly skilled coaches, selected and trained for their ability to develop talents of others. This coaching model is intended to be a

  4. A Research Career? The Portuguese Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sofia Branco; Magalhães, António M.

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on the European Charter of Researchers and the Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers in the framework of the construction of the European Research Area. These documents are discussed in the light of the debate of Mode-1 and Mode-2 typology, and academic and post-academic science. In the second part, the paper…

  5. Leadership mentoring in nursing research, career development and scholarly productivity: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thóra Hafsteinsdóttir; Angeli van der Zwaag; Prof. Dr. Marieke J. Schuurmans

    2017-01-01

    Although nursing has been an academic discipline for decades, the infrastructure for nursing research in many countries is still fragile and struggling. Postdoctoral nurses have difficulties developing sustaining careers in nursing research due to lack of career opportunities. Considerable research

  6. Challenges facing young African scientists in their research careers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Africa accounts for 14% of world's population, and the economies of most African countries are considered to be growing, but this is not reflected in the amount of research published by Africans. This study aimed at identifying the challenges that young African scientists face in their career development.

  7. Mentoring: A Review of Early Career Researcher Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeren, Ellen; Lokhtina-Antoniou, Irina; Sakurai, Yusuke; Herman, Chaya; McAlpine, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews 23 journal articles on "mentoring" in the context of Early Career Researchers, defined as those in academia with less than 10 years of experience from the start of their PhD. Achieving a better understanding of mentoring is important since within the higher education context new dynamics have created expectations…

  8. Association of Polar Early Career Scientists: a model for experiential learning in professional development for students and early career researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, A. C.; Hindshaw, R. S.; Fugmann, G.; Mariash, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists was established by early career researchers during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year as an organization for early career researchers in the polar and cryospheric sciences. APECS works to promote early career researchers through soft-skills training in both research and outreach activities, through advocating for including early career researchers in all levels of the scientific process and scientific management, and through supporting a world-wide network of researchers in varied fields. APECS is lead by early career researchers; this self-driven model has proved to be an effective means for developing the leadership, management, and communication skills that are essential in the sciences, and has shown to be sustainable even in a community where frequent turn-over is inherent to the members. Since its inception, APECS has reached over 5,500 members in more than 80 countries, and we have placed more than 50 early career researchers on working groups and steering committees with organizations around the world in the last two years alone. The close partnerships that APECS has with national and international organizations exposes members to both academic and alternative career paths, including those at the science-policy interface. This paper describes APECS's approach to experiential learning in professional development and the best practices identified over our nearly ten years as an organization.

  9. European research agenda for career guidance and counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Peter C.; Katsarov, Johannes; Cohen-Scali, Valérie

    2018-01-01

    In a changing world, there is a need to reflect about the research basis of career guidance and counselling (CGC) as a professional practice, considering the contributions of various disciplines and research traditions. This paper outlines a possible European research agenda (ERA) to further...... enhance the knowledge foundation of the CGC practice. The proposed lines of research, which are pronounced in the ERA, are based on a literature review involving 45 researchers concerned with the CGC practice. At three events, approximately 150 researchers from across Europe were engaged in the discussion...

  10. The career paths of women (and men) in French research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cheveigné, Suzanne

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents results from a qualitative study of perceptions of science careers in the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), the main research institution in France. Its aim is to understand the 'glass ceiling' effect, which reduces the proportion of women at the higher levels of the career hierarchy. Long interviews were carried out with men, as well as women, support staff and researchers. Factors such as tension between individual and collective dimensions of research activity, and long-term time-management problems, were identified: these affect both men and women but in different ways. Organizations bear an important responsibility through the way they reinforce or alleviate difficulties that women and men face in contributing to scientific research at all levels.

  11. Leadership mentoring in nursing research, career development and scholarly productivity : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B.; van der Zwaag, Angeli M.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although nursing has been an academic discipline for decades, the infrastructure for nursing research in many countries is still fragile and struggling. Postdoctoral nurses have difficulties developing sustaining careers in nursing research due to lack of career opportunities.

  12. Research project management 101: insiders' tips from Early Career Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristini, Luisa; Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Stichel, Torben

    2016-04-01

    From the very beginning of their career, it is important for Early Career Scientists (ECS) to develop project management skills to be able to organise their research efficiently. ECS are often in charge of specific tasks within their projects or for their teams. However, without specific training or tools, the successful completion of these assignments will depend entirely on the organisational skills of individual researchers. ECS are thus facing "sink-or-swim" situations, which can be either instructive or disastrous for their projects. Here we provide experience-based tips from fellow ECS that can help manage various project activities, including: 1. Communication with supervisors and peers 2. Lab management 3. Field trips (e.g., oceanographic campaigns) 4. Internships and collaborations with other institutions 5. Literature/background research 6. Conference convening These are potential "life buoys" for ECS, which will help them to carry out these tasks efficiently and successfully.

  13. The Influence of Research on Career Development at Academic Colleges of Education in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Eva; Coleman, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    Interviewed and surveyed Israeli teacher educators regarding links between research and career development. Young and ambitious respondents used research for extrinsic rewards and career advancement. Teacher educators toward the end of their careers looked for intrinsic rewards and viewed research as contributing to professional growth.…

  14. MOTIVATION, VALUES, AND CAREER RESEARCH AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Gergely

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Career and motivation examinations are an interesting point to consider at all times. This is not only the company leaders need to find and hire the adequate employee but they have to be capable of keeping them. However, what motivates the individual? What is necessary for employees to stay at the organization? What kind of carrier expectation they have? These questions are not only important when somebody is in the system but when somebody is at the beginning of their work. Due to these questions, we have considered important to carry out examinations on motivation, value, and career among the employees and students. The research has been conducted among the students at the University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics. These students will be the fresh enterers of the labor market and may become talented employees of organizations. In the research joint surveys have been applied. The questionnaires were related to working values, values, motivation and career. The sample contains 235 full-time students. One of the positive results of the examination is sampled students are strongly performance motivated. Regarding their performances, the pursuit of success and the need for execution tasks are important, and the high level of effort-performance is outstanding. The results are closely aligned with the sampled students because personal development is important to them and this is a typical age characteristic. The appearance for fulfilling basic needs such as safety, material and physical environment and self-assertion also have a key role. Regarding their career orientation security is in the center of attention. They do not want reputation with all their hearts. Furthermore, management and leadership are not the most important for them. The career anchor analysis has also proved this because leader competence was the lowest career anchor. In the future it would be worth extending the research to the other faculties of the University of Debrecen or

  15. Career Interests of Canadian Psychiatry Residents: What Makes Residents Choose a Research Career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Vincent; Rapoport, Mark J.; Andrew, Melissa; Davidson, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Training future clinician-researchers remains a challenge faced by Canadian psychiatry departments. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of residents interested in pursuing research and other career options as part of their practice, and to identify the factors associated with interest in research. Method: Data from a national online survey of 207 Canadian psychiatry residents from a total of 853 (24.3% response rate) were examined. The main outcome was interest in research as part of residents’ future psychiatrist practice. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify demographic and vocational variables associated with research interest. Results: Interest in research decreases by 76% between the first and fifth year of psychiatry residency (OR 0.76 per year, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.97). Training in a department with a residency research track did not correlate with increased research interest (χ2 = 0.007, df = 1, P = 0.93). Conclusions: Exposing and engaging psychiatry residents in research as early as possible in residency training appears key to promoting future research interest. Psychiatry residency programs and research tracks could consider emphasizing research training initiatives and protected research time early in residency. PMID:27253699

  16. Career success in a boundaryless career world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arthur, Michael B.; Khapova, S.N.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares contemporary career theory with the theory applied in recent career success research. The research makes inconsistent use of career theory, and in particular neglects the interdependence of the objective and subjective careers, and boundaryless career issues of

  17. Clinical Research Careers: Reports from a NHLBI Pediatric Heart Network Clinical Research Skills Development Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wyman W.; Richmond, Marc; Li, Jennifer S.; Saul, J. Philip; Mital, Seema; Colan, Steven D.; Newburger, Jane W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; McCrindle, Brain W.; Minich, L. LuAnn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Marino, Bradley S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Pearson, Gail D.; Evans, Frank; Scott, Jane D.; Cohen, Meryl S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Wyman W. Lai, MD, MPH, and Victoria L. Vetter, MD, MPH. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), funded under the U.S. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH–NHLBI), includes two Clinical Research Skills Development (CRSD) Cores, which were awarded to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and to the Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York–Presbyterian. To provide information on how to develop a clinical research career to a larger number of potential young investigators in pediatric cardiology, the directors of these two CRSD Cores jointly organized a one-day seminar for fellows and junior faculty from all of the PHN Core sites. The participants included faculty members from the PHN and the NHLBI. The day-long seminar was held on April 29, 2009, at the NHLBI site, immediately preceding the PHN Steering Committee meeting in Bethesda, MD. Methods The goals of the seminar were 1) to provide fellows and early investigators with basic skills in clinical research 2) to provide a forum for discussion of important research career choices 3) to introduce attendees to each other and to established clinical researchers in pediatric cardiology, and 4) to publish a commentary on the future of clinical research in pediatric cardiology. Results The following chapters are compilations of the talks given at the 2009 PHN Clinical Research Skills Development Seminar, published to share the information provided with a broader audience of those interested in learning how to develop a clinical research career in pediatric cardiology. The discussions of types of clinical research, research skills, career development strategies, funding, and career management are applicable to research careers in other areas of clinical medicine as well. Conclusions The aim of this compilation is to stimulate those who might be interested in the research career options available to investigators. PMID:21167335

  18. Understanding the impact of career academy attendance: an application of the principal stratification framework for causal effects accounting for partial compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Lindsay C

    2012-04-01

    Results from MDRC's longitudinal, random-assignment evaluation of career-academy high schools reveal that several years after high-school completion, those randomized to receive the academy opportunity realized a $175 (11%) increase in monthly earnings, on average. In this paper, I investigate the impact of duration of actual academy enrollment, as nearly half of treatment group students either never enrolled or participated for only a portion of high school. I capitalize on data from this experimental evaluation and utilize a principal stratification framework and Bayesian inference to investigate the causal impact of academy participation. This analysis focuses on a sample of 1,306 students across seven sites in the MDRC evaluation. Participation is measured by number of years of academy enrollment, and the outcome of interest is average monthly earnings in the period of four to eight years after high school graduation. I estimate an average causal effect of treatment assignment on subsequent monthly earnings of approximately $588 among males who remained enrolled in an academy throughout high school and more modest impacts among those who participated only partially. Different from an instrumental variables approach to treatment non-compliance, which allows for the estimation of linear returns to treatment take-up, the more general framework of principal stratification allows for the consideration of non-linear returns, although at the expense of additional model-based assumptions.

  19. High School Astronomical Research at the Army and Navy Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady

    2016-06-01

    Establishment of a high school astronomy and research program is a difficult task to accomplish in an environment of state mandated high school educational curricula and the task saturation for many teachers today created by their class room and administrative requirements. This environment is most challenging for public schools. The astronomy program we will describe seems to be better suited at least at the present time for private or specialized schools. We will outline how a broad astronomy program was developed over two years at the Army and Navy Academy (ANA), a private boarding school in Carlsbad, California. Starting with no astronomy program in 2013, the Academy now has an astronomy club, a University of California a-g certified two semester high school course, and a college accredited astronomy research seminar with over 20 published high school authors.At ANA the development followed this path: finding a strong proponent at the school who can make actionable decisions; building interest and perceived value to other staff and faculty members; establishing an astronomy club to generate student interest and future student leaders; and designing the a-g certified high school course including the course length, structure and balance of teaching elements. Building on these foundations, the college level astronomy research seminar was then added to provide an avenue for inspired students to undertake actual research and publication of their work in scientific journals in their free time for college credit.Creating a sustainable program with supporting infrastructure comes next. Success with the three foundation steps builds confidence in the program with faculty and staff. Published, tangible successes highlight the value and enable advanced placement and scholarship opportunities for graduates. These successes build enthusiasm. The further keys to sustainability include addressing course credit, instructor compensation and rewards, and integration into the

  20. A Content Analysis of Acculturation Research in the Career Development Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew J.; Kerlow-Myers, Andrew E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to highlight the importance of acculturation as an explanatory variable in career development and to provide an empirical review of acculturation research in the career development literature. Acculturation is a cultural variable that has been linked to a number of important career development outcomes for…

  1. The Family's Influence on Adolescent and Young Adult Career Development: Theory, Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Cathy; Thomas, Trang

    2003-01-01

    A research review identified a range of family process variables associated with enhanced career development for adolescents and young adults. Findings were consistent with the theories of Roe (personality development and career choice) and Super (life-span, life-space) regarding the influence of family processes on career development. (Contains…

  2. How well does early-career investigators' cardiovascular outcomes research training align with funded outcomes research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Matthew J; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Wang, Tracy Y; Khazanie, Prateeti; Kressin, Nancy R; Krumholz, Harlan M; Kiefe, Catarina I; Wells, Barbara L; O'Brien, Sean M; Peterson, Eric D; Sanders, Gillian D

    2018-02-01

    Outcomes research training programs should prepare trainees to successfully compete for research funding. We examined how early-career investigators' prior and desired training aligns with recently funded cardiovascular (CV) outcomes research. We (1) reviewed literature to identify 13 core competency areas in CV outcomes research; (2) surveyed early-career investigators to understand their prior and desired training in each competency area; (3) examined recently funded grants commonly pursued by early-career outcomes researchers to ascertain available funding in competency areas; and (4) analyzed alignment between investigator training and funded research in each competency area. We evaluated 185 survey responses from early-career investigators (response rate 28%) and 521 funded grants from 2010 to 2014. Respondents' prior training aligned with funded grants in the areas of clinical epidemiology, observational research, randomized controlled trials, and implementation/dissemination research. Funding in community-engaged research and health informatics was more common than prior training in these areas. Respondents' prior training in biostatistics and systematic review was more common than funded grants focusing on these specific areas. Respondents' desired training aligned similarly with funded grants, with some exceptions; for example, desired training in health economics/cost-effectiveness research was more common than funded grants in these areas. Restricting to CV grants (n=132) and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded grants (n=170) produced similar results. Identifying mismatch between funded grants in outcomes research and early-career investigators' prior/desired training may help efforts to harmonize investigator interests, training, and funding. Our findings suggest a need for further consideration of how to best prepare early-career investigators for funding success. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals’ pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers. PMID:28178270

  4. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals' pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers.

  5. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Roach

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals' pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers.

  6. 1st International Early Research Career Enhancement School

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Valentin; Rybina, Galina

    2016-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge research focused on current challenges towards the realization of Biologically Inspired intelligent agents, or Cognitive Architectures (BICA). The chapters are written by both world-recognized experts (including Antonio Chella, Olivier Georgeon, Oliver Kutz, Antonio Lieto, David Vernon, Paul Verschure, and others) and young researchers. Together, they constitute a good mixture of new findings with tutorial-based reviews and position papers, all presented at the First International Early Research Career Enhancement School on Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures (FIERCES on BICA 2016), held April 21-24 in Moscow, Russia. Most works included here cross boundaries between disciplines: from neuroscience to social science, from cognitive science to robotics, and from bioengineering to artificial intelligence. A special emphasis is given to novel solutions to urgent problems that have been resisting traditional approaches for decades. Intended for providing readers with an up...

  7. Continuing Education Workshops in Bioinformatics Positively Impact Research and Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazas, Michelle D; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2016-06-01

    Bioinformatics.ca has been hosting continuing education programs in introductory and advanced bioinformatics topics in Canada since 1999 and has trained more than 2,000 participants to date. These workshops have been adapted over the years to keep pace with advances in both science and technology as well as the changing landscape in available learning modalities and the bioinformatics training needs of our audience. Post-workshop surveys have been a mandatory component of each workshop and are used to ensure appropriate adjustments are made to workshops to maximize learning. However, neither bioinformatics.ca nor others offering similar training programs have explored the long-term impact of bioinformatics continuing education training. Bioinformatics.ca recently initiated a look back on the impact its workshops have had on the career trajectories, research outcomes, publications, and collaborations of its participants. Using an anonymous online survey, bioinformatics.ca analyzed responses from those surveyed and discovered its workshops have had a positive impact on collaborations, research, publications, and career progression.

  8. A proposed clinical research support career pathway for noninvestigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheree; Gullick, Janice; Ballard, Jacqueline; Perry, Lin

    2018-03-08

    To discuss the international experience of clinical research support for noninvestigator roles and to propose a new pathway for Australia, to promote a sustainable research support workforce capable of delivering high-quality clinical research. Noninvestigator research support roles are currently characterized by an ad hoc approach to training, with limited role delineation and perceived professional isolation with implications for study completion rates and participant safety. A focused approach to developing and implementing research support pathways has improved patient recruitment, study completion, job satisfaction, and research governance. The Queensland and New South Wales state-based Nurses' Awards, the Australian Qualifications Framework, and a University Professional (Research) Staff Award. Research nurses in the clinical environment improve study coordination, adherence to study protocol, patient safety, and clinical care. A career pathway that guides education and outlines position descriptions and skill sets would enhance development of the research support workforce. This pathway could contribute to changing the patient outcomes through coordination and study completion of high-quality research. A wide consultative approach is required to determine a cost-effective and feasible approach to implementation and evaluation of the proposed pathway. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Trending topics in careers: A review and future research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Kubasch, Stella

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – Virtually all contemporary scientific papers studying careers emphasize its changing nature. Indeed, careers have been changing during recent decades, for example becoming more complex and unpredictable. Furthermore, hallmarks of the new career – such as individual agency – are clearly

  10. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discoura...

  11. Identifying future research directions for biodiversity, ecosystem services and sustainability : perspectives from early-career researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hossain, S.; Pogue, S.J.; Trenchard, L.; Oudenhoven, van A.P.E.; Washbourne, C-L.; Muiruri, E.W.; Tomczyk, A.M.; García-Llorente, M.; Hale, R.; Hevia, V.; Adams, T.; Tavallali, L.; De, Bell S.; Pye, M.; Resende, F.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to identify priority research questions in the field of biodiversity, ecosystem services and sustainability (BESS), based on a workshop held during the NRG BESS Conference for Early Career Researchers on BESS, and to compare these to existing horizon scanning exercises. This work highlights

  12. Women's career advancement in organisations: Integrative framework for research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišić-Andrić Marijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary organisations, caught in the middle of global economic and social crisis, are facing different business challenges, having to respond to quick changes in business environment and demographic changes in workforce composed by increasing number of women. Although the number of women in workforce is on the rise, they are still underrepresented in manager positions, especially higher management. This implies that certain barriers are in place which makes difficult for women to develop their careers, especially in reaching manager positions. The aim of this paper is to analyse and present a theoretical framework for further study of professional carrier advancement for women. The paper especially analyse integrative theoretical framework which stresses the equal importance of researching individual factors (personal influence and organisational factors (social inclusion, having in mind how the organisational context can improve or deter women's carrier. The paper presents possible directions for future research based on the analysis of the theoretical framework and especially individual and organisational factors.

  13. A review of four decades of research in organisational career psychology by academia in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dries Schreuder

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Career research in organisations has increased in importance since the 1970s, which heralded new directions for organisational career research and practice both globally and nationally. Research purpose: The study critically reviewed trends in organisational career psychology research in South Africa from 1970 to 2011 in terms of global and present national challenges that require empirical investigation in the contemporary South African world of work context. Motivation for the study: The increasingly complex contexts, in which people have been pursuing their careers since the catalytic 1970s, demand the continuous generation and development of knowledge for the benefit of the discipline and practice of careers. Research design, approach and method: A broad systematic review was carried out to analyse documented academia research (N = 110 on careers from 1970 to 2011, which was published in six accredited South African scientific journals. Main findings: Much of the research addressed issues pertaining to career theory and concepts, the world of work and career assessment and technology. Career development, professional issues and organisational career interventions in the multi-cultural South African context appear to be under-researched. Practical/managerial implications: The insight derived from the findings can be employed by academia and researchers, in this field, to plan future research initiatives that will contribute to the profession and practice of career guidance and counselling in the contemporary workplace. Contribution/value-add: The findings provide preliminary insight that adds to the body of knowledge concerned with career studies in the South African organisational context.

  14. A review of four decades of research in organisational career psychology by academia in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dries Schreuder

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Career research in organisations has increased in importance since the 1970s, which heralded new directions for organisational career research and practice both globally and nationally. Research purpose: The study critically reviewed trends in organisational career psychology research in South Africa from 1970 to 2011 in terms of global and present national challenges that require empirical investigation in the contemporary South African world of work context.Motivation for the study: The increasingly complex contexts, in which people have been pursuing their careers since the catalytic 1970s, demand the continuous generation and development of knowledge for the benefit of the discipline and practice of careers.Research design, approach and method: A broad systematic review was carried out to analyse documented academia research (N = 110 on careers from 1970 to 2011, which was published in six accredited South African scientific journals.Main findings: Much of the research addressed issues pertaining to career theory and concepts, the world of work and career assessment and technology. Career development, professional issues and organisational career interventions in the multi-cultural South African context appear to be under-researched.Practical/managerial implications: The insight derived from the findings can be employed by academia and researchers, in this field, to plan future research initiatives that will contribute to the profession and practice of career guidance and counselling in the contemporary workplace.Contribution/value-add: The findings provide preliminary insight that adds to the body of knowledge concerned with career studies in the South African organisational context.

  15. Flying the Nest: How the Home Department Shapes Researchers' Career Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottenrott, Hanna; Lawson, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the importance of the socialization environment--nest--for the career destinations of early career researchers. In a sample of research groups in the fields of science and engineering at universities in Germany, we identify research orientation, output, funding as well as openness to industry and commercialization as relevant…

  16. Creating a Research Agenda in Career Counselling: The Place of Action Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard A.; Domene, Jose F.

    2012-01-01

    After identifying historical and current problems in career counselling research, we propose a research agenda based on contextual action theory. This theory has been used as a framework for research in the career field and for general counselling practice. It is advantageous for several reasons including its conceptual basis, its detailed…

  17. The Gender-Differential Impact of Work Values on Prospects in Research Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttges, Annett; Fay, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Women are strongly underrepresented at top positions in research, with some research suggesting the postdoctoral career stage is a critical stage for female researchers. Drawing on role congruity theory and social cognitive career theory, we tested the gender-differential impact of work values (extrinsic rewards-oriented work values and work-life…

  18. Funding opportunities for clinical investigators in the early stages of career development in cardiovascular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Becker, Richard C

    2013-11-01

    Contemporary cardiovascular research offers junior investigators the opportunity to explore the gamut of biomedical questions. Despite the recent reduction in the availability of funding mechanisms that have historically served as the primary pathways for investigators in the early stages of career development, there remain numerous traditional and non-traditional funding opportunities. This article highlights these opportunities in order to assist early career investigators in the development of a personalized research trajectory, which optimizes the potential for career success.

  19. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995.

  20. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995

  1. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics research report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Scientific interests of Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences are focused on DNA replication and repair, gene expression, gene sequencing and molecular biophysics. The work reviews research projects of the Institute in 1994-1995.

  2. Early Environmental Field Research Career Exploration: An Analysis of Impacts on Precollege Apprentices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Susan K.; Beyer, Katherine M.; Pérez, Maria; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    Research apprenticeships offer opportunities for deep understanding of scientific practice, transparency about research careers, and possible transformational effects on precollege youth. We examined two consecutive field-based environmental biology apprenticeship programs designed to deliver realistic career exploration and connections to…

  3. The Unacknowledged Value of Female Academic Labour Power for Male Research Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angervall, Petra; Beach, Dennis; Gustafsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Academic work in Sweden's higher education system is changing character. Distinctly different career pathways are emerging, as facilities for developing research careers and capital have become both more restricted and more dependent on external funding. These developments are in focus in the present article. Based on ethnographic research and a…

  4. Implications for Focusing Research in Career and Technical Education and Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeth, Jeanea M.; Joerger, Richard M.; Elliot, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Education and educational research is shaped by philosophy, psychology, practice, and ever changing educational policies. Previous studies have expressed a need for a relevant and focused research agenda for career and technical education (CTE), workforce development education and career and technical education. A need for a relevant and timely…

  5. Treatment of Race/Ethnicity in Career-Technical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Xing, Xue

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how researchers of career-technical education have treated the construct of race/ethnicity in recent studies. Fifty-one of 71 articles published in the Career and Technical Education Research (CTER) over a 7-year span (2005-2011) were included. A content analysis found that only one quarter (n = 13, 25.49%) of eligible studies…

  6. Identity Bargaining: A Policy Systems Research Model of Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawski, Carl

    A detailed, general and comprehensive accounting scheme is presented, consisting of nine stages of career development, three major sets of elements contributing to career choice (in terms of personal, cultural and situational roles), and 20 hypotheses relating the separate elements. Implicit in the model is a novel procedure and method for…

  7. Large Scale Survey Data in Career Development Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Large scale survey datasets have been underutilized but offer numerous advantages for career development scholars, as they contain numerous career development constructs with large and diverse samples that are followed longitudinally. Constructs such as work salience, vocational expectations, educational expectations, work satisfaction, and…

  8. Life as an early career researcher: interview with Catherine Martel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Catherine Martel speaks to Francesca Lake, Managing Commissioning Editor: Catherine Martel obtained her PhD from the Université de Montréal and pursued a postdoctoral fellowship first at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York (NY, USA), then at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis (MO, USA), and obtained the Junior Investigator Award for Women from the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology council of the American Heart Association. Her postdoctoral work is certainly groundbreaking and brings forward new considerations in the field: she discovered that the lymphatic vessel route, the network that runs in parallel with the blood vessels, is critical for removing cholesterol from multiple tissues, including the aortic wall. In 2013, she joined the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Early Career Committee, eager to bring a Canadian perspective to the group and get involved in council activities. Since 2014, she is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Medicine at the Université de Montréal, and a research scientist at the Montreal Heart Institute. Her research program now focuses on characterizing the physiopathologic role of the lymphatics in the initiation, progression and regression of atherosclerosis. Basic and translational research will allow her team to identify the causes of lymphatic dysfunction, and eventually target potential therapeutic strategies aiming at improving lymphatic function at the different levels of the atherothrombotic disease. You can follow her laboratory at @LaboMartel_ICM.

  9. Clinician researcher career pathway for registered nurses and midwives: A proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheree; Gullick, Janice; Ballard, Jacqueline; Perry, Lin

    2018-06-01

    To consider clinician researcher career frameworks and propose a new pathway, integrating university and health service components to support research career progression within nursing and midwifery practice. Hospitals with research-active clinicians report fewer adverse events and better patient outcomes. Nursing clinician researcher career development is therefore an international priority, yet positions and expectations associated with this are not always well articulated, with nurses and midwives challenged to accommodate research and clinical careers. This discussion paper describes nurse/midwife clinician researcher career frameworks and a new pathway that aligns academic and nursing role descriptions. The new framework was informed by a brief literature search for international framework documents, three Australian state-based Nurses and Midwives Awards: the Australian Qualifications Framework, publically available University Academic (Research) Award schedules and academic staff descriptions, and state health department and health services publications. The implementation of research-based practice is a key element of nursing and midwifery roles and "advanced practice" position descriptions have well-defined research expectations. This paper considers structures to support their achievement. This paper provides a blueprint for clinician researcher career development. It elevates the research domain as an equal alongside clinical, managerial and educational clinical career development. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Identifying future research directions for biodiversity, ecosystem services and sustainability: perspectives from early-career researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, S.; Pogue, S.J.; Trenchard, L.; Oudenhoven, van, A.P.E.; Washbourne, C-L.; Muiruri, E.W.; Tomczyk, A.M.; García-Llorente, M.; Hale, R.; Hevia, V.; Adams, T.; Tavallali, L.; De, Bell S.; Pye, M.; Resende, F.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to identify priority research questions in the field of biodiversity, ecosystem services and sustainability (BESS), based on a workshop held during the NRG BESS Conference for Early Career Researchers on BESS, and to compare these to existing horizon scanning exercises. This work highlights the need for improved data availability through collaboration and knowledge exchange, which, in turn, can support the integrated valuation and sustainable management of ecosystems in response to g...

  11. Research and Education: Planning an Effective Outreach Program in Balance with a Research Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Brian

    2002-04-01

    As scientific scholars and educators we are in a position to make a difference in outreach efforts to elementary and high school students as well as the general public, in addition to mentoring undergraduate and doctoral students. Outreach is a major component of the CAREER grant, the Lederman fellowship, as well as the primary focus of the Young Physicists Outreach Panel (YPOP). As recipients of these awards, and participants in YPOP, we would like to share our insights with the audience. The talk will cover the topics of YPOP, the Lederman Fellowship, and the CAREER grant. The Lederman Fellowship is awarded in recognition of Leon Lederman's legacy as an educator, where the fellows participate in educational/outreach programs of their choice. The NSF makes the CAREER awards to junion faculty. Outreach is of fundamental importance in these grants, with a 40 percent weight attached to the outreach and education component of the proposal. The speakers, a graduate student, a post-doctoral research fellow, and an Assistant Professor, will describe the educational/outreach activities they have been involved in, and discuss how outreach can be integrated into a career in physics research.

  12. The National Insurance Academy: Serving India's Insurance Professionals and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Bhagyashree

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how a special library can meet the needs of a specific industry. The author focuses on India's National Insurance Academy (NIA) Library, which serves the insurance industry of India and some neighboring countries. It is where the author serves as the chief librarian.

  13. The CUNY Fatherhood Academy: A Qualitative Evaluation. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Marla; Simms, Margaret C.; Monson, William; de Leon, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the economic challenges young fathers without postsecondary education face in providing for their families, New York City's Young Men's Initiative launched a fatherhood program housed in LaGuardia Community College in spring 2012. The CUNY Fatherhood Academy (CFA) aims to connect young fathers to academic and employment opportunities while…

  14. Research-Based Knowledge: Researchers' Contribution to Evidence-Based Practice and Policy Making in Career Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Erik Hagaseth; Plant, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To present evidence for the outcomes of career guidance is increasingly seen as pivotal for a further professionalization of policy making and service provision. This paper puts an emphasis on researchers' contribution to evidence-based practice and policy making in career guidance. We argue for a broader and more pluralistic research strategy to…

  15. Snow, Ice, & Satellites: An Early Career Researcher's Experience with Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A.; Scambos, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    As a doctoral student, I was lucky enough to be able to experiment with a variety of communication and outreach activities (classroom visits, museum events, science festivals, blogging, social media, etc.) to build communication skills and learn how to talk about my science without writing a journal article. More importantly, the wide range of experience helped me identify what worked for me. My favorite way to share my science now? Twitter. To many, Twitter is a frivolous platform for sharing snippets 140 characters or less. To me, however, it is how I can connect directly with the elusive "wider public" and share my science. Specifically, I use satellite imagery (mostly Landsat 8) to study glaciers around the world. I look at long-term change related to climate, and I also investigate new, innovative ways to use satellite imagery to better understand glaciers and ice sheets. Luckily for me, my research is very visual. Whether fieldwork snapshots or satellite data, images make for great, shareable, accessible tweets. In this presentation, I propose to share my experience of tweeting as an early career researcher. I will include successful strategies (e.g. particular #hashtags, creating new content, using story-telling, timely tweets), as well as some not-so-successful attempts. I will also talk about how I built my Twitter network. In addition to anecdotes, I will include evaluation of my Twitter activity using available metrics and analytics (e.g. followers, favorites, re-tweets, Klout score, etc.). While misunderstood by many in the scientific community, Twitter is a platform increasingly being adopted by researchers. Used correctly, it can be a great tool for connecting directly with an interested, non-technical audience eager to learn about your research. With my experiences and evaluation, I will show how both scientists and the networks that they join and create can benefit by using Twitter as a platform for science communication.

  16. Implementing the CASPiE course-based research experience at the United States Military Academy: Affective responses and effects on critical thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Anthony Michael

    The Center for Authentic Science Practices in Education (CASPiE) pioneered a course-based research experience approach to teaching chemistry laboratory courses. The method had previously been studied in a variety of institutional settings. Recently, the United States Military Academy at West Point decided to develop CASPiE-style modules for the introductory honors chemistry course. This research setting presents clean experimental-control comparisons and a group of faculty who were completely new to the method. Equipping students with authentic research experiences early in their education is important regardless of the institution. However, cadets at a military academy must make decisions relatively early (the outset of their second year) as to what their career trajectory will be as eventual officers. In the new CASPiE-based experience, cadets are given the opportunity to select from one of three different modules (analytical chemistry, toxicology, and chemical engineering) in which to participate during the course. These three modules represent subsections of an overall Army waste-to-energy research project. Cadets generate unique hypotheses, real data, and research posters towards the advancement of the project. Posters are then presented in a session. that includes an audience of project stakeholders, course instructors, and other academy faculty and staff. Here, I will present my research methods, evaluative procedures, and findings in the affective domain, critical thinking, and laboratory content comprehension.

  17. The early career researcher's toolkit:translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products

    OpenAIRE

    Rafiq, Qasim A.; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I.; Wilson, Samantha L.; Patel, Asha K.; Barnes, Amanda L.; Adams, Christopher F.; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in...

  18. Measurement Invariance in Careers Research: Using IRT to Study Gender Differences in Medical Students' Specialization Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, Tara S.; Thompson, Lori Foster; Meade, Adam W.; Newton, Dale A.; Grayson, Martha S.

    2008-01-01

    The current study demonstrates the use of item response theory (IRT) to conduct measurement invariance analyses in careers research. A self-report survey was used to assess the importance 1,363 fourth-year medical students placed on opportunities to provide comprehensive patient care when choosing a career specialty. IRT analyses supported…

  19. Preparing for Portfolio Careers in Australian Music: Setting a Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartleet, Brydie-Leigh; Bennett, Dawn; Bridgstock, Ruth; Draper, Paul; Harrison, Scott; Schippers, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, Australian musicians increasingly maintain "portfolio" careers, in which they combine diverse employment arrangements and activities. Often, these incorporate industry sectors outside of music. This career pattern is widespread but not well understood, largely because of the limitations of existing research.…

  20. College Students' Views of Work-Life Balance in STEM Research Careers: Addressing Negative Preconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan-Wilson, Anna; Stamp, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    In career discussions, female undergraduates said that if they were to attend graduate school in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and were to follow a career based on their research training, they would have to give up having a family. A subsequent survey showed that many students, both men and women, thought work-life…

  1. Tomorrow's Workforce: School Pupils' Views of a Career in Hospitality. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregaskis, Olga; And Others

    A survey involving 1,024 secondary pupils and 22 career educators from schools throughout the United Kingdom collected information on pupils' perceptions of entering the hotel and catering industry as a career. The research looked in detail at the job expectations of pupils, the status they associated with hotel and catering and nonhotel and…

  2. Opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinary research career development: implementation of a women's health research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Steven E; Smith, Yolanda R; Johnson, Timothy R B

    2007-03-01

    A key component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap for Medical Research is the development of interdisciplinary research teams. How best to teach and foster interdisciplinary research skills has not been determined. An effort at promoting interdisciplinary research was initiated by the Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) at NIH in 1999. The following year, 12 academic centers were funded to support 56 scholar positions for 2-5 years under Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH). A second cohort of 12 centers, called BIRCWH II, was funded in 2002. In this paper, we present the experience of the University of Michigan BIRCWH program, including a practical approach to dealing with the challenges and opportunities of interdisciplinary research training. Scholars are mentored not only by their primary research advisor but also by a three-person mentor team as well as by their peers. All scholars and a core of supportive faculty meet regularly to discuss interdisciplinary research career development and approaches to apply knowledge in new ways. Of the original cohort of 10 scholars at the University of Michigan, 7 have achieved independent research funding. Challenges include arranging times to meet, developing a common language and knowledge base, dealing proactively with expectations and misunderstandings, focusing on a conceptual model, and providing timely feedback.

  3. What drives Researchers´ Careers? The Role of International Mobility, Gender and Family

    OpenAIRE

    FERNANDEZ-ZUBIETA Ana; MARINELLI ELISABETTA; ELENA PÉREZ SUSANA

    2013-01-01

    International mobility has become increasingly common in the research profession, partly due to strong policy support. To understand this trend, it is necessary to explore how researchers plan and envisage their career, that is, what drives their decisions. In this exploratory paper we shed light on this issue, comparing career drivers across three mobility categories. Furthermore, we take into account gender and the parental status of the researchers, as both factors remarkably influence car...

  4. How gender impacts career development and leadership in rehabilitation medicine: a report from the AAPM&R research committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy K; McElligott, Jacinta; Chan, Leighton; Wagner, Eugene P; Segal, Neil A; Gerber, Lynn H

    2007-05-01

    To examine the role that gender plays in meeting the medical academic mission by assessing career development, leadership, and research productivity among rehabilitation researchers. Prospective, cross-sectional cohort study. National survey. Three hundred sixty rehabilitation professionals linked to the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Association of Academic Physiatrists, and/or the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Online or paper survey. Research skills, resources and productivity, salary, leadership, and academic advancement. Results suggested that women rated themselves as being less skilled and having fewer resources for research compared with their male counterparts. Additionally, significantly fewer women applied for grant funding and had a lower publication rate compared with men. A proportionally larger number of women remained at lower academic ranks than men, and fewer women achieved senior academic ranks or positions of leadership. Even after adjusting for potential confounding factors, female sex remained a significant variable associated with lower salaries and lower manuscript production. Unlike men, female respondents tended to believe that being a woman was a negative factor with respect to academic advancement, leadership opportunities, salary, and resources. Female rehabilitation researchers were less developed professionally than their male counterparts and saw themselves as disadvantaged. These findings have potential implications for attracting women into rehabilitation research and the rehabilitation research community's efforts to sustain its academic mission, to improve research capacity, and to meet the needs of the 52 million people in the United States with disabilities.

  5. Career Satisfaction and Perceived Salary Competitiveness among Individuals Who Completed Postdoctoral Research Training in Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Nelson, David E; Izmirlian, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Studies examining career satisfaction of biomedical scientists are limited, especially in the context of prior postdoctoral training. Here we focused on career satisfaction defined as satisfaction with one's career trajectory and perceived salary competitiveness among a predominantly Ph.D.-trained population of scientists who completed cancer prevention-related postdoctoral training between 1987-2011. National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumni (n = 114), and previous recipients of NCI-sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA/F32) postdoctoral fellowships (n = 140) completed online surveys. Associations of career satisfaction and perception of salary competitiveness with demographic, training, and employment-related factors were examined using logistic regression. Overall, 61% reported high levels of satisfaction with their career trajectory to-date. Higher salary (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07-7.69) and having more leadership roles (OR = 2.26, 95% CI:1.04-4.90) were independently associated with higher career satisfaction. Persons with race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.20-0.82) or age ≥ 50 (OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17-0.94) had lower career satisfaction levels. There were no statistically significant differences in career satisfaction levels by gender, scientific discipline, or employment sector. 74% perceived their current salary as competitive, but persons with 5-9, or ≥10 years in their current position reported lower levels (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15-0.65; and OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.87, respectively), as did individuals in government positions (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.11-0.98). These data add to the understanding of career satisfaction of those with advanced training in biomedical research by examining these measures in relation to prior postdoctoral research training and across multiple career sectors.

  6. Career Satisfaction and Perceived Salary Competitiveness among Individuals Who Completed Postdoctoral Research Training in Cancer Prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Faupel-Badger

    Full Text Available Studies examining career satisfaction of biomedical scientists are limited, especially in the context of prior postdoctoral training. Here we focused on career satisfaction defined as satisfaction with one's career trajectory and perceived salary competitiveness among a predominantly Ph.D.-trained population of scientists who completed cancer prevention-related postdoctoral training between 1987-2011. National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP alumni (n = 114, and previous recipients of NCI-sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA/F32 postdoctoral fellowships (n = 140 completed online surveys. Associations of career satisfaction and perception of salary competitiveness with demographic, training, and employment-related factors were examined using logistic regression. Overall, 61% reported high levels of satisfaction with their career trajectory to-date. Higher salary (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07-7.69 and having more leadership roles (OR = 2.26, 95% CI:1.04-4.90 were independently associated with higher career satisfaction. Persons with race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.20-0.82 or age ≥ 50 (OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17-0.94 had lower career satisfaction levels. There were no statistically significant differences in career satisfaction levels by gender, scientific discipline, or employment sector. 74% perceived their current salary as competitive, but persons with 5-9, or ≥10 years in their current position reported lower levels (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15-0.65; and OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.87, respectively, as did individuals in government positions (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.11-0.98. These data add to the understanding of career satisfaction of those with advanced training in biomedical research by examining these measures in relation to prior postdoctoral research training and across multiple career sectors.

  7. Annual report-2011. Institute for Nuclear Research National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iivanyuk, F.O.

    2012-01-01

    Annual report contains information on the fundamental, scientific and applied investigations carried out in the Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in the year 2010. The report contains abstracts of research works in the fields of nuclear physics, atomic energy, radiation physics and radiation material science, physics of plasma, radiation ecology and biology.

  8. University of New Mexico Undergraduate Breast Cancer Training Program: Pathway to Research Careers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffith, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    We have established a three-phase training program to motivate talented undergraduate students, especially students from under-represented Southwestern minorIties, to pursue careers in breast cancer research...

  9. University of New Mexico Undergraduate Breast Cancer Training Program: Pathway to Research Careers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffith, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    We have established a three-phase training program to motivate talented undergraduate students, especially students from under-represented southwester minorities, to pursue careers in breast cancer research...

  10. University of New Mexico Undergraduate Breast Cancer Training Program: Pathway to Research Careers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2005-01-01

    We have established a three-phase training program to motivate talented undergraduate students, especially students from under-represented Southwestern minorities, to pursue careers in breast cancer research...

  11. Process Evaluation for Improving K12 Program Effectiveness: Case Study of a National Institutes of Health Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health Research Career Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Nancy C; Wyman, Jean F; Dighe, Satlaj; Harwood, Eileen M; Hang, Mikow

    2018-06-01

    Process evaluation is an important tool in quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how a systematic and continuous evaluation process can be used to improve the quality of faculty career development programs by using the University of Minnesota's Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) K12 program as an exemplar. Data from a rigorous process evaluation incorporating quantitative and qualitative measurements were analyzed and reviewed by the BIRCWH program leadership on a regular basis. Examples are provided of how this evaluation model and processes were used to improve many aspects of the program, thereby improving scholar, mentor, and advisory committee members' satisfaction and scholar outcomes. A rigorous evaluation plan can increase the effectiveness and impact of a research career development plan.

  12. Practice and Research in Career Counseling and Development--2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    A review of the 2009 career counseling and development literature indicates that the field remains vital, vibrant, valid, and viable precisely 100 years after its founding. Using the field's 4 fundamental traditions of person-environment fit, life-span development, social cognition, and constructivism-social constructionism as lenses for…

  13. Academic couples, parenthood and women’s research careers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohlídalová, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 16, 2-3 (2017), s. 166-182 ISSN 1474-9041 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LE12003 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : Academic careers * academic couples * Czech Republic Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography OBOR OECD: Sociology

  14. Perceptions of scientific research literature and strategies for reading papers depend on academic career stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Katharine E; Dunbar, Sonja D

    2017-01-01

    Reading primary research literature is an essential skill for all scientists and students on science degree programmes, however little is known about how researchers at different career stages interact with and interpret scientific papers. To explore this, we conducted a survey of 260 undergraduate students and researchers in Biological Sciences at a research intensive UK university. Responses to Likert scale questions demonstrated increases in confidence and skill with reading the literature between individuals at each career stage, including between postdoctoral researchers and faculty academics. The survey indicated that individuals at different career stages valued different sections of scientific papers, and skill in reading the results section develops slowly over the course of an academic career. Inexperienced readers found the methods and results sections of research papers the most difficult to read, and undervalued the importance of the results section and critical interpretation of data. These data highlight a need for structured support with reading scientific literature at multiple career stages, and for senior academics to be aware that junior colleagues may prioritise their reading differently. We propose a model for the development of literature processing skills, and consider the need for training strategies to help inexperienced readers engage with primary literature, and therefore develop important skills that underpin scientific careers. We also encourage researchers to be mindful of language used when writing papers, and to be more inclusive of diverse audiences when disseminating their work.

  15. Want to Inspire Science Students to Consider a Research Career? Host a Scientist in Your Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Baynham, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Most biology students have limited exposure to research since this is not a public activity and the pace of science does not lend itself to television dramatization. In contrast, medicine is the subject of numerous TV shows, and students’ experience visiting doctors may lead them to think they want to become physicians. One effective way to encourage these students to consider a research career is to invite engaging scientists to speak about their career paths and lives during class. S...

  16. Early Career Researchers Demand Full-text and Rely on Google to Find Scholarly Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Hayman

    2017-01-01

    A Review of: Nicholas, D., Boukacem-Zeghmouri, C., Rodríguez-Bravo, B., Xu, J., Watkinson, A., Abrizah, A., Herman, E., & Świgoń, M. (2017). Where and how early career researchers find scholarly information. Learned Publishing, 30(1), 19-29. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/leap.1087 Abstract Objective – To examine the attitudes and information behaviours of early career researchers (ECRs) when locating scholarly information. Design – Qualitative longitudinal study. Setting – R...

  17. The European Research Agenda for career guidance and counseling - and beyond. ECADOC - Early stage researchers symposium 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie; Weber, Peter C.

    Research in CGC is an expanding field of research still it is important to attract doctoral candidates to commit themselves to participation in scholarly exchange at central conferences. IAEVG is a central conference to the research field of Career Guidance and Counseling. With this symposium we...... to present their research in progress and to open up for discussion on the inclusion process into the research field of CGC. The Early stage researchers symposium 2016 includes work in progress presentations 1) the European Research Agenda 2) recognition in adult education and the role of guidance, 3......) quality in career guidance, 4) an ESR experience of entering the CGC research community. The symposium will support and encourage Early stage researchers participation in the international career guidance research community and allow for symposium participants to hear about the newest research ideas...

  18. College Students’ Views of Work–Life Balance in STEM Research Careers: Addressing Negative Preconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan-Wilson, Anna; Stamp, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    In career discussions, female undergraduates said that if they were to attend graduate school in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and were to follow a career based on their research training, they would have to give up having a family. A subsequent survey showed that many students, both men and women, thought work–life balance would be more difficult to achieve in a STEM research path than in other professions they were considering. Their views of STEM research being less family-friendly were more pronounced on issues of parental leaves and caring for children than finding a spouse/partner and landing two jobs in the same locality. To provide role models of work–life balance in STEM professions, we convened panels of dual-career couples who described how they worked together to raise their children while advancing their scientific careers. Our selection of panelists and topics of discussion were based on findings of social science research on work–life balance. On a survey with the same questions administered afterward, the changes in paired responses of male and female students with respect to all four issues showed a significant shift toward thinking that a research-based STEM career would be no more difficult than other careers they were considering. PMID:26163564

  19. A new approach to mentoring for research careers: the National Research Mentoring Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkness, Christine A; Pfund, Christine; Ofili, Elizabeth O; Okuyemi, Kolawole S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Zavala, Maria Elena; Pesavento, Theresa; Fernandez, Mary; Tissera, Anthony; Deveci, Alp; Javier, Damaris; Short, Alexis; Cooper, Paige; Jones, Harlan; Manson, Spero; Buchwald, Dedra; Eide, Kristin; Gouldy, Andrea; Kelly, Erin; Langford, Nicole; McGee, Richard; Steer, Clifford; Unold, Thad; Weber-Main, Anne Marie; Báez, Adriana; Stiles, Jonathan; Pemu, Priscilla; Thompson, Winston; Gwathmey, Judith; Lawson, Kimberly; Johnson, Japera; Hall, Meldra; Paulsen, Douglas; Fouad, Mona; Smith, Ann; Luna, Rafael; Wilson, Donald; Adelsberger, Greg; Simenson, Drew; Cook, Abby; Feliu-Mojer, Monica; Harwood, Eileen; Jones, Amy; Branchaw, Janet; Thomas, Stephen; Butz, Amanda; Byars-Winston, Angela; House, Stephanie; McDaniels, Melissa; Quinn, Sandra; Rogers, Jenna; Spencer, Kim; Utzerath, Emily; Duplicate Of Weber-Main; Womack, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Effective mentorship is critical to the success of early stage investigators, and has been linked to enhanced mentee productivity, self-efficacy, and career satisfaction. The mission of the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) is to provide all trainees across the biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences with evidence-based mentorship and professional development programming that emphasizes the benefits and challenges of diversity, inclusivity, and culture within mentoring relationships, and more broadly the research workforce. The purpose of this paper is to describe the structure and activities of NRMN. NRMN serves as a national training hub for mentors and mentees striving to improve their relationships by better aligning expectations, promoting professional development, maintaining effective communication, addressing equity and inclusion, assessing understanding, fostering independence, and cultivating ethical behavior. Training is offered in-person at institutions, regional training, or national meetings, as well as via synchronous and asynchronous platforms; the growing training demand is being met by a cadre of NRMN Master Facilitators. NRMN offers career stage-focused coaching models for grant writing, and other professional development programs. NRMN partners with diverse stakeholders from the NIH-sponsored Diversity Program Consortium (DPC), as well as organizations outside the DPC to work synergistically towards common diversity goals. NRMN offers a virtual portal to the Network and all NRMN program offerings for mentees and mentors across career development stages. NRMNet provides access to a wide array of mentoring experiences and resources including MyNRMN, Guided Virtual Mentorship Program, news, training calendar, videos, and workshops. National scale and sustainability are being addressed by NRMN "Coaches-in-Training" offerings for more senior researchers to implement coaching models across the nation. "Shark Tanks" provide

  20. Challenges in communicating research and research careers: lesson learned from the European Researchers' Nights at INGV

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Rubbia, Giuliana; Musacchio, Gemma; Lanza, Tiziana

    2014-05-01

    frequent comment was the invitation to repeat more frequently such events. With no doubt, the visit to seismic surveillance room contributes to give more information and clarification about seismicity of the territory, dispel the myth or deepen the debate on deterministic earthquake prediction and regain at least part of the reputational damage following both the earthquake and the L'Aquila trial (Amato et al., EGU2013-12140). Nevertheless, it remains challenging to measure effects of such initiatives on middle terms, and performance indicators are desirable. It is worth noting that, while INGV organizes this kind of events for several years, it seem that researchers who take active part in this organization are still a limited number. In fact, participants where mainly technician and fixed-term position personnel, mostly women. Is this unavailability related to weak curricular evaluation of third-mission activity in research careers? This require a reflection. Moreover, a video realized by INGV Osservatorio Etneo dealing with working conditions of women in research, presented during the 2012 edition, allows to reflect about the need for more family friendly practices to balance family care and work as well as to promote participation of female researchers to decision making bodies.

  1. Inclination towards research and the pursuit of a research career among medical students: an international cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tam Cam; Ng, Sheryl; Chen, Cynthia; Yong, Sook Kwin; Koh, Gerald C H; Tan, Say Beng; Malhotra, Rahul; Altermatt, Fernando; Seim, Arnfinn; Biderman, Aya; Woolley, Torres; Østbye, Truls

    2018-05-02

    Involvement of clinicians in biomedical research is imperative for the future of healthcare. Several factors influence clinicians' inclination towards research: the medical school experience, exposure to research article reading and writing, and knowledge of research. This cohort study follows up medical students at time of graduation to explore changes in their inclination towards research and pursuing a research career compared to their inclination at time of entry into medical school. Students from medical schools in six different countries were enrolled in their first year of school and followed-up upon graduation in their final year. Students answered the same self-administered questionnaire at both time points. Changes in inclination towards research and pursuing a research career were assessed. Factors correlated with these changes were analysed. Of the 777 medical students who responded to the study questionnaire at entry into medical school, 332 (42.7%) completed the follow-up survey. Among these 332 students, there was no significant increase in inclination towards research or pursuing a research career over the course of their medical schooling. Students from a United States based school, in contrast to those from schools other countries, were more likely to report having research role models to guide them (51.5% vs. 0%-26.4%) and to have published in a peer-reviewed journal (75.7% vs. 8.9%-45%). Absence of a role model was significantly associated with a decrease in inclination towards research, while an increased desire to learn more about statistics was significantly associated with an increase in inclination towards pursuing a research career. Most medical students did not experience changes in their inclination towards research or pursuing a research career over the course of their medical schooling. Factors that increased their inclination to undertaking research or pursuing a research career were availability of a good role model, and a good

  2. Reflections of a community-based participatory researcher from the intersection of disability advocacy, engineering, and the academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymaker, Dora M

    2017-09-01

    This article uses an evocative autoethnographic approach to explore the experience of being an insider-researcher in a community-based participatory research setting. Taking a holistic perspective and using the form of narrative story-telling, I examine the dynamics between the typically marginalizing (but sometimes empowering) experience of being an autistic woman and the typically privileging (but sometimes oppressive) experience of being an engineering professional, during a time of career upheaval. Themes of motivations and mentors, adversity from social services and the academy, belonging, the slipperiness of intersectional positioning, feedback cycles of opportunity, dichotomies of competence and inadequacy, heightened stakes, and power and resistance are explored through the narrative. While primarily leaving the narrative to speak for itself per the qualitative approach taken, the article concludes with a discussion of how the personal experiences described relate both to the broader work of insider-researchers within disability-related fields, and to misconceptions about self-reflection and capacity for story-telling in individuals on the autism spectrum.

  3. Funding opportunities for clinical investigators in the early stages of career development in cardiovascular research

    OpenAIRE

    Mentz, Robert J.; Becker, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary cardiovascular research offers junior investigators the opportunity to explore the gamut of biomedical questions. Despite the recent reduction in the availability of funding mechanisms that have historically served as the primary pathways for investigators in the early stages of career development, there remain numerous traditional and non-traditional funding opportunities. This article highlights these opportunities in order to assist early career investigators in the developmen...

  4. Senior Female Academics in the UK Academy: Theoretical Perspectives for Understanding the Impact of Education and Familial Influences on Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Kate

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the theoretical perspectives I utilised in my doctoral research to uncover the role of class and gender in my respondents' stories and experiences of their career success. I argue that adopting an economic model for conceptualising the influence of social class and gender in the respondents' stories and experiences of their…

  5. Brief Communication : Future avenues for permafrost science from the perspective of early career researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritz, M.; Deshpande, B. N.; Bouchard, F.; Högström, E.; Malenfant-Lepage, J.; Morgenstern, A.; Nieuwendam, A.; Oliva, M.; Paquette, M.; Rudy, A. C A; Siewert, M. B.; Sjöberg, Y.; Weege, S.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating climate change and increased economic and environmental interests in permafrost-affected regions have resulted in an acute need for more directed permafrost research. In June 2014, 88 early career researchers convened to identify future priorities for permafrost research. This

  6. UNESCO Launches Open Access Curriculum for Young and Early Career Researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Anup-Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This article narrates the background of UNESCO Curriculum titled "Open Access for Researchers" which was launched on 16th March 2015. This Open Access Curriculum contains five modules for capacity building, awareness raising and sensitizing young and early career researchers affiliated to research laboratories or higher educational institutions across the world.

  7. The Effect of the Summer Training Program on Midshipmen Career Choice at the United States Naval Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    theory, and social constructionism . It is important to note that the specific names of the traditions and the theories they contain vary from author...10 B. DEVELOPMENTAL.................................................................................14 C. SOCIAL -COGNITIVE...psychology has lead to the development of several new models for vocational development. Among these, the Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown

  8. Research and career opportunities for chemists in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two recent publications [Training Requirements for Chemists in Nuclear Medicine, Nuclear Industry, and Related Areas: Report of a Workshop National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1988, and Report of the Society of Nuclear Medicine Manpower Committee, Journal of Nuclear Medicine, January, 1989] have emphasized the opportunities for Chemists in Nuclear Medicine. These opportunities exist in Medical Centers, the Radiopharmaceutical Drug Industry as well as the Ethical Drug Industry of particular importance of the need for organic and inorganic chemists with knowledge and experience in radiochemistry to develop and prepare the radiopharmaceuticals needed for the Nuclear Medicine community. The number of positions available at present and anticipated in the future will be compared and the number of training programs listed. Examples of the types of opportunities in this area will be given

  9. Polish Academy of Sciences. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1998-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The report presented research activities of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, in 1998-1999. Research interests focus on: replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA, regulation of gene expression, biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins, gene sequencing and functional gene analysis, structure and function of enzymes, conformation of proteins and peptides, modeling of structures and prediction of function of proteins.

  10. Polish Academy of Sciences. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The report presented research activities of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, in 1998-1999. Research interests focus on: replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA, regulation of gene expression, biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins, gene sequencing and functional gene analysis, structure and function of enzymes, conformation of proteins and peptides, modeling of structures and prediction of function of proteins

  11. Retrospectives, current valences and prospective dimensions of research at the Academy of Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel SÎMBOTEANU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to identify the social determinants, which initiated and facilitated the content and evolution of the scientific research of the administrative phenomenon in the Republic of Moldova after the declaration of independence. It also elucidates the current valences and perspectives of this activity in the context of the provisions of the recently adopted Research Strategy of the Academy of Public Administration for the period 2016-2020.

  12. WHAT DRIVES RESEARCHERS' CAREERS? THE ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY, GENDER AND FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fernandez-Zubieta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available International mobility has become increasingly common in the research profession, partly due to strong policy support. To understand this trend, it is necessary to explore how researchers plan and envisage their career, that is, what drives their decisions. In this exploratory paper we shed light on this issue, comparing career drivers across three mobility categories. Furthermore, we take into account gender and the parental status of the researchers, as both factors remarkably influence career choices. We use data from the Study on International Mobility and Researchers’ Career Development Project (SIM-ReC, launched in 2011 by the Institute of Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS in collaboration with NIFU (Norway, Logotech (Greece and the University of Athens. The dataset covers researchers working in European universities across ten countries: Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. The results highlight how different mobility patterns reflect different motivations and confirm that gender and parenthood are critical in shaping career decisions

  13. WHAT DRIVES RESEARCHERS' CAREERS? THE ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY, GENDER AND FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fernandez-Zubieta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available International mobility has become increasingly common in the research profession, partly due to strong policy support. To understand this trend, it is necessary to explore how researchers plan and envisage their career, that is, what drives their decisions. In this exploratory paper we shed light on this issue, comparing career drivers across three mobility categories. Furthermore, we take into account gender and the parental status of the researchers, as both factors remarkably influence career choices. We use data from the Study on International Mobility and Researchers’ Career Development Project (SIM-ReC, launched in 2011 by the Institute of Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS in collaboration with NIFU (Norway, Logotech (Greece and the University of Athens. The dataset covers researchers working in European universities across ten countries: Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. The results highlight how different mobility patterns reflect different motivations and confirm that gender and parenthood are critical in shaping career decisions.

  14. Academicians' Career Capital and Career Satisfaction: The Mediation Effect of Research Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin, Ihsan; Erdogmus, Nihat; Erdil, Oya; Akgün, Ali E.

    2016-01-01

    The competitive advantages of knowledge-producing institutions are their wise, creative, enthusiastic, and excited academicians and their competences. Currently, questions come to the fore as to which variables affect the research performance of university-employed academicians, and what role does research performance have in the relationship of…

  15. Career Satisfaction and Perceived Salary Competitiveness among Individuals Who Completed Postdoctoral Research Training in Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M.; Nelson, David E.; Izmirlian, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Studies examining career satisfaction of biomedical scientists are limited, especially in the context of prior postdoctoral training. Here we focused on career satisfaction defined as satisfaction with one’s career trajectory and perceived salary competitiveness among a predominantly Ph.D.-trained population of scientists who completed cancer prevention-related postdoctoral training between 1987–2011. National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumni (n = 114), and previous recipients of NCI-sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA/F32) postdoctoral fellowships (n = 140) completed online surveys. Associations of career satisfaction and perception of salary competitiveness with demographic, training, and employment-related factors were examined using logistic regression. Overall, 61% reported high levels of satisfaction with their career trajectory to-date. Higher salary (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07–7.69) and having more leadership roles (OR = 2.26, 95% CI:1.04–4.90) were independently associated with higher career satisfaction. Persons with race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.20–0.82) or age ≥ 50 (OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17–0.94) had lower career satisfaction levels. There were no statistically significant differences in career satisfaction levels by gender, scientific discipline, or employment sector. 74% perceived their current salary as competitive, but persons with 5–9, or ≥10 years in their current position reported lower levels (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15–0.65; and OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16–0.87, respectively), as did individuals in government positions (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.11–0.98). These data add to the understanding of career satisfaction of those with advanced training in biomedical research by examining these measures in relation to prior postdoctoral research training and across multiple career sectors. PMID:28121985

  16. Meta-Analysis as a Choice to Improve Research in Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard R. D.; McClain, Clifford R.; Kim, Yeonsoo; Maldonado, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    A search of the ERIC and Academic Search Premier data bases, and a comprehensive review of literature suggest that meta-analysis is ignored by career and technical education (CTE) researchers, a situation that is regrettable but remediable. The purpose of this theoretical paper is to provide CTE researchers and consumers with procedures for…

  17. Career Aspirations of Malaysian Research and Development Professionals in the Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Maimunah; Ramly, Efizah Sofiah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to compare the influence of self-efficacy, organizational socialization and continuous improvement (CI) practices on the career aspirations of research and development (R&D) professionals in government research institutes (GRIs) and multinational corporations (MNCs) in Malaysia. R&D professionals in this study…

  18. Teaching and Research in Mid-Career Management Education: Function and Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Bríd C.

    2016-01-01

    The apparent disconnect between teaching and research has implications for both curricular content and pedagogic practice and has particular salience in the field of mid-career education. To overcome this disconnect, faculty endeavour to integrate teaching and research. Pressure to do so stems from many sources. Benchmarks of professional…

  19. The G4R GMES Academy - linking research, academia, service providers and local authorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeil, Peter; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2013-04-01

    The GMES Academy intends to enhance the role of the academic and R&D communities in the evolution of EO & GI services. The GMES4Regions G4R initiative, aiming to strengthen the link between GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) and European regions, inaugurated the GMES Academy at the University Mozarteum of Salzburg (Austria) on 13th - 14th September 2012. This academy has been created with the objective of fostering a dialogue among the private sector, Local and Regional Administration (LRA) and the academic and research community, in order to improve the development of Earth Observation (EO) and Geographic Information (GI) services. On this occasion, Z_GIS, the Interfaculty Department of Geoinformatics of Salzburg University, hosted the round table "Fostering Downstream Services for the Regions - contributions from Research & Academia," during which the participants had the opportunity to discuss with representatives of the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA) the future role of the academic community in this domain. Stakeholders from the academic and R&D world adopted the 'Salzburg Declaration on GMES related Research', calling for strengthening connections between research activities and educational programmes to improve GMES services. The Declaration calls mainly for: • fostering education and training on GMES • ensuring cooperation among the academic and research community through the GMES Academy • maintaining a political commitment towards the implementation of such academic initiatives. The GMES Academy is established as a platform with six components: GATEWAY - the directory of Universities and Research Centres BRIDGE - an inventory of research briefs documenting the latest offerings from research to effective applications FACILITATOR - a portal to seek or propose internships or contract research across Europe and addressing outreach and advocacy: LINK - Access to the repository of on-going GMES related

  20. Undergraduate Research as a Primary Pathway to STEM Careers: Perspectives from the Council on Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, P. L.; Ambos, E. L.

    2012-12-01

    Undergraduate research (UR) is one of the most authentic and effective ways to promote student learning, and is a high-impact educational practice that can lead to measurable gains in student retention and graduation rates, as well as career aspirations. In recent years, UR has expanded from intensive summer one-on-one faculty-student mentored experiences to application in a variety of educational settings, including large lower division courses. The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), founded in 1978, is a national organization of individual (8000) and institutional members (650) within a divisional structure that includes geosciences, as well as 10 other thematic areas. CUR's main mission is to support and promote high-quality undergraduate student-faculty collaborative research and scholarship that develops learning through research. CUR fulfills this mission through extensive publication offerings, faculty and student-directed professional development events, and outreach and advocacy activities that share successful models and strategies for establishing, institutionalizing, and sustaining undergraduate research programs. Over the last decade, CUR has worked with hundreds of academic institutions, including two-year colleges, to develop practices to build undergraduate research into campus cultures and operations. As documented in CUR publications such as Characteristics of Excellence in Undergraduate Research (COEUR), strategies institutions may adopt to enhance and sustain UR often include: (1) the establishment of a central UR campus office, (2) extensive student and faculty participation in campus-based, as well as regional UR celebration events, (3) development of a consistent practice of assessment of UR's impact on student success, and, (4) establishment of clear policies for recognizing and rewarding faculty engagement in UR, particularly with respect to mentorship and publication with student scholars. Three areas of current focus within the

  1. Outcomes from the NIH Clinical Research Training Program: A Mentored Research Experience to Enhance Career Development of Clinician–Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ognibene, Frederick P.; Gallin, John I.; Baum, Bruce J.; Wyatt, Richard G.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Clinician-scientists are considered an endangered species for many reasons, including challenges with establishing and maintaining a career pipeline. Career outcomes from year-long medical and dental students’ research enrichment programs have not been well determined. Therefore, the authors assessed career and research outcome data from a cohort of participants in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Research Training Program (CRTP). Method The CRTP provided a year-long mentored clinical or translational research opportunity for 340 medical and dental students. Of these, 135 completed their training, including fellowships, from 1997 to January 2014. Data for 130 of 135 were analyzed, including time conducting research, types of public funding (NIH grants), and publications from self-reported surveys that were verified via NIH RePORT and PUBMED. Results Nearly two-thirds (84 of 130) indicated that they were conducting research, and over half of the 84 (approximately one-third of the total cohort) spent more than 25% of time devoted to research. Of those 84, over 25% received grant support from the NIH, and those further in their careers published more scholarly manuscripts. Conclusions Data suggest that the CRTP helped foster the careers of research-oriented medical and dental students as measured by time conducting research, successful competition for federal funding, and the publication of their research. Longer follow-up is warranted to assess the impact of these mentored research experiences. Investments in mentored research programs for health professional students are invaluable to support the dwindling pipeline of biomedical researchers and clinician-scientists. PMID:27224296

  2. College Students' Views of Work-Life Balance in STEM Research Careers: Addressing Negative Preconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan-Wilson, Anna; Stamp, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    In career discussions, female undergraduates said that if they were to attend graduate school in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and were to follow a career based on their research training, they would have to give up having a family. A subsequent survey showed that many students, both men and women, thought work-life balance would be more difficult to achieve in a STEM research path than in other professions they were considering. Their views of STEM research being less family-friendly were more pronounced on issues of parental leaves and caring for children than finding a spouse/partner and landing two jobs in the same locality. To provide role models of work-life balance in STEM professions, we convened panels of dual-career couples who described how they worked together to raise their children while advancing their scientific careers. Our selection of panelists and topics of discussion were based on findings of social science research on work-life balance. On a survey with the same questions administered afterward, the changes in paired responses of male and female students with respect to all four issues showed a significant shift toward thinking that a research-based STEM career would be no more difficult than other careers they were considering. © 2015 A. Tan-Wilson and N. Stamp. et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Early Career Mentoring for Translational Researchers: Mentee Perspectives on Challenges and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Thomas E.; Collier, Peter J.; Blakeslee, Jennifer E.; Logan, Kay; McCracken, Karen; Morris, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Background and purposes The education and training of early career biomedical translational researchers often involves formal mentoring by more experienced colleagues. This study investigated the nature of these mentoring relationships from the perspective of mentees. The objective was to understand the challenges and issues encountered by mentees in forming and maintaining productive mentoring relationships. Method Three focus groups (n=14) were conducted with early career researchers who had mentored career development awards. Thematic analysis identified, categorized, and illustrated the challenges and issues reported by mentees. Results The range of mentee challenges was reflected in five major categories: 1) network—finding appropriate mentors to meet various needs; 2) access—structuring schedules and opportunities to receive mentoring; 3) expectations—negotiating the mechanics of the mentoring relationship and its purpose; 4) alignment—managing mentor-mentee mismatches regarding interests, priorities, and goals; and 5) skills and supports—developing the institutional supports to be successful. Conclusions Mentoring relationships created for academic training and career development contend with tasks common to many other relationships, namely recognizing compatibility, finding time, establishing patterns, agreeing to goals, and achieving aims. Identifying challenges faced by mentees can facilitate the development of appropriate trainings and supports to foster mentoring relationships in academic and career settings. PMID:25010230

  4. Entering the Field: Decisions of an Early Career Researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajeel Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Classic grounded theory methodology is a much-debated topic in research, especially when novice researchers are selecting classic grounded theory for their research or theses. There is a constant need to justify and defend certain processes of grounded theory, which often challenge other research methods. As a novice researcher, I have often found myself juggling between the need to follow specific procedures and regulations of the university while opting to support the views of Glaser and the application of classic grounded theory for my research. To tackle such difficulties, specific decisions were used to support and justify key choices that favoured classic grounded theory and the requirements of the research institute and my research process. This article provides a reflection on the decisions taken at different stages of the research process to help readers make informed decisions before entering the field.

  5. The early career researcher's toolkit: translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Qasim A; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I; Wilson, Samantha L; Patel, Asha K; Barnes, Amanda L; Adams, Christopher F; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine translation, we discuss common pitfalls associated with translational research, providing practical solutions and important considerations which will aid process and product development. Suggestions range from effective project management, consideration of key manufacturing, clinical and regulatory matters and means of exploiting research for successful commercialization.

  6. From Criticism to Research: The 'Textual' in the Academy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghan Morris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available When the first joint workshop on cultural research between the University of Western Sydney’s Centre for Cultural Research (CCR and the Department of Cultural Studies at Hong Kong’s Lingnan University (LU began in July 2002, I had to admit to a little uncertainty in opening the proceedings. It was a novel experience for me to speak in Sydney as a member of a foreign delegation, and I spent an anxious moment wondering how to pitch my remarks: should I be telling old friends from UWS about what we do at Lingnan, or introducing new friends from Hong Kong to the Sydney—no, the Parramatta-based environment where we would spend the next few days?

  7. Language Learning Careers as an Object of Narrative Research in TESOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Phil

    2011-01-01

    One of the strengths of narrative research in TESOL is its potential to provide insight into long-term language learning experiences that cannot be investigated in real time. Reliance on retrospection, however, brings two problems that are addressed in this article through the concept of "language learning careers". The first problem is…

  8. Moving up the ladder : heterogeneity influencing academic careers through research orientation, gender, and mentors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, Ward; Werker, C.; Hopp, Christian

    2018-01-01

    We look into the question whether heterogeneity stemming from research orientation, gender, or disciplinary and cultural differences with their PhD supervisors helps or hampers academics’ careers. Based on a sample of 248 academics at two leading European universities of technology, we combine

  9. The 41st Chair: Defining Careers in the Current Biomedical Research Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F. W. B.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years academic capitalism and a distancing from Mertonian scientific norms have shifted the traditional reward of academic science from peer recognition to the award of grants. With the shrinking of the NIH budget in real terms since 2003, there are increasing numbers of researchers whose careers are at risk from lack of funding. This…

  10. Organising, Providing and Evaluating Technical Training for Early Career Researchers: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besouw, Rachel M.; Rogers, Katrine S.; Powles, Christopher J.; Papadopoulos, Timos; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the importance of providing technical training opportunities for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) worldwide through the case study of a MATLAB training programme, which was proposed, organised, managed and evaluated by a team of five ECRs at the University of Southampton. The effectiveness of the programme in terms of the…

  11. A Pragmatic Approach to Getting Published: 35 Tips for Early Career Researchers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glover, N. M.; Antoniadi, I.; George, G. M.; Götzenberger, Lars; Gutzat, R.; Koorem, K.; Liancourt, Pierre; Rutkowicz, K.; Saharan, K.; You, W.; Mayer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, 09 May (2016), s. 1-7, č. článku 610. ISSN 1664-462X EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 267243 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : publishing * early career researcher * collaboration Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  12. Qualitative Research in Career Development: Content Analysis from 1990 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Graham B.; Perry, Justin C.; Munka, Linda M.; Bonnett, Heather R.; Shiban, Abbey P.; Care, Esther

    2012-01-01

    A content analysis of 11 journals that published career, vocational, and work-related articles from 1990 to 2009 was conducted. Of 3,279 articles analyzed, 55.9% used quantitative methods and 35.5% were theoretical/conceptual articles. Only 6.3% used qualitative research methods. Among the qualitative empirical studies, standards of academic rigor…

  13. Strategies for Handling Missing Data with Maximum Likelihood Estimation in Career and Technical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Heok

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in career and technical education often ignore more effective ways of reporting and treating missing data and instead implement traditional, but ineffective, missing data methods (Gemici, Rojewski, & Lee, 2012). The recent methodological, and even the non-methodological, literature has increasingly emphasized the importance of…

  14. Use of "t"-Test and ANOVA in Career-Technical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gemici, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    Use of t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedures in published research from three scholarly journals in career and technical education (CTE) during a recent 5-year period was examined. Information on post hoc analyses, reporting of effect size, alpha adjustments to account for multiple tests, power, and examination of assumptions…

  15. Supervision, mentorship and peer networks: how Estonian early career researchers get (or fail to get support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana Eigi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses issues related to supervision and support of early career researchers in Estonian academia. We use nine focus groups interviews conducted in 2015 with representatives of social sciences in order to identify early career researchers’ needs with respect to support, frustrations they may experience, and resources they may have for addressing them. Our crucial contribution is the identification of wider support networks of peers and colleagues that may compensate, partially or even fully, for failures of official supervision. On the basis of our analysis we argue that support for early career researchers should take into account the resources they already possess but also recognise the importance of wider academic culture, including funding and employment patterns, and the roles of supervisors and senior researchers in ensuring successful functioning of support networks. Through analysing the conditions for the development of early career researchers – producers of knowledge – our paper contributes to social epistemology understood as analysis of specific forms of social organisation of knowledge production.

  16. Current Status and Future Agenda for the Theory, Research, and Practice of Childhood Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, Donna E. Palladino

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the current status and a future agenda for childhood career development theory, research, and practice. The fragmented nature of the current state of the literature is noted, and a call is made for a reexamination and reconsideration of the childhood developmental pathways of life's work. It is suggested that the study of…

  17. Expanding Research Concerning Family Influences on Career Development: Cultivating a Number of Brown Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiston, Susan C.; Keller, Briana K.

    2004-01-01

    We would like to begin by thanking the respondents for their thoughtful analyses of our review, particularly for their scholarly suggestions for expanding the research on the association between the family of origin and career development across the lifespan. In our opinion, each of the five responses to our article provides significant insights…

  18. Organizational Culture, Performance and Career Choices of Ph.D.s: A Case Study of Dutch Medical Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weijden, Inge; de Gilder, Dick; Groenewegen, Peter; Geerling, Maaike

    2008-01-01

    Increasing demands for accountability and applicability raise the question of how organizational factors affect researchers' performance and career choices. In a study of Dutch medical Ph.D. student's experiences, organizational culture and climate and attitudes towards research quality are related to performance and career choices. Ph.D.s who…

  19. Leadership mentoring in nursing research, career development and scholarly productivity: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; van der Zwaag, Angeli M; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2017-10-01

    Although nursing has been an academic discipline for decades, the infrastructure for nursing research in many countries is still fragile and struggling. Postdoctoral nurses have difficulties developing sustaining careers in nursing research due to lack of career opportunities. Considerable research has been conducted on leadership and mentoring in various areas of nursing. We aimed to systematically review the literature investigating leadership programs and mentoring for postdoctoral nurse researchers, as well as the influence of leadership and mentoring on research productivity, research career development, leadership knowledge and skills, the nurses' health and well-being, staff relationships, work culture and collaboration, salaries and postdoctoral nurses' experiences. A systematic review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement was conducted. The electronic databases PubMed, CINAHL and EMBASE were searched without time limits for eligible studies up to January 2016. Reference lists of included articles were also searched manually and authors were contacted to inquire about other relevant papers. Two authors independently assessed eligibility of studies for inclusion. Titles and abstracts were matched with the inclusion criteria: studies investigating leadership and mentoring programs for postdoctoral nurses and leadership and mentoring influencing research productivity, and career development; and leadership knowledge and skills and other outcomes. The quality of the studies was appraised using the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine for surveys, the Critical Appraisal Skill Program Qualitative Appraisal Checklist for qualitative studies, and a critical appraisal list for mixed methods studies. Any disagreements were resolved by consensus. Data were extracted by two reviewers. We screened 1775 titles and abstracts, resulting in 15 studies, which included quantitative, descriptive, qualitative and mixed

  20. The Role of Scientific Communication Skills in Trainees’ Intention to Pursue Biomedical Research Careers: A Social Cognitive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Lee, Hwa Young; Anderson, Cheryl; Byars-Winston, Angela; Baldwin, Constance D.; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Scientific communication (SciComm) skills are indispensable for success in biomedical research, but many trainees may not have fully considered the necessity of regular writing and speaking for research career progression. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between SciComm skill acquisition and research trainees’ intentions to remain in research careers. We used social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to test a model of the relationship of SciComm skills to SciComm-related cognitive variables in explaining career intentions. A sample of 510 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at major academic health science centers in the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, were surveyed online. Results suggested that interest in performing SciComm tasks, SciComm outcome expectations (SCOEs), and SciComm productivity predicted intention to remain in a research career, while SciComm self-efficacy did not directly predict career intention. SCOEs also predicted interest in performing SciComm tasks. As in other SCCT studies, SciComm self-efficacy predicted SCOEs. We conclude that social cognitive factors of SciComm skill acquisition and SciComm productivity significantly predict biomedical trainees’ intentions to pursue research careers whether within or outside academia. While further studies are needed, these findings may lead to evidence-based interventions to help trainees remain in their chosen career paths. PMID:26628562

  1. Mind the Gap: Promoting Careers in Academic Research to Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posporelis, Sotirios; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn S.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Chisolm, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective With the shift of interest in psychiatry towards patient-oriented research with clinically relevant outcomes, there is a critical need for well-trained psychiatrist-scientists. The authors report on two developmentally-tailored, longitudinal research training curricula designed to use peer mentoring to bridge the gap between physicians and scientists, and to promote careers in academic research. Methods The authors instituted two independent research training curricula, one for first-year and one for second-to-fourth year psychiatry residents, spanning two campuses of one institutional residency training program. Each curriculum’s participants included psychiatry residents and peer scientific investigators, and both were attended by senior scientists and departmental leaders. The authors developed and administered an anonymous survey at the end of the first cycle of the first-year resident curriculum to assess participant attitudes. Results The first-year and second-to-fourth-year resident curricula have been implemented for 3and 2 years respectively. The authors observed overall participant satisfaction with the first-year curricula, independent of trainee status. Furthermore, first-year psychiatry residents reported increased interest in academic research careers after exposure to the curricula. Conclusions Results suggest it is possible to encourage academic research careers using peer mentoring, an innovative approach that requires minimal funding, little disruption to the residents’ schedule, and engages the gamut of individuals involved in psychiatry care and research: psychiatrists-in-training and young non-clinician scientists-in-training. PMID:24497181

  2. Best practices and pearls in interdisciplinary mentoring from Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Nagel, Joan D; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2012-11-01

    Increasingly, national programs and leaders are looking at interdisciplinary collaborations as essential to future research. Twelve years ago, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) developed and implemented the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) K12 program to focus on interdisciplinary mentored career development for junior faculty in women's health research. We applied a mixed-methods approach using an electronic survey and in-person presentations and discussions to understand best practices and lessons learned for interdisciplinary mentoring across BIRCWH K12 program leaders. We received responses from all 29 active BIRCWH programs. Factors associated with success included ensuring sufficient protected time for regular (weekly or biweekly) mentoring; mentors promoting the research independence of the Scholar; a team mentoring approach, including career as well as content mentors; and explicit and clear expectations outlined between the Scholar and mentor. The majority of programs conduct formal evaluations of mentorship, and 79% of programs offer training in mentorship for either Scholars, mentors, or both. This article presents program leaders' best practices, challenges, and lessons learned from mentoring junior faculty who are conducting women's health research, whether basic, clinical, behavioral, translational, or health services research, using an interdisciplinary mentoring approach.

  3. A Comparison of Internal Dispositions and Career Trajectories after Collaborative versus Apprenticed Research Experiences for Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Kyle J; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K; Britner, Shari L; Carruth, Laura L; Williams, Brian A; Pecore, John L; DeHaan, Robert L; Goode, Christopher T

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences confer benefits on students bound for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers, but the low number of research professionals available to serve as mentors often limits access to research. Within the context of our summer research program (BRAIN), we tested the hypothesis that a team-based collaborative learning model (CLM) produces student outcomes at least as positive as a traditional apprenticeship model (AM). Through stratified, random assignment to conditions, CLM students were designated to work together in a teaching laboratory to conduct research according to a defined curriculum led by several instructors, whereas AM students were paired with mentors in active research groups. We used pre-, mid-, and postprogram surveys to measure internal dispositions reported to predict progress toward STEM careers, such as scientific research self-efficacy, science identity, science anxiety, and commitment to a science career. We are also tracking long-term retention in science-related career paths. For both short- and longer-term outcomes, the two program formats produced similar benefits, supporting our hypothesis that the CLM provides positive outcomes while conserving resources, such as faculty mentors. We discuss this method in comparison with course-based undergraduate research and recommend its expansion to institutional settings in which mentor resources are scarce. © 2017 K. J. Frantz et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Primary care careers among recent graduates of research-intensive private and public medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Phillip A; Xu, Shuai; Ayanian, John Z

    2013-06-01

    Despite a growing need for primary care physicians in the United States, the proportion of medical school graduates pursuing primary care careers has declined over the past decade. To assess the association of medical school research funding with graduates matching in family medicine residencies and practicing primary care. Observational study of United States medical schools. One hundred twenty-one allopathic medical schools. The primary outcomes included the proportion of each school's graduates from 1999 to 2001 who were primary care physicians in 2008, and the proportion of each school's graduates who entered family medicine residencies during 2007 through 2009. The 25 medical schools with the highest levels of research funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2010 were designated as "research-intensive." Among research-intensive medical schools, the 16 private medical schools produced significantly fewer practicing primary care physicians (median 24.1% vs. 33.4%, p schools. In contrast, the nine research-intensive public medical schools produced comparable proportions of graduates pursuing primary care careers (median 36.1% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.87) and matching in family medicine residencies (median 7.4% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.37) relative to the other 66 public medical schools. To meet the health care needs of the US population, research-intensive private medical schools should play a more active role in promoting primary care careers for their students and graduates.

  5. Early-career researchers' views on ethical dimensions of patient engagement in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélisle-Pipon, Jean-Christophe; Rouleau, Geneviève; Birko, Stanislav

    2018-03-07

    Increasing attention and efforts are being put towards engaging patients in health research, and some have even argued that patient engagement in research (PER) is an ethical imperative. Yet there is relatively little empirical data on ethical issues associated with PER. A three-round Delphi survey was conducted with a panel of early-career researchers (ECRs) involved in PER. One of the objectives was to examine the ethical dimensions of PER as well as ECRs' self-perceived level of preparedness to conduct PER ethically. The study was conducted among awardees of the Québec SPOR-SUPPORT Unit in Canada, who represent the next generation of researchers involved in PER. Many themes were addressed throughout the study, such as definition, values, patients' roles, expected characteristics of patients, and anticipated challenges (including ethical issues). Open-ended questions were used, and all quantitative data were collected through statements using 7-point Likert scales. Between April and November 2016, 25 ECRs were invited to participate; 18 completed both the first and second rounds, and 16 completed the third round. Panelists consisted of nine women and seven men with various backgrounds (general practitioners and postgraduate students). The majority were between 25 and 44 years old. Panelists' responses showed PER raises important ethical issues: 1) professionalization of patients involved in research (with risks of patients becoming less representative); 2) adequate remuneration of patients; 3) fair recognition of patients' experiential knowledge; and 4) tokenism (engaging patients only for symbolic appeal). While the panelists felt moderately prepared to confront these ethical issues, they reported being uncomfortable applying for an ethics certificate for a PER project. If PER is an ethical imperative, it is vital to establish clear ethical standards and to train and support the PER community to identify and resolve ethical issues. Despite their overall

  6. An Engineering Degree Does Not (Necessarily) an Engineer Make: Career Decision Making among Undergraduate Engineering Majors. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Gary; Loshbaugh, Heidi G.; Claar, Brittany; Chen, Helen L.; Jackson, Kristyn; Sheppard, Sheri

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the career-related decision making of seniors enrolled in undergraduate engineering programs at two nationally recognized institutions. This strand of the Academic Pathways Study (APS) research revealed that many engineering students were undecided about their career plans, even late into their senior years and that many were…

  7. A Mentor Training Program Improves Mentoring Competency for Researchers Working with Early-Career Investigators from Underrepresented Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective…

  8. Communicating Gender-Equality Progress, Reduces Social Identity Threats for Women Considering a Research Career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Una Tellhed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the majority of top-level researchers are men, how does this vertical gender-segregation affect students’ perceptions of a research career? In the current study, an experimental manipulation either reminded students of academia’s current dominance of men or of its improving gender-balance. The results showed that women primed with the dominance of men anticipated much higher social identity threats (e.g., fear of discrimination in a future research career as compared to a control group. In contrast, women primed with the improving gender-balance anticipated much lower threat. Further, the dominance of men prime increased men’s interest in the PhD program, as compared to controls. Women’s interest was unaffected by the prime, but their lower interest as compared to men’s across conditions was mediated by their lower research self-efficacy (i.e., competence beliefs. The results imply that communicating gender-equality progress may allow women to consider a career in research without the barrier of social identity threat.

  9. A Mentoring Toolkit: Tips and Tools for Mentoring Early-Career Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Effective mentoring is a critical component in the training of early-career researchers, cultivating more independent, productive and satisfied scientists. For example, mentoring has been shown by the 2005 Sigma Xi National Postdoc Survey to be a key indicator for a successful postdoctoral outcome. Mentoring takes many forms and can include support for maximizing research skills and productivity as well as assistance in preparing for a chosen career path. Yet, because there is no "one-size-fits-all” approach, mentoring can be an activity that is hard to define. In this presentation, a series of tips and tools will be offered to aid mentors in developing a plan for their mentoring activities. This will include: suggestions for how to get started; opportunities for mentoring activities within the research group, within the institution, and outside the institution; tools for communicating and assessing professional milestones; and resources for fostering the professional and career development of mentees. Special considerations will also be presented for mentoring international scholars and women. These strategies will be helpful to the PI responding to the new NSF mentoring plan requirement for postdocs as well as to the student, postdoc, researcher or professor overseeing the research and training of others.

  10. Early-career researchers: an interview with Paloma Gonzalez Bellido.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Paloma Gonzalez Bellido is a Lecturer in the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge, where she investigates insect vision. She received her Bachelor's degree in Marine Biology from the University of Queensland, Australia, before moving to the University of Sheffield for her PhD with Mikko Juusola, which she completed in 2009. Paloma has been awarded a Cozzarelli Prize and her research has been recognised by the Society for Neuroethology and the Society for Experimental Biology. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Early-career researchers: an interview with Kakani Katija.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Kakani Katija is a Principal Engineer at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, USA, where she designs and builds instrumentation to study marine invertebrate ecomechanics. She received her Bachelor's degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the University of Washington, USA, before moving to the California Institute of Technology, USA, for her Master's degree in Aeronautics with Morteza Gharib and PhD in Bioengineering in the laboratory of John Dabiri, completed in 2010. Katija was recognised as a National Geographic Emerging Explorer in 2011 and has given presentations at TEDYouth and TEDWomen. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Want to Inspire Science Students to Consider a Research Career? Host a Scientist in Your Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J. Baynham

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Most biology students have limited exposure to research since this is not a public activity and the pace of science does not lend itself to television dramatization. In contrast, medicine is the subject of numerous TV shows, and students’ experience visiting doctors may lead them to think they want to become physicians. One effective way to encourage these students to consider a research career is to invite engaging scientists to speak about their career paths and lives during class. Students are most likely to be influenced by people they consider to be like themselves. While this method is well-suited to a lecture format where the scientist can address a larger audience, the laboratory would also be appropriate.

  13. Competency based career ladders for project managers in a large research & development organisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available the same organisation employing multiple sources of evidence to determine an optimal way of recognising and rewarding the career growth of project managers. Employee loyalty and career decisions are influenced by motivational theory, the need for career...

  14. Use of multivariate analysis to research career advancement of academic librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto Felipe Martínez Arellano

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse variables dealing with credential factors, bureaucratiuc factors, organizational and disciplinary achievements, academic culture factors, social ascribed factors, and institutional factors were stated as explanatory elements of promotion, tenure status, and earnings. A survey was the research instrument for collecting data to test diverse variables dealing with academic librarians rewards and earnings. Since the study attempted to analyze variables in a multivariate context, variable interactions were tested using multiple regression analysis. Findings of this study contribute to a better understanding of those factors influencing career advancement of academic librarians. Likewise, research methodology of this study could be used in Library and Information Science(LIS research.

  15. Mary Ellen Avery’s Research Career- Remembrance of Things Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Steven Torday

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mary Ellen Avery’s research is recognized as a milestone in biomedical research. She had discovered the underlying cause of Hyaline Membrane Disease, surfactant deficiency, fostering ever more vigorous efforts to reduce neonatal mortality in the burgeoning practice of Neonatology. Neonatology is the only clinical discipline that began as an experiment, making it a model for biomedical research. Avery knew that the concerted effort to treat preterm newborns could potentially do more harm than good, violating her oath to Hippocrates, if not held to the highest scientific standards. She remained true to that pledge throughout her career, as recounted in this Review.

  16. Handbook of Research on Sustainable Careers : Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beatrice van der Heijden; Ans de Vos

    2015-01-01

    What is a sustainable career and how can individuals and organizations develop pathways that lead to them? With current levels of global unemployment and the need for life-long learning and employability enhancement these questions assume a pressing significance. With twenty-eight chapters from

  17. Cohort Profile : The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R.; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A.

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved

  18. Exploring intentions of physician-scientist trainees: factors influencing MD and MD/PhD interest in research careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jennifer M; Daye, Dania; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Conlon, Claudia Morrissey; Kim, Hajwa; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Payne, Aimee S; Riddle, Megan; Madera, Sharline; Adami, Alexander J; Winter, Kate Quinn

    2017-07-11

    Prior studies have described the career paths of physician-scientist candidates after graduation, but the factors that influence career choices at the candidate stage remain unclear. Additionally, previous work has focused on MD/PhDs, despite many physician-scientists being MDs. This study sought to identify career sector intentions, important factors in career selection, and experienced and predicted obstacles to career success that influence the career choices of MD candidates, MD candidates with research-intense career intentions (MD-RI), and MD/PhD candidates. A 70-question survey was administered to students at 5 academic medical centers with Medical Scientist Training Programs (MSTPs) and Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) from the NIH. Data were analyzed using bivariate or multivariate analyses. More MD/PhD and MD-RI candidates anticipated or had experienced obstacles related to balancing academic and family responsibilities and to balancing clinical, research, and education responsibilities, whereas more MD candidates indicated experienced and predicted obstacles related to loan repayment. MD/PhD candidates expressed higher interest in basic and translational research compared to MD-RI candidates, who indicated more interest in clinical research. Overall, MD-RI candidates displayed a profile distinct from both MD/PhD and MD candidates. MD/PhD and MD-RI candidates experience obstacles that influence their intentions to pursue academic medical careers from the earliest training stage, obstacles which differ from those of their MD peers. The differences between the aspirations of and challenges facing MD, MD-RI and MD/PhD candidates present opportunities for training programs to target curricula and support services to ensure the career development of successful physician-scientists.

  19. Classroom-based science research at the introductory level: changes in career choices and attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melinda; Dunbar, David; Ratmansky, Lisa; Boyd, Kimberly; Lopatto, David

    2011-01-01

    Our study, focused on classroom-based research at the introductory level and using the Phage Genomics course as the model, shows evidence that first-year students doing research learn the process of science as well as how scientists practice science. A preliminary but notable outcome of our work, which is based on a small sample, is the change in student interest in considering different career choices such as graduate education and science in general. This is particularly notable, as previous research has described research internships as clarifying or confirming rather than changing undergraduates' decisions to pursue graduate education. We hypothesize that our results differ from previous studies of the impact of engaging in research because the students in our study are still in the early stages of their undergraduate careers. Our work builds upon the classroom-based research movement and should be viewed as encouraging to the Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education movement advocated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Science Foundation, and other undergraduate education stakeholders.

  20. Effect of two Howard Hughes Medical Institute research training programs for medical students on the likelihood of pursuing research careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Di; Meyer, Roger E

    2003-12-01

    To assess the effect of Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) two one-year research training programs for medical students on the awardees' research careers. Awardees of the HHMI Cloister Program who graduated between 1987 and 1995 and awardees of the HHMI Medical Fellows Program who graduated between 1991 and 1995 were compared with unsuccessful applicants to the programs and MD-PhD students who graduated during the same periods. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess research career outcomes while controlling for academic and demographic variables that could affect selection to the programs. Participation in both HHMI programs increased the likelihood of receiving National Institutes of Health postdoctoral support. Participation in the Cloister Program also increased the likelihood of receiving a faculty appointment with research responsibility at a medical school. In addition, awardees of the Medical Fellows Program were not significantly less likely than Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) and non-MSTP MD-PhD program participants to receive a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral award, and awardees of the Cloister Program were not significantly less likely than non-MSTP MD-PhD students to receive a faculty appointment with research responsibility. Women and underrepresented minority students were proportionally represented among awardees of the two HHMI programs whereas they were relatively underrepresented in MD-PhD programs. The one-year intensive research training supported by the HHMI training programs appears to provide an effective imprinting experience on medical students' research careers and to be an attractive strategy for training physician-scientists.

  1. The Role of Scientific Communication Skills in Trainees' Intention to Pursue Biomedical Research Careers: A Social Cognitive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Lee, Hwa Young; Anderson, Cheryl; Byars-Winston, Angela; Baldwin, Constance D; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Scientific communication (SciComm) skills are indispensable for success in biomedical research, but many trainees may not have fully considered the necessity of regular writing and speaking for research career progression. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between SciComm skill acquisition and research trainees' intentions to remain in research careers. We used social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to test a model of the relationship of SciComm skills to SciComm-related cognitive variables in explaining career intentions. A sample of 510 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at major academic health science centers in the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, were surveyed online. Results suggested that interest in performing SciComm tasks, SciComm outcome expectations (SCOEs), and SciComm productivity predicted intention to remain in a research career, while SciComm self-efficacy did not directly predict career intention. SCOEs also predicted interest in performing SciComm tasks. As in other SCCT studies, SciComm self-efficacy predicted SCOEs. We conclude that social cognitive factors of SciComm skill acquisition and SciComm productivity significantly predict biomedical trainees' intentions to pursue research careers whether within or outside academia. While further studies are needed, these findings may lead to evidence-based interventions to help trainees remain in their chosen career paths. © 2015 C. Cameron et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Early-Career Professional Development Training for Stakeholder-Relevant, Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, D. H.; Bamzai, A.; Mcpherson, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    There are many challenges to conducting inter- or multi-disciplinary research because basic research, applied research, management processes, disciplines, and even sub-disciplines have been "siloed" for so long that many research and management professionals find it difficult to communicate common interests and research needs. It is clear that the next generation of researchers must overcome these disciplinary biases and engage in more open dialogue with other disciplines and the management community in order to be better positioned to collaborate, speak a common language, and understand each other's needs. The U.S. Department of the Interior's South Central Climate Science Center recently conducted a professional development workshop for 28 early-career researchers involved in climate-related research across the South-Central U.S. The participants consisted of graduate students, postdocs, and junior faculty representing 17 different natural and social science disciplines and seven Universities/Institutions. The workshop provided the participants with guidance and instruction on how to overcome the identified challenges in conducting "actionable" research and how to better navigate multi-institutional and multi- or inter-disciplinary research. The workshop was comprised of: (1) a series of instructional presentations organized into themed sessions; (2) two keynote addresses to provide a broader perspective; (3) a real-world case study activity; (4) individual and group projects/presentations; and (5) field trips. In addition, we purposely created informal opportunities for participants to network, which met the goal of facilitating interdisciplinary interactions. An overview of the workshop experience will be provided, including a focus on those aspects leading to its ultimate success and recommendations for how to develop and implement a similar early-career workshop for your own purposes.

  3. Research on the evaluation indicators of skilled employees’ career success based on grounded theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulei Chu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: summarized and sorted career success evaluation indicators of skilled employees Design/methodology/approach: Based on Grounded Theory, through interviews and questionnaires to railway skilled employees Findings and Originality/value: the study shows that “subjective career success”, including work-family balance, life satisfaction, career satisfaction, perception of career success, “objective career success”, including level of total revenue venue, growth rate of wage and times of promotion, “knowledge and skills career success” including upgrade of knowledge and skills, classification of skills, external competitiveness and job autonomy, are three important career success evaluation indicators of skilled employees. Originality/value: The results show that different age groups, different titles and different positions of skilled employees, there is a significant difference in the choice of career success evaluation indicators. It provides a useful reference to establish a career development system for the skilled employees.

  4. Performance curves of medical researchers during their career: analysis of scientific production from a retrospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Antoine; Herquelot, Eléonore; Polazzi, Stéphanie; Malbezin, Muriel; Claris, Olivier

    2017-02-24

    To establish the pattern of change in individual scientific production over the career of medical researchers. Retrospective cohort based on prospectively collected data in a hospital information system. Multicentre university hospital in France. Two distinct populations of 1835 researchers (full professors vs non-academic physicians) having produced 44 723 publications between 1995 and 2014. Annual number of publications referenced in Medline/PubMed with a sensitivity analysis based on publications as first/last author and in high impact journals. The individual volume of publications was modelled by age using generalised estimating equations adjusted for birth cohort, biomedical discipline and academic position of researchers. Averaged over the whole career, the annual number of publications was 5.28 (95% CI 4.90 to 5.69) among professors compared to 0.82 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.89) among non-academic physicians (pscientific production between 25 and 35 years (adjusted incidence rate ratio 102.20, 95% CI 60.99 to 171.30), a maturation phase with a slower increase from 35 to 50 years (2.10, 95% CI 1.75 to 2.51) until a stabilisation phase with constant production followed by a potential decline at the end of career (0.90, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.06). The non-academic physicians experienced a slower pace of learning curve at the beginning of their careers (42.38, 95% CI 25.37 to 70.81) followed by a smaller increase in the annual number of publications (1.29, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.51). Compared to full professors, non-academic physicians had a poor capacity to publish, indicating a low productivity when medical doctors have limited time or little interest in undertaking research. This finding highlights the potential for rethinking the missions of medical doctors towards an enlargement of scientific prerogatives in favour of progress in global knowledge. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  5. Teaching Laboratory and Research Skills as Preparation for Careers in Science and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Brian

    2007-03-01

    Recipients of bachelor's degrees in physics have identified lab skills, team work, and research skills as abilities necessary for success in their jobs. However, they also report having received less than adequate preparation in these areas during their college careers. We report on the redesign of a junior physics-major modern physics laboratory course into an inquiry-based, research-like laboratory course. The overall strategy was such as to require the students to approach the experiments in a research-like fashion. In addition, experiments which explore materials properties which can't be looked up in textbooks, e.g. Hall Effect, have been added to further emphasize a research-like approach to the investigations. Laboratory reporting requirements were written to closely reproduce current practices in scientific journals. Assessment of the redesign was performed through surveys of current and graduated students and through comparison of laboratory reports.

  6. Evaluation of a mid-career investigator career development award: Assessing the ability of OppNet K18 awardees to obtain NIH follow-on research funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy-Carter, Cassidy A; Williams, Sharon R; Han, Xueying; Elwood, William N; Zuckerman, Brian L

    2018-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) K18 award mechanism provides funded opportunities for established investigators to gain knowledge in fields outside of their primary disciplines, but outcomes associated with these awards have not been evaluated to date. NIH's Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Opportunity Network (OppNet) is one of the few initiatives that has used this award mechanism. We explored how the unique features of K18 awards affect the ability of recipients to obtain follow-on NIH research funding. We compared outcomes (ability to obtain follow-on funding and interval between receipt of the primary award and receipt of the first follow-on award) associated with OppNet K18 awards to findings from evaluations of other NIH career development (K) awards, which usually target early-career investigators. We hypothesized that K18 award recipients might be (1) more successful than are other K award recipients in obtaining follow-on NIH research funding due to their career experience or (2) less successful due to the competing demands of other projects. By analyzing follow-on NIH research awards and interview data, we found that OppNet K18 award recipients were at least as successful as were other K award recipients in obtaining follow-on funding and may have been more successful by certain measures. K18 awards produce their outcomes with a lower investment per investigator than do other K awards, suggesting continued or enhanced use of the mechanism.

  7. Evaluation of a mid-career investigator career development award: Assessing the ability of OppNet K18 awardees to obtain NIH follow-on research funding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy A Pomeroy-Carter

    Full Text Available The National Institutes of Health (NIH K18 award mechanism provides funded opportunities for established investigators to gain knowledge in fields outside of their primary disciplines, but outcomes associated with these awards have not been evaluated to date. NIH's Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Opportunity Network (OppNet is one of the few initiatives that has used this award mechanism. We explored how the unique features of K18 awards affect the ability of recipients to obtain follow-on NIH research funding. We compared outcomes (ability to obtain follow-on funding and interval between receipt of the primary award and receipt of the first follow-on award associated with OppNet K18 awards to findings from evaluations of other NIH career development (K awards, which usually target early-career investigators. We hypothesized that K18 award recipients might be (1 more successful than are other K award recipients in obtaining follow-on NIH research funding due to their career experience or (2 less successful due to the competing demands of other projects. By analyzing follow-on NIH research awards and interview data, we found that OppNet K18 award recipients were at least as successful as were other K award recipients in obtaining follow-on funding and may have been more successful by certain measures. K18 awards produce their outcomes with a lower investment per investigator than do other K awards, suggesting continued or enhanced use of the mechanism.

  8. The Research Career of Subramanian Raman at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Fred E.

    2005-01-01

    Subramanian 'Ram' Raman, a distinguished nuclear physicist and senior staff member of the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), died April 8, 2003. In June 1966, Raman joined the staff at ORNL working in the Nuclear Data Project. This position provided him insights into important open questions in nuclear structure physics, and the power of 'horizontal' compilations of properties across a broad range of nuclei. These insights would guide Raman's research interests throughout his 36-year career at ORNL.As shown by his great variety of publications, Raman's research career was marked by an intense interest in all areas of nuclear physics. He published papers on topics ranging from detailed nuclear structure to giant resonances, to the search for superheavy nuclei, to the scattering of heavy ions. His research resulted in over 200 published papers and over 3000 citations of his work. It is however, his nuclear data evaluations, both horizontal and vertical, that we most often remember. His most often cited papers deal with the evaluation and systematics of nuclear data, and he helped establish many of the 'rules' and guidelines for assignment of nuclear level properties. An overview of Raman's work at ORNL is presented

  9. Dual Enrollment Academy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Nicolas; Chavez, Guadalupe

    2009-01-01

    Dual Enrollment Engineering (DEEA) and Medical Science (DEMSA) Academies are two-year dual enrollment programs for high school students. Students explore engineering and medical careers through college coursework. Students prepare for higher education in engineering and medical fields while completing associate degrees in biology or engineering…

  10. The Carbon_h-factor: predicting individuals' research impact at early stages of their career.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Carbon

    Full Text Available Assessing an individual's research impact on the basis of a transparent algorithm is an important task for evaluation and comparison purposes. Besides simple but also inaccurate indices such as counting the mere number of publications or the accumulation of overall citations, and highly complex but also overwhelming full-range publication lists in their raw format, Hirsch (2005 introduced a single figure cleverly combining different approaches. The so-called h-index has undoubtedly become the standard in scientometrics of individuals' research impact (note: in the present paper I will always use the term "research impact" to describe the research performance as the logic of the paper is based on the h-index, which quantifies the specific "impact" of, e.g., researchers, but also because the genuine meaning of impact refers to quality as well. As the h-index reflects the number h of papers a researcher has published with at least h citations, the index is inherently positively biased towards senior level researchers. This might sometimes be problematic when predictive tools are needed for assessing young scientists' potential, especially when recruiting early career positions or equipping young scientists' labs. To be compatible with the standard h-index, the proposed index integrates the scientist's research age (Carbon_h-factor into the h-index, thus reporting the average gain of h-index per year. Comprehensive calculations of the Carbon_h-factor were made for a broad variety of four research-disciplines (economics, neuroscience, physics and psychology and for researchers performing on three high levels of research impact (substantial, outstanding and epochal with ten researchers per category. For all research areas and output levels we obtained linear developments of the h-index demonstrating the validity of predicting one's later impact in terms of research impact already at an early stage of their career with the Carbon_h-factor being approx

  11. Air Force Officer Accession Planning: Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements for Nonrated Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report Air Force Officer Accession Planning Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements...potential performance, and how to include these quality measures in the classification process. The research sponsor asked us to focus on academic ...Andrew P., and James K. Lowe, “Decision Support for the Career Field Selection Process at the US Air Force Academy,” European Journal of Operational

  12. Effects of Discovery, Iteration, and Collaboration in Laboratory Courses on Undergraduates' Research Career Intentions Fully Mediated by Student Ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Lisa A; Runyon, Christopher R; Ghanem, Eman; Sandy, Moriah; Clark, Greg; Palmer, Gregory C; Reichler, Stuart; Rodenbusch, Stacia E; Dolan, Erin L

    2018-06-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide a promising avenue to attract a larger and more diverse group of students into research careers. CUREs are thought to be distinctive in offering students opportunities to make discoveries, collaborate, engage in iterative work, and develop a sense of ownership of their lab course work. Yet how these elements affect students' intentions to pursue research-related careers remain unexplored. To address this knowledge gap, we collected data on three design features thought to be distinctive of CUREs (discovery, iteration, collaboration) and on students' levels of ownership and career intentions from ∼800 undergraduates who had completed CURE or inquiry courses, including courses from the Freshman Research Initiative (FRI), which has a demonstrated positive effect on student retention in college and in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. We used structural equation modeling to test relationships among the design features and student ownership and career intentions. We found that discovery, iteration, and collaboration had small but significant effects on students' intentions; these effects were fully mediated by student ownership. Students in FRI courses reported significantly higher levels of discovery, iteration, and ownership than students in other CUREs. FRI research courses alone had a significant effect on students' career intentions.

  13. Employability: A Review of the Literature 2012 to 2016. A Report for the Higher Education Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artess, Jane; Hooley, Tristram; Mellors-Bourne, Robin

    2017-01-01

    This report for the Higher Education Academy, in partnership with the University of Derby and the Career Development Organisation, examined 187 pieces of research published between 2012 and 2016 that describe how the subject of employability has been addressed during this period. It draws out some of the key implications for higher education…

  14. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Research Tools Research Roadmap Facts and Figures Unified Orthopaedic Research Agenda Sex and Gender in Research ... Career Center Clinician Scholar Career Development Clinician-Patient Communication Leadership Fellows Program Medical Student Resources Postgraduate Orthopaedic ...

  15. Characterization of the training of research skills in the career of physical culture in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Guillermo Aldas Arcos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In some cases, professors blame research training on the discipline of Research Methodology, oriented at the beginning or end of careers. However, in Ecuador this issue has been little discussed. The present study evidences some difficulties related to the formation of investigative abilities in universities of the Ecuadorian context, specifically the race of Physical Culture. Results are compiled through the application of methods such as documentary analysis (curricula of the main Ecuadorian universities 2014, analysis and synthesis (during the whole process under study surveys of students and graduates attending the III International Congress of Education Curriculum Planning Physics and Planning of Sports Training, held in Riobamba Ecuador UNACH, in 2014. Likewise, interviews were applied to professionals of the fourth level. In the development is theorized on the state of the art, from the conceptions given by scholars on the subject.

  16. The report of joint research over 20 years of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and Hiroshima Institute of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka,Takeshi; Vutova,Katia

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Hiroshima Institute of Technology (EC-HIT) started the international joint research with the Laboratory “Physical Problems of Electron Beam technologies” of the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (IE-BAS) from 1994. 20 papers, included a book chapter, were published by implementing the international joint research under 5 Agreements for Academic Cooperation and Exchange between HIT and IEBAS. Our international joint ...

  17. Career Advancement: Meeting the Challenges Confronting the Next Generation of Endocrinologists and Endocrine Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Richard J; Joham, Anju; Fishbein, Lauren; Vella, Kristen R; Ebeling, Peter R; Gibson-Helm, Melanie; Teede, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Challenges and opportunities face the next generation (Next-Gen) of endocrine researchers and clinicians, the lifeblood of the field of endocrinology for the future. A symposium jointly sponsored by The Endocrine Society and the Endocrine Society of Australia was convened to discuss approaches to addressing the present and future Next-Gen needs. Data collection by literature review, assessment of previously completed questionnaires, commissioning of a new questionnaire, and summarization of symposium discussions were studied. Next-Gen endocrine researchers face diminishing grant funding in inflation-adjusted terms. The average age of individuals being awarded their first independent investigator funding has increased to age 45 years. For clinicians, a workforce gap exists between endocrinologists needed and those currently trained. Clinicians in practice are increasingly becoming employees of integrated hospital systems, resulting in greater time spent on nonclinical issues. Workforce data and published reviews identify challenges specifically related to early career women in endocrinology. Strategies to Address Issues: Recommendations encompassed the areas of grant support for research, mentoring, education, templates for career development, specific programs for Next-Gen members by senior colleagues as outlined in the text, networking, team science, and life/work integration. Endocrine societies focusing on Next-Gen members provide a powerful mechanism to support these critical areas. A concerted effort to empower, train, and support the next generation of clinical endocrinologists and endocrine researchers is necessary to ensure the viability and vibrancy of our discipline and to optimize our contributions to improving health outcomes. Collaborative engagement of endocrine societies globally will be necessary to support our next generation moving forward.

  18. Evaluating the Productivity of VA, NIH, and AHRQ Health Services Research Career Development Awardees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, John W; Amundson, Erin O; Bi, Xiaoyu; Cucciare, Michael A; Eisen, Seth A; Finlay, Andrea K; Halvorson, Max A; Hayashi, Ko; Owens, Douglas K; Maisel, Natalya C; Timko, Christine; Weitlauf, Julie C; Cronkite, Ruth C

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the academic advancement and productivity of Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Career Development Award (CDA) program recipients, National Institutes of Health (NIH) K awardees in health services research (HSR), and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) K awardees. In all, 219 HSR&D CDA recipients from fiscal year (FY) 1991 through FY2010; 154 NIH K01, K08, and K23 awardees FY1991-FY2010; and 69 AHRQ K01 and K08 awardees FY2000-FY2010 were included. Most data were obtained from curricula vitae. Academic advancement, publications, grants, recognition, and mentoring were compared after adjusting for years since award, and personal characteristics, training, and productivity prior to the award. No significant differences emerged in covariate-adjusted tenure-track academic rank, number of grants as primary investigator (PI), major journal articles as first/sole author, Hirsch h-index scores, likelihood of a journal editorship position or membership in a major granting review panel, or mentoring postgraduate researchers between the HSR&D CDA and NIH K awardees from FY1991-FY2010, or among the three groups of awardees from FY2000 or later. Among those who reported grant funding levels, HSR&D CDAs from FY1991-2010 had been PI on more grants of $100,000 than NIH K awardees. HSR&D CDAs had a higher mean number of major journal articles than NIH K awardees from FY1991-2010. Findings show that all three HSR career development programs are successfully selecting and mentoring awardees, ensuring additional HSR capacity to improve the quality and delivery of high-value care.

  19. Human Resources Development and Career Development: Where Are We, and Where Do We Need to Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, Brad; McDonald, Kim; Rocco, Tonette S.; Byrd, Marilyn; Dawes, Elliott

    2018-01-01

    At the 2017 meeting of the Academy of Human Resource Development Annual Town Hall, four scholars discussed their diverse outlooks on the research and practice of career development in the Human Resource Development field. What follows in this curated collection of voices is a look into the perspective of each person who spoke at the 2017 Town Hall…

  20. Association of Research Self-Efficacy with Medical Student Career Interests, Specialization, and Scholarship: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, S. Beth; Prayson, Richard A.; Dannefer, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal…

  1. Work-Life Interferences in the Early Stages of Academic Careers: The Case of Precarious Researchers in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzon, Rossella; Murgia, Annalisa; Poggio, Barbara; Rapetti, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the topic of work-life interferences in academic contexts. More specifically, it focuses on early career researchers in the Italian university system. The total availability required from those who work in the research sector is leading to significant transformations of the temporalities of work, especially among the new…

  2. Decolonizing Qualitative Research: Non-traditional Reporting Forms in the Academy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa M. González y González

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative researchers have assumed that cross-cultural work required deep understanding of the culture being reported on. Even earlier, cross-cultural work focused on "receiving contexts," and on end-users who were primarily Western. The utility of such studies is severely limited, however, in a globalized world, and studies undertaken now must serve the interests of not only Western scholars, but also the needs of nationals and locals (or indigenous peoples. Research conducted in different languages, non-Western contexts and different cultures becomes more problematic and understanding intrinsic issues more urgent with the increasing number of reports (such as dissertations conducted by international scholars and thus bear potential for decolonizing the academy. Conducting and reporting cross-cultural qualitative data focuses on understanding at least five major ideas: working with bilingual data, considering non-Western cultural traditions, multiple perspectives, multi-vocal & multi-lingual texts, and technical issues to insure accessibility. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs060418

  3. Gender differences in salary in a recent cohort of early-career physician-researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Griffith, Kent A; Stewart, Abigail; Sambuco, Dana; DeCastro, Rochelle; Ubel, Peter A

    2013-11-01

    Studies have suggested that male physicians earn more than their female counterparts. The authors examined whether this disparity exists in a recently hired cohort. In 2010-2011, the authors surveyed recent recipients of National Institutes of Health (NIH) mentored career development (i.e., K08 or K23) awards, receiving responses from 1,275 (75% response rate). For the 1,012 physicians with academic positions in clinical specialties who reported salary, they constructed linear regression models of salary considering gender, age, race, marital status, parental status, additional doctoral degree, academic rank, years on faculty, specialty, institution type, region, institution NIH funding rank, K award type, K award funding institute, K award year, work hours, and research time. They evaluated the explanatory value of spousal employment status using Peters-Belson regression. Mean salary was $141,325 (95% confidence interval [CI] 135,607-147,043) for women and $172,164 (95% CI 167,357-176,971) for men. Male gender remained an independent, significant predictor of salary (+$10,921, P work hours, research time, and other factors. Peters-Belson analysis indicated that 17% of the overall disparity in the full sample was unexplained by the measured covariates. In the married subset, after accounting for spousal employment status, 10% remained unexplained. The authors observed, in this recent cohort of elite, early-career physician-researchers, a gender difference in salary that was not fully explained by specialty, academic rank, work hours, or even spousal employment. Creating more equitable procedures for establishing salary is important.

  4. Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edington, C.W.

    1991-02-01

    The activities of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), has a long history and the specific time period supported by this contract is but a small piece of the long-term continuing program. As a background, in August 1945, atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima (6 August) and Nagasaki (9 August). Shortly after the bombings, US medical teams joined forces with their Japanese counterparts to form a Joint Commission for the Investigation of the Effects of the Atomic Bombs. As a result of the Joint Commission's investigations, it was determined that consideration should be given to the establishment of a long-term study of the potential late health effects of exposure of the survivors to radiation from the bombs. The results obtained from RERF studies contribute the vast majority of information that provides a better understanding of radiation effects on humans. This information has been used extensively by national organizations and international committees for estimating risks associated with radiation exposures. The estimated risks developed by these independent organizations are used by government agencies around the world to establish standards for protection of individuals exposed in the occupational, medical, and general environment. Some of these results are described briefly in this report

  5. Networks of trainees: examining the effects of attending an interdisciplinary research training camp on the careers of new obesity scholars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godley J

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Jenny Godley,1 Nicole M Glenn,2 Arya M Sharma,3 John C Spence4 1Department of Sociology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2School of Public Health, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, 4Sedentary Living Laboratory, Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Students training in obesity research, prevention, and management face the challenge of developing expertise in their chosen academic field while at the same time recognizing that obesity is a complex issue that requires a multidisciplinary and multisectoral approach. In appreciation of this challenge, the Canadian Obesity Network (CON has run an interdisciplinary summer training camp for graduate students, new career researchers, and clinicians for the past 8 years. This paper evaluates the effects of attending this training camp on trainees' early careers. We use social network analysis to examine the professional connections developed among trainee Canadian obesity researchers who attended this camp over its first 5 years of operation (2006–2010. We examine four relationships (knowing, contacting, and meeting each other, and working together among previous trainees. We assess the presence and diversity of these relationships among trainees across different years and disciplines and find that interdisciplinary contact and working relationships established at the training camp have been maintained over time. In addition, we evaluate the qualitative data on trainees' career trajectories and their assessments of the impact that the camp had on their careers. Many trainees report that camp attendance had a positive impact on their career development, particularly in terms of establishing contacts and professional relationships. Both the quantitative and the qualitative results demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary training and relationships for career development in the health

  6. Evaluation through research of a three-track career ladder program for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Carol; Eliades, Aris Beoglos

    2010-01-01

    A descriptive study design was employed to survey registered nurse participants in a career ladder program comprising of three tracks: clinical, education, and management. Findings indicate that participation allows nurses of varying education preparation and roles to demonstrate professional development. Implications for staff development include efficacy of the online survey technique, provision of a reliable tool to evaluate a career ladder, and evaluation of a career ladder that includes the staff development educator.

  7. RESEARCH ON HISTORIC BIM OF BUILT HERITAGE IN TAIWAN – A CASE STUDY OF HUANGXI ACADEMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Lu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital archiving technology for conserving cultural heritage is an important subject nowadays. The Taiwanese Ministry of Culture continues to try to converge the concept and technology of conservation towards international conventions. However, the products from these different technologies are not yet integrated due to the lack of research and development in this field. There is currently no effective schema in HBIM for Taiwanese cultural heritage. The aim of this research is to establish an HBIM schema for Chinese built heritage in Taiwan. The proposed method starts from the perspective of the components of built heritage buildings, up to the investigation of the important properties of the components through important international charters and Taiwanese laws of cultural heritage conservation. Afterwards, object-oriented class diagram and ontology from the scale of components were defined to clarify the concept and increase the interoperability. A historical database was then established for the historical information of components and to bring it into the concept of BIM in order to build a 3D model of heritage objects which can be used for visualization. An integration platform was developed for the users to browse and manipulate the database and 3D model simultaneously. In addition, this research also evaluated the feasibility of this method using the study case at the Huangxi academy located in Taiwan. The conclusion showed that class diagram could help the establishment of database and even its application for different Chinese built heritage objects. The establishment of ontology helped to convey knowledge and increase interoperability. In comparison to traditional documentation methods, the querying result of the platform was more accurate and less prone to human error.

  8. Journey in Aeronautical Research: A Career at NASA Langley Research Center. No. 12; Monographs in Aerospace History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. Hewitt

    1998-01-01

    An autobiography, of a noted aeronautical engineer, W. Hewitt Phillips, whose career spanned 58 years (1940-1998) at NASA Langley is presented. This work covers his early years to the Sputnik launch. His interests have been in research in aeronautics and in the related problems of spaceflight. After an introduction, his early life through the college years is reviewed, and his early interest in model airplanes is described. The first assignment for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), which would later become NASA, was with the Flight Research Division. His early work involved "Flying Qualities", i.e., the stability and control characteristics of an airplane. The next chapter describes his early analytical studies. His work during World War II in the design of military airplanes, and the other effects of the war on research activities, is covered in the next two chapters. This research was involved in such innovations and refinements as the swept wing, the flettner tabs, servo tabs, spring tabs and whirlerons. The rest of the work covers the research which Mr. Hewitt was involved in, after the war until the Sputnik launch. These areas include unsteady lift, measurements of turbulence in the atmosphere, gust alleviation, and lateral response to random turbulence. He was also involved in several investigations of airplane accidents. The last two chapters cover the administration of the Langley Research Center, and the dawn of the Space Age. A complete bibliography of reports written by Mr. Hewitt, is included.

  9. Straw Godzilla: Engaging the Academy and Research Ethics in Artistic Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Barbara; Vincs, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, the university ethics approval process is guided by the "National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research." The "National Statement" does not provide a hurdle to be overcome or avoided, nor is it a Godzilla-like monster that must be slain for "truth" to survive. Rather the "National…

  10. Ethical concerns and career satisfaction in obstetrics and gynecology: a review of recent findings from the Collaborative Ambulatory Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Victoria A; Leddy, Meaghan A; Lawrence, Hal; Schulkin, Jay

    2011-09-01

    Obstetricians-gynecologists (ob-gyns) are frequently confronted with situations that have ethical implications (e.g., whether to accept gifts or samples from drug companies or disclosing medical errors to patients). Additionally, various factors, including specific job-related tasks, costs, and benefits, may impact ob-gyns' career satisfaction. Ethical concerns and career satisfaction can play a role in the quality of women's health care. This article summarizes the studies published between 2005 and 2009 by the Research Department of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which encompass ethical concerns regarding interactions with pharmaceutical representatives and patient safety/medical error reporting, as well as ob-gyn career satisfaction. Additionally, a brief discussion regarding ethical concerns in the ob-gyn field, in general, highlights key topics for the last 30 years. Ethical dilemmas continue to be of concern for ob-gyns. Familiarity with guidelines on appropriate interactions with industry is associated with lower percentages of potentially problematic relationships with pharmaceutical industries. Physicians report that the expense of patient safety initiatives is one of the top barriers for improving patient safety, followed by fear of liability. Overall, respondents reported being satisfied with their careers. However, half of the respondents reported that they were extremely concerned about the impact of professional liability costs on the duration of their careers. Increased familiarity with guidelines may lead to a decreased ob-gyn reliance on pharmaceutical representatives and free samples, whereas specific and practical tools may help them implement patient safety techniques. The easing of malpractice insurance and threat of litigation may enhance career satisfaction among ob-gyns. This article will discuss related findings in recent years. Obstetricians & Gynecologists and Family Physicians. After the completing the CME

  11. A Longitudinal Study of How Quality Mentorship and Research Experience Integrate Underrepresented Minorities into STEM Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Mica; Hernandez, Paul R; Schultz, P Wesley

    2018-01-01

    African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans are historically underrepresented minorities (URMs) among science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degree earners. Viewed from a perspective of social influence, this pattern suggests that URMs do not integrate into the STEM academic community at the same rate as non-URM students. Estrada and colleagues recently showed that Kelman's tripartite integration model of social influence (TIMSI) predicted URM persistence into science fields. In this paper, we longitudinally examine the integration of URMs into the STEM community by using growth-curve analyses to measure the development of TIMIS's key variables (science efficacy, identity, and values) from junior year through the postbaccalaureate year. Results showed that quality mentorship and research experience occurring in the junior and senior years were positively related to student science efficacy, identity, and values at that same time period. Longitudinal modeling of TIMSI further shows that, while efficacy is important, and perhaps a necessary predictor of moving toward a STEM career, past experiences of efficacy may not be sufficient for maintaining longer-term persistence. In contrast, science identity and values do continue to be predictive of STEM career pathway persistence up to 4 years after graduation. © 2018 M. Estrada et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2018 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Research Success and Structured Support: Developing Early Career Academics in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, H.

    2009-01-01

    Entry into a successful academic career is often an arduous process. From career preparation through to doctoral studies and beyond, the journey can be fraught with trials. Why do many academics find difficulty in completing their studies in the minimum time and publishing afterwards? As the University of the Witwatersrand has a strategic goal of…

  13. Employment in the Catering & Hospitality Industry--Employee Attitudes and Career Expectations. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotel and Catering Training Co., London (England).

    A study examined the attitudes and career expectations of a random sample of catering and hospitality industry employees in the United Kingdom. The survey focused on the following: aspiration and career intentions, factors causing job satisfaction/dissatisfaction, employment patterns in the industry, satisfaction with/access to…

  14. Predicting Career Adaptability through Self-Esteem and Social Support: A Research on Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataç, Lale Oral; Dirik, Deniz; Tetik, Hilmiye Türesin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between career adaptability and self-esteem, and analyze the moderating role of social support in this relationship on a sample of 313 young adults. The results of the study confirm that career adaptability is significantly predicted by self-esteem. Moreover, findings suggest that (1)…

  15. Challenging the “Ontology of Aging” in Athletic Career Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkainen, Noora; Ryba, Tatiana

    , M. (under review). ‘The engine just started coughing!’ – Limits of development, aging and career continuity in elite endurance sports. Journal for Aging Studies. Wainwright, S. P., & Turner, B. S. (2003). Aging and the dancing body. In C. Faircloth (Ed.), Aging bodies: Images and everyday......In this paper, we critically examine the existing theorization of athletic career and how the existing models construct aging and reaching the limits of physical development. We argue that the ‘ontology of aging’ as proposed by Wainwright and Turner (2003) underpins the definition of athletic...... career and its developmental stage models. A commonly used definition of an athletic career as a pursuit aimed at achieving the person’s peak in athletic performance carries a prescriptive assumption of career discontinuation when the athlete no longer has ‘objective’ possibilities of development. Sport...

  16. STAR - Research Experiences at National Laboratory Facilities for Pre-Service and Early Career Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. M.; Rebar, B.; Buxner, S.

    2012-12-01

    The STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Program provides pre-service and beginning teachers the opportunity to develop identity as both teachers and researchers early in their careers. Founded and implemented by the Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education (CESaME) at California Polytechnic State University on behalf of the California State University (CSU) system, STAR provides cutting edge research experiences and career development for students affiliated with the CSU system. Over the past three summers, STAR has also partnered with the NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program to include Noyce Scholars from across the country. Key experiences are one to three summers of paid research experience at federal research facilities associated with the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Anchoring beginning teachers in the research community enhances participant understanding of what it means to be both researchers and effective teachers. Since its inception in 2007, the STAR Program has partnered with 15 national lab facilities to provide 290 research experiences to 230 participants. Several of the 68 STAR Fellows participating in the program during Summer 2012 have submitted abstracts to the Fall AGU Meeting. Through continued partnership with the Noyce Scholar Program and contributions from outside funding sources, the CSU is committed to sustaining the STAR Program in its efforts to significantly impact teacher preparation. Evaluation results from the program continue to indicate program effectiveness in recruiting high quality science and math majors into the teaching profession and impacting their attitudes and beliefs towards the nature of science and teaching through inquiry. Additionally, surveys and interviews are being conducted of participants who are now teaching in the classroom as

  17. Early Career Researchers Demand Full-text and Rely on Google to Find Scholarly Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hayman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Nicholas, D., Boukacem-Zeghmouri, C., Rodríguez-Bravo, B., Xu, J., Watkinson, A., Abrizah, A., Herman, E., & Świgoń, M. (2017. Where and how early career researchers find scholarly information. Learned Publishing, 30(1, 19-29. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/leap.1087 Abstract Objective – To examine the attitudes and information behaviours of early career researchers (ECRs when locating scholarly information. Design – Qualitative longitudinal study. Setting – Research participants from the United Kingdom, United States of America, China, France, Malaysia, Poland, and Spain. Subjects – A total 116 participants from various disciplines, aged 35 and younger, who were holding or had previously held a research position, but not in a tenured position. All participants held a doctorate or were in the process of earning one. Methods – Using structured interviews of 60-90 minutes, researchers asked 60 questions of each participant via face-to-face, Skype, or telephone interviews. The interview format and questions were formed via focus groups. Main Results – As part of a longitudinal project, results reported are limited to the first year of the study, and focused on three primary questions identified by the authors: where do ECRs find scholarly information, whether they use their smartphones to locate and read scholarly information, and what social media do they use to find scholarly information. Researchers describe how ECRs themselves interpreted the phrase scholarly information to primarily mean journal articles, while the researchers themselves had a much expanded definition to include professional and “scholarly contacts, ideas, and data” (p. 22. This research shows that Google and Google Scholar are widely used by ECRs for locating scholarly information regardless of discipline, language, or geography. Their analysis by country points to currency and the combined breadth-and-depth search experience that Google provides as

  18. The HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute: Training Early-Career Scientists to Conduct Research on Research Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B.; Yuko, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    The responsible conduct of HIV/drug abuse prevention research requires investigators with both the knowledge of and ability to generate empirical data that can enhance global ethical practices and policies. This article describes a multidisciplinary program offering early-career professionals a 2-year intensive summer curriculum along with funding to conduct a mentored research study on a wide variety of HIV/drug abuse research ethics topics. Now in its fifth year, the program has admitted 29 trainees who have to date demonstrated increased knowledge of research ethics, produced 17 peer-reviewed publications, 46 professional presentations, and submitted or been awarded five related federal grants. The institute also hosts a global information platform providing general and HIV/drug abuse relevant research ethics educational and research resources that have had more than 38,800 unique visitors from more than 150 countries. PMID:26564944

  19. The HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute: Training Early-Career Scientists to Conduct Research on Research Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B; Yuko, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    The responsible conduct of HIV/drug abuse prevention research requires investigators with both the knowledge of and ability to generate empirical data that can enhance global ethical practices and policies. This article describes a multidisciplinary program offering early-career professionals a 2-year intensive summer curriculum along with funding to conduct a mentored research study on a wide variety of HIV/drug abuse research ethics topics. Now in its fifth year, the program has admitted 29 trainees who have to date demonstrated increased knowledge of research ethics, produced 17 peer-reviewed publications, 46 professional presentations, and submitted or been awarded five related federal grants. The institute also hosts a global information platform providing general and HIV/drug abuse relevant research ethics educational and research resources that have had more than 38,800 unique visitors from more than 150 countries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Expanding the Field of Surgical Researchers: The Jahnigen Career Development Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Stacie

    2017-10-01

    Under a long-standing collaboration with the John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF), the Atlantic Philanthropies (AP), and specialty societies in 10 targeted specialties, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) has been working to improve quality of care provided to older adults by surgical and related medical specialists. To support and nurture future academic leaders, the Geriatrics-for-Specialists Initiative (GSI) established the Dennis W. Jahnigen Career Development Scholar Award (JCDA) program in 2002, with AP joining JAHF as a core funder of the awards in 2003. Commencing in 2011, the National Institute on Aging (NIA) launched the Grants for Early Medical/Surgical Specialists' Transition to Aging Research (GEMSSTAR) program, using an RO3 mechanism. Recipients of the JCDA and the GEMSSTAR are provided with 2 years of research support and networking opportunities with other scholars; 79 JCDA and 26 surgical and related medical specialty GEMSSTAR scholars have been funded through these award mechanisms, with AGS, JAHF, and surgical and related medical specialty societies providing matching support for 20 of the GEMSSTAR scholars for leadership development programs. One of the primary criteria for judging the overall success of the program was eventual transition of the award to a federally funded program, which was achieved when NIA launched the GEMSSTAR program in 2011. © 2017, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Association of research self-efficacy with medical student career interests, specialization, and scholarship: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, S Beth; Prayson, Richard A; Dannefer, Elaine F

    2015-05-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal Inventory-Short Form (CRAI-SF) items at matriculation (n = 128) or graduation (n = 111) during 2009-2013. Parametric statistics were used to compare CRAI-SF scales to domains proposed in SCCT: trainees' characteristics (gender, training level, advanced degree), career interests, career intentions (medical specialty), and performance (peer-reviewed publications and required thesis topic). A number of lessons emerged in using theory to frame the evaluation of a complex educational program. Graduates rated their research self-efficacy significantly higher on all six CRAI-SF scales with large effect sizes (>.90) on five scales (Conceptualizing a Study, Study Design and Analysis, Responsible Research Conduct, Collaborating with Others, and Reporting a Study). Women and men did not have significantly different scores on CRAI-SF scales (p > .05), suggesting that the research program provides adequate supports for women students. Most thesis projects addressed clinical (36.9 %, n = 41) or translational (34.2 %, n = 38) research topics. The CRAI-SF discriminated between medical school matriculates and graduates, suggesting that research self-efficacy increases with mastery experiences. No significant relationships occurred between CRAI-SF scores and graduates' thesis topics or chosen clinical specialty. Correlations demonstrated significant relationships between graduates' perceptions of research self-efficacy and their interest in clinical research careers.

  2. REQUIREMENTS TO AUTOMATIZATION PROCESSING IN THE PROGRAMMING INFORMATION SYSTEM OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCHES IN ACADEMY OF PEDAGOGICAL SCIENCES OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla V. Kilchenko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A construction and introduction of the information systems in a management education is the actual task of forming of modern information society. In the article the results of research of automation of treatment of financial documents, which was conducted within the project «Scientific-methodical providing of the informative system of programming of scientific researches in Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of Ukraine based on the Internet» № 0109U002139 are represented. The article contains methodical principles of automation of treatment programming and financial documents as well as requirements to the information system, which will be the base to next project stages.

  3. The Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School: Career and Research Benefits to Students and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowee, M.; Woodroffe, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    In 2016 we held the 6th Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School. This 8-week long program is designed for mid-career graduate students in related fields to come to LANL, receive lectures on space physics and space environment topics, and carry out a research project under the mentorship of LANL staff members. We accept typically 6-8 students via competitive admissions to the program, with a strong applicant pool to choose from. This type of summer school program is relatively unique in the space physics community—there are several other summer schools but they are of shorter duration and do not include the mentor-research project aspect which builds a strong one-on-one connection between the summer student and his/her LANL mentor(s). From the LANL perspective, this program was intended to have several benefits including building collaborations between LANL staff and universities and recruitment of potential postdocs. From the student perspective, this program is not only an educational opportunity but a strong networking opportunity and a chance to enhance their professional skills and publication record. Students are permitted to work on projects directly related to their thesis or on projects in areas that are completely new to them. At the end of the summer school, the students also develop their presentation skills by preparing and giving AGU-style presentations on their research projects to the research group. Over the past five years the summer school has increased in popularity, and the feedback from the student participants has been very positive. Alumni of the program have continued collaborations with their mentors, resulting in publications and conference presentations, and three postdoc hires to date.

  4. Gender Differences in Salary in a Recent Cohort of Early-Career Physician-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Griffith, Kent A.; Stewart, Abigail; Sambuco, Dana; DeCastro, Rochelle; Ubel, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Since prior studies have suggested that male physicians earn more than their female counterparts, the authors examined whether this disparity exists in a recently hired cohort. Method In 2010-11, the authors surveyed recent recipients of National Institutes of Health (NIH) mentored career development (i.e., K08 or K23) awards, receiving responses from 1,275 (75% response rate). For the 1,012 physicians with academic positions in clinical specialties who reported salary, they constructed linear regression models of salary considering gender, age, race, marital status, parental status, additional doctoral degree, academic rank, years on faculty, specialty, institution type, region, institution NIH funding rank, K-award type, K-award funding institute, K-award year, work hours, and research time. They evaluated the explanatory value of spousal employment status using Peters-Belson regression. Results Mean salary was $141,325 (95% confidence interval [CI] 135,607-147,043) for women and $172,164 (95% CI 167,357-176,971) for men. Male gender remained an independent, significant predictor of salary (+$10,921, P salary that was not fully explained by specialty, academic rank, work hours, or even spousal employment. Creating more equitable procedures for establishing salary at academic institutions is important. PMID:24072109

  5. Female science faculty in liberal arts colleges and research universities: A case study of building careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Kerry Michelle

    2001-07-01

    This study investigates the lives of twelve female science faculty in higher education, in both the Liberal Arts College and the Research University environments. The study focuses on two areas---the gender issue and women's positive experiences in being science faculty. The methods used are qualitative, including interviews and self-esteem, achievement-motivation, and self-descriptive word ranking scales, which were used to determine success and determination to understand the desire to continue in the field of academic science. The central findings of the study focused on the rampant gender and sexual discrimination that was apparent at the Liberal Arts College science department, and the desire to balance a family with a career. The common misperception that a woman cannot be an academic science and have a family appeared to have troubled most of the subjects in the study. It appeared that the support of a spouse and family are two factors that have led to the continuation of the majority of the women to want to remain in academic science. The issue of gender touched on the lack of financial compensation among some of the female science faculty in the study, as well as the need for more institutional and structural support for human relations within the science departments.

  6. "Disqus" Website-Based Commenting as an e-Research Method: Engaging Doctoral and Early-Career Academic Learners in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Daniel; Earley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of established qualitative research methods for online focus groups by using the "Disqus" website-based commenting platform as a medium for discussion among doctoral and early-career academic learners. Facilities allowing Internet users to comment on the content of web pages are increasingly popular on…

  7. Clinical aspects of Chernobyl's accidents response (the researches of Military-medical academy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, Yu.L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of medical examinations of the persons taking part in elimination of consequences of Chernobyl's disaster obtained by the specialists of Military-medical academy allowed to verify the conseption of damage action of radiation and nonradiation complex of injury factors, to estimate well-information of stale and new biological indicators of radiation dose, to plan the ways of rescuers reabilitation during stationary, policlinic and sanatorium stages of treatment

  8. Career Exploration among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Ghosh, Arpita; Chang, Wen-hsin; Figueiredo, Catia; Bachhuber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    College is a significant time for undergraduates to declare majors and choose career paths. For many undergraduates, choosing both a major and a career path is challenging. Research shows that many universities deliver career interventions through dedicated career decision-making courses (Mead & Korschgen, 1994). However, there has been…

  9. Harnessing the power of communities: career networking strategies for bioscience PhD students and postdoctoral researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Sarah

    2018-04-01

    With an ever more competitive global labour market, coupled with an ever-increasing population of PhD-qualified graduates, the ability to communicate effectively and build strategic connections with others can be advantageous in the job-search process. Whether in pursuit of a tenure-track or non-academic position, many postdoctoral researchers and PhD students will benefit from networking as early as possible to enhance their career prospects. Sometimes viewed cynically as 'using people' or dismissed as 'the old boy network,' the ability to make meaningful connections and build relationships can be more valuable than other job-related skills in order to gain entry to, and progress within, many professions. This mini-review highlights the positive influence of networking and how bioscience PhD students and postdoctoral researchers can harness the power of communities to achieve career success. It is argued that those who make connections and promote personal patronage through networking can gain an advantage over their contemporaries. A summary of key theories and research studies that underpin the practice of networking provides credence to these assertions, which are further substantiated with examples pertinent to the academic community. Although primarily focussed on the biosciences, much of the content is applicable to other scientists at a similar career stage.

  10. Topical Collection: Climate-change research by early-career hydrogeologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Viviana; Maldaner, Carlos H.; Gurdak, Jason J.; Leblanc, Marc; Resende, Tales Carvalho; Stigter, Tibor Y.

    2018-05-01

    Scientific outreach, international networking, collaboration and adequate courses are needed in both developed and developing countries to enable early-career hydrogeologists to promote long-term multidisciplinary approaches to cope with climate-change issues and emphasize the importance of groundwater in a global strategy for adaptation. One such collaboration has involved the Early Career Hydrogeologists' Network of the International Association of Hydrogeologists (ECHN-IAH) and the UNESCO International Hydrological Programme's (IHP) Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Changes (GRAPHIC) project. This collaboration seeks to foster the education and involvement of the future generation of water leaders in the debate over groundwater and climate change.

  11. AcademyHealth's Delivery System Science Fellowship: Training Embedded Researchers to Design, Implement, and Evaluate New Models of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, Nisha; Hahn, Erin; Gould, Michael; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Savitz, Lucy; Holve, Erin

    2017-07-01

    AcademyHealth's Delivery System Science Fellowship (DSSF) provides a paid postdoctoral pragmatic learning experience to build capacity within learning healthcare systems to conduct research in applied settings. The fellowship provides hands-on training and professional leadership opportunities for researchers. Since its inception in 2012, the program has grown rapidly, with 16 health systems participating in the DSSF to date. In addition to specific projects conducted within health systems (and numerous publications associated with those initiatives), the DSSF has made several broader contributions to the field, including defining delivery system science, identifying a set of training objectives for researchers working in delivery systems, and developing a national collaborative network of care delivery organizations, operational leaders, and trainees. The DSSF is one promising approach to support higher-value care by promoting continuous learning and improvement in health systems. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  12. Development of Enriched Core Competencies for Health Services and Policy Research: Training for Stronger Career Readiness and Greater Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Stephen; Heritage, Melissa; Chudak, Amanda; Tamblyn, Robyn; McMahon, Meghan; Brown, Adalsteinn

    2018-03-11

    To develop an enriched set of core competencies for health services and policy research (HSPR) doctoral training that will help graduates maximize their impact across a range of academic and nonacademic work environments and roles. Data were obtained from multiple sources, including literature reviews, key informant interviews, stakeholder consultations, and Expert Working Group (EWG) meetings between January 2015 and March 2016. The study setting is Canada. The study used qualitative methods and an iterative development process with significant stakeholder engagement throughout. The literature reviews, key informant interviews, existing data on graduate career trajectories, and EWG deliberations informed the identification of career profiles for HSPR graduates and the competencies required to succeed in these roles. Stakeholder consultations were held to vet, refine, and validate the competencies. The EWG reached consensus on six sectors and eight primary roles in which HSPR doctoral graduates can bring value to employers and the health system. Additionally, 10 core competencies were identified that should be included or further emphasized in the training of HSPR doctoral students to increase their preparedness and potential for impact in a variety of roles within and outside of traditional academic workplaces. The results offer an expanded view of potential career paths for HSPR doctoral graduates and provide recommendations for an expanded set of core competencies that will better equip graduates to maximize their impact on the health system. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Theory-Informed Research Training and Mentoring of Underrepresented Early-Career Faculty at Teaching-Intensive Institutions: The Obesity Health Disparities PRIDE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Bettina M; Bruce, Marino A; Thorpe, Roland J; Heitman, Elizabeth; Griffith, Derek M; Norris, Keith C

    2018-01-01

    Mentoring has been consistently identified as an important element for career advancement in many biomedical and health professional disciplines and has been found to be critical for success and promotion in academic settings. Early-career faculty from groups underrepresented in biomedical research, however, are less likely to have mentors, and in general, receive less mentoring than their majority-group peers, particularly among those employed in teaching-intensive institutions. This article describes Obesity Health Disparities (OHD) PRIDE, a theoretically and conceptually based research training and mentoring program designed for early-career faculty who trained or are employed at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

  14. Participation in college laboratory research apprenticeships among students considering careers in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy A. Andriole

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We sought to determine the prevalence of college laboratory research apprenticeship (CLRA participation among students considering medical careers and to examine the relationship between CLRA participation and medical-school acceptance among students who applied to medical school. Methods: We used multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of: 1 CLRA participation in a national cohort of 2001–2006 Pre-Medical College Admission Test (MCAT Questionnaire (PMQ respondents and 2 among those PMQ respondents who subsequently applied to medical school, medical-school acceptance by June 2013, reporting adjusted odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: Of 213,497 PMQ respondents in the study sample (81.2% of all 262,813 PMQ respondents in 2001–2006, 72,797 (34.1% reported CLRA participation. Each of under-represented minorities in medicine (URM race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06, Asian/Pacific Islander race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.17–1.22, and high school summer laboratory research apprenticeship (HSLRA participation (aOR: 3.95; 95% CI: 3.84–4.07 predicted a greater likelihood of CLRA participation. Of the 213,497 PMQ respondents in the study sample, 144,473 (67.7% had applied to medical school and 87,368 (60.5% of 144,473 medical-school applicants had been accepted to medical school. Each of female gender (vs. male, aOR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.16–1.22, URM race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 3.91; 95% CI: 3.75–4.08, HSLRA participation (aOR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.03–1.19, CLRA participation (aOR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.09–1.15, college summer academic enrichment program participation (aOR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.21–1.31, and higher MCAT score (per point increase, aOR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.30–1.31 predicted a greater likelihood of medical-school acceptance. Conclusions: About one-third of all PMQ respondents had participated in CLRAs prior to taking the MCAT, and such participation

  15. Mutual Mentoring for Early-Career and Underrepresented Faculty: Model, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jung H.; Baldi, Brian; Sorcinelli, Mary Deane

    2016-01-01

    In the beginning, "Mutual Mentoring" was little more than an idea, a hopeful vision of the future in which a new model of mentoring could serve as a medium to better support early-career and underrepresented faculty. Over time, Mutual Mentoring evolved from an innovative idea to an ambitious pilot program to a fully operational,…

  16. Career Counselling with Secondary School-Aged Youth: Directions for Theory, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    In the midst of an information age and a global economy, people around the world continue to face significant inequities at school and in the workforce. Career counselling thus finds itself in a paradigm shift that increasingly stresses the influences of culture and sociopolitical context. One area in which the profession can advance a social…

  17. Personality Influences Career Choice: Sensation Seeking in Professional Musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuust, Peter; Gebauer, Line; Hansen, Niels Chr.; Jorgensen, Stine Ramsgaard; Moller, Arne; Linnet, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Despite the obvious importance of deciding which career to pursue, little is known about the influence of personality on career choice. Here we investigated the relation between sensation seeking, a supposedly innate personality trait, and career choice in classical and "rhythmic" students at the academies of music in Denmark. We…

  18. Using Participatory Action Research to Study the Implementation of Career Development Benchmarks at a New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, Dale S.; Bailey, Robyn; Trought, David

    2016-01-01

    Benchmarks for career development services at tertiary institutions have been developed by Careers New Zealand. The benchmarks are intended to provide standards derived from international best practices to guide career development services. A new career development service was initiated at a large New Zealand university just after the benchmarks…

  19. American Academy of Audiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certification Meetings & Events Employee Resources Research Academia Practice Management Reimbursement Coding Compliance Resources and Tools Publications & News News Audiology Today Journal of the American Academy of Audiology Books Brochures Multimedia Guidelines and Standards ...

  20. Enhancing the Careers of Under-Represented Junior Faculty in Biomedical Research: The Summer Institute Program to Increase Diversity (SIPID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Treva K; Liu, Li; Jeffe, Donna B; Jobe, Jared B; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Pace, Betty S; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2014-01-01

    The Summer Institute Program to Increase Diversity (SIPID) in Health-Related Research is a career advancement opportunity sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Three mentored programs address difficulties experienced by junior investigators in establishing independent research careers and academic advancement. Aims are to increase the number of faculty from under-represented minority groups who successfully compete for external research funding. Data were collected using a centralized data-entry system from three Summer Institutes. Outcomes include mentees' satisfaction rating about the program, grant and publications productivity and specific comments. Fifty-eight junior faculty mentees (38% male) noticeably improved their rates of preparing/submitting grant applications and publications, with a 18-23% increase in confidence levels in planning and conducting research. According to survey comments, the training received in grantsmanship skills and one-on-one mentoring were the most valuable program components. The SIPID mentoring program was highly valued by the junior faculty mentees. The program will continue in 2011-2014 as PRIDE (PRogram to Increase Diversity among individuals Engaged in health-related research). Long-term follow-up of current mentees will be indexed at five years post training (2013). In summary, these mentoring programs hope to continue increasing the diversity of the next generation of scientists in biomedical research.

  1. Contextualize that sort focus in the work and research training of the pedagogical career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ruiz-Ducasse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper have purpose of perfecting continuous for learning and teaching process in the pedagogy careers, in this case, from a sort focus perspective. From development didactic of the labor investigative practice, he suggests idea about of the woman role. This work will let a change in the way proceeding of the professors’ future, to using the possibility that offer of the subject, for to guarantee a tally behaved and educate formation, which will let a first educate labor.

  2. Understanding the role of organizational factors in shaping the research careers of women academics in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Ion

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents an attempt to make a theoretical contribution to its knowledge base through an analysis of the group factors which contribute to the success of women academics engaged in research within the area of social sciences. The data were obtained through a series of in-depth interviews carried out at public universities in Catalonia, with women academics –all of whom were the heads of research groups recognized by the Generalitat [Regional Government] of Catalonia. The findings indicate that research groups provide a supportive and effective environment for female researchers enabling them to develop their academic careers, as measured by such key performance indicators as the number of publications and successful applications for research funding.

  3. Strengthening the career development of clinical translational scientist trainees: a consensus statement of the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Research Education and Career Development Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Frederick J; Begg, Melissa D; Fleming, Michael; Merchant, Carol

    2012-04-01

    The challenges for scholars committed to successful careers in clinical and translational science are increasingly well recognized. The Education and Career Development (EdCD) of the national Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium gathered thought leaders to propose sustainable solutions and an agenda for future studies that would strengthen the infrastructure across the spectrum of pre- and postdoctoral, MD and PhD, scholars. Six consensus statements were prepared that include: (1) the requirement for career development of a qualitatively different investigator; (2) the implications of interdisciplinary science for career advancement including institutional promotion and tenure actions that were developed for discipline-specific accomplishments; (3) the need for long-term commitment of institutions to scholars; (4) discipline-specific curricula are still required but curricula designed to promote team work and interdisciplinary training will promote innovation; (5) PhD trainees have many pathways to career satisfaction and success; and (6) a centralized infrastructure to enhance and reward mentoring is required. Several themes cut across all of the recommendations including team science, innovation, and sustained institutional commitment. Implied themes include an effective and diverse job force and the requirement for a well-crafted public policy that supports continued investments in science education. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Innovative Practice in Advancement of Academic Nurse Educator Careers: Developing Scholarship From Program Grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Linda L; Hoeksel, Renee; Fitzgerald, Cindy; Doutrich, Dawn

    We describe an innovative practice in advancing careers of academic nurse educators: demonstrating scholarly productivity from program grants. Scholarly productivity is often narrowly defined, especially in research-intensive institutions. The expectation may be a career trajectory based on the traditional scholarship of discovery. However, nurse educators, especially at the associate and full professor ranks, are often involved in leadership activities that include writing and managing program grants. We encourage the academy to value and support the development of program grants that include significant scholarly components, and we offer exemplars of associate and full professor scholarship derived from these projects.

  5. [Trends in nursing research in Korea: research trends for studies published from the inaugural issue to 2010 in the Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing and the journals published by member societies under Korean Academy of Nursing Science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Myoung Ae; Kim, Nam Cho; Kim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Sung Jae; Park, Kyung Sook; Byeon, Young Soon; Shin, Sung Rae; Yang, Soo; Lee, Kyung Sook; Lee, Eun Hyun; Lee, In Sook; Lee, Tae Wha; Cho, Myung Ok; Kim, Jin Hak

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify trends for studies published in the Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing and journals published by member societies from inaugural issues to 2010. A total of 6890 studies were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Quantitative studies accounted for 83.6% while qualitative studies accounted for 14.4%. Most frequently used research designs were quasi-experimental (91.1%) for experimental research and survey (85.2%) for non-experimental research. Most frequent study participants were healthy people (35.8%), most frequent nursing interventions, nursing skills (53.5%), and 39.8% used knowledge, attitude and behavior outcomes for dependent variables. Most frequently used keyword was elderly. Survey studies decreased from 1991 to 2010 by approximately 50%, while qualitative studies increased by about 20%. True experimental research (1.2%) showed no significant changes. Studies focusing on healthy populations increased from 2001-2005 (37.5%) to 2006-2010 (41.0%). From 1970 to 2010, studies using questionnaire accounted for over 50% whereas physiological measurement, approximately 5% only. Experimental studies using nursing skill interventions increased from 1970-1980 (30.4%) to 2006-2010 (64.0%). No significant changes were noted in studies using knowledge, attitude and behavior (39.9%) as dependent variables. The results suggest that further expansion of true experimental, qualitative studies and physiological measurements are needed.

  6. Gummi-Bears On Fire! Bringing Students and Scientists Together at the Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J.; Schamel, D.; Fisher, P.; Terschak, J. A.; Stelling, P.; Almberg, L.; Phillips, E.; Forner, M.; Gregory, D.

    2002-12-01

    When a gummi-bear is introduced into hot potassium chlorate there is a powerful reaction. This is analogous to the response we have seen to the Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA). ASRA is a residential science research camp supported by the College of Science, Engineering and Mathematics at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The hallmark of ASRA is the opportunity for small groups of 4 or fewer students, ages 10-17, to conduct scientific research and participate in engineering design projects with university faculty and researchers as mentors. Participating scientists, engineers, faculty, graduate students, and K-12 teachers from a variety of disciplines design individual research units and guide the students through designing and constructing a project, collecting data, and synthesizing results. The week-long camp culminates with the students from each project making a formal presentation to the camp and public. In its second year ASRA is already a huge success, quadrupling in size from 21 students in 2001 to 89 students in 2002. Due to a high percentage of returning students, we anticipate there will be a waiting list next year. This presentation contains perspectives from administrators, instructors, staff, and students. Based on our experience we feel there is a large potential demand for education and public outreach (EPO) in university settings. We believe the quality and depth of the ASRA experience directly contributes to the success of a worthwhile EPO program. ASRA will be portrayed as a useful model for EPO at other institutions.

  7. Being relevant: Practical guidance for early career researchers interested in solving conservation problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Chapman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In a human-altered world where biodiversity is in decline and conservation problems abound, there is a dire need to ensure that the next generation of conservation scientists have the knowledge, skills, and training to address these problems. So called “early career researchers” (ECRs in conservation science have many challenges before them and it is clear that the status quo must change to bridge the knowledge–action divide. Here we identify thirteen practical strategies that ECRs can employ to become more relevant. In this context, “relevance” refers to the ability to contribute to solving conservation problems through engagement with practitioners, policy makers, and stakeholders. Conservation and career strategies outlined in this article include the following: thinking ‘big picture’ during conservation projects; embracing various forms of knowledge; maintaining positive relationships with locals familiar with the conservation issue; accepting failure as a viable (and potentially valuable outcome; daring to be creative; embracing citizen science; incorporating interdisciplinarity; promoting and practicing pro-environmental behaviours; understanding financial aspects of conservation; forming collaboration from the onset of a project; accepting the limits of technology; ongoing and effective networking; and finally, maintaining a positive outlook by focusing on and sharing conservation success stories. These strategies move beyond the generic and highlight the importance of continuing to have an open mind throughout the entire conservation process, from establishing one’s self as an asset to embracing collaboration and interdisciplinary work, and striving to push for professional and personal connections that strengthen personal career objectives.

  8. Career guidance in communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie

    for the development of a critically reflexive career guidance practice. The considerations are organised around seven elements. 1. Creating opportunity, structure and access 2. Entering a community and increasing visibility 3. Providing guidance in communities 4. Exploring potentials in guidance situations 5...... in career guidance practices as well as in the lives of the people in the communities. This paper falls into two parts: The first part considers the collective as the starting point for the development of meaningful career guidance activities. Based on previous research on career guidance in communities......The aim of this paper is to inspire practitioners and professionals to leave their offices to bring career guidance into communities that might not identify with career guidance in the first instance. By making the effort to engage with communities, practitioners may bring about a critical change...

  9. Career adaptability and career entrenchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes; Ambiel, Rodolfo A.M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto

    2015-01-01

    Career adaptability constitutes a resource that can help employees to effectively manage career changes and challenges. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between the two higher-order constructs of career adaptability and career entrenchment (i.e., the perceived inability

  10. Mobility in the academic careers at the Flemish universities: Results from the Human Resources in Research database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debacker, N.; Vandevelde, K.

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide mobility of researchers is generally correlated with an enhancement of the continuous interchange of ideas and is therefore highly stimulated. Flemish universities have occasionally been criticized for providing limited career opportunities for foreign researchers. However, presently no reliable data is available on researchers’ mobility in Flanders. For the five Flemish universities a full dataset is available at the ECOOM Centre for R&D Monitoring, containing all academic appointments and PhD’s awarded since 1990-1991. This dataset allows for prospective analyses within the Flemish university system as well as retrospective analyses and provides information on international and interuniversity recruitment and academic inbreeding. The present results confirm that the academic system in Flanders is indeed recognized by a tradition of internal recruitment. However specific differences between the universities and the scientific disciplines are observed calling for a more complex study of researchers’ mobility and of the relationship between mobility and research excellence. (Author)

  11. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mallory O; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the US engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a 2-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors' abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program.

  12. The translational science training program at NIH: Introducing early career researchers to the science and operation of translation of basic research to medical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, C Taylor; Sittampalam, G Sitta; Wang, Philip Y; Ryan, Philip E

    2017-01-02

    Translational science is an emerging field that holds great promise to accelerate the development of novel medical interventions. As the field grows, so does the demand for highly trained biomedical scientists to fill the positions that are being created. Many graduate and postdoctorate training programs do not provide their trainees with sufficient education to take advantage of this growing employment sector. To help better prepare the trainees at the National Institutes of Health for possible careers in translation, we have created the Translational Science Training Program (TSTP). The TSTP is an intensive 2- to 3-day training program that introduces NIH postdoctoral trainees and graduate students to the science and operation of turning basic research discoveries into a medical therapeutic, device or diagnostic, and also exposes them to the variety of career options in translational science. Through a combination of classroom teaching from practicing experts in the various disciplines of translation and small group interactions with pre-clinical development teams, participants in the TSTP gain knowledge that will aid them in obtaining a career in translational science and building a network to make the transition to the field. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):13-24, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Other Sources | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Report by National Task Force for Women in Science, DST. ... A Report on Science Career for Indian Women - Indian National Science Academy ... Charusita Chakravarty, one of the stars of our community of women scientists, at a young ...

  14. American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New Research AADSM Highlights Members More news... Dental Sleep Medicine: An area of dental practice that focuses on ... SomnoMed Silver Sponsors Copyright © American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

  15. Information and Announcements Science Academies' Refresher ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2015-09-20

    Sep 20, 2015 ... Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi, The National Academy ... Advances in Chemistry for College/University teachers and research scholars will be ... Course will cover both basic and advanced topics in Chemistry ...

  16. Career Planning Trends in Japanese Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Firkola, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of career planning trends in Japanese companies. Research on career development in Japan is first reviewed. Career planning practices in Japanese companies are examined. Factors influencing career planning choice are then discussed. It was found that there appears to be a change occurring in the career planning practices, specifically the shifting of responsibility for an employees' career from the employer to the employee. (JEL Classifi-cation: M12, M54

  17. Competencies for the Contemporary Career: Development and Preliminary Validation of the Career Competencies Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Huibers, M.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2013-01-01

    A new and promising area of research has recently emerged in the field of career development: career competencies. The present article provides a framework of career competencies that integrates several perspectives from the literature. The framework distinguishes between reflective, communicative,

  18. Competencies for the contemporary career: Development and preliminary validation of the Career Competencies Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Huibers, M.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2013-01-01

    A new and promising area of research has recently emerged in the field of career development: career competencies. The present article provides a framework of career competencies that integrates several perspectives from the literature. The framework distinguishes between reflective, communicative,

  19. The Role of Gender in the Employment, Career Perception and Research Performance of Recent PhD Graduates from Dutch Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaijer, Cathelijn J F; Sonneveld, Hans; Buitendijk, Simone E; van Bochove, Cornelis A; van der Weijden, Inge C M

    2016-01-01

    Recent decades have seen a sharp increase in the number of female PhD graduates in the Netherlands. Currently, the share of females among newly graduated PhDs is almost on par with that of males. A considerable body of scientific studies has investigated the role of gender in the academic workplace. However, the role of gender in the careers of all PhD graduates, including those outside academia, has been studied less. In this study, we investigate gender differences in type of job, occupation, career perception and research performance of recent PhDs. The study is based on a survey of persons who obtained a PhD from one of five Dutch universities between 2008 and early 2012. We show that gender differences in post-PhD careers are non-existent in some aspects studied, but there are small differences in other aspects, such as sector of employment, type of contract, involvement in teaching and management, and career perception. In contrast, male and female PhDs differ sharply on two factors. The first is field of PhD, females being heavily underrepresented in engineering and the natural sciences. The second is part-time employment, females being much more likely to work part-time than males, especially if they work in the Netherlands. In later career stages, the combination of the small and large differences can be presumed to affect the career progression of female PhDs through cumulative disadvantage.

  20. Borders of "the boundarlyless career"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutaiba, Sami Stephan; Sommerlund, Julie

    2007-01-01

    , the methodology can inspire scholars to explore the findings observed in this paper. Practical implications – The idealization of the boundaryless career is problematic, as it poses problems to those concerned with the career. A more flexible ideal of careers would be preferable to researchers and organisational...

  1. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work–Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work–life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school. Methods: Baseline faculty surveys were analyzed from the first year of a 4-year National Institutes of Health–funded study to evaluate awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and use of family friendly policies and career satisfaction. The study focus was on the impact of family responsibilities and characteristics of the faculty position (rank, clinical vs. nonclinical, and academic series) in multivariate comparisons between primary predictors and outcomes of interest. Results: Both clinical and family responsibilities for children under 18 play a major and interacting role in satisfaction with career and work–life balance. Clinical faculty respondents without children at home reported significantly greater career satisfaction and better work–life balance than their nonclinical counterparts. Nonclinical faculty respondents with children reported greater satisfaction and better balance than counterparts without family responsibilities. However, the advantage in career satisfaction and work–life balance for clinical faculty respondents disappeared for those with responsibility for young children. No gender-based differences were noted in the results or across faculty rank for respondents; however, for women, reaching associate professor resulted in greater career satisfaction. Conclusion: This study suggests that both work-related factors and family responsibilities influence satisfaction with career and work–life balance, but the predictors appear to interact in complex and nuanced ways. Further research is needed to delineate more clearly these interactions and to explore other factors that may play important additional roles. PMID

  2. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work-Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis; Villablanca, Amparo C

    2015-06-01

    Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work-life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school. Baseline faculty surveys were analyzed from the first year of a 4-year National Institutes of Health-funded study to evaluate awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and use of family friendly policies and career satisfaction. The study focus was on the impact of family responsibilities and characteristics of the faculty position (rank, clinical vs. nonclinical, and academic series) in multivariate comparisons between primary predictors and outcomes of interest. Both clinical and family responsibilities for children under 18 play a major and interacting role in satisfaction with career and work-life balance. Clinical faculty respondents without children at home reported significantly greater career satisfaction and better work-life balance than their nonclinical counterparts. Nonclinical faculty respondents with children reported greater satisfaction and better balance than counterparts without family responsibilities. However, the advantage in career satisfaction and work-life balance for clinical faculty respondents disappeared for those with responsibility for young children. No gender-based differences were noted in the results or across faculty rank for respondents; however, for women, reaching associate professor resulted in greater career satisfaction. This study suggests that both work-related factors and family responsibilities influence satisfaction with career and work-life balance, but the predictors appear to interact in complex and nuanced ways. Further research is needed to delineate more clearly these interactions and to explore other factors that may play important additional roles.

  3. Academy News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ethical Guidelines and Procedures document. Posted on 17 January 2017. A revised version of the document 'Scientific Values: Ethical Guidelines and Procedures' has been produced by the Academy's Panel on Scientific Values. For more details, see the Academy Committee on Scientific Values page.

  4. Early career researchers and PhD students from the social sciences use of Social Networking Sites (SNS) for science communication: an affordances approach

    OpenAIRE

    Manco Vega, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to understand the different practices and strategies early career researchers and PhD students from the social sciences have in Social Networking Sites (SNSs) for science communication in one particular country: Brazil. Following this purpose, the central research question is which are the motives and rationale of the researchers for using social networking sites for science communication. Two sub-questions arise from this general research question: How do practices and str...

  5. Researching College- and Career Ready Standards to Improve Student Outcomes: Technical Working Group Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, August 19-20, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Education Sciences, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In August, IES worked with the National Science Foundation and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to convene a technical working group to discuss research objectives related to college- and career-ready standards in English language arts and mathematics. Forty people (including researchers,…

  6. CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: "How to make research succeed in your emergency department: How to develop and train career researchers in emergency medicine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Snider, Carolyn E; Artz, Jennifer D; Stiell, Ian G; Shaeri, Sedigheh; McLeod, Shelley; Le Sage, Natalie; Hohl, Corinne; Calder, Lisa A; Vaillancourt, Christian; Holroyd, Brian; Hollander, Judd E; Morrison, Laurie J

    2015-05-01

    We sought to 1) identify best practices for training and mentoring clinician researchers, 2) characterize facilitators and barriers for Canadian emergency medicine researchers, and 3) develop pragmatic recommendations to improve and standardize emergency medicine postgraduate research training programs to build research capacity. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase using search terms relevant to emergency medicine research fellowship/graduate training. We conducted an email survey of all Canadian emergency physician researchers. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) research fellowship program was analysed, and other similar international programs were sought. An expert panel reviewed these data and presented recommendations at the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) 2014 Academic Symposium. We refined our recommendations based on feedback received. Of 1,246 potentially relevant citations, we included 10 articles. We identified five key themes: 1) creating training opportunities; 2) ensuring adequate protected time; 3) salary support; 4) infrastructure; and 5) mentorship. Our survey achieved a 72% (67/93) response rate. From these responses, 42 (63%) consider themselves clinical researchers (i.e., spend a significant proportion of their career conducting research). The single largest constraint to conducting research was funding. Factors felt to be positive contributors to a clinical research career included salary support, research training (including an advanced graduate degree), mentorship, and infrastructure. The SAEM research fellowship was the only emergency medicine research fellowship program identified. This 2-year program requires approval of both the teaching centre and each applying fellow. This program requires training in 15 core competencies, manuscript preparation, and submission of a large grant to a national peer-review funding organization. We recommend that the CAEP Academic Section create a

  7. U.S. Department of Energy physical protection upgrades at the Latvian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Research Center, Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, M.; Hine, C.; Robertson, C.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately five years ago, the Safe, Secure Dismantlement program was started between the US and countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU). The purpose of the program is to accelerate progress toward reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, including such threats as theft, diversion, and unauthorized possession of nuclear materials. This would be accomplished by strengthening the material protection, control, and accounting systems within the FSU countries. Under the US Department of Energy''s program of providing cooperative assistance to the FSU countries in the areas of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A), the Latvian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Research Center (LNRC) near Riga, Latvia, was identified as a candidate site for a cooperative MPC and A project. The LNRC is the site of a 5-megawatt IRT-C pool-type research reactor. This paper describes: the process involved, from initial contracting to project completion, for the physical protection upgrades now in place at the LNRC; the intervening activities; and a brief overview of the technical aspects of the upgrades

  8. Advice for a career in academic gastroenterology: from fellowship application through job selection and contract negotiations to research and promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappell, M S

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to describe a comprehensive strategy for success in academic gastroenterology by reporting common sense, but mostly previously unpublished, recommendations. The recommendation are based on expert opinion from personal experience mentoring 125 gastroenterology fellows and residents as a program director for nine years and from mentoring research while publishing more than 160 articles in peer-reviewed journals and editing 11 books during a 23-year academic career. Primary criteria for fellowship applicant selection include board scores, clinical performance, interview performance, clinical training, and research productivity. For optimal chances, select the subspecialty of gastroenterology early during residency, consult a mentor, and develop a well-planned strategy. Faculty advancement depends upon publications, grants, national recognition, interpersonal skills, and recommendations. Article categories from highest-to-lowest in prestige are original investigations, review articles, book chapters, case reports, and letters/abstracts. Articles are judged by the prestige of the journal of publication. Resubmit rejected articles to successively less prestigious journals until accepted for publication. Articles in journals without peer-review have negligible career impact. Grant support creates protected time. Institutional reputation is important in academics. Do not accept a job without a written contract. Have a lawyer review your contract. An outside offer strengthens a negotiating position. Be sociable and nonconfrontational at work. Network with colleagues. Seek a mentor. Meet your supervisor regularly for feedback. Never express anger at your boss or patients. Avoid litigation with employers. Sub-subspecialize to develop expertise in one area. Focus on this area in your research and clinical practice. In conclusion, a well-planned strategy can help you achieve a senior academic position early and efficiently.

  9. Exploring predictors of scientific performance with decision tree analysis: The case of research excellence in early career mathematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, J.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to introduce the exploratory method of decision tree analysis as a complementary alternative to current confirmatory methods used in scientometric prediction studies of research performance; and (2) as an illustrative case, to explore predictors of future research excellence at the individual level among 493 early career mathematicians in the sub-field of number theory between 1999 and 2010. A conceptual introduction to decision tree analysis is provided including an overview of the main steps of the tree-building algorithm and the statistical method of cross-validation used to evaluate the performance of decision tree models. A decision tree analysis of 493 mathematicians was conducted to find useful predictors and important relationships between variables in the context of predicting research excellence. The results suggest that the number of prestige journal publications and a topically diverse output are important predictors of future research excellence. Researchers with no prestige journal publications are very unlikely to produce excellent research. Limitations of decision three analysis are discussed. (Author)

  10. "I Love My Work, but This Is Not My Life": Women of Color in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Jasmine A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study used critical ethnography and intersectionality theory to better understand the experiences of Women of Color (WOC) in the academy. WOC experience numerous and significant challenges in the academy that have the potential to stifle their career growth. Claiming increased acceptance and diversity in the academy without a…

  11. Building up careers in translational neuroscience and mental health research: Education and training in the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapado-Castro, Marta; Pazos, Ángel; Fañanás, Lourdes; Bernardo, Miquel; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Leza, Juan Carlos; Berrocoso, Esther; de Arriba, Jose; Roldán, Laura; Sanjuán, Julio; Pérez, Victor; Haro, Josep M; Palomo, Tomás; Valdizan, Elsa M; Micó, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2015-01-01

    The number of large collaborative research networks in mental health is increasing. Training programs are an essential part of them. We critically review the specific implementation of a research training program in a translational Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health in order to inform the strategic integration of basic research into clinical practice to have a positive impact in the mental health system and society. Description of training activities, specific educational programs developed by the research network, and challenges on its implementation are examined. The Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has focused on training through different activities which have led to the development of an interuniversity master's degree postgraduate program in mental health research, certified by the National Spanish Agency for Quality Evaluation and Accreditation. Consolidation of training programs within the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has considerably advanced the training of researchers to meet competency standards on research. The master's degree constitutes a unique opportunity to accomplish neuroscience and mental health research career-building within the official framework of university programs in Spain. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer science, biology and biomedical informatics academy: outcomes from 5 years of immersing high-school students into informatics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J King

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pittsburgh's Department of Biomedical Informatics and Division of Pathology Informatics created a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM pipeline in 2011 dedicated to providing cutting-edge informatics research and career preparatory experiences to a diverse group of highly motivated high-school students. In this third editorial installment describing the program, we provide a brief overview of the pipeline, report on achievements of the past scholars, and present results from self-reported assessments by the 2015 cohort of scholars. The pipeline continues to expand with the 2015 addition of the innovation internship, and the introduction of a program in 2016 aimed at offering first-time research experiences to undergraduates who are underrepresented in pathology and biomedical informatics. Achievements of program scholars include authorship of journal articles, symposium and summit presentations, and attendance at top 25 universities. All of our alumni matriculated into higher education and 90% remain in STEM majors. The 2015 high-school program had ten participating scholars who self-reported gains in confidence in their research abilities and understanding of what it means to be a scientist.

  13. Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics academy: Outcomes from 5 years of Immersing High-school Students into Informatics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew J; Fisher, Arielle M; Becich, Michael J; Boone, David N

    2017-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh's Department of Biomedical Informatics and Division of Pathology Informatics created a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) pipeline in 2011 dedicated to providing cutting-edge informatics research and career preparatory experiences to a diverse group of highly motivated high-school students. In this third editorial installment describing the program, we provide a brief overview of the pipeline, report on achievements of the past scholars, and present results from self-reported assessments by the 2015 cohort of scholars. The pipeline continues to expand with the 2015 addition of the innovation internship, and the introduction of a program in 2016 aimed at offering first-time research experiences to undergraduates who are underrepresented in pathology and biomedical informatics. Achievements of program scholars include authorship of journal articles, symposium and summit presentations, and attendance at top 25 universities. All of our alumni matriculated into higher education and 90% remain in STEM majors. The 2015 high-school program had ten participating scholars who self-reported gains in confidence in their research abilities and understanding of what it means to be a scientist.

  14. Career patterns of healthcare executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, D F; Myrtle, R C

    2001-02-01

    This research examines the job and career changes of healthcare executives and managers working in different segments of the healthcare industry in the western United States. The results suggest that the job and career patterns in the healthcare delivery sector are undergoing significant transformation. One third of the respondents reports that at least one of their last four job changes was involuntary or unplanned. One half of those attempted to make a career change. This study identifies four different executive and management career patterns. The most common was one of multiple career changes. The second pattern was that of a single career change, followed by a 'traditional' career in which one did not seek a career change. The final pattern was characterized as a movement back and forth between two different segments of the healthcare industry. Age, gender, marital status and education were not associated with any specific career pattern. The need to achieve results early in the respondent's career had a strong influence on career patterns. This study confirms the fluidity of career movement and the changing permeability between the various segments of the healthcare industry. It also suggests that career success increasingly will require broad management experience in those different segments.

  15. Beyond the indicators: formulation of the career strategies of scientists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PÁLINKÓ, E.

    2016-07-01

    During the past years a comprehensive indicator-system has been developing in Hungary providing instant information for the purposes of evidence-based national science policy. The values in the indicator system are clear and comparable with international references. The suggested indices can point out important issues of the national R&D system and can contribute to raise relevant questions, however, it is emphasized that deeper analysis is needed during the decision making processes. The aim of this article is to show the importance of such analyses based on the preliminary results of a career path research project among PhD holders. The relevant science policy indicators show a favorable picture of the R&D system and the researchers’ pay scale in Hungary by the wage premium of those with tertiary education compared with those with secondary education only. The deeper analysis shows a different picture. The first findings of the recent Career Path Monitor project among researchers at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS CPM) could provide additional concerns by understanding the background of the career decisions of the PhD holders deeper. Data shows that some dimensions of satisfaction could determine the career-decisions of the examined scholars. The most problematic factor is wage owing to the characteristics of the public servant salary pay scale which is unfavourable for the young researchers at the beginning of their career. What is more it does not differentiate according to scientific performance, so the satisfaction with wage is usually low among young researchers. This problem makes researcher statuses less engaging causing drop in new supplies. Young researchers try to improve their financial circumstances in order to align their possibilities and their expectations based on their high qualification. SSH and STEM researchers have different optimization strategies, nevertheless both inhere severe risks (e.g. decline in scientific performance, brain

  16. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process of election of Fellows is described in the statutes. Nomination forms are provided only to the Fellows and are not made available on the Academy website. Those pursuing research in India are eligible to be nominated. The last date for receipt of new nominations is 31st May. The Academy offers only fellowship ...

  17. Fellowship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Medical Biostatistics, Medical Research Methodology, Medical ... Address: Centre for Advanced Research & Development, SBM Jain College of ... Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the teaching of the ...

  18. Joint Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society on the Recommended Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Adult: Methodology and Discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Badr, M. Safwan; Belenky, Gregory; Bliwise, Donald L.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Buysse, Daniel; Dinges, David F.; Gangwisch, James; Grandner, Michael A.; Kushida, Clete; Malhotra, Raman K.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Quan, Stuart F.; Tasali, Esra

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society recently released a Consensus Statement regarding the recommended amount of sleep to promote optimal health in adults. This paper describes the methodology, background literature, voting process, and voting results for the consensus statement. In addition, we address important assumptions and challenges encountered during the consensus process. Finally, we outline future directions that will advance our understanding of sleep n...

  19. Recommended Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Adult: A Joint Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Badr, M. Safwan; Belenky, Gregory; Bliwise, Donald L.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Buysse, Daniel; Dinges, David F.; Gangwisch, James; Grandner, Michael A.; Kushida, Clete; Malhotra, Raman K.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Quan, Stuart F.; Tasali, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is essential for optimal health. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and Sleep Research Society (SRS) developed a consensus recommendation for the amount of sleep needed to promote optimal health in adults, using a modified RAND Appropriateness Method process. The recommendation is summarized here. A manuscript detailing the conference proceedings and evidence supporting the final recommendation statement will be published in SLEEP and the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

  20. Junior High Career Planning: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    This research used "The Comprehensive Career Needs Survey" to assess the career counselling needs of 3,562 junior high students in Southern Alberta. This article examines junior high students' responses regarding their perceptions of (a) the relevance of career planning, (b) who they would approach for help with career planning, and (c)…

  1. Preparing for an interdisciplinary future: A perspective from early-career researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridle, Helen; Vrieling, A.; Cardillo, Monica; Araya, Yoseph; Hinojosa, Leonith

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, research is moving towards more interdisciplinary endeavours. Effective collaboration between people from different disciplines is necessary to maximize the potential benefits of interdisciplinarity for future research activity. This paper analyses an approach to fostering the skills

  2. 1st October 2010 - Chinese Vice President of the Academy of Sciences signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, witnessed by Adviser R. Voss

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    1st October 2010 - Chinese Vice President of the Academy of Sciences signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, witnessed by Adviser R. Voss

  3. Proposal for a Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-o

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Proposal for a Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-o

  4. Mentor Perspectives on the Place of Undergraduate Research Mentoring in Academic Identity and Career Development: An Analysis of Award Winning Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric E.; Walkington, Helen; Shanahan, Jenny Olin; Ackley, Elizabeth; Stewart, Kearsley A.

    2018-01-01

    This study examines how Undergraduate Research (UR) mentoring fits into the career profile of award-winning UR mentors and the factors that motivate engagement as UR mentors. Twenty-four award-winning UR mentors in four countries were interviewed about their mentoring practices. Six themes emerged: (1) Academic Identity and Motivations; (2)…

  5. Transitions and careers in the teaching profession - and how that affects expertise development; An analysis of the domain and a proposal for research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, Els; Van der Klink, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Boshuizen, H. P. A., & Van der Klink, M. R. (2010, 25-27 August). Transitions and careers in the teaching profession - and how that affects expertise development; An analysis of the domain and a proposal for research. Paper presented at the 5th EARLI-SIG14 Learning and Professional Development,

  6. Broadening the Definition of College and Career Readiness: A Holistic Approach. ACT Research Report Series, 2014 (5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista; Burrus, Jeremy; Camara, Wayne; O'Connor, Ryan; Hansen, Mary Ann; Gambrell, James; Casillas, Alex; Bobek, Becky

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of the US education system is the opportunity afforded to students to pursue education and career paths of their own choosing. This flexibility and autonomy, however, has drawbacks. Students must navigate a series of complex and often disconnected environments, as well as numerous decision points, before they attain a fulfilling career.…

  7. How to get started with a systematic review in epidemiology: an introductory guide for early career researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, Hayley J; Dodds, Richard M; Ntani, Georgia; Cooper, Rachel; Cooper, Cyrus; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Baird, Janis

    2013-08-07

    Systematic review is a powerful research tool which aims to identify and synthesize all evidence relevant to a research question. The approach taken is much like that used in a scientific experiment, with high priority given to the transparency and reproducibility of the methods used and to handling all evidence in a consistent manner.Early career researchers may find themselves in a position where they decide to undertake a systematic review, for example it may form part or all of a PhD thesis. Those with no prior experience of systematic review may need considerable support and direction getting started with such a project. Here we set out in simple terms how to get started with a systematic review. Advice is given on matters such as developing a review protocol, searching using databases and other methods, data extraction, risk of bias assessment and data synthesis including meta-analysis. Signposts to further information and useful resources are also given. A well-conducted systematic review benefits the scientific field by providing a summary of existing evidence and highlighting unanswered questions. For the individual, undertaking a systematic review is also a great opportunity to improve skills in critical appraisal and in synthesising evidence.

  8. The Arecibo Observatory Space Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ford, Linda A.; Fernanda Zambrano Marin, Luisa; Aponte Hernandez, Betzaida; Soto, Sujeily; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.

    2016-10-01

    The Arecibo Observatory Space Academy (AOSA) is an intense fifteen-week pre-college research program for qualified high school students residing in Puerto Rico, which includes ten days for hands-on, on site research activities. Our mission is to prepare students for their professional careers by allowing them to receive an independent and collaborative research experience on topics related to the multidisciplinary field of space science. Our objectives are to (1) supplement the student's STEM education via inquiry-based learning and indirect teaching methods, (2) immerse students in an ESL environment, further developing their verbal and written presentation skills, and (3) foster in every student an interest in the STEM fields by harnessing their natural curiosity and knowledge in order to further develop their critical thinking and investigation skills. Students interested in participating in the program go through an application, interview and trial period before being offered admission. They are welcomed as candidates the first weeks, and later become cadets while experiencing designing, proposing, and conducting research projects focusing in fields like Physics, Astronomy, Geology, Chemistry, and Engineering. Each individual is evaluated with program compatibility based on peer interaction, preparation, participation, and contribution to class, group dynamics, attitude, challenges, and inquiry. This helps to ensure that specialized attention can be given to students who demonstrate a dedication and desire to learn. Deciding how to proceed in the face of setbacks and unexpected problems is central to the learning experience. At the end of the semester, students present their research to the program mentors, peers, and scientific staff. This year, AOSA students also focused on science communication and were trained by NASA's FameLab. Students additionally presented their research at this year's International Space Development Conference (ISDC), which was held in

  9. All EU hands to the EU pumps: the Science Academies of Europe (EASAC) recommend strong support of research to tackle antibacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyssens, I C

    2008-10-01

    Despite many European Union (EU) conferences on fighting microbial resistance, rates of resistance in Europe continue to increase. Although research is catching up with discovery, the development of new antimicrobials is threatened by economic factors, in particular the need for a return of investment via high-volume sales. The EU should invest in independent research into the economic and business aspects of antibiotic development. Multidisciplinary input from the fields of finance, law, marketing, sociology and psychology will inform a broad agenda for change at the regulatory, academic and commercial levels and identify new options for novel anti-infective research and development, as recently recommended by the Science Academies of Europe (EASAC).

  10. Security careers skills, compensation, and career paths

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    The third edition of Security Careers is the authoritative reference for current job descriptions and pay practices of security, compliance, ethics, environmental, health and safety occupations. The job descriptions and compensation ranges in this report are drawn from research from the Foushée Group, which has been conducting this research since 1980. Security Careers includes more than 75 job descriptions for security-related positions, which range from the entry-level security guard to the top global corporate executive. It also provides four years of compensation trend data to give a th

  11. Engaging diverse community college students in the geosciences through a year-round career mentoring and research workforce program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, V.; Barge, L. M.; Smith, M.

    2017-12-01

    Student attrition from STEM majors most often occurs in the first or second year of college. To retain underrepresented minority students who are largely enrolled in community colleges in STEM pathways, it is critical to provide hands-on experiences and exposure to STEM occupations in a supportive community, before the students transfer to four-year colleges. The goal of the Bridge to the Geosciences is to provide community college students with year-round career mentoring, exposure to different fields and organizations in the geosciences through small field or research experiences, and community-building within the cohort and in connection with a broader community of scientists. Each year, 20 students from Citrus College in Glendora, California participate in research "geomodules" organized around the planetary, atmospheric, ocean, and environmental science subfields of the geosciences at: (1) the Oak Crest Institute of Science, a chemistry research and diversity-oriented education organization in Monrovia, CA; (2) the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a NASA center in Pasadena, CA; (3) the University of Southern California's (USC) Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, a research center on Catalina Island; and (4) the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) in Boulder, CO. A peak experience of the program is a ten-day mini-internship at UCAR in Colorado where the students are immersed in atmospheric research, training, fieldwork, and presenting at a premier facility. Professional development, mentoring, science communication and cohort-development are woven across all four geomodules and throughout the year. This program is funded by the National Science Foundation's Improving Undergraduate STEM Education or IUSE program. Preliminary results indicate that the students' interest in the geosciences, confidence in their skills and identify as a scientist, and their sense of belonging to a cohort are increased by participation in this program.

  12. Sagar Sengupta | Speakers | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sagar Sengupta. Sagar Sengupta. NII, New Delhi. Sagar Sengupta is Staff Scientist at National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi. He is a Fellow of all three National Science Academies in India. He is a recipient of the 2011 National Bioscience Award for Career Development by Department of Biotechnology, India.

  13. Nuclear research at the institute of physics of Azerbaijan national academy of sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagiyev, Sh. M.

    2002-01-01

    In the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics the research of a number of theoretical and experimental problems is being carried out. Theoretical research by axiomatic, symmetric and field theoretical methods in elementary particles and nuclear physics have obtained wider development. Theorists study the problems of electroweak interaction, investigate relativistic composite models in the framework of a finite-difference version of relativistic quantum mechanics and phenomenological aspects of subquark models, develop a description of fundamental interactions in the axiomatic quantum field theory and investigate non-perturbative methods in gauge field theory. Using field theoretical methods, a relativistic covariant Hamiltonian quantum field theory on the light cone (on the light-front planes) for fields with arbitrary spin was developed.The various exactly soluble finite-difference models for some important applications of dynamic quantum systems (linear and three-dimensional harmonic oscillators, hydrogen atoms etc.) were investigated. The wave functions, energy spectra and dynamic symmetry were determined; the coherent states and Wigner distribution functions for the stationary states and the states of thermodynamic equilibrium were constructed.Research related to the possible description of lepton and lepton-hadron interactions within the framework of the weak and electromagnetic interaction theories with spontaneously broken of SU(2)xU(1) gauge symmetry were carried out. The questions of acceptance of different SU(2)xU(1) models were investigated. Several methods for introducing heavy leptons were also considered.It was shown that, the spin interactions in even deformed nuclei generate a new collective branch of monopoly excitations, and are responsible for the formation of observables in experiments on magnetic dipole and Gamov-Teller resonances. The experimental studies are primarily focused on the investigation of the following problems: a) ATLAS

  14. Imagined and Emerging Career Patterns: Perceptions of Doctoral Students and Research Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Lynn; Turner, Gill

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, research staff positions rather than lectureships are the reality for social sciences PhD graduates wishing academic work. Within this context, our longitudinal study examined how social science doctoral students and research staff in two UK universities imagined their futures in and out of academia. The variation over time in how…

  15. Lenore White Harmon: One Woman's Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.

    1997-01-01

    Presents biographical information on Lenore White Harmon, noted professor, counselor, and researcher. In a question-and-answer section, Harmon describes her early career decisions, work history, research efforts, professional contributions, important influences and reflections on her career development. (KW)

  16. Setting research priorities to improve the health of children and young people with neurodisability: a British Academy of Childhood Disability-James Lind Alliance Research Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Simkiss, Doug; Busk, Mary; Morris, Maureen; Allard, Amanda; Denness, Jacob; Janssens, Astrid; Stimson, Anna; Coghill, Joanna; Robinson, Kelly; Fenton, Mark; Cowan, Katherine

    2015-01-28

    To engage young people, parent carers and clinicians in a systematic process to identify and prioritise research questions regarding ways to improve the health and well-being of children and young people with neurodisability. British Academy of Childhood Disability (BACD)-James Lind Alliance research priority setting partnership bringing together patients, carers and clinicians as equal stakeholders. UK health service and community. The BACD Strategic Research Group formed the partnership. A Steering Group was established; charity and professional partner organisations were recruited. Suggestions were gathered in an open survey and from research recommendations for statutory guidance. Items were aggregated to formulate indicative research questions and verified as uncertainties from research evidence. An interim survey was used to rank the questions to shortlist topics. A mixed group of stakeholders discussed the top 25 questions at the final priority setting workshop agreeing a final rank order and the top 10 research priorities. Partner organisations were 13 charities and 8 professional societies. 369 people submitted suggestions (40% non-clinicians). 76 people participated in the interim prioritisation (26 parents, 1 young person, 10 charity representatives, 39 clinicians); 22 took part in the final workshop (3 young people, 7 parents, 3 charity representatives, 9 professionals). The top three research priorities related to (1) establishing the optimal frequency and intensity (dose) for mainstream therapies, (2) means for selecting and encouraging use of communication strategies and (3) ways to improve children's attitudes towards disability. The top 10 included evaluating interventions to promote mobility, self-efficacy, mental health, continence, physical fitness, educational inclusion and reduce impacts of sleep disturbance. The methodology provided a systematic and transparent process to identify research priorities that included stakeholders that have

  17. Scientific mobility of Early Career Researchers in Spain and The Netherlands through their publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson-Garcia, N.; Cañibano, C.; Woolley, R.; Costas, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an exploratory analysis of different typologies of researchers according to their traceable mobility using scientific publications covered in the Web of Science (WoS). We compare two populations of researchers, of the same ‘scientific age’, based in Spain and The Netherlands. To establish reasonable comparisons between researchers based in The Netherlands and Spain, we must first identify similar groups of researchers in each country. We only consider 'trusted' direct linkages between author and affiliation as reported in scientific publications and recorded by WoS. We establish three different study groups: Mobile versus non-mobile researchers, returned versus not returned researchers and, single versus multiple affiliations. We observe differences in the mobility patterns and their relation with production and citation impact between countries. Differences for each study group are found in the case of Spain but not as evident for The Netherlands. We conclude remarking the need to further analyse the institutional framework of each country to better understand how much do they influence research mobility and in what way. (Author)

  18. Career Transitions and Career Success in the "New" Career Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzikowski, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The "new" career, most notably the boundaryless career, is associated with high career mobility, which is in turn associated with employability and career success of individuals. The current study examined how frequency, form (organisational, horizontal or vertical) and impact (objective career success) of career transitions have changed…

  19. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    This symposium will introduce a project developed under the auspices of the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) in an effort to inspire and support the development of culturally sensitive theoretical frameworks and research methodologies in career studies and career assistance services...... around the world. The cultural approach to the theory and practice of sport psychological research has been recently articulated in two edited books, Cultural Sport Psychology (Schinke & Hanrahan, 2009) and The Cultural Turn in Sport Psychology (Ryba, Schinke, & Tenenbaum, 2010). The presenters...... in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...

  20. Can scholarship in nursing/midwifery education result in a successful research career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon; Absalom, Irene; Cant, Robyn; Bogossian, Fiona; Kelly, Michelle; Levett-Jones, Tracy; McKenna, Lisa

    2018-05-07

    In a recent editorial we examined the research outputs of 150 Australian nursing and midwifery professors (McKenna, Cooper, Cant, Bogossian, 2017) identifying publication metrics on par with, and sometimes above those of professors in the UK (Watson, McDonagh & Thompson, 2016). Because global university rankings are heavily weighted towards research, there has been pressure on universities and on academics to maximise research performance (Nguyen, Rambaldi & Tang, 2017). Although many Australian universities have increasingly focused on education delivery, and despite the need for a strong evidence base for learning and teaching, academics are often cautioned against focusing too heavily on educational research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Guidance theory and practice : the status of career exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Taveira, Maria do Céu; Rodríguez Moreno, Maria Luísa

    2003-01-01

    Career intervention can be designed to enhance constructive attitudes, emotions and behaviours that will improve clients’ career attainment. In this sense, mobilisation of career exploration constitutes one of the most important tasks of career counsellors, particularly with emphasis in developmental career guidance models, first developed in the 1950s. The authors present a brief review of career exploration conceptualisation and empirical research lines. The implications for career guidance...

  2. Long-term research challenges in wind energy – a research agenda by the European Academy of Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kuik, G. A. M.; Peinke, Joachim; Nijssen, R.

    2016-01-01

    knowledge in 11 research areas, ranging from physics and design to environmental and societal aspects. Because of the very nature of this initiative, this document does not intend to be permanent or complete. It shows the vision of the experts of the eawe, but other views may be possible. We sincerely hope...

  3. Nuclear Academy for journalists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoenyi, Z.; Bujdoso, E.; Komornik, F.

    2000-01-01

    Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority launched a comprehensive nuclear training program for journalists in 1999. The aim of the ''Nuclear Academy'' was to gain the journalists for the objective interpretation and - for this reason - to provide them a large-scale knowledge and experience in connection with nuclear energy. The Academy consisted of ten all day long programs monthly, containing lectures, discussions, debates and technical visits to the Paks NPP, research and training reactors, scientific institutions and facilities of waste disposal, etc. Two international outlooks were important events of the training: the journalists visited the Mohovce NPP (Slovakia) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna.The successful attendants took over diplomas at the closing ceremony in June 2000, which diplomas authorise them to use the ''Nuclear Journalist'' title. The slogan of the Academy was: ''Gain and provide objective information''. (author)

  4. Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edington, C.W.

    1992-06-01

    This progress report relates progress in the various research projects evaluating the late health effects, both somatic and genetic, resulting from radiation exposure of the survivors of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Considerable progress has been made in the collection and utilization of the various epidemiological data bases. These include the Life Span Study, (LSS) cohort, the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort, the In Utero cohort, the leukemia registry and the F-1 Study population. Important progress has been made in using RERF Tumor and Tissue Registry records for evaluation of cancer incidence and radiation risk estimates for comparison with cancer mortality and risk in the LSS cohort. At the present time, a manuscript on the incidence of solid tumors (1950-1987) is undergoing internal and external review for publication as an RERF Technical report (TR) and for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. In addition, manuscripts are in preparation on (1) a comprehensive report on the incidence of hematological cancers, including analysis of leukemia by cell type (1950-1987), (2) a general description of Tumor Registry operations and (3) a comparison of incidence- and mortality-based estimates of radiation risk in the LSS cohort.

  5. Mars Exploration Student Data Teams: Building Foundations and Influencing Students to Pursue STEM Careers through Experiences with Authentic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, D.; Grigsby, B.; Murchie, S. L.; Buczkowski, D.; Seelos, K. D.; Nair, H.; McGovern, A.; Morgan, F.; Viviano, C. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Thompson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT) immerses diverse teams of high school and undergraduate students in an authentic research Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) based experience and allows students to be direct participants in the scientific process by working with scientists to analyze data sets from NASA's Mars program, specifically from the CRISM instrument. MESDT was created by Arizona State University's Mars Education Program, and is funded through NASA's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars or CRISM, an instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Students work with teacher mentors and CRISM team members to analyze data, develop hypotheses, conduct research, submit proposals, critique and revise work. All students begin the program with basic Mars curriculum lessons developed by the MESDT education team. This foundation enables the program to be inclusive of all students. Teachers have reported that populations of students with diverse academic needs and abilities have been successful in this program. The use of technology in the classroom allows the MESDT program to successfully reach a nationwide audience and funding provided by NASA's CRISM instrument allows students to participate free of charge. Recent changes to the program incorporate a partnership with United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a CRISM sponsored competitive scholarship for two teams of students to present their work at the annual USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting. Returning MESDT teachers have attributed an increase in student enrollment and interest to this scholarship opportunity. The 2013 USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting was held in Washington DC which provided an opportunity for the students to meet with their Senators at the US Capitol to explain the science work they had done throughout the year as well as the impact that the program had had on their goals for the future. This opportunity extended to the students by the

  6. Future Careers in Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vink, G. E.; van der Vink, G. E.

    2001-05-01

    A new generation of Geoscientists are abandoning the traditional pathways of oil exploration and academic research to pursue careers in public policy, international affairs, business, education and diplomacy. They are using their backgrounds in Geoscience to address challenging, multi-disciplinary problems of societal concern. To prepare for such careers, students are developing a broad understanding of science and a basic literacy in economics, international affairs, and policy-making.

  7. Research activity by National Center of Archaeological studies of Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitdikov Ayrat G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work of the National Center for Archaeological Studies named after A.Sh. Khalikov with the Institute of History named after Sh Mardjani of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan (NCAS in 2013 was conducted within three Departments: prehistoric and medieval archaeology, conservation studies, and a bioarchaeological laboratory. The basic problems were: “Archaeology of the ancient population of the Volga-Kama: the formation and interaction of cultures”; “Medieval Turkic-Tatar civilization: the emergence, development, interaction with the peoples of Eurasia”; “Anthropology and genetics of the ancient population of the Middle Volga region”. Within the project on “Geographic information systems of Tatarstan archaeological heritage”, preparatory works for monitoring of the condition of cultural heritage objects located in the Kuibyshev and Nizhnekamsk reservoirs zones of influence were conducted. Archaeological fieldwork was conducted in the framework of the Primitive, Early Bulgar, Kazan, Bulgar, Lower Volga, Sviyazhsk archaeological expeditions and Preservation and salvation expedition in the area of Nizhnekamsk and Kuibyshev reservoirs. Beyond the Republic of Tatarstan, exploratory research was conducted in the territory of the Chuvash and Mordovian republics, Ulyanovsk and Samara Oblasts. The study of monuments in the Lower Volga region continued in collaboration with colleagues from the Astrakhan Oblast and the Republic of Mari El. Joint international archaeological research was carried out in the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria and Ukraine. 5 conferences were organized, including 4 international ones. The NCAS staff participated in 16 conferences, including 11 international ones. 2 Doctor habilitatus and 3 Doctor’s theses were defended. 5 collections of articles and theses, and 4 issues of the “Privolzhskaya arkheologiya” (Volga region archaeology were published. The NCAS staff prepared 216

  8. Sexual Diversity in the Judiciary in England and Wales; Research on Barriers to Judicial Careers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie J. Moran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Debates about the diversity of the judiciary in the UK have been dominated by gender, race and ethnicity. Sexuality is notable by its absence and is perceived to pose particular challenges. It is usually missing from the list of diversity categories. When present, its appearance is nominal. One effect of this has been a total lack of official data on the sexual composition of the judiciary. Another is the gap in research on the barriers to the goal of a more sexually diverse judiciary. In 2008 the Judicial Appointment Commission (JAC for England and Wales undertook research to better understand the challenges limiting progress towards judicial diversity. A central gaol of the project was to investigate barriers to application for judicial appointment across different groups defined by “sex, ethnicity and employment status”. Sexual orientation was again noticeable by its absence. Its absence was yet another missed opportunity to recognise and take seriously this strand of diversity. This study is based on a response to that absence. A stakeholder organisation, InterLaw Diversity Forum for lesbian gay bisexual and transgender networks in the legal services sector, with the JAC’s approval, used their questionnaire and for the first time asked lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender lawyers about the perceptions and experiences of barriers to judicial appointment. This paper examines the findings of that unique research and considers them in the light of the initial research on barriers to judicial appointment and subsequent developments.

  9. Barriers to Career Success for Minority Researchers in the Behavioral Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameny, Rebecca R.; DeRosier, Melissa E.; Taylor, Lorraine C.; McMillen, Janey Sturtz; Knowles, Meagan M.; Pifer, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    The United States falls short in the diversity of its scientific workforce. While the underrepresentation of minority researchers in the behavioral sciences has been a concern for several decades, policy and training initiatives have been only marginally successful in increasing their number. Diversity plays a critical role in our nation's…

  10. Integrating Program Assessment and a Career Focus into a Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Mary Scheuer

    2017-01-01

    Sociology research methods students in 2013 and 2016 implemented a series of "real world" data gathering activities that enhanced their learning while assisting the department with ongoing program assessment and program review. In addition to the explicit collection of program assessment data on both students' development of sociological…

  11. Decolonisation through Critical Career Research and Action: Maori Women and Accountancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, Patty; Humphries, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The call for a just social order in Aotearoa (New Zealand) includes the transformation of mono-cultural institutions such as the accountancy profession. Maori women accountants in this research expressed concern about maintaining their identity as Maori while participating in the corporate culture of the firms in which they are employed. These…

  12. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/sadh/038/01/0123-0131 ... play a key role in telemedicine applications that help in accurate diagnosis and research. ... Department of Electronics Engineering, Sinhgad Academy of Engineering, Pune 411048 ...

  13. About | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 82nd Annual Meeting of the Indian Academy of Sciences is being held at ... by newly elected Fellows and Associates over a wide range of scientific topics. ... Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Bhopal: Indian ...

  14. Career anchors and values from different career management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cunha da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To analyze the relationships between career anchors and young Generation Y professionals’ values, from the career concept perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Research concerning the proposed objective was carried out through quantitative research involving 189 Business Administration majors from a Catholic university in São Paulo, Brazil. We used two instruments to identify the career anchors and values of respondents: Schein (1990 and Schwartz (1994, respectively. We used statistical techniques to explore the relationships between career anchors and values. Findings – Among the results, mention should be made to the statistical relationships found between analyzed career anchors and values. It is also important to stress that, although the Lifestyle career anchor was predominantly present in the conglomerate division, this anchor was the predominant characteristic in the differentiation of the smaller group of respondents, the new career group. The General Management Career Anchor, which presents a lower incidence, is the predominant characteristic of the larger group, referring to organizational careers. As well as the Lifestyle career anchor, the Hedonism value was predominant among respondents. Originality/value – The need to consider the following was found: Generation Y presents generational characteristics that drive people management to propose work structures that offer activities to generate learning, pleasure, self-fulfillment and conciliation between work and personal life.

  15. Career Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verification of Employment Life at the Lab Career Stories Dual Careers Inclusion & Diversity Work-Life ) Make yourself at home Life at the Lab Life at the Lab Inclusion & Diversity Inclusion & © & Cover Letter Tips Social Media Tips Learn More Watch Videos Employee Spotlight Student Successes

  16. WE-G-204-02: So You Want to Do Research: Two Approaches to Beginning a Career in Medical Physics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, J.

    2016-01-01

    While many indicators for academic medical physics are distressing – jobs are tight, demands on clinical time are high (and getting worse) and national funding has been flat for several years (meaning less money in reality) the present is perhaps one of the most exciting times in cancer research history, and medical physicists have an opportunity to make a difference. Many of us predict the impact of medical physics on cancer research over the next decade to be more significant than ever. Why is that? First, medical imaging is used for every cancer patient in developed countries. Every improvement in the acquisition, processing or analysis of radiological images has the potential to impact patients. The use of radiation therapy is at an all-time high – and virtually cannot be performed without medical physics. Many of the advances in both biomedical imaging and radiation oncology are the result of the hard work of academic medical physicists who are thinking of the next generation of technologies that will be used against cancer or an even broader spectrum of diseases. A career in academic medical physics is demanding, particularly for those with clinical responsibilities. As the demands for justification of their clinical effort become increasingly metricized, the ability to do “unfunded research” will become even more difficult. This means that many will have to generate external salary support to justify their efforts in research and development. This comes at a time when funding for research is compressed and harder to obtain. Generally speaking, if you are not contributing 50% or more of your effort to research, you are competing at a disadvantage and it is very unlikely you will get an NIH/NCI/NIBIB grant. Furthermore, in the ongoing effort to improve patient care and safety, we have developed credentialing pathways that now require at least two-years of residency training. This full-time clinical training creates a gap in the research trajectory of

  17. WE-G-204-02: So You Want to Do Research: Two Approaches to Beginning a Career in Medical Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deasy, J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    While many indicators for academic medical physics are distressing – jobs are tight, demands on clinical time are high (and getting worse) and national funding has been flat for several years (meaning less money in reality) the present is perhaps one of the most exciting times in cancer research history, and medical physicists have an opportunity to make a difference. Many of us predict the impact of medical physics on cancer research over the next decade to be more significant than ever. Why is that? First, medical imaging is used for every cancer patient in developed countries. Every improvement in the acquisition, processing or analysis of radiological images has the potential to impact patients. The use of radiation therapy is at an all-time high – and virtually cannot be performed without medical physics. Many of the advances in both biomedical imaging and radiation oncology are the result of the hard work of academic medical physicists who are thinking of the next generation of technologies that will be used against cancer or an even broader spectrum of diseases. A career in academic medical physics is demanding, particularly for those with clinical responsibilities. As the demands for justification of their clinical effort become increasingly metricized, the ability to do “unfunded research” will become even more difficult. This means that many will have to generate external salary support to justify their efforts in research and development. This comes at a time when funding for research is compressed and harder to obtain. Generally speaking, if you are not contributing 50% or more of your effort to research, you are competing at a disadvantage and it is very unlikely you will get an NIH/NCI/NIBIB grant. Furthermore, in the ongoing effort to improve patient care and safety, we have developed credentialing pathways that now require at least two-years of residency training. This full-time clinical training creates a gap in the research trajectory of

  18. Snakes in the wrong places: Gordon Rodda’s career in invasive species research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jim

    2012-01-01

    When USGS research zoologist Gordon G. Rodda was a graduate student at Cornell University studying behavioral biology of alligators —or later, completing a post-doc at the Smithsonian Institute studying the social behavior of green iguanas in Venezuela or following that, as a statistics and sociobiology instructor at the University of Tennessee—he did not foresee that his professional future was in snakes. Lots of snakes, and in places they don’t belong.

  19. A Research on Glass Ceiling Syndrome Career Barriers of Women Academics

    OpenAIRE

    Serdar Öge; Alpay Karasoy; Özlem Kara

    2014-01-01

    Although women have merit in their jobs, they still are located very few in the top management in many sectors. There are many causes of such situation. Such a situation creates obstacles; especially invisible ones are called “glass ceiling syndrome”. Also, studies which handle this subject in academic community are very few. The aim of this research is to reach the results about glass ceiling obstacles in terms of female teaching staff (academics) working in higher educa...

  20. Initial Career and Work Meanings in Seven European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Rita; Quintanilla, S. Antonio R.

    1994-01-01

    Explores initial careers of two target groups of young adults in seven European countries. Career patterns were constructed through cluster analysis on data gathered via self-report. Six career patterns were identified. Offers suggestions for further research and implications for career counseling, career education, and organizational career…

  1. Career Locus of Control and Career Success among Chinese Employees: A Multidimensional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanjun; Wang, Zhen; Dong, Zhilin; Liu, Yukun; Yue, Yumeng; Liu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yuqing; Zhou, Wenxia; Liu, Haihua

    2013-01-01

    The current research aimed to develop a multidimensional measure of career locus of control (LOC) and examine its predictive validity on objective and subjective career success among Chinese employees. Items of career LOC were generated based on literature review of the significant predictors of career success, as well as the open-ended responses…

  2. Developing Youth Football Academies in Greece: Managing Issues and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Trikalis; Zisis Papanikolaou; Sofia Trikali

    2014-01-01

    Present study firstly investigated the goals and objectives of youth football academies in Greece, according to the different sector that they operate (public, private, voluntary) and secondly created proposals for future youth football academies development. Research was conducted in Greece, at the period of 2010-2011. Fourteen youth football academies participated in this study and divided into three categories (five academies in commercial sector, four academies in public sector, and five ...

  3. Preclinical stress research: where are we headed? An early career investigator's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururajan, Anand; Kos, Aron; Lopez, Juan Pablo

    2018-03-07

    Stress is a major risk factor in the development of various psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. The use of stress paradigms in preclinical contexts is essential to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology of these disorders. However, they are not without their limitations and in this commentary, we have examined some of the practical issues associated with their use. We also highlight some of the latest techniques to identify their neuromolecular correlates as well as the potentially important and integrative role of computational neuroscience. Finally, we share our perspective on future directions in the field of preclinical stress research.

  4. Balancing Family and Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andam, Aba Bentil; Dawson, Silvina Ponce; Horton, K. Renee; Sandow, Barbara

    2005-10-01

    In essentially all countries, responsibilities for child care, cooking, cleaning, and other homemaking tasks fall predominantly on the wife and mother. In addition, the childbearing years come during the period when a physicist must study hard, work long hours on research, and take temporary positions, often abroad. Thus, balancing family and career has long been one of the major barriers to women's participation in science and engineering fields, including physics. While many young women believe that they must choose between having children and having a science career, the fact is that the majority of women physicists in both developing and developed countries have successfully done both. This paper summarizes some ideas and recommendations raised in discussions, especially focused on easing the challenges of having children while in temporary jobs, returning to physics after a career break, the need for "family-friendly" working conditions, and the dual-career problem facing couples where both are scientists.

  5. How policy can help develop and sustain workforce capacity in UK dementia research: insights from a career tracking analysis and stakeholder interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Sonja; Lichten, Catherine A; Robin, Enora; Parks, Sarah; Harte, Emma; MacLure, Calum; Walton, Clare; Pickett, James

    2016-08-31

    To identify research support strategies likely to be effective for strengthening the UK's dementia research landscape and ensuring a sustainable and competitive workforce. Interviews and qualitative analysis; systematic internet search to track the careers of 1500 holders of UK doctoral degrees in dementia, awarded during 1970-2013, to examine retention in this research field and provide a proxy profile of the research workforce. 40 interviewees based in the UK, whose primary role is or has been in dementia research (34 individuals), health or social care (3) or research funding (3). Interviewees represented diverse fields, career stages and sectors. While the UK has diverse strengths in dementia research, needs persist for multidisciplinary collaboration, investment in care-related research, supporting research-active clinicians and translation of research findings. There is also a need to better support junior and midlevel career opportunities to ensure a sustainable research pipeline and future leadership. From a sample of 1500 UK doctorate holders who completed a dementia-related thesis in 1970-2013, we identified current positions for 829 (55%). 651 (43% of 1500) could be traced and identified as still active in research (any field) and 315 (21%) as active in dementia research. Among recent doctoral graduates, nearly 70% left dementia research within 4-6 years of graduation. A dementia research workforce blueprint should consider support for individuals, institutions and networks. A mix of policy interventions are needed, aiming to attract and retain researchers; tackle bottlenecks in career pathways, particularly at early and midcareer stages (eg, scaling-up fellowship opportunities, rising star programmes, bridge-funding, flexible clinical fellowships, leadership training); and encourage research networks (eg, doctoral training centres, succession and sustainability planning). Interventions should also address the need for coordinated investment to improve

  6. Career Satisfaction Following Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Betty Manager

    2011-01-01

    The effect of career and technical education in the Caribbean is an area of intervention research that needs more attention. This present research is the first of its kind within the region. The study benefits from a large sample size (N = 500) conducted among a non-traditional population in the field of career development. This paper reports on…

  7. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 55: Career goals and educational preparation of aerospace engineering and science students: An international perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented of a survey of aerospace engineering and science students conducted in India, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The similarities and differences among aerospace engineering and science students from the five countries are examined in the context of two general aspects of educational experience. First, the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that led to the choice of a career in aerospace, their current levels of satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives is considered. Second, the importance of certain communications/information-use skills for professional use is examined, as well as the frequency of use and importance of specific information sources and products to meet students' educational needs. Overall, the students who participated in this research remain relatively happy with the choice of a career in aerospace engineering, despite pessimism in some quarters about the future of the industry. Regardless of national identity, aerospace engineering and science students appear to share a similar vision of the profession in terms of their career goals and aspirations. The data also indicate that aerospace engineering and science students are well aware of the importance of communications/information-use skills to professional success and that competency in these skills will help them to be productive members of their profession. Collectively, all of the students appear to use and value similar information sources and products, although some differences appear by country.

  8. The Role of Career Stress in the Relationship between Maladaptive Perfectionism and Career Attitude Maturity in South Korean Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heerak; Choi, Bo Young; Nam, Suk Kyung; Lee, Sang Min

    2011-01-01

    Given the central role of career stress in college students' lives, this research examined whether career stress mediated the relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and career attitude maturity in a sample of 185 undergraduate students in South Korea. The results indicated that career ambiguity stress, as measured by a career stress…

  9. Early-career researchers in medical applications @ CERN | 6 June | Main Auditorium

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

      Discover how technological advances for high-energy physics have become essential tools for modern medicine. CERN seeks to answer fundamental questions about the Universe, and this mission naturally contributes to advancing the frontiers of technology. State-of-the-art techniques developed for particle accelerators, detectors, and physics computing have applications beyond the high-energy physics community in the medical field. These applications now have an essential role in clinical practices and medical research centres: from imaging devices, accelerator-technology dedicated to cancer therapy, to simulations and data science tools. This knowledge transfer from the high energy physics community to innovation in other fields is an inherent component of CERN’s mission and culture. It fuels scientific collaboration and technological advances, and drives innovation. In addition, it motivates future generations of scientists, and contributes to the public awareness of the impact of fu...

  10. Openness to the unexpected: Our Pathways to Careers in a Federal Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kurt R.; Bunnell, David B.; Hondorp, Darryl W.; Taylor, William W.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Léonard, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Many fisheries professionals may not be in the job they originally envisioned for themselves when they began their undergraduate studies. Rather, their current positions could be the result of unexpected, opportunistic, or perhaps even “lucky” open doors that led them down an unexpected path. In many cases, a mentor helped facilitate the unforeseen trajectory. We offer three unique stories about joining a federal fisheries research laboratory, from the perspective of a scientist, a joint manager-scientist, and a manager. We also use our various experiences to form recommendations that should help the next generation of fisheries professionals succeed in any stop along their journey, including being open to opportunities, setting high expectations, and finding a strong and supportive team environment to work in.

  11. Gilda's Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplessis, Gilda

    2008-01-01

    Immediately after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, the author and her partner made a decision to rebuild their child care center as two apartments. However, the city of New Orleans would only approve the location for one dwelling with a child care center. This article describes the author's experiences in rebuilding Gilda's Academy, her child…

  12. Tracking the career development of scientists in low- and middle-income countries trained through TDR's research capacity strengthening programmes: Learning from monitoring and impact evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpaap, Béatrice; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Certain, Edith; Alvarado, Tini; Saint Martin, Caroline; Merle, Corinne; Mihut, Michael; Launois, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) co-sponsored by UNICEF, UNDP, World Bank and WHO has been supporting research capacity strengthening in low- and middle-income countries for over 40 years. In order to assess and continuously optimize its capacity strengthening approaches, an evaluation of the influence of TDR training grants on research career development was undertaken. The assessment was part of a larger evaluation conducted by the European Science Foundation. A comprehensive survey questionnaire was developed and sent to a group of 117 trainees supported by TDR who had completed their degree (masters or PhD) between 2000 and 2012; of these, seventy seven (77) responded. Most of the respondents (80%) rated TDR support as a very important factor that influenced their professional career achievements. The "brain drain" phenomenon towards high-income countries was particularly low amongst TDR grantees: the rate of return to their region of origin upon completion of their degree was 96%. A vast majority of respondents are still working in research (89%), with 81% of respondents having participated in multidisciplinary research activities; women engaged in multidisciplinary collaboration to a higher extent than men. However, only a minority of all have engaged in intersectoral collaboration, an aspect that would require further study. The post-degree career choices made by the respondents were strongly influenced by academic considerations. At the time of the survey, 92% of all respondents hold full-time positions, mainly in the public sector. Almost 25% of the respondents reported that they had influenced policy and practice changes. Some of the challenges and opportunities faced by trainees at various stages of their research career have been identified. Modalities to overcome these will require further investigation. The survey evidenced how TDR's research capacity grant programmes made a difference on researchers' career

  13. Tracking the career development of scientists in low- and middle-income countries trained through TDR's research capacity strengthening programmes: Learning from monitoring and impact evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Halpaap

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR co-sponsored by UNICEF, UNDP, World Bank and WHO has been supporting research capacity strengthening in low- and middle-income countries for over 40 years. In order to assess and continuously optimize its capacity strengthening approaches, an evaluation of the influence of TDR training grants on research career development was undertaken. The assessment was part of a larger evaluation conducted by the European Science Foundation. A comprehensive survey questionnaire was developed and sent to a group of 117 trainees supported by TDR who had completed their degree (masters or PhD between 2000 and 2012; of these, seventy seven (77 responded. Most of the respondents (80% rated TDR support as a very important factor that influenced their professional career achievements. The "brain drain" phenomenon towards high-income countries was particularly low amongst TDR grantees: the rate of return to their region of origin upon completion of their degree was 96%. A vast majority of respondents are still working in research (89%, with 81% of respondents having participated in multidisciplinary research activities; women engaged in multidisciplinary collaboration to a higher extent than men. However, only a minority of all have engaged in intersectoral collaboration, an aspect that would require further study. The post-degree career choices made by the respondents were strongly influenced by academic considerations. At the time of the survey, 92% of all respondents hold full-time positions, mainly in the public sector. Almost 25% of the respondents reported that they had influenced policy and practice changes. Some of the challenges and opportunities faced by trainees at various stages of their research career have been identified. Modalities to overcome these will require further investigation. The survey evidenced how TDR's research capacity grant programmes made a difference on

  14. Forty years of the Institute for Nuclear Research (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 22 December 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    On 22 December 2010, the scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), devoted to the 40th anniversary of the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, was held at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS in Troitsk. The agenda of the session announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Matveev V A (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Introductory word''; (2) Gavrin V N (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Contribution of the SAGE results to the understanding of solar physics and neutrino physics''; (3) Domogatsky G V (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Baikal neutrino experiment''; (4) Tkachev I I (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Observation of the Greisen - Zatsepin - Kuz'min effect at the Telescope Array Observatory''; (5) Kudenko Yu G (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Neutrino T2K experiment: the first results''; (6) Sadykov R A (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Fields of study of condensed media at the neutron facility at the INR, RAS''; (7) Zhuikov B L (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Production of isotopes at the INR, RAS: reality and prospects''. The papers written on the base of reports 1-5 and 7 are published below. In addition, the paper ''High-power diode-pumped alkali lasers'' by A M Shalagin is published. The paper is based on the report presented at the scientific session of the General Assembly of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS (13 December 2010) devoted to the 50th anniversary of the laser, the main materials of the session having been published in Usp. Fiz. Nauk 181 (8) 867 (2011) [Phys. Usp. 54 837 (2011)]. . Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences turns 40, V A Matveev Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 9, Pages 939-940 . The Russian-American gallium experiment SAGE, V N Gavrin Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54

  15. Joint Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society on the Recommended Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Adult: Methodology and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F; Badr, M Safwan; Belenky, Gregory; Bliwise, Donald L; Buxton, Orfeu M; Buysse, Daniel; Dinges, David F; Gangwisch, James; Grandner, Michael A; Kushida, Clete; Malhotra, Raman K; Martin, Jennifer L; Patel, Sanjay R; Quan, Stuart F; Tasali, Esra

    2015-08-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society recently released a Consensus Statement regarding the recommended amount of sleep to promote optimal health in adults. This paper describes the methodology, background literature, voting process, and voting results for the consensus statement. In addition, we address important assumptions and challenges encountered during the consensus process. Finally, we outline future directions that will advance our understanding of sleep need and place sleep duration in the broader context of sleep health. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Meeting Report of the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Academy of Surgical Research: Summary of Presentations, Labs, and Workshops, Focusing on Experimental Surgery, Las Vegas, NV, October 4-6, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Melanie L; Ziegelhofer, Tracy; Ehrmann, Jon

    2018-04-11

    The 33rd Annual Meeting of the Academy of Surgical Research was held from October 4 to 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting welcomed >160 participants from 27 different states and five countries representing the organization's diverse membership of technicians, veterinarians, medical doctors, and biomedical researchers. The Academy's annual meeting is focused on promoting the advancement of professional and academic standards, education, and research related to the art and science of experimental surgery. Presentations included four invited keynote speakers and 30 selected lectures and posters. A primary strength of the meeting was that lectures were complimented with practical sessions that included four wet lab and two dry lab half-day courses. Likewise, participants were brought together in workshops emphasizing research workflow from starting experimental design to readying results for publication. In this report, we present the highlights from this meeting and some selected abstracts that illustrate the diverse scientific expertise of the Academy and progress in surgical research.

  17. Career Competencies And Career Success Of Thai Employees In Tourism And Hospitality Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Aurathai Lertwannawit; Sirivan Serirat; Siroj Pholpantin

    2011-01-01

    This research assesses the relationship between career competencies and career success of Thai employees in the tourism and hospitality sector. The authors distinguished and operationalized four career competencies, i.e. computer and language skills, work spirits and ethics, team working and leadership, and tourism and hospitality knowledge and skills, and two career successes, i.e. objective and subjective career successes. A quantitative study was performed using 800 employees in four indus...

  18. Modeling dynamics in career construction : reciprocal relationship between future work self and career exploration.

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Zhuang, M.; Cai, Z.; Ding, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, Z.; Lai, X.

    2017-01-01

    In extant research, scholars have treated proactive career behavior (e.g., career exploration) primarily as a consequence of future work self. Yet, emerging evidence provides support for a relationship in the opposite direction, suggesting that career exploration may also be an antecedent. Using a cross-lagged panel design, we empirically tested the reciprocal relationship between future work self and career exploration. In Study 1, we measured both future work self and career exploration at ...

  19. Empirical research on the Accounting and Finance Students' opinion about the perspective of their professional training and career prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Polychronidou, Persefoni; Nikolaidis, Stephanos; Perdiki, Fotini

    2017-01-01

    The present paper focuses on studying, recording and presenting the point of view of Accounting and Finance students about their career opportunities and prospects. We considered obvious to make a correct and complete recording, in order to realize how much they are interested in their specialty and determined to follow a career based on their field of studies. Provided they are, they are supposed to be aware of their professional rights, as well as how easy it is for them to be absorbed into...

  20. Career Mobility: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Rose R.

    1992-01-01

    A study examined attitudes of 95 women biomedical researchers in dual-career relationships toward mobility for enhancing occupational advancement. The women and spouses were surveyed concerning use of time, income, job satisfaction, willingness to move, and general career and marital satisfaction. Results indicate changes in gender effects on…

  1. The Chicago Landscape of Career and Technical Education. Feature on Research and Leadership. Vol. 2, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Devean R.; Welton, Anjalé D.

    2016-01-01

    In this brief, Owens and Welton provide an introductory overview of career and technical education (CTE) programs in both Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and the City Colleges of Chicago (CCC). They report that the State of Illinois, and the City of Chicago in particular, have some of the highest unemployment rates in the country for youth ages 16 to…

  2. Virginia Demonstration Project Encouraging Middle School Students in Pursuing STEM Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jane T.; Kota, Dena H.; Kota, Aaron J.

    2011-01-01

    Encouraging students at all grade levels to consider pursuing a career in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields i s a national focus. In 2005, the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD), a Department of Defense laboratory located in Da hlgren, Virginia, began work on the Virginia Demonstration Project (VDP) with the goal of increasing more student interest in STEM educatio n and pursuing STEM careers. This goal continues as the program enters its sixth year. This project has been successful through the partici pation of NSWCDD's scientists and engineers who are trained as mentor s to work in local middle school classrooms throughout the school year, As an extension of the in-class activities, several STEM summer aca demies have been conducted at NSWCDD, These academies are supported by the Navy through the VDP and the STEM Learning Module Project. These projects are part of more extensive outreach efforts offered by the National Defense Education Program (NDEP), sponsored by the Director, Defense Research and Engineering. The focus of this paper is on the types of activities conducted at the summer academy, an overview of the academy planning process, and recommendations to help support a nati onal plan of integrating modeling and simulation-based engineering and science into all grade levels. based upon the lessons learned

  3. Office Staff | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administration; Editorial Staff - Academy; Editorial Staff - Current Science ... Coordinator, Summer Research Fellowship Programme (Science Education Panel), .... Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the teaching of the ...

  4. Career Management Skills Among Vocational Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Normah; Yamin, Azlin; Maarof, Rosmawati

    2017-08-01

    Career management skills are important elements that should be present in each individual, because career selection process is crucial for school leavers. The phenomenon of students who are less knowledgeable about career at the end of school is among the main reasons they choose a career that does not fit. The situation is very worrying and poses various negative implications such as work stress and frequent swapping of jobs. In fact, research has found that most vocational students have a low level of career management. Therefore, this study is aimed to identify career management skills that students possess. The research design was a survey using a quantitative approach with a number of samples, n = 480. Data was analysed using statistical software, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). The results show that students’ overall career management skills are moderate. To develop human capital with the right competence, career management skills are critical requirements that can fill the gaps in industry.

  5. Social Justice Competencies and Career Development Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra; Marshall, Catherine; McMahon, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The recent focus on social justice issues in career development is primarily conceptual in nature and few resources account for the challenges or successes experienced by career development practitioners. The purpose of this article is to report the results of a research study of career practitioners in Canada regarding the competencies they use…

  6. Theories of Career Development. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipow, Samuel H.; Fitzgerald, Louise F.

    This book describes and assesses the major theories of career choice and related research. The following are among the topics examined: history of vocational and career psychology (historical foundations; psychoanalytic conceptions of career choice; the Ginzberg, Ginsburg, Axelrad, and Herma theory; Tiedeman's developmental theory; recent history…

  7. Career Management Issues of Female Business Expatriates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmer, Jan; Leung, Alicia S. M.

    2002-01-01

    Responses to a career management survey from 309 male and 79 female business expatriates revealed that, controlling for demographic differences, females could less often meet their career goals with the corporation. They were less likely to regard expatriation as a useful career move. Explanations were derived from relevant research literature.…

  8. Asian American Career Development: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Smothers, Melissa K.; Chen, Yung-Lung; Fitzpatrick, Mary; Terry, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This study used a modified version of consensual qualitative research design to examine how contextual, cultural, and personal variables influence the career choices of a diverse group of 12 Asian Americans. Seven domains of influences on career choices emerged including family, culture, external factors, career goals, role models, work values,…

  9. Widening opportunities for career guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Bo Klindt; Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte; Thomsen, Rie

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses research circles as a way of organising collaboration between career guidance researchers and practitioners. Such collaboration, it is argued, helps resist neoliberal governance mechanisms and supports social justice perspectives among teachers involved in the provision...... of career education in Danish schools. Based on a research and development project on career education, case analysis is used to explore research circles as a means for collaboration between researchers and practitioners. This analysis shows that research circles provide teachers with a space to reflect...... both in and on action. Career education is the key focus of the case presented in this chapter and it is argued that, in order to increase social mobility through education, there is a need to widen opportunities through experience-based activities among pupils in Danish schools. The chapter contends...

  10. Widening opportunities for career guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Bo Klindt; Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte; Thomsen, Rie

    2018-01-01

    This chapter discusses research circles as a way of organising collaboration between career guidance researchers and practitioners. Such collaboration, it is argued, helps resist neoliberal governance mechanisms and supports social justice perspectives among teachers involved in the provision...... of career education in Danish schools. Based on a research and development project on career education, case analysis is used to explore research circles as a means for collaboration between researchers and practitioners. This analysis shows that research circles provide teachers with a space to reflect...... both in and on action. Career education is the key focus of the case presented in this chapter and it is argued that, in order to increase social mobility through education, there is a need to widen opportunities through experience-based activities among pupils in Danish schools. The chapter contends...

  11. Perioperative careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Paul

    2012-05-01

    When I look back at how my career started, I think to myself, what if I had undertaken the BA in Business Studies which I had been accepted for, instead of the BSc in Nursing for which I was still waiting to hear the results of my interview? Well, probably I would have spent four years studying business, followed by 40 years sitting in an office somewhere; Tesco, Sainsbury's or Marks and Spencer probably. I was lucky though, my father phoned up every couple of weeks (I was only 17 and didn't really have a clue what I wanted to do) and eventually they said 'yes' and I started my nursing career. Perhaps this is the first bit of advice for anybody thinking of a career in health:

  12. Becoming a nurse - A study of career choice and professional adaptation among Israeli Jewish and Arab nursing students: A quantitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Ofra; Mashiach-Eizenberg, Michal

    2014-10-01

    The growing shortage of nurses is a global issue, with nursing recruitment and retention recognized as priorities worldwide. Israeli Jews and Israeli Arabs share residency and citizenship. However, language, religion, values, customs, symbols and lifestyle differ between the groups. This research covers only Arab citizens of Israel and not those in the occupied territories, the West Bank and Gaza. The future of the profession lies in the ability to recruit and retain the next generation of nurses. To examine career choice and professional adaptation among Israeli Jews and Israeli Arab nursing students by addressing motivation, materialistic factors and professional adaptation. 395 students, which comprised the total number of students in the first five years of the nursing program's existence, in the nursing faculty at an academic college in Israel. A questionnaire was created and administered to the students in the first week of their first year in the nursing program. Altruistic motivation, such as the opportunity to help others, was the primary factor that influenced students to choose nursing as a profession followed by professional interest. Materialistic factors, such as social status and good salary, had less influence. A significant positive correlation was found between professional adaptation and all three dimensions of role perception - teamwork, professional knowledge, and treatment skills. The female students perceived those components as more important than the male students and the Jewish students perceived themselves as more suitable for nursing than the Arab students. Career choice and professional adaptation are influenced by multiple factors. Future recruitment and retention strategies used to address the critical nursing shortage should consider these factors, as well as the role of mentors, peers, and role models in the formulation of career expectations and career choice decisions. © 2013.

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Joseph Daniels1,&, Ruth Nduati1,2, James Kiarie1,3, Carey Farquhar1,4,5 .... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, .... a research environment that supports knowledge sharing to develop research ...

  14. Medicine Goes Female: Protocol for Improving Career Options of Females and Working Conditions for Researching Physicians in Clinical Medical Research by Organizational Transformation and Participatory Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebrook, Joachim; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Buhre, Wolfgang F F A; de Korte-de Boer, Dianne; Hamaekers, Ankie E W; Metelmann, Bibiana; Metelmann, Camila; Bortul, Marina; Palmisano, Silvia; Mellin-Olsen, Jannicke; Macas, Andrius; Andres, Janusz; Prokop-Dorner, Anna; Vymazal, Tomáš; Hinkelmann, Juergen; Rodde, Sibyll; Pfleiderer, Bettina

    2017-08-02

    platform. Project results will be published in peer-reviewed journals with high-impact factors. In addition, workshops on gender dimension in research using the principles of Gendered Innovation will be held. Support and consulting services for hospitals will be introduced in order to develop a European consulting service. The main impact of the project will be the implementation of innovative GEP tailored to the needs of university hospitals, which will lead to measurable institutional change in gender equality. This will impact the research at university hospitals in general, and will improve career prospects of female researchers in particular. Simultaneously, the gender dimension in medical research as an innovation factor and mandatory topic will be strengthened and integrated in each individual university hospital research activity. Research funding organizations can use the built knowledge to include mandatory topics for funding applications to enforce the use and implementation of GEP in university hospitals. ©Joachim Hasebrook, Klaus Hahnenkamp, Wolfgang F.F.A. Buhre, Dianne de Korte-de Boer, Ankie E.W. Hamaekers, Bibiana Metelmann, Camila Metelmann, Marina Bortul, Silvia Palmisano, Jannicke Mellin-Olsen, Andrius Macas, Janusz Andres, Anna Prokop-Dorner, Tomáš Vymazal, Juergen Hinkelmann, Sibyll Rodde, Bettina Pfleiderer. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 02.08.2017.

  15. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    2- 0010 Report Period: 02/06/2012-02/28/2018 4/11/2018, 12:17 PM During the reporting period, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering , and...to advertise the NRC Research Associateship Programs included the following: 1) attendance at meetings of major scientific and engineering ...professional societies; 2) advertising in programs and career centers for these and other professional society meetings; 3) direct mailing and emailing of

  16. Wind Power Career Chat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Flowers

    2011-01-01

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  17. Careers in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, R E; Rotger, V I; Herrera, M C

    2010-01-01

    Although biomedical engineering was started in Argentina about 35 years ago, it has had a sustained growth for the last 25 years in human resources, with the emergence of new undergraduate and postgraduate careers, as well as in research, knowledge, technological development, and health care.

  18. Factors Associated With Success of Clinician-Researchers Receiving Career Development Awards From the National Institutes of Health: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Griffith, Kent A; Jones, Rochelle D; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the careers of recent career development awardees is essential to guide interventions to ensure gender equity and success in academic medicine. In 2010-2011 (T1) and 2014 (T2), 1,719 clinician-researchers who received new K08 and K23 awards in 2006-2009 were longitudinally surveyed. Multivariable analyses evaluated the influence of factors on success, including demographics, job characteristics, work environment, priorities, and domestic responsibilities. Of 1,275 respondents at T1, 1,066 (493 women; 573 men) responded at T2. Men and women differed in job characteristics, work environment, priorities, and domestic responsibilities. By T2, women had less funding (mean $780,000 vs. $1,120,000, P = .002) and published fewer papers (mean 33 vs. 45). Using a composite measure that considered funding, publications, or leadership to define success, 53.5% (264/493) of women and 67.0% (384/573) of men were successful. Gender differences in success persisted after accounting for other significant predictors-K award type, specialty, award year, work hours, funding institute tier, feeling responsible for participating in department/division administration, importance of publishing prolifically, feeling responsible for contributing to clinical care, importance of publishing high-quality research, collegiality of the mentoring relationship, adequacy of research equipment, and departmental climate. A significant interaction existed between K award type and gender; the gender difference in success was most pronounced among K23 researchers (among whom the odds ratio for females = 0.32). Men and women continue to have different experiences and career outcomes, with important implications for the design of interventions to promote equity and success.

  19. Career cartography: a conceptualization of career development to advance health and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feetham, Suzanne; Doering, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptualization of career development that emphasizes the interdependence between research, practice, and policy. Career cartography applies three decades of career development experience to lay out a systematic, comprehensive, and iterative approach for planning and communicating the outcomes of science at any career stage. To inform practice and policy, nurse researchers must be clear on the intended destination and trajectory of the science, and be skilled in communicating that science and vision to diverse stakeholders. Career cartography builds on the science of cartography, is developed within the context of public and health policy, and is composed of several components, including a destination statement, career mapping, a supportive career cartography team, and use of communication and dissemination strategies. The successful utilization of career cartography may accelerate advancement of individual careers, scientific impact, and the discipline as a whole by guiding nurse researchers to be deliberative in career planning and to communicate successfully the outcomes of research across a wide variety of stakeholders. Career cartography provides a framework for planning a nurse researcher's program of research and scholarship to advance science, policy, and health of the public. Career cartography guides nurse researchers to realize their full potential to advance the health of the public and inform public and health policy in academic and practice environments. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  20. Career Builders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    While a main goal for corporate trainers traditionally has been to train employees to reach organizational goals, many trainers may find their roles expanding. With companies cutting back on staffing and consolidating multiple job roles into single positions, career development has taken on a much larger significance. At forward-thinking…

  1. Defense Threat Reduction Agency > Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integration Command Senior Enlisted Leader Media News News Archive Strategic Plan Videos Mission Research Support Center Contact Us FAQ Sheet Links Success Stories Contracts Business Opportunities Current Justifications & Approvals Careers Who We Are Our Values Strategic Recruiting Programs Professional

  2. Journal of the Cameroon Academy of Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revue de L'academie des Sciences du Cameroun The Journal of the Cameroon Academy of Sciences is a multi-disciplinary publication devoted to all aspects of fundamental and applied research. It also publishes topical reviews on science and technology in development, arts, humanities and culture.

  3. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Center for Agricultural Resources Research, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shijiazhuang, 050021, Hebei, People's Republic of China; Tianxing Biotechnology, Handian Industrial Zone, 256200 Zouping, Shandong, People's Republic of China; Tobacco Research Institute, ...

  4. An International Discussion about Cross-Cultural Career Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Debra S.

    2012-01-01

    Career assessments are a common resource used by career practitioners internationally to help inform individuals' career decision-making. Research on the topic of cross-cultural career assessment has been mostly limited to the applicability of an established inventory to a different culture. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the existing…

  5. Linear and Nonlinear Career Models: Metaphors, Paradigms, and Ideologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzanell, Patrice M.; Goldzwig, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the linear or bureaucratic career models (dominant in career research, metaphors, paradigms, and ideologies) which maintain career myths of flexibility and individualized routes to success in organizations incapable of offering such versatility. Describes nonlinear career models which offer suggestive metaphors for re-visioning careers…

  6. Stages of Teachers' Careers: Implications for Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Judith; And Others

    This monograph on the development of teachers' careers synthesizes researchers' prescriptions for early-, mid-, and late-career professional development; and describes successful programs that demonstrate sensitivity to the stages of teachers' growth. The first chapter, "Teachers' Career Development," reviews current adult- and career-stage…

  7. Parents' Perceptions of Their Role in Children's Career Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2005-01-01

    This research used the Comprehensive Career Needs Survey to assess the career planning needs of junior and senior high students in southern Alberta. This article examines parents' perceptions of how prepared parents believe their children are for career planning; the role parents play; how parents can help their children with career planning; and…

  8. The Impact of Career Boundarylessness on Subjective Career Success: The Role of Career Competencies, Career Autonomy, and Career Insecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Sidika N.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theoretical frameworks of the career enactment and the stress perspectives, this study develops and tests a model in which career boundarylessness affects subjective career success through its effect on three career competencies--knowing-why, knowing-how, and knowing-whom--and career autonomy and career insecurity. The results…

  9. Traditional career versus self-directed or protean career: a comparative study of satisfaction with career, profession and work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Assunção de Andrade

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.5007/2175-8077.2011v13n31p58 This research has analyzed if the attitudes and values of news professionals are more adherent to the traditional idea of career or self-directed/protean careers. The objectives were to identify the anchors of respondents’ careers, the degree of satisfaction towards their careers, professions and work and the relationship between these variables and their career profiles. The data collection instrument used was a questionnaire and a sample consisted of 113 graduate and undergraduate students in the area of Administration. As a result, we have found the “Lifestyle” career anchor with the highest average, indicating a tendency to pursue a career that allows integrating personal, family and work lives. We have detected a trend of the subjects to track the protean career. And no correlation was found between career anchors and career satisfaction, indicating that there is not a specific anchor that could provide greater work satisfaction than others. The study contributes to the proposition questions about the career profile that has been used, with the identification of the level of professional satisfaction. Besides it has indicated there should be a revision of the scale of Career Anchors, in order to increase its reliability.

  10. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Early-career scientists honoured Nine physicists were among 67 US-based researchers to be awarded a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers at a White House ceremony in late December 2008. The award comes with up to five years' funding for research deemed critical to government missions. This year's winners include nuclear physicist Mickey Chiu and particle physicist Hooman Davoudiasl, both of the Brookhaven National Laboratory; biophysicist Michael Elowitz of the California Institute of Technology; Chad Fertig, an atomic physicist at the University of Georgia; astronomer Charles Kankelborg of Montana State University; astrophysicist Merav Opher of George Mason University; theorist Robin Santra of the Argonne National Laboratory; quantum-computing researcher Raymond Simmons of the National Institute of Standards and Technologies in Boulder, Colorado; and string theorist Anastasia Volovich of Brown University.

  11. A Qualitative Inquiry of Career Exploration in Highly Implemented Career and Technical Education Programs of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipanovic, Natalie; Stringfield, Sam

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explores career counseling and guidance services as provided to students engaged in career and technical education programs at three sites in the United States. The sites, consisting of high schools and community colleges, were part of the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education's 5-year studies of…

  12. The Impact of Career Exploration on Career Development among Hong Kong Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Raysen; Arnold, John

    2014-01-01

    Career exploration is widely believed to produce positive career development outcomes among college and university students. Some research has supported this belief, but there is little information about exactly which outcomes it affects and whether any benefits of career exploration can be observed beyond individualistic western cultures. We…

  13. Research Article Special Issue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-07

    Mar 7, 2018 ... Intention Based on the Social Cognitive Career. Theory. Anh T.P. Tran. Harald Von Korflesch .... Work-Based Learning in Social ..... [13] Wood R, Bandura A. Social cognitive theory of organizational management. Academy of ...

  14. Career-related instruction promoting students’ career awareness and interest towards science learning

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Anssi; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Keinonen, Tuula

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how the career-related instruction implemented in secondary school chemistry education concerning water issues influence students’ career awareness and interest towards science learning. This case study is part of a larger design-based research of the EU-MultiCO project that focuses on promoting students’ scientific career awareness and attractiveness by introducing them career-based scenarios at the beginning of the instruction unit. The participants ...

  15. Career anchors and learning plan (part one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is divided into three parts. The first part concentrates on how important career is for an individual, organization and society. The author establishes that understanding of career has changed dramatically and does not only refer to climbing up the career ladder, but also moving off or even down the career ladder. The notion of career, as a lifelong and professional path, encompasses all aspects of human personality and their roles acquired through one's life. On basis of vast and longitudinal research, where the author has studied career anchors of individuals, it is the objective of the author to find out on basis of what grounds do the individuals decide to take certain directions in their careers and how learning contributes to such decisions. As a source the author has used Shein's theory of career anchors. Part one describes in greater detail 8 different career anchors and introduces their main features with the findings of the research, which refer to the analysis of professions (work positions and established career anchors. The author thus verifies the hypothesis that career anchors do exist in our area.

  16. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aim and Scope. The scope of the Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series is to publish invited and peer reviewed original research, review, perspective, and commentary articles arising from presentations at select and topical Scientific Conferences. Upto four issues are published a year, each edited in consultation ...

  17. Programs for attracting under-represented minority students to graduate school and research careers in computational science. Final report for period October 1, 1995 - September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, James C. Jr.; Mason, Thomas; Guerrieri, Bruno

    1997-10-01

    Programs have been established at Florida A & M University to attract minority students to research careers in mathematics and computational science. The primary goal of the program was to increase the number of such students studying computational science via an interactive multimedia learning environment One mechanism used for meeting this goal was the development of educational modules. This academic year program established within the mathematics department at Florida A&M University, introduced students to computational science projects using high-performance computers. Additional activities were conducted during the summer, these included workshops, meetings, and lectures. Through the exposure provided by this program to scientific ideas and research in computational science, it is likely that their successful applications of tools from this interdisciplinary field will be high.

  18. Research project of P3 (Protected Plutonium Production) and global academy for 3S (Safety, Security, Safeguard) for peace and sustainable prosperity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Full text:Nuclear engineering education has been initiated in 1957 at the graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Higher Educational activities have been conducted for more than half century. More than 1000 Master students and 200 Doctoral students graduated from the Department of Nuclear Engineering in Tokyo Institute of Technology. Many of them are working in nuclear industries and institutes. International course of nuclear engineering was initiated in 1994, and 130 students from 20 overseas countries have graduated from Master and Doctoral Programs. In the national research program, Protected Plutonium Production (P 3 ) has been proposed to enhance the proliferation resistance of plutonium by the transmutation of Minor Actinides (MAs). In 2011, Academy for Global Nuclear Safety and Security Agent was initiated with the unique features of a full boarding system and a curriculum that combines education in liberal arts and science/ engineering. Both educational and research programs have been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan. In the conference, the current nuclear educational and research activities in Tokyo Institute of Technology will be presented. (author)

  19. Training and career development in palliative care and end-of-life research: opportunities for development in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Noreen M; Grady, Patricia A; Curtis, J Randall

    2013-12-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in attention to the field of palliative care and end-of-life (PCEOL) research over the past 20 years. This increase is particularly notable in the development of palliative care clinical and educational programs. However, there remain important shortcomings in the evidence base to ensure access to and delivery of effective palliative care for patients with life-limiting illness and their families. Development of this evidence base will require that we train the next generation of researchers to focus on issues in PCEOL. The purpose of this article was to explore the current status of the recruitment, training, and retention of future investigators in PCEOL research in the U.S. and propose recommendations to move us forward. Some key contextual issues for developing and supporting this research workforce are articulated, along with timely and important research areas that will need to be addressed during research training and career development. We provide targeted key recommendations to facilitate the nurturing and support of the future research workforce that is needed to ensure the development and implementation of the science necessary for providing high-quality, evidence-based palliative care to all who need and desire it. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Home | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-06

    Nov 6, 2016 ... The Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru, through many scientific meetings, symposia, and public lectures it organizes, aims to facilitate scientific exchange among researchers and to highlight novel findings both within the scientific community and the public. The Mid-Year Meetings held during July at ...

  1. Home | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 25 July 2016 issue of Current Science includes a compilation of nine articles ... These articles, authored by various medical experts, both from India and outside, ... India's current position on the regulation of Ayurvedic practice, research and ... journal of science education brought out by the Indian Academy of Sciences.

  2. INSPIRED High School Computing Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerschuk, Peggy; Liu, Jiangjiang; Mann, Judith

    2011-01-01

    If we are to attract more women and minorities to computing we must engage students at an early age. As part of its mission to increase participation of women and underrepresented minorities in computing, the Increasing Student Participation in Research Development Program (INSPIRED) conducts computing academies for high school students. The…

  3. Home | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru, through many scientific meetings, symposia, and public lectures it organizes, aims to facilitate scientific exchange among researchers and to highlight novel findings both within the scientific community and the public. The Mid-Year Meetings held during July at Bengaluru and the ...

  4. Associateship | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 21 September 1953. Specialization: Plant Genetics Address during Associateship: Scientist, National Botanical Research, Institute, Rana Prathap Marg, Lucknow 226 001. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year ...

  5. Career age peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polozov Andrey Anatolievich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Most researchers seem career as translational motion the steps to the top. However, very similar to that on the ladder just two steps – in 25 and 39 years. At age 25, the largest value reaches the value of the index of intelligence, and at the age of 39 years – management experience. Best results have revealed 6 years after the beginning of its profile.

  6. National Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Irma. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) PNAS is one of the world’s most- ... Exchange Evolution Resources Biographical Memoirs National Academy of Sciences About The NAS Mission History Organization Leadership and ...

  7. Academic dreamers to leaders: The emergence of the mathematics and science for minority students ((MS)(2)) program at Philips Academy Andover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Jerrell K.

    (MS)2 is a summer program for high achieving minority students interested in math and science careers. It was started in 1977. The Program is located at Phillips Academy in Andover Massachusetts. Phillips Academy is one of the nation's oldest college preparatory schools. The school was founded in 1778. Current U.S. President George Bush attended Phillips Academy and his father before him. The students in (MS)2 attend Phillips Academy in the summertime, along with regular Summer Session students. The (MS)2 Program represents about a fifth of the students at Phillips Academy Summer Session. At present the program is made up of African Americans, Latinos, and Native American students who attend a number of different public schools throughout the nation. This dissertation explores the experiences of students in this program spanning nearly a quarter of a central. My research seeks to understand and shred additional light on how certain outreach programs might help along the pipeline in regard to improving minority representation in mathematics and science fields. Also, this narrative hopes to not only paints a more complex pictures of the experiences of minorities in schools, but seeks to serve the larger public interest by challenging some of the popular renditions and myths of the failure of Blacks, Latino/as, and Native Americans in schooling (Ogbu 2003), as oppose to certain aspects of schooling and society continuing to failing them.

  8. Career Cartography: From Stories to Science and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deleise S; Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Visovatti, Moira; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Feetham, Suzanne

    2017-05-01

    To present four case scenarios reflecting the process of research career development using career cartography. Career cartography is a novel approach that enables nurses, from all clinical and academic settings, to actively engage in a process that maximizes their clinical, teaching, research, and policy contributions that can improve patient outcomes and the health of the public. Four early-career nurse researchers applied the career cartography framework to describe their iterative process of research career development. They report the development process of each of the components of career cartography, including destination statement, career map, and policy statement. Despite diverse research interests and career mapping approaches, common experiences emerged from the four nurse researchers. Common lessons learned throughout the career cartography process include: (a) have a supportive mentorship team, (b) start early and reflect regularly, (c) be brief and to the point, (d) keep it simple and avoid jargon, (e) be open to change, (f) make time, and (g) focus on the overall career destination. These four case scenarios support the need for nurse researchers to develop their individual career cartography. Regardless of their background, career cartography can help nurse researchers articulate their meaningful contributions to science, policy, and health of the public. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. The "new normal": Adapting doctoral trainee career preparation for broad career paths in science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah St Clair

    Full Text Available Doctoral recipients in the biomedical sciences and STEM fields are showing increased interest in career opportunities beyond academic positions. While recent research has addressed the interests and preferences of doctoral trainees for non-academic careers, the strategies and resources that trainees use to prepare for a broad job market (non-academic are poorly understood. The recent adaptation of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to explicitly highlight the interplay of contextual support mechanisms, individual career search efficacy, and self-adaptation of job search processes underscores the value of attention to this explicit career phase. Our research addresses the factors that affect the career search confidence and job search strategies of doctoral trainees with non-academic career interests and is based on nearly 900 respondents from an NIH-funded survey of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical sciences at two U.S. universities. Using structural equation modeling, we find that trainees pursuing non-academic careers, and/or with low perceived program support for career goals, have lower career development and search process efficacy (CDSE, and receive different levels of support from their advisors/supervisors. We also find evidence of trainee adaptation driven by their career search efficacy, and not by career interests.

  10. Why a Steiner Academy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avison, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the curious position of the Academy model in the English school system and how a potential Hereford Steiner Waldorf Academy might figure in this. It sketches the background to the Steiner movement in the UK and goes on to set out the key aspirations and concerns of Steiner educators regarding an Academy. The article provides…

  11. Impact of a Constructivist Career Course on Academic Performance and Graduation Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier-Reed, Tabitha; Chahla, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Career planning courses are one of the most effective ways to improve career development, and the benefits to career decision-making are well documented. The research base regarding whether career courses contribute to academic outcomes is less well-developed. Although recent findings suggest that career courses may improve retention in the first-…

  12. Support for a special symposium to highlight the research of early career women physical chemists at the 2011 fall ACS nationall meeting, Aug 28-Sept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Geraldine [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2012-12-19

    The symposium was well attended during the 4-day symposium. The invited speakers were primarily women in early career stage (~4-8 years) with a few senior women and men as invited speakers or session chairs. Included in each day was a Poster Session for graduate students and a lunch in which the turn out was strong and the posters presented encouraged much of dialogue with the invited speakers, guests and others attending the ACS meeting and wanted to discuss the student's research and meet with the speakers. Most all speakers and participants were very positive about the sessions and expressed that the funding to cover some expenses made it possible for them to attend the conference and the poster session luncheon. There was a total of 51 presenters, below are the speakers and their abstracts, in order presented:

  13. Introduction to NASA's Academy of Aerospace Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Alice; Smith, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Academy of Aerospace Quality (AAQ) is an internet-based public domain forum of quality assurance-related educational modules for students and faculty at academic institutions targeting those involved in aerospace research, technology development, and payload design and development including Cube Sats, Small Sats, Nano Sats, Rockets and High Altitude Balloons. The target users are university project and research teams but the academy has also been used by K-12 teams, independent space...

  14. Career competencies for the modern career

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Marinka; Scheerens, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    Career development gains new meaning in the context of employability demands in a knowledge economy. In this context, increased mobility, a dynamic work environment, and an increased level of career support from employers are seen as characteristics of a modern career. All of these characteristics

  15. Airline Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airlines. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the airline industry, including salaries, working conditions, job requirements, and projected job opportunities. In the main part of the booklet, the following 22 job…

  16. Cannabis careers revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ravn, Signe

    2014-01-01

    A considerable part of today's sociological research on recreational drug use is (explicitly or implicitly) inspired by Howard Becker's classical model of deviant careers. The aim of the present paper is to directly apply Becker's theory to empirical data on present-day cannabis use and to suggest...... in treatment for cannabis problems in Copenhagen, Denmark. We suggest a revision of Becker's career model in relation to four aspects: initiation of cannabis use, differentiation between socially integrated and individualised, disintegrated use, social control from non-users, and the users' moral stance...... on cannabis. A central point of the paper is that social interaction may both motivate cannabis use, as Becker proposed, and serve as a protective factor against extensive, problematic use....

  17. Improving Critical Thinking "via" Authenticity: The CASPiE Research Experience in a Military Academy Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, A. M.; Clancy, H. A.; Lachance, R. P.; Mathison, B. M.; Chiu, M. M.; Weaver, G. C.

    2017-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) can introduce many students to authentic research activities in a cost-effective manner. Past studies have shown that students who participated in CUREs report greater interest in chemistry, better data collection and analysis skills, and enhanced scientific reasoning compared to traditional…

  18. Descriptive Analysis of a Baseline Concussion Battery Among U.S. Service Academy Members: Results from the Concussion Assessment, Research, and Education (CARE) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kathryn L; Dain Allred, C; Cameron, Kenneth L; Campbell, Darren E; D'Lauro, Christopher J; Houston, Megan N; Johnson, Brian R; Kelly, Tim F; McGinty, Gerald; O'Donnell, Patrick G; Peck, Karen Y; Svoboda, Steven J; Pasquina, Paul; McAllister, Thomas; McCrea, Michael; Broglio, Steven P

    2018-03-28

    The prevalence and possible long-term consequences of concussion remain an increasing concern to the U.S. military, particularly as it pertains to maintaining a medically ready force. Baseline testing is being used both in the civilian and military domains to assess concussion injury and recovery. Accurate interpretation of these baseline assessments requires one to consider other influencing factors not related to concussion. To date, there is limited understanding, especially within the military, of what factors influence normative test performance. Given the significant physical and mental demands placed on service academy members (SAM), and their relatively high risk for concussion, it is important to describe demographics and normative profile of SAMs. Furthermore, the absence of available baseline normative data on female and non-varsity SAMs makes interpretation of post-injury assessments challenging. Understanding how individuals perform at baseline, given their unique individual characteristics (e.g., concussion history, sex, competition level), will inform post-concussion assessment and management. Thus, the primary aim of this manuscript is to characterize the SAM population and determine normative values on a concussion baseline testing battery. All data were collected as part of the Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (CARE) Consortium. The baseline test battery included a post-concussion symptom checklist (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT), psychological health screening inventory (Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18) and neurocognitive evaluation (ImPACT), Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), and Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC). Linear regression models were used to examine differences across sexes, competition levels, and varsity contact levels while controlling for academy, freshman status, race, and previous concussion. Zero inflated negative binomial models estimated symptom scores due to the high frequency of zero scores

  19. Development of a career coaching model for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yera

    2016-03-01

    Deciding on a future career path or choosing a career specialty is an important academic decision for medical students. The purpose of this study is to develop a career coaching model for medical students. This research was carried out in three steps. The first step was systematic review of previous studies. The second step was a need assessment of medical students. The third step was a career coaching model using the results acquired from the researched literature and the survey. The career coaching stages were defined as three big phases: The career coaching stages were defined as the "crystallization" period (Pre-medical year 1 and 2), "specification" period (medical year 1 and 2), and "implementation" period (medical year 3 and 4). The career coaching model for medical students can be used in programming career coaching contents and also in identifying the outcomes of career coaching programs at an institutional level.

  20. The effect of career planning education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Turnšek Mikačič

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: We employed a qualitative approach to study the effects of career planning education, perceiving it as an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of introductorily-organised career education. Purpose: We researched important areas to formulate a questionnaire for quantitative analysis. Method: We used a qualitative research approach in order to develop a theoretical framework for the exploration, interpretation and identification of the impact of education on career plans, on the changing attitudes towards careers, the raising of self-esteem and perception of personal growth. We used Neuro-linguistic programming as a tool to develop and achieve personal excellence within the career planning. Results: We constructed a paradigmatic model and developed the final theory. By means of qualitative analysis, we identified the elements of design criteria for the construction of the questionnaire; we measured the effects of education on career plans. Organization: The findings of the research will prove useful in personal management and career management in the process of planning and organizing the promotion of individuals within the organizations in accordance with the needs of those organizations. Originality: A career plan as a building block of personal growth, based on the model of career education with the in-built elements and tools of NLP, has been confirmed by the most recent studies in neuroscience. This represents a novelty, and, therefore, this study offers a genuine contribution, and is an indicator of contemporary knowledge, based on the results of the research. Limitations/Future Research: The model of career education and the results of this study open new directions for further research of the influence of career planning on the organisation of companies and their success, which is the phase of the study which was not carried out.

  1. Ethnic Minority Personnel Careers: Hindrances and Hopes

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Catharine

    2004-01-01

    Personnel departments often have particular responsibility for equal opportunities within their organizations. This paper explores equal opportunities within personnel departments themselves, in relation to the careers of ethnic minority personnel practitioners. Through primary research, it identifies a range of criteria which can affect personnel careers, of which ethnic origin is often one. However, although being categorized as of ethnic minority origin often hinders personnel careers, the...

  2. Training Early Career Space Weather Researchers and other Space Weather Professionals at the CISM Space Weather Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.; Hughes, W.

    2011-12-01

    This talk will outline the organization of a summer school designed to introduce young professions to a sub-discipline of geophysics. Through out the 10 year life time of the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) the CISM Team has offered a two week summer school that introduces new graduate students and other interested professional to the fundamentals of space weather. The curriculum covers basic concepts in space physics, the hazards of space weather, and the utility of computer models of the space environment. Graduate students attend from both inside and outside CISM, from all the sub-disciplines involved in space weather (solar, heliosphere, geomagnetic, and aeronomy), and from across the nation and around the world. In addition, between 1/4 and 1/3 of the participants each year are professionals involved in space weather in some way, such as: forecasters from NOAA and the Air Force, Air Force satellite program directors, NASA specialists involved in astronaut radiation safety, and representatives from industries affected by space weather. The summer school has adopted modern pedagogy that has been used successfully at the undergraduate level. A typical daily schedule involves three morning lectures followed by an afternoon lab session. During the morning lectures, student interaction is encouraged using "Timeout to Think" questions and peer instruction, along with question cards for students to ask follow up questions. During the afternoon labs students, working in groups of four, answer thought provoking questions using results from simulations and observation data from a variety of source. Through the interactions with each other and the instructors, as well as social interactions during the two weeks, students network and form bonds that will last them through out their careers. We believe that this summer school can be used as a model for summer schools in a wide variety of disciplines.

  3. Career Issues in HRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on career issues in human resource development (HRD). "Are Careers What They Used To Be: A Factor Analysis of Schein's Career Orientations Inventory" (Gerri Mukri, Sharon Confessore) is a statistical analysis of Schein's Career Orientations Inventory that finds the inventory to be a…

  4. Stressors and their Influence on Job Performance of Career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stressors and their Influence on Job Performance of Career Administrative Staff in ... African Research Review ... Abstract. The purpose of this study was to determine stressors and how they influence university career administrative staff in the ...

  5. Research activity of institute of physical chemistry of Russian Academy of sciences in the field of nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikaev, A.K. [Institute of Physical Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    The report is a brief review of the most important directions in research activity of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of RAS (Moscow) in the field of nuclear fuel cycle. The main attention is paid to researches and developments on liquid radioactive waste management including the removal of wastes to deep geological formations and the immobilization of the wastes. In particular, the data from the study on the properties of new, basaltic-like matrices for the immobilization are presented. The results of research on gas evolution from the systems modeling liquid high-level radioactive wastes are considered. The separation of some radionuclides from irradiated nuclear and the production of radiation sources by various methods are discussed. (author)

  6. Changing academic roles and shifting gender inequalities: a case analysis of the influence of the teaching-research nexus on the academic career prospects of female academics in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leisyte, Liudvika; Hosch-Dayican, Bengü

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of the change in academic roles for female academics and the implications of this change for their career opportunities. In this article, we therefore aim to answer the following research questions: (1) How have the changes introduced by the new

  7. Career development: graduate nurse views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Muthulakshmi, Paulpandi; Happell, Brenda; Hunt, Glenn E

    2013-09-01

    To explore recent Singapore nursing graduates' experience of and views about their career development and progress. The recruitment and retention of an adequate number of registered nurses is a continuing workforce issue in Singapore and other major cities. Survey of recent nursing graduates. Recent nursing graduates from the Bachelor programme (n = 147) were sent an individual survey; a response rate of 54% was achieved. Findings show that nurses rated their self-concept in a positive manner and were most satisfied (moderately to very) with helping patients and providing effective care, and the level of patient involvement. They were least satisfied (moderately to only a little) with prestige among the general medical community and the general public, hours of work, lifestyle factors and research opportunities. The following four factors were identified as significant impediments to career development; lack of support in the work place; perceived insufficient clinical career development opportunities; excessive work hours; and limited access to merit-based places in further education. Suggestions made to overcome perceived career development barriers are as follows: broad multifactorial healthcare system changes; decreased and more flexible working hours; and fairer access to further clinical and higher education. Results highlight the value clinical nurses place on having access to career development opportunities, merit-based further education and work place supports. These factors also have the potential to influence patient care and impact on the retention of nurses in their present job and satisfaction with their nursing career. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Career opportunities in clinical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, W A

    1992-01-01

    The varied career opportunities open to clinical engineers are described in this paper. Many of these opportunities are within the medical device industry in research, development, manufacturing design, regulatory activities, production, operations, sales, marketing, service, and management. Additional opportunities are available in hospitals, with the Veterans Administration, or working as an entrepreneur or a consultant. Each of these careers requires specific training and skills, and they all require a fundamental scientific knowledge of physical principles and mathematics. Research and management, however, require different educational preparation. The research emphasis should be on theoretical principles and creativity; the management emphasis should be on financial and labor problems. In all clinical engineering careers, the individual is a problem solver.

  9. epubworkshop | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of Sciences. Home · About IASc · History · Memorandum of Association · Role of the Academy · Statutes · Council · Raman Chair · Jubilee Chair · Academy – Springer Nature chair · Academy Trust · Contact details · Office Staff · Office complaint ...

  10. Final Technical Report for Year 5 Early Career Research Project "Viscosity and equation of state of hot and dense QCD matter"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Denes [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-05-25

    The Section below summarizes research activities and achievements during the fifth (last) year of the PI’s Early Career Research Project (ECRP). Unlike the first four years of the project, the last year was not funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The ECRP advanced two main areas: i) radiative 3 ↔ 2 radiative transport, via development of a new computer code MPC/Grid that solves the Boltzmann transport equation in full 6+1D (3X+3V+time); and ii) application of relativistic hydrodynamics, via development of a self-consistent framework to convert viscous fluids to particles. In Year 5 we finalized thermalization studies with radiative gg ↔ ggg transport (Sec. 1.1.1) and used nonlinear covariant transport to assess the accuracy of fluid-to-particle conversion models (Sec. 1.1.2), calculated observables with self-consistent fluid-to-particle conversion from realistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution (Secs. 1.2.1 and 1.2.2), extended the covariant energy loss formulation to heavy quarks (Sec. 1.4.1) and studied energy loss in small systems (Sec. 1.4.2), and also investigated how much of the elliptic flow could have non-hydrodynamic origin (Sec 1.3). Years 1-4 of the ECRP were ARRA-funded and, therefore, they have their own report document ’Final Technical Report for Years 1-4 of the Early Career Research Project “Viscosity and equation of state of hot and dense QCD matter”’ (same award number DE-SC0004035). The PI’s group was also part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration, a multi-institution project that overlapped in time significantly with the ECRP. Purdue achievements as part of the JET Top- ical Collaboration are in a separate report “Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration” (award DE-SC0004077).

  11. Motivation and career development

    OpenAIRE

    Flemr, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this diploma thesis is to outline various theories of work motivation, career growth and their practical application in sales team management within a sales organization. In the theoretical part the paper deals with the definition of essential terms including but not limited to motivation, work motivation, career and work career. Moreover, it focuses on selected motivational theories, basic criteria and current principles of managing the work career, career growth and de...

  12. Do Family Responsibilities and a Clinical Versus Research Faculty Position Affect Satisfaction with Career and Work–Life Balance for Medical School Faculty?

    OpenAIRE

    Beckett, Laurel; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Howell, Lydia Pleotis; Villablanca, Amparo C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Balancing career and family obligations poses challenges to medical school faculty and contributes to dissatisfaction and attrition from academics. We examined the relationship between family setting and responsibilities, rank, and career and work–life satisfaction for faculty in a large U.S. medical school.

  13. Career exploration in Mozambique : exploratory study with secondary students

    OpenAIRE

    Ussene, Camilo; Taveira, Maria do Céu

    2009-01-01

    This article is part of a larger research project on the evaluation of career intervention needs in Mozambique. It consists of an exploratory study of the career exploration process of Mozambican students attending the 12th grade. The results of the construct validity and clustering analyses of the responses to the Career Exploration Survey (CES; Stumpf, Colarelli, & Hartman, 1983) are discussed, in the light of the career exploration theory and empirical research, namely the cognitive-motiva...

  14. Career anchors and career resilience: Supplementary constructs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Van Vuuren

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously the authors reported on a study in which an attempt was made at defining and measuring the construct career resilience (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998. The present article continues this investigation by reporting on the relationship between career resilience and career anchors, as defined in Scheins (1975; 1978; 1990; 1992 career anchor model. The aim of the study was to determine whether career anchor patterning could potentially inhibit or facilitate individuals' levels of career resilience. The "Career Resilience Questionnaire" (CRQ (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998 together with Scheins (1990 "Career Orientations Inventory" (COI were administered to 352 skilled employees. The findings regarding the statistical relationship between the two constructs are discussed. Opsomming Loopbaanankers en loopbaangehardheid: supplementere konstrukte? In n vorige publikasie van Fourie en Van Vuuren (1998 is die bevindinge aangaande die afbakening en meting van die konstruk, loopbaangehardheid, gerapporteer. In die huidige artikel word die ondersoek voortgesit met 'n beskrywing van die verwantskap tussen loopbaangehardheid en loopbaanankers, soos gedefinieer in die loopbaanankermodel van Schein (1975; 1978; 1990; 1992. Die doel met die studie was om te bepaal of die mate van loopbaanankerontplooiing individuele vlakke van loopbaangehardheid potensieel fasiliteer ofinhibeer. Die "Career Resilience Questionnaire" (CRQ (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998 is tesame met die "Career Orientation Inventory" (COI (Schein, 1990 op 352 geskoolde werknemers geadministreer. Die bevindinge betreffende die statistiese verwantskap tussen die twee konstrukte word bespreek.

  15. A Research Experiences for Undergraduates program (REU) Program Designed to Recruit, Engage and Prepare a Diverse Student Population for Careers in Ocean Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkston, B. E.; Garza, C.

    2016-02-01

    The problem of improving diversity within the Ocean Sciences workforce—still underperforming relative to other scientific disciplines—can only be addressed by first recruiting and engaging a more diverse student population into the discipline, then retaining them in the workforce. California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB) is home to the Monterey Bay Regional Ocean Science Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. As an HSI with strong ties to multiple regional community colleges and other Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) in the CSU system, the Monterey Bay REU is uniquely positioned to address the crucial recruitment and engagement of a diverse student body. Eleven sophomore and junior-level undergraduate students are recruited per year from academic institutions where research opportunities in STEM are limited and from groups historically underrepresented in the Ocean Sciences, including women, underrepresented minorities, persons with disabilities, and veterans. During the program, students engage in a 10-week original research project guided by a faculty research mentor in one of four themes: Oceanography, Marine Biology and Ecology, Ocean Engineering, and Marine Geology. In addition to research, students develop scientific self-efficacy and literacy skills through rigorous weekly professional development workshops in which they practice critical thinking, ethical decision-making, peer review, writing and oral communication skills. These workshops include tangible products such as an NSF-style proposal paper, Statement of Purpose and CV modelled for the SACNAS Travel Award Application, research abstract, scientific report and oral presentation. To help retain students in Ocean Sciences, students build community during the REU by living together in the CSUMB dormitories; post-REU, students stay connected through an online facebook group, LinkedIn page and group webinars. To date, the REU has supported 22 students in two

  16. Influential Structures: Understanding the Role of the Head of Department in Relation to Women Academics' Research Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obers, Noëlle

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted at a small "research-led" institution in South Africa. The data indicate that women produce less research than men and have low levels of professional self-esteem. Factors such as accrual of social capital, family responsibilities and self-esteem are constraints experienced by women academics in pursuing research…

  17. Obstacles Facing the Iranian Basketball Academy

    OpenAIRE

    Hamta Hadian; Mohamad Reza Boroumand; Saeed Amirnejad; Masoud Najafi

    2016-01-01

    This study, which is a strategic study with a mixed research approach aimed to identify obstacles facing the academies of Iranian Basketball Federation. The population comprises board of directors and committees responsible for Education and Talent Spotting Association, academy administrators, physical education instructors, qualified experts, professors, coaches, referees and heads of delegations who were asked via interviews and questionnaire (exploratory manner) to state internal and exter...

  18. Initiatives of the Belgian SCK•CEN Academy to attract young talent in nuclear research and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Our aim: • Explain/refresh basics of radioactivity; • Discuss several examples of nuclear applications → In nuclear, medical, non-nuclear industry, daily life, … • Present research activities of SCK•CEN, justify why nuclear research is important, how does it contribute to well-being of society in general; • Discuss with teachers how the standard education programs can integrate a pluralistic approach to complex technical issues such as applications of radioactivity. Conclusions: • Focus on knowledge, understanding, skills, attitudes, … and show “real-life” situations = added value; • Mention the whole picture: → ALL application fields, ALL issues; • Motivate to choose for scientific or technical studies can be one aim, but equally (or more) important: discuss risks and benefits of nuclear applications in general, develop an open and critical mind in order to gain more insight in multi-facetted issues such as risks and benefits of radioactivity and nuclear technology, and contribute in serene way to the societal debate; • Contribution to critical-intellectual nuclear capacities for society

  19. Scientific research in front of energy challenges - Committee of prospective on energy of the Academy of Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candel, Sebastien; Tissot, Bernard; Andre, Jean-Claude; Balian, Roger; Brechet, Yves; Brezin, Edouard; Cesarsky, Catherine; Rebut, Paul-Henri; Jacquinot, Jean; Combarnous, Michel; Pouchard, Michel; Courtillot, Vincent; Jaupart, Claude; Duplessy, Jean-Claude; Laval, Guy; Encrenaz, Pierre; Pironneau, Olivier; Fontecave, Marc; Joliot, Pierre; Guillaumont, Robert; Henry, Claude; Pelegrin, Marc; Roux, Didier; Salencon, Jean; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Bamberger, Yves; Clement, Daniel; Moisan, Francois; Montagne, Xavier; Singh, Satish

    2012-01-01

    This report proposes a contribution to the debate on energy, mainly from the point of view of researches to be undertaken to face the successive challenges which will appear within the next decades. The authors starts from the acknowledgement of constraints which are acting on the development of the energy sector: increase of CO 2 emissions leading to an increase of CO 2 in the atmosphere, scarcity of fossil resources, project financing, increased demand of energy (notably electricity), environmental issues, reactions from society, and European and international context. After an overview of the status and perspectives of renewable energies, the report addresses that of fossil energies (shale gas, hydrates of natural gas), nuclear energy (evolution, fourth generation reactors, the ITER project and thermonuclear fusion), vectors and storage (electricity grids, role of hydrogen, energy storage, CO 2 valorization), energy management and saving (energy management in housing and office buildings, proximity mobility of people and goods), and the energy for tomorrow's aeronautics (future characteristics of air transport, aeronautic fuels, oil perspectives and kerosene availability). Appendices address research and development in energy at the international level, the fuel cycle for fast breeders, fusion-fission hybrid reactors, ageing of PWR nuclear power plants, characteristics of lignocellulosic plants)

  20. An Inner Barrier to Career Development: Preconditions of the Impostor Phenomenon and Consequences for Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neureiter, Mirjam; Traut-Mattausch, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The impostor phenomenon (IP) is increasingly recognized as an important psychological construct for career development, yet empirical research on how it functions in this domain is sparse. We investigated in what way impostor feelings are related to the fear of failure, fear of success, self-esteem, and the career-development aspects career planning, career striving, and the motivation to lead. We conducted two studies with independent samples of university students (N = 212) in a laboratory study and working professionals (N = 110) in an online study. In both samples, impostor feelings were fostered by fear of failure, fear of success, and low self-esteem and they decreased career planning, career striving, and the motivation to lead. A path analysis showed that impostor feelings had the most negative effects on career planning and career striving in students and on the motivation to lead in working professionals. The results suggest that the IP is relevant to career development in different ways at different career stages. Practical implications and interventions to reduce the negative effects of impostor feelings on career development are discussed.

  1. An inner barrier to career development: Preconditions of the impostor phenomenon and consequences for career development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam eNeureiter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The impostor phenomenon is increasingly recognized as an important psychological construct for career development, yet empirical research on how it functions in this domain is sparse. We investigated in what way impostor feelings are related to the fear of failure, fear of success, self-esteem, and the career-development aspects career planning, career striving, and the motivation to lead. We conducted two studies with independent samples of university students (N = 212 in a laboratory study and working professionals (N = 110 in an online study. In both samples, impostor feelings were fostered by fear of failure, fear of success, and self-esteem and they decreased career planning, career striving, and motivation to lead. A path analysis showed that impostor feelings had the most negative effects on career planning and career striving in students and on the motivation to lead in working professionals. The results suggest that the impostor phenomenon is relevant to career development in different ways at different career stages. Practical implications and interventions to reduce the negative effects of impostor feelings on career development are discussed.

  2. The clinical academic workforce of the future: a cross-sectional study of factors influencing career decision-making among clinical PhD students at two research-intensive UK universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Joana; Ranieri, Veronica; Lambert, Trevor; Pugh, Chris; Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi J; Rees, Geraint; Best, Denise

    2017-08-28

    To examine clinical doctoral students' demographic and training characteristics, career intentions, career preparedness and what influences them as they plan their future careers. Online cross-sectional census surveys at two research-intensive medical schools in England in 2015-2016. All medically qualified PhD students (N=523) enrolled at the University of Oxford and University College London were invited to participate. We report on data from 320 participants (54% male and 44% female), who were representative by gender of the invited population. Career intentions. Respondents were mainly in specialty training, including close to training completion (25%, n=80), and 18% (n=57) had completed training. Half (50%, n=159) intended to pursue a clinical academic career (CAC) and 62% (n=198) were at least moderately likely to seek a clinical lectureship (CL). However, 51% (n=163) had little or no knowledge about CL posts. Those wanting a CAC tended to have the most predoctoral medical research experience (χ 2 (2, N=305)=22.19, p=0.0005). Key reasons cited for not pursuing a CAC were the small number of senior academic appointments available, the difficulty of obtaining research grants and work-life balance. Findings suggest that urging predoctoral clinicians to gain varied research experience while ensuring availability of opportunities, and introducing more flexible recruitment criteria for CL appointments, would foster CACs. As CL posts are often only open to those still in training, the many postdoctoral clinicians who have completed training, or nearly done so, do not currently gain the opportunity the post offers to develop as independent researchers. Better opportunities should be accompanied by enhanced career support for clinical doctoral students (eg, to increase knowledge of CLs). Finally, ways to increase the number of senior clinical academic appointments should be explored since their lack seems to significantly influence career decisions. © Article author

  3. Careers in focus library and information science

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Careers in Focus: Library and Information Science, Second Edition profiles 19 careers for professionals interested in this field. Job profiles include:. -Acquisitions librarians. -Book conservators. -Children's librarians. -Corporate librarians. -Film and video librarians. -Law librarians. -Library assistants. -Library media specialists. -Medical librarians. -Research assistants.

  4. Career Counsellors and Suicide Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadiuk, Natalee Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Recent discussions suggest that career counsellors need to be trained in more holistic frameworks in order to deal with the career and psychological issues of their clients. In particular, research shows a strong connection between employment and suicidality, including changes in socioeconomic status, disruption in employment, sudden unemployment,…

  5. Older Women's Career Development and Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Mary; Bimrose, Jenny; Watson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers women's career development and the potential contribution of career development theory, research, practice and policy in advancing a social inclusion agenda. In particular, the paper focuses on older women in the contexts of an ageing population, labour market shortages and Australia's social inclusion agenda. Supporting young…

  6. The utilisation of a career conversation framework based on Schein’s career anchors model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Bezuidenhout

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This  study  constituted  and  reported  on  the  outcomes  of  a  structured  career conversation  framework  based  on  Schein’s  eight  career  anchors  in  an  open  distance  and e-learning (ODeL university in South Africa. Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to report on the utilisation of a structured career conversation framework based on Schein’s career anchors model. Motivation for the study: The rationale for the study was the paucity of studies investigating career anchors in South Africa’s multicultural organisational context. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative approach was adopted in the study. The population consisted of 4200 employees at a university in South Africa. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA as well as a Scheffe post hoc test. Main  findings: The  findings  of  this  study  suggest  that  career  conversation  has  a  dynamic nature (i.e. it changes over a period of time. Consequently, career development interventions in the workplace need to approach the workforce holistically. Practical/managerial implications: The findings and results will assist managers, practitioners and  career  development  specialists  in  the  practical  implementation  of  the  career  anchor concept. Contribution/value-add: The career conversation framework based on Schein’s career anchors has expanded the existing theory to find the right balance between career conversations and career anchors to keep people motivated to perform optimally in an organisation.

  7. Choosing Teaching as a Career: Importance of the Type of Motivation in Career Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tomšik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research looks into what are Extrinsic, Intrinsic and Altruistic motives and their importance when students are choosing their career. The study involved 324 teacher trainees in their first year of bachelor studies. The types of motivation when choosing teaching career were studied by SMVUP2-S (Teaching Career Choice Scale. The model of motivation types was supplemented by subscales: Influence by other, Career growth and Alternative choice. Objective of the study was to show the relationship between these variables. Results from the research showed that influence by other and alternative choice of teaching career were in a negative relation with interest and skills/experience that this career requires and students should have.

  8. The Career Resources Model: An Integrative Framework for Career Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the nature of work and organisations have led to an increased need for self-directed career management (SDCM). However, there is no consensus in the literature of what constitutes SDCM and many related concepts have been proposed. Integrating previous research across different conceptualisations of SDCM, the article proposes four…

  9. Tales of the unexpected: Integrating career shocks in the contemporary careers literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Akkermans

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This article addresses the interplay between individual agency and contextual factors in contemporary career development processes. In light of the prominence of the former in the contemporary scholarly debate, we present a case for a more comprehensive approach by heeding the latter as well.   Research purpose: The main aim of this article was to provide a definition and conceptualisation of career shocks, as well as an agenda for future research on this topic.   Motivation for the study: Most of the contemporary careers literature has overemphasised the role of individual agency in career development. While certainly important, we argue that we also need to address the role of context – in this case, career shocks – in order to gain a fuller appreciation of career development processes.   Main conclusions and implications: We provide a definition of career shocks based on the existing literature related to chance events and turnover. In addition, we provide an overview of attributes of career shocks, potentially valuable theoretical perspectives and key issues for future research.   Contribution: This article brings together several existing streams of literature related to career shocks and provides an integrative definition and conceptualisation. We hope that this will ignite future research on an important but often overlooked topic.

  10. The Relationship between Career Growth and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qingxiong; McElroy, James C.; Morrow, Paula C.; Liu, Rongzhi

    2010-01-01

    This research examines the relationship between employees' career growth and organizational commitment. Career growth was conceptualized by four factors: career goal progress, professional ability development, promotion speed and remuneration growth, while organizational commitment was conceptualized using Meyer and Allen's (1997) three component…

  11. Identity Disorder and Career Counseling Theory: Recommendations for Conceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Michael T.

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III Revised rubric of identity disorder is linked to career theory and research findings on vocational identity, career indecisiveness, vocational maturity, and to the theories of Erikson and Kohut. Identity disorder has been found in career counseling clients. It appears that the brief…

  12. Pediatrics Department of the Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education and Moscow Research Clinical Institute of Pediatry and Children Surgery – half century hand in hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term cooperation of the two scientific institutions contributing to the professional development of pediatricians is based on the long-term scientific relations of the Department of Pediatrics of the Russian Medical Academy of Continuing Professional Education and the Moscow Research Institute of Pediatrics and Pediatric Surgery (now the Research Institute of Pediatrics named after Academician Yu.E.Veltischev. The role of remarkable pediatric scientists – G.N. Speransky, Yu.E. Veltstschev, M.S. Ignatova, N.A. Korovina in the development of these links and pediatric science in Russia. 

  13. CAREER GUIDANCE EXPERIENCE ABROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Tolstoguzov

    2015-01-01

    ; earlier fixing of professional preferences and less flexible relation to an unsuccessful choice of a speciality or profession of the youth is marked there. The most typical characteristics of foreign career-oriented schemes are the following: the organisation of continuous training lasting throughout all school; supervision over students’ achievements, propensities and hobbies; portfolio or cumulative files drafting and recording data of all pupil’s results while professional consulting and selection of entrants for vocational training continuation in colleges or high schools. The author points out the general characteristic: the economy requirement for high quality experts on the basis of selection of the pupils who are able to master high-end technologies and have an obvious potential of professional growth and personal development. Practical significance. The research materials and implementations can be useful to Russian career-and professional specialists, and the experts who are engaged in education management. 

  14. Central Laboratory of X-ray and Electron Microscopy Research at the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zymierska, D.

    2008-01-01

    The beginning and history of the Central Laboratory of X-ray and Electron Microscopy at the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw is described. Then, recent scientific achievements are presented. Organising activities of the Laboratory staff are also mentioned. (author)

  15. THE CAREERS OF THE EDUCATION IN TECHNOLOGY GRADUATES

    OpenAIRE

    Noga, Henryk

    2016-01-01

    A very important indicator of the usefulness of studies is the graduates’ career advancement. It indicates to what extent studies facilitate or speed up the professional career. The research concerned the careers of Education in Technology graduates and their professional adaptation. An attempt to assessment the quality of education has also been made. After graduation students are able to assess the quality of education and its impact on their lives and professional careers.  

  16. Chaotic Careers: A Narrative Analysis of Career Transition Themes and Outcomes Using Chaos Theory as a Guiding Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Sharon; McDowall, Almuth

    2012-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world of work, little research exists on mid-career transitions. We investigated these using the open-systems approach of chaos theory as a guiding metaphor and conducted interviews with seven mid-career individuals chosen for their experience of a significant mid-career transition. Four common themes were identified through…

  17. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  18. Dentistry: Careers in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Dentistry e-mail Print Share Careers in Dentistry A dental education opens up a world of ... accredited training programs in your area . Careers in Dentistry Be a Dentist General Dentistry Dental Specialties Dental ...

  19. Second Careers in Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kellye

    1992-01-01

    Describes career changes and retirement choices made by outgoing "career" superintendents. Choices ranged from teaching and consulting to administering philanthropic organizations and launching a charter-boat business. (MLH)

  20. CareerConnector

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CareerConnector is USAID's premiere recruiting tool. It is powered by Monster and integrated with www.usajobs.gov. CareerConnector tracks the progression of a...

  1. academy public lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ethical Guidelines and Procedures document. Posted on 17 January 2017. A revised version of the document 'Scientific Values: Ethical Guidelines and Procedures' has been produced by the Academy's Panel on Scientific Values. For more details, see the Academy Committee on Scientific Values page.

  2. Talent Management in Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Brent; Davies, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Academies are semi-autonomous schools set up outside the normal local government structures with sponsors from business and charity groups to create new and innovative ways of creating and sustaining school transformation. The aim of this paper is to assist in a strategic conversation within the academy movement on talent development.…

  3. Invitations received from potential predatory publishers and fraudulent conferences: a 12-month early-career researcher experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Eric; Tardif, Pier-Alexandre; Moore, Lynne; Le Sage, Natalie; Cameron, Peter A

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to describe all unsolicited electronic invitations received from potential predatory publishers or fraudulent conferences over a 12-month period following the first publication as a corresponding author of a junior academician. Unsolicited invitations received at an institutional email address and perceived to be sent by predatory publishers or fraudulent conferences were collected. A total of 502 invitations were included of which 177 (35.3%) had subject matter relevant to the recipient's research interests and previous work. Two hundred and thirty-seven were invitations to publish a manuscript. Few disclosed the publication fees (32, 13.5%) but they frequently reported accepting all types of manuscripts (167, 70.5%) or emphasised on a deadline to submit (165, 69.6%). Invitations came from 39 publishers (range 1 to 87 invitations per publisher). Two hundred and ten invitations from a potential fraudulent conference were received. These meetings were held in Europe (97, 46.2%), North America (65, 31.0%), Asia (20.4%) or other continents (5, 2.4%) and came from 18 meeting organisation groups (range 1 to 137 invitations per organisation). Becoming an editorial board member (30), the editor-in-chief (1), a guest editor for journal special issue (6) and write a book chapter (11) were some of the roles offered in the other invitations included while no invitation to review a manuscript was received. Young researchers are commonly exposed to predatory publishers and fraudulent conferences following a single publication as a corresponding author. Academic institutions worldwide need to educate and inform young researchers of this emerging problem. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Career success criteria and locus of control as indicators of adaptive readiness in the career adaptation model.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, W.; Guan, Y.; Xin, L.; Mak, M.C.K.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The present research had two goals. The first goal was to identify additional individual characteristics that may contribute to adaptive readiness. The second goal was to test if these characteristics fit the career adaptation model of readiness to resources to responses. We examined whether career success criteria (measured at Time 1) and career locus of control (measured at Time 1) would contribute to adaptivity and predict university students’ career decision-making self-efficacy (measured...

  5. Psychological career resources, career adaptability and work engagement of generational cohorts in the media industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The global skills crisis coupled with the aging workforce, rapid technological advances and changing nature of work have infringed various challenges upon organisations and employees. Media organisations in particular are affected by these trends, with retention further at risk because of the specialised and scarce skills sought and the versatility and ambiguity inherent in the nature of careers within the media industry, therefore resulting in engagement and skills retention being high on the agenda. Research purpose: The aim of the study was to explore whether employees’ age, psychological career resources and career adaptability significantly predict their work engagement and whether generational cohorts differ significantly regarding these variables. Motivation for the study: Within a retention context, it is important to gain insight into the employees’ personal career-related capabilities and dispositions as these are deemed important for driving career development and engagement levels, which, in turn, impact on the retention of talent. Research design, approach and method: A stratified random sample (N = 248 of predominantly female (63.3% and black African people (54% within their early career stages (80% < 45 years was used. A cross-sectional, quantitative research design approach was followed. Stepwise regression analyses and tests for significant mean differences were performed. Main findings: The results indicated generational cohort (age, career confidence (career adaptability and career harmonisers (psychological career resources as significant predictors of work engagement. The Generation Y individuals had higher levels of psychological career resources (career preferences, career values and career drivers, while the Generation X individuals had higher career curiosity. The Baby Boomers showed higher levels of work engagement. Practical and managerial implications: Psycho-social career meta-capacities positively

  6. Interpreting Early Career Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnatt, Joan; Gahlsdorf Terrell, Dianna; D'Souza, Lisa Andries; Jong, Cindy; Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Viesca, Kara Mitchell; Gleeson, Ann Marie; McQuillan, Patrick; Shakman, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Career decisions of four teachers are explored through the concept of figured worlds in this qualitative, longitudinal case study. Participants were purposefully chosen for similarity at entry, with a range of career trajectories over time. Teacher career paths included remaining in one school, repeated changes in schools, attrition after…

  7. Ohio Career Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This resource is designed to provide Ohio labor market information for use with advisory committees to stimulate and inform dialogue about the current evaluation and future planning of programs. It provides reports for 23 career fields in 6 career clusters. Each report highlights careers and occupations in the field and answers these questions:…

  8. Career Commitment in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    A longitudinal, repeated-measures descriptive survey used to measure career commitment and its relationship to turnover and work performance in 320 newly employed registered nurses at one hospital found that career commitment is not a stable phenomenon. The direct association between career commitment and turnover and with job performance is weak.…

  9. BULGARIAN TEACHERS’ CAREER MOTIVATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Stoyanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of several studies of teachers’ career motivation since Bulgarian Renaissance till nowadays is presented in this paper. 203 Bulgarian teachers in public schools were studied by means of a questionnaire created by Slavchov & Stoyanova (2007 measuring career motivational types, according to Moses’ typology (2003. The career motivational type of Authenticity seekers was the most preferred by the studied Bulgarian teachers, followed by Personal developers and Stability seekers. Career builders as a career motivational type was minor career motivator, the least preferred one by Bulgarian teachers. A lot of significant positive correlations existed between teachers’ career motivational types. Some social-demographic factors (such as gender, specialty, work experience, and age differentiated teachers’ career motivators. The type of Autonomy seekers was more preferred career motivator by male teachers than by female teachers in correspondence to the traditional stereotypes for men. Longer teachers’ work experience and teachers’ advance in age were related to more frequency of Stability seekers, but less frequency of Novelty seekers career motivator. Preschool and elementary school teachers preferred more strongly Authenticity seekers as a career motivator than teachers in natural sciences and mathematics. Establishing major career motivators for teachers may be related to opportunities for improvement of performance and work satisfaction.

  10. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Commemoration of the centenary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 February 2009; Joint session of the Research Council of the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Rosatom State Corporation, 18 March 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatnikov, Isaak M.; Fortov, Vladimir E.; Makarov, Aleksandr A.; Fridman, Aleksei M.; Martynenko, Yurii V.

    2009-12-01

    The scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) devoted to the centenary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich was held on 18 February 2009 in the conference hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Khalatnikov I M (L D Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) "Nonaccidental coincidences (Lev Andreevich Artsimovich)"; (2) Pashinin P P (A M Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) "L A Artsimovich and inertial thermonuclear fusion"; (3) Fortov V E (Institute of Thermophysics of Extreme States of the Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RAS, Moscow) "High-power shock waves and extreme states of plasma"; (4) Fridman A M (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "Prediction and discovery of ultrastrong hydrodynamic instabilities caused by a velocity jump: theory and experiment"; (5) Smirnov V P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Retracing Artsimovich's path to the thermonuclear source of energy". On 18 March 2009, a joint session of the Learned Council of the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' (RNTsKI in Russ. abbr.), the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Rosatom State Corporation took place at RNTsKI; the session was devoted to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich. The following talks were presented at the session: (1) Velikhov E P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Academician L A Artsimovich—the founder of our field of science and industry"; (2) Smirnov V P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Retracing Artsimovich's path to the thermonuclear source of energy"; (3) Boyarchuk A A (Division of General Physics and Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "L A Artsimovich and astronomy"; (4) Martynenko Yu V (Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow

  11. Rediscovering Paideia and the Meaning of a Scholarly Career: Rejoinder to "Identifying Research Topic Development in Business and Management Education Research Using Legitimation Code Theory"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacopoulou, Elena P.

    2016-01-01

    In "Identifying Research Topic Development in Business and Management Education Research Using Legitimation Code Theory," authors J.B. Arbaugh, Charles J. Fornaciari, and Alvin Hwang ("Journal of Management Education," December 2016 vol. 40 no. 6 p654-691, see EJ1118407) used citation analysis to track the development of…

  12. Card Sort Technique in Vocational Guidance/Career Counseling: Pilot Study about Career Values

    OpenAIRE

    Tülin ACAR; Yalçın DEMİR; Fidan KORKUT; Özlem HASKAN; Tuğba KABALCI; Dilşad KUTSAL; İlker Mustafa PEKİN; Esra TURHAN

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and to pilot a not-test technique for assessing career and work values. This instrument was developed during a Career Counseling course taught by one of the authors of this paper. The first stage of development was the generation of a master list of career and work values, as reflected in the current literature related to theories and vocational research. From this master list 38 career values were selected resulting in the final deck that was used i...

  13. Career Awareness, Career Planning, and Career Transition Needs among Sports Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, David

    2006-01-01

    This study is conducted with 56 recently retired full-time sports coaches to examine the importance of career awareness, postsport career planning, and career transition needs. Results indicate that the individuals do not have a high level of career awareness, have done relatively little postsport career planning during their coaching careers, and…

  14. Summer Research Program - 1997 Summer Faculty Research Program Volume 6 Arnold Engineering Development Center United States Air Force Academy Air Logistics Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Fracture Analysis of the F-5, 15%-Spar Bolt DR Devendra Kumar SAALC/LD 6- 16 CUNY-City College, New York, NY A Simple, Multiversion Concurrency Control...Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH. [3]AFGROW, Air Force Crack Propagation Analysis Program, Version 3.82 (1997) 15-8 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION ...Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC and San Antonio Air Logistic Center August 1997 16-1 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION CONCURRENCY

  15. Defense Threat Reduction Agency > Careers > Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integration Command Senior Enlisted Leader Media News News Archive Strategic Plan Videos Mission Research Support Center Contact Us FAQ Sheet Links Success Stories Contracts Business Opportunities Current Justifications & Approvals Careers Who We Are Our Values Strategic Recruiting Programs Professional

  16. Defense Threat Reduction Agency > Careers > Onboarding > Onboarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    includes developing professional networks, identifying additional training and development opportunities , and celebrating accomplishments. Mission Personalization Networking Learning Career Development Basic and Applied Science Research Funding Opportunities Science of WMD Sensing and Recognition Network

  17. Careers | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    lab. Discover New Opportunities Find a Job Our Culture Within our safe and supportive work environment Simulation and Optimization Researcher Our Culture Within our safe and supportive work environment, we NRELians what they enjoy most about working at the lab, many will say, "the people." Meet an

  18. The influence of career orientations on subjective work experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2010-11-01

    Research purpose: The study empirically assessed the causal influence of individuals’ career orientations on their perceived life satisfaction, job or career satisfaction, sense of happiness and their perceptions of work as a valuable activity as aspects of their subjective work experiences. Motivation for study: From an organisational perspective, research on individuals’ inner definitions of career success and satisfaction is needed to guide current selection, placement, development, reward and retention practices. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative survey was conducted on a random sample of 2997 participants at predominantly managerial and supervisory level in the service industry. The measuring instruments consisted of an adapted five-factor career orientations model of the Career Orientations Inventory and a 4-item global subjective work experiences scale. Structural equation modelling (SEM was conducted to achieve the aim of the study. Main findings/results: Statistically significant causal relationships were observed between the career orientations and subjective work experiences variables. Practical implications: Individuals’ career orientations influence their general sense of life and job or career satisfaction, happiness and perceptions of work as a valuable activity. Organisations concerned with the retention of staff need to find a way of aligning individuals’ career needs and motives with the goals and aspirations of the organisation. Contribution/value-add: The research confirms the need for assessing the inner career orientations of employees as these provide valuable information regarding the motives and values driving individuals’ career decision making and subjective experiences of their working lives.

  19. Navigating the Path to a Biomedical Science Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Andrea McNeely

    The number of biomedical PhD scientists being trained and graduated far exceeds the number of academic faculty positions and academic research jobs. If this trend is compelling biomedical PhD scientists to increasingly seek career paths outside of academia, then more should be known about their intentions, desires, training experiences, and career path navigation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand the process through which biomedical PhD scientists are trained and supported for navigating future career paths. In addition, the study sought to determine whether career development support efforts and opportunities should be redesigned to account for the proportion of PhD scientists following non-academic career pathways. Guided by the social cognitive career theory (SCCT) framework this study sought to answer the following central research question: How does a southeastern tier 1 research university train and support its biomedical PhD scientists for navigating their career paths? Key findings are: Many factors influence PhD scientists' career sector preference and job search process, but the most influential were relationships with faculty, particularly the mentor advisor; Planned activities are a significant aspect of the training process and provide skills for career success; and Planned activities provided skills necessary for a career, but influential factors directed the career path navigated. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  20. Factors Contributing to the Subjective Career Success among Islamic Educators in Primary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Mesnan Supa`ad; Nor Wahiza Abd Wahat; Fathiyah Mohd Fakhruddin; Turiman Suandi

    2013-01-01

    A very limited research has been done in the field of career development among Islamic education teachers. Most of the previous researches showed an improvement in terms of grades, positions, and responsibilities of their previous routines as an indicator of their career advancement. However, this conceptual (concept paper) discusses how personality factors, career planning, and career strategy can provide significant contribution to the success of Islamic education teachers’ career. Based on...

  1. Qualifying for Career Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kovač

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for education in various spheres of life, which allows a person to fully develop his/her personality, is more and more presen t also in our society. The discussed educational programme Discovering Vocational Goals and Forming Strategies· to Realize them qualifies people for autonomous career planning by offer­ ing them one of the possible ways of making decisions in relation to profession and job. In the course of the realization of the programme the participants are given the chance to think about the kind of work that would suit their interests, capabilities and individual characteristics as weel as the needs in certain environments (possible employers. They are encouraged to make an actual plan, stating how and when the desired objective will be reached. In 1995 the pro­ gramme was being carried out within nine semi­ nars organized at the Employment Offices in Maribor and Ptuj. During that time the pro­ gramme has also been evaluated by Doba - Education Office, which was funded by the Ministry of Work, Family and Social Matters. The paper includes the content of the programme as well as the assessments of the research project. The presented data show that the participants learned the method of career planning and acqu­ired greater self-confidence and motivation to solve their job problem actively.

  2. CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UROŠEVIĆ Snežana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is a very important industrial branch because it produces clothes for nearly seven billion people and textile materials for technical usage. It employs a huge number of competitive and qualified, mostly female work force. It is also technologically and technically challenging. Thus, it is vital to employ qualified and well trained employees with certain competences, knowledge and skills in order to respond to rapid technological and market changes. Here, we will consider the influence of the career development on doing business in the textile industry while acquiring the competitive advantage. Career development is a lifelong process and it is includes knowledge management. The term career has several meanings while nowadays it can mean advancement. The career usually reflects the professional development path of an individual during his or her working career. The career is that concept which connects and unifies most strongly and explicitly individual and organizational interests and needs. The theoretical part explains terms such as career development, importance and improvement of employees for an organization, the possibility for career development within the textile industry. The second part of the paper deals with research conducted among the employees of the textile sector in Leskovac, the town in Serbia with a long-lasting textile tradition.

  3. Visible Leading: Principal Academy Connects and Empowers Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Jennifer; Rozzelle, Jan; Ball, Rachel; Fahey, John

    2015-01-01

    The School-University Research Network (SURN) Principal Academy at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, has a mission to build a leadership development program that increases principals' instructional knowledge and develops mentor principals to sustain the program. The academy is designed to connect and empower principals…

  4. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Innovations in Genetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PG and Research Department of Botany, Vivekananda College of Arts and Sciences for Women. (Autonomous), Elayampalayam ... Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi ... R Uma Shaankar, Department of Crop physiology and School of Ecology and Conservation, University of ...

  5. Self-Efficacy and social support of Academy cricketers | Cowan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... This article aims to provide an initial insight into the role that South African provincial cricket academies play in talent development of cricketers by reflecting on possible changes in academy cricketers' self-efficacy and perceived social ...

  6. Promoting Protean Career through Employability Culture and Mentoring: Career Strategies as Moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siew Chin; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Abdul Wahat, Nor Wahiza

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of organizational-related variables and the moderating role of career strategies on protean career among employees. Design/methodology/approach: Research data are gathered from a sample of 306 employees in 18 electrical and electronics multinational corporations (MNCs) in Malaysia.…

  7. Political Science Careers at Comprehensive Universities: Building Balanced Careers at "Greedy" Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Ryan C.; Mueller, Melinda A.; Strand, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    A considerable amount of research exists about political science careers at community colleges and liberal arts institutions, as well as about training and hiring practices across different types of institutions. However, there is virtually no commentary available on political science careers at comprehensive institutions, where a significant…

  8. Past career in future thinking: How career management practices shape entrepreneurial decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Y.; van Burg, J.C.; Kleijn, E.; Khapova, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    This study builds a grounded model of how careers shape entrepreneurs’ preference for causal and effectual decision logics when starting new ventures. Using both verbal protocol analysis and interviews, we adopt a qualitative research approach to induct career management practices germane to

  9. Past Career in Future Thinking : How Career Management Practices Shape Entrepreneurial Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Y.; van Burg, E.; Kleijn, E.; Khapova, S.

    2017-01-01

    This study builds a grounded model of how careers shape entrepreneurs’ preferences for causal and effectual decision logics when starting new ventures. Using both verbal protocol analysis and interviews, we adopt a qualitative research approach to induct career management practices germane to

  10. Motivations Underlying Career Decision-Making Activities: The Career Decision-Making Autonomy Scale (CDMAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to develop and validate a measure of motivation toward career decision-making activities, the Career Decision-Making Autonomy Scale (CDMAS). The CDMAS is designed to assess the constructs of intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, introjected regulation, and external regulation. A longitudinal study was…

  11. The emergence of career boundaries in unbounded industries : career odysseys in the Italian New Economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagdadli, S; Solari, L; Usai, A; Grandori, A

    The main objective of this research(1) was to study boundaries to the 'boundaryless career' in a novel context. Our empirical study focused on career paths leading top managers to enter emergent firms. We collected data on professional histories of a sample of top managers who operated in firms

  12. Career-Related Instruction Promoting Students' Career Awareness and Interest towards Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Anssi; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Keinonen, Tuula

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how career-related instruction implemented in secondary school chemistry education concerning water issues influences students' career awareness and their interest towards science learning. This case study is part of a larger design-based research study for the EU-MultiCO project, which focuses on promoting…

  13. Utilisation of academic nursing competence in Europe - A survey among members of the European Academy of Nursing Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen, Tove Aminda; Olsen, Pia Riis

    2018-01-01

    academic nurses' competencies are used and in what positions. AIM: To understand the progression of nurses' academic careers following completion of the EANS Summer School and to picture how research and academic skills of the nurses are being used for research and/or other fields in nursing. METHODS: We......BACKGROUND: In line with national and international strategies in Europe, the number of nurses with a doctoral degree has increased. The European Academy of Nursing Science (EANS) has for 18years delivered a three-year doctoral summer school for nurses. Questions have been raised in terms of how...... commenced a cross-sectional survey. Former EANS Summer School participants were invited to take part in the online survey with questions developed specifically for this study. The study conformed to the principle of good clinical research practice and was reviewed and approved by the EANS Board. RESULTS...

  14. The reciprocal dynamic model of career decision ambiguity tolerance with career indecision: A longitudinal three-wave investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Tracey, Terence J G

    2017-10-01

    The current study investigated the dynamic interplay of career decision ambiguity tolerance and career indecision over 3 assessment times in a sample of college students (n = 583). While the previous research has repeatedly shown an association of career decision ambiguity tolerance with career indecision, the direction of this association has not been adequately assessed with longitudinal investigation. It was hypothesized in this study that there is a reciprocal pattern of career decision ambiguity tolerance leading to subsequent career indecision and career indecision leading to subsequent career decision ambiguity tolerance. Using a cross-lagged panel design, this study found support for the reciprocal pattern that aversion to ambiguity led to increased negative affect and choice anxiety in career decision making, while negative affect and choice anxiety led to increased aversion to ambiguity. Additionally, this study revealed that aversion led to decreased readiness for career decision making and readiness for career decision making led to increased interests in new information. The key findings were discussed with respect to the theoretical and clinical implications for career counseling along with limitations and suggestions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. The Relationships among Calling, Religiousness, and Dysfunctional Career Thoughts in Public University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Stefanie Josephine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among calling, religiousness, and dysfunctional career thoughts. Though the cognitive processes in the career decision-making process have been a focus of research in recent years, the relationship between career thoughts and calling has only been studied once and career thoughts'…

  16. Development of the Career Indecision Profile: Factor Structure, Reliability, and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Jason; Carr, Andrea; Abrams, Matthew; Brown, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Prior research using a 167-item measure of career indecision (Career Indecision Profile-167 [CIP-167]) has suggested that career choice difficulties may be associated with four major sources of career indecision: neuroticism/negative affectivity, choice/commitment anxiety, lack of readiness, and interpersonal conflicts. The purpose of this study…

  17. Preparation of Underrepresented Males for Scientific Careers: A Study of the Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program at Morehouse College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rahmelle C; Monroe-White, Thema; Xavier, Jeffrey; Howell, Courtney; Moore, Myisha Roberson; Haynes, J K

    Equal representation within higher education science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and the STEM workforce in the United States across demographically diverse populations is a long-standing challenge. This study uses two-to-one nearest-neighbor matched-comparison group design to examine academic achievement, pursuit of graduate science degree, and classification of graduate institution attended by students participating in the Hopps Scholars Program (Hopps) at Morehouse College. Hopps is a highly structured enrichment program aimed at increasing participation of black males in STEM fields. Morehouse institutional records, Hopps Program records, and National Student Clearinghouse data were used to examine differences between Hopps and non-Hopps STEM graduates of Morehouse. Two-way sample t tests and chi-square tests revealed significant differences in academic achievement, likelihood of STEM degree pursuit, and the classification of graduate institutions attended by Hopps versus non-Hopps students. Hopps Scholars were significantly more likely than non-Hopps STEM graduates both to pursue STEM doctoral degrees and to attend doctoral-granting institutions with higher research activity. The Hopps Program's approach to training black male students for scientific careers is a model of success for other programs committed to increasing the number of black males pursuing advanced degrees in STEM. © 2016 R. C. Thompson et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. Sense of coherence, career adaptability and burnout of early-career Black staff in the call centre environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Harry

    2013-11-01

    Research purpose: This study explored whether call centre agents’ sense of coherence significantly influences their career adaptability and whether their burnout levels significantly moderate the sense of coherence–career adaptability relationship. The research also investigated whether age, gender and years of service (as control variables, along with sense of coherence, predicted career adaptability. Motivation for the study: The positive psychological construct of career adaptability and its association with call centre agents’ sense of coherence, burnout, age, gender and years of service have not yet been investigated in the call centre environment. Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional quantitative survey design was used. The Orientation to Life, Career Adapt-Abilities Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory General Scale were administered to a non-probability purposive sample of 409 early-career Black staff employed in three of the largest outsourced financial call centres in Africa. Main findings: Multiple regression analyses revealed that age, gender and meaningfulness significantly predicted call centre agents’ career adaptability, but that their burnout levels do not significantly moderate the sense of coherence–career adaptability relationship. Practical/managerial implications: Enhancing call centre agents’ sense of meaningfulness will increase their levels of career adaptability and career wellbeing. Contribution/value-add: This research is the first to investigate the construct of career adaptability in the call centre environment and adds new knowledge and insights to the existing wellness and positive psychology literature.

  19. [Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease. Consensus document of the Bárány Society, the Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Escamez, José A; Carey, John; Chung, Won-Ho; Goebel, Joel A; Magnusson, Måns; Mandalà, Marco; Newman-Toker, David E; Strupp, Michael; Suzuki, Mamoru; Trabalzini, Franco; Bisdorff, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes 2 categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low-to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 min and 12h. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 min to 24h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  20. My career in medical research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence

    Sitaramayya, who taught Sir C.V. Raman during his school days. My earliest ... responsible for this condition, changes in other organs, biochemi- cal parameters and ... My work was published in a number of international journals of repute,.

  1. Iraqi Military Academies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodar Z. Mossaki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the system of training of officers in military academies in Iraq – in Zakho, Qalacholan, ar-Rustamiyah and an-Nasiriyah. The author describes the history of creation, process of evolution, challenges and features of training in these colleges. Particular attention paid to military academies in the territory of Iraqi Kurdistan, which actually do not obey the central government of Iraq, however, have the highest level of training. Currently, Iraq's military academies operate on the basis of the NATO standards. Iraqi military academies paid miuch attention to the specifics of the military and political situation in Iraq – counterinsurgency and counterterrorism operations, patrolling cities, fighting in an urban environment etc. Significant place in the curriculum take the courses contributing to the formation of pro-Western sentiment.

  2. American Academy of Optometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Award Recipients Nov 07, 2017 View all news Optometry and Vision Science Journal Optometry and Vision Science is the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. AAO members receive a complimentary online subscription. Learn ...

  3. Academy of General Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Examine Oral Systemic Health Nov 14, 2017 General Dentistry and American Family Physician Collaborate to Examine Oral ... Oral Health Oct 23, 2017 Academy of General Dentistry Foundation Celebrates 45 Years Raising Awareness for Oral ...

  4. Academy Training Catalog -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — IRIS is a suite of front-end web applications utilizing a centralized back-end Oracle database. The system fully supports the FAA Academy's Distance Learning Program...

  5. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brahma

    The Academy reserves the right to reject/not to accept any quotation without assigning any reason thereof. ❖ Those interested may ... The sealed covers must be superscribed "TENDER FOR HOUSEKEEPING –. 2016-17" and submitted to:.

  6. Evaluation of a Career Counselling Program Focused on Greek Elementary School Children's Career Interests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyxeni Antonellou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although childhood is the most significant period in one's career development process, little research attention has been paid to the evaluation of career counselling intervention programs in elementary-aged children. An intervention study was carried out in order to evaluate a career counselling program implemented in one Greek elementary school which focused on the enrichment of the children's career interests. The research methodology used was the quasi experimental research design. Children (N = 84 aged 8-11 years were distributed in experimental and control groups. Τhe impact of the intervention focused on the enrichment of their career interests, which was assessed via semi-structured interviews and use of drawings. The results showed a statistical significant difference between groups concerning children's career interests after intervention, while the analysis of drawings revealed more differences in self-confidence, self- esteem and extraversion in favour of the children that participated in the experimental group. Gender and age differences were also explored and revealed. The results are discussed in relation to various aspects of children's career development, as well as to the significance of career counselling intervention programs.

  7. Boundaryless career and career success: the impact of emotional and social competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerli, Fabrizio; Bonesso, Sara; Pizzi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Even though, over the last two decades, the boundaryless career concept has stimulated a wide theoretical debate, scholars have recently claimed that research on the competencies that are necessary for managing a cross-boundary career is still incomplete. Similarly, the literature on emotional and social competencies has demonstrated how they predict work performance across industries and jobs but has neglected their influence in explaining the individual's mobility across boundaries and their impact on career success. This study aims to fill these gaps by examining the effects of emotional and social competencies on boundaryless career and on objective career success. By analyzing a sample of 142 managers over a period of 8 years, we found evidence that emotional competencies positively influence the propensity of an individual to undertake physical career mobility and that career advancements are related to the possession of social competencies and depend on the adoption of boundaryless career paths. This study also provides a contribution in terms of the evaluation of the emotional and social competencies demonstrated by an individual and of the operationalization of the measurement of boundaryless career paths, considering three facets of the physical mobility construct (organizational, industrial, and geographical boundaries).

  8. TRIANGULATION OF METHODS OF CAREER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Turnsek Mikacic

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an overview of the current research in the field of career education and career planning. Presented results constitute a model based on the insight into different theories and empirical studies about career planning as a building block of personal excellence. We defined credibility, transferability and reliability of the research by means of triangulation. As sources of data of triangulation we included essays of participants of education and questionnaires. Qualitative analysis represented the framework for the construction of the paradigmatic model and the formulation of the final theory. We formulated a questionnaire on the basis of our own experiences in the area of the education of individuals. The quantitative analysis, based on the results of the interviews, confirms the following three hypotheses: The individuals who elaborated a personal career plan and acted accordingly, changed their attitudes towards their careers and took control over their lives; in addition, they achieved a high level of self-esteem and self-confidence, in tandem with the perception of personal excellence, in contrast to the individuals who did not participate in career education and did not elaborate a career plan. We used the tools of NLP (neurolinguistic programming as an additional technique at learning.

  9. Peer Mentoring Communities of Practice for Early and Mid-Career Faculty: Broad Benefits from a Research-Oriented Female Peer Mentoring Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Amanda; Shaw, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    In light of recent interest in the limitations of early and mid-career mentoring (Driscoll et al 2009; Trowers 2011), this case study of a women's scholarly activity and goal setting Community of Practice (CoP) indicates that such groups can offer extensive peer mentoring at one teaching-oriented state university in the United States. Using a…

  10. The Effects Of Gender, Engineering Identification, and Engineering Program Expectancy On Engineering Career Intentions: Applying Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) In Engineering Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendhar, Chosang; Paretti, Marie C.; Jones, Brett D.

    2017-01-01

    This study had three purposes and four hypotheses were tested. Three purposes: (1) To use hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to investigate whether students' perceptions of their engineering career intentions changed over time; (2) To use HLM to test the effects of gender, engineering identification (the degree to which an individual values a…

  11. There’s More to Science than Research: A Team-Based Role Game to Develop School Students’ Understanding of Science Careers in Pharmaceutical Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Collins

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available School students lack information about STEM based careers, a subject that is not sufficiently embedded in the national science curriculum. As a result, students feel they receive insufficient advice to support their choice of subjects at GCSE level and beyond. Students struggle to envisage potential career pathways leading on from studying science at school, and especially for younger students it is difficult to convey typical science-based career pictures in a way that is easily accessible to them. To address this need, we developed an interactive team-based activity which uses role play to help students envisage typical work processes within a science-based career—microbial quality control in a pharmaceutical industrial environment. This activity addresses children’s curiosity about science-based careers, by enabling them to experience typical every day work processes in an industrial environment in a hands-on fashion. Additionally, the activity helps to convey abstract concepts, such as the abundance of microbes in the natural environment, microbial contamination and the importance of hygiene, which link to the science curriculum.

  12. SEMINAR ON “WOMEN IN SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY: CAREER ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    admin

    2010-05-16

    May 16, 2010 ... Women in Science, Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru ... Vijayaragavan on the topic “The making of a flowering stem: ... To encourage faculty to carry out high end research in their tyopic of research and submit projects.

  13. Novice Academic Librarians Provide Insight into Choosing Their Careers, Graduate School Education, and First Years on the Job. A Review of: Sare, L., Bales, S., & Neville, B. (2012. New academic librarians and their perceptions of the profession. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 12(2, 179-203. doi: 10.1353/pla.2012.0017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol D. Howe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To study the ways in which noviceacademic librarians’ perceptions oflibrarianship develop from the time theydecide to attend library school through theirfirst 6 to 24 months of library work.Design – Grounded theory method utilizingtwo qualitative research techniques: one-onone,face-to-face interviews and documentanalysis.Setting – The libraries of three Texasuniversities, three Texas four-year colleges,and one Texas community college.Subjects – 12 professional academic librarianswho graduated from eight different graduateschools. Participants were 6 to 24 months intotheir professional careers and had little or nopre-professional experience.Methods – The researchers sought participantsthrough mailings, emails, electronic mailinglist postings, and referrals from otherparticipants. They conducted a small pilotstudy with two novice librarians to refine theirresearch methodology. The researchersinterviewed additional participants andanalyzed the interview transcripts untilcategories of interest were identified andsaturated. Saturation occurred at 12participants, not including the pilotparticipants. Each interview was 30-45minutes. The researchers recorded theinterviews and systematically coded thetranscripts using activist imagery. Four of the participants gave the researchers their “statement of purpose” essay that they used when applying for graduate school. These documents were also discussed with participants and analyzed.Main Results – From the data they collected, the researchers identified six categories of interest regarding librarians’ perceptions of librarianship: deciding upon a career, experiencing graduate school, continuing education, defining the work, evaluating the work, and (reimagining the future. In considering librarianship as a career, the participants had not been entirely sure what it entailed, but they utilized what they did know about libraries and librarianship to generally deem the

  14. Effective career ladders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, B; Rabbitts, D; Shover, J; Torres, M; VanDerHeyden, B; Violand-Jones, S

    1992-01-01

    Motivation, quality improvement, productivity enhancement. These are just some of the benefits of an effective career ladder program. The key term here is effective. It is easy for laboratory personnel to stagnate professionally if they do not have a career ladder program, but it is even easier for them to become frustrated--even cynical--over a program that fails to live up to its expectations to encourage, support, and reward professional advancement. If you have been looking form some ideas to get your own career ladder program off the ground, the following responses from your colleagues may help as CLMR asks: What makes your career ladder program effective?

  15. Managing Career Development in the Not for Profit Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Chi

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a report on a pilot study that was conducted to inform a DBA research project. It will investigate employee perceptions of their career development in the not-for-profit (NFP) sector. Theoretical and empirically based literature searches were conducted on career development for this study. Some researchers argue that the old career model (which involves an employee working for an organisation and committed to the organisation and in turn, the organisation offers the employ...

  16. A Review of Previous Studies on Information Processing in Career Decision Making among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    池田, 智子; Satoko, Ikeda

    2018-01-01

    This review of the researches of career choice of Japanese university students focused the studies on decision-making theory conducted in Japan. The present review suggested the necessity of examination of the effect of self-efficacy about career information search on the process of career choice. It is also needed to examine the relationship between specific self-efficacy about career information search and career decision-making self-efficacy, moreover, general self-efficacy.

  17. The relation between career anchors, occupational types and job satisfaction of midcareer employees

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Ellison; A. M. G. Schreuder

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the value of the career anchor model in career decision-making. Career models that can provide the individual with greater self-insight can serve as an important guide when making career choices in todays turbulent working environment. Two hundred and ninety-five midcareer employees (managerial and non-managerial) completed questionnaires to determine their career anchor, occupation type and levels of general, intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfa...

  18. Protean career: perspectives of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litvinova Ye.Yu.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes different approaches to study of models of constructing the employment career in current environment. The changes having taken place in interrelationsbetween employees and organizations over recent 15 years led to changes in their mutual expectations including the ones concerning the career development. Boundaryless career based on career mobility and protean career based on subjective understanding of career success are regarded as alternatives to traditional careers. The main attributes of “new careers” are: an increased independence in employee-organization dyads, low level of mutual obligations, freedom of choice, self-actualization, priority of career loyalty and self-management in contrast to organization loyalty. Changes in career conceptualizing inevitably led to revision of career competences. Traditional professional competences give way to career meta-competences like adaptiveness, capacity for education, self-management, taking responsibility. At the same time empirical studies displaya prematurity of statements about the expressed loss of interest to traditional careers.

  19. Early career professionals: the mission of a task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G D; Lauw, M N

    2016-07-01

    Early career researchers and clinicians face unique challenges in comparison with more senior colleagues, for instance connecting with expert leaders outside of their own institution to enhance their expertise. As the largest international thrombosis and hemostasis professional society, the ISTH can play a central role in supporting the development of early career professionals. The ISTH Early Career Task Force was formed to improve support for, and encourage collaboration between early career thrombosis and hemostasis researchers and clinicians. These activities include (1) maintaining an online forum for early career ISTH members to connect, promote clinical, research, funding and educational activities, and to generate a sense of community; (2) broaden ISTH's reach with early career professionals in the developing world through promotion of the Reach-the-World fellowships and translating ISTH websites into six languages; (3) encourage early career engagement with ISTH activities, such as guidelines and guidance document processing and online webinar series; and (4) establishing this early career forum series in this journal. The JTH Forum series will highlight the early career perspective on a wide range of issues relevant to this group, and all ISTH early career members are encouraged to contribute. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  20. The Northern Manitoba Mining Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Paul

    2017-04-01

    The Northern Manitoba Mining Academy (NMMA, miningacademy.ca) is a new educational institution located in Flin Flon, Manitoba. It is associated with the University College of the North and is specifically intended to serve the needs of the Northern Manitoban communities with regards to job creation by providing training in a variety of mining, construction, and exploration related areas. NMMA's mission is to provide innovative and responsible solutions for the creation of a knowledgeable, skilled, and sustainable workforce within a vibrant, mineral-rich resource industry. It facilitates strategic training initiatives and research activities in order to strengthen the social, economic, and environmental benefits of a robust mining and resources sector. In terms of education, NMMA offers its own programs, mostly short courses in health and safety, courses organized by the University College of the North (wilderness safety, prospecting, and exploration), and courses organized in association with provincial Industries-Based Safety Programs and Associations (a variety of construction-related trades). However, the programming is not limited to those courses already on the syllabus: the Academy operates on open-doors policy and welcomes people with their unique and diverse needs; it prides itself in its ability to tailor or create specific on-demand courses and deliver them locally in the North. The Northern Manitoba Mining Academy also provides access to its world-class facilities for field-based undergraduate courses, as well as graduate students and researchers doing field work. Full sample preparation facilities are offered to students and scientists in all natural and environmental sciences.