WorldWideScience

Sample records for researchers move closer

  1. Moving improvement research closer to practice: the Researcher-in-Residence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Martin; Pagel, Christina; French, Catherine; Utley, Martin; Allwood, Dominique; Fulop, Naomi; Pope, Catherine; Banks, Victoria; Goldmann, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The traditional separation of the producers of research evidence in academia from the users of that evidence in healthcare organisations has not succeeded in closing the gap between what is known about the organisation and delivery of health services and what is actually done in practice. As a consequence, there is growing interest in alternative models of knowledge creation and mobilisation, ones which emphasise collaboration, active participation of all stakeholders, and a commitment to shared learning. Such models have robust historical, philosophical and methodological foundations but have not yet been embraced by many of the people working in the health sector. This paper presents an emerging model of participation, the Researcher-in-Residence. The model positions the researcher as a core member of a delivery team, actively negotiating a body of expertise which is different from, but complementary to, the expertise of managers and clinicians. Three examples of in-residence models are presented: an anthropologist working as a member of an executive team, operational researchers working in a front-line delivery team, and a Health Services Researcher working across an integrated care organisation. Each of these examples illustrates the contribution that an embedded researcher can make to a service-based team. They also highlight a number of unanswered questions about the model, including the required level of experience of the researcher and their areas of expertise, the institutional facilitators and barriers to embedding the model, and the risk that the independence of an embedded researcher might be compromised. The Researcher-in-Residence model has the potential to engage both academics and practitioners in the promotion of evidence-informed service improvement, but further evaluation is required before the model should be routinely used in practice. PMID:24894592

  2. Research that Helps Move Us Closer to a World where Each Child Thrives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Adele

    Schools are curtailing programs in arts, physical exercise, and play so more time and resources can be devoted to academic instruction. Yet indications are that the arts (e.g., music, dance, or theatre) and physical activity (e.g., sports, martial arts, or youth circus) are crucial for all aspects of children's development - including success in school . Thus in cutting those activities, schools may be impeding academic success, not aiding it. Correlational and retrospective studies have laid the groundwork, as have moving personal accounts, case studies, and theoretical arguments. The time is ripe for rigorous studies to investigate causality (Do arts and physical activities actually produce academic benefits or would kids in those activities have succeeded anyway?) and what characteristics of programs account for the benefits. Instead of simply claiming that the arts and/or physical activities can transform kids' lives, that needs to be demonstrated, and granting agencies need to be more open to funding rigorous research of real-world arts and physical-activity programs.

  3. Move Closer: Towards Design Patterns To Support Initiating Social Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Robb; Boer, Laurens

    2017-01-01

    be addressed. Each inspirational design pattern offers strategies to make social interaction more likely through enabling, encouraging or excusing people to move closer together. The patterns are "Feel For Fun", "Conjoining Self Images", "Eye To Eye", and "Nudge People Together". Articulating possible...... approaches for increasing conviviality may broaden the repertoire of developers concerned with social settings and collaboration....

  4. Move Closer: Towards Design Patterns To Support Initiating Social Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Robb; Boer, Laurens

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers four inspirational design patterns concerned with reducing inhibitions for unacquainted co-located people to interact. These patterns identify impediments to interpersonal contact in relation to the distances between people and present diverse examples of how these challenges may...... be addressed. Each inspirational design pattern offers strategies to make social interaction more likely through enabling, encouraging or excusing people to move closer together. The patterns are "Feel For Fun", "Conjoining Self Images", "Eye To Eye", and "Nudge People Together". Articulating possible...

  5. Nuclear plant owners move closer to life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A major debate is now underway about the safety of 40-year-old nuclear power plants. Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 a nuclear power plant's license is limited to a maximum of 40 years. Although the act permits the renewal of an operating license, it does not outline any standards or procedures for determining when or under what conditions a plant's operating license should be renewed. This paper reports that the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-sponsors of a program to demonstrate the license renewal process for two nuclear power plants - Yankee Atomic Electric's 175-MW Yankee PWR plant and Northern States Power's 536-MW Monticello BWR plant. The demonstration is known as the lead plant project. Yankee Atomic has already analyzed the plant's condition and evaluated aging using computer-based expert systems and the plant's operating experience. During these tests Yankee Atomic found embrittlement of the reactor vessel

  6. European Science Research Organisations forge closer ties

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Effective collaboration has always been one of the foundations of CERN's success. An essential ingredient for collaboration is communication and a new body EIROFORUM has just held its first meeting in Brussels with the aim of developing greater cross fertilization of ideas and projects. Seven organisations, CERN, EMBL (molecular biology), ESA (space activities), ESO (astronomy and astrophysics), ESRF (synchrotron radiation), ILL (neutron source) and EFDA (fusion) are currently members of EIROFORUM. Common interest between the organisations in computational grid development, materials science, instrumentation, public outreach and technology transfer has made EIROFRUM an essential group for maximising these European research organisations' resources. Increasing involvement in the Sixth Framework Programme, Europe's research guidelines for the next four years, is also one of the goals of the group. CERN takes over the chair of EIROFORUM in July 2001 and the next meeting will be held on site on 24 October .

  7. Moving forward together, stronger, and closer: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of marital benefits in infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvé, Marie-Soleil; Péloquin, Katherine; Brassard, Audrey

    2018-03-01

    Some couples find in infertility the bonding opportunities that reinforce their relationship. Using an interpretative phenomenological analysis, this study examined marital benefits in three couples seeking fertility treatment. Interviews revealed five types of benefits: being engaged in a shared hardship, feeling closer to one another, feeling reassured in the relationship, developing a satisfying communication and support behaviors, and having faith in the couple's capacity to face adversity. A dyadic analysis also illustrated how marital benefits developed in each couple. Marital benefits nourished marital satisfaction, thus underscoring their importance to help couples cope through fertility treatment.

  8. Moving Closer to EarthScope: A Major New Initiative for the Earth Sciences*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D.; Blewitt, G.; Ekstrom, G.; Henyey, T.; Hickman, S.; Prescott, W.; Zoback, M.

    2002-12-01

    science community. A broad sector of the university research community has joined with federal agencies to stimulate the development of facility plans and move EarthScope forward as a coordinated national initiative. With strong prospects for funding next year, the time is right for bold new ideas on how to maximize the use of these powerful new resources in the Earth scientist's toolkit. * On behalf of the EarthScope Working Group

  9. G protein-coupled receptor modulation with pepducins: moving closer to the clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimond, Patricia; Carlson, Kenneth; Bouvier, Michel

    2011-01-01

    At the 2nd Pepducin Science Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 4–5, 2010, investigators working in G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) research convened to discuss progress since last year's inaugural conference. This year's symposium focused on increasing knowledge of the stru...

  10. Looking back and moving forward: A closer look at the Dutch gender quota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Galle

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch Civil Code stipulates that, for balanced gender representation, 30% of seats on the boards of large corporations should be occupied by women. If a company does not meet this requirement, the company is compelled to be transparent in its annual report by means of the ‘comply or explain’ principle. This article analyses the application of this rule through content analysis of the annual reports of 52 listed companies in 2012 and 49 in 2013. The article discusses whether this rule has the desired effect of creating transparency on the gender quota. The conclusion is that ‘the comply or explain’ mechanism is inadequate without further measures, including sanctions. For 2012, 21% of the companies researched made no mention in their annual report of the application of the gender quota. In 2013, 18% of the companies made no mention of it. The companies that did indicate that they did not meet the quota failed to provide the required transparency. The reasons cited for not meeting the quota are nothing more than clichéd phrases, lacking any specificity. If the Netherlands wants to achieve the European and Dutch targets with the aid of the ’comply or explain’ mechanism, the government will have to introduce additional mechanisms, including sanctions - or, alternatively, steer an entirely different course.

  11. NREL Research Pushes Perovskites Closer to Market | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    even get close-to the above-20% efficiencies dominated by silicon solar panels. NREL researcher Kai Zhu ; Perovskites have a couple of major benefits over silicon solar panels. The silicon technology requires a high as excellent semiconductors. This means perovskite panels are more flexible than rigid silicon panels

  12. Moving forward research agendas on international NGOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opoku-Mensah, Paul Yaw; Lewis, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper sates out an argument for moving forwrd research on non-governmental organisations (NGOs)within development studies. The body of research on NGOs that emerged from the late 1980s onwards focused primarily on NGO roles as development actors and their organisational attributes, but pais ...... less attention to theory and context. While such research had many positive strenghts, it was also criticised for its normative focus, and for its vulnerability to changing development fashions and donor preoccupations. Today, attitudes to NGOs have grown more complex and ambiguous......, and the institutional landscape in which NGOs are embedded is undergoing rapid change. A new wave of NGO-related reserach is underway which gives particular emphasis to theory, agency, method and context. Such approaches have the potential to consolidate the field of NGO research within development studies as a more...

  13. Moving research beyond the spanking debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Harriet L; Mikton, Christopher R

    2017-09-01

    Despite numerous studies identifying a broad range of harms associated with the use of spanking and other types of physical punishment, debate continues about its use as a form of discipline. In this commentary, we recommend four strategies to move the field forward and beyond the spanking debate including: 1) use of methodological approaches that allow for stronger causal inference; 2) consideration of human rights issues; 3) a focus on understanding the causes of spanking and reasons for its decline in certain countries; and 4) more emphasis on evidence-based approaches to changing social norms to reject spanking as a form of discipline. Physical punishment needs to be recognized as an important public health problem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Moving Forward in Inclusive Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten, Ozlem; Savage, Robert Samuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to address conceptual and methodological challenges of doing research in the field of inclusive education and revisit school effectiveness research literature to inform future research. First, we present the rationale for inclusive education and briefly review the evolution of special needs education. Then, we discuss limitations…

  15. Research team training: moving beyond job descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, LaRon E; Morrison-Beedy, Dianne

    2008-08-01

    Providing appropriate training to research team members is essential to the effective implementation and overall operation of a research project. It is important to identify job requirements beyond those listed in the job description in order to fully assess basic and supplementary training needs. Training needs should be identified prior to and during the conduct of the study. Methods for delivering the training must also be identified. This article describes the identification of training needs and methods in the design of a research team training program using examples from an HIV prevention intervention trial with adolescent girls.

  16. Patient Outcomes as Transformative Mechanisms to Bring Health Information Technology Industry and Research Informatics Closer Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krive, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fast pace of recent innovation within the health information technology and research informatics domains, there remains a large gap between research and academia, while interest in translating research innovations into implementations in the patient care settings is lacking. This is due to absence of common outcomes and performance measurement targets, with health information technology industry employing financial and operational measures and academia focusing on patient outcome concerns. The paper introduces methodology for and roadmap to introduction of common objectives as a way to encourage better collaboration between industry and academia using patient outcomes as a composite measure of demonstrated success from health information systems investments. Along the way, the concept of economics of health informatics, or "infonomics," is introduced to define a new way of mapping future technology investments in accordance with projected clinical impact.

  17. New technology allows closer study of neutrinos; researchers credit specialized telescope

    CERN Multimedia

    Huang, N

    2002-01-01

    With the help of a newly designed telescope, University of California-Berkeley scientists and an international team of researchers have made a recent breakthrough in the study of neutrino emissions from the sun. The turning point is the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in Canada. This telescope is the first of its kind to be sensitive enough to detect all types of neutrinos (1 page).

  18. Moving Beyond a Deficit Perspective with Qualitative Research Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzul, Margaret; Evans, Judith F.; King, Rita; Tellier-Robinson, Dora

    2001-01-01

    Four researchers argue the merits of qualitative methodology and its particular relevance to those in special education who seek to move beyond a deficit perspective. Unconstrained by defined variables and decontextualized settings, qualitative methods allowed the researchers to extend the scope of their studies beyond originally stated research…

  19. EURATOM research and training programme: towards a new way of developing-teaching science, closer to the end-users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Goethem, G.

    2015-01-01

    important is public information and engagement in energy policy issues, notably in connection with nuclear decision making. In fact, a new way of 'developing - teaching science' is emerging in the EU, closer to the needs of the end-users, i.e.: society and industry. As a result, a strong scientific foundation is being established to support decision making in regulatory and/or industrial organisations, based on confirmed facts and research findings stemming from 'Best Available Science'. The article is followed by the slides of the presentation

  20. Cultural "Insiders" and the Issue of Positionality in Qualitative Migration Research: Moving "Across" and Moving "Along" Researcher-Participant Divides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deianira Ganga

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Positionality has, to-date, been conceptualised by social scientists as a central component in the process of qualitative (and to an extent quantitative data collection. This paper intends to build upon this conceptualisation by reflecting upon the influence that class and generation can have on qualitative migration research. Specifically, the authors argue that being insiders in the social interview is much more complex and multi-faceted than usually recognised. They also claim that, to a large extent, interviewing within one's own "cultural" community—as an insider—affords the researcher a degree of social proximity that, paradoxically, increases awareness amongst both researcher and participant of the social divisions that exist between them. The authors will use the case of an Italian researcher interviewing Italian migrants in Nottingham (UK and a British researcher interviewing British migrants in Paris (France to illustrate this. In doing so they will first highlight the way in which researchers may "move-up" socio-economically when interviewing, but will also stress that whilst such movement is possible—through strategies of constructing rapport—a certain power imbalance is inevitable. Second, the authors will highlight, through reference to notions of the adopted insider and impartial observer, the way in which interviewers can (at least partially "move across" generational divides within the migrant community. This methodological reflection is designed to aid and improve future research conducted from "inside" the migrant community. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs060379

  1. Making the Move: A Mixed Research Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gilbert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this mixed research integrative review is to determine factors that influence relocation transitions for older adults who are considering a move from independent living to supervised housing, such as assisted living, using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a conceptual guide. PubMED, CINAHL, and PsychInfo databases were queried using key words: relocation, transition, older adults, and, elderly and time limited from 1992 to 2014. Sixteen articles were retained for review. The majority of articles, qualitative in design, reveal that older adults who comprehend the need to move and participate in the decision-making process of a relocation adjust to new living environments with fewer negative outcomes than older adults who experience a forced relocation. The few quantitative articles examined the elements of impending relocation using a variety of instruments but support the necessity for older adults to recognize the possibility of a future move and contribute to the relocation process. Additionally, the influence of family, friends, and health care providers provides the older adult with support and guidance throughout the process.

  2. Novartis School Lab: bringing young people closer to the world of research and discovering the excitement of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Christiane Röckl; Standke, Gesche; Naef, Reto

    2012-01-01

    The Novartis School Lab (http://www.novartis.ch/schullabor) is an institution with an old tradition. The School Lab reaches about 5000 students through internal courses and an additional 5000 children at public science events where they can enjoy hands-on science in disciplines of biomedical research. The subjects range from chemistry, physics, molecular biology and genetics to toxicology and medical topics. The Novartis School Lab offers a variety of activities for youngsters aged 10-20 ranging from lab courses for school classes, continuing education for teachers and development of teaching kits, support for individual research projects to outreach for public science events. Innovation and adaptation to changes of current needs are essential aspects for the Novartis School Lab. Ongoing activities to shape the Novartis Biomedical Learning Lab include design of new teaching experiments, exploration into additional disciplines of biomedical science and the creation of a fascinating School Lab of the future.

  3. At the Crossroads of Clinical and Preclinical Research for Muscular Dystrophy-Are We Closer to Effective Treatment for Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Kinga I

    2018-05-16

    Among diseases affecting skeletal muscle, muscular dystrophy is one of the most devastating and complex disorders. The term 'muscular dystrophy' refers to a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases associated with a primary muscle defect that leads to progressive muscle wasting and consequent loss of muscle function. Muscular dystrophies are accompanied by numerous clinical complications and abnormalities in other tissues that cause extreme discomfort in everyday life. The fact that muscular dystrophy often takes its toll on babies and small children, and that many patients die at a young age, adds to the cruel character of the disease. Clinicians all over the world are facing the same problem: they have no therapy to offer except for symptom-relieving interventions. Patients, their families, but also clinicians, are in urgent need of an effective cure. Despite advances in genetics, increased understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying muscle disease, despite a sweeping range of successful preclinical strategies and relative progress of their implementation in the clinic, therapy for patients is currently out of reach. Only a greater comprehension of disease mechanisms, new preclinical studies, development of novel technologies, and tight collaboration between scientists and physicians can help improve clinical treatment. Fortunately, inventiveness in research is rapidly extending the limits and setting new standards for treatment design. This review provides a synopsis of muscular dystrophy and considers the steps of preclinical and clinical research that are taking the muscular dystrophy community towards the fundamental goal of combating the traumatic disease.

  4. Research on moving object detection based on frog's eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongwei; Li, Dongguang; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of object's information processing mechanism with frog's eyes, this paper discussed a bionic detection technology which suitable for object's information processing based on frog's vision. First, the bionics detection theory by imitating frog vision is established, it is an parallel processing mechanism which including pick-up and pretreatment of object's information, parallel separating of digital image, parallel processing, and information synthesis. The computer vision detection system is described to detect moving objects which has special color, special shape, the experiment indicates that it can scheme out the detecting result in the certain interfered background can be detected. A moving objects detection electro-model by imitating biologic vision based on frog's eyes is established, the video simulative signal is digital firstly in this system, then the digital signal is parallel separated by FPGA. IN the parallel processing, the video information can be caught, processed and displayed in the same time, the information fusion is taken by DSP HPI ports, in order to transmit the data which processed by DSP. This system can watch the bigger visual field and get higher image resolution than ordinary monitor systems. In summary, simulative experiments for edge detection of moving object with canny algorithm based on this system indicate that this system can detect the edge of moving objects in real time, the feasibility of bionic model was fully demonstrated in the engineering system, and it laid a solid foundation for the future study of detection technology by imitating biologic vision.

  5. Research on moving target defense based on SDN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingyong; Wu, Weimin

    2017-08-01

    An address mutation strategy was proposed. This strategy provided an unpredictable change in address, replacing the real address of the packet forwarding process and path mutation, thus hiding the real address of the host and path. a mobile object defense technology based on Spatio-temporal Mutation on this basis is proposed, Using the software Defined Network centralized control architecture advantage combines sFlow traffic monitoring technology and Moving Target Defense. A mutated time period which can be changed in real time according to the network traffic is changed, and the destination address is changed while the controller abruptly changes the address while the data packet is transferred between the switches to construct a moving target, confusing the host within the network, thereby protecting the host and network.

  6. Faith Moves Mountains-Mountains Move Faith: Two Opposite Epidemiological Forces in Research on Religion and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidt, N C; Hvidtjørn, D; Christensen, K; Nielsen, J B; Søndergaard, J

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests opposite epidemiological forces in religion and health: (1). Faith seems to move mountains in the sense that religion is associated with positive health outcomes. (2). Mountains of bad health seem to move faith. We reflected on these forces in a population of 3000 young Danish twins in which all religiosity measures were associated with severe disease. We believe the reason for this novel finding is that the sample presents as a particularly secular population-based study and that the second epidemiological force has gained the upper hand in this sample. We suggest that all cross-sectional research on religion and health should be interpreted in light of such opposite epidemiological forces potentially diluting each other.

  7. DMPD: Fifty years of interferon research: aiming at a moving target. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mmunity. 2006 Sep;25(3):343-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Fifty years of interferon research: aiming at a moving target. Pubm...edID 16979566 Title Fifty years of interferon research: aiming at a moving target.

  8. Moving research into practice: lessons from the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's IDSRN program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Erin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ Integrated Delivery Systems Research Network (IDSRN program was established to foster public-private collaboration between health services researchers and health care delivery systems. Its broad goal was to link researchers and delivery systems to encourage implementation of research into practice. We evaluated the program to address two primary questions: 1 How successful was IDSRN in generating research findings that could be applied in practice? and 2 What factors facilitate or impede such success? Methods We conducted in-person and telephone interviews with AHRQ staff and nine IDSRN partner organizations and their collaborators, reviewed program documents, analyzed projects funded through the program, and developed case studies of four IDSRN projects judged promising in supporting research implementation. Results Participants reported that the IDSRN structure was valuable in creating closer ties between researchers and participating health systems. Of the 50 completed projects studied, 30 had an operational effect or use. Some kinds of projects were more successful than others in influencing operations. If certain conditions were met, a variety of partnership models successfully supported implementation. An internal champion was necessary for partnerships involving researchers based outside the delivery system. Case studies identified several factors important to success: responsiveness of project work to delivery system needs, ongoing funding to support multiple project phases, and development of applied products or tools that helped users see their operational relevance. Factors limiting success included limited project funding, competing demands on potential research users, and failure to reach the appropriate audience. Conclusion Forging stronger partnerships between researchers and delivery systems has the potential to make research more relevant to users

  9. The Research Imagination in a World on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenway, Jane; Fahey, Johannah

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the shifting terrain of mobile researchers beginning with an overview of research and research policy on "brain mobility", and then discussing what we call their optical illusions/delusions. Subsequently, our main purpose is to elaborate on a line of inquiry that offers richer notions of researcher mobility, connectivity and…

  10. Moving forward in a role as a researcher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Larsen, Kristian; Bjerregaard, Lene

    2003-01-01

    in several variables between the two groups. Eighty-nine per cent of the study group members were active in planning their own research projects compared with 35.7% in the reference group. The study group also showed a higher level of interest and commitment to research results of others and read English......The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 1-year research course in basic research methodology, designed for clinical nurses, had a positive effect on the nurses' own research activity and their commitment to research in general. The research method applied was use of semistructured...

  11. Research in Technology Education: Looking Back to Move Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. John

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the focus of the research that has recently taken place in Technology Education, and from that basis suggest a trajectory for future research trends. Some research that is considered particularly seminal to the profession is summarised, and the paper is concluded with some reflections about personal research…

  12. Comparison of Design Research on Manufacturing Firms Moving Towards Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, Detlef; Sakao, Tomohiko; Sandström, Gunilla Ölundh

    2007-01-01

    Corresponding to a steadily advancing integration of roducts and service operations in the manufacturing industry, a number of research groups within the design community are working with issues of integrated product and service development. Although closely related, the evolving groups focus...... on different research dimensions, and thus the terminologies and concepts used in research contributions are not fully compatible. This research attempts to promote and support an evolving collaboration between the different research groups within the design community, by analysing and comparing the key...... contribution areas of three of the existing groups, namely the groups of Integrated Product and Service Engineering, Service/Product Engineering and Product/Service-System development. A review of the groups’ research contributions is carried out and the main characteristics’ of their research is compared...

  13. Moving Beyond the Systems Approach in SCM and Logistics Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Fredrik; Gammelgaard, Britta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a paradigmatic reflection on theoretical approaches recently identified in logistics and supply chain management (SCM); namely complex adaptive systems and complexity thinking, and to compare it to the dominant approach in logistics and SCM research...... for research results. This paper provides both a framework for and an analysis of such reflection which contributes to the further development of SCM and logistics research. Future research is needed to empirically provide insights on how complexity approaches can advance the area of SCM and logistics......, namely the systems approach. By analyzing the basic assumptions of the three approaches, SCM and logistics researchers are guided in their choice of research approaches which increases their awareness of the consequences different approaches have on theory and practice. Design...

  14. Moving from Damage-Centered Research through Unsettling Reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    The author revisits autoethnographic work in order to examine how she unwittingly incorporated damage-centered (Tuck 2009) research approaches that reproduce settler colonial understandings of marginalized communities. The paper examines the reproduction of settler colonial knowledge in ethnographic research by unearthing the inherent surveillance…

  15. Editorial: Moving forward with mobile positioning data in academic research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Acker, V.; Neutens, T.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of the European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research (EJTIR) comprises three papers addressing some key issues in transport geographical research that use location tracking data. Preliminary versions of those papers were presented at the Mobile Ghent 2013 Conference.

  16. Mapping Government Social Media Research and Moving it Forward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medaglia, Rony; Zheng, Lei

    2017-01-01

    ), and the public administration (PA) research fields, we mapped government social media research into the six focus categories of context, user characteristics, user behavior, platform properties, management, and effects. Findings show that 1) research focuses on government, rather than on users; 2) studies......The growing phenomenon of government social media requires better informed and more complex studies, but all beginning with a clearer understanding of the current research. Drawing on a comprehensive review of government social media literature in the e-government, the Information Systems (IS...... focusing on context, management, and users mostly focus on quantitative aspects; 3) the properties of social media platforms are under-investigated; and 4) research on the relationship between constructs of the government social media phenomenon is under-investigated. Based on our analysis, we propose...

  17. Investigating Move Structure of English Applied Linguistics Research Article Discussions Published in International and Thai Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amnuai, Wirada; Wannaruk, Anchalee

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the rhetorical move structure of English applied linguistic research article Discussions published in Thai and international journals. Two corpora comprising of 30 Thai Discussions and 30 international Discussions were analyzed using Yang & Allison's (2003) move model. Based on the analysis, both similarities and…

  18. Moving Beyond the Systems Approach in SCM and Logistics Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Fredrik; Gammelgaard, Britta

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a paradigmatic reflection on theoretical approaches recently identified in logistics and supply chain management (SCM); namely complex adaptive systems and complexity thinking, and to compare it to the dominant approach in logistics and SCM research......, namely the systems approach. By analyzing the basic assumptions of the three approaches, SCM and logistics researchers are guided in their choice of research approaches which increases their awareness of the consequences different approaches have on theory and practice. Design...... to the dominant approach in SCM and logistics research, the systems approach, it is concluded that the underlying assumptions of complex adaptive systems and complexity thinking are more appropriate than systems approach for contemporary challenges of organizational complexity in SCM and logistics. It is found...

  19. As our earliest supported research projects move toward completion ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CCAA

    and evaluation of farmer field schools” for southern and central ... CCAA research and capacity building projects, including papers, book chapters, newsletters, bulletins and theses .... climatique et à l'action de l'homme : mémoire de master de.

  20. Advances in thermoelectric materials research: Looking back and moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Tritt, Terry M

    2017-09-29

    High-performance thermoelectric materials lie at the heart of thermoelectrics, the simplest technology applicable to direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion. In its recent 60-year history, the field of thermoelectric materials research has stalled several times, but each time it was rejuvenated by new paradigms. This article reviews several potentially paradigm-changing mechanisms enabled by defects, size effects, critical phenomena, anharmonicity, and the spin degree of freedom. These mechanisms decouple the otherwise adversely interdependent physical quantities toward higher material performance. We also briefly discuss a number of promising materials, advanced material synthesis and preparation techniques, and new opportunities. The renewable energy landscape will be reshaped if the current trend in thermoelectric materials research is sustained into the foreseeable future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  1. Sports genetics moving forward: lessons learned from medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, C Mikael; Wheeler, Matthew T; Waggott, Daryl; Caleshu, Colleen; Ashley, Euan A

    2016-03-01

    Sports genetics can take advantage of lessons learned from human disease genetics. By righting past mistakes and increasing scientific rigor, we can magnify the breadth and depth of knowledge in the field. We present an outline of challenges facing sports genetics in the light of experiences from medical research. Sports performance is complex, resulting from a combination of a wide variety of different traits and attributes. Improving sports genetics will foremost require analyses based on detailed phenotyping. To find widely valid, reproducible common variants associated with athletic phenotypes, study sample sizes must be dramatically increased. One paradox is that in order to confirm relevance, replications in specific populations must be undertaken. Family studies of athletes may facilitate the discovery of rare variants with large effects on athletic phenotypes. The complexity of the human genome, combined with the complexity of athletic phenotypes, will require additional metadata and biological validation to identify a comprehensive set of genes involved. Analysis of personal genetic and multiomic profiles contribute to our conceptualization of precision medicine; the same will be the case in precision sports science. In the refinement of sports genetics it is essential to evaluate similarities and differences between sexes and among ethnicities. Sports genetics to date have been hampered by small sample sizes and biased methodology, which can lead to erroneous associations and overestimation of effect sizes. Consequently, currently available genetic tests based on these inherently limited data cannot predict athletic performance with any accuracy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Neighborhoods on the move: a community-based participatory research approach to promoting physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suminski, Richard R; Petosa, Rick L; Jones, Larry; Hall, Lisa; Poston, Carlos W

    2009-01-01

    There is a scientific and practical need for high-quality effectiveness studies of physical activity interventions in "real-world" settings. To use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to develop, implement, operate, and evaluate an intervention for promoting physical activity called Neighborhoods on the Move. Two communities with similar physical and social characteristics participated in this study. One community was involved in Neighborhoods on the Move; the other (comparison community) participated only in the assessments. Academic personnel and residents/organizations in the Neighborhoods on the Move community worked together to create a community environment that was more conducive for physical activity. Pre- and posttest data on new initiatives promoting physical activity, existing physical activity initiatives, and business policies supporting physical activity were collected simultaneously in both communities. The success of the CBPR approach was evidenced by several developments, including substantial resident involvement and the formation of a leadership committee, marketing campaign, and numerous community partnerships. The number of businesses with policies promoting physical activity and breadth of existing physical activity initiatives (participants, activities, hours) increased substantially more in the Neighborhoods on the Move community than in the comparison community. A total of sixty new initiatives promoting physical activity were implemented in the Neighborhoods on the Move community during the intervention. The CBPR approach is an effective strategy for inducing environmental changes that promote physical activity. Additional research is needed to assess the portability and sustainability of Neighborhoods on the Move.

  3. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H; Efstathiou, Jason A; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E

    2016-04-27

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety of timely issues: 1) data sharing, privacy and social media; 2) improving patient navigation through therapy; 3) promising developments in immunotherapy; 4) and moving bladder cancer research from bench to bedside. Lastly, early career researchers presented their bladder cancer studies and had opportunities to network with leading experts.

  4. Research on measurement method of optical camouflage effect of moving object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juntang; Xu, Weidong; Qu, Yang; Cui, Guangzhen

    2016-10-01

    Camouflage effectiveness measurement as an important part of the camouflage technology, which testing and measuring the camouflage effect of the target and the performance of the camouflage equipment according to the tactical and technical requirements. The camouflage effectiveness measurement of current optical band is mainly aimed at the static target which could not objectively reflect the dynamic camouflage effect of the moving target. This paper synthetical used technology of dynamic object detection and camouflage effect detection, the digital camouflage of the moving object as the research object, the adaptive background update algorithm of Surendra was improved, a method of optical camouflage effect detection using Lab-color space in the detection of moving-object was presented. The binary image of moving object is extracted by this measurement technology, in the sequence diagram, the characteristic parameters such as the degree of dispersion, eccentricity, complexity and moment invariants are constructed to construct the feature vector space. The Euclidean distance of moving target which through digital camouflage was calculated, the results show that the average Euclidean distance of 375 frames was 189.45, which indicated that the degree of dispersion, eccentricity, complexity and moment invariants of the digital camouflage graphics has a great difference with the moving target which not spray digital camouflage. The measurement results showed that the camouflage effect was good. Meanwhile with the performance evaluation module, the correlation coefficient of the dynamic target image range 0.1275 from 0.0035, and presented some ups and down. Under the dynamic condition, the adaptability of target and background was reflected. In view of the existing infrared camouflage technology, the next step, we want to carry out the camouflage effect measurement technology of the moving target based on infrared band.

  5. Moving Away from Social Work and Half Way Back Again: New Research on Skills in Probation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Peter; Vanstone, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Research on social work in the criminal justice system was well represented in the social work literature until the 1990s. Since then, changes in the organisation, training and research base of probation practice, particularly in England and Wales, have all contributed to a separation between probation research and the mainstream social work research literature. However, recent probation research, by focusing on individual practice skills and on the quality of relationships, is producing findings which resonate with traditional social work concerns. The study presented here, based on analysis of videotaped interviews between probation staff and the people they are supervising, shows what skills are used and the effects of skilled supervision. People supervised by more skilled staff were significantly less likely to be reconvicted over a two-year follow-up, and the most effective supervisors combined good relationship skills with a range of ‘structuring’ or change-promoting skills. In effect, this can be regarded as a test of the impact of social work skills used by probation staff and suggests that a closer relationship between mainstream social work research and probation research could be productive for both. PMID:27559218

  6. Research and design of the moving system for the cobalt-60 industrial irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Minh Tuan; Tran Khac An; Cao Van Chung; Phan Phuoc Thang

    2016-01-01

    On the way of localization of Cobalt-60 industrial irradiators, Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology (VINAGAMMA) has successfully designed and manufactured the first version of Co-60 industrial irradiator, VINAGA1. The second version of Co-60 industrial irradiator has been studied and designed by VINAGAMMA in the frame of the scientific project No. DTCB.02/15/TTNCTK. The nucleus of a Co-60 industrial irradiator is a mechanical system inside an irradiation room namely a tote box moving system. This report presents the tote box moving system designed by VINAGAMMA. The tote box moving system contains 52 tote boxes with the dimensions of 50 cm (w) × 70 cm (l) × 150 cm (h) that are moving around the source racks in the manner of 4 passes and 2 levels. The irradiator with this tote box moving system has good specifications: The minimum time of an irradiation cycle is 1h 20 min and the dose uniformity ratio (DUR) at the product densities of 0.1 g/cm 3 and 0.5 g/cm 3 is 1.4 and 1.8, respectively. Radiation energy utilization efficiency at the product densities of 0.1 g/cm 3 and 0.5 g/cm 3 is 19.7% and 48.8%, respectively. These specifications meet the requirements for a multi-purpose Co-60 industrial irradiator and the present irradiation requirements in Vietnam. (author)

  7. Research and design of the moving system for the cobalt-60 industrial irradiator VINAGA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Minh Tuan; Tran Khac An; Nguyen Ngoc Phuong; Tran Van Hung; Cao Van Chung; Phan Phuoc Thang; Ha Thanh Viet; Nguyen Thanh Cuong; Nguyen Duc Hoa

    2017-01-01

    On the way of localization of Cobalt-60 industrial irradiators, Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology (VINAGAMMA) has successfully designed and manufactured the first version of Co-60 industrial irradiator, VINAGA1. The second version of Co-60 industrial irradiator has been studied and designed by VINAGAMMA in the frame of the scientific project No. DTCB.02/15/TTNCTK. The main system of a Co-60 industrial irradiator is a mechanical system inside an irradiation room namely a tote box moving system. This report presents the tote box moving system of VINAGA2 designed by VINAGAMMA. The tote box moving system contains 52 tote boxes with the dimensions of 50 cm (w) × 70 cm (l) × 150 cm (h) that are moving around the source racks in the manner of 4 passes and 2 levels. The irradiator VINAGA2 with this tote box moving system has good specifications: The minimum time of an irradiation cycle is 1 h 20 min. and the dose uniformity ratio (DUR) at the product densities of 0.1 g/cm 3 and 0.5 g/cm 3 is 1.4 and 1.8, respectively. Radiation energy utilization efficiency at the product densities of 0.1 g/cm 3 and 0.5 g/cm 3 is 19.7% and 48.8%, respectively. These specifications meet the requirements for a multi-purpose Co-60 industrial irradiator and the present irradiation requirements in Vietnam. (author)

  8. Meteorological Research Institute multivariate ocean variational estimation (MOVE) system: Some early results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Norihisa; Ishizaki, Shiro; Fujii, Yosuke; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Tamaki; Kamachi, Masafumi

    The Meteorological Research Institute multivariate ocean variational estimation (MOVE) System has been developed as the next-generation ocean data assimilation system in Japan Meteorological Agency. A multivariate three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme with vertical coupled temperature salinity empirical orthogonal function modes is adopted. The MOVE system has two varieties, the global (MOVE-G) and North Pacific (MOVE-NP) systems. The equatorial Pacific and western North Pacific are analyzed with assimilation experiments using MOVE-G and -NP, respectively. In each system, the salinity and velocity fields are well reproduced, even in cases without salinity data. Changes in surface and subsurface zonal currents during the 1997/98 El Niño event are captured well, and their transports are reasonably consistent with in situ observations. For example, the eastward transport in the upper layer around the equator has 70 Sv in spring 1997 and weakens in spring 1998. With MOVE-NP, the Kuroshio transport has 25 Sv in the East China Sea, and 40 Sv crossing the ASUKA (Affiliated Surveys of the Kuroshio off Cape Ashizuri) line south of Japan. The variations in the Kuroshio transports crossing the ASUKA line agree well with observations. The Ryukyu Current System has a transport ranging from 6 Sv east of Taiwan to 17 Sv east of Amami. The Oyashio transport crossing the OICE (Oyashio Intensive observation line off Cape Erimo) line south of Hokkaido has 14 Sv southwestward (near shore) and 11 Sv northeastward (offshore). In the Kuroshio Oyashio transition area east of Japan, the eastward transport has 41 Sv (32 36°N) and 12 Sv (36 39°N) crossing the 145°E line.

  9. Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health: Moving the Field Forward (Executive Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Walter R.; Bean, Jonathan F.; Damiano, Diane; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jette, Alan; Jung, Ranu; Lieber, Rick L.; Malec, James F.; Mueller, Michael J.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Tansey, Keith E.; Thompson, Aiko

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Currently, 17 institutes and centers at NIH invest more than $500 million per year in rehabilitation research. Recently, the director of NIH, Francis Collins, appointed a Blue Ribbon Panel to evaluate the status of rehabilitation research across institutes and centers. As a follow-up to the work of that panel, NIH recently organized a conference, “Rehabilitation Research at NIH: Moving the Field Forward.” This report is a summary of the discussions and proposals that will help guide rehabilitation research at NIH in the near future. PMID:28422639

  10. Particulate Matter: a closer look

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsman E; Beck JP; Bree L van; Cassee FR; Koelemeijer RBA; Matthijsen J; Thomas R; Wieringa K; LED; MGO

    2005-01-01

    The summary in booklet form 'Fijn stof nader bekeken' (Particulate Matter: a closer look) , published in Dutch by the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (MNP) and the Environment and Safety Division of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), has been designed to

  11. Agreement Moves Nevada Solar Plant Step Closer to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secretary Christine Ervin, CSTRR President Rose McKinney-James and NREL Director Dr. Charles Gay today new partnership, NREL will make available its facilities to test renewable energy technologies, help other renewable technologies. NREL will support the efforts of DOE's Federal Energy Management Program

  12. A Comparison of Rhetorical Move Structure of Applied Linguistics Research Articles Published in International and National Thai Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannaruk, Anchalee; Amnuai, Wirada

    2016-01-01

    The rhetorical organization of research articles has attracted extensive attention in genre study, and the focus of move-based analysis is on the textual function. The primary aim of the present study was the comparison of the rhetorical moves of English research articles in the field of Applied Linguistics written by Thai first authors and…

  13. Knowledge Translation Research: The Science of Moving Research into Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet A.; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Hayden, Jill A.; Campbell, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Research findings will not change health outcomes unless health care organizations, systems, and professionals adopt them in practice. Knowledge translation research is the scientific study of the methods to promote the uptake of research findings by patients, health care providers, managers, and policy makers. Many forms of enquiry addressing…

  14. MOVES sensitivity analysis update : Transportation Research Board Summer Meeting 2012 : ADC-20 Air Quality Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    OVERVIEW OF PRESENTATION : Evaluation Parameters : EPAs Sensitivity Analysis : Comparison to Baseline Case : MOVES Sensitivity Run Specification : MOVES Sensitivity Input Parameters : Results : Uses of Study

  15. Research Article Abstracts in Two Subdisciplines of Business--Move Structure and Hedging between Management and Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Pramoolsook, Issra

    2015-01-01

    The importance of RA abstracts lies in their influence on the readers' decision about whether the accompanying article is worth reading. A number of studies have investigated the move structure of abstracts and have generated several influential models. However, little research has been conducted on subdisciplinary variations in move structure of…

  16. Rehabilitation research at the National Institutes of Health moving the field forward (executive summary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Walter R; Bean, Jonathan F; Damiano, Diane; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jette, Alan; Jung, Ranu; Lieber, Rick L; Malec, James F; Mueller, Michael J; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Tansey, Keith E; Thompson, Aiko

    2017-08-01

    Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Currently, 17 institutes and centers at NIH invest more than $500 million per year in rehabilitation research. Recently, the director of NIH, Francis Collins, appointed a Blue Ribbon Panel to evaluate the status of rehabilitation research across institutes and centers. As a follow-up to the work of that panel, NIH recently organized a conference, "Rehabilitation Research at NIH: Moving the Field Forward." This report is a summary of the discussions and proposals that will help guide rehabilitation research at NIH in the near future. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health: Moving the Field Forward (Executive Summary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Walter R; Bean, Jonathan F; Damiano, Diane; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jette, Alan; Jung, Ranu; Lieber, Rick L; Malec, James F; Mueller, Michael J; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Tansey, Keith E; Thompson, Aiko

    Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Currently, 17 institutes and centers at NIH invest more than $500 million per year in rehabilitation research. Recently, the director of NIH, Francis Collins, appointed a Blue Ribbon Panel to evaluate the status of rehabilitation research across institutes and centers. As a follow-up to the work of that panel, NIH recently organized a conference, "Rehabilitation Research at NIH: Moving the Field Forward." This report is a summary of the discussions and proposals that will help guide rehabilitation research at NIH in the near future. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  18. Brazil and CERN get closer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The map of countries affiliated to CERN may in future include Brazil. On a visit to CERN last week, the Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology, Ronaldo Mota Sardenberg, expressed his country's interest in closer links to the Laboratory.   Luciano Maiani and the Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology Ronaldo Mota Sardenberg shake hands on CERN-Brazil co-operation. During his visit, the Minister and CERN Director General Luciano Maiani issued a joint statement for the continuation of a Co-operation Agreement first established in 1990. They also agreed to study the possibility of Brazil joining CERN-led Grid computing infrastructure projects. Brazilian physicists are already involved in the LHCb, ATLAS and CMS experiments. At the conclusion of the Minister's visit, he and Director-General Maiani agreed to establish a Working Group to examine ways of strengthening Brazil's links with CERN, and to prepare the way for a Brazilian request to CERN Council to become an Observer at th...

  19. Moving into the 21st century - The United States' Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David G.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Saris, Elizabeth C.; Reilly, Jill E.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1996, when the United States Department of Energy and the Department of State jointly adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, twelve shipments totaling 2,985 MTR and TRIGA spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research reactors around the world have been accepted into the United States. These shipments have contained approximately 1.7 metric tons of HEU and 0.6 metric tons of LEU. Foreign research reactor operators played a significant role in this success. A new milestone in the acceptance program occurred during the summer of 1999 with the arrival of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from Europe through the Charleston Naval Weapons Station via the Savannah River Site to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This shipment consisted of five casks of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from research reactors in Germany, Italy, Slovenia, and Romania. These casks were transported by truck approximately 2,400 miles across the United States (one cask packaged in an ISO container per truck). Drawing upon lessons learned in previous shipments, significant technical, legal, and political challenges were addressed to complete this cross-country shipment. Other program activities since the last RERTR meeting have included: formulation of a methodology to determine the quantity of spent nuclear fuel in a damaged condition that may be transported in a particular cask (containment analysis for transportation casks); publication of clarification of the fee policy; and continued planning for the outyears of the acceptance policy including review of reactors and eligible material quantities. The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program continues to demonstrate success due to the continuing commitment between the United States and the research reactor community to make this program work. We strongly encourage all eligible research reactors to decide as soon as possible to

  20. Knowledge Translation Tools are Emerging to Move Neck Pain Research into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Joy C; Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita R

    2013-01-01

    Development or synthesis of the best clinical research is in itself insufficient to change practice. Knowledge translation (KT) is an emerging field focused on moving knowledge into practice, which is a non-linear, dynamic process that involves knowledge synthesis, transfer, adoption, implementation, and sustained use. Successful implementation requires using KT strategies based on theory, evidence, and best practice, including tools and processes that engage knowledge developers and knowledge users. Tools can provide instrumental help in implementing evidence. A variety of theoretical frameworks underlie KT and provide guidance on how tools should be developed or implemented. A taxonomy that outlines different purposes for engaging in KT and target audiences can also be useful in developing or implementing tools. Theoretical frameworks that underlie KT typically take different perspectives on KT with differential focus on the characteristics of the knowledge, knowledge users, context/environment, or the cognitive and social processes that are involved in change. Knowledge users include consumers, clinicians, and policymakers. A variety of KT tools have supporting evidence, including: clinical practice guidelines, patient decision aids, and evidence summaries or toolkits. Exemplars are provided of two KT tools to implement best practice in management of neck pain-a clinician implementation guide (toolkit) and a patient decision aid. KT frameworks, taxonomies, clinical expertise, and evidence must be integrated to develop clinical tools that implement best evidence in the management of neck pain.

  1. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity: Moving from research to regulatory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, Bas; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    2017-06-01

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for Identifying Acute Systemic Toxicity: Moving from Research to Regulatory Testing, reviewed the state-of-the-science of non-animal alternatives for this testing and explored ways to facilitate implementation of alternatives. Workshop attendees included representatives from international regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Resources identified as necessary for meaningful progress in implementing alternatives included compiling and making available high-quality reference data, training on use and interpretation of in vitro and in silico approaches, and global harmonization of testing requirements. Attendees particularly noted the need to characterize variability in reference data to evaluate new approaches. They also noted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of acute toxicity, which could be facilitated by the development of adverse outcome pathways. Workshop breakout groups explored different approaches to reducing or replacing animal use for acute toxicity testing, with each group crafting a roadmap and strategy to accomplish near-term progress. The workshop steering committee has organized efforts to implement the recommendations of the workshop participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An elementary research on wireless transmission of holographic 3D moving pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kunihiko; Sato, Koki; Endo, Takaya; Asano, Hiroaki; Fukuzawa, Atsuo; Asai, Kikuo

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, a transmitting process of a sequence of holograms describing 3D moving objects over the communicating wireless-network system is presented. A sequence of holograms involves holograms is transformed into a bit stream data, and then it is transmitted over the wireless LAN and Bluetooth. It is shown that applying this technique, holographic data of 3D moving object is transmitted in high quality and a relatively good reconstruction of holographic images is performed.

  3. Bringing fusion electric power closer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kintner, E.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the controlled fusion research program is given. The tokamak research program is described. Beam injection heating, control systems, and the safety of fusion reactors are topics that are also discussed

  4. Research on Motivation in Collaborative Learning: Moving beyond the Cognitive-Situative Divide and Combining Individual and Social Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvela, Sanna; Volet, Simone; Jarvenoja, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose that in order to advance our understanding of motivation in collaborative learning we should move beyond the cognitive-situative epistemological divide and combine individual and social processes. Our claim is that although recent research has recognized the importance of social aspects in emerging and sustained…

  5. The utilization of research-based information: Moving beyond communicating assessments of (climate) impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulwarty, R.; Cohen, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    , identify similarities and differences in communicating short term climate forecasts and climate change scenarios, and identify guidelines for overcoming barriers to collaboration between researchers and decision-makers. We argue that moving beyond more broad-based assessments requires approaches that are not only problem-focused and contextual, but must that are also action-oriented AND reflectively interactive among participants about their roles and requirements in various public and private institutions.

  6. Anticipatory Cyber Security Research: An Ultimate Technique for the First-Move Advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat S.Rawal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Across all industry segments, 96 percent of systems could be breached on average. In the game of cyber security, every moment a new player (attacker is entering the game with new skill sets. An attacker only needs to be effective once while defenders of cyberspace have to be successful all of the time. There will be a first-mover advantage in such a chasing game, which means that the first move often wins. In this paper, in order to face the security challenges brought in by attacker’s first move advantage, we analyzed the past ten years of cyber-attacks, studied the immediate attack’s pattern and offer the tools to predict the next move of the cyber attacker.

  7. Key Issues in Essential Tremor Genetics Research: Where Are We Now and How Can We Move Forward?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia M. Testa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetics research is an avenue towards understanding essential tremor (ET. Advances have been made in genetic linkage and association: there are three reported ET susceptibility loci, and mixed but growing data on risk associations. However, causal mutations have not been forthcoming. This disappointing lack of progress has opened productive discussions on challenges in ET genetics research, including fundamental assumptions in the field. This article reviews the ET genetics literature, results to date, the open questions in ET genetics and the current challenges in addressing them. Several inherent ET features complicate genetic linkage and association studies: high potential phenocopy rates, inaccurate tremor self-reporting, and ET misdiagnoses are examples. Increasing use of direct exam data for subjects, family members and controls is one current response. Smaller moves towards expanding ET phenotype research concepts into non-tremor features, clinically disputed ET subsets, and testing phenotype features instead of clinical diagnosis against genetic data are gradually occurring. The field has already moved to considering complex trait mechanisms requiring detection of combinations of rare genetic variants. Hypotheses may move further to consider novel mechanisms of inheritance, such as epigenetic. It is an exciting time in ET genetics as investigators start moving past assumptions underlying both phenotype and genetics experimental contributions, overcoming challenges to collaboration, and engaging the ET community. Multicenter collaborative efforts comprising rich longitudinal prospective phenotype data and neuropathologic analysis combined with the latest in genetics experimental design and technology will be the next wave in the field.

  8. CERN/USSR: Closer collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The decision of CERN Council to grant Observer status to the Soviet Union is a new milestone in a long history of collaboration between European and Soviet particle physicists which bodes well for the continued success of their research programmes

  9. Europe edges closer to an integrated science policy

    CERN Multimedia

    Schiermeier, Q

    2000-01-01

    At a meeting in Luxembourg last week, the research ministers of the 15 member states of the EU fixed a schedule for changes intended to forge closer links between the science activities and policies pursued by individual member states (1 page).

  10. Immersion, Embodiment, and Imagination: Moving Beyond an Aesthetic of Objectivity in Research-Informed Performance in Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gray

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Growing numbers of qualitative health researchers of diverse disciplinary backgrounds are experimenting with various forms of performance (e.g., film, live theater, dance as innovative approaches to engage broader communities in complex and critical ways with research. Despite this emerging alliance between performance and research, much of research-informed performance work is informed by an "aesthetic of objectivity," which assumes a linear trajectory between research findings and performance, and minimizes the relevance of aesthetic interpretation, which we argue is fundamental to achieving critical research-informed performative work. To move beyond this aesthetic of objectivity, we will explore our development of a research-informed film, "Fit for Dialysis." We argue that embracing the role of aesthetics, imagination, and embodiment more fully is essential to achieving the full interactive, educational, and emancipatory potential of the alliance between performance and research. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1502290

  11. Relationship research between meteorological disasters and stock markets based on a multifractal detrending moving average algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingchen; Cao, Guangxi; Xu, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Based on a multifractal detrending moving average algorithm (MFDMA), this study uses the fractionally autoregressive integrated moving average process (ARFIMA) to demonstrate the effectiveness of MFDMA in the detection of auto-correlation at different sample lengths and to simulate some artificial time series with the same length as the actual sample interval. We analyze the effect of predictable and unpredictable meteorological disasters on the US and Chinese stock markets and the degree of long memory in different sectors. Furthermore, we conduct a preliminary investigation to determine whether the fluctuations of financial markets caused by meteorological disasters are derived from the normal evolution of the financial system itself or not. We also propose several reasonable recommendations.

  12. Research on Copy-Move Image Forgery Detection Using Features of Discrete Polar Complex Exponential Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yanfen; Zhong, Junliu

    2015-12-01

    With the aid of sophisticated photo-editing software, such as Photoshop, copy-move image forgery operation has been widely applied and has become a major concern in the field of information security in the modern society. A lot of work on detecting this kind of forgery has gained great achievements, but the detection results of geometrical transformations of copy-move regions are not so satisfactory. In this paper, a new method based on the Polar Complex Exponential Transform is proposed. This method addresses issues in image geometric moment, focusing on constructing rotation invariant moment and extracting features of the rotation invariant moment. In order to reduce rounding errors of the transform from the Polar coordinate system to the Cartesian coordinate system, a new transformation method is presented and discussed in detail at the same time. The new method constructs a 9 × 9 shrunk template to transform the Cartesian coordinate system back to the Polar coordinate system. It can reduce transform errors to a much greater degree. Forgery detection, such as copy-move image forgery detection, is a difficult procedure, but experiments prove our method is a great improvement in detecting and identifying forgery images affected by the rotated transform.

  13. Red - take a closer look.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L Buechner

    Full Text Available Color research has shown that red is associated with avoidance of threat (e.g., failure or approach of reward (e.g., mating depending on the context in which it is perceived. In the present study we explored one central cognitive process that might be involved in the context dependency of red associations. According to our theory, red is supposed to highlight the relevance (importance of a goal-related stimulus and correspondingly intensifies the perceivers' attentional reaction to it. Angry and happy human compared to non-human facial expressions were used as goal-relevant stimuli. The data indicate that the color red leads to enhanced attentional engagement to angry and happy human facial expressions (compared to neutral ones - the use of non-human facial expressions does not bias attention. The results are discussed with regard to the idea that red induced attentional biases might explain the red-context effects on motivation.

  14. Research component in MIS curriculum: A move towards broadening the radiography spectrum in scaling professional heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilaha, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    This paper attempts to provide an insight into what research is, why it is important for radiographers (Medical Imaging Technologists), the process of carrying out research in imaging technology, the potential areas for evidence - based research activities in the profession and how research can broaden the radiography spectrum in a bid to scale the professional heights

  15. Innovative Mixed-Methods Research: Moving beyond Design Technicalities to Epistemological and Methodological Realizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazi, A. Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Mixed-methods research (MMR), as an inter-discourse (quantitative and qualitative) methodology, can provide applied linguistics researchers the opportunity to draw on and integrate the strengths of the two research methodological approaches in favour of making more rigorous inferences about research problems. In this article, the argument is made…

  16. TEXTUAL ORGANISATION AND LINGUISTIC FEATURES IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS RESEARCH ARTICLES: MOVING FROM INTRODUCTION TO METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    Khamkhien, Attapol

    2015-01-01

    AbstractWriting and publishing research articles (RAs) in English is crucial because an RA is considered as one of the channels to communicate among researchers and scholars worldwide. Research publication has become one of the requirements for Thai graduate students before graduation; however writing for publication is a daunting task to them as it requires substantial writing skills to ensure that researchers can efficiently present research findings and express themselves in response to te...

  17. Moving beyond 'not enough time': factors influencing paediatric clinicians' participation in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Simon P; Caldwell, Patrina H Y; Murphy, Joyce; Lilischkis, Kimberley J; Morrow, Angie M

    2017-03-01

    Increasing the amount of clinical research that occurs in healthcare settings has been identified as an important mechanism to improve healthcare outcomes. While clinicians are key persons in achieving this aim, research participation amongst clinicians is generally limited. To identify the factors (barriers and facilitators) influencing clinician research participation and determine how professional culture impacts on these factors. Forty clinicians working at a tertiary children's hospital participated in six discipline-specific focus groups. Thematic analysis was performed using an inductive process based in grounded theory. Four major themes (cultural factors, personal factors, resources and solutions) and 16 subthemes were identified. Participants described how the current health system discourages clinician research. They reported that their research participation requires personal sacrifice of their own time; income or career progression. Research participation was seen to compete with other priorities in clinicians' workload and is disadvantaged because of the primacy of clinical work and the lack of immediate tangible benefit from research projects. Solutions suggested by our participants included better alignment of clinical and research goals, improved availability of research mentors and collaborative opportunities. Nurses and allied health professionals reported a changing professional culture that values research. Only doctors identified research participation to be important for career progression. For clinician research participation to flourish, significant changes in healthcare structure and priorities will be required that result in research becoming more embedded in healthcare delivery. Initiatives to improve collaboration between clinicians and universities may also support these aims. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Tripping, Slipping and Losing the Way: Moving beyond Methodological Difficulties in Social Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrie, Anne; Macleod, Gale

    2010-01-01

    This article is intended as a contribution to the debate on the epistemology of educational research. It is as much concerned with research as a social process as it is with the process of social research. The authors draw upon ways of walking, discussions of embodiment, place and materiality, and their analogues in relation to the processes of…

  19. "The Purpose of This Study Is to": Connecting Lexical Bundles and Moves in Research Article Introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a group of lexical bundles identified in a corpus of research article introductions as the first step in the analysis of these expressions in the different sections of the research article. A one-million word corpus of research article introductions from various disciplines was compiled and the lexical bundles identified in…

  20. Learning from Mistakes and Moving Forward in Intercultural Research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Vanette; Woods, Glenn

    2018-01-01

    The ongoing challenges in equitable research involving Indigenous peoples and their communities and ways to overcome these are discussed in this article. Central to this article is the narrative reflection of a non-Indigenous researcher following research on Indigenous spirituality, well-being and resilience in the Yaegl community of northern New…

  1. Into the Meta: Research Methods for Moving beyond Social Media Surfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Hannah R.; Lynch, Tom Liam

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the role of social media metadata in conducting studies of professional development in social media spaces. It traces the brief history of research surrounding social media spaces, noting the lack of research that drills into social media metadata in research on professional development. Framed through a software studies…

  2. Rattling the Cage: Moving beyond Ethical Standards to Ethical Praxis in Self-Study Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Robyn; Gervasoni, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The ethical practice underpinning self-study research has been addressed extensively in the literature of self-study of teacher education practices. Less attention has been paid to how researchers deal with ethical tensions and dilemmas when they arise unexpectedly during self-study research. In this article, we examine how the extrapolation and…

  3. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank

    OpenAIRE

    Kamat, Ashish M.; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B.; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety o...

  4. Moving research tools into practice: the successes and challenges in promoting uptake of classification tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Barbara Jane; Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Thomas-Stonell, Nancy; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present our experiences - both successes and challenges - in implementing evidence-based classification tools into clinical practice. We also make recommendations for others wanting to promote the uptake and application of new research-based assessment tools. We first describe classification systems and the benefits of using them in both research and practice. We then present a theoretical framework from Implementation Science to report strategies we have used to implement two research-based classification tools into practice. We also illustrate some of the challenges we have encountered by reporting results from an online survey investigating 58 Speech-language Pathologists' knowledge and use of the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS), a new tool to classify children's functional communication skills. We offer recommendations for researchers wanting to promote the uptake of new tools in clinical practice. Specifically, we identify structural, organizational, innovation, practitioner, and patient-related factors that we recommend researchers address in the design of implementation interventions. Roles and responsibilities of both researchers and clinicians in making implementations science a success are presented. Implications for rehabilitation Promoting uptake of new and evidence-based tools into clinical practice is challenging. Implementation science can help researchers to close the knowledge-to-practice gap. Using concrete examples, we discuss our experiences in implementing evidence-based classification tools into practice within a theoretical framework. Recommendations are provided for researchers wanting to implement new tools in clinical practice. Implications for researchers and clinicians are presented.

  5. Engaging with and Moving on from Participatory Research: A Personal Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristy, Cath

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I respond to the call to articulate experiences of the messy realities of participatory research. I reflect on my engagement and struggle with the realities and ethics of a piece of case study research, which set out with a participatory approach. The project involved a group of young people from an isolated rural community who…

  6. D-Move: A Mobile Communication Based Delphi for Digital Natives to Support Embedded Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Otto

    2017-01-01

    Digital Natives are raised with computers and the Internet, which are a familiar part of their daily life. To gain insights into their attitude and behavior, methods and media for empirical research face new challenges like gamification, context oriented embedded research, integration of multiple data sources, and the increased importance of…

  7. Move Analysis of the Conclusion Sections of Research Papers in Persian and English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Gerannaz; Ebadi, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the conclusion sections in Research Papers (RPs) is of significance in academic writing. The conclusion section in spite of providing an outline of the article, states other essential components, such as recommendations, implications and statements of possible lines of future research. This paper analyses the conclusion parts of…

  8. Moving Science Off the ``Back Burner'': Meaning Making Within an Action Research Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Karen

    2008-02-01

    In this study, the participants conceptualized and implemented an action research project that focused on the infusion of inquiry principles into a neglected science curriculum. Specific objectives were to find (a) What factors challenge and support the evolution of an action research community of practice? (b) How are teachers’ beliefs about science teaching and learning transformed? and (c) How does teachers’ knowledge of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and student learning change as a result of learning within a community of practice? In this instrumental case study (Stake 2000, In N. K. Denzin, & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of qualitative research (pp. 435-454). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage), a range of data collection sources and methods were adopted. Outcomes focus on how the design principles for cultivating a community of practice emerged in the action research group, as well as the types of teacher learning that occurred by engaging in action research.

  9. Disseminating research in rural Yup’ik communities: challenges and ethical considerations in moving from discovery to intervention development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Rivkin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The native people of Alaska have experienced historical trauma and rapid changes in culture and lifestyle patterns. As a consequence, these populations shoulder a disproportionately high burden of psychological stress. The Yup’ik Experiences of Stress and Coping project originated from rural Yup’ik communities’ concerns about stress and its effects on health. It aimed to understand the stressful experiences that affect Yup’ik communities, to identify coping strategies used to deal with these stressors and to inform culturally responsive interventions. Objectives. Here, we examine the process of moving from research (gaining understanding to disseminating project findings to translation into intervention priorities. We highlight the importance of community participation and discuss challenges encountered, strategies to address these challenges and ethical considerations for responsible intervention research with indigenous communities that reflect their unique historical and current socio-cultural realities. Design. Community-wide presentations and discussions of research findings on stress and coping were followed by smaller Community Planning Group meetings. During these meetings, community members contextualized project findings and discussed implications for interventions. This process placed priority on community expertise in interpreting findings and translating results and community priorities into grant applications focused on intervention development and evaluation. Results. Challenges included translation between English and Yup’ik, funding limitations and uncertainties, and the long timelines involved in moving from formative research to intervention in the face of urgent and evolving community needs. The lack of congruence between institutional and community worldviews in the intervention research enterprise highlights the need for “principled cultural sensitivity”. Conclusions. Cultural sensitivity requires

  10. Moving beyond the prostate: benefits in broadening the scope of research on men and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Lisa M; Oliffe, John L

    2013-03-01

    As researchers recognize the value in considering gender dynamics within the cancer experience, a majority of the masculinities work has centered on men with prostate cancer. This focus has positioned prostate cancer as the flagship of men's cancer (and perhaps men's health). There is value in this research. However, as 78% of men experience cancers of a different type, a narrow focus on prostate cancer does not necessarily account for broader intersections of cancer and masculinity. Argued here are the benefits to expanding the focus of research on men's cancer experiences. As researchers consider patterns and diversities among men managing an array of cancers, there is opportunity to broaden understanding of the challenges "cancer" can present for men, disrupt assumptions that the study of men's gendered experience of cancer must be tethered to male sex-specific biology, and enhance the relevance and impact of psychosocial interventions for men living with cancer.

  11. NASA Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Health: Moving from Research to Operational End Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, J.; Estes, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Health providers and researchers need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. Satellite remote sensing of the environment offers a unique vantage point that can fill in the gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. This presentation will demonstrate NASA's applied science programs efforts to transition from research to operations to benefit society. Satellite earth observations present a unique vantage point of the earth's environment from space, which offers a wealth of health applications for the imaginative investigator. The presentation is directly related to Earth Observing systems and Global Health Surveillance and will present research results of the remote sensing environmental observations of earth and health applications, which can contribute to the health research. As part of NASA approach and methodology they have used Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Health Models to provide a method for bridging gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. This presentation will provide a venue where the results of both research and practice using satellite earth observations to study weather and it's role in health research and the transition to operational end users.

  12. Moving event and moving participant in aspectual conceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izutsu Katsunobu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study advances an analysis of the event conception of aspectual forms in four East Asian languages: Ainu, Japanese, Korean, and Ryukyuan. As earlier studies point out, event conceptions can be divided into two major types: the moving-event type and the moving-participant type, respectively. All aspectual forms in Ainu and Korean, and most forms in Japanese and Ryukyuan are based on that type of event conception. Moving-participant oriented Ainu and movingevent oriented Japanese occupy two extremes, between which Korean and Ryukyuan stand. Notwithstanding the geographical relationships among the four languages, Ryukyuan is closer to Ainu than to Korean, whereas Korean is closer to Ainu than to Japanese.

  13. Moving towards Practice-Oriented and Research-Based Teacher Education: Challenges of Kosovo and Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Vula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the current status, development trends and challenges of teacher education in Kosovo and Albania in their efforts to be aligned with current trends of a more research-based, practice and skills oriented teacher education system. The article compares the provision of pre-service teacher education and draws conclusions related to future development trends of the two countries as they aim to meet the best international standards and practices in shaping pre-service teacher education from a research-based and practice orientation. This article is based primarily on findings from desk research conducted at public universities in Kosovo and Albania, more specifically analyzing the university curricula and other documents related to the provision of teacher education courses. In addition, the research involves the analysis of work completed and documents produced as a result of the 2009-2011 Trans-European Mobility Program for University Studies (TEMPUS Project “Development of Master Study Programs in Education” (DEMED. The article outlines the similarities and differences of teacher education systems in Kosovo and Albania and emphasizes the need for small countries to co-operate on joint reform that leads to wider regional impact and facilitates mobility of staff and students. Identifying common goals is thus important. The two priority goals for these two countries are: development of practice and research-based teacher education. Conclusions are presented with the intent of findings being extrapolated to similar small, developing countries.

  14. Moving research to patient applications through commercialization: understanding and evaluating the role of intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    The advancement of research from discovery to the delivery of medical care can be limited without the support of industry to sponsor its continued development. Federal government financial support is generally crucial in early-stage development through funding from the NIH, National Science Foundation, and other federal agencies; however, government support generally stops shortly after basic research discoveries have been reported. Much of the cessation of financial support derives from the government's regulatory responsibilities, as sponsoring the commercialization of a product conflicts with regulation of the approval for clinical use of a drug or device. Furthermore, differences in goals, resources, and flexibility render government, as compared with private industry, inefficient and less responsive to market demands with regard to stream-lining the development of and enhancing the quality of products and services offered. Thus, industry and private investment provide the bridge that converts new discoveries into healthcare products that are available to consumers and patients. This conversion occurs through commercialization, which involves both high risks and high rewards. Taking advantage of the commercialization option for research development requires an understanding of the technology transfer process. This article reviews 5 topics: 1) industry motivation to invest in academic research; 2) institutional considerations in partnering with industry; 3) academia's interactions with inventors in the commercialization process; 4) the research institution's route to commercialization, and 5) the role of intellectual property and commercialization in the advancement of healthcare.

  15. Information Technology Research Services: Powerful Tools to Keep Up with a Rapidly Moving Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Marty firms offer Information Technology Research reports, analyst calls, conferences, seminars, tools, leadership development, etc. These entities include Gartner, Forrester Research, IDC, The Burton Group, Society for Information Management, 1nfoTech Research, The Corporate Executive Board, and so on. This talk will cover how a number of such services are being used at the Goddard Space Flight Center to improve our IT management practices, workforce skills, approach to innovation, and service delivery. These tools and services are used across the workforce, from the executive leadership to the IT worker. The presentation will cover the types of services each vendor provides and their primary engagement model. The use of these services at other NASA Centers and Headquarters will be included. In addition, I will explain how two of these services are available now to the entire NASA IT workforce through enterprise-wide subscriptions.

  16. Moving on: researching, surviving, and thriving in the evidence-saturated world of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Julianne

    2011-05-01

    In the worlds inhabited by qualitative inquirers working in health-related areas, health care, evidence, qualitative research, and qualitative researchers are four areas of potential tension and, at times, collision. These areas, or at least aspects of them, are constantly reinvented and realigned as the effects of such encounters are navigated. This article is about some of these close encounters, what we might learn from them, and how we might use this to "survive" as qualitative inquirers in an evidence-based world of health care and health care delivery.

  17. Moving up the ladder : heterogeneity influencing academic careers through research orientation, gender, and mentors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, Ward; Werker, C.; Hopp, Christian

    2018-01-01

    We look into the question whether heterogeneity stemming from research orientation, gender, or disciplinary and cultural differences with their PhD supervisors helps or hampers academics’ careers. Based on a sample of 248 academics at two leading European universities of technology, we combine

  18. Research in Technology Education: Looking Back to Move Forward … Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. John

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 I published, in this Journal, a review of journals and conference publications in Technology Education from 2006 to 2010 as one measure of the nature of research that was being conducted in the area (Williams in "Int J Technol Des Educ" 23(1):1-9, 2013). An element of that review was a prediction of trends, from the findings, to…

  19. Moving alcohol prevention research forward-Part I: introducing a complex systems paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Lemke, Michael K; Barry, Adam E; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller

    2018-02-01

    The drinking environment is a complex system consisting of a number of heterogeneous, evolving and interacting components, which exhibit circular causality and emergent properties. These characteristics reduce the efficacy of commonly used research approaches, which typically do not account for the underlying dynamic complexity of alcohol consumption and the interdependent nature of diverse factors influencing misuse over time. We use alcohol misuse among college students in the United States as an example for framing our argument for a complex systems paradigm. A complex systems paradigm, grounded in socio-ecological and complex systems theories and computational modeling and simulation, is introduced. Theoretical, conceptual, methodological and analytical underpinnings of this paradigm are described in the context of college drinking prevention research. The proposed complex systems paradigm can transcend limitations of traditional approaches, thereby fostering new directions in alcohol prevention research. By conceptualizing student alcohol misuse as a complex adaptive system, computational modeling and simulation methodologies and analytical techniques can be used. Moreover, use of participatory model-building approaches to generate simulation models can further increase stakeholder buy-in, understanding and policymaking. A complex systems paradigm for research into alcohol misuse can provide a holistic understanding of the underlying drinking environment and its long-term trajectory, which can elucidate high-leverage preventive interventions. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Linguistic Diversity in First Language Acquisition Research: Moving beyond the Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Barbara F.; Forshaw, William; Nordlinger, Rachel; Wigglesworth, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The field of first language acquisition (FLA) needs to take into account data from the broadest typological array of languages and language-learning environments if it is to identify potential universals in child language development, and how these interact with socio-cultural mechanisms of acquisition. Yet undertaking FLA research in remote…

  1. 77 FR 13656 - Call for Papers: National Symposium on Moving Target Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... a dynamic attack surface to an adversary, increasing the work factor necessary to successfully attack and exploit a cyber target. Throughout the federal government, research related to MT has been... improvement in the defense of cyber systems (a game changer),'' including how to develop better measures of...

  2. Bringing MapReduce Closer To Data With Active Drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpayegani, N.; Prathapan, S.; Warmka, R.; Wyatt, B.; Halem, M.; Trantham, J. D.; Markey, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Moving computation closer to the data location has been a much theorized improvement to computation for decades. The increase in processor performance, the decrease in processor size and power requirement combined with the increase in data intensive computing has created a push to move computation as close to data as possible. We will show the next logical step in this evolution in computing: moving computation directly to storage. Hypothetical systems, known as Active Drives, have been proposed as early as 1998. These Active Drives would have a general-purpose CPU on each disk allowing for computations to be performed on them without the need to transfer the data to the computer over the system bus or via a network. We will utilize Seagate's Active Drives to perform general purpose parallel computing using the MapReduce programming model directly on each drive. We will detail how the MapReduce programming model can be adapted to the Active Drive compute model to perform general purpose computing with comparable results to traditional MapReduce computations performed via Hadoop. We will show how an Active Drive based approach significantly reduces the amount of data leaving the drive when performing several common algorithms: subsetting and gridding. We will show that an Active Drive based design significantly improves data transfer speeds into and out of drives compared to Hadoop's HDFS while at the same time keeping comparable compute speeds as Hadoop.

  3. Evaluating patient and stakeholder engagement in research: moving from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmail, Laura; Moore, Emily; Rein, Alison

    2015-03-01

    Despite the growing demand for research that engages stakeholders, there is limited evidence in the literature to demonstrate its value - or return on investment. This gap indicates a general lack of evaluation of engagement activities. To adequately inform engagement activities, we need to further investigate the dividends of engaged research, and how to evaluate these effects. This paper synthesizes the literature on hypothesized impacts of engagement, shares what has been evaluated and identifies steps needed to reduce the gap between engagement's promises and the underlying evidence supporting its practice. This assessment provides explicit guidance for better alignment of engagement's promised benefits with evaluation efforts and identifies specific areas for development of evaluative measures and better reporting processes.

  4. Moving towards Practice-Oriented and Research-Based Teacher Education: Challenges of Kosovo and Albania

    OpenAIRE

    Eda Vula; Blerim Saqipi; Theodory Karaj; Nikoleta Mita

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes the current status, development trends and challenges of teacher education in Kosovo and Albania in their efforts to be aligned with current trends of a more research-based, practice and skills oriented teacher education system. The article compares the provision of pre-service teacher education and draws conclusions related to future development trends of the two countries as they aim to meet the best international standards and practices in shaping pre-service teacher ...

  5. In the Midst of Participatory Action Research Practices: Moving towards Decolonizing and Decolonial Praxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartej Gill

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Where disenfranchised groups such as women, immigrants and people of color more generally were either excluded from the academy or not thought to have important 'stories' to tell, several qualitative methodologies now value these voices, in large measure because disenfranchised research participants have an understanding in their bodies of what it means to be exposed to patriarchy, racism, classism, heterosexism, ableism, xenophobia and other complex forms of oppression (Gitlin, 2007, p.1.

  6. Fresh Faces, New Places: Moving beyond Teacher-Researcher Perspectives in Hip-Hop-Based Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Decoteau J.; Hall, H. Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in critical and culturally relevant theory, hip-hop-based education (HHBE) research documents the use of hip-hop in educational settings. Despite the richness of the emerging field, overreliance on teacher-researcher perspectives leaves much to be desired. Little is known of the extent and ways HHBE is used by nonresearching K-12…

  7. How Research Moves into Practice: A Preliminary Study of What Training Professionals Read, Hear, and Perceive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Carliner

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the growing body of research on the practice of training and development, several studies suggest that use of research-based findings in practice is low. The present study was designed to better understand the research-practice gap by exploring these questions: (1 Which published sources in the field are practicing professionals reading? How frequently do they read these materials? (2 Which conferences and meetings do practicing professionals attend? How frequently do they attend these events? (3 In what formats are research content most usable to practicing professionals? (4 What are practicing professionals’ general perceptions of research publications and presentations? Key findings point to publications having a wider reach among practicing professionals than conferences and, of those publications, professional magazines have a wider reach than peer-reviewed journals. In terms of the manner in which the content is presented, practicing professionals prefer case studies from the workplace over other types of content. Résumé : Dans le corpus croissant de recherches portant sur la pratique de la formation et du perfectionnement, plusieurs études suggèrent une faible utilisation des résultats de recherche dans la pratique. La présente étude a été conçue afin de mieux comprendre l’écart entre la recherche et la pratique par l’examen des questions suivantes : (1 Quelles sources de publications du domaine les professionnels pratiquants lisent-ils? À quelle fréquence lisent-ils ces publications? (2 À quelles conférences et réunions les professionnels pratiquants assistent-ils? À quelle fréquence assistent-ils à ces événements? (3 Dans quels formats les contenus de recherche sont-ils le plus facilement utilisables par les professionnels pratiquants? (4 Quelles sont les perceptions générales des professionnels pratiquants envers les publications et présentations de recherche? Les résultats principaux

  8. Strategies for moving towards equity in recruitment of rural and Aboriginal research participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sabrina T; Wu, Leena; Boswell, Brooke; Housden, Laura; Lavoie, Josee

    2013-01-01

    Equitable recruitment strategies, designed to ensure improved opportunities to participate in the research, are needed to include First Nations (FN) communities. The purpose of this article is to report on a set of successful strategies trialed with rural and FN communities in Canada. The strategies discussed were designed as part of a larger mixed-method study examining the effectiveness of Group Medical Visits (GMVs) on the quality of primary healthcare (PHC) in both FN reserve and northern communities in British Columbia (BC). Community partners and the study's decision-maker partners helped to identify and recruit primary care practices and reserve communities who were offering GMVs. Eleven communities (6 rural and 5 FN reserve) within the Northern Health Authority, BC participated in the study. Participants completed a survey either in person or via telephone. Content analysis was conducted on team meeting and field notes, focusing on issues related to the data collection process. Financial analysis was conducted on monetary resources spent on recruitment efforts in the various communities. Data were recorded regarding the number of times potential participants were contacted and mode of interview. Descriptive statistics were used to examine whether there were differences by mode of data collection, gender, and FN status. Logistic regression was used to examine whether FN status remained statistically significant after controlling for sex, education, employment status, age and health status. Once people were contacted, participation rate was 68% with 269 (n=90 men, n=179 women) people. Of those who participated in the survey, 42% were from FN communities. Content analysis revealed two overarching categories: (1) communication and coordination of the geographically dispersed research team and participating communities was maintained using synchronous and asynchronous methods; and (2) flexibility was needed to tailor recruitment strategies. Financial resources

  9. Moving Along: In biomechanics, rehabilitation engineering, and movement analysis, Italian researchers are making great strides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliellmelli, Eugenio; Micera, Silvestro; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pedotti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, biomechanics research and the analysis of human and animal movement have had a very long history, beginning with the exceptional pioneering work of Leonardo da Vinci. In 1489, da Vinci began investigating human anatomy, including an examination of human tendons, muscles, and the skeletal system. He continued this line of inquiry later in life, identifying what he called "the four powers--movement, weight, force, and percussion"--and how he thought they worked in the human body. His approach, by the way, was very modern--analyzing nature through anatomy, developing models for interpretation, and transferring this knowledge to bio-inspired machines.

  10. Present concepts of radiation action in living organisms, and the way to move research forwards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, Mike J.

    2017-01-01

    500 years after Professor Luther's iconoclastic ''Wittenberg Declarations'' it is appropriate to reflect on the beliefs used to underpin the principles of radiation protection. Paradigms that no longer stand the test of time include the absence of non-targeted effects, the strict distinction between deterministic and stochastic effects, and target theory with associated clonal evolution. Even linearity in the dose response relationship is questioned. The following is a personal reflection on the current state of radiobiological research.

  11. Present concepts of radiation action in living organisms, and the way to move research forwards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, Mike J. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt (GmbH), Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenbiologie

    2017-07-01

    500 years after Professor Luther's iconoclastic ''Wittenberg Declarations'' it is appropriate to reflect on the beliefs used to underpin the principles of radiation protection. Paradigms that no longer stand the test of time include the absence of non-targeted effects, the strict distinction between deterministic and stochastic effects, and target theory with associated clonal evolution. Even linearity in the dose response relationship is questioned. The following is a personal reflection on the current state of radiobiological research.

  12. IFRS 8 Operating Segments - A Closer Look

    OpenAIRE

    Muthupandian, K S

    2008-01-01

    The International Accounting Standards Board issued the International Financial Reporting Standard 8 Operating Segments. Segment information is one of the most vital aspects of financial reporting for investors and other users. The IFRS 8 requires an entity to adopt the ‘management approach’ to reporting on the financial performance of its operating segments. This article presents a closer look of the standard (objective, scope, and disclosures).

  13. A closer look at web questionnaire design

    OpenAIRE

    Toepoel, V.

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the design of online questionnaires and its consequences for data quality: what is the effect of the number of items placed on a screen, the response categories, layout choices et cetera. It also focuses on attrition and panel conditioning: what do people learn from taking surveys both in content and in the response process. In short: A Closer Look at Web Questionnaire Design.

  14. Moving to Google Cloud: Renovation of Global Borehole Temperature Database for Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Y.; Huang, S.

    2013-12-01

    Borehole temperature comprises an independent archive of information on climate change which is complementary to the instrumental and other proxy climate records. With support from the international geothermal community, a global database of borehole temperatures has been constructed for the specific purpose of the study on climate change. Although this database has become an important data source in climate research, there are certain limitations partially because the framework of the existing borehole temperature database was hand-coded some twenty years ago. A database renovation work is now underway to take the advantages of the contemporary online database technologies. The major intended improvements include 1) dynamically linking a borehole site to Google Earth to allow for inspection of site specific geographical information; 2) dynamically linking an original key reference of a given borehole site to Google Scholar to allow for a complete list of related publications; and 3) enabling site selection and data download based on country, coordinate range, and contributor. There appears to be a good match between the enhancement requirements for this database and the functionalities of the newly released Google Fusion Tables application. Google Fusion Tables is a cloud-based service for data management, integration, and visualization. This experimental application can consolidate related online resources such as Google Earth, Google Scholar, and Google Drive for sharing and enriching an online database. It is user friendly, allowing users to apply filters and to further explore the internet for additional information regarding the selected data. The users also have ways to map, to chart, and to calculate on the selected data, and to download just the subset needed. The figure below is a snapshot of the database currently under Google Fusion Tables renovation. We invite contribution and feedback from the geothermal and climate research community to make the

  15. Stand up, sit down, keep moving: turning circles in physical activity research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W J; Bauman, A E; Owen, N

    2009-02-01

    This review tracks the evidence and associated recommendations and guidelines for optimal levels of physical activity for health benefit. In the 1950s, early epidemiological studies focused on the increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality associated with sitting at work. The period from the mid-seventies to the turn of the century saw an initial focus on the health benefits of vigorous exercise give way to mounting evidence for the benefits of moderate-intensity physical activity. As daily energy expenditure in most domains of human activity (travel, domestic and occupational work, and leisure) continues to decline, early 21st century researchers are starting to turn full circle, with a rekindling of interest in the health effects of sedentary behaviour at work, and indeed in the balance between activity and sedentariness in all aspects of daily life.

  16. Moving research to practice through partnership: a case study in Asphalt Paving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Charlotte; Nixon, Laura; Baker, Robin

    2015-08-01

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships play a critical role in dissemination and implementation in health and safety. To better document and understand construction partnerships that have successfully scaled up effective interventions to protect workers, this case study focused on the collaborative processes of the Asphalt Paving Partnership. In the 1990s, this partnership developed, evaluated, disseminated, and achieved near universal, voluntary adoption of paver engineering controls to reduce exposure to asphalt fumes. We used in-depth interviews (n = 15) and document review in the case study. We describe contextual factors that both facilitated and challenged the formation of the collaboration, central themes and group processes, and research to practice (r2p) outcomes. The Asphalt Paving Partnership offers insight into how multi-stakeholder partnerships in construction can draw upon the strengths of diverse members to improve the dissemination and adoption of health and safety innovations and build a collaborative infrastructure to sustain momentum over time. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Moving Forward on Digital Inclusion: A framework for integrating research, policy and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah West

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a technological divide is frequently employed to discuss and analyse the social inequities that exist in relation to the use of technology. These disparities occur across local, regional, national and international levels of society and consequences include the reduction of people’s ability to participate in the information economy. This paper reflects on the Framework for Inquiry into the Technological Divide; a social work framework to facilitate understanding and provide direction to research, policy and practice targeted at closing the technological divide. Application of the framework is discussed in light of a recent study carried out in the Northern Territory of Australia that investigated the presence of a technological divide at the care nexus of people with dementia, carers and practitioners. A summary of broader applications of the framework is also presented. Het concept “Technological Divide” wordt vaak gebruikt om sociale ongelijkheden te analyseren, die betrekking hebben op het gebruik van informatie- en communicatietechnologie. Deze ongelijkheden komen op lokaal, regionaal, nationaal en internationaal niveau voor en belemmeren onder andere de mogelijkheden die mensen hebben om deel te nemen aan de informatiesamenleving. Dit artikel reflecteert op het Framework for Inquiry into the Technological Divide. Dit framework geeft richting aan onderzoek, beleid en uitvoeringspraktijken die deze technologiekloof willen dichten. Het artikel bespreekt de toepassing van het framework in het licht van een recente studie, uitgevoerd in het Noordelijk grondgebied van Australië, die de aanwezigheid van een technologiekloof onderzocht in de samenhangende zorg door professionals en verzorgers aan mensen met dementie. Ook wordt een samenvatting van de bredere toepassingsmogelijkheden van het framework gepresenteerd.

  18. Mentor Networks in Academic Medicine: Moving Beyond a Dyadic Conception of Mentoring for Junior Faculty Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Career development award programs often require formal establishment of mentoring relationships. The authors sought to gain a nuanced understanding of mentoring from the perspective of a diverse national sample of faculty clinician-researchers who were all members of formal mentoring relationships. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Three relevant themes emerged: (1) the numerous roles and behaviors associated with mentoring in academic medicine, (2) the improbability of finding a single person who can fulfill the diverse mentoring needs of another individual, and (3) the importance and composition of mentor networks. Many respondents described the need to cultivate more than one mentor. Several participants discussed the utilization of peer mentors, citing benefits such as pooled resources and mutual learning. Female participants generally acknowledged the importance of having at least one female mentor. Some observed that their portfolio of mentors needed to evolve in order to remain effective. Conclusions Those who seek to promote the careers of faculty in academic medicine should focus upon developing mentoring networks, rather than hierarchical mentoring dyads. The members of each faculty member's mentoring team or network should reflect the protégé's individual needs and preferences, with special attention towards ensuring diversity in terms of area of expertise, academic rank, and gender. PMID:23425990

  19. White certificates in an oligopoly market: closer to reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, Vlasis (SOM, Univ. of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)); Giacomo, Marina Di (Univ. of Torino, Dept. di Scienze Economiche e Finanziarie, Torino (Italy)); Russolillo, Daniele (Fondazione per l' Ambiente ' T. Fenoglio' (Italy)); Becchis, Franco (Univ. of East Piedmont, POLIS Dept., Environmental Economics (Italy))

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we depart from neoclassical assumptions of fully competitive energy markets, and attempt to represent an oligopolistic market, which is closer to reality than a fully competitive environment given the reconsolidation tendencies of energy companies. We focus mainly on the effects of energy policies for energy efficiency improvement, namely on supplier obligations and White Certificates in an oligopoly market. In particular we concentrate on two of the most common oligopolistic models: the Cournot and the Stackelberg model where agents are assumed to strategically interact (unlike perfect competition where firms behave atomistically). In these two game theoretically based models the behaviour of each market actor is based on a detailed decision tree, which determines the optimal move given the expectations on the competitor's strategy. According to our preliminary findings, the price of electricity is always higher under the symmetric Cournot model than the Stackelberg one, but the introduction of white certificate obligations should encompass larger increases in the electricity prices in a Stackelberg game. In order to test our theoretical findings we make use of a typical oligopolistic market in Italy, where we depict that a leader company can serve the main part of electricity and energy efficiency projects, through financing them with White Certificates, while the residual demand is more expensive and must be covered at a high cost from follower companies.

  20. Move up,Move out

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2007-01-01

    @@ China has already become the world's largest manufacturer of cement,copper and steel.Chinese producers have moved onto the world stage and dominated the global consumer market from textiles to electronics with amazing speed and efficiency.

  1. Relating Performative and Ostensive Management Accounting Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan

    2011-01-01

    . Findings – The paper illustrates how the process is a balancing act. On the one hand, it requires performative researchers to relate more closely to aspects decisive for ostensive researchers; yet, on the other, they need to preserve the distinctiveness of the performative approach. Originality....../value – This paper exemplifies these issues with reference to management accounting research and contributes by clarifying the methodological implications of moving performative research closer to ostensive research....

  2. Large Cancer Drug Trial Helps Move Precision Medicine Toward the Mainstream | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A landmark cancer drug trial is helping set the stage for moving precision medicine into the mainstream of clinical practice, according to a new study. The study, reported in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, validates a procedure used in the dru

  3. Moving related to separation : who moves and to what distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Clara H.; Malmberg, Gunnar

    We address the issue of moving from the joint home on the occasion of separation. Our research question is: To what extent can the occurrence of moves related to separation, and the distance moved, be explained by ties to the location, resources, and other factors influencing the likelihood of

  4. The adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitisation: Moving closer to replacing animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Terry W; Dimitrova, Gergana; Dimitrov, Sabcho; Mekenyan, Ovanes G

    2016-10-01

    This article outlines the work of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that led to being jointly awarded the 2015 Lush Black Box Prize. The award-winning work centred on the development of 'The Adverse Outcome Pathway for Skin Sensitisation Initiated by Covalent Binding to Proteins'. This Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) has provided the mechanistic basis for the integration of skin sensitisation-related information. Recent developments in integrated approaches to testing and assessment, based on the AOP, are summarised. The impact of the AOP on regulatory policy and on the Three Rs are discussed. An overview of the next generation of the skin sensitisation AOP module in the OECD QSAR Toolbox, based on more-recent work at the Laboratory of Mathematical Chemistry, is also presented. 2016 FRAME.

  5. Advanced MR imaging in Lhermitte-Duclos disease: moving closer to pathology and pathophysiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.; Krishnamoorthy, T.; Kesavadas, C.; Radhakrishnan, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD, dysplastic gangliocytoma) is an extremely rare cerebellar lesion of uncertain etiology. The debate as to whether it constitutes a neoplastic, malformative, or hamartomatous lesion is still continuing. In this report we explore the usefulness of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion imaging, and chemical shift imaging (CSI) in demonstrating the pathology and pathophysiology in two patients with LDD. MR imaging of the brain and the cervicodorsal spine was performed on a 1.5-T scanner in a 47-year-old woman presenting with numbness and paresthesia of both upper and lower limbs, and in a 17-year-old male with right frontal headache associated with neck pain. Routine imaging in the first patient showed a left-side cerebellar mass with characteristic 'tiger-striped' thick folia associated with Chiari I malformation, tonsillar herniation and cervicodorsal syringomyelia and in the second patient a right cerebellar mass with similar findings. The SWI demonstrated the characteristic deep running veins between the folia, which is thought to be the cause for vascular contrast enhancement. Diffusion showed a T2 shine-through effect with mild increased diffusivity, and perfusion showed increase in relative cerebral blood volume, relative cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time in the lesion. MR spectroscopy demonstrated reduction in metabolites and a prominent lactate peak in both the patients. The pathological and pathophysiological significance of these findings is discussed. MRI with the newer imaging capabilities can demonstrate the pathology and pathophysiology in Lhermitte-Duclos disease better. SWI helps in detecting the veins around the thickened folia. (orig.)

  6. Advanced MR imaging in Lhermitte-Duclos disease: moving closer to pathology and pathophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.; Krishnamoorthy, T.; Kesavadas, C. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Kerala (India); Radhakrishnan, V.V. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Pathology, Kerala (India)

    2007-09-15

    Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD, dysplastic gangliocytoma) is an extremely rare cerebellar lesion of uncertain etiology. The debate as to whether it constitutes a neoplastic, malformative, or hamartomatous lesion is still continuing. In this report we explore the usefulness of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion imaging, and chemical shift imaging (CSI) in demonstrating the pathology and pathophysiology in two patients with LDD. MR imaging of the brain and the cervicodorsal spine was performed on a 1.5-T scanner in a 47-year-old woman presenting with numbness and paresthesia of both upper and lower limbs, and in a 17-year-old male with right frontal headache associated with neck pain. Routine imaging in the first patient showed a left-side cerebellar mass with characteristic 'tiger-striped' thick folia associated with Chiari I malformation, tonsillar herniation and cervicodorsal syringomyelia and in the second patient a right cerebellar mass with similar findings. The SWI demonstrated the characteristic deep running veins between the folia, which is thought to be the cause for vascular contrast enhancement. Diffusion showed a T2 shine-through effect with mild increased diffusivity, and perfusion showed increase in relative cerebral blood volume, relative cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time in the lesion. MR spectroscopy demonstrated reduction in metabolites and a prominent lactate peak in both the patients. The pathological and pathophysiological significance of these findings is discussed. MRI with the newer imaging capabilities can demonstrate the pathology and pathophysiology in Lhermitte-Duclos disease better. SWI helps in detecting the veins around the thickened folia. (orig.)

  7. Research to Quantify the Effect of Permanent Change of Station Moves on Wives’ Wages and Labor Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    psychic costs and reduces incomes of family members. Spouses and other dependents mast give up jobs and take time to make the move. The Navy...tine only find, wanted, slack, unable 8. why no work hone, school, can’t find, other 9. weeks worked 10. weeks worked part-time 11. weeks unemployed ...Status March 1976 15. full-tim 16. part-tim T-7-1 i 17. unemployed /looking:I 18. keeping house 19. other Demographic Characteristics 20. wife living

  8. Nuclear Genome Size: Are We Getting Closer?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Greilhuber, J.

    77A, č. 7 (2010), s. 635-642 ISSN 1552-4922 R&D Projects : GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytometric techniques * reference standards * genome sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.749, year: 2010

  9. Moving knowledge into action for more effective practice, programmes and policy: protocol for a research programme on integrated knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ian D; Kothari, Anita; McCutcheon, Chris

    2018-02-02

    Health research is conducted with the expectation that it advances knowledge and eventually translates into improved health systems and population health. However, research findings are often caught in the know-do gap: they are not acted upon in a timely way or not applied at all. Integrated knowledge translation (IKT) is advanced as a way to increase the relevance, applicability and impact of research. With IKT, knowledge users work with researchers throughout the research process, starting with identification of the research question. Knowledge users represent those who would be able to use research results to inform their decisions (e.g. clinicians, managers, policy makers, patients/families and others). Stakeholders are increasingly interested in the idea that IKT generates greater and faster societal impact. Stakeholders are all those who are interested in the use of research results but may not necessarily use them for their own decision-making (e.g. governments, funders, researchers, health system managers and policy makers, patients and clinicians). Although IKT is broadly accepted, the actual research supporting it is limited and there is uncertainty about how best to conduct and support IKT. This paper presents a protocol for a programme of research testing the assumption that engaging the users of research in phases of its production leads to (a) greater appreciation of and capacity to use research; (b) the production of more relevant, useful and applicable research that results in greater impact; and (c) conditions under which it is more likely that research results will influence policy, managerial and clinical decision-making. The research programme will adopt an interdisciplinary, international, cross-sector approach, using multiple and mixed methods to reflect the complex and social nature of research partnerships. We will use ongoing and future natural IKT experiments as multiple cases to study IKT in depth, and we will take advantage of the team

  10. Inter-professional collaboration as a health human resources strategy: moving forward with a western provinces research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Grace; Suter, Esther; Deutschlander, Siegrid; Bainbridge, Lesley; Harrison, Liz; Grymonpre, Ruby; Hepp, Shelanne

    2012-01-01

    The current gap in research on inter-professional collaboration and health human resources outcomes is explored by the Western Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (WCIHC). In a recent research planning workshop with the four western provinces, 82 stakeholders from various sectors including health, provincial governments, research and education engaged with WCIHC to consider aligning their respective research agendas relevant to inter-professional collaboration and health human resources. Key research recommendations from a recent knowledge synthesis on inter-professional collaboration and health human resources as well as current provincial health priorities framed the discussions at the workshop. This knowledge exchange has helped to consolidate a shared current understanding of inter-professional education and practice and health workforce planning and management among the participating stakeholders. Ultimately, through a focused research program, a well-aligned approach between sectors to finding health human resources solutions will result in sustainable health systems reform. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  11. 75 FR 2553 - Moving Into the Future-New Dimensions and Strategies for Women's Health Research for the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... necessary to understand how cultural, ethnic, and racial differences influence the causes, diagnosis... cardiovascular health issues, including the following: pregnancy and cardiovascular disease research and ethical...

  12. A scoping review of research on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the mass media: looking back, moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Laura C; Strudsholm, Tina

    2008-07-19

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become more common in Western developed countries in recent years, as has media reporting on CAM and related issues. Correspondingly, media reports are a primary information source regarding decisions to use CAM. Research on CAM related media reports is becoming increasingly relevant and important; however, identifying key concepts to guide future research is problematic due to the dispersed nature of completed research in this field. A scoping review was conducted to: 1) determine the amount, focus and nature of research on CAM and the mass media; and 2) summarize and disseminate related research results. The main phases were: 1) searching for relevant studies; 2) selecting studies based on pre-defined inclusion criteria; 3) extracting data; and 4) collating, summarizing and reporting the results. Of 4,454 studies identified through various search strategies, 16 were relevant to our objectives and included in a final sample. CAM and media research has focused primarily on print media coverage of a range of CAM therapies, although only a few studies articulated differences within the range of therapies surveyed. Research has been developed through a variety of disciplinary perspectives, with a focus on representation research. The research reviewed suggests that journalists draw on a range of sources to prepare media reports, although most commonly they cite conventional (versus CAM) sources and personal anecdotes. The tone of media reports appears generally positive, which may be related to a lack of reporting on issues related to risk and safety. Finally, a variety of discourses within media representations of CAM are apparent that each appeal to a specific audience through resonance with their specific concerns. Research on CAM and the mass media spans multiple disciplines and strategies of inquiry; however, despite the diversity in approach, it is clear that issues related to production and reception

  13. Analysis of Moves in Research Article Abstracts(English as an 'International Language' : Educational Goals and Standards)

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 薫; Kaoru, Kobayashi; 東京農業大学; Tokyo University of Agriculture

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes the organizational structure and metatext strategies in English and Japanese research article abstracts in the field of applied linguistics. There have been some contrastive studies on logical development between English and Japanese texts on expository writing and argumentative essays, (H. Kobayashi, 1984, Oi, 1986, Oi and Kamimura 1997, Kubota 1996, 1997, 1998). However, there has not been much research on genre specific contrastive rhetoric between English and J...

  14. Moving from a Predominantly Teaching Oriented Culture to a Research Productivity Mission: The Case of Mexico and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gregorutti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study qualitatively analyzes the culture conflicts professors in the United States and Mexico are experiencing with the increasing pressures to produce more research about higher education. The first dataset was collected from 36 faculty members from 12 small and medium sized private, doctorate-granting universities. These universities are located in 11 states across the United States. The remaining data came from 44 faculty members employed at four small and medium sized private, doctoral granting universities in four states across Mexico. Results showed that universities in the US are transitioning from a predominantly teaching college culture to a more research orientation. Although the sampled universities continue to offer established graduate programs, faculty members continue to struggle with their teaching requirements and conflicts research productivity pressures place on their teaching and mentoring time with students. Participating faculty members employed in the US were not evenly interested in research opportunities due to the diverse mission objectives promoted by their respective institutions. On the other hand, faculty members employed in Mexico were generally more concerned with their research productivity and subsequent factors, which negatively impact their research productivity. Mexican faculty members rarely cited conflicts between their institutional missions and teaching objectives. This study is highly relevant to policy makers, higher education administrators, and scholars interested in comparative and international higher education. Administrators can benefit from the findings in this study, which provides faculty members’ perceptions and describes departmental structures and organizational dynamics employed to advance greater research and development opportunities. This study concludes with a discussion on how administrators and faculty members should handle the pressures for research productivity and

  15. Cellular Therapies Clinical Research Roadmap: lessons learned on how to move a cellular therapy into a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, Stacy; Tappitake, Darah; Armant, Myriam; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Derecho, Ivy; Draxler, Rebecca; Wood, Deborah; Centanni, John M

    2015-04-01

    A clinical research roadmap has been developed as a resource for researchers to identify critical areas and potential pitfalls when transitioning a cellular therapy product from the research laboratory, by means of an Investigational New Drug (IND) application, into early-phase clinical trials. The roadmap describes four key areas: basic and preclinical research, resource development, translational research and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and IND assembly and submission. Basic and preclinical research identifies a new therapeutic concept and demonstrates its potential value with the use of a model of the relevant disease. During resource development, the appropriate specialists and the required expertise to bring this product into the clinic are identified (eg, researchers, regulatory specialists, GMP manufacturing staff, clinicians and clinical trials staff, etc). Additionally, the funds required to achieve this goal (or a plan to procure them) are identified. In the next phase, the plan to translate the research product into a clinical-grade therapeutic is developed. Finally regulatory approval to start the trial must be obtained. In the United States, this is done by filing an IND application with the Food and Drug Administration. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-funded Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies program has facilitated the transition of a variety of cellular therapy products from the laboratory into Phase1/2 trials. The five Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies facilities have assisted investigators by performing translational studies and GMP manufacturing to ensure that cellular products met release specifications and were manufactured safely, reproducibly and at the appropriate scale. The roadmap resulting from this experience is the focus of this article. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Landscape of the EU-US Research Infrastructures and actors: Moving towards international interoperability of earth system data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, Ari; Powers, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    Research Infrastructures (RIs) are major long-term investments supporting innovative, bottom-up research activities. In the environmental research, they range from high atmosphere radars, to field observation networks and coordinated laboratory facilities. The Earth system is highly interactive and each part of the system interconnected across the spatial and disciplinary borders. However, due practical and historical reasons, the RIs are built from disciplinary points-of-view and separately in different parts of the world, with differing standards, policies, methods and research cultures. This heterogeneity provides necessary diversity to study the complex Earth system, but makes cross-disciplinary and/or global interoperability a challenge. Global actions towards better interoperability are surfacing, especially with EU and US. For example, recent mandates within the US government prioritize open data for federal agencies and federally funded science, and encourage collaboration among agencies to reduce duplication of efforts and increase efficient use of resources. There are several existing initiatives working toward these goals (e.g., COOPEUS, EarthCube, RDA, ICSU-WDS, DataOne, ESIP, USGEO, GEO). However, there is no cohesive framework to coordinate efforts among these, and other, entities. COOPEUS and EarthCube have now begun to map the landscape of interoperability efforts across earth science domains. The COOPEUS mapping effort describes the EU and US landscape of environmental research infrastructures to accomplish the following: identify gaps in services (data provision) necessary to address societal priorities; provide guidance for development of future research infrastructures; and identify opportunities for Research Infrastructures (RIs) to collaborate on issues of common interest. EarthCube mapping effort identifies opportunities to engage a broader community by identifying scientific domain organizations and entities. We present the current situation

  17. Embodied affectivity: On moving and being moved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFuchs

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of research indicating that bodily sensation and behaviour strongly influences one’s emotional reaction towards certain situations or objects. On this background, a framework model of embodied affectivity is suggested: we regard emotions as resulting from the circular interaction between affective qualities or affordances in the environment and the subject’s bodily resonance, be it in the form of sensations, postures, expressive movements or movement tendencies. Motion and emotion are thus intrinsically connected: one is moved by movement (perception; impression; affection and moved to move (action; expression; e-motion. Through its resonance, the body functions as a medium of emotional perception: it colours or charges self-experience and the environment with affective valences while it remains itself in the background of one’s own awareness. This model is then applied to emotional social understanding or interaffectivity which is regarded as an intertwinement of two cycles of embodied affectivity, thus continuously modifying each partner’s affective affordances and bodily resonance. We conclude with considerations of how embodied affectivity is altered in psychopathology and can be addressed in psychotherapy of the embodied self.

  18. Use of empirically supported interventions for psychopathology: can the participatory approach move us beyond the research-to-practice gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Carolyn Black; Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Woda, Susan

    2009-04-01

    Dissemination, or distribution, of empirically supported interventions (ESIs) for psychopathology remains a significant challenge. This paper reviews the principles of community-partnership research (CPR) and explores why CPR might improve distribution of psychological ESIs. Benefits of CPR include building trust, pooling resources and knowledge, and better serving a community by directly involving its members in the design and implementation of research. In addition, after establishing a community's trust using CPR, researchers are likely to be better positioned to partner with communities in the further distribution of ESIs via community networks. This paper reviews the case of dissonance-based eating disorder prevention interventions to provide an example of how CPR can facilitate the adoption and distribution of an ESI by a community, in this case, sororities. CPR also presents a number of challenges, however, because it is time consuming and does not always align with funding mechanisms and research designs used in randomized controlled trials. Further, CPR does not necessarily solve the challenge of training providers, though it may help with problem solving. Ultimately, we suggest that the benefits of CPR far outweigh the challenges, and hope that more researchers will adopt these practices so that more individuals can benefit from empirically supported psychological interventions.

  19. Information Management at a Health Services Research Organization in Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Moving from Identifiable Data to Coded Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Thurairasu

    2017-04-01

    The processing practices used at the organization comply with Canadian privacy laws such as the Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA as well as organizational policies and Research Ethics Board approvals. The approaches used to conceal individual identities yet allow linkage to various data sources can be modelled by other health agencies, ministries, and non-health related organizations that work with sensitive data but face challenges in maintaining both privacy and research quality. Our organization strives to make processing as efficient as possible and create maximum linkability to the various data sources in house while upholding privacy and confidentiality.

  20. Chasing a Moving Target: Perceptions of Work Readiness and Graduate Capabilities in Music Higher Research Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Scott; Grant, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Recent efforts to increase workplace readiness in university students have largely centred on undergraduates, with comparatively few strategies or studies focusing on higher research degree candidates. In the discipline of music, a wide diversity of possible career paths combined with rapidly changing career opportunities makes workplace readiness…

  1. Use of formative research and social network theory to develop a group walking intervention: Sumter County on the Move!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forthofer, Melinda; Burroughs-Girardi, Ericka; Stoisor-Olsson, Liliana; Wilcox, Sara; Sharpe, Patricia A; Pekuri, Linda M

    2016-10-01

    Although social support is a frequently cited enabler of physical activity, few studies have examined how to harness social support in interventions. This paper describes community-based formative research to design a walking program for mobilizing naturally occurring social networks to support increases in walking behavior. Focus group methods were used to engage community members in discussions about desired walking program features. The research was conducted with underserved communities in Sumter County, South Carolina. The majority of focus group participants were women (76%) and African American (92%). Several important themes emerged from the focus group results regarding attitudes toward walking, facilitators of and barriers to walking, ideal walking program characteristics, and strategies for encouraging community members to walk. Most noteably, the role of existing social networks as a supportive influence on physical activity was a recurring theme in our formative research and a gap in the existing evidence base. The resulting walking program focused on strategies for mobilizing, supporting and reinforcing existing social networks as mechanisms for increasing walking. Our approach to linking theory, empirical evidence and community-based formative research for the development of a walking intervention offers an example for practitioners developing intervention strategies for a wide range of behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Moving Virtual Research Environments from high maintenance Stovepipes to Multi-purpose Sustainable Service-oriented Science Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, Jens; Fraser, Ryan; Wyborn, Lesley; Friedrich, Carsten; Squire, Geoffrey; Barker, Michelle; Moloney, Glenn

    2017-04-01

    The researcher of today is likely to be part of a team distributed over multiple sites that will access data from an external repository and then process the data on a public or private cloud or even on a large centralised supercomputer. They are increasingly likely to use a mixture of their own code, third party software and libraries, or even access global community codes. These components will be connected into a Virtual Research Environments (VREs) that will enable members of the research team who are not co-located to actively work together at various scales to share data, models, tools, software, workflows, best practices, infrastructures, etc. Many VRE's are built in isolation: designed to meet a specific research program with components tightly coupled and not capable of being repurposed for other use cases - they are becoming 'stovepipes'. The limited number of users of some VREs also means that the cost of maintenance per researcher can be unacceptably high. The alternative is to develop service-oriented Science Platforms that enable multiple communities to develop specialised solutions for specific research programs. The platforms can offer access to data, software tools and processing infrastructures (cloud, supercomputers) through globally distributed, interconnected modules. In Australia, the Virtual Geophysics Laboratory (VGL) was initially built to enable a specific set of researchers in government agencies access to specific data sets and a limited number of tools, that is now rapidly evolving into a multi-purpose Earth science platform with access to an increased variety of data, a broader range of tools, users from more sectors and a diversity of computational infrastructures. The expansion has been relatively easy, because of the architecture whereby data, tools and compute resources are loosely coupled via interfaces that are built on international standards and accessed as services wherever possible. In recent years, investments in

  3. Taking Inventory and Moving Forward: A Review of the Research Literature and Assessment of Qualitative Research in JPCC, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Pamela R

    2015-12-01

    As the foremost journal in spiritual care and counseling (SCC), Journal of Pastoral Care & Counseling (JPCC) functions as a barometer for the discipline's research and interests. This article presents the findings of a review of the research literature in JPCC between 2010 and 2014. It examines research articles by asking the following questions: What are the quantity and types of research published? What are the dominant themes in this research? What are the quantity and methodologies of qualitative research? Findings are presented, discussed and recommendations are made in an effort to assess and further build the research base of the discipline. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Moving alcohol prevention research forward-Part II: new directions grounded in community-based system dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Lemke, Michael K; Barry, Adam E; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller

    2018-02-01

    Given the complexity of factors contributing to alcohol misuse, appropriate epistemologies and methodologies are needed to understand and intervene meaningfully. We aimed to (1) provide an overview of computational modeling methodologies, with an emphasis on system dynamics modeling; (2) explain how community-based system dynamics modeling can forge new directions in alcohol prevention research; and (3) present a primer on how to build alcohol misuse simulation models using system dynamics modeling, with an emphasis on stakeholder involvement, data sources and model validation. Throughout, we use alcohol misuse among college students in the United States as a heuristic example for demonstrating these methodologies. System dynamics modeling employs a top-down aggregate approach to understanding dynamically complex problems. Its three foundational properties-stocks, flows and feedbacks-capture non-linearity, time-delayed effects and other system characteristics. As a methodological choice, system dynamics modeling is amenable to participatory approaches; in particular, community-based system dynamics modeling has been used to build impactful models for addressing dynamically complex problems. The process of community-based system dynamics modeling consists of numerous stages: (1) creating model boundary charts, behavior-over-time-graphs and preliminary system dynamics models using group model-building techniques; (2) model formulation; (3) model calibration; (4) model testing and validation; and (5) model simulation using learning-laboratory techniques. Community-based system dynamics modeling can provide powerful tools for policy and intervention decisions that can result ultimately in sustainable changes in research and action in alcohol misuse prevention. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Moving forward on facilitation research: response to changing environments and effects on the diversity, functioning and evolution of plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliveres, Santiago; Smit, Christian; Maestre, Fernando T.

    2015-01-01

    Once seen as anomalous, facilitative interactions among plants and their importance for community structure and functioning are now widely recognized. The growing body of modelling, descriptive and experimental studies on facilitation covers a wide variety of terrestrial and aquatic systems throughout the globe. However, the lack of a general body of theory linking facilitation among different types of organisms and biomes and their responses to environmental changes prevents further advances in our knowledge regarding the evolutionary and ecological implications of facilitation in plant communities. Moreover, insights gathered from alternative lines of inquiry may substantially improve our understanding of facilitation, but these have been largely neglected thus far. Despite over 15 years of research and debate on this topic, there is no consensus on the degree to which plant–plant interactions change predictably along environmental gradients (i.e. the stress-gradient hypothesis), and this hinders our ability to predict how plant–plant interactions may affect the response of plant communities to ongoing global environmental change. The existing controversies regarding the response of plant–plant interactions across environmental gradients can be reconciled when clearly considering and determining the species-specificity of the response, the functional or individual stress type, and the scale of interest (pairwise interactions or community-level response). Here, we introduce a theoretical framework to do this, supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence. We also discuss current gaps in our knowledge regarding how plant–plant interactions change along environmental gradients. These include the existence of thresholds in the amount of species-specific stress that a benefactor can alleviate, the linearity or non-linearity of the response of pairwise interactions across distance from the ecological optimum of the beneficiary, and the need to explore

  6. And We Are Still Walking … When a Protest Walk Becomes a Step Towards Research on the Move

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guylaine Racine

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In June 2005, we joined about one hundred other participants in the No One Is Illegal March on Ottawa. This 200-kilometer march was organized by Solidarity Across Borders and non-status immigrants living in Canada. This paper tells the story of this march and of the people who participated in the week-long event, which was part of a movement to defend the rights of non-status immigrants in Canada. Our desire to tell this story stems from the fact that we are still actively participating in this march in many different ways. We would like to trace some of the connections between what is really two stories: one that relates the actual march, and another that describes a documentary we made and a research project we are conducting on the march. Finally, this paper gives us an opportunity to experiment with a style of writing and publication that allows us to use both images and text in order to bring seldom-heard voices—those of non-status immigrants—into the public sphere. In so doing, we wish to present not only some of our work, but also some of the people who were involved in the march and whose thoughts and actions inspired our work. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0802293

  7. Moving Encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Deslandes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores my experience of losing an authoritative speaking position – that is, ‘falling on my face’ in a research encounter with the Brazilian Landless Worker’s Movement (O Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais sem Terra, or MST.  My specific movements through this locale invoke Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s concept of ‘unlearning one’s privilege as a loss’; and Sara Ahmed’s theory of ‘stranger fetishism’.  In writing my brief loss, I also; of course, recover my speaking position, meaning that I can always efface the loss by re-writing it as a source of ethnographic authority.  This essay is written in two voices in order to reflect this paradox: one which describes the encounter, and one that critically ruminates upon it.  I note, for example, that the MST as a variegated conglomerate of people takes the form of particular ‘Others’ when they are represented in the scholarship and polemic of ‘first world’ activists in the so called ‘global justice movement’.  ‘Falling on my face in the street’ of these Others locates particular processes of fetishization within the global justice movement and the relationships across power and difference that are contained herein; processes that impact on the idea of a ‘global’ solidarity against systemic ‘global’ oppressions.

  8. Moving in Circles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Gunvor

    2008-01-01

    The article examines the development of African diaspora history during the last fifty years. It outlines the move from a focus on African survivals to a focus on deep rooted cultural principles and back again to a revived interest in concrete cultural transfers from Africa to the Americas....... This circular movement can be explained by a combination of elements characterizing African Atlantic and black Atlantic history. Among them is a lack of attention to questions of periodisation and change. Likewise, it has proven difficult to conceptualize Africa and America at one and the same time...... as characterized by cultural diversity and variation. Moreover, the field has been haunted by a tendency of moving to easily from descriptive evidence to conclusions about African identity in the Americas. A promising way to overcome these problems, it is suggested, is to develop research that focuses on single...

  9. Tax Policy and Sole Proprietorships: A Closer Look

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Susan C.

    2008-01-01

    The 21 million sole proprietorship returns filed in 2005 represent a wide variety of economic activity. This paper examines three major tax policy issues related to sole proprietorships—taxpayer compliance, taxpayer burden, and incentives for growth. It uses tax return data to take a closer look at sole proprietorships. It proposes a new taxonomy for describing these returns in an economically meaningful way, based on the principal factors of production that they use: their own labor, hired l...

  10. Developing a Research Strategy for Suicide Prevention in the Department of Defense: Status of Current Research, Prioritizing Areas of Need, and Recommendations for Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    practice. Websites, brochures , pamphlets , and marketing campaigns can help translate “jargon-y” academic research ndings into layman’s terms for...websites, brochures , pamphlets , and marketing campaigns, among other approaches. Careful attention should be paid to the media portrayal of new practices...cide prevention every three to six months from the Chief of Sta of the Air Force. As stated in Air Force Pamphlet 44-160: “It is encouraging that

  11. Job Surfing: Move On to Move Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Justin

    1997-01-01

    Looks at the process of switching jobs and changing careers. Discusses when to consider options and make the move as well as the need to be flexible and open minded. Provides a test for determining the chances of promotion and when to move on. (JOW)

  12. Moving Matters: The Causal Effect of Moving Schools on Student Performance. Working Paper #01-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Stiefel, Leanna; Cordes, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of existing research on mobility indicates that students do worse in the year of a school move. This research, however, has been unsuccessful in isolating the causal effects of mobility and often fails to distinguish the heterogeneous impacts of moves, conflating structural moves (mandated by a school's terminal grade) and…

  13. The Commonwealth Games as an Example of Bringing States Closer Through Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobierecki Michał Marcin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to investigate the issue of positive sports diplomacy directed at bringing countries closer and deepening cooperation between them. Generally, sports diplomacy is a broader term and may include various ways of utilizing sport, both negative and positive, even for the sake of nation-branding. Positive sports diplomacy most commonly refers to bringing hostile states closer together, but it may also be used to deepen political alliances or foster friendship and cooperation between states that are not mutually hostile. The research focuses on the latter form of positive sports diplomacy. The investigation is a case study concerning the Commonwealth Games, a sports event that is held once every four years and gathers countries and territories that used to belong to the former British Empire. The research therefore aims to determine whether this event, the second largest multisport event in the world, is significant from political and diplomatic perspectives. A second research question concerns whether the Commonwealth Games should be seen as an attempt by Great Britain to maintain influence in its former colonies. The research attempts to test the hypothesis that the Commonwealth Games are an important contributor to sustaining ties between states of the former British Empire.

  14. Nordic Seniors on the Move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ”I believe that all people need to move about. Actually, some have difficulties in doing so. They stay in their home neighbourhoods where they’ve grown up and feel safe. I can understand that, but my wife and I, we didn’t want that. We are more open to new ideas.” This anthology is about seniors...... on the move. In seven chapters, Nordic researchers from various disciplines, by means of ethnographic methods, attempt to comprehend the phenomenon of Nordic seniors who move to leisure areas in their own or in other countries. The number of people involved in this kind of migratory movement has grown...... above gives voice to one of these seniors, stressing the necessity of moving. The anthology contributes to the international body of literature about later life migration, specifically representing experiences made by Nordic seniors. As shown here, mobility and migration in later life have implications...

  15. Hepatic encephalopathy: Ever closer to its big bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Pablo A; Marcotegui, Ariel R; Orbea, Lisandro; Skerl, Juan; Perazzo, Juan Carlos

    2016-11-14

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that commonly complicates the course of patients with liver disease. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized hundreds of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of HE and is estimated to affect more that 75% of patients with liver cirrhosis. It is characterized by cognitive impairment predominantly attention, reactiveness and integrative function with very subtle clinical manifestations. The development of MHE is associated with worsen in driving skills, daily activities and the increase of overall mortality. Skeletal muscle has the ability to shift from ammonia producer to ammonia detoxifying organ. Due to its large size, becomes the main ammonia detoxifying organ in case of chronic liver failure and muscular glutamine-synthase becomes important due to the failing liver and brain metabolic activity. Gut is the major glutamine consumer and ammonia producer organ in the body. Hepatocellular dysfunction due to liver disease, results in an impaired clearance of ammonium and in its inter-organ trafficking. Intestinal bacteria, can also represent an extra source of ammonia production and in cirrhosis, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and symbiosis can be observed. In the study of HE, to get close to MHE is to get closer to its big bang; and from here, to travel less transited roads such as skeletal muscle and intestine, is to go even closer. The aim of this editorial is to expose this road for further and deeper work.

  16. Supernatural/Paranormal Phenomena: A Passionate Closer Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, S.; Robinson, G.; Maulton, J.

    2003-05-01

    A collaboration between a psychologist, a philosopher, and an astronomer resulted in an inter-term (January) course, titled "Supernatural/Paranormal Phenomena: A Passionate Closer Look" at Smith College. The main purpose of the course was to provide students with the tools to evaluate the pseudo-sciences that are so enticing in today's complex and stressful world. We examined some of the reasons why people are attracted to New-Age enterprises that claim to: provide personal insight and social guidance from stars and planets; communicate with the dead; predict the future; prove contact with extraterrestrial beings. The course provided us with an opportunity to introduce the methodology of science and compare it with the claims made by the defenders of pseudo-sciences. We also conducted a survey of paranormal beliefs of enrolled students before and after our inter-term class.

  17. Norway [and the closer relations with the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Opinion in Norway seems to have settled on the idea that having a closer relation to the EC is inevitable, although opinion is divided as to whether this will be a good thing. The plain fact is that with Denmark already involved and the Swedes thinking about it, some Norwegian politicians are nervous about being left out in the cold. However, this feeling of inevitability does not mean that the EC can treat Norway's curious economy like an oyster, to be cracked open and eaten at a time of its own choosing. The Norweigians are, after all, sitting on Western Europe's largest and most secure hydrocarbon reserves for export, and they also have hydropower. The situation in which these resources place Norway are examined with respect to EC membership. (author)

  18. Mechanics of moving materials

    CERN Document Server

    Banichuk, Nikolay; Neittaanmäki, Pekka; Saksa, Tytti; Tuovinen, Tero

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with theoretical aspects of modelling the mechanical behaviour of manufacturing, processing, transportation or other systems in which the processed or supporting material is travelling through the system. Examples of such applications include paper making, transmission cables, band saws, printing presses, manufacturing of plastic films and sheets, and extrusion of aluminium foil, textiles and other materials.   The work focuses on out-of-plane dynamics and stability analysis for isotropic and orthotropic travelling elastic and viscoelastic materials, with and without fluid-structure interaction, using analytical and semi-analytical approaches.  Also topics such as fracturing and fatigue are discussed in the context of moving materials. The last part of the book deals with optimization problems involving physical constraints arising from the stability and fatigue analyses, including uncertainties in the parameters.   The book is intended for researchers and specialists in the field, providin...

  19. Envisioning New Technologies in Teacher Practice: Moving Forward, Circling Back Using a Teacher Action Research Approach. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies. Volume 47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong-Wilson, Teresa, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    How do classroom teachers envision new technologies within their practice? In the conversation on incorporating new technologies into classrooms, teachers are often sidelined. "Envisioning New Technologies in Teacher Practice" looks at the complex ways in which teachers move forward to embrace change as well as how they circle back, continually…

  20. Many colours influence the shape and development of the plant : steering plants via light colour moves closer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ieperen, van W.; Heuvelink, E.; Kierkels, T.

    2013-01-01

    The use of LED’s in horticulture is still progressing. And the increasing number of control possibilities is staggering. But the speed at which our knowledge is being transferred into new developments could be faster, certainly when it comes to the influence of light colour. Here is the current

  1. The closer the relationship, the more the interaction on facebook? Investigating the case of Taiwan users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chiung-Wen Julia; Wang, Ching-Chan; Tai, Yi-Ting

    2011-01-01

    This study argues for the necessity of applying offline contexts to social networking site research and the importance of distinguishing the relationship types of users' counterparts when studying Facebook users' behaviors. In an attempt to examine the relationship among users' behaviors, their counterparts' relationship types, and the users' perceived acquaintanceships after using Facebook, this study first investigated users' frequently used tools when interacting with different types of friends. Users tended to use less time- and effort-consuming and less privacy-concerned tools with newly acquired friends. This study further examined users' behaviors in terms of their closeness and intimacy and their perceived acquaintanceships toward four different types of friends. The study found that users gained more perceived acquaintanceships from less close friends with whom users have more frequent interaction but less intimate behaviors. As for closer friends, users tended to use more intimate activities to interact with them. However, these activities did not necessarily occur more frequently than the activities they employed with their less close friends. It was found that perceived acquaintanceships with closer friends were significantly lower than those with less close friends. This implies that Facebook is a mechanism for new friends, rather than close friends, to become more acquainted.

  2. Moving and Being Moved: Implications for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretchmar, R. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Uses philosophical writings, a novel about baseball, and a nonfiction work on rowing to analyze levels of meaning in physical activity, showing why three popular methods for enhancing meaning have not succeeded and may have moved some students away from deeper levels of meaning. The paper suggests that using hints taken from the three books could…

  3. Moving Field Guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie Meador; Mark Twery; Meagan. Leatherbury

    2011-01-01

    The Moving Field Guides (MFG) project is a creative take on site interpretation. Moving Field Guides provide an example of how scientific and artistic endeavors work in parallel. Both begin with keen observations that produce information that must be analyzed, understood, and interpreted. That interpretation then needs to be communicated to others to complete the...

  4. People on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Audrey

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this 2-3 day lesson is to introduce students in Grades 2-4 to the idea that people move around the world for a variety of reasons. In this activity, students explore why people move through class discussion, a guided reading, and interviews. The teacher elicits student ideas using the compelling question (Dimension 1 of the C3…

  5. Moving ring reactor 'Karin-1'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The conceptual design of a moving ring reactor ''Karin-1'' has been carried out to advance fusion system design, to clarify the research and development problems, and to decide their priority. In order to attain these objectives, a D-T reactor with tritium breeding blanket is designed, a commercial reactor with net power output of 500 MWe is designed, the compatibility of plasma physics with fusion engineering is demonstrated, and some other guideline is indicated. A moving ring reactor is composed mainly of three parts. In the first formation section, a plasma ring is formed and heated up to ignition temperature. The plasma ring of compact torus is transported from the formation section through the next burning section to generate fusion power. Then the plasma ring moves into the last recovery section, and the energy and particles of the plasma ring are recovered. The outline of a moving ring reactor ''Karin-1'' is described. As a candidate material for the first wall, SiC was adopted to reduce the MHD effect and to minimize the interaction with neutrons and charged particles. The thin metal lining was applied to the SiC surface to solve the problem of the compatibility with lithium blanket. Plasma physics, the engineering aspect and the items of research and development are described. (Kako, I.)

  6. A service model for delivering care closer to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Joanna; Taylor, Charlotte Elizabeth; Bunyan, Paul; White, Philippa Mary; Thomas, Siân Myra; Upton, Dominic

    2011-04-01

    Upton Surgery (Worcestershire) has developed a flexible and responsive service model that facilitates multi-agency support for adult patients with complex care needs experiencing an acute health crisis. The purpose of this service is to provide appropriate interventions that avoid unnecessary hospital admissions or, alternatively, provide support to facilitate early discharge from secondary care. Key aspects of this service are the collaborative and proactive identification of patients at risk, rapid creation and deployment of a reactive multi-agency team and follow-up of patients with an appropriate long-term care plan. A small team of dedicated staff (the Complex Care Team) are pivotal to coordinating and delivering this service. Key skills are sophisticated leadership and project management skills, and these have been used sensitively to challenge some traditional roles and boundaries in the interests of providing effective, holistic care for the patient.This is a practical example of early implementation of the principles underlying the Department of Health's (DH) recent Best Practice Guidance, 'Delivering Care Closer to Home' (DH, July 2008) and may provide useful learning points for other general practice surgeries considering implementing similar models. This integrated case management approach has had enthusiastic endorsement from patients and carers. In addition to the enhanced quality of care and experience for the patient, this approach has delivered value for money. Secondary care costs have been reduced by preventing admissions and also by reducing excess bed-days. The savings achieved have justified the ongoing commitment to the service and the staff employed in the Complex Care Team. The success of this service model has been endorsed recently by the 'Customer Care' award by 'Management in Practice'. The Surgery was also awarded the 'Practice of the Year' award for this and a number of other customer-focussed projects.

  7. Spatio-Temporal Queries for moving objects Data warehousing

    OpenAIRE

    Esheiba, Leila; Mokhtar, Hoda M. O.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, Moving Object Databases (MODs) have attracted a lot of attention from researchers. Several research works were conducted to extend traditional database techniques to accommodate the new requirements imposed by the continuous change in location information of moving objects. Managing, querying, storing, and mining moving objects were the key research directions. This extensive interest in moving objects is a natural consequence of the recent ubiquitous location-aware device...

  8. Moving Tourism Social Entrepreneurship Forward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheldon, Pauline; Dredge, Dianne; Daniele, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    This chapter concludes the book by considering the role that research and education can play to move the TSE agenda forward. In addition to consolidating the chapter authors’ thoughts about the future of SE and tourism, it also lays out some directions for research tracks in the future....... It considers the changes needed in research approaches, in our universities, our curricula, our learners, and ourselves as academics. These changes we hope will stimulate the dialog on how TSE can mobilize the energy, vision and social spirit of those who seek to change the world for the better through tourism....

  9. PARALLEL MOVING MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ion Tiberius Petrescu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Moving mechanical systems parallel structures are solid, fast, and accurate. Between parallel systems it is to be noticed Stewart platforms, as the oldest systems, fast, solid and precise. The work outlines a few main elements of Stewart platforms. Begin with the geometry platform, kinematic elements of it, and presented then and a few items of dynamics. Dynamic primary element on it means the determination mechanism kinetic energy of the entire Stewart platforms. It is then in a record tail cinematic mobile by a method dot matrix of rotation. If a structural mottoelement consists of two moving elements which translates relative, drive train and especially dynamic it is more convenient to represent the mottoelement as a single moving components. We have thus seven moving parts (the six motoelements or feet to which is added mobile platform 7 and one fixed.

  10. Towards a Re-Conceptualization of Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs: Tackling Enduring Problems with the Quantitative Research and Moving On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Various commentators have argued for years that the study of teachers' self-efficacy (TSE) beliefs, largely dominated by quantitative research methodologies, has been confused. Contentious issues include the very conceptualization of these beliefs, how they are defined and accessed through research and how the research is used. One of the…

  11. The Moving image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Every day we are presented with bodily expressions in audiovisual media – by anchors, journalists and characters in films for instance. This article explores how body language in the moving image has been and can be approached in a scholarly manner.......Every day we are presented with bodily expressions in audiovisual media – by anchors, journalists and characters in films for instance. This article explores how body language in the moving image has been and can be approached in a scholarly manner....

  12. One Step Closer to the Marketplace for State-of-the-Art Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivetrain | News | NREL One Step Closer to the Marketplace for State-of-the-Art Wind Turbine Drivetrain One Step Closer to the Marketplace for State-of-the-Art Wind Turbine Drivetrain April 1, 2016 modeling, and testing in state-of-the-art facilities designed to put the drivetrain through its paces

  13. Social scaling of extrapersonal space: target objects are judged as closer when the reference frame is a human agent with available movement potentialities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, C; Brass, M; Committeri, G

    2015-01-01

    Space perception depends on our motion potentialities and our intended actions are affected by space perception. Research on peripersonal space (the space in reaching distance) shows that we perceive an object as being closer when we (Witt, Proffitt, & Epstein, 2005; Witt & Proffitt, 2008) or another actor (Costantini, Ambrosini, Sinigaglia, & Gallese, 2011; Bloesch, Davoli, Roth, Brockmole, & Abrams, 2012) can interact with it. Similarly, an object only triggers specific movements when it is placed in our peripersonal space (Costantini, Ambrosini, Tieri, Sinigaglia, & Committeri, 2010) or in the other's peripersonal space (Costantini, Committeri, & Sinigaglia, 2011; Cardellicchio, Sinigaglia, & Costantini, 2013). Moreover, also the extrapersonal space (the space outside reaching distance) seems to be perceived in relation to our movement capabilities: the more effort it takes to cover a distance, the greater we perceive the distance to be (Proffitt, Stefanucci, Banton, & Epstein, 2003; Sugovic & Witt, 2013). However, not much is known about the influence of the other's movement potentialities on our extrapersonal space perception. Three experiments were carried out investigating the categorization of distance in extrapersonal space using human or non-human allocentric reference frames (RF). Subjects were asked to judge the distance ("Near" or "Far") of a target object (a beach umbrella) placed at progressively increasing or decreasing distances until a change from near to far or vice versa was reported. In the first experiment we found a significant "Near space extension" when the allocentric RF was a human virtual agent instead of a static, inanimate object. In the second experiment we tested whether the "Near space extension" depended on the anatomical structure of the RF or its movement potentialities by adding a wooden dummy. The "Near space extension" was only observed for the human agent but not for the dummy. Finally, to rule out the possibility that the

  14. Moving a House by Moved Participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Erik

    himself in controlling every detail of the shape of the concrete slaps. He pushed all the other participants of the meetings, asking for details, information, the change of drawings etc. He explained the technical issues he was pursuing, was prepared for problems at the meetings, was well informed, always......? The participant observer believed it was a matter of changing coordinates, but the engineers immediately saw it was an issue of pipes in the ground, could they be moved and still function as planned? To decide the possibility of this suggestion the engineer was given the task of investigating the consequences...... they saw him as a bit pushy. On the other hand they understood why he was so since his firm would be fined if the concrete slabs did not meet specifications. The case will be the basis for a discussion of double motivation of the engineer, his evident interest in his professional work, and the wish...

  15. Closer to Learning: Social Networks, Trust, and Professional Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Hwa; Daly, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, educators, and policymakers suggest the use of professional learning communities as one important approach to the improvement of teaching and learning. However, relatively little research examines the interplay of professional interactions (structural social capital) around instructional practices and key elements of professional…

  16. MOVES regional level sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The MOVES Regional Level Sensitivity Analysis was conducted to increase understanding of the operations of the MOVES Model in regional emissions analysis and to highlight the following: : the relative sensitivity of selected MOVES Model input paramet...

  17. Move of ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Shigehiko

    1983-01-01

    As a ground water flow which is difficult to explain by Darcy's theory, there is stagnant water in strata, which moves by pumping and leads to land subsidence. This is now a major problem in Japan. Such move on an extensive scale has been investigated in detail by means of 3 H such as from rainfall in addition to ordinary measurement. The move of ground water is divided broadly into that in an unsaturated stratum from ground surface to water-table and that in a saturated stratum below the water-table. The course of the analyses made so far by 3 H contained in water, and the future trend of its usage are described. A flow model of regarding water as plastic fluid and its flow as channel assembly may be available for some flow mechanism which is not possible to explain with Darcy's theory. (Mori, K.)

  18. Moving toroidal limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari; Miyahara, Akira.

    1983-06-01

    The concept of the limiter-divertor proposed by Mirnov is extended to a toroidal limiter-divertor (which we call moving toroidal limiter) using the stream of ferromagnetic balls coated with a low Z materials such as plastics, graphite and ceramics. An important advantage of the use of the ferromagnetic materials would be possible soft landing of the balls on a catcher, provided that the temperature of the balls is below Curie point. Moreover, moving toroidal limiter would work as a protector of the first wall not only against the vertical movement of plasma ring but also against the violent inward motion driven by major disruption because the orbit of the ball in the case of moving toroidal limiter distributes over the small major radius side of the toroidal plasma. (author)

  19. The Specificity of Observational Studies in Physical Activity and Sports Sciences: Moving Forward in Mixed Methods Research and Proposals for Achieving Quantitative and Qualitative Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguera, M Teresa; Camerino, Oleguer; Castañer, Marta; Sánchez-Algarra, Pedro; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J

    2017-01-01

    Mixed methods studies are been increasingly applied to a diversity of fields. In this paper, we discuss the growing use-and enormous potential-of mixed methods research in the field of sport and physical activity. A second aim is to contribute to strengthening the characteristics of mixed methods research by showing how systematic observation offers rigor within a flexible framework that can be applied to a wide range of situations. Observational methodology is characterized by high scientific rigor and flexibility throughout its different stages and allows the objective study of spontaneous behavior in natural settings, with no external influence. Mixed methods researchers need to take bold yet thoughtful decisions regarding both substantive and procedural issues. We present three fundamental and complementary ideas to guide researchers in this respect: we show why studies of sport and physical activity that use a mixed methods research approach should be included in the field of mixed methods research, we highlight the numerous possibilities offered by observational methodology in this field through the transformation of descriptive data into quantifiable code matrices, and we discuss possible solutions for achieving true integration of qualitative and quantitative findings.

  20. The Specificity of Observational Studies in Physical Activity and Sports Sciences: Moving Forward in Mixed Methods Research and Proposals for Achieving Quantitative and Qualitative Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Anguera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed methods studies are been increasingly applied to a diversity of fields. In this paper, we discuss the growing use—and enormous potential—of mixed methods research in the field of sport and physical activity. A second aim is to contribute to strengthening the characteristics of mixed methods research by showing how systematic observation offers rigor within a flexible framework that can be applied to a wide range of situations. Observational methodology is characterized by high scientific rigor and flexibility throughout its different stages and allows the objective study of spontaneous behavior in natural settings, with no external influence. Mixed methods researchers need to take bold yet thoughtful decisions regarding both substantive and procedural issues. We present three fundamental and complementary ideas to guide researchers in this respect: we show why studies of sport and physical activity that use a mixed methods research approach should be included in the field of mixed methods research, we highlight the numerous possibilities offered by observational methodology in this field through the transformation of descriptive data into quantifiable code matrices, and we discuss possible solutions for achieving true integration of qualitative and quantitative findings.

  1. Moving to Jobs?

    OpenAIRE

    Dave Maré; Jason Timmins

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines whether New Zealand residents move from low-growth to high-growth regions, using New Zealand census data from the past three inter-censal periods (covering 1986-2001). We focus on the relationship between employment growth and migration flows to gauge the strength of the relationship and the stability of the relationship over the business cycle. We find that people move to areas of high employment growth, but that the probability of leaving a region is less strongly relate...

  2. Using animal models to overcome temporal, spatial and combinatorial challenges in HIV persistence research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denton, Paul W.; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Research challenges associated with understanding HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy can be categorized as temporal, spatial and combinatorial. Temporal research challenges relate to the timing of events during establishment and maintenance of HIV persistence. Spatial research challeng...... for directly addressing these research challenges. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive review of these recent translational advances made in animal models of HIV persistence....... will improve our understanding of HIV persistence and move the field closer to achieving eradication of persistent HIV. Given that humanized mice and non-human primate HIV models permit rigorous control of experimental conditions, these models have been used extensively as in vivo research platforms...

  3. Moving towards a more inclusive patient and public involvement in health research paradigm: the incorporation of a trauma-informed intersectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimmin, Carolyn; Wittmeier, Kristy D M; Lavoie, Josée G; Wicklund, Evan D; Sibley, Kathryn M

    2017-08-07

    The concept of patient engagement in health research has received growing international recognition over recent years. Yet despite some critical advancements, we argue that the concept remains problematic as it negates the very real complexities and context of people's lives. Though patient engagement conceptually begins to disrupt the identity of "researcher," and complicate our assumptions and understandings around expertise and knowledge, it continues to essentialize the identity of "patient" as a homogenous group, denying the reality that individuals' economic, political, cultural, subjective and experiential lives intersect in intricate and multifarious ways. Patient engagement approaches that do not consider the simultaneous interactions between different social categories (e.g. race, ethnicity, Indigeneity, gender, class, sexuality, geography, age, ability, immigration status, religion) that make up social identity, as well as the impact of systems and processes of oppression and domination (e.g. racism, colonialism, classism, sexism, ableism, homophobia) exclude the involvement of individuals who often carry the greatest burden of illness - the very voices traditionally less heard in health research. We contend that in order to be a more inclusive and meaningful approach that does not simply reiterate existing health inequities, it is important to reconceptualize patient engagement through a health equity and social justice lens by incorporating a trauma-informed intersectional analysis. This article provides key concepts to the incorporation of a trauma-informed intersectional analysis and important questions to consider when developing a patient engagement strategy in health research training, practice and evaluation. In redefining the identity of both "patient" and "researcher," spaces and opportunities to resist and renegotiate power within the intersubjective relations can be recognized and addressed, in turn helping to build trust, transparency and

  4. Interviewing clinicians and advocates who work with sexual assault survivors: a personal perspective on moving from quantitative to qualitative research methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Sarah E

    2005-09-01

    This article describes the author's personal experiences of conducting a qualitative semistructured interview study, after having done predominantly quantitative survey research in the social sciences. The author describes the process of learning how to approach conducting semistructured interviews with female advocates and clinicians who provide services to sexual assault survivors in the community. The author describes making the transition from a logical positivist deductive approach to thinking about and conducting research to a more social constructionist stance in which one learns from participants about their experiences and perspectives in narrative form to discover knowledge and develop theory inductively.

  5. Welcoming Quality in Non-Significance and Replication Work, but Moving beyond the p-Value: Announcing New Editorial Policies for Quantitative Research in "JOAA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Matthew T.; Matthews, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The self-correcting nature of psychological and educational science has been seriously questioned. Recent special issues of "Perspectives on Psychological Science" and "Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts" have roundly condemned current organizational models of research and dissemination and have criticized the…

  6. Is It God or Just the Data that Moves in Mysterious Ways? How Well-Being Research May Be Mistaking Faith for Virtue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans-Stekhoven, James Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Opinion is mixed regarding the link between spiritual faith-based beliefs (SFBBs) and psychological well-being--however, most published field studies suggest a positive link. Controlled experiments demonstrate that spirituality promotes social cohesion and deters excessive self-interested behaviour. Yet past research has largely overlooked virtues…

  7. Libraries on the MOVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Jim; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents papers from Illinois State Library and Shawnee Library System's "Libraries on the MOVE" conference focusing on how libraries can impact economic/cultural climate of an area. Topics addressed included information services of rural libraries; marketing; rural library development; library law; information access; interagency…

  8. Sense of moving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Grünbaum, Thor

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we assume the existence of a sense of “movement activity” that arises when a person actively moves a body part. This sense is usually supposed to be part of sense of agency (SoA). The purpose of the chapter is to determine whether the already existing experimental paradigms can...

  9. Indexing Moving Points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars Allan; Erickson, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    We propose three indexing schemes for storing a set S of N points in the plane, each moving along a linear trajectory, so that any query of the following form can be answered quickly: Given a rectangle R and a real value t, report all K points of S that lie inside R at time t. We first present an...

  10. Moving up in industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, Charlotte

    2016-01-23

    Charlotte Covell is commercial business manager at Virbac UK, a role that gives her responsibility for the company's sales to corporate practices, some buying groups and internet pharmacies. She began her career as a veterinary nurse, but moved into industry and now has a role in senior business management. British Veterinary Association.

  11. Optics of moving media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwnicki, P.; Leonhardt, U.

    2001-01-01

    Light experiences a moving medium as an effective gravitational field. In the limit of low medium velocities the medium flow plays the role of a magnetic vector potential. We review the background of our theory [U. Leonhardt and P. Piwnicki, Phys. Rev. A 60, 4301 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 822 (2000)], including our proposal of making optical black holes.

  12. Moving Another Big Desk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Gay

    1996-01-01

    New ways of thinking about leadership require that leaders move their big desks and establish environments that encourage trust and open communication. Educational leaders must trust their colleagues to make wise choices. When teachers are treated democratically as leaders, classrooms will also become democratic learning organizations. (SM)

  13. Making Images That Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The history of the moving image (the cinema) is well documented in books and on the Internet. This article offers a number of activities that can easily be carried out in a science class. They make use of the phenomenon of "Persistence of Vision." The activities presented herein demonstrate the functionality of the phenakistoscope, the…

  14. Aboard the "Moving School."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Mel; Hopkins, David

    1992-01-01

    In many countries, education legislation embodies contradictory pressures for centralization and decentralization. In the United Kingdom, there is growing government control over policy and direction of schools; schools are also being given more responsibility for resource management. "Moving" schools within Improving the Quality of…

  15. Get a Little Closer: Further Examination of Nonverbal Comforting Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Connie; Horn, Charlotte

    1995-01-01

    Tests whether a set of nonverbal comforting strategies and their relationships with affective orientation and gender in previous research are generalizable to a broader sample. Concludes gender differences in affective orientation, diversity and number of strategies, and use of specific strategies were supported. Finds that females were more…

  16. The Oral Introduction to the Instructional Film: A Closer Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arwady, Joseph W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses reasons for an oral introduction to instructional films, types of oral introductions--i.e., substantive, attention-directing, anxiety-inducing, and advance organizers--and research related to these four areas. Recommendations for the use of the oral introduction are also offered. (RAO)

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Neuroscience: Towards Closer Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Jokić-Begić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review article is to provide an integrative perspective by combining basic assumptions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT with neuroscience research results. In recent years, interdisciplinary research in the field of neuroscience has expanded our knowledge about neurobiological correlates of mental processes and changes occurring in the brain due to therapeutic interventions. The studies are largely based on non-invasive brain imaging techniques, such as functional neuroimaging technologies of positron emission tomography (PET and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The neuroscientific investigations of basic CBT hypotheses have shown that (i functional and non-functional behavior and experiences may be learned through lifelong learning, due to brain neuroplasticity that continues across the entire lifespan; (ii cognitive activity contributes to dysfunctional behavior and emotional experience through focusing, selective perception, memory and recall, and characteristic cognitive distortion; on a neurobiological level, there is a relationship between top-down and bottom-up regulation of unpleasant emotional states; and (iii cognitive activity may be changed, as shown by therapeutic success achieved by metacognitive and mindfulness techniques, which also have their neurobiological correlates in the changes occurring in the cortical and subcortical structures and endocrine and immune systems. The empirical research also shows that neurobiological changes occur after CBT in patients with arachnophobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, major depressive disorder and chronic fatigue syndrome.disorder and chronic fatigue syndrome.

  18. Getting closer: the effects of personalized and interactive online political communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruikemeier, S.; van Noort, G.; Vliegenthart, R.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2013-01-01

    Political parties and politicians increasingly use the possibilities of the Internet to communicate interactively with citizens and vice versa. The Internet also offers opportunities for individual politicians to profile themselves. These developments are often said to bring politics closer to

  19. Moving towards Freirean Critical Pedagogy: Redefining Competence-based Curricula through Participatory Action Research as Resistance to the Neoliberalization of Higher Education in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fernández-Aballí Altamirano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The neoliberalization of higher education in Spain has been consolidating through its integration process to the European Higher Education Area. In this context, competence-based curricula have become an instrument to create a model of education and citizenship in which market values override solidarity, justice and community well-being. There is, however, still room to shift the teaching-learning space. Using Freirean critical pedagogy to redefine the curriculum through the implementation of Participatory Action Research (PAR in the classroom provides a methodological approach within and despite current EHEA policies to revert the neoliberalization of higher education.

  20. AHP 21: Review: Moving Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Noseworthy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Moving Mountains stands out among recent discussions of the Southeast Asian Highlands, drawing from twelve contributors with extensive field experience living and working in locales closed to nonCommunist academics between 1945 and 1990 (3. The authors' methodologies focus on the anthropological approach of participant observation combined with oral history. Previously, substantial research had been confined to the experience of "hill tribes" in Northern Thailand (11, unless one gained access to the massive collections of French language research under the École Française d'Extrême Orient (EFEO or the Société Asiatique (SA, both in Paris. As such, this volume's contributors are able to ring out the voices of Southeast Asian Massif populations in a way that demonstrates a mindful assembly of research, while carefully narrating a more complex view of the region than that presented by Scott's (2009:22 "zones of refuge." ...

  1. Electric moving shadow garden

    OpenAIRE

    Bracey, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Electric Moving Shadow Garden is a multi-directional exploration of the links between artists and cinema, with multiple reference and contextual points. it accompanied the exhibition, UnSpooling: Artists & Cinema, curated by Bracey and Dave Griffiths at Corernhouse, Manchester, who also edited the publication. Published to accompany the Cornerhouse exhibition, UnSpooling: Artists & Cinema, curated by artists Andrew Bracey and Dave Griffiths. This illustrated catalogue explores how internat...

  2. TCR moves to MCR

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Sollander, AB/OP/TI

    2005-01-01

    The monitoring of CERN's technical infrastructure has moved from the Technical Control Room in building 212 to the Meyrin Control Room (MCR) in building 354 (see map) and from the TS/CSE group to AB/OP. The operation's team as well as the services provided remain the same as before and you can still reach the operator on shift by calling 72201. Peter Sollander, AB/OP/TI

  3. CERN Pension Fund move

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund has moved to new offices on the 5th floor of Building 5. The Benefits Service of the Fund is now located in Offices 5-5-017 - 5-5-021 - 5-5-023. We remind you that the office hours are: Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday from 10 am to 12 am and from 3 pm to 5 pm. The Fund would like to take this opportunity to warmly thank all the persons involved in the relocation.

  4. Lecture - "Move! Eat better"

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    As part of the "Move! Eat better" campaign, Novae’s nutrition adviser, Irène Rolfo, will give a talk on the subject of everyday good nutrition. This will be held in the main building auditorium at 12:30 on Thursday, 20 September 2012. Don’t miss this informative event. For more information, go to http://cern.ch/bpmm            

  5. As polar ozone mends, UV shield closer to equator thins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, April

    2018-02-01

    Thirty years after nations banded together to phase out chemicals that destroy stratospheric ozone, the gaping hole in Earth's ultraviolet radiation shield above Antarctica is shrinking. But new findings suggest that at midlatitudes, where most people live, the ozone layer in the lower stratosphere is growing more tenuous—for reasons that scientists are struggling to fathom. In an analysis published this week, researchers found that from 1998 to 2016, ozone in the lower stratosphere ebbed by 2.2 Dobson units—a measure of ozone thickness—even as concentrations in the upper stratosphere rose by about 0.8 Dobson units. The culprit may be ozone-eating chemicals such as dichloromethane that break down within 6 months after escaping into the air.

  6. Self-esteem: a closer look at clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisenhelder, J B

    1985-01-01

    Self-esteem, a positive regard for oneself, is a universal need for every human being and a key component in restoring and maintaining mental and physical health. Yet, this important concept is remarkably neglected in nursing literature and easily overlooked in clinical practice. This article examines the existing research on the antecedents of self-esteem and compiles a list of factors which can facilitate the nurse's therapeutic effect on her client's positive self-concept. From this list, specific nursing interventions are provided for raising and maintaining a client's self-esteem. Since the impact of nursing interventions varies with clinical circumstances, the nursing actions are correlated with their most effective health care settings. This article provides a global and practical approach to the enhancement of clients' self-esteem.

  7. A moving experience !

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The Transport Service pulled out all the stops and, more specifically, its fleet of moving and lifting equipment for the Discovery Monday on 6 June - a truly moving experience for all the visitors who took part ! Visitors could play at being machine operator, twiddling the controls of a lift truck fitted with a jib to lift a dummy magnet into a wooden mock-up of a beam-line.They had to show even greater dexterity for this game of lucky dip...CERN-style.Those with a head for heights took to the skies 20 m above ground in a telescopic boom lift.Children were allowed to climb up into the operator's cabin - this is one of the cranes used to move the LHC magnets around. Warm thanks to all members of the Transport Service for their participation, especially B. Goicoechea, T. Ilkei, R. Bihery, S. Prodon, S. Pelletier, Y. Bernard, A.  Sallot, B. Pigeard, S. Guinchard, B. Bulot, J. Berrez, Y. Grandjean, A. Bouakkaz, M. Bois, F. Stach, T. Mazzarino and S. Fumey.

  8. A closer look at temperature changes with remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Markus; Rocchini, Duccio; Neteler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Temperature is a main driver for important ecological processes. Time series temperature data provide key environmental indicators for various applications and research fields. High spatial and temporal resolution is crucial in order to perform detailed analyses in various fields of research. While meteorological station data are commonly used, they often lack completeness or are not distributed in a representative way. Remotely sensed thermal images from polar orbiting satellites are considered to be a good alternative to the scarce meteorological data as they offer almost continuous coverage of the Earth with very high temporal resolution. A drawback of temperature data obtained by satellites is the occurrence of gaps (due to clouds, aerosols) that must be filled. We have reconstructed a seamless and gap-free time series for land surface temperature (LST) at continental scale for Europe from MODIS LST products (Moderate Resolution Imaging Sensor instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites), keeping the temporal resolution of four records per day and enhancing the spatial resolution from 1 km to 250 m. Here we present a new procedure to reconstruct MODIS LST time series with unprecedented detail in space and time, at the same time providing continental coverage. Our method constitutes a unique new combination of weighted temporal averaging with statistical modeling and spatial interpolation. We selected as auxiliary variables datasets which are globally available in order to propose a worldwide reproducible method. Compared to existing similar datasets, the substantial quantitative difference translates to a qualitative difference in applications and results. We consider both our dataset and the new procedure for its creation to be of utmost interest to a broad interdisciplinary audience. Moreover, we provide examples for its implications and applications, such as disease risk assessment, epidemiology, environmental monitoring, and temperature anomalies. In

  9. A closer look at overuse injuries in the pediatric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Casciano, Rebecca; Friedman, Hilary Levey; Meehan, William P; Micheli, Lyle J

    2015-01-01

    To examine male-female differences in pediatric overuse sports injuries. Cross-sectional epidemiological study. Tertiary level sports medicine division in a large academic pediatric medical center. Five percent probability sample of patients 5 to 17 years seen from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009. About 3813 charts reviewed. Final study cohort included 1614 patients. Nonlinear decomposition analysis of male-female differences in overuse injuries. Age, body mass index, history of previous injury, and activity type (contact/collision, team vs individual, "high overuse"). Females sustained approximately half of the total injuries. Fifty-two percent of the injuries were overuse, 61% to the lower extremity. A high proportion of tennis players, swimmers, dancers, track athletes, runners, gymnasts, and cheerleaders were seen for overuse injuries. Females sustained more overuse injuries versus males (63% and 40%, respectively). Males playing team sports have a 5.3 times higher likelihood of being seen for an overuse injury compared with males not playing team sports (P sport participation increased overuse injury odds by a factor of 10 for males versus 3.6 for females (P ≤ 0.01 for males and females). Forty-six percent of the male-female difference in overuse injuries could be attributed to sport/activity characteristics-contact/collision, team, and high overuse. A large proportion of the sex discrepancy in overuse injuries in this cohort was attributed to compositional differences in sports played. Future research is needed to investigate the independent effect of sex on risk for pediatric sports injuries. This study provides a unique analysis of male-female differences in pediatric sports injuries and is the first study to estimate the impact of the different characteristics (ie, collision, team, high overuse) of sports children play on overuse injuries sustained by young athletes. The findings will help guide future prevention efforts.

  10. on the performance of Autoregressive Moving Average Polynomial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    Distributed Lag (PDL) model, Autoregressive Polynomial Distributed Lag ... Moving Average Polynomial Distributed Lag (ARMAPDL) model. ..... Global Journal of Mathematics and Statistics. Vol. 1. ... Business and Economic Research Center.

  11. Rearrangement moves on rooted phylogenetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambette, Philippe; van Iersel, Leo; Jones, Mark; Lafond, Manuel; Pardi, Fabio; Scornavacca, Celine

    2017-08-01

    Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is usually done by local search heuristics that explore the space of the possible tree topologies via simple rearrangements of their structure. Tree rearrangement heuristics have been used in combination with practically all optimization criteria in use, from maximum likelihood and parsimony to distance-based principles, and in a Bayesian context. Their basic components are rearrangement moves that specify all possible ways of generating alternative phylogenies from a given one, and whose fundamental property is to be able to transform, by repeated application, any phylogeny into any other phylogeny. Despite their long tradition in tree-based phylogenetics, very little research has gone into studying similar rearrangement operations for phylogenetic network-that is, phylogenies explicitly representing scenarios that include reticulate events such as hybridization, horizontal gene transfer, population admixture, and recombination. To fill this gap, we propose "horizontal" moves that ensure that every network of a certain complexity can be reached from any other network of the same complexity, and "vertical" moves that ensure reachability between networks of different complexities. When applied to phylogenetic trees, our horizontal moves-named rNNI and rSPR-reduce to the best-known moves on rooted phylogenetic trees, nearest-neighbor interchange and rooted subtree pruning and regrafting. Besides a number of reachability results-separating the contributions of horizontal and vertical moves-we prove that rNNI moves are local versions of rSPR moves, and provide bounds on the sizes of the rNNI neighborhoods. The paper focuses on the most biologically meaningful versions of phylogenetic networks, where edges are oriented and reticulation events clearly identified. Moreover, our rearrangement moves are robust to the fact that networks with higher complexity usually allow a better fit with the data. Our goal is to provide a solid basis for

  12. Rearrangement moves on rooted phylogenetic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Gambette

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is usually done by local search heuristics that explore the space of the possible tree topologies via simple rearrangements of their structure. Tree rearrangement heuristics have been used in combination with practically all optimization criteria in use, from maximum likelihood and parsimony to distance-based principles, and in a Bayesian context. Their basic components are rearrangement moves that specify all possible ways of generating alternative phylogenies from a given one, and whose fundamental property is to be able to transform, by repeated application, any phylogeny into any other phylogeny. Despite their long tradition in tree-based phylogenetics, very little research has gone into studying similar rearrangement operations for phylogenetic network-that is, phylogenies explicitly representing scenarios that include reticulate events such as hybridization, horizontal gene transfer, population admixture, and recombination. To fill this gap, we propose "horizontal" moves that ensure that every network of a certain complexity can be reached from any other network of the same complexity, and "vertical" moves that ensure reachability between networks of different complexities. When applied to phylogenetic trees, our horizontal moves-named rNNI and rSPR-reduce to the best-known moves on rooted phylogenetic trees, nearest-neighbor interchange and rooted subtree pruning and regrafting. Besides a number of reachability results-separating the contributions of horizontal and vertical moves-we prove that rNNI moves are local versions of rSPR moves, and provide bounds on the sizes of the rNNI neighborhoods. The paper focuses on the most biologically meaningful versions of phylogenetic networks, where edges are oriented and reticulation events clearly identified. Moreover, our rearrangement moves are robust to the fact that networks with higher complexity usually allow a better fit with the data. Our goal is to provide

  13. CERN Pension Fund move

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund has moved to new offices at the 5th floor of Building 5. The Benefits Service of the Fund will henceforth receive you in the offices: 5-5-017 - 5-5-021 - 5-5-023. We remind you that the office hours are: Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday from 10 am to 12 am and from 3 pm to 5 pm. The Fund would like to take this opportunity to warmly thank all the persons involved in the Removal.

  14. PERSPECTIVE: Keeping a closer eye on fossil fuel CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter F.

    2009-12-01

    Peter F Nelson The world is watching expectantly as the clock winds down towards the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP15; http://en.cop15.dk/) to be held 7-18 December 2009 in Copenhagen. While most are now convinced of the need for a strong and concerted response to the climate challenge, the exact nature and extent of that response remains uncertain. There is evidence (Barnett 2009) that current estimates of emissions now exceed all but the most extreme emission scenarios developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). If that increase in emissions persists then temperature increases of 4 °C by 2060 have been predicted (Barnett 2009). An inevitable result of the potential for such extreme climate change is to advance the need for multiple adaptation strategies to decision making about, for example, infrastructure, urban planning and forest management. These strategies need to do more than incremental adaptation (Barnett 2009); instead transformative approaches may be required to adapt. The timing of the response is also proving to be a critical determining factor in the effectiveness of global actions. Using a simple conceptual model of emissions, Vaughan and co-workers (Vaughan et al 2009) show that avoiding dangerous climate change is more effective if such action begins early. Early action is also more effective than acting more aggressively later (Vaughan et al 2009). Uncertainties, although reduced, are still significant in the science of climate change. The interactions between control of particulate air pollutants and climate change are particularly challenging (Arneth et al 2009, Shindell et al 2009) but many other uncertainties require continuing research. The scientific uncertainties are only one aspect of an intense interdisciplinary, political, economic and cultural dialogue. It is clear that political will, economic interest, target setting for emissions reductions, adaptation, technology and financing (Pan 2009) will

  15. Ready, set, move!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    This year, the CERN Medical Service is launching a new public health campaign. Advertised by the catchphrase “Move! & Eat Better”, the particular aim of the campaign is to encourage people at CERN to take more regular exercise, of whatever kind.   The CERN annual relay race is scheduled on 24 May this year. The CERN Medical Service will officially launch its “Move! & Eat Better” campaign at this popular sporting event. “We shall be on hand on the day of the race to strongly advocate regular physical activity,” explains Rachid Belkheir, one of the Medical Service doctors. "We really want to pitch our campaign and answer any questions people may have. Above all we want to set an example. So we are going to walk the same circuit as the runners to underline to people that they can easily incorporate movement into their daily routine.” An underlying concern has prompted this campaign: during their first few year...

  16. Slow light in moving media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, U.; Piwnicki, P.

    2001-06-01

    We review the theory of light propagation in moving media with extremely low group velocity. We intend to clarify the most elementary features of monochromatic slow light in a moving medium and, whenever possible, to give an instructive simplified picture.

  17. Taking a Closer Look at English Learner Subgroups Whose Achievement Stalls Out. REL West Research Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory West, 2014

    2014-01-01

    To figure out better ways to serve their English language learner (ELL) students, the state departments of education in the West Region states of Arizona, Nevada, and Utah, who are members of the English Learner Alliance, asked REL West to help them put together a more detailed picture of two particular groups of K-12 ELL students who seem to…

  18. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    This thesis investigates autonomous landing of a micro air vehicle (MAV) on a nonstationary ground platform. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) are becoming every day more ubiquitous. Nonetheless, many applications still require specialized human pilots or supervisors. Current research is focusing on augmenting the scope of tasks that these vehicles are able to accomplish autonomously. Precise autonomous landing on moving platforms is essential for self-deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures robust stability for systems with bounded disturbances under system state reconstruction. This thesis proposes a MAV control strategy based on this variant of MPC to perform rapid and precise autonomous landing on moving targets whose nominal (uncommitted) trajectory and velocity are slowly varying. The proposed approach is demonstrated on an experimental setup.

  19. Continuous-release formulation for environmental doses to moving receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepho, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric dispersion models frequently assume a puff release or several puff releases, each of which are described separately. A dispersion model should better describe a continuous release as more puffs are assumed, but the computational cost and bookkeeping difficulty increases with additional puffs. A new formulism is derived in this work which replaces the puff approximation. With the new continuous release formulation, radioactive dose calculations to moving receptors are more accurately calculated without any great additional computation. There are several advantages of a continuous release formulation. With this formulation, a dose rate to a moving receptor is calculated as a function of time. The dose-rate will increase (decrease) as the bulk of the release gets closer (farther) to (from) the receptor which is at position x(t), y(t). The receptor may follow any x, y trajectory as a function of time, and the dose rate will be calculated along the path

  20. Closer Scrutiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Examines strategies that some universities are using to make their stadium sporting events more secure in the post September 11 era. Schools reveal how they are minimizing their terrorism risks and providing a greater security presence. (GR)

  1. "Our federalism" moves indoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruger, Theodore W

    2013-04-01

    A great deal of the US Supreme Court's federalism jurisprudence over the past two decades has focused on the outer limits of federal power, suggesting a mutually exclusive division of jurisdiction between the states and the federal government, where subjects are regulated by one sovereign or the other but not both. This is not an accurate picture of American governance as it has operated over the past half century - most important areas of American life are regulated concurrently by both the federal government and the states. The Supreme Court's June 2012 decision clearing the way for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) to move forward thus should not be regarded as an affront to state sovereignty but as a realistic embrace of state power in its active, modern form. The PPACA is infused with multiple major roles for the states, and as the statute goes into operation over the next few years, states retain, and are already exercising, substantial policy discretion.

  2. Moving Spatial Keyword Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Dingming; Yiu, Man Lung; Jensen, Christian S.

    2013-01-01

    propose two algorithms for computing safe zones that guarantee correct results at any time and that aim to optimize the server-side computation as well as the communication between the server and the client. We exploit tight and conservative approximations of safe zones and aggressive computational space...... text data. State-of-the-art solutions for moving queries employ safe zones that guarantee the validity of reported results as long as the user remains within the safe zone associated with a result. However, existing safe-zone methods focus solely on spatial locations and ignore text relevancy. We...... pruning. We present techniques that aim to compute the next safe zone efficiently, and we present two types of conservative safe zones that aim to reduce the communication cost. Empirical studies with real data suggest that the proposals are efficient. To understand the effectiveness of the proposed safe...

  3. Move! Eat better: news

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Are you curious to know whether you’re doing enough daily exercise…? Test yourself with a pedometer!   Through the Move! Eat better campaign, launched in May 2012, the CERN medical service is aiming to improve the health of members of the personnel by encouraging them to prioritise physical activity in conjunction with a balanced diet. Various successful activities have already taken place: relay race/Nordic walk, Bike2work, Zumba and fitness workshops, two conferences (“Physical activity for health” and “Good nutrition every day”), events in the restaurants, as well as posters and a website. Although everyone has got the message from our various communications that physical activity is good for your health, there is still a relevant question being asked: “What is the minimum amount of exercise recommended?” 10,000 steps per day is the ideal figure, which has been demonstrated as beneficial by scientific studies ...

  4. What moves us?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Katalog til udstillingen på Museum Jorn - What moves us? Le Corbusier & Asger Jorn - 12. sept. - 13. dec. 2015. Kataloget undersøger Le Corbusiers skifte fra en rationelt funderet tilgang til arkitekturen til en poetisk, materialistisk tilgang i efterkrigstiden. Den viser hans indflydelse på den...... yngre Asger Jorn og beskriver danskerens første beundring, som sidenhen forvandledes til skarp kritik. Kataloget, som er rigt illustreret med billeder af Le Corbusiers og Asger Jorns kunst og arkitektur, indeholder også genoptryk af originale tekster, samt bidrag i ord og billeder fra fremtrædende...... eksperter. Kataloget indeholder en række artikler af internationale skribenter under flg. overskrifter: Le Corbusier - kunstnerarkitekten i efterkrigstidens Europa Le Corbusier og Asger Jorn - David mod Goliat Gensyn med Le Corbusier - spor i dansk arkitektur og byrum...

  5. Giving Back, Moving Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Fortmann

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While reflecting on her own experience with giving back in Zimbabwe, Fortmann considers how the idea of “giving back” sits at the intersection of feminist theory, participatory research, and the democratization of science. From feminist theory arises the question of how to reciprocate to those who have contributed to our research. The participatory research and democratization of science literature push us to recognize and consider the collaborative nature of our research. Fortmann concludes by identifying three categories of reciprocity in research: material, intellectual, and personal. Sharing must occur, regardless of the kind of research taking place.

  6. Why Make the World Move?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Evan Green

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The next horizons of human-computer interaction promise a whirling world of digital bytes, physical bits, and their hybrids. Are human beings prepared to inhabit such cyber-physical, adaptive environments? Assuming an optimistic view, this chapter offers a reply, drawing from art and art history, environmental design, literature, psychology, and evolutionary anthropology, to identify wide-ranging motivations for the design of such “new places” of human-computer interaction. Moreover, the author makes a plea to researchers focused in the domain of adaptive environments to pause and take a longer, more comprehensive, more self-reflective view to see what we’re doing, to recognize where we are, and to possibly find ourselves and others within our designed artifacts and systems that make the world move.

  7. Moving In, Moving Through, and Moving Out: The Transitional Experiences of Foster Youth College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Sara I.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the transitional experiences of foster youth college students. The study explored how foster youth experienced moving into, moving through, and moving out of the college environment and what resources and strategies they used to thrive during their college transitions. In addition, this study…

  8. Moving On: Young People and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Kathryn; Chamberlain, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To help explain why some young people move from recreational drug use to substance abuse, twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with young people who had experienced problematic substance use. The data were supplemented by statistical data on 111 young people. The researchers found a variety of "structural" factors that help explain…

  9. Moving Feedback Forward: Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsmond, Paul; Maw, Stephen J.; Park, Julian R.; Gomez, Stephen; Crook, Anne C.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial research interest in tutor feedback and students' perception and use of such feedback. This paper considers some of the major issues raised in relation to tutor feedback and student learning. We explore some of the current feedback drivers, most notably the need for feedback to move away from simply a monologue from a tutor to…

  10. Assessing the Cartographic Visualization of Moving Objects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four representations are considered in this research: the single static map, multiple static maps, animation, and the space-time cube. The study is conducted by considering four movement characteristics (or aspects of moving objects): speed change, returns, stops, and path of movement. The ability of users to perceive and ...

  11. Role of moving planes and moving spheres following Dupin cyclides

    KAUST Repository

    Jia, Xiaohong

    2014-03-01

    We provide explicit representations of three moving planes that form a μ-basis for a standard Dupin cyclide. We also show how to compute μ-bases for Dupin cyclides in general position and orientation from their implicit equations. In addition, we describe the role of moving planes and moving spheres in bridging between the implicit and rational parametric representations of these cyclides. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Role of moving planes and moving spheres following Dupin cyclides

    KAUST Repository

    Jia, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    We provide explicit representations of three moving planes that form a μ-basis for a standard Dupin cyclide. We also show how to compute μ-bases for Dupin cyclides in general position and orientation from their implicit equations. In addition, we describe the role of moving planes and moving spheres in bridging between the implicit and rational parametric representations of these cyclides. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Move and eat better

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    CERN has many traditions, but in a week that’s seen the launch of the Medical Service’s  ‘Move & eat better’ campaign, it’s refreshing to note that among the oldest is a sporting one.  The CERN relay race dates back to 15 October 1971 when 21 pioneering teams set off to pound the pavements of CERN. Back then, the Focus users group came in first with a time of 12 minutes and 42 seconds. Today’s route is slightly different, and the number of teams has risen to over 100, with a new category of Nordic Walking introduced, as part of the campaign, for the first time.   The relay has provided some memorable events, and perhaps one of the longest-standing records in the history of sport, with the UA1 strollers’ 10 minutes and 13 seconds unbeaten for thirty years. In the women’s category, the UN Gazelles set the fastest time of 13 minutes and 16 seconds in 1996, while in the veterans category, you wi...

  14. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    Della Mussia, S

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1st March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day. Two road trailers each with 64 wheels, positioned side by side. This was the solution chosen to transport the lower part of the central barrel of ATLAS' tile hadronic calorimeter from Building 185 to the PX16 shaft at Point 1 (see Figure 1). The transportation, and then the installation of the component in the experimental cavern, which took place over three days were, to say the least, rather spectacular. On 25 February, the component, consisting of eight 6-metre modules, was loaded on to the trailers. The segment of the barrel was transported on a steel support so that it wouldn't move an inch during the journey. On 26 February, once all the necessary safety checks had been carried out, the convoy was able to leave Buildi...

  15. A Closer Look at Deep Learning Neural Networks with Low-level Spectral Periodicity Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.; Kereliuk, Corey; Pikrakis, Aggelos

    2014-01-01

    Systems built using deep learning neural networks trained on low-level spectral periodicity features (DeSPerF) reproduced the most “ground truth” of the systems submitted to the MIREX 2013 task, “Audio Latin Genre Classification.” To answer why this was the case, we take a closer look...

  16. Explore: An Action to Bring Science and Technology Closer to Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torras-Melenchon, Nuria; Grau, M. Dolors; Font-Soldevila, Josep; Freixas, Josep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the experience of an initiative, the EXPLORE courses, designed to bring science and technology closer to secondary school. The EXPLORE courses, organised by "EXPLORATORI: Natural Resources" project, are particularly addressed to secondary school teachers and are conducted at Catalonia (North East of Spain). The main…

  17. Measurement of vertical track deflection from a moving rail car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The University of Nebraska has been conducting research sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research and Development to develop a system that measures vertical track deflection/modulus from a moving rail car. Previous work ...

  18. Moving object detection using background subtraction

    CERN Document Server

    Shaikh, Soharab Hossain; Chaki, Nabendu

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief presents a comprehensive survey of the existing methodologies of background subtraction methods. It presents a framework for quantitative performance evaluation of different approaches and summarizes the public databases available for research purposes. This well-known methodology has applications in moving object detection from video captured with a stationery camera, separating foreground and background objects and object classification and recognition. The authors identify common challenges faced by researchers including gradual or sudden illumination change, dynamic bac

  19. Camouflage, detection and identification of moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joanna R; Cuthill, Innes C; Baddeley, Roland; Shohet, Adam J; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E

    2013-05-07

    Nearly all research on camouflage has investigated its effectiveness for concealing stationary objects. However, animals have to move, and patterns that only work when the subject is static will heavily constrain behaviour. We investigated the effects of different camouflages on the three stages of predation-detection, identification and capture-in a computer-based task with humans. An initial experiment tested seven camouflage strategies on static stimuli. In line with previous literature, background-matching and disruptive patterns were found to be most successful. Experiment 2 showed that if stimuli move, an isolated moving object on a stationary background cannot avoid detection or capture regardless of the type of camouflage. Experiment 3 used an identification task and showed that while camouflage is unable to slow detection or capture, camouflaged targets are harder to identify than uncamouflaged targets when similar background objects are present. The specific details of the camouflage patterns have little impact on this effect. If one has to move, camouflage cannot impede detection; but if one is surrounded by similar targets (e.g. other animals in a herd, or moving background distractors), then camouflage can slow identification. Despite previous assumptions, motion does not entirely 'break' camouflage.

  20. Radiation by moving charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2017-04-01

    It is generally accepted that in order to describe the dynamics of relativistic particles in the laboratory (lab) frame it is sufficient to take into account the relativistic dependence of the particle momenta on the velocity. This solution of the dynamics problem in the lab frame makes no reference to Lorentz transformations. For this reason they are not discussed in particle tracking calculations in accelerator and plasma physics. It is generally believed that the electrodynamics problem can be treated within the same ''single inertial frame'' description without reference to Lorentz transformations. In particular, in order to evaluate radiation fields arising from charged particles in motion we need to know their velocities and positions as a function of the lab frame time t. The relativistic motion of a particle in the lab frame is described by Newton's second law ''corrected'' for the relativistic dependence of momentum on velocity. It is assumed in all standard derivations that one can perform identification of the trajectories in the source part of the usual Maxwell's equations with the trajectories vector x(t) measured (or calculated by using the corrected Newton's second law) in the lab frame. This way of coupling fields and particles is considered since more than a century as the relativistically correct procedure.We argue that this procedure needs to be changed, and we demonstrate the following, completely counterintuitive statement: the results of conventional theory of radiation by relativistically moving charges are not consistent with the principle of relativity. In order to find the trajectory of a particle in the lab frame consistent with the usual Maxwell's equations, one needs to solve the dynamic equation inmanifestly covariant form by using the coordinate-independent proper time τ to parameterize the particle world-line in space-time. We show that there is a difference between ''true'' particle trajectory vector x(t) calculated or measured in

  1. Emotions on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Louise

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to discuss how including, and stressing, emotions in research enables us to understand the experience of commuting as an everyday practice that has more meaning than a journey from A to B. The paper shows how emotions are practiced and produced while commuting......, and how these emotions are crucial for the production of social space onboard trains. In doing so it draws on ethnographical research conducted while following various commuting communities and individual commuters. The paper concludes that the emotional practice of commuting produces an ever changing...

  2. On the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the Ph.D. project about home and mobility in the field of research-through-design. The project concerns design for mobile life and through various prototypes it is an investigation of how to support the act of home making away from the primary home.......This paper is a summary of the Ph.D. project about home and mobility in the field of research-through-design. The project concerns design for mobile life and through various prototypes it is an investigation of how to support the act of home making away from the primary home....

  3. Studying Teacher Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In July 2011, Bill Gates told the "Wall Street Journal," "I'm enough of a scientist to want to say, "What is it about a great teacher?"" As a "practitioner" of sorts, the author has wondered the same thing for 15 years. The K-12 school sector generates little empirical research of any sort. And of this small amount, most is targeted to…

  4. Time to Move On?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentino, A.; Nell, Phillip Christopher; Hotho, Jasper J.

    2013-01-01

    Building on prior research, we examine theoretically the institutional factors that push top managers to relocate HQ units overseas. To this end, we first discuss how coercive, isomorphic, and normative pressures may differentially affect HQ relocation decisions. Subsequently, we consider how eco...

  5. Radiation by moving charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    It is generally accepted that in order to describe the dynamics of relativistic particles in the laboratory (lab) frame it is sufficient to take into account the relativistic dependence of the particle momenta on the velocity. This solution of the dynamics problem in the lab frame makes no reference to Lorentz transformations. For this reason they are not discussed in particle tracking calculations in accelerator and plasma physics. It is generally believed that the electrodynamics problem can be treated within the same ''single inertial frame'' description without reference to Lorentz transformations. In particular, in order to evaluate radiation fields arising from charged particles in motion we need to know their velocities and positions as a function of the lab frame time t. The relativistic motion of a particle in the lab frame is described by Newton's second law ''corrected'' for the relativistic dependence of momentum on velocity. It is assumed in all standard derivations that one can perform identification of the trajectories in the source part of the usual Maxwell's equations with the trajectories vector x(t) measured (or calculated by using the corrected Newton's second law) in the lab frame. This way of coupling fields and particles is considered since more than a century as the relativistically correct procedure.We argue that this procedure needs to be changed, and we demonstrate the following, completely counterintuitive statement: the results of conventional theory of radiation by relativistically moving charges are not consistent with the principle of relativity. In order to find the trajectory of a particle in the lab frame consistent with the usual Maxwell's equations, one needs to solve the dynamic equation inmanifestly covariant form by using the coordinate-independent proper time τ to parameterize the particle world-line in space-time. We show that there is a difference between &apos

  6. Moving in extreme environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W

    2016-01-01

    they are set; present the pros and cons for self versus prescribed acute and chronic exposure; describe humans' (mal)adaptations; and finally suggest future directions for practice and research. In summary, we describe adaptation patterns that are often U or J shaped and that over time minimal or no load...... be studied in this perspective. With improved access to insightful and portable technologies, there are some exciting possibilities to explore these questions in this context....

  7. Tiny cells meet big questions: a closer look at bacterial cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goley, Erin D

    2013-04-01

    While studying actin assembly as a graduate student with Matt Welch at the University of California at Berkeley, my interest was piqued by reports of surprising observations in bacteria: the identification of numerous cytoskeletal proteins, actin homologues fulfilling spindle-like functions, and even the presence of membrane-bound organelles. Curiosity about these phenomena drew me to Lucy Shapiro's lab at Stanford University for my postdoctoral research. In the Shapiro lab, and now in my lab at Johns Hopkins, I have focused on investigating the mechanisms of bacterial cytokinesis. Spending time as both a eukaryotic cell biologist and a bacterial cell biologist has convinced me that bacterial cells present the same questions as eukaryotic cells: How are chromosomes organized and accurately segregated? How is force generated for cytokinesis? How is polarity established? How are signals transduced within and between cells? These problems are conceptually similar between eukaryotes and bacteria, although their solutions can differ significantly in specifics. In this Perspective, I provide a broad view of cell biological phenomena in bacteria, the technical challenges facing those of us who peer into bacterial cells, and areas of common ground as research in eukaryotic and bacterial cell biology moves forward.

  8. IAS 8, Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors – A Closer Look

    OpenAIRE

    Muthupandian, K S

    2008-01-01

    The International Accounting Standards Board issued the revised version of the International Accounting Standard 8, Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors. The objective of IAS 8 is to prescribe the criteria for selecting, applying and changing accounting policies, together with the accounting treatment and disclosure of changes in accounting policies, changes in accounting estimates and the corrections of errors. This article presents a closer look of the standard (o...

  9. A closer relationship between working and learning? Employers and distance learners talk about developing work skills

    OpenAIRE

    Pegg, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Across Europe universities are expected to work more closely with employers to ensure that learners develop employability skills for the workplace. Policy discourse suggests that a closer relationship between universities and employers can act as a mechanism to develop employability skills more effectively. This article draws on a small qualitative case study which investigated the “Graduate@Work” initiative undertaken by the Open University. These distance learners, sponsored by their SME em...

  10. Pipelines : moving biomass and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Moving biomass and energy through pipelines was presented. Field sourced biomass utilization for fuel was discussed in terms of competing cost factors; economies of scale; and differing fuel plant sizes. The cost versus scale in a bioenergy facility was illustrated in chart format. The transportation cost of biomass was presented as it is a major component of total biomass processing cost and is in the typical range of 25-45 per cent of total processing costs for truck transport of biomass. Issues in large scale biomass utilization, scale effects in transportation, and components of transport cost were identified. Other topics related to transportation issues included approaches to pipeline transport; cost of wood chips in pipeline transport; and distance variable cost of transporting wood chips by pipeline. Practical applications were also offered. In addition, the presentation provided and illustrated a model for an ethanol plant supplied by truck transport as well as a sample configuration for 19 truck based ethanol plants versus one large facility supplied by truck plus 18 pipelines. Last, pipeline transport of bio-oil and pipeline transport of syngas was discussed. It was concluded that pipeline transport can help in reducing congestion issues in large scale biomass utilization and that it can offer a means to achieve large plant size. Some current research at the University of Alberta on pipeline transport of raw biomass, bio-oil and hydrogen production from biomass for oil sands and pipeline transport was also presented. tabs., figs.

  11. Analysis of the Dose Distribution of Moving Organ using a Moving Phantom System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yon Lae; Park, Byung Moon; Bae, Yong Ki; Kang, Min Young; Bang, Dong Wan; Lee, Gui Won

    2006-01-01

    Few researches have been performed on the dose distribution of the moving organ for radiotherapy so far. In order to simulate the organ motion caused by respiratory function, multipurpose phantom and moving device was used and dosimetric measurements for dose distribution of the moving organs were conducted in this study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate how dose distributions are changed due to respiratory motion. A multipurpose phantom and a moving device were developed for the measurement of the dose distribution of the moving organ due to respiratory function. Acryl chosen design of the phantom was considered the most obvious choice for phantom material. For construction of the phantom, we used acryl and cork with density of 1.14 g/cm 3 , 0.32 g/cm 3 respectively. Acryl and cork slab in the phantom were used to simulate the normal organ and lung respectively. The moving phantom system was composed of moving device, moving control system, and acryl and cork phantom. Gafchromic film and EDR2 film were used to measure dose distributions. The moving device system may be driven by two directional step motors and able to perform 2 dimensional movements (x, z axis), but only 1 dimensional movement(z axis) was used for this study. Larger penumbra was shown in the cork phantom than in the acryl phantom. The dose profile and isodose curve of Gafchromic EBT film were not uniform since the film has small optical density responding to the dose. As the organ motion was increased, the blurrings in penumbra, flatness, and symmetry were increased. Most of measurements of dose distributions, Gafchromic EBT film has poor flatness and symmetry than EDR2 film, but both penumbra distributions were more or less comparable. The Gafchromic EBT film is more useful as it does not need development and more radiation dose could be exposed than EDR2 film without losing film characteristics. But as response of the optical density of Gafchromic EBT film to dose is low, beam profiles

  12. Luxury consumption moves East

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Omera

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The literature contains relatively little prescriptive guidance for establishing supply chain strategies in the luxury fashion marketplace. The focus has been on fashion rather than luxury fashion and the purpose of this paper is to identify and explore the critical supply chain success...... factors to consider when entering the Chinese luxury fashion marketplace. Design/methodology/approach – Given the lack of research in this area an exploratory and in-depth case study was conducted with a niche UK textile manufacturer. Findings – Findings from the case study suggest there are four critical...... success factors to consider when developing a business strategy to enter the Chinese luxury fashion marketplace. Practical implications – The findings could guide managers that are developing a business case for entering the Chinese luxury fashion marketplace. Originality/value – This case study provides...

  13. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-11-09

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  14. Imaging of Moving Ground Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rihaczek, A

    1996-01-01

    ... requires that use be made of the complex image. The yaw/pitch/roll/bounce/flex motion of a moving ground vehicle demands that different motion compensations be applied to different parts of the vehicle...

  15. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-01-08

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  16. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  17. Belarus: Moving Forward Together

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivaniukovich, Uladzimir

    2015-01-01

    The 45th anniversary of INIS provides an opportunity for Member States to look back on significant events. Belarus was among the founding members of the system and the 45th anniversary of INIS also marks 45 years of this country’s participation. In 1992, Belarus began to work independently after a change in the political situation. As a result, the activity of the Belarus INIS Centre increased significantly. Within this time frame, about 6000 inputs were contributed and more than 100 copies of NCL were provided. Currently, Belarus submits about 300 inputs per year to INIS. This quantity reflects the activity of our scientists in the fields corresponding to the scope of INIS. In our country, interest in nuclear technologies is defined by two main factors – the severe consequences of the Chernobyl accident and the acute shortage of energy resources. Therefore, the main focuses of nuclear research are the behavior of ecosystems in conditions of radioactive contamination, and the impact of low dose radiation on living organisms, nuclear medicine, nuclear energy, radiation protection and radiation safety

  18. Autowaves in moving excitable media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A.Davydov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of kinematic theory of autowaves we suggest a method for analytic description of stationary autowave structures appearing at the boundary between the moving and fixed excitable media. The front breakdown phenomenon is predicted for such structures. Autowave refraction and, particulary, one-side "total reflection" at the boundary is considered. The obtained analytical results are confirmed by computer simulations. Prospects of the proposed method for further studies of autowave dynamics in the moving excitable media are discussed.

  19. Infinite games with uncertain moves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Asher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study infinite two-player games where one of the players is unsure about the set of moves available to the other player. In particular, the set of moves of the other player is a strict superset of what she assumes it to be. We explore what happens to sets in various levels of the Borel hierarchy under such a situation. We show that the sets at every alternate level of the hierarchy jump to the next higher level.

  20. Moving On (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Well, here we are with another full volume published. I have watched this journal grow from an idea to a sustainable, reputable journal with readers and contributors from all over the world. It has grown from a small editorial group to a collection of peer reviewers, Evidence Summary writers, copyeditors, etc., that is eighty-four strong (and counting. I have wavered between wondering whether promoting evidence based librarianship is akin to flogging a dead horse to feeling secure in knowing that we are making a difference. Being involved with this journal has made me look at what I do in a different light and I now approach decisions and change with what I refer to as “structured flexibility”. Following the EBL framework is the structured part, and when it works, it works well. But we all know that there is not always an answer in the literature nor is there a guarantee that implemented evidence based change will work similarly in different environments. That’s where the flexibility comes in.Three years as Editor-in-Chief has been a challenging, enjoyable, time-consuming, and fascinating learning experience. It has provided me with numerous opportunities in terms of speaking engagements, workshop offerings, and valuable discussion and discourse. It has also provided me with research and project ideas that I have had to place on the back burner until a time when I have enough hours in the day. Recognizing that adding additional hours to the day is, well, impossible, I have decided to stepdown from my editorial role to pursue other activities. This was a bittersweet decision, but a necessary one. I am pleased to announce that Denise Koufogiannakis will be taking on the role of Editor-in-Chief for the next term. Denise, as many of you know, has also been involved with this journal since its inception and, after a brief period of reduced involvement, has eagerly stepped up to the plate. This journal would not be what it is today without

  1. The Robobo Project: Bringing Educational Robotics Closer to Real-World Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellas, Francisco; Naya, Martin; Varela, Gervasio

    2017-01-01

    The Robobo Project is a STEM-based project that aims to bring educational robotics, in primary and high school, closer to real-world applications. It is based on the use of a smartphone-based robotic platform called Robobo, a very flexible programming environment, and a set of lessons to integrate...... them. The smartphone provides high-level hardware capabilities in terms of sensors, communications and processing capabilities that allow to create more practical and realistic lessons that exploit human-robot interaction, with a small investment. In this paper, we present the main elements...

  2. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-05-14

    This thesis presents a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves, at some unknown time, differently than the “background” motion, which can be induced from camera motion. The goal of proposed method is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Since motion estimation can be unreliable between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Observing more frames before declaring a detection may lead to a more accurate detection and segmentation, since more motion may be observed leading to a stronger motion cue. However, this leads to greater delay. The proposed method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms, defined as declarations of detection before the object moves or incorrect or inaccurate segmentation at the detection time. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  3. Moving Horizon Estimation and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    successful and applied methodology beyond PID-control for control of industrial processes. The main contribution of this thesis is introduction and definition of the extended linear quadratic optimal control problem for solution of numerical problems arising in moving horizon estimation and control...... problems. Chapter 1 motivates moving horizon estimation and control as a paradigm for control of industrial processes. It introduces the extended linear quadratic control problem and discusses its central role in moving horizon estimation and control. Introduction, application and efficient solution....... It provides an algorithm for computation of the maximal output admissible set for linear model predictive control. Appendix D provides results concerning linear regression. Appendix E discuss prediction error methods for identification of linear models tailored for model predictive control....

  4. Automatic Moving Object Segmentation for Freely Moving Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Wan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new moving object segmentation algorithm for freely moving cameras which is very common for the outdoor surveillance system, the car build-in surveillance system, and the robot navigation system. A two-layer based affine transformation model optimization method is proposed for camera compensation purpose, where the outer layer iteration is used to filter the non-background feature points, and the inner layer iteration is used to estimate a refined affine model based on the RANSAC method. Then the feature points are classified into foreground and background according to the detected motion information. A geodesic based graph cut algorithm is then employed to extract the moving foreground based on the classified features. Unlike the existing global optimization or the long term feature point tracking based method, our algorithm only performs on two successive frames to segment the moving foreground, which makes it suitable for the online video processing applications. The experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in both of the high accuracy and the fast speed.

  5. Protecting entanglement by adjusting the velocities of moving qubits inside non-Markovian environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezapour, Ali; Ahmadi Borji, Mahdi; Lo Franco, Rosario

    2017-05-01

    Efficient entanglement preservation in open quantum systems is a crucial scope towards a reliable exploitation of quantum resources. We address this issue by studying how two-qubit entanglement dynamically behaves when two atom qubits move inside two separated identical cavities. The moving qubits independently interact with their respective cavity. As a main general result, we find that under resonant qubit-cavity interaction the initial entanglement between two moving qubits remains closer to its initial value as time passes compared to the case of stationary qubits. In particular, we show that the initial entanglement can be strongly protected from decay by suitably adjusting the velocities of the qubits according to the non-Markovian features of the cavities. Our results supply a further way of preserving quantum correlations against noise with a natural implementation in cavity-QED scenarios and are straightforwardly extendable to many qubits for scalability.

  6. A method of real-time detection for distant moving obstacles by monocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bao-zhi; Zhu, Ming

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for detection of distant moving obstacles like cars and bicycles by a monocular camera to cooperate with ultrasonic sensors in low-cost condition. We are aiming at detecting distant obstacles that move toward our autonomous navigation car in order to give alarm and keep away from them. Method of frame differencing is applied to find obstacles after compensation of camera's ego-motion. Meanwhile, each obstacle is separated from others in an independent area and given a confidence level to indicate whether it is coming closer. The results on an open dataset and our own autonomous navigation car have proved that the method is effective for detection of distant moving obstacles in real-time.

  7. Simulation of Pedestrian Behavior in the Collision-Avoidance Process considering Their Moving Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilu Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking habits can affect the self-organizing movement in pedestrian flow. In China, pedestrians prefer to walk along the right-hand side in the collision-avoidance process, and the same is true for the left-hand preference that is followed in several countries. Through experiments with pedestrian flow, we find that the relative position between pedestrians can affect their moving preferences. We propose a kind of collision-avoidance force based on the social force model, which considers the predictions of potential conflict and the relative position between pedestrians. In the simulation, we use the improved model to explore the effect of moving preference on the collision-avoidance process and self-organizing pedestrian movement. We conclude that the improved model can bring the simulation closer to reality and that moving preference is conducive to the self-adjustment of counterflow.

  8. Carlson Wagonlit Travel is moving

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The renovation of the Main Building continues!   Because of this, Carlson Wagonlit Travel will move from building 62 to building 510 on 4 October and the agency will be closed in the afternoon. An emergency service will be organised for official travels only. Phone: 022 799 75 73 & 022 799 75 78 / e-mail: cern@carlsonwagonlit.ch

  9. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves, at some unknown time, differently than the “background” motion, which can be induced from camera motion. The goal

  10. Congestion and residential moving behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Marott; Pilegaard, Ninette; Van Ommeren, Jos

    2008-01-01

    to congestion. We focus on the equilibrium in which some workers currently living in one region accept jobs in the other, with a fraction of them choosing to commute from their current residence to the new job in the other region and the remainder choosing to move to the region in which the new job is located...

  11. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon

  12. How animals move: comparative lessons on animal locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Paul J; Lindstedt, Stan L

    2013-01-01

    Comparative physiology often provides unique insights in animal structure and function. It is specifically through this lens that we discuss the fundamental properties of skeletal muscle and animal locomotion, incorporating variation in body size and evolved difference among species. For example, muscle frequencies in vivo are highly constrained by body size, which apparently tunes muscle use to maximize recovery of elastic recoil potential energy. Secondary to this constraint, there is an expected linking of skeletal muscle structural and functional properties. Muscle is relatively simple structurally, but by changing proportions of the few muscle components, a diverse range of functional outputs is possible. Thus, there is a consistent and predictable relation between muscle function and myocyte composition that illuminates animal locomotion. When animals move, the mechanical properties of muscle diverge from the static textbook force-velocity relations described by A. V. Hill, as recovery of elastic potential energy together with force and power enhancement with activation during stretch combine to modulate performance. These relations are best understood through the tool of work loops. Also, when animals move, locomotion is often conveniently categorized energetically. Burst locomotion is typified by high-power outputs and short durations while sustained, cyclic, locomotion engages a smaller fraction of the muscle tissue, yielding lower force and power. However, closer examination reveals that rather than a dichotomy, energetics of locomotion is a continuum. There is a remarkably predictable relationship between duration of activity and peak sustainable performance.

  13. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-ying Ma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Painful legs and moving toes syndrome (PLMT is a rare movement disorder with low diagnostic rate, which is characterized by lower limb pain with involuntary movements of feet or toes. Etiology and pathogenesis of this disease is still unclear. Patients have different clinical manifestations, so the diagnosis is difficult. Treatment methods for PLMT are numerous, but so far the treatment of this disease is still a major challenge for clinicians. Further research is still needed to guide clinical work. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.013

  14. Ethnicity at the individual and neighborhood level as an explanation for moving out of the neighborhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake, K.; Burgers, J.; Mulder, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    We address the influence of both the ethnic composition of the neighborhood and the ethnicity of individual residents on moving out of neighborhoods in the Netherlands. Using the Housing Research Netherlands survey and multinomial logistic regression analyses of moving out versus not moving or

  15. Moving Manifolds in Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Svintradze

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose dynamic non-linear equations for moving surfaces in an electromagnetic field. The field is induced by a material body with a boundary of the surface. Correspondingly the potential energy, set by the field at the boundary can be written as an addition of four-potential times four-current to a contraction of the electromagnetic tensor. Proper application of the minimal action principle to the system Lagrangian yields dynamic non-linear equations for moving three dimensional manifolds in electromagnetic fields. The equations in different conditions simplify to Maxwell equations for massless three surfaces, to Euler equations for a dynamic fluid, to magneto-hydrodynamic equations and to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  16. Stand up and move forward

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, Johan; Shokoohi, Roya

    2017-01-01

    Insufficient physical activity or being inactive is one of the leading risk factors for non-communicable diseases worldwide. Globally between 6-10% of premature mortality, caused by non-communicable diseases, could be avoided if people adhered to general physical activity guidelines. Besides that, studies link sitting for prolonged periods of time with many serious health concerns. The solution seems simple: Stand up and move forward. However, human behavior is difficult to change – due to th...

  17. Autoregressive Moving Average Graph Filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Isufi, Elvin; Loukas, Andreas; Simonetto, Andrea; Leus, Geert

    2016-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of the field of signal processing on graphs are graph filters, direct analogues of classical filters, but intended for signals defined on graphs. This work brings forth new insights on the distributed graph filtering problem. We design a family of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) recursions, which (i) are able to approximate any desired graph frequency response, and (ii) give exact solutions for tasks such as graph signal denoising and interpolation. The design phi...

  18. Quality and quantity tackling real issues in an institutional research repository

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Simpson, Pauline

    2005-01-01

    The TARDis project has examined and tackled many practical issues in scaling up from the current individual departmental scholarly communication practices towards an active institutional research repository. This repository must, of necessity, serve a variety of goals for a wide spread of disciplines. We illustrate the steps that have helped move the University of Southampton’s institutional research repository into a key position within the university’s research strategy for both visibility and reporting. We demonstrate the practical activities being developed to manage research assessment in conjunction with the EPrints software. These balance others which we show help fulfill the broad vision of disseminating all research output. These steps are enabling the visions of open access and institutional repositories to come closer together in a constructive fashion.

  19. Improving ISD Agility in Fast-Moving Software Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, John Stouby; Nørbjerg, Jacob; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2016-01-01

    Fast-moving software organizations must respond quickly to changing technological options and market trends while delivering high-quality services at competitive prices. Improving agility of information systems development (ISD) may reconcile these inherent tensions, but previous research...... study on how to improve ISD agility in a fast-moving software organization. The study maps central problems in the ISD management to direct improvements of agility. Our following intervention addressed method improvements in defining types of ISD by customer relations and integrating the method...... with the task management tool used by the organization. The paper discusses how the action research contributes to our understanding of ISD agility in fast-moving software organizations with a framework for mapping and evaluating improvements of agility. The action research specifically points out that project...

  20. Moving walls and geometric phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.facchi@ba.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and MECENAS, Università di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Garnero, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.garnero@uniba.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and MECENAS, Università di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Marmo, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche and MECENAS, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Samuel, Joseph [Raman Research Institute, 560080 Bangalore (India)

    2016-09-15

    We unveil the existence of a non-trivial Berry phase associated to the dynamics of a quantum particle in a one dimensional box with moving walls. It is shown that a suitable choice of boundary conditions has to be made in order to preserve unitarity. For these boundary conditions we compute explicitly the geometric phase two-form on the parameter space. The unboundedness of the Hamiltonian describing the system leads to a natural prescription of renormalization for divergent contributions arising from the boundary.

  1. Dark matter. A light move

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Doebrich, Babette [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    This proceedings contribution reports from the workshop Dark Matter - a light move, held at DESY in Hamburg in June 2013. Dark Matter particle candidates span a huge parameter range. In particular, well motivated candidates exist also in the sub-eV mass region, for example the axion. Whilst a plethora of searches for rather heavy Dark Matter particles exists, there are only very few experiments aimed at direct detection of sub-eV Dark Matter to this date. The aim of our workshop was to discuss if and how this could be changed in the near future.

  2. Live histograms in moving windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1989-01-01

    Application of computer graphics for specific hardware testing is discussed. The hardware is position sensitive detector (multiwire proportional chamber) which is used in high energy physics experiments, and real-out electronics for it. Testing program is described (XPERT), which utilises multi-window user interface. Data are represented as histograms in windows. The windows on the screen may be moved, reordered, their sizes may be changed. Histograms may be put to any window, and hardcopy may be made. Some program internals are discussed. The computer environment is quite simple: MS-DOS IBM PC/XT, 256 KB RAM, CGA, 5.25'' FD, Epson MX. 4 refs.; 7 figs

  3. Dark matter. A light move

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, Javier; Doebrich, Babette

    2013-11-01

    This proceedings contribution reports from the workshop Dark Matter - a light move, held at DESY in Hamburg in June 2013. Dark Matter particle candidates span a huge parameter range. In particular, well motivated candidates exist also in the sub-eV mass region, for example the axion. Whilst a plethora of searches for rather heavy Dark Matter particles exists, there are only very few experiments aimed at direct detection of sub-eV Dark Matter to this date. The aim of our workshop was to discuss if and how this could be changed in the near future.

  4. 'The Closer'-percutaneous vascular suture device: evaluation of safety and performance in neuroangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henk, Christine B.; Grampp, Stephan; Heimberger, Karl; Czerny, Christian; Schindler, Erwin; Mostbeck, Gerhard H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of the suture mediated vascular closure device concerning practicability and safety in clinical angiography practice. Material and methods: One hundred and seventeen patients (59 female, 58 male, mean age 40.9±13.4) underwent percutaneous closure of common femoral arterial puncture sites following diagnostic neuroangiography using the suture device 'the Closer' (Perclose Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA). Primary success, early problems (within 24 h) and late complications were evaluated. Complications were graded as minor and severe with or without need of surgical intervention and categorized by type. Parameters such as age, gender, sheath size and number of previous arterial punctures were evaluated with respect to complications. Results: Percutaneous closure was primary successful in 85% (100/117). The overall complication rate was 32% (28% mild n=35, 4% severe n=6, which needed surgical intervention). All but one problem occurred within the first 24 h after the suture. Additional manual compression was necessary in 32 cases (25%). There was no significant difference in age and gender between the groups with and without complications. Sheath size was significantly larger (P<0.01) and numbers of preceding angiograms were significantly higher (P<0.01) in the complications group compared with uncomplicated cases. Conclusion: The evaluated percutaneous vascular suture device is useful in clinical practice but limitations concerning patient selection seem to emerge in order to avoid complications

  5. Angioedema Spotlight: A Closer Examination of Sacubitril/Valsartan Safety Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Ryan E; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of neprilysin inhibition into heart failure pharmacotherapy regimens has recently been recommended by U.S. guidelines, based on results from the PARADIGM-HF trial comparing sacubitril/valsartan to enalapril. While most of the discussion has focused on efficacy, a closer examination of the safety results, particularly the incidence of angioedema during the run-in and double-blind periods, is also warranted. Although no major safety concerns were identified, an angioedema risk comparable to enalapril was found, primarily in the black population. Therefore, despite combination with an angiotensin receptor blocker, which historically has a lower incidence of angioedema, the addition of neprilysin inhibition yields an angioedema risk profile comparable to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Clinicians should recognize this safety risk when prescribing sacubitril/valsartan and remain vigilant in counseling patients regarding the signs and symptoms of angioedema. As recommended by the guidelines, avoiding sacubitril/valsartan use concurrently or within 36 hours of the last dose of an ACE inhibitor or in patients with a history of angioedema is also crucial to minimize angioedema risk and prevent patient harm. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... renowned stem cell and regenerative medicine community. More stem cell research Take a closer look Recent Blogs View ... story independent nonprofit organization & the voice of the stem cell research community The International Society for Stem Cell ...

  7. Moving as an interspecies unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondeme, Chloé

    In urban spaces, people are normatively expected to move, to be mobile. In such “evolving ecologies” (Haddington, Nevile and Mondada, 2013), pedestrians, cyclists, and car-drivers are constantly adjusting to one another's mobility. Stillness, conversely, is noticed and somehow disruptive (Hadding......In urban spaces, people are normatively expected to move, to be mobile. In such “evolving ecologies” (Haddington, Nevile and Mondada, 2013), pedestrians, cyclists, and car-drivers are constantly adjusting to one another's mobility. Stillness, conversely, is noticed and somehow disruptive...... (Haddington, 2012 ; Lan Hing Ting & al., 2013). Staying immobile, for instance just before crossing a street, is in that respect a non-dynamic action yet to account for. Will the projected next action of the still participant be to wait and stay for a while, or to cross the street? To put is in other words......, how can immobility be unproblematically bound to a waiting status? What are the embodied resources used to be ‘doing wainting’ (Ayass, 2015)? In this presentation we will look at a collection of street crossings accomplished by blind persons with their guide-dogs. In the absence of visual access...

  8. Exoplanet Caught on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    For the first time, astronomers have been able to directly follow the motion of an exoplanet as it moves from one side of its host star to the other. The planet has the smallest orbit so far of all directly imaged exoplanets, lying almost as close to its parent star as Saturn is to the Sun. Scientists believe that it may have formed in a similar way to the giant planets in the Solar System. Because the star is so young, this discovery proves that gas giant planets can form within discs in only a few million years, a short time in cosmic terms. Only 12 million years old, or less than three-thousandths of the age of the Sun, Beta Pictoris is 75% more massive than our parent star. It is located about 60 light-years away towards the constellation of Pictor (the Painter) and is one of the best-known examples of a star surrounded by a dusty debris disc [1]. Earlier observations showed a warp of the disc, a secondary inclined disc and comets falling onto the star. "Those were indirect, but tell-tale signs that strongly suggested the presence of a massive planet, and our new observations now definitively prove this," says team leader Anne-Marie Lagrange. "Because the star is so young, our results prove that giant planets can form in discs in time-spans as short as a few million years." Recent observations have shown that discs around young stars disperse within a few million years, and that giant planet formation must occur faster than previously thought. Beta Pictoris is now clear proof that this is indeed possible. The team used the NAOS-CONICA instrument (or NACO [2]), mounted on one of the 8.2-metre Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), to study the immediate surroundings of Beta Pictoris in 2003, 2008 and 2009. In 2003 a faint source inside the disc was seen (eso0842), but it was not possible to exclude the remote possibility that it was a background star. In new images taken in 2008 and spring 2009 the source had disappeared! The most recent

  9. Reasons for Moving in Nonmetro Iowa

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Sandra Charvat; Edelman, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This study highlights the experiences of people who have recently moved to or from 19 selected nonmetropolitan counties of Iowa. This report highlights work, family, community, and housing reasons for moving. The purpose is to increase understanding about why people move so community leaders and citizens can develop actionable strategies for attracting and retaining population.

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Joseph Daniels1,&, Ruth Nduati1,2, James Kiarie1,3, Carey Farquhar1,4,5 .... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, .... a research environment that supports knowledge sharing to develop research ...

  11. A Snapshot of Gender in Brazil Today : Institutions, Outcomes, and a Closer Look at Racial and Geographic Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Gukovas, Renata; Muller, Miriam; Pereira, Ana Claudia; Reimao, Maira Emy

    2016-01-01

    The Gender Diagnostic: ‘A Snapshot of Gender in Brazil Today: Institutions, Outcomes, and a Closer Look at Racial and Geographic Differences Gender issues in Brazil’ highlights progress on gender equality in the country and lays out the main areas of persisting challenges. It details gender outcomes beyond the national aggregate and emphasizes that gender inequality in Brazil has to be und...

  12. Multiple Moving Obstacles Avoidance of Service Robot using Stereo Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Jazidie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a multiple moving obstacles avoidance using stereo vision for service robots in indoor environments. We assume that this model of service robot is used to deliver a cup to the recognized customer from the starting point to the destination. The contribution of this research is a new method for multiple moving obstacle avoidance with Bayesian approach using stereo camera. We have developed and introduced 3 main modules to recognize faces, to identify multiple moving obstacles and to maneuver of robot. A group of people who is walking will be tracked as a multiple moving obstacle, and the speed, direction, and distance of the moving obstacles is estimated by a stereo camera in order that the robot can maneuver to avoid the collision. To overcome the inaccuracies of vision sensor, Bayesian approach is used for estimate the absense and direction of obstacles. We present the results of the experiment of the service robot called Srikandi III which uses our proposed method and we also evaluate its performance. Experiments shown that our proposed method working well, and Bayesian approach proved increasing the estimation perform for absence and direction of moving obstacle.

  13. The Effect of Direction on Cursor Moving Kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Ping Lu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There have been only few studies to substantiate the kinematic characteristics of cursor movement. In this study, a quantitative experimental research method was used to explore the effect of moving direction on the kinematics of cursor movement in 24 typical young persons using our previously developed computerized measuring program. The results of multiple one way repeated measures ANOVAs and post hoc LSD tests demonstrated that the moving direction had effects on average velocity, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. Moving leftward showed better efficiency than moving rightward, upward and downward from the kinematic evidences such as velocity, movement unit and time. Moreover, the unique pattern of the power spectral density (PSD of velocity (strategy for power application explained why the smoothness was still maintained while moving leftward even under an unstable situation with larger momentum. Moreover, the information from this cursor moving study can guide us to relocate the toolbars and icons in the window interface, especially for individuals with physical disabilities whose performances are easily interrupted while controlling the cursor in specific directions.

  14. A Closer Look at Transcendence and Its Relationship to Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, John R

    2018-04-01

    Experiences of transcendence can promote growth, creativity and altruism, but often exist in tension with critical thought and can feature problematically in certain mental disorders. Identification of the core elements in the experience of transcendence-suspending disbelief, being moved or inspired, surrendering oneself and identifying within a larger context, can clarify its relationship to psychopathology, and the basis for a clinician's role. To help individuals engage transcendent resources well, clinicians can help patients recognize how depression and trauma may interfere with engagement, masochistic and magical tendencies may distort healthy self-surrender, and vulnerability to social pressure may interfere with mature identification with a larger context or community.

  15. Prototype moving-ring reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Ashworth, C.P.; Abreu, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    We have completed a design of the Prototype Moving-Ring Reactor. The fusion fuel is confined in current-carrying rings of magnetically-field-reversed plasma (Compact Toroids). The plasma rings, formed by a coaxial plasma gun, undergo adiabatic magnetic compression to ignition temperature while they are being injected into the reactor's burner section. The cylindrical burner chamber is divided into three burn stations. Separator coils and a slight axial guide field gradient are used to shuttle the ignited toroids rapidly from one burn station to the next, pausing for 1/3 of the total burn time at each station. D-T- 3 He ice pellets refuel the rings at a rate which maintains constant radiated power

  16. Moving Forest di Expo 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Moretti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a reading of the Expo 2015 landscape project through the essay "Moving Forest "by Franco Zagari and Benedetto Selleri; in which the authors trace the design process of the exposition site. It describes the design features of the green spaces that surround and mark the Exposition City. The green project is the connection between innovation, technology and rural landscape, like that surrounds the site. The Expo map represents one of the largest landscape projects in the last years in Europe, with its 300,000 square meters, organized in a sequence of different landscape that improve a gradual transition from the rural and natural landscape outside, to the urban landscape inside the exposition city.

  17. Mobility narratives that move me

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jonas Andreasen; Kronlid, David

    and fiction. By opposing the classic anthropocentric ontological split between human (discourse) and object, fiction and Reality, OOO opens up for a new understanding of the role of narratives as independent objects on the same scale as grains of sand, universities, axolotls and planets. In short...... of speed, acceleration, the rhythm of technogenic moving and mooring, which can be translated into an understanding of our own movements and moorings through life and how we engage with new things, such as mediating new information through a certain pace, rhythm, movement, acceleration, slowing down....... This fictive/Real example of a narrative object illustrates that regardless of the metaphysical status of what/who we encounter in education and throughout life, if this experience becomes meaningful to us, we are navigating around them, towards them, and enmesh with them in the same principle ways...

  18. Simple, Yet Powerful English of MoveOns's Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Munandar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Getting messages across to a large audience of diverse backgrounds is a challenge. MoveOn.org is successful in responding to the challenge when writing its campaigns in a language intelligible to all members. This research studies the characteristics of English used in MoveOn’s campaigns during the periods of January 25, to March 30, 2011. It reveals that the campaigns choose ordinary words (neither politically charged nor hyperbolic to maintain neutrality and situation-problem-solution pattern for its rhetorical structure in order to convey an easy-to-follow argument. The research concludes that MoveOn designs its campaigns to produce persuasive effects that are more rational based than emotional-based.

  19. Alpha detection on moving surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, D.; Orr, C.; Luff, C.

    1998-01-01

    Both environmental restoration (ER) and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) require characterization of large surface areas (walls, floors, in situ soil, soil and rubble on a conveyor belt, etc.) for radioactive contamination. Many facilities which have processed alpha active material such as plutonium or uranium require effective and efficient characterization for alpha contamination. Traditional methods for alpha surface characterization are limited by the short range and poor penetration of alpha particles. These probes are only sensitive to contamination located directly under the probe. Furthermore, the probe must be held close to the surface to be monitored in order to avoid excessive losses in the ambient air. The combination of proximity and thin detector windows can easily cause instrument damage unless extreme care is taken. The long-range alpha detection (LRAD) system addresses these problems by detecting the ions generated by alpha particles interacting with ambient air rather than the alpha particle directly. Thus, detectors based on LRAD overcome the limitations due to alpha particle range (the ions can travel many meters as opposed to the several-centimeter alpha particle range) and penetrating ability (an LRAD-based detector has no window). Unfortunately, all LRAD-based detectors described previously are static devices, i.e., these detectors cannot be used over surfaces which are continuously moving. In this paper, the authors report on the first tests of two techniques (the electrostatic ion seal and the gridded electrostatic LRAD detector) which extend the capabilities of LRAD surface monitors to use over moving surfaces. This dynamic surface monitoring system was developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and at BNFL Instruments. All testing was performed at the BNFL Instruments facility in the UK

  20. An Analysis of Voucher Advocacy: Taking a Closer Look at the Uses and Limitations of "Gold Standard" Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubienski, Christopher; Brewer, T. Jameson

    2016-01-01

    Voucher proponents have increasingly pursued empirical evidence on the effectiveness of vouchers as a form of education improvement, in addition to advocating for vouchers on moral or ethical grounds. Voucher proponents contend that randomized assignment studies of students in voucher programs have consistently confirmed the effectiveness of…

  1. Stem Cells: Taking a Closer Look at the Advancements and Hurdles of Stem Cell Research in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Aimee

    2008-01-01

    The technology surrounding stem cells generates great excitement amongst scientists, media and the community. For science teachers, this means not only embracing and keeping track of the rapid growth and ongoing development in this field but also tackling the ethical and legislative issues surrounding the topic. So what are stem cells, what is all…

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive qualitative research design was used to determine whether participants ... simulation as a teaching method; a manikin offering effective learning; confidence ..... Tesch R. Qualitative Research: Analysis Types and Software Tools.

  3. Nonlinear Vibration of Ladle Crane due to a Moving Trolley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Xin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural vibration of the main beam of a crane causes fatigue damage and discomfort to the driver. The swing of the payload has an effect on positioning precision, especially for a ladle crane, and this directly affects production safety. To study the influence of system parameters on the vibration of a crane’s main beam and the angle of the payload, a system consisting of the main beam, trolley, payload, and cabin was constructed. A rigid-flexible coupling dynamic model of a moving trolley with a hanging payload that moves on the flexible main beam with a concentrated cabin mass is established, and the direct integration method is used to solve the nonlinear differential equations of system vibration, which are obtained through Lagrange’s equation. Then, the time domain responses of the flexible main beam, payload angle, and cabin vibration are obtained. The influences of the trolley running speed, quality of the payload, and quality and position of the cabin on the vibration of the main beam and payload angle are analyzed. The results indicate that the amplitude of the main beam is directly proportional to the quality of the trolley, payload, and cab; the position of the cabin is closer to the mid-span; the amplitude of the main beam is larger; the structural damping has some influence on the vibration of the main beam; and the swing angle of the payload is related to the maximum running speed of the trolley, acceleration time, and length of the wire rope. In order to reduce the vibration of the main beam and cabin, the connection stiffness of the cabin should be ensured during installation.

  4. Sensorimotor Distractions When Learning with Mobile Phones On-the-Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Soledad; Arnedillo-Sánchez, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion on potential conflicts originated by sensorimotor distractions when learning with mobile phones on-the-move. While research in mobile learning points to the possibility of everywhere, all the time learning; research in the area suggests that tasks performed while on-the-move predominantly require low cognitive…

  5. Against the odds : Human values arising in unfavourable circumstances elicit the feeling of being moved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strick, M.A.; Van Soolingen, Jantine

    2017-01-01

    People sometimes say they are ‘moved’ or ‘touched’ by something. Although the experience is familiar to most, systematic research on being moved has just begun. The current research aims to advance our understanding of the prototypical elicitors of being moved. We tested the hypothesis that being

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research process, as part of which students must find and appraise evidence from research.[5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined towards equipping students ... Students believed that evidence-based practice was vital, yet their understanding of the concept was restricted when compared with the.

  7. Advanced sorbent development progam; development of sorbents for moving-bed and fluidized-bed applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, R.E.; Venkataramani, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 C (900-1000F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 C (650-1000 F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost assessment and

  8. Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, I.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ''Radon Hazards in Homes'' project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ''Mechanisms of Radon Injury'' and ''In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage'' projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ''Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,'' ''Laser Measurements of Pb-210,'' ''Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,'' ''Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,'' ''Mutation of DNA Targets,'' ''Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,'' and ''Aerosol Technology Development'' also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research

  9. Mapping and tracking of moving objects in dynamic environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pancham, A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order for mobile robots to operate in dynamic or real world environments they must be able to localise themselves while building a map of the environment, and detect and track moving objects. This work involves the research and implementation...

  10. Choosing to Move: Child Agency on Peru's Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinaweaver, Jessaca B.

    2007-01-01

    This article links research into constructions of childhood and child agency to anthropological studies of young people's informal adoption and state involvement in family arrangements. It analyses the life history of a young Peruvian woman who deliberately chose to move into an orphanage. The multiple points at which individual and family plans…

  11. Travelling Academics: The Lived Experience of Academics Moving across Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusimaki, Liisa; Garvis, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    The article reports on a study that explored the personal narratives of two female travelling academics at a Swedish University who had moved from Australia. To complement previous accounts of difficult migration and enculturation within the research literature, this article focuses mainly on the successful experiences of the academics and how…

  12. Mixing and scale affect moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Andries; Blom, Ewout; Terjesen, Bendik Fyhn

    2017-01-01

    Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBR) are used increasingly in closed systems for farming of fish. Scaling, i.e. design of units of increasing size, is an important issue in general bio-reactor design since mixing behaviour will differ between small and large scale. Research is mostly performed on

  13. Method and apparatus for a combination moving bed thermal treatment reactor and moving bed filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, Phillip C.; Dunn, Jr., Kenneth J.

    2015-09-01

    A moving bed gasification/thermal treatment reactor includes a geometry in which moving bed reactor particles serve as both a moving bed filter and a heat carrier to provide thermal energy for thermal treatment reactions, such that the moving bed filter and the heat carrier are one and the same to remove solid particulates or droplets generated by thermal treatment processes or injected into the moving bed filter from other sources.

  14. Is the Perspective of a Closer French Policy toward Russian a threat for Eastern European Countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim BELGACEM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The current world is not moving as all specialists predicted. Brexit, Trump, everyone was wrong. This paper will have two targets: describing the French policy toward Russia, making a perspective on the future policy, whatever the new French presidency in 2017, Francois Hollande will transmit the key to his successor with new election. He refused to compete for a second mandate. It is good to remind that Hollande was involving in the Ukrainian affairs and had managed with Germany the Minsk I and II agreements. He also had suspended Mistral ships selling and approving sanctions against Russia. How will be the future with François Fillon, Marine Le Pen or other? The analysis will be focusing on the future relationships toward Russia and Eastern European Countries.

  15. Cosmology with moving bimetric fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-García, Carlos; Maroto, Antonio L.; Martín-Moruno, Prado, E-mail: cargar08@ucm.es, E-mail: maroto@ucm.es, E-mail: pradomm@ucm.es [Departamento de Física Teórica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    We study cosmological implications of bigravity and massive gravity solutions with non-simultaneously diagonal metrics by considering the generalized Gordon and Kerr-Schild ansatzes. The scenario that we obtain is equivalent to that of General Relativity with additional non-comoving perfect fluids. We show that the most general ghost-free bimetric theory generates three kinds of effective fluids whose equations of state are fixed by a function of the ansatz. Different choices of such function allow to reproduce the behaviour of different dark fluids. In particular, the Gordon ansatz is suitable for the description of various kinds of slowly-moving fluids, whereas the Kerr-Schild one is shown to describe a null dark energy component. The motion of those dark fluids with respect to the CMB is shown to generate, in turn, a relative motion of baryonic matter with respect to radition which contributes to the CMB anisotropies. CMB dipole observations are able to set stringent limits on the dark sector described by the effective bimetric fluid.

  16. Computations of slowly moving shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karni, S.; Canic, S.

    1997-01-01

    Computations of slowly moving shocks by shock capturing schemes may generate oscillations are generated already by first-order schemes, but become more pronounced in higher-order schemes which seem to exhibit different behaviors: (i) the first-order upwind (UW) scheme which generates strong oscillations and (ii) the Lax-Friedrichs scheme which appears not to generate any disturbances at all. A key observation is that in the UW case, the numerical viscosity in the shock family vanishes inside the slow shock layer. Simple scaling arguments show the third-order effects on the solution may no longer be neglected. We derive the third-order modified equation for the UW scheme and regard the oscillatory solution as a traveling wave solution of the parabolic modified equation for the perturbation. We then look at the governing equation for the perturbation, which points to a plausible mechanism by which postshock oscillations are generated. It contains a third-order source term that becomes significant inside the shock layer, and a nonlinear coupling term which projects the perturbation on all characteristic fields, including those not associated with the shock family. 5 refs., 8 figs

  17. Leadership in moving human groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarete Boos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How is movement of individuals coordinated as a group? This is a fundamental question of social behaviour, encompassing phenomena such as bird flocking, fish schooling, and the innumerable activities in human groups that require people to synchronise their actions. We have developed an experimental paradigm, the HoneyComb computer-based multi-client game, to empirically investigate human movement coordination and leadership. Using economic games as a model, we set monetary incentives to motivate players on a virtual playfield to reach goals via players' movements. We asked whether (I humans coordinate their movements when information is limited to an individual group member's observation of adjacent group member motion, (II whether an informed group minority can lead an uninformed group majority to the minority's goal, and if so, (III how this minority exerts its influence. We showed that in a human group--on the basis of movement alone--a minority can successfully lead a majority. Minorities lead successfully when (a their members choose similar initial steps towards their goal field and (b they are among the first in the whole group to make a move. Using our approach, we empirically demonstrate that the rules of swarming behaviour apply to humans. Even complex human behaviour, such as leadership and directed group movement, follow simple rules that are based on visual perception of local movement.

  18. The Telecom Lab is moving

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    As of 2nd March 2009, the Telecom Lab will move to Building 58 R-017. The Telecom Lab is the central point for all support questions regarding CERN mobile phone services (provision of SIM cards, requests for modifications of subscriptions, diagnostics for mobile phone problems, etc.). The opening hours as well as the contact details for the Telecom Lab remain unchanged: New location: Building 58 R-017 Opening hours: Every week day, from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. Phone number: 72480 Email address: labo.telecom@cern.ch This change has no impact on support requests for mobile services. Users can still submit their requests concerning mobile phone subscriptions using the usual EDH form (https://edh.cern.ch/Document/GSM). The automatic message sent to inform users of their SIM card availability will be updated to indicate the new Telecom Lab location. You can find all information related to CERN mobile phone services at the following link: http://cern.ch/gsm CS Section - IT/CS group

  19. TRAX - Real-World Tracking of Moving Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Pakalnis, Stardas

    2007-01-01

    accuracy. This paper presents the TRAX tracking system that supports several techniques capable of tracking the current positions of moving objects with guaranteed accuracies at low update and communication costs in real-world settings. The techniques are readily relevant for practical applications......, but they also have implications for continued research. The tracking techniques offer a realistic setting for existing query processing techniques that assume that it is possible to always know the exact positions of moving objects. The techniques enable studies of trade-offs between querying and update...

  20. Detection of Moving Targets Using Soliton Resonance Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Igor K.; Zak, Michail

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a fundamentally new method for detecting hidden moving targets within noisy and cluttered data-streams using a novel "soliton resonance" effect in nonlinear dynamical systems. The technique uses an inhomogeneous Korteweg de Vries (KdV) equation containing moving-target information. Solution of the KdV equation will describe a soliton propagating with the same kinematic characteristics as the target. The approach uses the time-dependent data stream obtained with a sensor in form of the "forcing function," which is incorporated in an inhomogeneous KdV equation. When a hidden moving target (which in many ways resembles a soliton) encounters the natural "probe" soliton solution of the KdV equation, a strong resonance phenomenon results that makes the location and motion of the target apparent. Soliton resonance method will amplify the moving target signal, suppressing the noise. The method will be a very effective tool for locating and identifying diverse, highly dynamic targets with ill-defined characteristics in a noisy environment. The soliton resonance method for the detection of moving targets was developed in one and two dimensions. Computer simulations proved that the method could be used for detection of singe point-like targets moving with constant velocities and accelerations in 1D and along straight lines or curved trajectories in 2D. The method also allows estimation of the kinematic characteristics of moving targets, and reconstruction of target trajectories in 2D. The method could be very effective for target detection in the presence of clutter and for the case of target obscurations.

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... facilitate and support articulation between the ECT mid-level worker qualification and the professional B EMC degree. Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, which is characterised by a qualitative phase of research followed by a quantitative phase. This design is ...

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    supports medical education and research at institutions in 12 ... (CBE). CapacityPlus, led by IntraHealth International, is the USAID-funded ... acquire public health, clinical, and/or research skills, usually through applied learning in a .... If students were evaluated, indicate the type of student (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, etc.) ...

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-01-24

    Jan 24, 2017 ... and the specific rotavirus VP4 (P-types) and VP7 (G-types) determined. Results: The .... Centre for Virus Research (CVR) of the Kenya Medical Research. Institute (KEMRI) ... rotavirus dsRNA was run on 10% polyacrylamide resolving gels using a large format .... What is known about this topic. •. Rotavirus is ...

  4. Measuring the Distance of Moving Objects from Big Trajectory Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaing Phyo Wai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services have become important in social networking, mobile applications, advertising, traffic monitoring, and many other domains. The growth of location sensing devices has led to the vast generation of dynamic spatial-temporal data in the form of moving object trajectories which can be characterized as big trajectory data. Big trajectory data enables the opportunities such as analyzing the groups of moving objects. To obtain such facilities, the issue of this work is to find a distance measurement method that respects the geographic distance and the semantic similarity for each trajectory. Measurement of similarity between moving objects is a difficult task because not only their position changes but also their semantic features vary. In this research, a method to measure trajectory similarity based on both geographical features and semantic features of motion is proposed. Finally, the proposed methods are practically evaluated by using real trajectory dataset.

  5. Numerical Analysis of Vibrations of Structures under Moving Inertial Load

    CERN Document Server

    Bajer, Czeslaw I

    2012-01-01

    Moving inertial loads are applied to structures in civil engineering, robotics, and mechanical engineering. Some fundamental books exist, as well as thousands of research papers. Well known is the book by L. Frýba, Vibrations of Solids and Structures Under Moving Loads, which describes almost all problems concerning non-inertial loads. This book presents broad description of numerical tools successfully applied to structural dynamic analysis. Physically we deal with non-conservative systems. The discrete approach formulated with the use of the classical finite element method results in elemental matrices, which can be directly added to global structure matrices. A more general approach is carried out with the space-time finite element method. In such a case, a trajectory of the moving concentrated parameter in space and time can be simply defined. We consider structures described by pure hyperbolic differential equations such as strings and structures described by hyperbolic-parabolic differential equations ...

  6. Can math beat gamers in Quantum Moves?

    OpenAIRE

    Sels, Dries

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: In a recent work on quantum state preparation, Sørensen and co-workers [Nature (London) 532, 210 (2016)] explore the possibility of using video games to help design quantum control protocols. The authors present a game called Quantum Moves (https://www.scienceathome.org/games/quantum-moves/) in which gamers have to move an atom from A to B by means of optical tweezers. They report that, players succeed where purely numerical optimization fails. Moreover, by harnessing the player str...

  7. Trading Fees and Slow-Moving Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Buss, Adrian; Dumas, Bernard J

    2015-01-01

    In some situations, investment capital seems to move slowly towards profitable trades. We develop a model of a financial market in which capital moves slowly simply because there is a proportional cost to moving capital. We incorporate trading fees in an infinite-horizon dynamic general-equilibrium model in which investors optimally and endogenously decide when and how much to trade. We determine the steady-state equilibrium no-trade zone, study the dynamics of equilibrium trades and prices a...

  8. Moving forward: Institutional perspectives on gender and entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Ahl, Helene; Nelson, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose a re‐directed and purposeful attention to the design of research on gender and entrepreneurship moving forward. Design/methodology/approach – The paper questions the value of more studies on the men v. women binary and encourages research on the institutions supporting the gendered construction. Findings – The paper suggests a re‐framing of gender (to include men, women, femininity, masculinity, etc.) both in topics investigated and in buildin...

  9. Older Men's Experiences of Moving Into Residential Care

    OpenAIRE

    Weighell, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Research examining the transition into residential aged care suggests that it can have a significant psychological and physiological impact upon older adults. There is a dearth of research examining the specific experiences of older men moving into and living in residential aged care. Older men may be at a significant disadvantage in managing the transition into care, particularly in context to; institutional living often characterised by increased dependency and a loss of control; physical d...

  10. Lattice Boltzmann methods for moving boundary flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamuro, Takaji

    2012-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) for moving boundary flows are presented. The LBM for two-phase fluid flows with the same density and the LBM combined with the immersed boundary method are described. In addition, the LBM on a moving multi-block grid is explained. Three numerical examples (a droplet moving in a constricted tube, the lift generation of a flapping wing and the sedimentation of an elliptical cylinder) are shown in order to demonstrate the applicability of the LBMs to moving boundary problems. (invited review)

  11. Lattice Boltzmann methods for moving boundary flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamuro, Takaji, E-mail: inamuro@kuaero.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Advanced Research Institute of Fluid Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs) for moving boundary flows are presented. The LBM for two-phase fluid flows with the same density and the LBM combined with the immersed boundary method are described. In addition, the LBM on a moving multi-block grid is explained. Three numerical examples (a droplet moving in a constricted tube, the lift generation of a flapping wing and the sedimentation of an elliptical cylinder) are shown in order to demonstrate the applicability of the LBMs to moving boundary problems. (invited review)

  12. Are we closer to the vision? A proposed framework for incorporating omics into environmental assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2018-04-01

    Environmental science has benefited a great deal from omics-based technologies. High-throughput toxicology has defined adverse outcome pathways (AOPs), prioritized chemicals of concern, and identified novel actions of environmental chemicals. While many of these approaches are conducted under rigorous laboratory conditions, a significant challenge has been the interpretation of omics data in "real-world" exposure scenarios. Clarity in the interpretation of these data limits their use in environmental monitoring programs. In recent years, one overarching objective of many has been to address fundamental questions concerning experimental design and the robustness of data collected under the broad umbrella of environmental genomics. These questions include: (1) the likelihood that molecular profiles return to a predefined baseline level following remediation efforts, (2) how reference site selection in an urban environment influences interpretation of omics data and (3) what is the most appropriate species to monitor in the environment from an omics point of view. In addition, inter-genomics studies have been conducted to assess transcriptome reproducibility in toxicology studies. One lesson learned from inter-genomics studies is that there are core molecular networks that can be identified by multiple laboratories using the same platform. This supports the idea that "omics-networks" defined a priori may be a viable approach moving forward for evaluating environmental impacts over time. Both spatial and temporal variability in ecosystem structure is expected to influence molecular responses to environmental stressors, and it is important to recognize how these variables, as well as individual factor (i.e. sex, age, maturation), may confound interpretation of network responses to chemicals. This mini-review synthesizes the progress made towards adopting these tools into environmental monitoring and identifies future challenges to be addressed, as we move into the next

  13. Comparison of energy expenditure when moving on wet and dry clothes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hrubý, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Title: Comparison of energy expenditure when moving on wet and dry clothes. Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare energy expenditure based on heart rate when moving in dryand wet clothes in different speeds. Methods: Quantitative research and subsequent intra-individual comparison of pulse frequency and energy expenditure when moving in dry and wet clothes. Movements were conducted on a treadmill and heart rate was measured by using sporttesters. Results: From the results we can ded...

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... stigma and superstition are known to lead to frequent presentation .... The limited documented research on challenges to help-seeking behaviour for cancer ..... to touch your breast [16] that breast self-examination may cause.

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-02

    Oct 2, 2015 ... thought to prevent infection, but recent research has proven otherwise. In addition ... One patient had ophthalmalgia and was exposed to. Kaiy for one year and ... migraine, ear infections, tuberculosis, bone fractures, epilepsy,.

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-07-12

    Jul 12, 2016 ... multiple risk factors provides support for multiple-behavior interventions as ... consumption) with smoking therefore needs further research. As such this study .... restaurants, in bars, and on a statewide basis. They preferred to.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mini-clinical-evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) is a way of assessing the clinical ... Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Medical Health. Research ..... mini-CEX assessment and feedback session, the greater the likelihood of.

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Qualitative data, content analysis approach was used. Results: Overall 422 .... Study design: A mixed method cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative research methods as described by. Hanson et al [33] ...

  19. Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. December 2017, Vol. 9, No. 4 AJHPE 171. During curriculum development, teachers ... Ideally, examiners need an educational method to determine ..... A major focus of this study was addressing the human resource gap when.

  1. [The Rosenthal experiment or: about the site of productive research - on move of the physiological experimental laboratory of Isidor Rosenthal (1836-1915) from the city to the country].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2010-01-01

    The disciplinary development of the new science of experimental physiology is often associated with the conditions of cultural development and increasingly technical working contexts of the Industrial Age. Following this perspective, the germ cells of 19th century institutes of experimental physiology were particularly found in the metropolises of Paris, Leipzig or Berlin. Only the major cities sat the revolutionary trends and within this general process, the scientific trends were no exceptions - the provincial research universities simply followed the central ones in their normal science endeavours. Due to this interpretation, the development of the scientific community was pre-formatted as the interplay of innovation (the city) and reception (the periphery). Isidor Rosenthal (1836-1915) was born in Labischin (District of Bromberg/Posen) in 1836 and got his medical training in Berlin. Like not many other experimental physiologists, he can be used as a historiographical testing probe, to follow the conditions of knowledge transfer from center to periphery: After his studies at the Friedrich Wilhelms University and the completion of his dissertation in 1859, Rosenthal entered the newly founded Physiological Institute in Berlin as the first Research Associate of Emil DuBois-Reymond (1818-1896). Rosenthal worked here particularly on the problem of "direct and indirect muscle irritation" in frogs. These neurophysiological investigations led to his growing scientific renown. In 1872, Rosenthal became offered a first professorship in physiology at the Friedrich Alexander University in Bavaria, as one of only few Jewish scientists (and even before Wilhelm Wundt, 1832-1920). But his life and work proved not only exceptional because of his scientific achievements, but also due to his deep rootedness in cultural life--both during his time in Berlin and in Erlangen. By applying a comparative and microhistorical approach in this article, the working conditions of this

  2. Moving from objects to possibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, Jared; Gunn, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    and controls that determine indoor climate. A central issue in relating perceptions and experiences of indoor climate to wider structures and systems is finding ways of supporting company, university partners and users to imagine possibilities instead of certainties in terms of innovation potential. Whereas....... This involves opening up pathways within wider structures and systems for improvisation, at the same time finding ways of negotiating openness and closure with materials. How then do design materials support partial understandings of indoor climate between researchers, users and company partners in situated......, researchers and industry partners working in the field of indoor climate emphasize identifiable, measurable, parameters of comfort and focus their efforts on engineering products and systems based upon behavioural models, as researchers interested in the notion of participatory innovation, we engage...

  3. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  4. Theses "Discussion" Sections: A Structural Move Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani; Khakbaz, Nafiseh

    2011-01-01

    The current study aimed at finding the probable differences between the move structure of Iranian MA graduates' thesis discussion subgenres and those of their non-Iranian counterparts, on the one hand, and those of journal paper authors, on the other. It also aimed at identifying the moves that are considered obligatory, conventional, or optional…

  5. How to Move in a Jostling Crowd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For people living in big cities it is an ordeal to walk in a bus stand or a railway station. They get stuck helplessly in a crowd. They are simply pushed around and all their efforts to move forward appear futile. Only the most energetic can wade through the constantly moving sea of people. How about the weaker ones?

  6. Online Risk Prediction for Indoor Moving Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Calders, Toon

    2016-01-01

    Technologies such as RFID and Bluetooth have received considerable attention for tracking indoor moving objects. In a time-critical indoor tracking scenario such as airport baggage handling, a bag has to move through a sequence of locations until it is loaded into the aircraft. Inefficiency or in...... reduce the operation cost....

  7. Student-Centered Coaching: The Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Diane; Harris, Leanna S.

    2017-01-01

    Student-centered coaching is a highly-effective, evidence-based coaching model that shifts the focus from "fixing" teachers to collaborating with them to design instruction that targets student outcomes. But what does this look like in practice? "Student-Centered Coaching: The Moves" shows you the day-to-day coaching moves that…

  8. Moving vertices to make drawings plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goaoc, X.; Kratochvil, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Shin, C.S.; Wolff, A.; Hong, S.K.; Nishizeki, T.; Quan, W.

    2008-01-01

    In John Tantalo’s on-line game Planarity the player is given a non-plane straight-line drawing of a planar graph. The aim is to make the drawing plane as quickly as possible by moving vertices. In this paper we investigate the related problem MinMovedVertices which asks for the minimum number of

  9. Moving eyes and naming objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, F.F. van der

    2001-01-01

    The coordination between eye movements and speech was examined while speakers were naming objects. Earlier research has shown that eye movements reflect on the underlying visual attention. Also, eye movements were found to reflect upon not only the visual and conceptual processing of an object, but

  10. Moving from Creativity to Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietzschel, Eric; RITTER, Simone; Reiter-Palmon, Roni; Kaufman, James

    2018-01-01

    The generation of creative ideas and insights is commonly thought to be an important precondition for innovation. However, the relation between these constructs is far from straightforward. In this chapter, we will give an overview of research on the evaluation and selection of creative ideas. In

  11. ERP – a moving target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Enterprise Resource Planning systems are central elements in longterm wide-ranging design and use networks. Present ERP research focuses on single-enterprise implementation and fails to address important features of the ERP networks such as multi-spatiality, the design of the generic and the dyna...

  12. Moving beyond Brownies and Pizza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel W.; Jorgensen, Theresa A.

    2015-01-01

    A lack of fractional understanding is a well-documented obstacle to student achievement in upper elementary and middle school math (National Center for Educational Statistics [NCES] 1999; Lamon 1999; National Research Council [NRC] 2001). Lamon (1999) notes that one major conceptual hurdle that students must overcome is the idea that fractions are…

  13. Moving Target Photometry Using WISE and NEOWISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    WISE band 1 observations have a significant noise contribution from confusion. The image subtraction done on W0855-0714 by Wright et al. (2014) shows that this noise source can be eliminated for sources that move by much more than the beamsize. This paper describes an analysis that includes a pattern of celestially fixed flux plus a source moving with a known trajectory. This technique allows the confusion noise to be modeled with nuisance parameters and removed even for sources that have not moved by many beamwidths. However, the detector noise is magnified if the motion is too small. Examples of the method applied to fast moving Y dwarfs and slow moving planets will be shown.

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-05-18

    May 18, 2017 ... available to populations of developing countries [2-5]. In 2013, in. Western and Central Europe and ..... initiation among the infected persons in the community. Addressing stigma and educating ... Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research (P30AI042853). Tables. Table 1: Baseline characteristics of ...

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    15 févr. 2016 ... présentent un Indice de Masse Corporel (IMC) normal, les autres femmes sont soit ..... In The health belief model and personal health behavior, edited by MH ... Evaluation of the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale. Research in.

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-14

    Mar 14, 2017 ... R Ebrahim,1 MSc (Dent); H Julie,2 MPH, MCur, PhD. 1 Extended ... and research is applied to develop and sustain society.[5]. Methods .... service they want, not the service we want to give whether they want it or. Co math. G.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... Page number not for citation purposes. 1. Prevalence and determinants of common mental ..... illnesses were smoke cigarette in the last 3 months that make prevalence of tobacco use 38.2%. ..... Okasha A, Karam E.Mental health services and research in the. Arab world. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-04-21

    Apr 21, 2014 ... Prospective assessment of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea in ... Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of .... University Teaching Hospital Health Research Ethics Committee ... BANG, Berlin questionnaire and the American Society of .... The epidemiology of adult obstructive sleep.

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark, 3Center for Global Health, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000. Odense .... BHP is a Danish-Guinean Demographic Surveillance Site with a study-area .... variables such as age groups, previous military duty, history of.

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-06-24

    Jun 24, 2015 ... related immunosuppression, previous history of TB, and pause in treatment [6]. In Brazil, researchers .... treatment, use of traditional medicines or herbs, history of TB drug side effects and treatment delay). ..... therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in Lima Ciudad, Peru. International journal of tuberculosis and ...

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. May 2016, Vol. 8, No. 1 AJHPE 37. Students who enrol in occupational therapy (OT) at the. University of Kwa Zulu-Natal (UKZN), Durban, South Africa ... The latter may include becoming familiar with the disintegrating social systems in primary .... They also lacked the skills needed to adapt sessions and failed to ...

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-06-22

    Jun 22, 2015 ... collaboration with Makerere University, School of Public Health. We acknowledge The Family Health Research and Development Centre. (FHRDC) Uganda. Supported by Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for. Population & Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, ...

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, a focus on competence alone is inadequate to produce graduates who are capable of adapting to the changing needs of health systems. While knowledge and technical ... shared their responses to guided questions. There were three sessions; after each session the researcher aggregated participant responses ...

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... by Hazarika in a population-based study in India. The researcher noted that patients' preference to the private health facilities was due mainly to their dissatisfaction with the services in the public health facilities [11]. Furthermore, the quality of the services in the private health facilities could also be a major ...

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-20

    Mar 20, 2018 ... student health professionals in various institutions, both in South Africa. (SA) and internationally. ... field include dentists, dental therapists and oral hygienists in training, .... The College of Health Sciences at UKZN has four schools: clinical ..... Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy ...

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Abstract. Introduction: Medical and dental students are a high-risk group for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection which is an ... The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. ... Research ... in the College of Health Sciences and clinical students (years four to .... Hepatology International.2017 Jan; 11(1):.

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-01-19

    Jan 19, 2015 ... One research assistant was available to assist the learners and to answer questions while they completed the questionnaires during a classroom period. ..... PubMed | Google Scholar. 4. Hall PA, Holmqvist M, Sherry SB. Risky adolescent sexual behaviour: A psychological perspective for primary care.

  8. The best of shape: 3-D scanning in South Africa gives aggregate a closer look

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The author of this article is conducting research in South Africa which addresses the difficulties in pavement design in developing methods and procedures for accurate quantification of aggregate shape and surface properties, which are well known...

  9. Transforming Identities through Transforming Care: How People with Learning Disabilities Experience Moving out of Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Annabel; Ellis-Caird, Helen; Rhodes, Louisa; Parkinson, Kathie

    2018-01-01

    Background: People with learning disabilities are moving out of hospitals as part of the Transforming Care programme, although thus far their views on how they have experienced this have not been researched. Materials and Methods: A qualitative design was used to explore how people with learning disabilities experienced moving as part of…

  10. Internal migration: why do Filipinos move?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolipa, N

    1980-01-01

    The rapid movement of Filipinos from 1 part of the Philippines to another is not a new phenomenon, but mobility has been increasing. A study conducted by Peter C. Smith revealed that interprovincial lifetime mobility of the national population increased from 15.8% in 1960 to 17.6% in 1970, while interregional mobility increased from 12.7% to 13.4%. People still disagree as to whether the size and rate of growth of the population are excessive, but there seems to be total consensus as regards its spatial imbalance. Because internal migration appears to be an important factor in national development, a need exists to examine different aspects of internal migration, such as the directions taken by migration flows, the migrants' reasons for moving, the migrants' characteristics, the migrants' success or lack of success at their places of destination, the social problems accompanying internal migration, effforts to deal with the problems caused by internal migration, and the implications of migration trends for policy and for the country's development programs. The most dominant migration trend in the Philippines in recent years has been toward the urban, or more accurately the suburban, areas adjacent to Metropolitan Manila. The city of Manila itself suffered a net outflow, further pointing to the trend toward suburbanization. Migration flows are primarily caused by economic reasons. About one half the sample of a Filipinas Foundation Study moved to provinces other than the province of birth in the pursuit of employment and other economic opportunities. A study of the country's migrant population age 15 and older showed that 53% of migrants were female. For male migrants, age ranges from 20-40; it ranges from 15-35 for females. Where cash income is concerned, migrants in Pernia's study of rural urban migration were better off than nonmigrants. Migrants were, on the average, as well off as native urbanites or metropolitanites. Among the more significant points raised by

  11. Energy flux correlations and moving mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    We study the quantum stress tensor correlation function for a massless scalar field in a flat two-dimensional spacetime containing a moving mirror. We construct the correlation functions for right-moving and left-moving fluxes for an arbitrary trajectory, and then specialize them to the case of a mirror trajectory for which the expectation value of the stress tensor describes a pair of delta-function pulses, one of negative energy and one of positive energy. The flux correlation function describes the fluctuations around this mean stress tensor, and reveals subtle changes in the correlations between regions where the mean flux vanishes

  12. Distributed Measurement Data Gathering about Moving Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kholod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes approaches to gathering measurement data about moving objects in networks with low bandwidth. The first approach uses Fog computing conception and suggests moving assessing the quality of the measurement data into measuring points. The second approach uses prediction of telemetry quality by mining models. In addition, the paper presents implementation of these approaches based on actor model. As a result, it became possible not only to load balancing among edge and cloud nodes, but also to significantly reduce the network traffic, which in turn brings the possibility of decreasing the requirements for communication channels bandwidth and of using wireless networks for gathering measurement data about moving objects.

  13. EU-Korea Conference on Science and Technology Closer to Humanity-Greenness

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Joung Hwan; Kim, Jung-Sik; EU- Korea Conference on Science and Technology

    2010-01-01

    Current research fields in science and technology were presented and discussed at the EKC2008, informing about the interests and directions of the scientists and engineers in EU countries and Korea. The Conference has emerged from the idea of bringing together EU and Korea to get to know each other better, especially in fields of science and technology.

  14. One Step Closer to Mars with Aquaponics: Cultivating Citizen Science in K12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolattukudy, Maria; Puranik, Niyati; Sane, Nishant; Bisht, Kritika; Saffat, Nabeeha; Gupta, Anika; McHugh, Anne; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Brad; Everroad, R. Craig

    2017-01-01

    The Microbial Ecology and Biogeochemistry Research Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center focuses primarily on the nutrient cycling and diversity of complex microbial communities. NASA is interested in the composition and functioning of microbial mat communities as these processes fundamentally shape the form and function of these analogs for the earliest forms of life on Earth (3.6 billion years ago), and likely will on other planets as well. Aquaponics systems are supported by microbial communities who perform many complex ecosystem services, including cycling nitrogen. Microbes are integral to the stability and productivity of aquaponics systems, which are analogous to microbial communities in food production systems that are essential for building efficient life support systems for long-distance space travel. Students at Meadow Park Middle School created 10 parallel aquaponics systems and took temporal microbial samples to characterize whether any macro-ecology variables impacted or changed the microbial diversity of these systems. Students additionally created a website so that other classrooms can pursue similar projects in their own schools (https://go.nasa.gov/2uJhxmF). Our lab at NASA Ames has sequenced water samples from each of the 10 tanks at 3 timepoints using a MinION sequencer. MPMS students will be involved in the analysis of the bioinformatics data generated through this collaboration. Our ongoing collaboration aims to collect and analyze data in the classroom setting that has utility for research scientists, while involving students as collaborators in the research process.

  15. The march to reliable metrics: a half-century of coming closer to the truth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.G.; Neijens, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Reach and frequency are key concepts advertisers face when selecting media for their campaigns. Around the world, the advertising industry relies on audience research for insights into how different media outlets perform on these key concepts. In this contribution, the authors discuss the

  16. Bringing employees closer : the effect of proximity on communication when teams function under time pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong, S.F.D.; Eerde, van W.; Rutte, C.G.; Chai, K.H.

    2012-01-01

    Some studies have assumed close proximity to improve team communication on the premise that reduced physical distance increases the chance of contact and information exchange. However, research showed that the relationship between team proximity and team communication is not always straightforward

  17. A Closer Look at the Brain As Related to Teachers and Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Elaine

    1981-01-01

    Recent findings related to neurological research include: (1) the Proster Theory implies that the brain works by sets of programs or prosters; (2) the Brain Growth Spurts theory defines the growth of the brain in spurts with cycles of rest; and (3) in the Hemispheric Specialization Theory, the left and right hemispheres of the brain have specific…

  18. Feeling Closer to the Future Self and Doing Better: Temporal Psychological Mechanisms Underlying Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Robert Mark; Herrmann, Sarah D.; Bodford, Jessica E.; Barbour, Joseph E.; Graudejus, Oliver; Okun, Morris A.; Kwan, Virginia S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    This research examined the function of future self-continuity and its potential downstream consequences for academic performance through relations with other temporal psychological factors and self-control. We also addressed the influence of cultural factors by testing whether these relations differed by college generation status. Undergraduate…

  19. Flexibility Versus Expertise: A Closer Look at the Employment of United States Air Force Imagery Analysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    for career broadening, and then back to still imagery or FMV as 13 a senior NCO. Along the way, they might gain experience on advanced sensors... advanced analytical skills. More in-depth research and analysis is required for still imagery products and those Airmen typically focus on one target...16 EVALUATION CRITERIA – CAREER MANAGEMENT

  20. Scalable Combinatorial Tools for Health Disparities Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Langston

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite staggering investments made in unraveling the human genome, current estimates suggest that as much as 90% of the variance in cancer and chronic diseases can be attributed to factors outside an individual’s genetic endowment, particularly to environmental exposures experienced across his or her life course. New analytical approaches are clearly required as investigators turn to complicated systems theory and ecological, place-based and life-history perspectives in order to understand more clearly the relationships between social determinants, environmental exposures and health disparities. While traditional data analysis techniques remain foundational to health disparities research, they are easily overwhelmed by the ever-increasing size and heterogeneity of available data needed to illuminate latent gene x environment interactions. This has prompted the adaptation and application of scalable combinatorial methods, many from genome science research, to the study of population health. Most of these powerful tools are algorithmically sophisticated, highly automated and mathematically abstract. Their utility motivates the main theme of this paper, which is to describe real applications of innovative transdisciplinary models and analyses in an effort to help move the research community closer toward identifying the causal mechanisms and associated environmental contexts underlying health disparities. The public health exposome is used as a contemporary focus for addressing the complex nature of this subject.

  1. NECESSARY CONDITIONS OF STABILITY MOVING PARTS OF ROTOR CENTRIFUGE

    OpenAIRE

    Strackeljan, Jens; Babenko, Andriy; Lavrenko, Iaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Design features of modern centrifuges studied. Revealed that their rotors are movable elements that revolve around horizontal axes. The dynamics of these moving parts of laboratory centrifuge considered. Using the Lagrange equation of the second kind the resulting differential equations of their motion considered. The modeling visualization of motion using the software package RecurDyn was made. The results that obtained by the research package RecurDyn and analytically showed that their moti...

  2. Neuromorphic Modeling of Moving Target Detection in Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-31

    Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39, 18 Grants FA9550-04-1-0283 and FA9550-04-1-0294 Neuromorphic Modeling of Moving Target Detection...natural for neuromorphic sensory processing. We developed visual motion detection circuitry, including photodetectors, early vision, and models for both...Lincoln Labs 3DM2 run, Tanner Research reserved and utilized space corresponding to two MOSIS ’tiny chips ’ (2mm square each), each with three interconnected

  3. Reinventing agricultural research : Changing context and moving targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struik, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    Future food security for the rapidly increasing human population is at stake because farmers need to produce more food on less land and with less water and energy. Natural resources will be less and less available for agriculture due to economic development, which diverts these resources to

  4. Asia on the move: research challenges for population geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, G

    1996-06-01

    This paper "summarises some of the major changes which have occurred in international migration to, from, and within Asia in the last two decades....A number of theoretical challenges are put forward regarding the complex interrelationships between international population movements, economic development and social change. The employment of systems approaches, neoclassical economic theory, social networks and institutional approaches, and the potential role of population geography in developing a more comprehensive explanation of the changing dynamics of international migration in the region, are discussed. Also considered are the gender dimension in migration, remittance flows and their consequences, and policy issues." excerpt

  5. Ethnography of Corporeality: A Carnal Move in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Gibson, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing focus on non-dualistic and materialist approaches in education technology studies, the materiality of the body has not been adequately examined. Because of the heavy orientation towards affordance, interaction, participation, inclusion and access at the interface or between various spatial and liminal settings, the subject's…

  6. Day labor and occupational health: time to take a closer look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The term "day labor" refers to work performed by individuals who are hired on a temporary basis, often for one day at a time. This type of employment has increased in North America as informal work arrangements and immigration have increased. Research on the occupational health of day laborers is minimal. The objectives of this article are to review the current literature pertaining to occupational health in day laborers, and to characterize the issues that affect this population's access to occupational health services. Surveys of day laborers and other immigrant, low-wage workers show that they are at elevated risk for occupational injury and are often unable to access medical care when injured on the job. Reasons include workers' reluctance to complain about unsafe work conditions, inadequate safety training, and lack of incentive for employers to reduce workplace injuries. More research is needed to better characterize the occupational health of this population.

  7. Quantum correlation with moving beamsplitters in relativistic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In multisimultaneity, as in the pilot-wave model, each particle emerging ... reference frames, each defining a time ordering, hence the name of multisimultaneity. In ... The setup we used to test entanglement of the photon pairs with moving ...

  8. MOVES2010a regional level sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    This document discusses the sensitivity of various input parameter effects on emission rates using the US Environmental Protection Agencys (EPAs) MOVES2010a model at the regional level. Pollutants included in the study are carbon monoxide (CO),...

  9. Preparing Your Child for a Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it. Kids can need some time and special attention during the transition. Try these tips to make the process less stressful for everyone. Making the Decision to Move Many kids thrive on familiarity and ...

  10. Being Moved: Linguistic Representation and Conceptual Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena eKuehnast

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the organisation of the semantic field and the conceptual structure of moving experiences by investigating German-language expressions referring to the emotional state of being moved. We used present and past participles of eight psychological verbs as primes in a free word-association task, as these grammatical forms place their conceptual focus on the eliciting situation and on the felt emotional state, respectively. By applying a taxonomy of basic knowledge types and computing the Cognitive Salience Index, we identified joy and sadness as key emotional ingredients of being moved, and significant life events and art experiences as main elicitors of this emotional state. Metric multidimensional scaling analyses of the semantic field revealed that the core terms designate a cluster of emotional states characterised by low degrees of arousal and slightly positive valence, the latter due to a nearly balanced representation of positive and negative elements in the conceptual structure of being moved.

  11. FDTD Seismic Simulation of Moving Tracked Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ketcham, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the utility of a large finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of seismic wave propagation from a spatially and time varying source that generically represents a moving tracked vehicle...

  12. Moving objects management models, techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jiajie

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the topics of moving objects modeling and location tracking, indexing and querying, clustering, location uncertainty, traffic aware navigation and privacy issues as well as the application to intelligent transportation systems.

  13. Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Hypertrophy: A Closer Look Reveals the Jury is Still Out

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfeld, Brad; Contreras, Bret

    2018-01-01

    This letter is a response to the paper by Damas et al (2017) titled, “The development of skeletal muscle hypertrophy through resistance training: the role of muscle damage and muscle protein synthesis,” which, in part, endeavored to review the role of exercise-induced muscle damage on muscle hypertrophy. We feel there are a number of issues in interpretation of research and extrapolation that preclude drawing the inference expressed in the paper that muscle damage neither explains nor potenti...

  14. Tiny cells meet big questions: a closer look at bacterial cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Goley, Erin D.

    2013-01-01

    While studying actin assembly as a graduate student with Matt Welch at the University of California at Berkeley, my interest was piqued by reports of surprising observations in bacteria: the identification of numerous cytoskeletal proteins, actin homologues fulfilling spindle-like functions, and even the presence of membrane-bound organelles. Curiosity about these phenomena drew me to Lucy Shapiro's lab at Stanford University for my postdoctoral research. In the Shapiro lab, and now in my lab...

  15. Confronting zoonoses through closer collaboration between medicine and veterinary medicine (as 'one medicine').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Laura H; Kaplan, Bruce; Steele, James H

    2007-01-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of 'one medicine' was embraced by leaders in the medical and veterinary medical communities. In the 20th century, collaborative efforts between medicine and veterinary medicine diminished considerably. While there have been some notable exceptions, such as Calvin W. Schwabe's proposal for unifying human and veterinary medicine and joint efforts by the Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization to control zoonotic diseases, 'one medicine' has languished in the modern milieu of clinical care, public health, and biomedical research. Risks of zoonotic disease transmission are rarely discussed in clinical care which is of particular concern if humans and/or animals are immunosuppressed. Physicians and veterinarians should advise their patients and pet-owning clients that some animals should not be pets. The risk of zoonotic disease acquisition can be considerable in the occupational setting. Collaborative efforts in biomedical research could do much to improve human and animal health. As the threat of zoonotic diseases continues to increase in the 21st century, medicine and veterinary medicine must revive 'one medicine' in order to adequately address these challenges. 'One medicine' revival strategies must involve medical and veterinary medical education, clinical care, public health and biomedical research.

  16. Moving Toward Healthy”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D. Wall-Bassett

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study utilized participatory and potentially empowering qualitative research methods of photo-elicitation and face-to-face interviews to investigate food choices of mothers living with their children in a residential substance use disorder recovery program. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with nine women (25–40 years living in a residential substance use disorder recovery program in the Southeastern United States. Each audio recorded and transcribed interview was coded individually before collectively developing a consensual version of the codebook and identifying themes. The recovering women in this study expressed a new or renewed desire to “eat healthy” and voiced concerns about the nutritional value of foods. Food choices were influenced by their children’s nutritional needs and food preferences, their own food preferences and habits, the financial resources available to them, their personal food preparation self-efficacy and skills, and the limitations inherent in residential recovery. Understanding food choices benefits both recovering parents and their children.

  17. Operational overhead of moving to higher energies

    CERN Document Server

    Lamont, M

    2011-01-01

    The operational overheads of moving above 3.5 TeV are examined. The costs of performing such a move at the start, or during, the 2011 run are evaluated. The impact of operation with beams above 3.5 TeV on machine protection systems is briefly reviewed, and any potential limitations are enumerated. Finally the possible benefits of increasing the beam energy on the luminosity are discussed.

  18. Being moved: linguistic representation and conceptual structure

    OpenAIRE

    Kuehnast, Milena; Wagner, Valentin; Wassiliwizky, Eugen; Jacobsen, Thomas; Menninghaus, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the organization of the semantic field and the conceptual structure of moving experiences by investigating German-language expressions referring to the emotional state of being moved. We used present and past participles of eight psychological verbs as primes in a free word-association task, as these grammatical forms place their conceptual focus on the eliciting situation and on the felt emotional state, respectively. By applying a taxonomy of basic knowledge types and co...

  19. Security Sector Reform and the Serbian Conundrum: Are Security Sector Reform Efforts Bringing Serbia Closer to European Union and North Atlantic Treaty Organization Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Marion J

    2005-01-01

    .... In 2005, certain of the southern Slav nations have gained NATO and EU membership, as in the case of Slovenia, or have drawn ever closer to qualifying for membership, as in the case of Croatia and Bulgaria...

  20. A comparison of moving object detection methods for real-time moving object detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Aditya; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    Moving object detection has a wide variety of applications from traffic monitoring, site monitoring, automatic theft identification, face detection to military surveillance. Many methods have been developed across the globe for moving object detection, but it is very difficult to find one which can work globally in all situations and with different types of videos. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate existing moving object detection methods which can be implemented in software on a desktop or laptop, for real time object detection. There are several moving object detection methods noted in the literature, but few of them are suitable for real time moving object detection. Most of the methods which provide for real time movement are further limited by the number of objects and the scene complexity. This paper evaluates the four most commonly used moving object detection methods as background subtraction technique, Gaussian mixture model, wavelet based and optical flow based methods. The work is based on evaluation of these four moving object detection methods using two (2) different sets of cameras and two (2) different scenes. The moving object detection methods have been implemented using MatLab and results are compared based on completeness of detected objects, noise, light change sensitivity, processing time etc. After comparison, it is observed that optical flow based method took least processing time and successfully detected boundary of moving objects which also implies that it can be implemented for real-time moving object detection.

  1. Looking Closer at the Effects of Framing on Risky Choice: An Item Response Theory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickar; Highhouse

    1998-07-01

    Item response theory (IRT) methodology allowed an in-depth examination of several issues that would be difficult to explore using traditional methodology. IRT models were estimated for 4 risky-choice items, answered by students under either a gain or loss frame. Results supported the typical framing finding of risk-aversion for gains and risk-seeking for losses but also suggested that a latent construct we label preference for risk was influential in predicting risky choice. Also, the Asian Disease item, most often used in framing research, was found to have anomalous statistical properties when compared to other framing items. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. Avian Colibacillosis and Salmonellosis: A Closer Look at Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, Control and Public Health Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Lutful Kabir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian colibacillosis and salmonellosis are considered to be the major bacterial diseases in the poultry industry world-wide. Colibacillosis and salmonellosis are the most common avian diseases that are communicable to humans. This article provides the vital information on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, control and public health concerns of avian colibacillosis and salmonellosis. A better understanding of the information addressed in this review article will assist the poultry researchers and the poultry industry in continuing to make progress in reducing and eliminating avian colibacillosis and salmonellosis from the poultry flocks, thereby reducing potential hazards to the public health posed by these bacterial diseases.

  3. Closer clutch inspection—quicker egg ejection: timing of host responses toward parasitic eggs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Požgayová, Milica; Procházka, Petr; Polačiková, Lenka; Honza, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2011), s. 46-51 ISSN 1045-2249 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930605; GA AV ČR IAA600930903; GA ČR(CZ) GD524/05/H536; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Acrocephalus arundinaceus * brood parasitism * egg discrimination * egg ejection time * great reed warbler * nest inspection Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.083, year: 2011

  4. Coulomb's Law in a Moving Medium--A Review Exercise in Advanced Undergraduate Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, G. P.

    1978-01-01

    The electromagnetic field of a static charge in a moving medium is evaluated using elements of special relativity, residue calculus, and Fourier integration. Some of the concepts in electrodynamics that are of current research value are discussed. (BB)

  5. Demonstration of a Moving-Map System for Improved Lane Navigation of Amphibious Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clohrenz, Maura

    2003-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is testing and demonstrating a prototype moving-map system on amphibious vehicles and landing craft to aid the location neutralization and navigation around mines and obstacles in the surf and beach zone...

  6. Schizophrenia genomics and proteomics: are we any closer to biomarker discovery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Alon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The field of proteomics has made leaps and bounds in the last 10 years particularly in the fields of oncology and cardiovascular medicine. In comparison, neuroproteomics is still playing catch up mainly due to the relative complexity of neurological disorders. Schizophrenia is one such disorder, believed to be the results of multiple factors both genetic and environmental. Affecting over 2 million people in the US alone, it has become a major clinical and public health concern worldwide. This paper gives an update of schizophrenia biomarker research as reviewed by Lakhan in 2006 and gives us a rundown of the progress made during the last two years. Several studies demonstrate the potential of cerebrospinal fluid as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers. Genetic association studies are making headway in identifying candidate genes for schizophrenia. In addition, metabonomics, bioinformatics, and neuroimaging techniques are aiming to complete the picture by filling in knowledge gaps. International cooperation in the form of genomics and protein databases and brain banks is facilitating research efforts. While none of the recent developments described here in qualifies as biomarker discovery, many are likely to be stepping stones towards that goal.

  7. Developing a comprehensive measure of mobility: mobility over varied environments scale (MOVES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jana A; Winters, Meghan; Sims-Gould, Joanie; Clarke, Philippa J; Ste-Marie, Nathalie; Ashe, Maureen; McKay, Heather A

    2017-05-25

    While recent work emphasizes the multi-dimensionality of mobility, no current measure incorporates multiple domains of mobility. Using existing conceptual frameworks we identified four domains of mobility (physical, cognitive, social, transportation) to create a "Mobility Over Varied Environments Scale" (MOVES). We then assessed expected patterns of MOVES in the Canadian population. An expert panel identified survey items within each MOVES domain from the Canadian Community Health Survey- Healthy Aging Cycle (2008-2009) for 28,555 (weighted population n = 12,805,067) adults (≥45 years). We refined MOVES using principal components analysis and Cronbach's alpha and weighted items so each domain was 10 points. Expected mobility trends, as assessed by average MOVES, were examined by sociodemographic and health factors, and by province, using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). MOVES ranged from 0 to 40, where 0 represents individuals who are immobile and 40 those who are fully mobile. Mean MOVES was 29.58 (95% confidence interval (CI) 29.49, 29.67) (10th percentile: 24.17 (95% CI 23.96, 24.38), 90th percentile: 34.70 (CI 34.55, 34.85)). MOVES scores were lower for older, female, and non-white Canadians with worse health and lower socioeconomic status. MOVES was also lower for those who live in less urban areas. MOVES is a holistic measure of mobility for characterizing older adult mobility across populations. Future work should examine individual or neighborhood predictors of MOVES and its relationship to broader health outcomes. MOVES holds utility for research, surveillance, evaluation, and interventions around the broad factors influencing mobility in older adults.

  8. Bringing a Global Issue Closer to Home: The OSU Climate Change Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentes Banicki, J.; Dierkes, C.

    2012-12-01

    When people think about the effects of climate change, many will still picture that iconic lone polar bear clinging to a shrinking iceberg in Antarctica. But many don't realize that the impacts that we will face here at home could also be severe, directly affecting the food we eat, the health we have, and the natural environments we appreciate. To help better explain and ultimately localize those impacts for Great Lakes residents, 10 departments within Ohio State University partnered in 2009 to create the Global Change, Local Impact webinar series. The monthly series brings in experts from around the Great Lakes region to discuss issues and impacts we will encounter regionally as our climate changes. Originally designed as a small series for Ohioans, the series has broadened to focus on Great Lakes-related issues, with more than 4,500 attendees representing 500 organizations in governmental agencies, academia, non-profit groups, private industry, and the legislature from around the country. Over the past two years, the OSU Climate Team expanded its educational reach by partnering with external groups like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Great Lakes Regional Water Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network to help deliver the most knowledgeable experts and resources for each Great Lake-focused climate topic and archive those resources on its www.changingclimate.osu.edu web site. As a result of these collaborative efforts, participants say the webinars are one of their primary resources for climate-related research information in the region, with 80-90% polled saying they use this information as an unbiased resource to help not only understand how climate change could affect local concerns like public health, agriculture, and infrastructure, but what they in their vocations and daily lives can do to prepare for it. For scientists and practitioners, this series serves as the perfect low carbon venue

  9. A Closer Look: Examining Teachers' Language Around UDL, Inclusive Classrooms, and Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, K Alisa; Hollingshead, Aleksandra; Howery, Kathy

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the language teachers used to discuss inclusion, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and learners with intellectual disability (ID) in an effort to better understand how teachers describe the relationship between those three. Utilizing a secondary analysis procedure, interview transcripts from seven general education teachers were reanalyzed to identify language used by teachers to refer to inclusive educational settings, the implementation of UDL, and learners with intellectual disability. The identified themes were then juxtaposed against the UDL framework (principles, guidelines, and checkpoints) and the current literature related to UDL and inclusive education. We end with recommendations for future practice and research involving inclusive classrooms, UDL, and learners with ID.

  10. London and beyond: Taking a closer look at urban energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirstead, James; Schulz, Niels B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the field of urban energy policy, a neglected yet important topic. Cities account for approximately two-thirds of global primary energy consumption creating significant benefits and costs. As a result there has been growing interest in the contribution of cities to global energy policy issues such as climate change but a number of significant questions remain: e.g. how do energy policy processes differ between national and urban scales, and how can cities contribute most effectively to global policy goals? We present the results of interviews with key stakeholders in London to illustrate some unique features of the urban energy policy cycle. We then take a wider view, proposing a research agenda with three key goals: describing the global variety of urban energy consumption and policy; understanding the resulting diversity in responsibility, vulnerability and capacity; and developing shared procedures and solutions. Tackling these questions is vital if cities are to contribute fully to current energy policy efforts.

  11. Sleep and Physiological Dysregulation: A Closer Look at Sleep Intraindividual Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Seeman, Teresa E; Carroll, Judith E; Wiley, Joshua F

    2017-09-01

    Variable daily sleep (ie, higher intraindividual variability; IIV) is associated with negative health consequences, but potential physiological mechanisms are poorly understood. This study examined how the IIV of sleep timing, duration, and quality is associated with physiological dysregulation, with diurnal cortisol trajectories as a proximal outcome and allostatic load (AL) as a multisystem distal outcome. Participants are 436 adults (Mage ± standard deviation = 54.1 ± 11.7, 60.3% women) from the Midlife in the United States study. Sleep was objectively assessed using 7-day actigraphy. Diurnal cortisol was measured via saliva samples (four/day for 4 consecutive days). AL was measured using 23 biomarkers from seven systems (inflammatory, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, metabolic glucose and lipid, cardiovascular, parasympathetic, sympathetic) using a validated bifactor model. Linear and quadratic effects of sleep IIV were estimated using a validated Bayesian model. Controlling for covariates, more variable sleep timing (p = .04 for risetime, p = .097 for bedtime) and total sleep time (TST; p = .02), but not mean sleep variables, were associated with flatter cortisol diurnal slope. More variable sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset, later average bedtime, and shorter TST were associated with higher AL adjusting for age and sex (p-values sleep patterns were associated with blunted diurnal cortisol trajectories but not with higher multisystem physiological dysregulation. The associations between sleep IIV and overall health are likely complex, including multiple biopsychosocial determinants and require further investigation. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. "Click for Closer Care": A Content Analysis of Community Pharmacy Websites in Four Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwier, Sandra

    2017-06-14

    with commercial services. Previous research into the presence of a combination of commercial and professional services suggests that such a combination may lead to increased interest in commercial services that may be unnecessary or inappropriate to patients' health. ©Sandra Zwier. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 14.06.2017.

  13. Principles for the Safe Moving and Handling of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanless Stephen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human movement when walking or running is a widely researched area. However, there is an increased incidence of musculoskeletal injury from poor positioning when moving and handling patients amongst healthcare professionals and is one of the main causes of long term musculoskeletal health problems. In the clinical area, an individual’s musculoskeletal health system is subjected to mechanical loading, increasing the body’s stress and strain limits, and once these are exceeded injury occurs. The risk of pain and injury has a direct relation from the over use of poor posture from poor moving and handling, which in turn can cause loss of strength and reduce musculoskeletal function. This can be changed through healthcare workers adopting safe biomechanical body movements during patient handling tasks.

  14. A Closer Look at Eduardo M. Torner's Bibliographic Survey of Spain's Traditional Music and Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Katz, Israel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo M. Torner (1881-1955 was among the most notable pioneers who contributed to the nascent field of ethnomusicology in Spain. His early field researches in Asturias and Galicia yielded exemplary publications and his associates included such outstanding figures as Ramón Menéndez Pidal, Manuel Manrique de Lara, Jesús Bal y Gay, and Kurt Schindler. The two bibliographies contained in this article, which Torner included among the essays in his classic Temas folklóricos: Música y Poesía (Madrid, 1935, represent but a mere sampling of the 4,000 entries he is purported to have gathered concering Spain's tradidonal music and dance. Fleeing first to Valencia and then to Barcelona at the outbreak of the Civil War, he utlimately sought refuge in London, where he continued his researches until his death. During the transitional period from Valencia to England, he lost his precious collection of photographs, historical documents, and personal manuscripts, together with his massive bibliographical compilation. Here I have reordered the bibliographies from Temas folklóricos, insuring that all his entries are accurate and complete, adding personal comments to Tomer's observations, and providing four indices: 1 Abbreviations and publications surveyed; 2 Authors; 3 Geographic locales, and 4 Subject matter.

    Eduardo M. Torner (1881-1935 fue uno de los más notables pioneros que contribuyeron al surgimiento de la etnomusicología en España. Sus primeras investigaciones de campo en Asturias y Galicia produjeron publicaciones modélicas, y se relacionó por su trabajo con figuras tan eminentes como Ramón Menéndez Pidal, Manuel Manrique de Lara, Jesús Bal y Gay y Kurt Schindler. Las dos bibliografías contenidas en este artículo que Torner incluyó entre los ensayos de su trabajo clásico Temas folklóricos: Música y Poesía (Madrid, 1935, no representan sino una mera muestra de las 4.000 entradas que se cree que recogi

  15. Stress and the multiple-role woman: taking a closer look at the "superwoman".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumra, Monika K; Schillaci, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    In the academic literature there is debate as to whether women who engage in multiple social roles experience more or less stress than women in fewer roles. For the present research we examined the relationship between levels of engagement in seven distinct roles and perceived stress and life satisfaction in a small non-random sample of women in North America (N = 308). We did not find a significant correlation between role engagement and perceived stress, though we did find a small but significant positive correlation between role engagement and life satisfaction. Similarly, in a subset of the participants (N = 31), there was not a significant relationship between the level of role engagement and physiological stress as measured by hair or urinary cortisol levels. We found a significant negative correlation between perceived stress and life satisfaction, and role satisfaction. The results from multiple regression models did not identify the level of role engagement as a significant predictor of either perceived stress or life satisfaction. Role satisfaction in addition to several life style variables such as the frequency of sex and exercise were identified as significant predictors of both outcome variables. We also examined the popularized notion of the "superwoman", which we defined as women who fell within the 4th quartile of role engagement, or those engaged in the wife/mother/worker/homemaker role combination. Based on popular discourses surrounding the superwoman we expected that superwomen would exhibit higher levels of perceived stress. Our results revealed that superwomen do not experience a significantly higher level of perceived stress than non-superwomen. The results of our study therefore suggest that multiple role engagement in women, even at a relatively high level as experienced by "superwomen", is not associated with significantly higher stress, or reduced life satisfaction.

  16. Stress and the multiple-role woman: taking a closer look at the "superwoman".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika K Sumra

    Full Text Available In the academic literature there is debate as to whether women who engage in multiple social roles experience more or less stress than women in fewer roles. For the present research we examined the relationship between levels of engagement in seven distinct roles and perceived stress and life satisfaction in a small non-random sample of women in North America (N = 308. We did not find a significant correlation between role engagement and perceived stress, though we did find a small but significant positive correlation between role engagement and life satisfaction. Similarly, in a subset of the participants (N = 31, there was not a significant relationship between the level of role engagement and physiological stress as measured by hair or urinary cortisol levels. We found a significant negative correlation between perceived stress and life satisfaction, and role satisfaction. The results from multiple regression models did not identify the level of role engagement as a significant predictor of either perceived stress or life satisfaction. Role satisfaction in addition to several life style variables such as the frequency of sex and exercise were identified as significant predictors of both outcome variables. We also examined the popularized notion of the "superwoman", which we defined as women who fell within the 4th quartile of role engagement, or those engaged in the wife/mother/worker/homemaker role combination. Based on popular discourses surrounding the superwoman we expected that superwomen would exhibit higher levels of perceived stress. Our results revealed that superwomen do not experience a significantly higher level of perceived stress than non-superwomen. The results of our study therefore suggest that multiple role engagement in women, even at a relatively high level as experienced by "superwomen", is not associated with significantly higher stress, or reduced life satisfaction.

  17. Stress and the Multiple-Role Woman: Taking a Closer Look at the “Superwoman”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumra, Monika K.; Schillaci, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    In the academic literature there is debate as to whether women who engage in multiple social roles experience more or less stress than women in fewer roles. For the present research we examined the relationship between levels of engagement in seven distinct roles and perceived stress and life satisfaction in a small non-random sample of women in North America (N = 308). We did not find a significant correlation between role engagement and perceived stress, though we did find a small but significant positive correlation between role engagement and life satisfaction. Similarly, in a subset of the participants (N = 31), there was not a significant relationship between the level of role engagement and physiological stress as measured by hair or urinary cortisol levels. We found a significant negative correlation between perceived stress and life satisfaction, and role satisfaction. The results from multiple regression models did not identify the level of role engagement as a significant predictor of either perceived stress or life satisfaction. Role satisfaction in addition to several life style variables such as the frequency of sex and exercise were identified as significant predictors of both outcome variables. We also examined the popularized notion of the “superwoman”, which we defined as women who fell within the 4th quartile of role engagement, or those engaged in the wife/mother/worker/homemaker role combination. Based on popular discourses surrounding the superwoman we expected that superwomen would exhibit higher levels of perceived stress. Our results revealed that superwomen do not experience a significantly higher level of perceived stress than non-superwomen. The results of our study therefore suggest that multiple role engagement in women, even at a relatively high level as experienced by “superwomen”, is not associated with significantly higher stress, or reduced life satisfaction. PMID:25816317

  18. Temperature distribution in a uniformly moving medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Joseph D; Petrov, Nikola P

    2009-01-01

    We apply several physical ideas to determine the steady temperature distribution in a medium moving with uniform velocity between two infinite parallel plates. We compute it in the coordinate frame moving with the medium by integration over the 'past' to account for the influence of an infinite set of instantaneous point sources of heat in past moments as seen by an observer moving with the medium. The boundary heat flux is simulated by appropriately distributed point heat sources on the inner side of an adiabatically insulating boundary. We make an extensive use of the Green functions with an emphasis on their physical meaning. The methodology used in this paper is of great pedagogical value as it offers an opportunity for students to see the connection between powerful mathematical techniques and their physical interpretation in an intuitively clear physical problem. We suggest several problems and a challenging project that can be easily incorporated in undergraduate or graduate courses

  19. Bringing science education in and out of school closer together - (Symposium SBBq Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dillon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, and for many decades, science-rich cultural institutions, such as zoos, aquaria, museums, and others, have collaborated with schools to provide students, teachers and families with opportunities  to expand their experiences and understanding of science. Programmes include supplementary classroom experiences; integrated core academic curricula; student science learning communities located in afterschool, summer, and weekend programmes; teacher professional development opportunities and communities; and even district infrastructure efforts around issues such as standards and assessment development or teacher preparation. Throughout the world, thesecollaborations have allowed students, and also teachers, to explore, understand, and care about a wide range of natural settings, phenomena, and cultural and historical objects. They have helped students to notice, consider, and investigate relationships between human social behavior and environmental consequences. They have  provided contexts, materials, rationales, and support for students and teachers to engage deeply in scientific inquiry processes of learning. These experiences—with an array of real-life settings, plants, animals, professional science communities, objects, scientific instrumentation, and current research and data—have been shown to spark curiosity, generate questions, and lead to a depth of understanding andcommitment in ways that are often less possible when the same material is encountered in books or on screens. This paper draws on theoretical perspectives as well as practical examples, focusing on inquiry-based science education, to show that formal-informal collaborations fall within the core activities  of both schools and organisations working in informal contexts including museums, youth programmes, and libraries. The paper argues that what is needed are more intentional and strategic deployments of resources, leading to

  20. Plant identification credibility in ethnobotany: a closer look at Polish ethnographic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łuczaj Łukasz J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to estimate the percentage of erroneously identified taxa in ethnographic studies concerning the use of plants and to propose a code for recording credibility of identification in historical ethnobotany publications. Methods A sample of Polish-language ethnobotanical literature (45 published sources from 1874-2005 and four collections of voucher specimens (from 1894-1975 were analyzed. Errors were detected in the publications by comparing the data with existing knowledge on the distribution of plant names and species ranges. The voucher specimens were re-examined. A one-letter code was invented for quick identification of the credibility of data published in lists of species compiled from historical or ethnographic sources, according to the source of identification: voucher specimen, Latin binominal, botanical expert, obvious widespread name, folk name, mode of use, range, physical description or photograph. To test the use of the code an up-to-date list of wild food plants used in Poland was made. Results A significant difference between the ratio of mistakes in the voucher specimen collections and the ratio of detectable mistakes in the studies without herbarium documentation was found. At least 2.3% of taxa in the publications were identified erroneously (mean rate was 6.2% per publication, and in half of these mistakes even the genus was not correct. As many as 10.0% of voucher specimens (on average 9.2% per collection were originally erroneously identified, but three quarters of the identification mistakes remained within-genus. The species of the genera Thymus, Rumex and Rubus were most often confused within the genus. Not all of the invented credibility codes were used in the list of wild food plants, but they may be useful for other researchers. The most often used codes were the ones signifying identification by: voucher specimen, botanical expert and by a common name used throughout the

  1. Plant identification credibility in ethnobotany: a closer look at Polish ethnographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczaj, Łukasz J

    2010-12-17

    This paper is an attempt to estimate the percentage of erroneously identified taxa in ethnographic studies concerning the use of plants and to propose a code for recording credibility of identification in historical ethnobotany publications. A sample of Polish-language ethnobotanical literature (45 published sources from 1874-2005) and four collections of voucher specimens (from 1894-1975) were analyzed. Errors were detected in the publications by comparing the data with existing knowledge on the distribution of plant names and species ranges. The voucher specimens were re-examined.A one-letter code was invented for quick identification of the credibility of data published in lists of species compiled from historical or ethnographic sources, according to the source of identification: voucher specimen, Latin binominal, botanical expert, obvious widespread name, folk name, mode of use, range, physical description or photograph. To test the use of the code an up-to-date list of wild food plants used in Poland was made. A significant difference between the ratio of mistakes in the voucher specimen collections and the ratio of detectable mistakes in the studies without herbarium documentation was found. At least 2.3% of taxa in the publications were identified erroneously (mean rate was 6.2% per publication), and in half of these mistakes even the genus was not correct. As many as 10.0% of voucher specimens (on average 9.2% per collection) were originally erroneously identified, but three quarters of the identification mistakes remained within-genus.The species of the genera Thymus, Rumex and Rubus were most often confused within the genus.Not all of the invented credibility codes were used in the list of wild food plants, but they may be useful for other researchers. The most often used codes were the ones signifying identification by: voucher specimen, botanical expert and by a common name used throughout the country. The results of this study support the rigorous use

  2. A Closer Look at Cardioprotective Function of HDL: Revise the HDL – Cholesterol Hypothesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The strong inverse association of plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol with coronary heart disease (CHD found in human epidemiological studies led to the development of the ‘HDL cholesterol hypothesis’, which posits that intervention to raise HDL cholesterol will result in reduced risk of CHD. A number of recent developments have brought the potential protective role of HDL into question. Several clinical trials of agents that substantially raise HDL-C have been demonstrated to not reduce CHD event rates. CONTENT: For decades, HDL and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C levels were viewed as synonymous, and modulation of HDL-C levels by drug therapy held great promise for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, recent failures of drugs that raise HDL-C to reduce cardiovascular risk and the now greater understanding of the complexity of HDL composition and biology have prompted researchers in the field to redefine HDL. As such, the focus of HDL has now started to shift away from a cholesterol-centric view toward HDL particle number, subclasses, and other alternative metrics of HDL. Many of the recently discovered functions of HDL are, in fact, not strictly conferred by its ability to promote cholesterol flux but by the other molecules it transports, including a diverse set of proteins, small RNAs, hormones, carotenoids, vitamins, and bioactive lipids. Based on HDL’s ability to interact with almost all cells and deliver fat-soluble cargo, HDL has the remarkable capacity to affect a wide variety of endocrine-like systems. SUMMARY: There is a significant need to redefine HDL and its benefit. HDL transports a diverse set of functional proteins, including many binding proteins. HDL transports and deliver vitamins, carotenoids, and other small molecules. Moreover, HDL transports hormones, steroids and bile acids, and can modulate multiple endocrine pathways. HDLs also transport and deliver micro

  3. Energy flow around a moving dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, H; Kirchner, H O K

    2009-01-01

    A dislocation moving in a lattice emits lattice waves. We study the energy flow accompanying the lattice wave emission in a molecular dynamics situation. About two thirds of the static free energy are emitted as lattice waves from the moving dislocation. Work done by the region around the dislocation helps to initiate the motion from the unstable equilibrium state under a small applied stress, or to compensate the energy emitted as lattice waves when the dislocation makes a long distance motion under a larger stress.

  4. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  5. No quantum friction between uniformly moving plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbin, T G; Leonhardt, U [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: tgp3@st-andrews.ac.uk

    2009-03-15

    The Casimir forces between two plates moving parallel to each other at arbitrary constant speed are found by calculating the vacuum electromagnetic stress tensor. The perpendicular force between the plates is modified by the motion but there is no lateral force on the plates. Electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations do not therefore give rise to 'quantum friction' in this case, contrary to previous assertions. The result shows that the Casimir-Polder force on a particle moving at constant speed parallel to a plate also has no lateral component.

  6. No quantum friction between uniformly moving plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philbin, T G; Leonhardt, U

    2009-01-01

    The Casimir forces between two plates moving parallel to each other at arbitrary constant speed are found by calculating the vacuum electromagnetic stress tensor. The perpendicular force between the plates is modified by the motion but there is no lateral force on the plates. Electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations do not therefore give rise to 'quantum friction' in this case, contrary to previous assertions. The result shows that the Casimir-Polder force on a particle moving at constant speed parallel to a plate also has no lateral component.

  7. Clustering Moving Objects Using Segments Slopes

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed E. El-Sharkawi; Hoda M. O. Mokhtar; Omnia Ossama

    2011-01-01

    Given a set of moving object trajectories, we show how to cluster them using k-meansclustering approach. Our proposed clustering algorithm is competitive with the k-means clusteringbecause it specifies the value of “k” based on the segment’s slope of the moving object trajectories. Theadvantage of this approach is that it overcomes the known drawbacks of the k-means algorithm, namely,the dependence on the number of clusters (k), and the dependence on the initial choice of the clusters’centroi...

  8. Moving Shadow Detection in Video Using Cepstrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Cogun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Moving shadows constitute problems in various applications such as image segmentation and object tracking. The main cause of these problems is the misclassification of the shadow pixels as target pixels. Therefore, the use of an accurate and reliable shadow detection method is essential to realize intelligent video processing applications. In this paper, a cepstrum-based method for moving shadow detection is presented. The proposed method is tested on outdoor and indoor video sequences using well-known benchmark test sets. To show the improvements over previous approaches, quantitative metrics are introduced and comparisons based on these metrics are made.

  9. 77 FR 16566 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: Let's Move Museums, Let's Move...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ..., Proposed Collection: Let's Move Museums, Let's Move Gardens AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library..., comment request. SUMMARY: The Institute of Museum and Library Services announces that the following... functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; Evaluate the...

  10. Detection of moving objects from a moving platform in urban scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, F.B. ter; Hollander, R.J.M. den; Dijk, J.

    2010-01-01

    Moving object detection in urban scenes is important for the guidance of autonomous vehicles, robot navigation, and monitoring. In this paper moving objects are automatically detected using three sequential frames and tracked over a longer period. To this extend we modify the plane+parallax,

  11. Vector Magnetometer Application with Moving Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii Prystai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In magnetic prospecting the aeromagnetic survey is a widespread method used for research in large territories or in the areas with difficult access (forests, swamps, shallow waters. At present, a new type of mobile carriers – remotely piloted vehicles or drones – is becoming very common. The drones supplied by magnetometer can be also used for underground utility location (for example, steel and concrete constructions, buried power cables, to name a few. For aeromagnetic survey, obtaining of 3-component magnetic field data gives higher processing precision, so the fluxgate magnetometers (FGM seem to be the most preferable by reason of low weight, noise, power consumption and costs. During movement of FGM fixed to a drone practically permanent attitude changes in the Earth’s magnetic field arises with corresponding changes of its projection at FGM axes. Also the electromagnetic interference from the drone motor and uncontrolled oscillations of drone and suspension are the factors which limit the magnetometer sensitivity level. Aroused because of this, signals significantly exceed the expected signals from a studied object and so should be removed by proper interference filtration and use of stabilized towed construction, as well as at data processing. To find the necessary resolution threshold of a drone-portable FGM, the modeling was made to estimate magnetic field value from a small sphere about 1 cm radius at the minimal altitude of drone flight and it was shown that such a small object can be reliably detected if the FGM noise level is less than 0.15 nT. Next requirement is the necessity to decrease as much as possible the FGM power consumption with retention of low noise level. Finally, because of drone movement, the broadening of a frequency range should be done. The LEMI-026 magnetometer was developed satisfying all requirements to the drone-mounted device. The field tests were successfully performed using two of LEMI-026

  12. Moving-Boundary Problems Associated with Lyopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Christopher Andrew

    The work presented in this Dissertation is motivated by research into the preservation of biological specimens by way of vitrification, a technique known as lyopreservation. The operative principle behind lyopreservation is that a glassy material forms as a solution of sugar and water is desiccated. The microstructure of this glass impedes transport within the material, thereby slowing metabolism and effectively halting the aging processes in a biospecimen. This Dissertation is divided into two segments. The first concerns the nature of diffusive transport within a glassy state. Experimental studies suggest that diffusion within a glass is anomalously slow. Scaled Brownian motion (SBM) is proposed as a mathematical model which captures the qualitative features of anomalously slow diffusion while minimizing computational expense. This model is applied to several moving-boundary problems and the results are compared to a more well-established model, fractional anomalous diffusion (FAD). The virtues of SBM are based on the model's relative mathematical simplicity: the governing equation under FAD dynamics involves a fractional derivative operator, which precludes the use of analytical methods in almost all circumstances and also entails great computational expense. In some geometries, SBM allows similarity solutions, though computational methods are generally required. The use of SBM as an approximation to FAD when a system is "nearly classical'' is also explored. The second portion of this Dissertation concerns spin-drying, which is an experimental approach to biopreservation in a laboratory setting. A biospecimen is adhered to a glass wafer and this substrate is covered with sugar solution and rapidly spun on a turntable while water is evaporated from the film surface. The mathematical model for the spin-drying process includes diffusion, viscous fluid flow, and evaporation, among other contributions to the dynamics. Lubrication theory is applied to the model and an

  13. Spatiotemporal Compression Techniques for Moving Point Objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meratnia, Nirvana; de By, R.A.; de By, R.A.; Bertino, E.

    Moving object data handling has received a fair share of attention over recent years in the spatial database community. This is understandable as positioning technology is rapidly making its way into the consumer market, not only through the already ubiquitous cell phone but soon also through small,

  14. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Zhang, H.

    2009-01-01

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions

  15. Moving vortices in noncommutative gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathy, P.A.; Stichel, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    Exact time-dependent solutions of nonrelativistic noncommutative Chern-Simons gauge theory are presented in closed analytic form. They are different from (indeed orthogonal to) those discussed recently by Hadasz, Lindstroem, Rocek and von Unge. Unlike theirs, our solutions can move with an arbitrary constant velocity, and can be obtained from the previously known static solutions by the recently found 'exotic' boost symmetry

  16. EPI moved in beam S3

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The housing of the External Particle Identifier (EPI) is being moved to S3 beam. Test measurements with EPI were performed in the S3 beam between 20 and 110 GeV/c, before installing it behind BEBC. 110 GeV/c before

  17. The Electromagnetic Force between Two Moving Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2018-01-01

    A simple model of parallel motion of two point charges and the subsequent analysis of the electromagnetic field transformation invariant quantity are considered. It is shown that ignoring the coupling of electric and magnetic fields, as is done in some introductory physics books, can lead to miscalculations of the force between moving charges.…

  18. Electromagnetic Sources in Moving Simple Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Günther

    1970-01-01

    A retarded potential tensor (4-vector) is derived in an arbitrary system of inertia for an arbitrary electromagnetic source in a moving homogeneous, isotropic, nondispersive, lossless dielectric. The velocity is uniform, and the result is relativistic correct. ©1970 The American Institute...

  19. Electromagnetic Sources in a Moving Conducting Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Günther

    1971-01-01

    The problem of an arbitrary source distribution in a uniformly moving, homogeneous, isotropic, nondispersive, conducting medium is solved. The technique used is to solve the problem in the rest system of the medium and then write the result in an appropriate four-dimensional, covariant form which...

  20. Towards a Psychological Construct of Being Moved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menninghaus, Winfried; Wagner, Valentin; Hanich, Julian; Wassiliwizky, Eugen; Kuehnast, Milena; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The emotional state of being moved, though frequently referred to in both classical rhetoric and current language use, is far from established as a well-defined psychological construct. In a series of three studies, we investigated eliciting scenarios, emotional ingredients, appraisal patterns,

  1. A dynamic analysis of moving average rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiarella, C.; He, X.Z.; Hommes, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    The use of various moving average (MA) rules remains popular with financial market practitioners. These rules have recently become the focus of a number empirical studies, but there have been very few studies of financial market models where some agents employ technical trading rules of the type

  2. Cooperative Scalable Moving Continuous Query Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohui; Karras, Panagiotis; Jensen, Christian S.

    2012-01-01

    of the global view and handle the majority of the workload. Meanwhile, moving clients, having basic memory and computation resources, handle small portions of the workload. This model is further enhanced by dynamic region allocation and grid size adjustment mechanisms that reduce the communication...... and computation cost for both servers and clients. An experimental study demonstrates that our approaches offer better scalability than competitors...

  3. Supportive Discourse Moves in Persian Requests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani; Allami, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study designed to investigate the types of supportive discourse moves employed by Persian speakers in their Requestive Speech Acts. 372 respondents took a Discourse Completion Test (DCT) with six scenarios ranging from formal to informal degrees of Perceived Situational Seriousness, and returned 2232 Requestive…

  4. Slow-light pulses in moving media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiurasek, J.; Leonhardt, U.; Parentani, R.

    2002-01-01

    Slow light in moving media reaches a counterintuitive regime when the flow speed of the medium approaches the group velocity of light. Pulses can penetrate a region where a counterpropagating flow exceeds the group velocity. When the counterflow slows down, pulses are reflected

  5. On the atmosphere of a moving body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan Rønby; Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    We explore whether a rigid body moving freely with no circulation around it in a two-dimensional ideal fluid can carry a fluid "atmosphere" with it in its motion. Somewhat surprisingly, the answer appears to be "yes." When the body is elongated and the motion is dominated by rotation, we demonstr...

  6. On the atmosphere of a moving body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan Rønby; Aref, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    We have explored whether a rigid body moving freely with no circulation around it in a two-dimensional ideal fluid can carry a fluid ``atmosphere'' with it in its motion. Somewhat surprisingly, the answer appears to be ``yes''. When the body is elongated and the motion is dominated by rotation, w...

  7. Holistic Processing of Static and Moving Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Humans' face ability develops and matures with extensive experience in perceiving, recognizing, and interacting with faces that move most of the time. However, how facial movements affect 1 core aspect of face ability--holistic face processing--remains unclear. Here we investigated the influence of rigid facial motion on holistic and part-based…

  8. Finding Funds to Move Summer Learning Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Summer learning loss creates a permanent drag on the US education system. With the generous support of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) developed "Moving Summer Learning Forward: A Strategic Roadmap for Funding in Tough Times" to provide out-of-school time programs, school districts,…

  9. Strategic Game Moves Mediate Implicit Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Elizabeth; Baker, Ryan S.; Asbell-Clarke, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Educational games have the potential to be innovative forms of learning assessment, by allowing us to not just study their knowledge but the process that takes students to that knowledge. This paper examines the mediating role of players' moves in digital games on changes in their pre-post classroom measures of implicit science learning. We…

  10. Clutter Moves in Old Age Homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This chapter introduces the notion of clutter moves as an experimental heuristic for tracing how movement threads together a range of cluttered entities in old age homecare ecologies. In particular it is concerned with older people and their cluttered technologies. It is based on empirical data o...

  11. Moving frames for heart fiber geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piuze, Emmanuel; Sporring, Jon; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    fibers is central to our understanding of normal heart function. Motivated by a recent abstraction by Savadjiev et al. of heart wall fibers into generalized helicoid minimal surfaces, this paper develops an extension based on differential forms. The key idea is to use Maurer-Cartan’s method of moving...

  12. Moving UA5 into the beam

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    The streamer chamber of UA5, which had been operating at the ISR until Easter, was installed in its platform, in ECA4 alongside the UA2 detector and in September was moved into the beam (this photo). See Annual Report 1981 p. 128.

  13. Performance of the Analog Moving Window Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, V. Gregers

    1970-01-01

    A type of analog integrating moving window detector for use with a scanning pulse radar is examined. A performance analysis is carried out, which takes into account both the radiation pattern of the antenna and the dynamic character of the detection process due to the angular scanning...

  14. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  15. Moving Facts in an Arctic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Kirsten Blinkenberg; Flora, Janne; Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    2016-01-01

    , and an engagement with other disciplinary practices. The gain of our cross-disciplinary experiment was therefore not only to know more about the makings of a particular landscape in a multi-disciplinary perspective, but also to understand how anthropology makes sense of inherently moving facts....

  16. Moving image compression and generalization capability of constructive neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liying; Khorasani, Khashayar

    2001-03-01

    To date numerous techniques have been proposed to compress digital images to ease their storage and transmission over communication channels. Recently, a number of image compression algorithms using Neural Networks NNs have been developed. Particularly, several constructive feed-forward neural networks FNNs have been proposed by researchers for image compression, and promising results have been reported. At the previous SPIE AeroSense conference 2000, we proposed to use a constructive One-Hidden-Layer Feedforward Neural Network OHL-FNN for compressing digital images. In this paper, we first investigate the generalization capability of the proposed OHL-FNN in the presence of additive noise for network training and/ or generalization. Extensive experimental results for different scenarios are presented. It is revealed that the constructive OHL-FNN is not as robust to additive noise in input image as expected. Next, the constructive OHL-FNN is applied to moving images, video sequences. The first, or other specified frame in a moving image sequence is used to train the network. The remaining moving images that follow are then generalized/compressed by this trained network. Three types of correlation-like criteria measuring the similarity of any two images are introduced. The relationship between the generalization capability of the constructed net and the similarity of images is investigated in some detail. It is shown that the constructive OHL-FNN is promising even for changing images such as those extracted from a football game.

  17. Fusion research at Culham site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolonen, P.; Toppila, T.

    1998-01-01

    One of the many targets on the Finnish Nuclear Society (ATS) excursion to England was the Culham fusion research site. The site has divided into two parts. One of them is UKAEA Fusion with small scale fusion reactors and 200 employees. UKAEA has 3 fusion reactors at Culham site. One of is the START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) which was operational since 1991 but is today already out of operation. UKAEA has been operating a JET-like tokamak fusion reactor COMPASS-D since 1989. The latest of three reactors is MAST (Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak), which is still under construction. The first plasma will take place in the end of 1998. Another part of Culham site is JET (Joint European Torus), an all-European fusion undertaking with 350 employees. 150 of them are from various European countries and the rest 200 are employed by UKAEA. JET is the biggest fusion reactor ever and it represents the latest step in world wide fusion programme. In October 1997 JET achieved a world record in fusion power and energy. JET produced 16,1 MW power for 1 s and totally 21,7 MJ energy. This is the closest attempt to achieve break-even conditions. The next step in world wide fusion programme will be international ITER-reactor. This undertaking has some financial problems, since United States has taken distance to magnetic fusion research and moved closer to inertial fusion with funding of US Department of Defence. The planned reactor, however, is physically twice as big as JET. The step after this phase will be DEMO, which is purposed to produce fusion energy. According to our hosts in Culham this phase is 40 years ahead. (author)

  18. Comments on Racetrack playa: Rocks moved by wind alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Cabestrero, Ó.; Rodríguez-Aranda, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which rocks move across the beds of playa lakes leaving tracks continue to be debated (Sanz-Montero and Rodríguez-Aranda, 2013; Norris et al., 2014; Sanz-Montero et al., 2015a,b; Baumgardner and Shaffer, 2015; Jones and Hooke, 2015). In this regard, the article by Jones and Hooke (Aeolian Research 19, 2015) is particularly interesting since it provides a description of these mechanisms by R. Jones who, during a storm event in 1972, was probably the first person to witness movement of rocks. The dominant meteorological conditions described by Jones during the period when the tracks were formed are, significantly, rather similar to those previously described by Clements (1952) at Little Bonnie Claire Playa (Nevada, USA). The storm conditions referred to in the article also coincide with the observations, measurements and deductions made by Sanz-Montero and Rodríguez-Aranda (2013) and Sanz-Montero et al. (2015a,b) at Altillo Chica playa lake, Central Spain. Furthermore, we were able to carry out an on-site analysis of the sedimentary structures at Racetrack playa in June 2015, allowing us to verify the similarity of the features present at both sites. Together with the important role played by gusty winds in the formation of the tracks, all the above mentioned studies point to the presence of a thin veneer of water, just a few millimeters deep, in the area of the playa lake where the rock movements occur. However, Jones and Hooke (2015) disregard the force exerted by moving water and analyze the coefficient of friction assuming that the rocks are moved by wind alone. We offer an alternative explanation for the movement of rocks both at Racetrack and Altillo Chica playa lake which considers not only the wind but also the role played by moving water in conjunction with other parameters which modify the erosion thresholds (rocks acting as obstacles) and reduce friction (benthic microorganisms).

  19. Moving lips versus moving policy: Can scientists figure out how to do both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    Global environmental issues are, well, global. Their complexity and scope make them among the most important issues of our time. Yet they are also among the most difficult to evaluate analytically and to communicate effectively. Scientists, when they choose to communicate with the public or policy makers at all, often find that their messages are often misunderstood, ignored, or simply marginalized, making public communications a less-than rewarding experience. Some methods, however, can prove more effective than others, and in the area of water resources and climate change, two approaches have proven especially effective. The first is to focus on “success stories” as a way to move the discussion from problems to solutions; the second is to focus on regional issues as a way to engage policy makers and the public, for whom the global scope of the challenges may be overwhelming. One additional complexity is how to deal with intentional efforts to obfuscate or misrepresent science. In the climate area, especially, this has long been a challenge, but successful approaches include refusing to let such efforts derail rational policy debates. This requires that scientists understand how science can be misrepresented or misused, and calling attention to such efforts. This presentation will summarize some successful communications efforts in the areas of climate and water from the experience of the Pacific Institute, a leading independent research group addressing these issues.

  20. Identification of moving vehicle forces on bridge structures via moving average Tikhonov regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chu-Dong; Yu, Ling; Liu, Huan-Lin

    2017-08-01

    Traffic-induced moving force identification (MFI) is a typical inverse problem in the field of bridge structural health monitoring. Lots of regularization-based methods have been proposed for MFI. However, the MFI accuracy obtained from the existing methods is low when the moving forces enter into and exit a bridge deck due to low sensitivity of structural responses to the forces at these zones. To overcome this shortcoming, a novel moving average Tikhonov regularization method is proposed for MFI by combining with the moving average concepts. Firstly, the bridge-vehicle interaction moving force is assumed as a discrete finite signal with stable average value (DFS-SAV). Secondly, the reasonable signal feature of DFS-SAV is quantified and introduced for improving the penalty function (∣∣x∣∣2 2) defined in the classical Tikhonov regularization. Then, a feasible two-step strategy is proposed for selecting regularization parameter and balance coefficient defined in the improved penalty function. Finally, both numerical simulations on a simply-supported beam and laboratory experiments on a hollow tube beam are performed for assessing the accuracy and the feasibility of the proposed method. The illustrated results show that the moving forces can be accurately identified with a strong robustness. Some related issues, such as selection of moving window length, effect of different penalty functions, and effect of different car speeds, are discussed as well.

  1. Strategies of moving image comprehension of students in primary and secondary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Szíjártó

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The research was based on a survey method of enquiry. We were looking for answers to the following questions: What strategies of moving image comprehension do participants use? Are there differences in social status in the level of comprehension of moving images? Are there differences between students whose education consists of the ‘moving image culture and media literacy’ module, and those whose does not? What typical levels of media literacy can be located amongst students? What tasks of development can we identify? According to the literature and our research findings, students’ strategies of moving image comprehension are formed by three components: the socio-cultural environment, the school, and those online social networks, which students frequently access – in classical terms this refers to the influence of peer groups. We have come up with logical connections at the intersection of the three areas, which posed as a vantage point in the development of our survey.

  2. Closer to Nature?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkfelt, Sune; Kondrup, Sara; Röcklinsberg, Helena

    2015-01-01

    discourses in order to sell one image of animal welfare in intensive animal production while the actual production at the same time presupposes a quite different paradigm of animal welfare. Specifically, product advertising utilizes representations tied to concepts of naturalness in depictions of both animal...... lives and product processes as “natural”. Product marketing suggests a coherence between nature, production process (farm, animal), and end product, thereby creating associations that the lives of production animals are lived in nature and that their products bring a wholesome and sustainable...

  3. Closer to Nature?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkfelt, Sune; Kondrup, Sara; Röcklinsberg, Helena

    2015-01-01

    As public awareness of environmental issues and animal welfare has risen, catering to public concerns and views on these issues has become a potentially profitable strategy for marketing a number of product types, of which animal products such as dairy and meat are obvious examples. Our analysis ...... product marketing, discusses the ethical implications of this type of marketing communication, and stresses the need for transparency in the area of animal welfare....

  4. Trees or Grids? Indexing Moving Objects in Main Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidlauskas, Darius; Saltenis, Simonas; Christiansen, Christian Winther

    2009-01-01

    New application areas, such as location-based services, rely on the efficient management of large collections of mobile objects. Maintaining accurate, up-to-date positions of these objects results in massive update loads that must be supported by spatial indexing structures and main-memory indexes...... are usually necessary to provide high update performance. Traditionally, the R-tree and its variants were used for indexing spatial data, but most of the recent research assumes that a simple, uniform grid is the best choice for managing moving objects in main memory. We perform an extensive experimental...

  5. Faith Moves Mountains: An Appalachian Cervical Cancer Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Hatcher, Jennifer; Dignan, Mark B.; Shelton, Brent; Wright, Sherry; Dollarhide, Kaye F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To provide a conceptual description of Faith Moves Mountains (FMM), an intervention designed to reduce the disproportionate burden of cervical cancer among Appalachian women. Methods FMM, a community-based participatory research program designed and implemented in collaboration with churches in rural, southeastern Kentucky, aims to increase cervical cancer screening (Pap tests) through a multiphase process of educational programming and lay health counseling. Results We provide a conceptual overview to key elements of the intervention, including programmatic development, theoretical basis, intervention approach and implementation, and evaluation procedures. Conclusions After numerous modifications, FMM has recruited and retained over 400 women, 30 churches, and has become a change agent in the community. PMID:19320612

  6. 30 CFR 56.14107 - Moving machine parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moving machine parts. 56.14107 Section 56.14107... Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14107 Moving machine parts. (a) Moving machine parts... takeup pulleys, flywheels, couplings, shafts, fan blades, and similar moving parts that can cause injury...

  7. Overlapping montage: a comparative study of mainstream film and moving-image installations

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Orla G.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation develops a discussion on the need for a comparative approach to the study of film and moving- image installations. It addresses the lack of critical attention given to moving-image installations within film studies generally and academic teaching programmes in particular. The development of a comparative approach requires researching a number of interlinking and independent fields of study such as film studies, art history/criticism, photography, literary theory, critical th...

  8. Heartwarming Closeness: Being Moved Induces Communal Sharing and Increases Feelings of Warmth

    OpenAIRE

    Zickfeld, Janis Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The feeling of being moved has only received marginal attention by emotion research during the last decades. Recently, an emotion framework termed kama muta has been introduced giving a first overview and suggesting that being moved is a positive cultural-dependent feeling typically accompanied by tears, piloerection, and a warm feeling in the chest (Seibt, Schubert, Zickfeld & Fiske, 2015). The present article tries to give a first insight into the effects of kama muta. Based on relational m...

  9. The actuator for micro moving of a body in a plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiljev, P.; Borodinas, S.; Yoon, S.-J.; Mazeika, D.; Kulvietis, G.

    2005-01-01

    In present work, the analysis of moving of positioning table in a plane is indicated. For this purpose, only one piezoelectric motor without intermediate parts is created. Being based on researches of compound ultrasonic piezoelectric systems called 'shaking beam' is developed actuator for moving of a body in a plane at any direction. Computer modeling of the actuator is carried out. The prototype is made. The experimental outcomes of the oscillation forms of working surfaces of an actuator are given

  10. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Joe A. Lemire; Marc A. Demeter; Iain George; Howard Ceri; Raymond J. Turner

    2015-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers (biofilm support materials), allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that ...

  11. Exploring Knowledge Processes Based on Teacher Research in a School-University Research Network of a Master's Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Frank; van Swet, Jacqueline; Beijaard, Douwe; Bergen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    School-university research networks aim at closer integration of research and practice by means of teacher research. Such practice-oriented research can benefit both schools and universities. This paper reports on a multiple-case study of five participants in a school-university research network in a Dutch master's program. The research question…

  12. On multiscale moving contact line theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaofan; Fan, Houfu

    2015-07-08

    In this paper, a multiscale moving contact line (MMCL) theory is presented and employed to simulate liquid droplet spreading and capillary motion. The proposed MMCL theory combines a coarse-grained adhesive contact model with a fluid interface membrane theory, so that it can couple molecular scale adhesive interaction and surface tension with hydrodynamics of microscale flow. By doing so, the intermolecular force, the van der Waals or double layer force, separates and levitates the liquid droplet from the supporting solid substrate, which avoids the shear stress singularity caused by the no-slip condition in conventional hydrodynamics theory of moving contact line. Thus, the MMCL allows the difference of the surface energies and surface stresses to drive droplet spreading naturally. To validate the proposed MMCL theory, we have employed it to simulate droplet spreading over various elastic substrates. The numerical simulation results obtained by using MMCL are in good agreement with the molecular dynamics results reported in the literature.

  13. Identifying New Members of Nearby Moving Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmbeck, Erika; Vican, Laura

    2014-06-01

    Our group has assembled a sample of 14,000 stars of spectral types B9-M9 with measured UVW Galactic space velocities and lying within 125 pc of Earth. We have identified candidate members of three nearby young (less than 100 Myr) moving groups. For stars of spectral types G5 and later, we have used the Kast spectrometer on the Shane 3m telescope at Lick Observatory to measure lithium abundance in order to determine stellar ages. With the data we have obtained from this run, we will be able to establish whether our candidates are bona fide members of the moving groups in question. I will be presenting the preliminary results from this survey, including spectra of the ~50 stars observed thus far. These nearby young stars will make excellent targets for direct imaging followup surveys, since any giant planets around young stars will still be warm, and will therefore be bright enough to detect with instruments like GPI.

  14. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  15. The active blind spot camera: hard real-time recognition of moving objects from a moving camera

    OpenAIRE

    Van Beeck, Kristof; Goedemé, Toon; Tuytelaars, Tinne

    2014-01-01

    This PhD research focuses on visual object recognition under specific demanding conditions. The object to be recognized as well as the camera move, and the time available for the recognition task is extremely short. This generic problem is applied here on a specific problem: the active blind spot camera. Statistics show a large number of accidents with trucks are related to the so-called blind spot, the area around the vehicle in which vulnerable road users are hard to perceive by the truck d...

  16. EDITORIAL: `Il sole - no si move'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Bob

    1999-05-01

    The Sun may not have moved for Galileo but it is certain that this coming August the Sun will have moved millions of folk towards a thin strip of land about 100 km wide stretching from Cornwall to the Indian Ocean. If you have yet to book your place for the biggest live show of this millennium year there are still places in hotels and campsites. The April edition of the UK camping and caravaning club magazine included at least four sites in Cornwall alone with vacancies. I am told that the difference between seeing a 98% eclipse and totality is considerably greater than 2%. The message appears to be - try to get to the line. However, a popular misconception among lay folk seems to be that you will only be able to see the event in Cornwall. As you will read in this issue the partial event will be visible from virtually the whole of Europe. Anyone who has tried to holiday in Cornwall or Devon will tell you how congested the roads become in any ordinary August. The best advice for this year is either to travel to the south west by bicycle or attack the totality path as it crosses Europe. Access will be much easier. For my part I have booked a hotel in Trier, Germany, about 20 km north of the totality path. An early breakfast on the 11th should leave enough time to motorcycle down to see the shadow. Of course, the whole business is weather dependent. With the chance of a clear sky in Cornwall, Devon and most of western Europe being about 50% on the date in question, forward planning depends on whether you are a `half empty' or a `half full' person. It is worth keeping this fact in mind especially if you drag an expectant family hundreds of miles through traffic just to watch the clouds drift by. Take a colouring book and a board game just in case. Of course, the chance of a clear sky increases to about 90% across Turkey but there are reasons why such a trip might not be so wise in the current political climate. In this special issue readers will find plenty to interest

  17. Nonholonomic feedback control among moving obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Stephen Gregory

    A feedback controller is developed for navigating a nonholonomic vehicle in an area with multiple stationary and possibly moving obstacles. Among other applications the developed algorithms can be used for automatic parking of a passenger car in a parking lot with complex configuration or a ground robot in cluttered environment. Several approaches are explored which combine nonholonomic systems control based on sliding modes and potential field methods.

  18. Culture as a Moving Symbolic Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Lívia Mathias

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose the notion of culture as a symbolic moving border. Departing from both, Boesch's (1991) concept of culture as a symbolic field of action, and Herbst's (1995) co-genetic logic, I will discuss the dynamics of self-other relationships in terms of their potentiality as sources of movement in culture. A brief analysis of an empirical material is given in illustrative character of the ideas here exposed.

  19. The electromagnetic force between two moving charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2018-05-01

    A simple model of parallel motion of two point charges and the subsequent analysis of the electromagnetic field transformation invariant quantity are considered. It is shown that ignoring the coupling of electric and magnetic fields, as is done in some introductory physics books, can lead to miscalculations of the force between moving charges. Conceptual and computational aspects of these issues are discussed, and implications to the design of electron beam devices are considered.

  20. Spark formation as a moving boundary process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Ute

    2006-03-01

    The growth process of spark channels recently becomes accessible through complementary methods. First, I will review experiments with nanosecond photographic resolution and with fast and well defined power supplies that appropriately resolve the dynamics of electric breakdown [1]. Second, I will discuss the elementary physical processes as well as present computations of spark growth and branching with adaptive grid refinement [2]. These computations resolve three well separated scales of the process that emerge dynamically. Third, this scale separation motivates a hierarchy of models on different length scales. In particular, I will discuss a moving boundary approximation for the ionization fronts that generate the conducting channel. The resulting moving boundary problem shows strong similarities with classical viscous fingering. For viscous fingering, it is known that the simplest model forms unphysical cusps within finite time that are suppressed by a regularizing condition on the moving boundary. For ionization fronts, we derive a new condition on the moving boundary of mixed Dirichlet-Neumann type (φ=ɛnφ) that indeed regularizes all structures investigated so far. In particular, we present compact analytical solutions with regularization, both for uniformly translating shapes and for their linear perturbations [3]. These solutions are so simple that they may acquire a paradigmatic role in the future. Within linear perturbation theory, they explicitly show the convective stabilization of a curved front while planar fronts are linearly unstable against perturbations of arbitrary wave length. [1] T.M.P. Briels, E.M. van Veldhuizen, U. Ebert, TU Eindhoven. [2] C. Montijn, J. Wackers, W. Hundsdorfer, U. Ebert, CWI Amsterdam. [3] B. Meulenbroek, U. Ebert, L. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 195004 (2005).

  1. BKSTS illustrated dictionary of moving image technology

    CERN Document Server

    Uren, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The fourth edition of the BKSTS dictionary provides clear and concise explanations of the terminology and acronyms encountered in the broadcasting and moving image industries.Convergence of these industries means that those practising within them are increasingly faced with unfamiliar terminology. Martin Uren has reflected this change in his extended choice of industry terms, acronyms and colloquialisms. He provides:- Over 3300 definitions covering film, television, sound and multimedia technologies, together with technical terms from the computing, networks and telecommunications industries.-

  2. A need for closer examination of FASD by the criminal justice system: has the call been answered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnier, Karina Royer; Moore, Timothy E; Green, Melvyn

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with FASD exhibit deficits in many domains that can include memory, learning, behavioural inhibition, executive functioning, interpersonal skills, and language. These deficits have serious implications for affected persons when they become engaged in the legal system. In 2004, Moore and Green reviewed case law and psychological literature which suggested that FASD-related deficits placed affected individuals at a significant disadvantage in the justice system. According to them, this disadvantage stemmed from the limited awareness and knowledge of FASD demonstrated by key players in the justice system, as well as the scarcity of effective interventions in place to rehabilitate affected defendants. The aim of the current paper is to assess the extent to which awareness of FASD-related issues in the Canadian justice system has advanced since the publication of Moore and Green's conclusions. First, the deficits associated with FASD and their implications for the justice system are described. Next, recent case law and psychological evidence are reviewed as we consider issues of witness reliability and false confessions. The significance of FASD for sentencing, fitness to stand trial, and the Not Criminally Responsible by Reason of Mental Disorder defence are also briefly discussed. Finally, emerging system wide responses to FASD-related issues are presented. Overall, it appears that the call for closer examination of FASD by the justice system has been answered, but a need for increased education and awareness remains.

  3. Moving backwards, moving forward: the experiences of older Filipino migrants adjusting to life in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Montayre, Jed; Neville, Stephen; Holroyd, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To explore the experiences of older Filipino migrants adjusting to living permanently in New Zealand. Method: The qualitative descriptive approach taken in this study involved 17 individual face-to-face interviews of older Filipino migrants in New Zealand. Results: Three main themes emerged from the data. The first theme was ?moving backwards and moving forward?, which described how these older Filipino migrants adjusted to challenges they experienced with migration. The sec...

  4. Reinvestigation of moving punctured black holes with a new code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhoujian; Yo Hweijang; Yu Juiping

    2008-01-01

    We report on our code, in which the moving puncture method is applied and an adaptive/fixed mesh refinement is implemented, and on its preliminary performance on black hole simulations. Based on the Baumgarte-Sharpiro-Shibata-Nakamura (BSSN) formulation, up-to-date gauge conditions and the modifications of the formulation are also implemented and tested. In this work, we present our primary results about the simulation of a single static black hole, of a moving single black hole, and of the head-on collision of a binary black hole system. For the static punctured black hole simulations, different modifications of the BSSN formulation are applied. It is demonstrated that both the currently used sets of modifications lead to a stable evolution. For cases of a moving punctured black hole with or without spin, we search for viable gauge conditions and study the effect of spin on the black hole evolution. Our results confirm previous results obtained by other research groups. In addition, we find a new gauge condition, which has not yet been adopted by any other researchers, which can also give stable and accurate black hole evolution calculations. We examine the performance of the code for the head-on collision of a binary black hole system, and the agreement of the gravitational waveform it produces with that obtained in other works. In order to understand qualitatively the influence of matter on the binary black hole collisions, we also investigate the same head-on collision scenarios but perturbed by a scalar field. The numerical simulations performed with this code not only give stable and accurate results that are consistent with the works by other numerical relativity groups, but also lead to the discovery of a new viable gauge condition, as well as clarify some ambiguities in the modification of the BSSN formulation. These results demonstrate that this code is reliable and ready to be used in the study of more realistic astrophysical scenarios and of numerical

  5. Robotic radiosurgery. Treating tumors that move with respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urschel, Harold C. Jr.; Kresl, John J.; Luketich, James D.; Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert D.; Schulz, Raymond A.

    2007-01-01

    revolutionary new tool, called the Synchrony registered Respiratory Tracking System, which can track moving tumors in real-time. This and other features of the CyberKnife are detailed in chapters by CyberKnife users. In addition, researchers in the broader field of stereotactic body radiation therapy were invited to contribute key chapters that place the technical and clinical benefits of CyberKnife into this growing and evolving field. Efforts have been made to achieve a homogeneous structure throughout the book, and illustrations are of a very high quality. This volume is intended for practitioners and students in all areas of oncology and medicine who are dedicated to the treatment of patients with lesions in the lungs, pancreas, and liver, lesions that move as patients breathe. (orig.)

  6. Robotic radiosurgery. Treating tumors that move with respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urschel, Harold C. Jr. [Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Chair of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgical Research, Education and Clinical Excellence; Kresl, John J. [Arizona Oncology Services at St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Luketich, James D. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center PUH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). The Heart, Lung and Esophageal Surgery Inst.; Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert D. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schulz, Raymond A. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    Knife using a revolutionary new tool, called the Synchrony {sup registered} Respiratory Tracking System, which can track moving tumors in real-time. This and other features of the CyberKnife are detailed in chapters by CyberKnife users. In addition, researchers in the broader field of stereotactic body radiation therapy were invited to contribute key chapters that place the technical and clinical benefits of CyberKnife into this growing and evolving field. Efforts have been made to achieve a homogeneous structure throughout the book, and illustrations are of a very high quality. This volume is intended for practitioners and students in all areas of oncology and medicine who are dedicated to the treatment of patients with lesions in the lungs, pancreas, and liver, lesions that move as patients breathe. (orig.)

  7. Moves Analysis on Abstracts Written by the Students in Academic Writing Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeng Setyorini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains analysis results on abstracts written by students in Academic Writing course. The analysis includes analyses on moves and linguistic features. The analysis aims at finding out how the abstract writing structures of the English Education students are in the Academic Writing course. The abstract analysis also includes the analysis on the use of the linguistic features in the abstracts. The analysis uses a qualitative research approach. There are totally 10 abstracts that are analyzed. These are then called as the data. Data obtained is analyzed using genre analysis approach. Results of analysis on the 10 abstracts showed that some of the abstracts are written using 5 kinds of moves. All of the abstracts are found using Purpose Move and Method Move. Meanwhile, Situation Move is found in 5 abstracts. 8 abstracts are identified using Result Move. Conclusion Move is found in 5 abstracts. The results also show that all of the abstract writers use pronouns ‘the writer’ and ‘the researcher’. The use of personal pronoun ‘she’ is also found in 1 abstract. Hedges used in abstracts written by students in Academic Writing course vary from modal auxiliary verbs, adjectival, adverbial, nominal to Approximates of degree.

  8. [Motion control of moving mirror based on fixed-mirror adjustment in FTIR spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-bing; Xu, Xian-ze; Le, Yi; Xu, Feng-qiu; Li, Jun-wei

    2012-08-01

    The performance of the uniform motion of the moving mirror, which is the only constant motion part in FTIR spectrometer, and the performance of the alignment of the fixed mirror play a key role in FTIR spectrometer, and affect the interference effect and the quality of the spectrogram and may restrict the precision and resolution of the instrument directly. The present article focuses on the research on the uniform motion of the moving mirror and the alignment of the fixed mirror. In order to improve the FTIR spectrometer, the maglev support system was designed for the moving mirror and the phase detection technology was adopted to adjust the tilt angle between the moving mirror and the fixed mirror. This paper also introduces an improved fuzzy PID control algorithm to get the accurate speed of the moving mirror and realize the control strategy from both hardware design and algorithm. The results show that the development of the moving mirror motion control system gets sufficient accuracy and real-time, which can ensure the uniform motion of the moving mirror and the alignment of the fixed mirror.

  9. Report of an innovative research program for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheil, E P; Crain, H

    1992-10-01

    In summary, an innovative low-cost way to teach undergraduate students about research and to socialize students into attending research conferences has been developed. It is not perfect yet, but with time, critical students, and responsive research-productive faculty, each program should improve. It is not surprising that sophomore students do not achieve the objectives at the same level as older students. As students move closer to the "real" world of nursing practice and develop increasing sophistication about nursing in general and research in particular, they are, hopefully, more knowledgeable consumers of nursing research. What is particularly satisfying to the planners of those Research Days is that through the experience of attending Undergraduate Research Day at various points in their educational progress, students are socialized into discussing research. Additionally, they seemed to develop some degree of comfort with this aspect of their future nursing role. The RN and former student panel participants normalized research involvement for the student attendees. Panel member stories about their mistakes and successes made students realize that nursing investigations need not be the sole property of those with doctoral degrees. A serendipitous outcome of these programs was an increased awareness by students of the specific research project in which their teachers were engaged. Students informally reported a feeling of pride and reflected accomplishment. The importance of timing in offering such programs should not have been a surprise at this urban commuter university. Unwittingly, in scheduling the Friday afternoon program the planners ignored the initial consideration that the program not impose financial hardship on students.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Ahead of snap elections, Greenland’s independence ambitions could open a window for closer co-operation with the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Ulrik Pram

    2014-01-01

    turmoil has undermined plans to use investment in extractive industries such as mining as the basis for an independent economy. He argues that the situation could present an opportunity for the EU to engage in closer bilateral co-operation with the country, particularly given Greenland’s natural resources...

  11. Moving object detection using dynamic motion modelling from UAV aerial images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, A F M Saifuddin; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Mahayuddin, Zainal Rasyid

    2014-01-01

    Motion analysis based moving object detection from UAV aerial image is still an unsolved issue due to inconsideration of proper motion estimation. Existing moving object detection approaches from UAV aerial images did not deal with motion based pixel intensity measurement to detect moving object robustly. Besides current research on moving object detection from UAV aerial images mostly depends on either frame difference or segmentation approach separately. There are two main purposes for this research: firstly to develop a new motion model called DMM (dynamic motion model) and secondly to apply the proposed segmentation approach SUED (segmentation using edge based dilation) using frame difference embedded together with DMM model. The proposed DMM model provides effective search windows based on the highest pixel intensity to segment only specific area for moving object rather than searching the whole area of the frame using SUED. At each stage of the proposed scheme, experimental fusion of the DMM and SUED produces extracted moving objects faithfully. Experimental result reveals that the proposed DMM and SUED have successfully demonstrated the validity of the proposed methodology.

  12. Moving through time: the role of personality in three real-life contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Sarah E; Feist, Michele I; McCarthy, Steven

    2014-01-01

    In English, two deictic space-time metaphors are in common usage: the Moving Ego metaphor conceptualizes the ego as moving forward through time and the Moving Time metaphor conceptualizes time as moving forward toward the ego (Clark, 1973). Although earlier research investigating the psychological reality of these metaphors has typically examined spatial influences on temporal reasoning (e.g., Boroditsky & Ramscar, 2002), recent lines of research have extended beyond this, providing initial evidence that personality differences and emotional experiences may also influence how people reason about events in time (Duffy & Feist, 2014; Hauser, Carter, & Meier, 2009; Richmond, Wilson, & Zinken, 2012). In this article, we investigate whether these relationships have force in real life. Building on the effects of individual differences in self-reported conscientiousness and procrastination found by Duffy and Feist (2014), we examined whether, in addition to self-reported conscientiousness and procrastination, there is a relationship between conscientious and procrastinating behaviors and temporal perspective. We found that participants who adopted the Moving Time perspective were more likely to exhibit conscientious behaviors, while those who adopted the Moving Ego perspective were more likely to procrastinate, suggesting that the earlier effects reach beyond the laboratory. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  13. Researching research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pais, Alexandre; Valero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    We discuss contemporary theories in mathematics education in order to do research on research. Our strategy consists of analysing discursively and ideologically recent key publications addressing the role of theory in mathematics education research. We examine how the field fabricates its object...... of research by deploying Foucault’s notion of bio-politics - mainly to address the object “learning” - and Žižek’s ideology critique - to address the object “mathematics”. These theories, which have already been used in the field to research teaching and learning, have a great potential to contribute...... to a reflexivity of research on its discourses and effects. Furthermore, they enable us to present a clear distinction between what has been called the sociopolitical turn in mathematics education research and what we call a positioning of mathematics education (research) practices in the Political....

  14. Canada on the Move: an intensive media analysis from inception to reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Guy; Finlay, Sara-Jane

    2006-01-01

    Research evaluating mediated physical activity campaigns uses an unsophisticated conceptualization of the media and would benefit from the application of a media studies approach. The purpose of this article is to report on the application of this type of analysis to the Canada on the Move media campaign. Through interviews and document analysis, the press release surrounding Canada on the Move was examined at four levels: inception, production, transmission and reception. Analytic strategies of thematic and textual analysis were conducted. The press release was well received by journalists and editors and was successfully transmitted as inferred from national and local television coverage, although there was no national print pickup. Canada on the Move was perceived by sampled audience members as a useful and interesting strategy to encourage walking. A holistic approach to media analysis reveals the complex and frequently messy process of this mediated communication process. Implications for future media disseminations of Canada on the Move are discussed.

  15. Fear of moving outdoors and development of outdoor walking difficulty in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna; Iwarsson, Susanne; Törmäkangas, Timo; Leinonen, Raija; Heikkinen, Eino; Rantanen, Taina

    2009-04-01

    To study which individual characteristics and environmental factors correlate with fear of moving outdoors and whether fear of moving outdoors predicts development of mobility limitation. Observational prospective cohort study and cross-sectional analyses. Community and research center. Seven hundred twenty-seven community-living people aged 75 to 81 were interviewed at baseline, of whom 314 took part in a 3.5-year follow-up. Fear of moving outdoors and its potential individual and environmental correlates were assessed at baseline. Perceived difficulties in walking 0.5 km and 2 km were assessed twice a year over a 3.5-year period. At baseline, 65% of the women and 29% of the men reported fear of moving outdoors. Poor socioeconomic status; musculoskeletal diseases; slow walking speed; and the presence of poor street conditions, hills in the nearby environment, and noisy traffic correlated with fear of moving outdoors. At the first 6-month follow-up, participants with fear of moving outdoors had more than four times the adjusted risk (odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.92-11.00) of developing difficulties in walking 0.5 km and a three times greater adjusted risk (OR=3.10, 95% CI=1.49-6.46) for developing difficulty in walking 2 km compared with those without fear. The difference in the prevalence of walking difficulties remained statistically significant over the 3.5-year follow-up (P=.02 and P=.009, respectively). Fear of moving outdoors is common in older adults and increases the risk of developing self-reported difficulties in walking 0.5 km and 2 km. Knowledge about individual and environmental factors underlying fear of moving outdoors and finding ways to alleviate fear of moving outdoors are important for community planning and prevention of disability.

  16. Moving interface problems and applications in fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lin, Ping

    2008-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research papers presented at the program on Moving Interface Problems and Applications in Fluid Dynamics, which was held between January 8 and March 31, 2007 at the Institute for Mathematical Sciences (IMS) of the National University of Singapore. The topics discussed include modeling and simulations of biological flow coupled to deformable tissue/elastic structure, shock wave and bubble dynamics and various applications including biological treatments with experimental verification, multi-medium flow or multi-phase flow and various applications including cavitation/supercavitation, detonation problems, Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid, and many other areas. Readers can benefit from some recent research results in these areas.

  17. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitara S R Ajjampur

    Full Text Available Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC, isolate B (ST7-B and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H, we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch's postulates for this parasite.

  18. Letterform research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks into the history of letterform research and discusses why the discipline has yet to make the big break within design research. By highlighting two of the most popular focus areas (letter distinctiveness and the role of serifs) and by discussing various forms of methodological...... shortcomings, the paper suggests that future research into letterforms should (1) draw on results from the field of reading research (2) be based on test material informed by design knowledge and (3) move away from the former tendency of looking for universal answers....

  19. Improved moving source photometry with TRIPPy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandersen, Mike; Fraser, Wesley Cristopher

    2017-10-01

    Photometry of moving sources is more complicated than for stationary sources, because the sources trail their signal out over more pixels than a point source of the same magnitude. Using a circular aperture of same size as would be appropriate for point sources can cut out a large amount of flux if a moving source moves substantially relative to the size of the aperture during the exposure, resulting in underestimated fluxes. Using a large circular aperture can mitigate this issue at the cost of a significantly reduced signal to noise compared to a point source, as a result of the inclusion of a larger background region within the aperture.Trailed Image Photometry in Python (TRIPPy) solves this problem by using a pill-shaped aperture: the traditional circular aperture is sliced in half perpendicular to the direction of motion and separated by a rectangle as long as the total motion of the source during the exposure. TRIPPy can also calculate the appropriate aperture correction (which will depend both on the radius and trail length of the pill-shaped aperture), and has features for selecting good PSF stars, creating a PSF model (convolved moffat profile + lookup table) and selecting a custom sky-background area in order to ensure no other sources contribute to the background estimate.In this poster, we present an overview of the TRIPPy features and demonstrate the improvements resulting from using TRIPPy compared to photometry obtained by other methods with examples from real projects where TRIPPy has been implemented in order to obtain the best-possible photometric measurements of Solar System objects. While TRIPPy has currently mainly been used for Trans-Neptunian Objects, the improvement from using the pill-shaped aperture increases with source motion, making TRIPPy highly relevant for asteroid and centaur photometry as well.

  20. The body talks, moves and acquires identity

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Calero; Adelaida Carreño

    2014-01-01

    The body is the main communication tool in the child, gesture and posture of those around you let you understand their environment; from birth the child begins a process of self-recognition to be strengthened in different social spheres from personal experiences, as the emission of sounds with your body, body language and play a fundamental part of your child’s condition.For the child to move in the surrounding medium is what is the most important, as this experience allows the child not only...