WorldWideScience

Sample records for research unit st

  1. Moving into the 21st century - The United States' Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David G.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Saris, Elizabeth C.; Reilly, Jill E.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1996, when the United States Department of Energy and the Department of State jointly adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, twelve shipments totaling 2,985 MTR and TRIGA spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research reactors around the world have been accepted into the United States. These shipments have contained approximately 1.7 metric tons of HEU and 0.6 metric tons of LEU. Foreign research reactor operators played a significant role in this success. A new milestone in the acceptance program occurred during the summer of 1999 with the arrival of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from Europe through the Charleston Naval Weapons Station via the Savannah River Site to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This shipment consisted of five casks of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from research reactors in Germany, Italy, Slovenia, and Romania. These casks were transported by truck approximately 2,400 miles across the United States (one cask packaged in an ISO container per truck). Drawing upon lessons learned in previous shipments, significant technical, legal, and political challenges were addressed to complete this cross-country shipment. Other program activities since the last RERTR meeting have included: formulation of a methodology to determine the quantity of spent nuclear fuel in a damaged condition that may be transported in a particular cask (containment analysis for transportation casks); publication of clarification of the fee policy; and continued planning for the outyears of the acceptance policy including review of reactors and eligible material quantities. The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program continues to demonstrate success due to the continuing commitment between the United States and the research reactor community to make this program work. We strongly encourage all eligible research reactors to decide as soon as possible to

  2. Dental Health Services Research Unit celebrates 30 years: Report of conference to mark the 30th anniversary of the Dental Health Services Research Unit (DHSRU) at Dundee, held on 1st December 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Pitts, Nigel B

    2009-04-01

    Over the years, several members of the staff of the Dental Health Services Research Unit (DHSRU) at Dundee have published papers in Primary Dental Care. Furthermore, its Director, Professor Nigel Pitts, together with Drs Jan Clarkson and Gail Topping have co-edited a number of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK)'s standards manuals and contributed to others. It had been suggested to the Unit by several parties that, having been in funded existence for some 30 years, it would be appropriate to mark this anniversary with a conference to explore 'Dental Health Services Research: After 30 years, what was the impact, what have we learned and where are we going?' So, following a range of consultations, the conference was convened at the West Park Conference Centre in Dundee with a mixed audience representing both dental research and dental practice.

  3. Public support for medical research in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P M

    2000-01-01

    Key public policies that have contributed to the rise of modern medical research in the 20th Century are reviewed, focusing especially on the United States and the post-World War II period. Drawing on this history, the question is posed: "Are these policies sufficient to insure vigorous medical research in the 21st Century?" Although radical policy changes are not needed, several proposals for policy and medical research portfolio redirection are offered, including a rebalancing of public supported research in all fields of science that contribute to medical advances. Medical research must also invest in a national and international information infrastructure that will allow the linking of researchers, clinical experimenters, practicing physicians, and the public in ways heretofore not imagined. Medical researchers must be leaders and advocates for the whole research enterprise in the 21st Century.

  4. Construction: first of St. Lucie unit 2 successes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) granted a full power operating license for St. Lucie Unit 2 on June 10, 1983, just six years after construction began. The industry average for nuclear power plant construction during this time was approximately ten years. The rate of completion had a positive effect on the cost of the facility. The price of the unit was $1.42 billion as compared to the $2 billion to $5 billion range experienced by other utilities for nuclear plants. These accomplishments were not serendipitous but the results of management techniques and personnel attitudes involved in the construction of the unit. More importantly, many of these same techniques and attitudes have now become part of a quality improvement program at St Lucie and are reflected in its performance indicators. This paper analyzes the construction success of St Lucie Unit 2 and demonstrates that excellent performance in the construction phase can be carried over to the operation of a facility

  5. 1st Roman Young Researchers Meeting Proceedings

    CERN Document Server

    Cannuccia, E; Pietrobon, D; Stellato, F; Veneziani, M

    2009-01-01

    During the last few decades scientists have been able to test the bases of the physics paradigms, where the quantum mechanics has to match the cosmological scales. Between the extremes of this scenario, biological phenomena and their complexity take place, challenging the laws we observe in the atomic and sub-atomic world. In order to explore the details of this world, new huge experimental facilities are under construction. These projects involve people coming from several countries and give physicists the opportunity to work together with chemists, biologists and other scientists. The Roman Young Researchers Meeting is a conference, organised by Ph. D. students and young postdocs connected to the Roman area. It is aimed primarily at graduate students and post-docs, working in physics. The 1st conference has been held on the 21st of July 2009 at the University of Roma Tor Vergata. It was organised in three sessions, devoted to Astrophysics and Cosmology, Soft and Condensed Matter Physics and Theoretical and ...

  6. Uranium chemistry research unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The initial field of research of this Unit, established in 1973, was the basic co-ordination chemistry of uranium, thorium, copper, cobalt and nickel. Subsequently the interest of the Unit extended to extractive metallurgy relating to these metals. Under the term 'co-ordination chemistry' is understood the interaction of the central transition metal ion with surrounding atoms in its immediate vicinity (within bonding distance) and the influence they have on each other - for example, structural studies for determining the number and arrangement of co-ordinated atoms and spectrophotometric studies to establish how the f electron energy levels of uranium are influenced by the environment. New types of uranium compounds have been synthesized and studied, and the behaviour of uranium ions in non-aqueous systems has also received attention. This work can be applied to the development and study of extractants and new extractive processes for uranium

  7. Life extension of the St. Lucie unit 1 reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowan, G.A.; Sun, J.B.; Mott, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989, Florida Power and Light Company (FP and L) established the policy that St. Lucie unit 1 should not be prevented from achieving a 60-yr operating life by reactor vessel embrittlement. A 60-yr operating life means that the plant would be allowed to operate until the year 2036, which is 20 years beyond the current license expiration date of 2016. Since modifications to the reactor vessel and its components are projected to be expensive, the desire of FP and L management was to achieve this lifetime extension through the use of fuel management and proven technology. The following limitations were placed on any acceptable method for achieving this lifetime extension capability: low fuel cycle cost; low impact on safety parameters; very little or no operations impact; and use of normal reactor materials. A task team was formed along with the Advanced Nuclear Fuels Company (ANF) to develop a vessel-life extension program

  8. Research universities for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The `public outcomes` from research universities are educated students and research that extends the frontiers of knowledge. Measures of these `public outcomes` are inadequate to permit either research or education consumers to select research universities based on quantitative performance data. Research universities annually spend over $20 billion on research; 60% of these funds are provided by Federal sources. Federal funding for university research has recently grown at an annual rate near 6% during a time period when other performers of Federal research have experienced real funding cuts. Ten universities receive about 25% of the Federal funds spent on university research. Numerous studies of US research universities are reporting storm clouds. Concerns include balancing research and teaching, the narrow focus of engineering education, college costs, continuing education, and public funding of foreign student education. The absence of research on the `public outcomes` from university research results in opinion, politics, and mythology forming the basis of too many decisions. Therefore, the authors recommend studies of other nations` research universities, studies of various economic models of university research, analysis of the peer review process and how well it identifies the most capable research practitioners and at what cost, and studies of research university ownership of intellectual property that can lead to increased `public outcomes` from publicly-funded research performed by research universities. They advocate two practices that could increase the `public outcomes` from university research. These are the development of science roadmaps that link science research to `public outcomes` and `public outcome` metrics. Changes in the university research culture and expanded use of the Internet could also lead to increased `public outcomes`. They recommend the use of tax incentives to encourage companies to develop research partnerships with research

  9. Application Technology Research Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To conduct fundamental and developmental research on new and improved application technologies to protect floricultural, nursery, landscape, turf, horticultural, and...

  10. Knowledge Globalization within and across the People's Republic of China and the United States: A Cross-National Study of Internationalization of Educational Research in the Early 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Robert J.; Kan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study examines globalization within and across China and the United States in conjunction with a portrayal of the nature of the scholarly endeavors over the past 10 years in the two preeminent educational research journals of these countries. By extensive analyses of topics, methodology, and citations the research clarifies the global and…

  11. The Uranium Chemistry Research Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The article discusses the research work done at the Uranium Chemistry Research Unit of the University of Port Elizabeth. The initial research programme dealt with fundamental aspects of uranium chemistry. New uranium compounds were synthesized and their chemical properties were studied. Research was also done to assist the mining industry, as well as on nuclear medicine. Special mentioning is made of the use of technetium for medical diagnosis and therapy

  12. Proceedings of the 1st symposium on advanced science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The 1st symposium on advanced science research was held in Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, on 23-24 March, 1995, under the auspices of JAERI. Two hundred and sixty scientists attended the symposium; over 40% of the attendants were from universities and laboratories outside JAERI. This proceedings consists of 6 oral presentations of the research activities in the Advanced Science Research Center, 70 poster presentations on the field of basic science from both the inside and outside of JAERI and 2 panel discussions on the actinide physics and biocrystallography. (author)

  13. Toxic Hazards Research Unit 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    in monkeys/man. - Materials safety training. - Correct and legal housing for iaboratory animals. - The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic...Whitmire, and E.R. Kinkeea. Presented at the 31st Navy Occupational Health and Preventive Medicina Workshop, Virginia Beach, VA, 11-16 March. 297 7• -7

  14. Pet Care Teaching Unit: 1st-3rd Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Activities in this unit are designed to familiarize primary grade students with the responsibilities involved in pet ownership. Teaching plans are provided for a total of 12 lessons involving social studies, language arts, math, and health sciences. Activities adaptable for readers and non-readers focus on pet overpopulation, care of pets when…

  15. St. Brendan's High Support Unit, Mulranny, Westport, Mayo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheehan, Aisling

    2015-02-01

    Nursing is experiencing a significant deficit in research capacity needed to meet future global healthcare demands-there is a call to double the number of nurses and healthcare professionals with a doctorate.

  16. 76 FR 77563 - Florida Power & Light Company; St. Lucie Plant, Unit No. 1; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... level for St. Lucie, Unit 1, from 2700 megawatts thermal (MWt) to 3020 MWt. As part of the LAR, the.... The above LAR referenced a topical report that stated that the proposed methodology for the P-T curves.... ML103560511), which references Combustion Engineering (CE) Owners Group Topical Report CE NPSD-683-A, Revision...

  17. A Transatlantic Bargain for the 21st Century: The United States, Europe, and the Transatlantic Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    THE 21ST CENTURY: THE UNITED STATES, EUROPE, AND THE TRANSATLANTIC ALLIANCE The burdens of global citizenship continue to bind us together. A change...had led Europe and America to drift apart, he argued that the “the burdens of global citizenship continue to bind us together,” requiring allies...capabilities, including Norway, Belgium, Italy, and Denmark. Qatar , the United Arab Emirates, Morocco, Jordan, and Swe- den also played key operational roles

  18. St. Augustine's Community Nursing Unit, Cathedral Road, Ballina, Mayo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nicholl, Honor

    2014-04-01

    In 2010\\/12 an innovative children\\'s palliative care interprofessional educational project funded by the Irish Hospice Foundation was undertaken in a University faculty (Trinity College Dublin). This initiative responded to international educational recommendations to meet the palliative care needs of children. The project involved the development and delivery of 3 standalone modules at Master\\'s level and a substantive research evaluation of the project to examine stakeholders and students perspectives to provide an insight into their experiences and to gather data for future developments. The research evaluation was conducted in two parts, part one sought students\\' evaluation and part two sought stakeholders\\

  19. Creating a 21st Century Community through the Teacher Research Experience (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, E.; Beine, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    In the spring of 2009, I participated in PolarTREC - Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a Teacher Research Experience (TRE) funded by the National Science Foundation and managed by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States. I assisted in hands-on research being performed by scientists with OASIS (Ocean, Atmosphere, Sea Ice and Snowpack) during their field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. Although I was in the field for only 3 weeks, it was merely a beginning to a transformation that took place not only in me, but also among all of those involved. The PolarTREC program embodies the principles fundamental to the 21st Century skill-set that we want our students to possess. The job market is changing for graduates, and education is striving to provide students with the skills necessary to thrive in the future. To ensure the success of students the International Society for Technology Education (ISTE) has defined 21st Century Skills. They are incorporated into many educational standards (such as the Arizona Educational Technology Standards) and they are practiced by the teachers, researchers, students and the PolarTREC community. They are: Creativity and Innovation Communication and Collaboration Research and Information Literacy Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Digital Citizenship Technology Operations and Concepts

  20. St. Fionnan's Community Nursing Unit, Achill Sound, Mayo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-05-01

    ‘Jading’ is a process of exhaustion in which apathy and cynicism replace the drive to be responsive and caring. ‘Burnout’ a term first coined in the psychology literature in 1974 was based on Graham Greene’s novel ‘A Burnt-Out Case1. It is the umbrella description for disengagement in the workplace setting characterised by withdrawal, denial and inefficiency. There is an alienation from the pressures of work. Marshall and Kasman2 defined it as ‘the loss of motivation for creative thought’. It is the opposite of engagement which is associated with energy and optimism. People who experience all 3 symptoms- emotional exhaustion, negative attitude towards patients, reduced sense of personal accomplishment- have the greatest degree of burnout. It doesn’t get better by being ignored. These processes have serious consequences for the individual involved and the hospital that they work in. The doctor underperforms and the Unit becomes dysfunctional There is decreased quality of care, increased absenteeism, and high staff turnover. There is an inability to make decisions and a failure to set priorities.

  1. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  2. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  3. Clinical Epidemiology Unit - overview of research areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical Epidemiology Unit (CEU) conducts etiologic research with potential clinical and public health applications, and leads studies evaluating population-based early detection and cancer prevention strategies

  4. Evaluation of the MIND Research Institute's Spatial-Temporal Math (ST Math) Program in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Staci; Rice, John; Nakamoto, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The MIND Research Institute contracted with the Evaluation Research Program at WestEd to conduct an independent assessment of mathematics outcomes in elementary school grades across California that were provided with the ST Math program. Spatial-Temporal (ST) Math is a game-based instructional software designed to boost K-5 and secondary-level…

  5. The United Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, D.

    1978-01-01

    The UNRI, the only common institute of the socialist countries was founded in 1956 in Dubna. The scientists of small countries have the opportunity to take part in fundamental research with very expensive devices which are usually not available for them. There are six research laboratories and one department in the UNRI namely: the theoretical physical laboratory; the laboratory of high energies - there is a synchrophasotron of 1a GeV there; the laboratory of nuclear problems - there is a synchrocyclotron of 680 MeV there; the laboratory of nuclear reactions with the cyclotron U-300 which can accelerate heavy ions; the neutronphysical laboratory with the impulse reactor IBM-30; the laboratory of computation and automatization with two big computers; the department of new acceleration methods. The main results obtained by Hungarian scientist in Dubna are described. (V.N.)

  6. Long-Lived Digital Data Collections Enabling Research and Education in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Collections: Enabling Research and Education in the 21st Century40 LoNG-LiVED DiGiTAL DATA CoLLECTioNS AND LARGE FACiLiTiES Workshop participants drew...Long-Lived Digital Data Collections: Enabling Research and Education in the 21st Century NSB-05-40 Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Long-Lived Digital Data Collections Enabling Research and Education in the 21st Century 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  7. Army Research Laboratory S&T Campaign Plans 2015-2035

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    for micro-robotics, and high quality factor communications, electronic warfare. Efforts focus on the maturation of LEAD zirconium titanate ( PZT ) and...spectrums (multiple impact, high energy impact, and high to low cycle fatigue ) to meet the needs of current and future Army platforms and structures...MATERIALS RESEARCH CAMPAIGN’s Polymer Coatings S&T Footprint S&T AREA POSTURE Polymer Coatings LEAD Corrosion & Fatigue research explores corrosion

  8. Research at the Dairy and Functional Foods Research Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Peggy Tomasula is Research Leader of the Dairy and Functional Foods Research Unit (DFFRU), ARS, USDA, Wyndmoor, PA, a group that includes 11 Research Scientists, 4 of whom are Lead Scientists (LS), 13 support scientists, and 3 Retired Collaborators. The mission of the DFFRU is to solve critical ...

  9. Research Directions: Multimodal Books in Science-Literacy Units: Language and Visual Images for Meaning Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine C.; Varelas, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a review of the author's long-term research in urban classrooms. The authors explore six illustrated information books created by children as culminating activities of integrated science-literacy units, Forest and Matter, that they developed, implemented, and studied in several 1st-3rd grade classrooms in Chicago Public…

  10. Chapitre 14. Networking Project: available S&T resources in the United States for networking with home countries

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Some science and technology (S&T) policies and programs of the United States would facilitate the networking of the foreign-born scientists and engineers (S&Es) with their home countries to contribute to development. These policies and programs would mainly facilitate networking to build up S&T infrastructure. The Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) has encouraged the U.S. science community to become even further engaged in the world, and has elevated international science withi...

  11. The Budapest research reactor as an advanced research facility for the early 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovszky, I.

    2001-01-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, Hungary's first nuclear facility was originally put into operation in 1959. The reactor serves for: basic and applied research, technological and commercial applications, education and training. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research. This unique research possibility is used by a broad user community of Europe. Eight instruments for neutron scattering, radiography and activation analyses are already used, others (e.g. time of flight spectrometer, neutron reflectometer) are being installed. The majority of these instruments will get a much improved utilization when the cold neutron source is put into operation. In 1999 the Budapest Research Reactor was operated for 3129 full power hours in 14 periods. The normal operation period took 234 hours (starting Monday noon and finishing Thursday morning). The entire production for the year 1999 was 1302 MW days. This is a slightly reduced value, due to the installation of the cold neutron source. For the year 2000 a somewhat longer operation is foreseen (near to 4000 hours), as the cold neutron source will be operational. The operation of the reactor is foreseen at least up to the end of the first decade of the 21 st century. (author)

  12. Commercializing research: the leadership challenges for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, P.L.; Verma, V.

    2000-06-01

    R and D today is a large industry that consumes vast amounts of public and private funds in most countries. It is becoming increasingly evident that technology transfer and the commercialization of research done at universities and government funded research laboratories must be a key element of their comprehensive strategic plan. It involves using a verified and organized knowledge and research to develop commercially viable products. It requires a visionary leader with effective project management skills to manage and motivate a team of scientists and engineers, otherwise even a top rated researcher will enervate and wither within the walls of research laboratories. This paper will highlight the importance, challenges and techniques of commercializing technology from accelerator research laboratories. It will provide an overview of the requirements of scientific leadership for both commercialization of research and technology, together with some case studies based on the experience at TRIUMF - Canada's national sub-atomic research facility in Vancouver. TRIUMF's experience with both research and commercial developments involving innovative technologies, along with some of the important leadership and management factors that lead to successful projects will be described. (author)

  13. Commercializing research: the leadership challenges for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, P.L.; Verma, V

    2000-06-01

    R and D today is a large industry that consumes vast amounts of public and private funds in most countries. It is becoming increasingly evident that technology transfer and the commercialization of research done at universities and government funded research laboratories must be a key element of their comprehensive strategic plan. It involves using a verified and organized knowledge and research to develop commercially viable products. It requires a visionary leader with effective project management skills to manage and motivate a team of scientists and engineers, otherwise even a top rated researcher will enervate and wither within the walls of research laboratories. This paper will highlight the importance, challenges and techniques of commercializing technology from accelerator research laboratories. It will provide an overview of the requirements of scientific leadership for both commercialization of research and technology, together with some case studies based on the experience at TRIUMF - Canada's national sub-atomic research facility in Vancouver. TRIUMF's experience with both research and commercial developments involving innovative technologies, along with some of the important leadership and management factors that lead to successful projects will be described. (author)

  14. Forging a 21st Century Model for Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Not all biology students get to experience scientific research firsthand, but the National Genomics Research Initiative (NGRI) is working to change that. The NGRI is the first initiative to spring from Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) new Science Education Alliance (SEA). At present, a competitive application process determines which…

  15. Towards a 21st century roadmap for biomedical research and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decades of costly failures in translating drug candidates from preclinical disease models to human therapeutic use warrant reconsideration of the priority placed on animal models in biomedical research. Following an international workshop attended by experts from academia, government institutions, research funding bodies and the corporate and NGO sectors, this consensus report analyses, as case studies, five disease areas with major unmet needs for new treatments. In view of the scientifically driven transition towards a human pathways-based paradigm in toxicology, a similar paradigm shift appears to be justified in biomedical research. There is a pressing need for an approach that strategically implements advanced, human biology-based models and tools to understand disease pathways at multiple biological scales. We present recommendations to help achieve this. To discover and develop new therapies, we need 21-century roadmaps for biomedical research based on multiscale human disease pathways, and supported by policy and funding strategies that prioritise human relevance.

  16. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Major nuclear research institutes in Japan are the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), National Research Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS), and the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN). In the 50s and 60s JAERI concentrated on the introduction of nuclear technology from overseas. Energy security issues led to the development of a strong nuclear power programme in the next two decades resulting in Japan having 50 light water cooled nuclear power plants in operation. Japan also worked on other reactor concepts. The current emphasis of JAERI is on advanced reactors and nuclear fusion. Its budget of 270 million US$ supports five research establishments. JAERI has strong collaboration with industry and university system on nuclear and other advanced research topics (neutron science, photon science). In many areas Japan has strong international links. JAERI has also been transferring know-how on radioisotope and radiation applications to the developing countries particularly through IAEA-RCA mechanisms. (author)

  17. Role of Research and Development in the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For the countries the importance of Research and Development has increased lately. In order to strengthened the economy of that given country more input are needed towards to these direction. Those countries that support researches could achieve higher GDP, which is an important issue. So these questions stepped into spotlight to try to close up the gap between the different levels of development. In the fist part of the paper the current EU Regulation was in spotlight. An observation was made to point out the lower R&D role than desired by the EU itself. With calculations of the different origin of sources and their relationship with the GDP per person we would like to point out the importance of the research and investment level in the future growing.

  18. 1st International Early Research Career Enhancement School

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Valentin; Rybina, Galina

    2016-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge research focused on current challenges towards the realization of Biologically Inspired intelligent agents, or Cognitive Architectures (BICA). The chapters are written by both world-recognized experts (including Antonio Chella, Olivier Georgeon, Oliver Kutz, Antonio Lieto, David Vernon, Paul Verschure, and others) and young researchers. Together, they constitute a good mixture of new findings with tutorial-based reviews and position papers, all presented at the First International Early Research Career Enhancement School on Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures (FIERCES on BICA 2016), held April 21-24 in Moscow, Russia. Most works included here cross boundaries between disciplines: from neuroscience to social science, from cognitive science to robotics, and from bioengineering to artificial intelligence. A special emphasis is given to novel solutions to urgent problems that have been resisting traditional approaches for decades. Intended for providing readers with an up...

  19. The professional research support in the 21st century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinstrup, Anya Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    for research is becoming increasingly competitive and there is significant political influence on the scope and scale of funding programmes. This along with the ever more complicated and varied administrative procedures and demands for compliance both with pre-award and postaward activities has led...... between different researchers and professions and INTEGRATING disciplines throughout the entire value chain. • A profession that is only incipient regarding a formalised TRAINING but where there still are very high demands and expectations to their professional act. • IT is playing an increasing role...

  20. A Character Education Research Perspective for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The Institute for Excellence and Ethics (IEE) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the development and dissemination of research-based tools and strategies for building intentional cultures of excellence and ethics in education, athletics, home, and workplace settings. The following five emphases and recommended actions are offered are…

  1. Toxic Hazards Research Unit Annual Report: 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    mediated hemolysis by mercapto compounds. Journal of Applied Toxicology, Volume 6, Number 5, pages 336-370, 1986. Hydrophobic tributyltin ( TBT ...7 ~OF~ AAMRL-TR-87-020 NMRI-87-2 ’~LRES 4 Iq 1986 TOXIC HAZARDS RESEARCH UNIT ANNUAL REPORT WILLIAM E. HOUSTON, Ph.D. RAYMOND S. KUTZMAN, Ph.D...and is approved for publication. FOR THE COMMANDElRi BRUCE 0. STUART, Ph.D. Director, Toxic Hazards Division Harry G. Armstrong Aerospace Medical

  2. Do stable non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes require admission to coronary care units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Sean; Lin, Meng; Bakal, Jeffrey A; McAlister, Finlay A; Kaul, Padma; Katz, Jason N; Fordyce, Christopher B; Southern, Danielle A; Graham, Michelle M; Wilton, Stephen B; Newby, L Kristin; Granger, Christopher B; Ezekowitz, Justin A

    2016-05-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend admitting patients with stable non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE ACS) to telemetry units, yet up to two-thirds of patients are admitted to higher-acuity critical care units (CCUs). The outcomes of patients with stable NSTE ACS initially admitted to a CCU vs a cardiology ward with telemetry have not been described. We used population-based data of 7,869 patients hospitalized with NSTE ACS admitted to hospitals in Alberta, Canada, between April 1, 2007, and March 31, 2013. We compared outcomes among patients initially admitted to a CCU (n=5,141) with those admitted to cardiology telemetry wards (n=2,728). Patients admitted to cardiology telemetry wards were older (median 69 vs 65years, PST-segment myocardial infarction or unstable angina. There were no differences in clinical outcomes observed between patients with NSTE ACS initially admitted to a ward or a CCU. These findings suggest that stable NSTE ACS may be managed appropriately on telemetry wards and presents an opportunity to reduce hospital costs and critical care capacity strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Role of the United Nations in the 21st Century: A Case for an International Police Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kersten, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    As the United Nations (UN) enters the 21st Century, it is faced with security challenges that were not seen by its creators, The end of the Cold War, globalization, intra-state conflict, and a desire to achieve universal human...

  4. EPA-WERF Cooperative Agreement: Innovation and Research for Water Infrastructure for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a brief slide presentation that will provide an overview of several projects that are being conducted in EPA-WERF Cooperative Agreement, Innovation and Research for Water Infrastructure for the 21st Century. The cooperative agreement objectives are to produce, evaluate, &...

  5. Galileo Educational Network: Creating, Researching, and Supporting 21st Century Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    School and classroom structures designed to meet the needs of the industrial past cannot "maintain the temperature required for sustaining life." Recent learning sciences research findings compel educators to invent new learning environments better suited to meet the demands of the 21st century. These new learning environments require…

  6. Projected 21st century climate change for wolverine habitats within the contiguous United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, Synte, E-mail: synte@ucar.edu [National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Ensembles of 21st century climate projections made using a state of the art global climate model are analyzed to explore possible changes in spring snow cover and summer air temperature in present-day wolverine habitats in the contiguous United States (US). Projected changes in both snow cover and temperature are presented for a range of future emissions scenarios, and implications for the continued survival of the wolverine in the contiguous US are discussed. It is shown that under a high or medium-low emissions scenario there are likely to be dramatic reductions in spring snow cover in present-day wolverine habitats. Under these scenarios there is also likely to be a concomitant increase in summer-time temperatures, with projected maximum daily August temperatures far above those currently tolerated by the wolverine. It is likely that the wolverine, with its many adaptations for cold weather and deep snow pack, would have great difficulty adapting to such changes. The results of the simulations presented here suggest that the very low numbers of wolverines currently living in the contiguous US will likely further decline in response to the deterioration of their habitat in coming decades.

  7. Projected 21st century climate change for wolverine habitats within the contiguous United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, Synte

    2011-01-01

    Ensembles of 21st century climate projections made using a state of the art global climate model are analyzed to explore possible changes in spring snow cover and summer air temperature in present-day wolverine habitats in the contiguous United States (US). Projected changes in both snow cover and temperature are presented for a range of future emissions scenarios, and implications for the continued survival of the wolverine in the contiguous US are discussed. It is shown that under a high or medium-low emissions scenario there are likely to be dramatic reductions in spring snow cover in present-day wolverine habitats. Under these scenarios there is also likely to be a concomitant increase in summer-time temperatures, with projected maximum daily August temperatures far above those currently tolerated by the wolverine. It is likely that the wolverine, with its many adaptations for cold weather and deep snow pack, would have great difficulty adapting to such changes. The results of the simulations presented here suggest that the very low numbers of wolverines currently living in the contiguous US will likely further decline in response to the deterioration of their habitat in coming decades.

  8. Prospects of Nuclear Energy in the United States in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Industry is now over 40 years old and a proven, mature product has been developed. That proven mature product has evolve into a small set of standardized designs - designs based on evolution of the best and safest features, not revolutionary changes. Just as the product design must be standardized, the regulatory process must also be standardized. With a predictable regulatory environment and rate structure the economic advantages of Nuclear Power will be self-evident. The Nuclear Industry in the United States has had a history of cycles as the economy and need for power has changed. The need for electricity to support growth is a given. With a strong focus on the standardization of the process and the product, a competent engineering approach to safety, and improved economies, the 21st century will see nuclear power assume its appropriate role as a key source in the energy mix in the United States. Presenting a discussion dealing with the future is always a risky thing. One man's prognosis is another mans wild guess. Today, I would like to talk briefly on my views of the future, and especially my views on the Prospects for Nuclear Energy in the U. S. in that future. Though it is clear that nuclear energy will play a key role in fulfilling the energy needs of the world, the future of nuclear energy in the United States is not as clear. A discussion of the future of the U. S. Nuclear Industry is especially appropriate here today because I am firmly confident that the Republic of Korea will play a major role in that future. The world energy situation and the role of nuclear power has undergone a number of upsets in the last decade. Often we tend to dwell on the gloom of the past and overlook the strengths that the Nuclear Industry has developed. Presently over 437 gigawatts of electricity in the world is planned to be produced by 564 nuclear units. There are over 32 countries with commercial nuclear programs. One of the brightest of these being here in

  9. Peter St. John | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John Photo of Peter St. John Peter St. John Researcher III-Chemical Engineering Peter.StJohn @nrel.gov | 303-384-7969 Orcid ID http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7928-3722 Education Peter St. John received his engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2015. During his Ph.D., St. John applied

  10. China's S&T Emergence: A Proposal for U.S. DOD-China Collaboration in Fundamental Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berry, William; Loeb, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    .... Recent visits to top Chinese academic institutions with strong S&T research programs demonstrated that they are attracting a cadre of excellent researchers trained in the top universities around the world...

  11. Research of nuclear energy on the 21st Century Center of Excellence (COE) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    COE is an abbreviation of 'Center of Excellence' and the '21st Century COE Program' is project begun by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MECSST) to make a trigger to grow some research strongholds with international competitive power by activating mutual competition of collages and universities. This program aims to form research and educational strongholds with the highest level in the world at every scholarship fields to a collage or a university in Japan, to intend to grow creative specialists capable of upgrading research level and leading research world, and to progress strong assistance to promote collages- and universities-making with international competitive power and individuality. In 2003 fiscal year, two research programs related to nuclear energy were selected by the Committee of 21st Century COE Program such as 'an innovative reactor supporting suitable development of the world' in the mechanical, engineering and other technology field and 'future to be cultivated by isotopes' in the interdisciplinary, composite and new region field. The first program aims to construct the concept of system of innovative reactor and separation nuclear transformation for zero release of radioactive waste and to research the necessary technologies. The second program is covered isotope science and it consists of two main researches such as 1) the fundamental researches: a) separation and creation of isotopes, b) measurement technologies with nano size and c) isotope materials, and 2) the harmonized development researches: a) environment and bioscience and b) culture information and creation of quantum computer. (S.Y.)

  12. Research of Houjiayao Unit in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y.

    2012-12-01

    "Houjiayao Group" is the standard stratigraphic unit of late Pleistocene in northern China, which was created by Jia Lanpo and Wei Qi during their research on Houjiayao site. Based on the mammal, ancient human fossils and Paleolithic features, "Houjiayao Group" was thought as late Pleistocene sediments. "Houjiayao Group" was defined as late Pleistocene stratigraphic units. However, the problems of the age of "Houjiayao Group", stratigraphic division and other issues, have not yet been well resolved. These issues include: the differences of age-dating results, the unclear comparison between stratigraphic units and regional contrast, the uncertain relationship between "Houjiayao Group" and "Nihewan Layer ", and so on. Houjiayao site which located in the southeast of Houjiayao village in Dongjingji town Yangyuan County, Hebei province of China, is a very important paleolithic site. But some researches show that Houjiayao site is located at the 3th terrace of Liyigou valley and there are many opinions about the age of Houjiayao site, which varies from 20-500 thousand years. Combined with former research results and many research methods, our study was mainly focused on the key problems existing in the study of "Houjiayao Group". Through the use of sequence stratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and other theoretical methods, stratigraphic section was studied in the late Pleistocene stratigraphy and sedimentary environment. Through environmental indicators and the age-dating tests, the evolution of ancient geography and environment were identified elementarily. After analyzing informations of this area, geomorphologic investigation and stratum comparation in and around Houjiayao site were done. Houjiayao site is located on the west bank of Liyigou river, which has a tributary named Black Stone River. Two or three layers of volcanic materials were found in this area, those sediments are from a buried paleovolcano in upstream of Black Stone River. The volcanic

  13. 1st International Symposium and 10th Balkan Conference on Operational Research

    CERN Document Server

    Sifaleras, Angelo; Georgiadis, Christos; Papathanasiou, Jason; Stiakakis, Emmanuil

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the Balkan Conference on Operational Research (BALCOR) has facilitated the exchange of scientific and technical information on the subject of Operations Research and related fields such as Mathematical Programming, Game Theory, Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis, Information Systems, Data Mining, and more, in order to promote international scientific cooperation.  The contributed papers contained in this volume consist of 25 selected research papers based on results presented at the 10th Balkan Conference & 1st International Symposium on Operational Research in Thessalonike, Greece. Subjects include, but do not restrict to, the development of theory and mathematical models for Operations Research, theory and applications of Combinatorial Optimization, Supply Chain Optimization, and Military Operations Research.  These carefully selected papers present important recent developments and modern applications, and will serve as excellent reference for students, researchers, and pr...

  14. Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program, a government-industry research partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The 21st Century Truck Program has been established as a government-industry research partnership to support the development and implementation of commercially viable technologies that will dramatically cut fuel use and emissions of commercial trucks and buses while enhancing their safety and affordability as well as maintaining or enhancing performance. The innovations resulting from this program will reduce dependence on foreign oil, improve our nation's air quality, provide advanced technology for military vehicles, and enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. truck and bus industry while ensuring safe and affordable freight and bus transportation for the nation's economy. This Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program has been prepared to guide the development of the technical advancements that will enable the needed improvements in commercial truck fuel economy, emissions, and safety.

  15. Lessons from Toxicology: Developing a 21st-Century Paradigm for Medical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Christopher P.; Balapure, Anil K.; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Bucher, John R.; Fentem, Julia; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne C.; Fowle, John R.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Kitano, Hiroaki; Lidbury, Brett A.; Muotri, Alysson R.; Peng, Shuang-Qing; Sakharov, Dmitry; Seidle, Troy; Trez, Thales; Tonevitsky, Alexander; van de Stolpe, Anja; Whelan, Maurice; Willett, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Summary Biomedical developments in the 21st century provide an unprecedented opportunity to gain a dynamic systems-level and human-specific understanding of the causes and pathophysiologies of disease. This understanding is a vital need, in view of continuing failures in health research, drug discovery, and clinical translation. The full potential of advanced approaches may not be achieved within a 20th-century conceptual framework dominated by animal models. Novel technologies are being integrated into environmental health research and are also applicable to disease research, but these advances need a new medical research and drug discovery paradigm to gain maximal benefits. We suggest a new conceptual framework that repurposes the 21st-century transition underway in toxicology. Human disease should be conceived as resulting from integrated extrinsic and intrinsic causes, with research focused on modern human-specific models to understand disease pathways at multiple biological levels that are analogous to adverse outcome pathways in toxicology. Systems biology tools should be used to integrate and interpret data about disease causation and pathophysiology. Such an approach promises progress in overcoming the current roadblocks to understanding human disease and successful drug discovery and translation. A discourse should begin now to identify and consider the many challenges and questions that need to be solved. PMID:26523530

  16. Implications of design on infection prevention and control practice in a novel hospital unit: the Medical Ward of the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSteelandt, Amanda; Conly, John; Ghali, William; Mather, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The physical design of hospital wards is associated with transmission of pathogenic organisms and hospital-acquired infections. A novel hospital unit, the Medical Ward of the 21st Century (W21C), optimizes features for infection prevention and control practices. Ethnographic research on the W21C versus conventional hospital wards examined the experiential and behavioural elements of the different designs. Three recurring themes emerged regarding the design features on the W21C and included visual cues, 'having a place for things', and less sharing of spaces and materials. Observational data of healthcare worker practices demonstrated significantly higher compliance with hand hygiene opportunities on the W21C compared with older hospital units. These findings suggest how the physical design of a hospital ward may enhance infection prevention and control practices.

  17. Music Education in the 21st Century in the United Kingdom: Achievements, Analysis and Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Susan, Ed.; Creech, Andrea. Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The landscape of music education in the UK is constantly shifting and developing. This book provides a timely and unique overview of this restless sector by considering the achievements of music education, analysing its current performance and setting out aspirations for the future. "Music Education in the 21st Century in the United…

  18. Proceedings of the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, N. Jill [Editor

    1999-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, held 21-24 September 1999 in Las Vegas, Nevada. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  19. Introduction to Future Wireless Networks research group's projects/activities (St. Petersburg)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, Albert A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available , Peace, Safety and Security  Materials Science and manufacturing  Meraka Institute (Information and Communication Technology)  Modelling and Digital Science  Natural Resources and the Environment  Implementation Unit  National Research Centres... CSIR Units and Centres  Operating Units  Biosciences  Built Environment  Defence, Peace, Safety and Security  Materials Science and manufacturing  Meraka Institute (Information and Communication Technology)  Modelling and Digital...

  20. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (Capsule 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Daejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin Unit 4 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.306E+18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.918 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.615E+18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 8.478E+18 and 1.673E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin Unit 4 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  1. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (CAPSULE 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2006-12-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin unit 3 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.674E 18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.920 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.913E 18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 9.249E 18 and 1.834E 19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin unit 3 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  2. Design of a new research reactor : 1st year conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol; Lee, B. C.; Chae, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    A new research reactor model satisfying the strengthened regulatory environments and the changed circumstances around nuclear society should be prepared for the domestic and international demand of research reactor. This can also lead to the improvement of technologies and fostering manpower obtained during the construction and the operation of HANARO. In this aspect, this study has been launched and the 1st year conceptual design has been carried out in 2003. The major tasks performed at the first year of conceptual design stage are as follows; Establishments of general design requirements of research reactors and experimental facilities, Establishment of fuel and reactor core concepts, Preliminary analysis of reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics for conceptual core, Conceptual design of reactor structure and major systems, International cooperation to establish foundations for exporting

  3. Outcomes by Mode of Transport of ST Elevation MI Patients in the United Arab Emirates

    OpenAIRE

    Callachan, Edward L.; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar; Bruijns, Stevan; Wallis, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this multicenter study was to assess differences in demographics, medical history, treatment times, and follow-up status among patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), who were transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS) or by private vehicle, or were transferred from other medical facilities. Methods This multicenter study involved the collection of both retrospective and prospective data from 455 patients admitted to four hosp...

  4. Research implementation and leadership engagement : 2012 UDOT research peer exchange, Oct. 29th-31st, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This report discusses the proceedings and recommendations of the 2012 UDOT Research Peer Exchange. The : 2012 UDOT Research Peer Exchange took place in October of 2012. Representatives from eight different : state DOTs, as well as representatives fro...

  5. The Prospect of Neutron Scattering in The 21st Century : A Powerful Tool For Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E-Kartini

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 60 years research reactors (RRs) have played an important role in technological and socio-economical development of mankind, such as radioisotope production for medicine, industry, research and education. Neutron scattering has been widely used for research and development in materials science. The prospect of neutron scattering as a powerful tool for materials research is increasing in the 21 st century. This can be seen from the investment of several new neutron sources all over the world such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in USA, the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (JPARC) in Japan, the new OPAL Reactor in Australia, and some upgrading to the existing sources at ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK; Institute of Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France and Berlin Reactor, Germany. Developing countries with moderate flux research reactor have also been involved in this technique, such as India, Malaysia and Indonesia The Siwabessy Multipurpose Reactor in Serpong, Indonesia that also produces thermal neutron has contributed to the research and development in the Asia Pacific Region. However,the international joint research among those countries plays an important role on optimizing the results. (author)

  6. The Prospect of Neutron Scattering In the 21st Century: A Powerful Tool for Materials Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kartini

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 60 years research reactors (RRs have played an important role in technological and socio-economical development of mankind, such as radioisotope production for medicine, industry, research and education. Neutron scattering has been widely used for research and development in materials science. The prospect of neutron scattering as a powerful tool for materials research is increasing in the 21st century. This can be seen from the investment of several new neutron sources all over the world such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS in USA, the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (JPARC in Japan, the new OPAL Reactor in Australia, and some upgrading to the existing sources at ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK; Institute of Laue Langevin (ILL in Grenoble, France and Berlin Reactor, Germany. Developing countries with moderate flux research reactor have also been involved in this technique, such as India, Malaysia and Indonesia. The Siwabessy Multipurpose Reactor in Serpong, Indonesia that also produces thermal neutron has contributed to the research and development in the Asia Pacific Region. However, the international joint research among those countries plays an important role on optimizing the results.

  7. INNOVATION AND RESEARCH FOR WATER INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY RESEARCH PLAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    This plan has been developed to provide the Office of Research and Development (ORD) with a guide for implementing a research program that addresses high priority needs of the Nation relating to its drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. By identifying these critical need...

  8. Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century (EIRR21): Description of an Innovative Research Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P' ng, Christine [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ito, Emma [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); How, Christine [Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bristow, Rob [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Catton, Pam; Fyles, Anthony; Gospodarowicz, Mary [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kelley, Shana [Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wong Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Liu Feifei, E-mail: Fei-Fei.Liu@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To describe and assess an interdisciplinary research training program for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and clinical fellows focused on radiation medicine; funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research since 2003, the program entitled 'Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century' (EIRR21) aims to train the next generation of interdisciplinary radiation medicine researchers. Methods and Materials: Online surveys evaluating EIRR21 were sent to trainees (n=56), mentors (n=36), and seminar speakers (n=72). Face-to-face interviews were also conducted for trainee liaisons (n=4) and participants in the international exchange program (n=2). Results: Overall response rates ranged from 53% (mentors) to 91% (trainees). EIRR21 was well received by trainees, with the acquisition of several important skills related to their research endeavors. An innovative seminar series, entitled Brainstorm sessions, imparting 'extracurricular' knowledge in intellectual property protection, commercialization strategies, and effective communication, was considered to be the most valuable component of the program. Networking with researchers in other disciplines was also facilitated owing to program participation. Conclusions: EIRR21 is an innovative training program that positively impacts the biomedical community and imparts valuable skill sets to foster success for the future generation of radiation medicine researchers.

  9. Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century (EIRR21): Description of an Innovative Research Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P'ng, Christine; Ito, Emma; How, Christine; Bezjak, Andrea; Bristow, Rob; Catton, Pam; Fyles, Anthony; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Jaffray, David; Kelley, Shana; Wong Shun; Liu Feifei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and assess an interdisciplinary research training program for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and clinical fellows focused on radiation medicine; funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research since 2003, the program entitled “Excellence in Radiation Research for the 21st Century” (EIRR21) aims to train the next generation of interdisciplinary radiation medicine researchers. Methods and Materials: Online surveys evaluating EIRR21 were sent to trainees (n=56), mentors (n=36), and seminar speakers (n=72). Face-to-face interviews were also conducted for trainee liaisons (n=4) and participants in the international exchange program (n=2). Results: Overall response rates ranged from 53% (mentors) to 91% (trainees). EIRR21 was well received by trainees, with the acquisition of several important skills related to their research endeavors. An innovative seminar series, entitled Brainstorm sessions, imparting “extracurricular” knowledge in intellectual property protection, commercialization strategies, and effective communication, was considered to be the most valuable component of the program. Networking with researchers in other disciplines was also facilitated owing to program participation. Conclusions: EIRR21 is an innovative training program that positively impacts the biomedical community and imparts valuable skill sets to foster success for the future generation of radiation medicine researchers.

  10. Basic Research in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Philip

    1979-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the development of basic research in the U.S. since World War II. Topics include the creation of the federal agencies, physics and astronomy, chemistry, earth science, life science, the environment, and social science. (BB)

  11. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Janice

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta. Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education, environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work, and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit

  12. Some Reflections On The Orientations And Volume Of Accounting HistoryResearch In The 21st Century)

    OpenAIRE

    Esteve, Esteban Hernandez

    2008-01-01

    (Some Reflections On The Orientations And Volume Of Accounting History Research In The 21st Century) Taking as starting point the 8th World Congress of Accounting Historians this paper attempts to identify the orientations followed by accounting history research in the first years of the 21st century, that is, from 2000 up to 2007. The main purpose of the attempt is to find out whether there have been significant novelties in the directions of research or, on the contrary, its development ha...

  13. Italian research on Antarctic atmosphere: 1st workshop. Ricerche italiane sull'atmosfera antartica: 1o workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colacino, M. (ed.); Giovannelli, G. (ed.); Stefanutti, L. (ed.)

    1989-01-01

    The papers and reports, presented at this 1st workshop on 'Italian research on antarctic atmosphere', deal with several main topics: meteorology and climatology, aerosol and tropospheric clouds, planetary boundary layer, chemical-physic stratospheric property, aeronomy. They define the stage of development of Italian research in this area after 3 years of activity in Antarctica.

  14. 21ST Century United States Military Strategy for East Asia: Countering an Emerging China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LeBlanc, Lee

    2004-01-01

    .... The United States National Security Strategy (NSS) suggests that the U.S. has relied on a U.S. forward military presence in the East Asian region for over 50 years enabling it to achieve its NSS objectives...

  15. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, In Soon; Lee, Mun-Ki

    2001-01-01

    Abstract. KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute), a national nuclear research institute in the Republic of Korea, celebrated its fortieth anniversary last April. It has played a key role in the Korean nuclear history such that it: initiated and promoted the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in the Republic of Korea; maintained nuclear expertise on whole spectrum of nuclear field through conducting nuclear R and D programs, operating nuclear research facilities, and training and educating specialized nuclear personnel; founded a cornerstone of Korean nuclear industry by participating in the establishment of a nuclear engineering company and a nuclear fuel company and localizing nuclear fuel and reactor technology; and contributed to nuclear safety regulation by incubating a specialized nuclear regulatory body. Recently, to concentrate on nuclear R and D on advanced technology, KAERI went through management reform such as: the transfer of nuclear engineering divisions responsible for NSSS design and nuclear fuel design to nuclear industry in 1996; and the downsizing of manpower in 1998. Currently KAERI is in the challenging stage in terms of its missions and manpower. In the coming 21st century, KAERI is required to maintain the current R and D momentum and also to conduct priority-based research requiring concentrated effort. (author)

  16. Bubble Chamber Research Group Microcomputer Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.; Barlow, J.; Mace, P.R.; Seller, P.; Waters, M.; Watson, J.G.

    1982-05-01

    A distributed data acquisition system has been developed by the Bubble Chamber Research Group at the Rutherford Appleton laboratory for use with their film measuring machines. The system is based upon a set of microcomputers linked together with a VAX 11/780 computer, in a local area computer network. This network is of the star type and uses a packet switching technique. Each film measuring machine is equipped with a microcomputer which controls the function of the table, buffers data and enhances the interface between operators and machines. This paper provides a detailed description of each microcomputer and can be used as a reference manual for these computers. (author)

  17. Research-based Curricula in the Context of 21st Century Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    When the Informatics revolution began again a little more than 10 years ago (longer for bio-informatics) geosciences (or Earth and Space Sciences) was paying attention via international attention from the Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) and related endeavours (IPY, IYPE, IHY). The research agenda was in the spotlight, or moreso what Earth and Space Science informatics, cast in emergent escience or cyber-infrastructures, could benefit from was the main focus of attention and funding. At the time almost all "Xinformatics" efforts were novel in their discipline or traditionally defined. However, a broader research and education agenda was clearly needed. At the same time, a much more cross-disciplinary field; data science emerged. In this presentation, we relate the development, delivery and assessment of research oriented informatics, data science and their specializations into geoscience education in generak and as undertaken at RPI over the last nine years. We conclude with a longitudinal view of the impacts on career paths in the 21st century

  18. 3rd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology (IMRMPT) and 1st Symposium on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions of the participants of the 3rd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology (3rd IMRMPT) and the 1st Symposium on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology which was held from 4 to May 9, 2015 at the Dann Carlton Hotel Bucaramanga, Colombia, organized by the faculty of science of the Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS) and the basic science department of the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. This was the third version of biennial meetings that began in 2011. The five-day scientific program of the 3rd IMRMPT consisted of 24 Magisterial Conferences, 70 Oral Presentations, 185 Poster Presentations, 3 Courses and 1 Discussion Panel with the participation of undergraduate and graduate students, professors, researchers and entrepreneurs from Colombia, Russia, Germany, France, Spain, England, United States, Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Venezuela, among others. Moreover, the objective of IMRMPT was to bring together national and international researchers in order to establish a network of scientific cooperation with a global impact in the area of the science and the technology of materials; to promote the exchange of creative ideas and the effective transfer of scientific knowledge, from fundamental research to innovation applied to industrial solutions and to advances in the development of new research allowing to increase the lifetime of the materials used in the industry by means of efficient transference of the knowledge between sectors academia and industry. The topics covered in the 3rd IMRMPT include New Materials, Surface Physics, Structural Integrity, Renewable Energy, Online Process Control, Non Destructive Evaluation, Characterization of Materials, Laser and Hybrid Processes, Thin Films and Nanomaterials, Surface Hardening Processes, Wear and Corrosion/Oxidation, Plasma Applications and Technologies, Modelling, Simulation and Diagnostics, Biomedical Coatings, Surface Treatments

  19. Archaeomagnetic research in the United States midcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Stacey Nicole

    This dissertation combines archaeomagnetic and independent chronometric data from 240 archaeological features to develop a regional secular variation curve for the U.S. midcontinent. These data were obtained from features located between 31.5--40.5° N latitude and 82.5--93.5° W longitude that have been dated to between 60 and 10,700 cal BP. The archaeomagnetic samples were collected from 41 sites within this region over the past 35 years under the direction of four different researchers: Robert DuBois (University of Oklahoma), Daniel Wolfman (University of Arkansas and New Mexico State Museum), Wulf Gose (University of Texas at Austin), and myself. In this project, the data are initially smoothed through the moving windows method to form the first approximation of the curve. Outlier analyses and pairwise statistical comparisons are utilized to refine the smoothed curve, and the results are compared to other Holocene-aged secular variation records from North America. These analyses indicate that the final curve should be treated as three distinct segments with different precision and use recommendations. First, the 850--75 cal BP segment can be used to date archaeomagnetic sample from the project area with expected temporal precision of 100--200 years. Second, the 2528--850 cal BP segment can be used cautiously to date archaeomagnetic samples with an expected temporal precision of 200--300 years. Third, the 9755--4650 cal BP segment should be used for contextual dating purposes only, in that an undated sample can be put into a regional context through comparison with the segment's constituent samples. Finally, three archaeological problems are addressed through the archaeomagnetic data. First, archaeomagnetic data are used to resolve the temporal conflict between an eastern Tennessee structure's morphology and a much earlier radiocarbon date obtained for the structure. Then, archaeomagnetic data are used to address a number of internal chronology questions

  20. PREFACE: 1st International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research 2011 (ICMER2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Rosli

    2012-09-01

    The year 2010 represented a significant milestone in the history of the Mechanical Engineering community with the organization of the first and second national level conferences (National Conference in Mechanical Engineering for Research, 1st and 2nd NCMER) at Universiti Malaysia Pahang on 26-27 May and 3-4 December 2010. The conferences attracted a large number of delegates from different premier academic and research institutions in the country to participate and share their research experiences at the conference. The International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2011) followed on from the first and second conferences due to good support from researchers. The ICMER 2011 is a good platform for researchers and postgraduate students to present their latest finding in research. The conference covers a wide range of topics including the internal combustion engine, machining processes, heat and mass transfer, fuel, biomechanical analysis, aerodynamic analysis, thermal comfort, computational techniques, design and simulation, automotive transmission, optimization techniques, hybrid electric vehicles, engine vibration, heat exchangers, finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, green energy, vehicle dynamics renewable energy, combustion, design, product development, advanced experimentation techniques, to name but a few. The international conference has helped to bridge the gap between researchers working at different institutions and in different countries to share their knowledge and has helped to motivate young scientists with their research. This has also given some clear direction for further research from the deliberations of the conference. Several people have contributed in different ways to the success of the conference. We thank the keynote speakers and all authors of the contributed papers, for the cooperation rendered to us in the publication of the CD conference proceedings. In particular, we would like to place on record our

  1. Outcomes by Mode of Transport of ST Elevation MI Patients in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callachan, Edward L; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar; Bruijns, Stevan; Wallis, Lee A

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this multicenter study was to assess differences in demographics, medical history, treatment times, and follow-up status among patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), who were transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS) or by private vehicle, or were transferred from other medical facilities. This multicenter study involved the collection of both retrospective and prospective data from 455 patients admitted to four hospitals in Abu Dhabi. We collected electronic medical records from EMS and hospitals, and conducted interviews with patients in person or via telephone. Chi-square tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to examine differences in variables by mode of transportation. Results indicated significant differences in modes of transportation when considering symptom-onset-to-balloon time (p transported by EMS, private vehicle, or transferred from an outside facility were as follows: symptom-onset-to-balloon time in hours, 3.1 (1.8-4.3), 3.2 (2.1-5.3), and 4.5 (3.0-7.5), respectively; door-to-balloon time in minutes, 70 (48-78), 81 (64-105), and 62 (46-77), respectively. In all cases, EMS transportation was associated with a shorter time to treatment than other modes of transportation. However, the EMS group experienced greater rates of in-hospital events, including cardiac arrest and mortality, than the private transport group. Our results contribute data supporting EMS transportation for patients with acute coronary syndrome. Although a lack of follow-up data made it difficult to draw conclusions about long-term outcomes, our findings clearly indicate that EMS transportation can speed time to treatment, including time to balloon inflation, potentially reducing readmission and adverse events. We conclude that future efforts should focus on encouraging the use of EMS and improving transfer practices. Such efforts could improve outcomes for patients presenting with STEMI.

  2. Management of dental unit waterline biofilms in the 21st century.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Mary J

    2011-10-01

    Dental chair units (DCUs) use water to cool and irrigate DCU-supplied instruments and tooth surfaces, and provide rinsewater during dental treatment. A complex network of interconnected plastic dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) supply water to these instruments. DUWLs are universally prone to microbial biofilm contamination seeded predominantly from microorganisms in supply water. Consequently, DUWL output water invariably becomes contaminated by high densities of microorganisms, principally Gram-negative environmental bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella species, but sometimes contain human-derived pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Patients and staff are exposed to microorganisms from DUWL output water and to contaminated aerosols generated by DCU instruments. A wide variety of approaches, many unsuccessful, have been proposed to control DUWL biofilm. More recently, advances in biofilm science, chemical DUWL biofilm treatment agents, DCU design, supply water treatment and development of automated DUWL biofilm control systems have provided effective long-term solutions to DUWL biofilm control.

  3. United States 1st Armored Division and Mission Command at the Battle of Faid Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    MilitaryReview_20130430_ art008.pdf and John Case, “The Exigency for Mission Command: A Comparison of World War II Command Cultures ,” Small Wars Journal...Borzoi Books, 1943), 229-232. 20 Concurrent to these efforts, the US and United Kingdom continued to mass forces in England for a cross channel...and psychological . The Axis had seized the initiative; the Allies just did not know it yet.154 Preparations for the Battle of Kasserine Pass

  4. Army Support to the United States Border Patrol in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    and Lieutenant Colonel (Promotable) Clifford J. Weinstein (United States Marine Corps). Thank you for letting me travel this important journey and...Operating Bases in Deming and Playas , New Mexico. The 4-14 CAV was preparing for its deployment to the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) at Fort Polk...write strategic policy. Once a suitable bench of key planners comes back to USBP, they can travel throughout the UCs and train other agents across the

  5. The 1st symposium of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy on fundamental development of the charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Fuminori

    2002-06-01

    This issue is the collection of the paper presented at the 1st Symposium of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy on fundamental development of the charged particle therapy. The 31 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. 1st IAEA research co-ordination meeting on charge exchange cross section data for fusion plasma studies. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.

    1999-02-01

    A brief description of the proceedings and the conclusions of the 1st Research Coordination Meeting on 'Charge Exchange Cross Section Data for Fusion Plasma Studies', held on September 24-25, 1999, at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, is provided. The conclusions of the Meeting regarding the data collection, assessment and generation priorities are also included in the report. (author)

  7. Research Center for Optical Physics: Education and Technology for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    During the past eleven years since its inception, RCOP has excelled in its two primary goals: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, as of May 2003, RCOP produced 36 Bachelors degrees, 25 Masters degrees, and 13 Doctoral degrees. Of these, all 36 Bachelors degrees, 16 of the Masters degrees and 9 of the Doctoral degrees were awarded to African Americans. Four of the Doctoral graduates and one of the Masters graduates are working at NASA Field Centers. RCOP has also provided research experiences to 130 undergraduate students and 22 high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been crucial to the development of the Ph.D. program in physics at Hampton University by providing high quality research training and technical electives required for a Doctoral degree in physics. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. Since 1992, RCOP researchers have leveraged over 8 million dollars in additional research funding, published 152 papers in refereed journals and proceedings, and given 125 presentations at refereed international conferences in the United States and eight other countries. RCOP also developed numerous collaborations with other research centers, universities and industries. In recognition of this outstanding work, RCOP is the first research center in the United States invited to join the Joint Open Laboratory for Laser Crystals and Precise Laser Systems headed by Dr. Alexander Kaminiskii of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  8. Fuel policy of the United Kingdom in the 21-st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    The main aspects of the United Kingdom fuel policy are analyzed. The possibility of using the new energy sources such as wind power, energy of waves, tide solar geothermal and thermonuclear energy is discussed. It is noted that in the large-scale power engineering for the purpose of fuel economy it is necessary to use schemes with combined production of heat and electric power. Construction of NPPs with thermal reactors having the total power of 40 GW by 2000 is projected as maximum program. Large commissioning of fast reactors is planned at the end of this century and at the beginning of next one. The exact date is determined by economic reasons, in particular, by the ratio of specific costs for thermal and fast reactors and relative cost of fuel cycle depending on the natural uranium cost. Favourable financial position of foreign partners and optimization of specifications of the NPP with a gas-cooled fast reactor (the use of helium or carbon dioxide is possible) make it possible to realize this reactor concept at the present stage approximately in two years. It is concluded that the development of methods for converting coal into liquid and gas fuels and transition to electric power production at NPPs are the main directions in fuel policy. In the future the use of wind and solar energy for district heating is the most favourable for the United Kingdom while the geothermal energy is the least perspective. In the far future the using the thermonuclear fusion is also perspective [ru

  9. Highlight: Research Chair unites four West African universities in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Local and regional experts including researchers, consultants, and academics convened in Cotonou, Benin, on February 26, 2015 to launch a Research Chair on EcoHealth. The Chair unites four West African universities that have pledged to reduce air pollution and non-communicable respiratory ...

  10. Future Directions for Urban Forestry Research in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; David J. Nowak; Gary W. Watson

    2002-01-01

    Urban forestry research promises to continue to be an integral part of the growth and development of forestry in urban and urbanizing areas of the United States. The future is expected to bring increased emphasis on research in support of the care of trees and other plants, ecological restoration, and comprehensive and adaptive management across the landscape....

  11. Infusing Active Learning into the Research Methods Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    The research methods unit of survey psychology classes introduces important concepts of scientific reasoning and fluency, making it an ideal course in which to deliver enhanced curricula. To increase interest and engagement, the author developed an expanded research methods and statistics module to give students the opportunity to explore…

  12. Research on novel coal conversion technology for energy and environment in 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Takarada [Gunma University (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    In the 21st century, more efficient coal conversion technology will be needed. In this paper, novel gasification, pyrolysis and desulfurization processes using active catalysts are introduced. In particular, the application of ion-exchanged metals in brown coal to coal conversion technology is featured in this study. Other topics discussed include: Catalysis of mineral matter in coal; Catalytic effectiveness of Ni and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for various coals; Direct production of methane from steam gasification; Preparation of active catalysts from NaCl and KCl using brown coal; Gasification of high rank coal by mixing K-exchanged brown coal; Recovery of sulfur via catalytic SO{sub 2} gasification of coal char; Research on novel coal conversion technology BTX production by hydropyrolysis of coal in PPFB using catalyst; High BTU gas production by low-temperature catalytic hydropyrolysis of coal; and Ca-exchanged brown coal as SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S sorbents. 12 refs., 17 figs.

  13. The Twins Study: NASA's First Foray into 21st Century Omics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrot, C. E.; Shelhamer, M.; Scott, G. B. I.

    2015-01-01

    The full array of 21st century omics-based research methods should be intelligently employed to reduce the health and performance risks that astronauts will be exposed to during exploration missions beyond low Earth Orbit. In March of 2015, US Astronaut Scott Kelly will launch to the International Space Station for a one year mission while his twin brother, Mark Kelly, a retired US Astronaut, remains on the ground. This situation presents an extremely rare flight opportunity to perform an integrated omics-based demonstration pilot study involving identical twin astronauts. A group of 10 principal investigators has been competitively selected, funded, and teamed together to form the Twins Study. A very broad range of biological function are being examined including the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, gut microbiome, immunological response to vaccinations, indicators of atherosclerosis, physiological fluid shifts, and cognition. The plans for the Twins Study and an overview of initial results will be described as well as the technological and ethical issues raised for such spaceflight studies. An anticipated outcome of the Twins Study is that it will place NASA on a trajectory of using omics-based information to develop precision countermeasures for individual astronauts.

  14. The role of Clinical Trial Units in investigator- and industry-initiated research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Niederhäusern, Belinda; Fabbro, Thomas; Pauli-Magnus, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Six multidisciplinary competence centres (Clinical Trial Units, CTUs) in Basel, Berne, Geneva, Lausanne, St. Gallen and Zurich provide professional support to clinical researchers in the planning, implementation, conduct and evaluation of clinical studies. Through their coordinated network, these units promote high-quality, nationally harmonised and internationally standardised clinical research conduct in Switzerland. We will describe why this network has been established, how it has been successful in stilling the growing need for clinical research support, which training and education opportunities it offers, and how it created national awareness for the still-existing hurdles towards clinical research excellence in Switzerland. Taking the CTU Basel as an example, we show that a considerable number (25%) of the studies submitted for regulatory approval in 2013 were supported by the CTU, decreasing the number of findings in ethics reviews by about one-third. We conclude that these achievements, together with a Swiss national funding model for clinical research, and improved national coordination, will be critical factors to successfully position Swiss clinical research at the international forefront.

  15. Summary Report of 1st Research Coordination Meeting on Development of Reference Database for Beta-delayed Neutron Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillmann, Iris; Dimitriou, Paraskevi; Singh, Balraj

    2014-03-01

    A summary is given of the 1st Research Coordination Meeting of the new IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of a Reference Database for Beta-delayed neutron emission data. Participants presented their work, reviewed the current status of the field with regards to individual precursors and aggregate data, and discussed the scope of the work to be undertaken. A list of priorities and task assignments was produced. (author)

  16. The Microcomputer in the Clinical Nursing Research Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwirian, Patricia M.; Byers, Sandra R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses the microcomputer in clinical nursing research. There are six general areas in which computers have been useful to nurses: nursing notes and charting; patient care plans; automated monitoring of high-tech nursing units; HIS and MIS systems; personnel distribution systems; and education. Three alternative models for the conduct of clinical nursing research in a hospital are described. The first is a centralized model relying on the bureaucratic structure of the hospital. Second is a decentralized network of professional nurses and research support personnel woven together by a Clinical Nurse Researcher, and third is a dedicated clinical nursing research unit. Microcomputers have five characteristics which make them vital tools for nurse researchers: user-friendliness; environment friendliness; low cost; ease of interface with other information systems; and range and quality of software.

  17. 21st Century Parent-Child Sex Communication in the United States: A Process Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Dalmacio; Barroso, Julie

    Parent-child sex communication results in the transmission of family expectations, societal values, and role modeling of sexual health risk-reduction strategies. Parent-child sex communication's potential to curb negative sexual health outcomes has sustained a multidisciplinary effort to better understand the process and its impact on the development of healthy sexual attitudes and behaviors among adolescents. This review advances what is known about the process of sex communication in the United States by reviewing studies published from 2003 to 2015. We used the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, SocINDEX, and PubMed, and the key terms "parent child" AND "sex education" for the initial query; we included 116 original articles for analysis. Our review underscores long-established factors that prevent parents from effectively broaching and sustaining talks about sex with their children and has also identified emerging concerns unique to today's parenting landscape. Parental factors salient to sex communication are established long before individuals become parents and are acted upon by influences beyond the home. Child-focused communication factors likewise describe a maturing audience that is far from captive. The identification of both enduring and emerging factors that affect how sex communication occurs will inform subsequent work that will result in more positive sexual health outcomes for adolescents.

  18. Re-visioning the doctoral research degree in nursing in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher R; Duxbury, Joy; French, Beverley; Monks, Rob; Carter, Bernie

    2009-05-01

    In the light of concerns about the wider social and economic value of the PhD training programme, this article discusses the challenges being directed primarily at the traditional doctoral programme of study. While the PhD is primarily concerned with the student making an original contribution to knowledge, the value-added component of the doctoral research degree needs to respond to the needs of a wider market of purchasers, and to meet practice and policy requirements for research leadership. The United Kingdom Research Councils (UK GRAD, 2001. Joint Skills Statement of Skills Training Requirements. Available at http://www.grad.ac.uk/downloads/documents/general/Joint%20Skills%20Statementpdf. (last accessed 1st April 2008.) suggest a range of seven skill domains over and above research design and management that should be offered to students. The seven domains are research skills and techniques, participation in the research environment, research management, personal effectiveness, communication, networking and team working, and career management. This article develops and extends these skill domains for the current healthcare context and considers how these should guide the development and evaluation of the value-added components of doctoral research degree programmes in nursing. The challenges that these issues present to academic departments are also discussed. Our conclusion is that PhD research training needs re-visioning and broadening so that the students' experience includes these value-added components.

  19. Use of a dissolved-gas measurement system for reducing the dissolved oxygen at St. Lucie Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, D.T.; Coit, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    When the dissolved oxygen in the condensate at St. Lucie Unit 2 could not be reduced below the administrative limit of 10 ppB, EPRI cooperated with Florida Power and Light to find the cause and develop remedies. Two problems were identified with the assistance of a dissolved gas measurement system (DGMS) that can detect leaks into condensate when used with argon blanketing. Drain piping from the air ejection system had flooded which decreased its performance, and leaks were found at a strainer flange and a couple expansion joints. Initially the dissolved oxygen content was reduced to about 9 ppB; owever, the dissolved oxygen from Condenser A was consistently higher than that from condenser B. Injection of about 0.4 cubic per minute (CFM) of argon above the hotwell considerably improved the ventilation of Condenser A, reducing the dissolved oxygen about 30% to about 6 ppB. The use of nitrogen was equally effective. While inert gas injection is helpful, it may be better to have separate air ejectors for each condenser. Several recommendations for improving oxygen removal are given

  20. Phoenix Park Community Nursing Units, St Mary's Hospital, Phoenix Park, Dublin 20.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Molly

    2010-05-25

    Abstract Background Sexual problems are common among people with coronary heart disease and can adversely affect patients\\' quality of life. GPs are ideally placed to deal with these problems. Research suggests that GPs are reluctant to address sexual problems but little is known about what currently takes place in practice. The aim of this study was to examine GPs\\' self-reported behaviour and attitudes to discussing sexual problems with people with coronary heart disease. Method Design: A cross-sectional survey which administered 230 postal questionnaires to a nationally representative, stratified random sample of GPs in the Republic of Ireland. GPs were asked about current practice, knowledge, awareness and confidence in dealing with sexual problems, barriers to addressing sexual problems, and about improving services in this area. Results Responses were available for 61 GPs (27% response rate). Seventy percent of GPs reported that they rarely or never discussed sexual problems with coronary patients. While all GPs believed addressing sexual problems was important, many GPs reported lacking awareness, knowledge and confidence in addressing sexual problems. The main barriers were lack of time, feeling the patient wasn\\'t ready and lack of training in the area. GPs wanted more training and guidelines for practice. Conclusions There is currently no standardised protocol for GPs for dealing with sexual problems among coronary patients. Awareness of these issues appears to be low among GPs. Services could be improved by developing practice guidelines for brief, effective actions or assessments, providing training in the area and improving information resources and support services for referral.

  1. An example of a United States Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    Under the likely scenario in which public support for nuclear energy remains low and fossil fuels continue to be abundant and cheap, government supported nuclear research centers must adapt their missions to ensure that they tackle problems of current significance. It will be critical to be multidisciplinary, to generate economic value, and to apply nuclear competencies to current problems. Addressing problems in nuclear safety, D and D, nuclear waste management, nonproliferation, isotope production are a few examples of current needs in the nuclear arena. Argonne's original mission, to develop nuclear reactor technology, was a critical need for the U.S. in 1946. It would be wise to recognize that this mission was a special instance of a more general one--to apply unique human and physical capital to long term, high risk technology development in response to society's needs. International collaboration will enhance the collective chances for success as the world moves into the 21st century

  2. Office of Naval Research-Interns in Biomolecular Sciences Multi-Institutional Research Enhancement Partnership Program: Research Leadership for the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avila, Diana; Chigbu, Paulinus; Garcia-Rios, Mario; Wild, James R

    2006-01-01

    .... The participants are from four minority-serving teaching institutions: Jackson State University (JSU), Jackson, MS; St. Mary's University (StMU), San Antonio, TX); Texas A & M International University...

  3. List of reports on reactor safety research by BMFT, USNRC, EPRI and JSTA. Period under review: 1st January until 31st March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from the United States of America and from Japan concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the United States Regulatory Commisssion (USNRC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA) these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list of reports appears quarterly. Requests for reports should be addressed to GRS, Forschungsbetreuung. Contractual view points have to be considered for the distribution of the reports. (orig.) [de

  4. Economics of conservation systems research in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of conservation systems in crop production is not a new concept in the southeastern United States. In 1978, researchers from across the Southeast met in Griffin, Georgia for the first annual Southern Conservation Agricultural Systems Conference. Four of the ten presentations specifically men...

  5. Conducting qualitative research within Clinical Trials Units: avoiding potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cindy; O'Cathain, Alicia; Hind, Danny; Adamson, Joy; Lawton, Julia; Baird, Wendy

    2014-07-01

    The value of using qualitative research within or alongside randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is becoming more widely accepted. Qualitative research may be conducted concurrently with pilot or full RCTs to understand the feasibility and acceptability of the interventions being tested, or to improve trial conduct. Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) in the United Kingdom (UK) manage large numbers of RCTs and, increasingly, manage the qualitative research or collaborate with qualitative researchers external to the CTU. CTUs are beginning to explicitly manage the process, for example, through the use of standard operating procedures for designing and implementing qualitative research with trials. We reviewed the experiences of two UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) registered CTUs of conducting qualitative research concurrently with RCTs. Drawing on experiences gained from 15 studies, we identify the potential for the qualitative research to undermine the successful completion or scientific integrity of RCTs. We show that potential problems can arise from feedback of interim or final qualitative findings to members of the trial team or beyond, in particular reporting qualitative findings whilst the trial is on-going. The problems include: We make recommendations for improving the management of qualitative research within CTUs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Forest ecohydrological research in the 21st century: what are the critical needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Vose; Ge Sun; Chelcy Ford; Michael Bredemeier; Kyoichi Ostsuki; Adam Wei; Zhiqiang Zhang; Lu. Zang

    2011-01-01

    Modern ecohydrologic science will be critical for providing the best information to policy makers and society to address water resource challenges in the 21st century. Implicitly, ecohydrology involves understanding both the functional interactions among vegetation, soils, and hydrologic processes at multiple scales and the linkages among upland, riparian, and aquatic...

  7. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  8. Research and photovoltaic industry at the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, Ch.; Herino, R.; Delville, R.; Allegre, R.

    2006-06-01

    For a big country as the United States, the solar energy can be a solution for the air quality improvement, the greenhouse gases fight and the reduction of the dependence to the imported petroleum and also for the economic growth by the increase of the employment in the solar industry sector. This document takes stock on the photovoltaic in the United States in the industrial and research domains. The american photovoltaic industry is the third behind the Japan and the Germany. (A.L.B.)

  9. Hydrologic Forecasting in the 21st Century: Challenges and Directions of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, P.; Schaake, J.

    2009-04-01

    Traditionally, the role of the Hydrology program of the National Weather Service has been centered around forecasting floods, in order to minimize loss of lives and damage to property as a result of floods as well as water levels for navigable rivers, and water supply in some areas of the country. A number of factors, including shifting population patterns, widespread drought and concerns about climate change have made it imperative to widen the focus to cover forecasting flows ranging from drought to floods and anything in between. Because of these concerns, it is imperative to develop models that rely more on the physical characteristics of the watershed for parameterization and less on historical observations. Furthermore, it is also critical to consider explicitly the sources of uncertainty in the forecasting process, including parameter values, model structure, forcings (both observations and forecasts), initial conditions, and streamflow observations. A consequence of more widespread occurrence of low flows as a result either of the already evident earlier snowmelt in the Western United States, or of the predicted changes in precipitation patterns, is the issue of water quality: lower flows will have higher concentrations of certain pollutants. This paper describes the current projects and future directions of research for hydrologic forecasting in the United States. Ongoing projects on quantitative precipitation and temperature estimates and forecasts, uncertainty modeling by the use of ensembles, data assimilation, verification, distributed conceptual modeling will be reviewed. Broad goals of the research directions are: 1) reliable modeling of the different sources of uncertainty. 2) a more expeditious and cost-effective approach by reducing the effort required in model calibration; 3) improvements in forecast lead-time and accuracy; 4) an approach for rapid adjustment of model parameters to account for changes in the watershed, both rapid as the result

  10. Science Policy Research Unit annual report 1984/1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The report covers the principal research programmes of the Unit, and also describes its graduate and undergraduate teaching, (listing subjects of postgraduate research) and library services. A list of 1984 published papers and staff is presented. The principle research programmes include: the setting up of the Designated Research Centre on Science, Technology and Energy Policy in British Economic Development; policy for technology and industrial innovation in industrialised countries; energy economics, technology and policy (with a sub-section on coal); European science and industrial policy; science policy and research evaluation; technical change and employment opportunities in the UK economy; new technology, manpower and skills; technology and social change; science and technology policy in developing countries; military technology and arms limitation. Short-term projects and consultancy are also covered.

  11. Updating Photonuclear Data Library and Generating a Reference Database for Photon Strength Functions. 1st Research Coordination Meeting. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goriely, S.; Dimitriou, P.

    2016-07-01

    A summary is given of the 1 st Research Coordination Meeting of the new IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Updating the Photonuclear Data Library and Generating a Reference Database for Photon Strength Functions. Participants presented their work, reviewed the current status of the field with regards to measurements, theoretical models and evaluations, discussed the scope of the work to be undertaken and agreed on a list of priorities and task assignments necessary to achieve the goals of the CRP. A summary of the presentations and discussions is presented in this report. (author)

  12. [General practice research units in Denmark: multidisciplinary research in support of practical work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reventlow, Susanne; Broholm, Katalin Alexa Király; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark the general practice research units operating in connection with universities provide a home base, training and methodology support for researchers in the field from medical students to general practitioners carrying out practical work. Research issues frequently require a multidisciplinary approach and use of different kinds of materials. Problems arising from the practical work of general practitioners take priority in the wide selection of topics. The units have networked efficiently with organizations of general practitioners and medical education. The combination of research environments has created synergy benefiting everybody and increased the scientific productivity and visibility of the field.

  13. Strategic Research for S&T Planning Should Focus on Key Issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Strategic planning for national and CAS mid- and long-term S&T development should avoid giving equal attention to every aspect of an issue, which can only lead to incremental progress.Instead, importance should be attached to priorities that will result in scientific, technical and engineering breakthroughs, said CAS President Lu Yongxiang, who is also vice-chairman of the national legislature, NPC.

  14. Strategic Engagement in Global S&T: Opportunities for Defense Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    ameliorating global chal- lenges, such as natural and engineered disasters (e.g., Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster ) and pandemic disease outbreaks (e.g...importance of both maintaining awareness of global S&T advances and increasing engagement with other parts of the U.S. government, industry, academia...perspectives on the following themes: mission, mechanisms for technology awareness , relationship building, enterprise coordination and connectivity, and

  15. Epidemic Emergence in the United States of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131-H30 (ST131-H30), 2000 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R; Porter, Stephen; Thuras, Paul; Castanheira, Mariana

    2017-08-01

    The H 30 subclone of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131- H 30) has become the leading antimicrobial resistance E. coli lineage in the United States and often exhibits resistance to one or both of the two key antimicrobial classes for treating Gram-negative infections, extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) and fluoroquinolones (FQs). However, the timing of and reasons for its recent emergence are inadequately defined. Accordingly, from E. coli clinical isolates collected systematically across the United States by the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program in 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009, 234 isolates were selected randomly, stratified by year, within three resistance categories: (i) ESC-reduced susceptibility, regardless of FQ phenotype (ESC-RS); (ii) FQ resistance, ESC susceptible (FQ-R); and (iii) FQ susceptible, ESC susceptible (FQ-S). Susceptibility profiles, phylogroup, ST, ST131 subclone, and virulence genotypes were determined, and temporal trends and between-variable associations were assessed statistically. From 2000 to 2006, concurrently with the emergence of ESC-RS and FQ-R strains, the prevalence of (virulence-associated) phylogroup B2 among such strains also rose dramatically, due entirely to rapid emergence of ST131, especially H 30. By 2009, H 30 was the dominant E. coli lineage overall (22%), accounting for a median of 43% of all single-agent and multidrug resistance (68% for ciprofloxacin). H 30's emergence increased the net virulence gene content of resistant (especially FQ-R) isolates, giving stable overall virulence gene scores despite an approximately 4-fold expansion of the historically less virulent resistant population. These findings define more precisely the timing and tempo of H 30's emergence in the United States, identify possible reasons for it, and suggest potential consequences, including more frequent and/or aggressive antimicrobial-resistant infections. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. The aging of biomedical research in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin R W Matthews

    Full Text Available In the past 30 years, the average age of biomedical researchers has steadily increased. The average age of an investigator at the National Institutes of Health (NIH rose from 39 to 51 between 1980 and 2008. The aging of the biomedical workforce was even more apparent when looking at first-time NIH grantees. The average age of a new investigator was 42 in 2008, compared to 36 in 1980. To determine if the rising barriers at NIH for entry in biomedical research might impact innovative ideas and research, we analyzed the research and publications of Nobel Prize winners from 1980 to 2010 to assess the age at which their pioneering research occurred. We established that in the 30-year period, 96 scientists won the Nobel Prize in medicine or chemistry for work related to biomedicine, and that their groundbreaking research was conducted at an average age of 41-one year younger than the average age of a new investigator at NIH. Furthermore, 78% of the Nobel Prize winners conducted their research before the age of 51, the average age of an NIH principal investigator. This suggested that limited access to NIH might inhibit research potential and novel projects, and could impact biomedicine and the next generation scientists in the United States.

  17. Mid-21st-century climate changes increase predicted fire occurrence and fire season length, Northern Rocky Mountains, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Karin L.; Loehman, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate changes are expected to increase fire frequency, fire season length, and cumulative area burned in the western United States. We focus on the potential impact of mid-21st-century climate changes on annual burn probability, fire season length, and large fire characteristics including number and size for a study area in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Although large fires are rare they account for most of the area burned in western North America, burn under extreme weather conditions, and exhibit behaviors that preclude methods of direct control. Allocation of resources, development of management plans, and assessment of fire effects on ecosystems all require an understanding of when and where fires are likely to burn, particularly under altered climate regimes that may increase large fire occurrence. We used the large fire simulation model FSim to model ignition, growth, and containment of wildfires under two climate scenarios: contemporary (based on instrumental weather) and mid-century (based on an ensemble average of global climate models driven by the A1B SRES emissions scenario). Modeled changes in fire patterns include increased annual burn probability, particularly in areas of the study region with relatively short contemporary fire return intervals; increased individual fire size and annual area burned; and fewer years without large fires. High fire danger days, represented by threshold values of Energy Release Component (ERC), are projected to increase in number, especially in spring and fall, lengthening the climatic fire season. For fire managers, ERC is an indicator of fire intensity potential and fire economics, with higher ERC thresholds often associated with larger, more expensive fires. Longer periods of elevated ERC may significantly increase the cost and complexity of fire management activities, requiring new strategies to maintain desired ecological conditions and limit fire risk. Increased fire activity (within the historical range of

  18. Closing Symposium of the DFG Research Unit FOR 1066

    CERN Document Server

    Niehuis, Reinhard; Kroll, Norbert; Behrends, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    The book reports on advanced solutions to the problem of simulating wing and nacelle stall, as presented and discussed by internationally recognized researchers at the Closing Symposium of the DFG Research Unit FOR 1066. Reliable simulations of flow separation on airfoils, wings and powered engine nacelles at high Reynolds numbers represent great challenges in defining suitable mathematical models, computing numerically accurate solutions and providing comprehensive experimental data for the validation of numerical simulations. Additional problems arise from the need to consider airframe-engine interactions and inhomogeneous onset flow conditions, as real aircraft operate in atmospheric environments with often-large distortions. The findings of fundamental and applied research into these and other related issues are reported in detail in this book, which targets all readers, academics and professionals alike, interested in the development of advanced computational fluid dynamics modeling for the simulation of...

  19. From research to policy and practice: the School of the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigler, Edward; Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2007-04-01

    Current education reform policies focus on raising academic achievement and ensuring that all students have access to high-quality education. Because the achievement gap is apparent even before children enter school, the authors believe that education reform must encompass the early childhood years. The current dialogue about universal preschool presents an opportunity to address the need for a national system for early care and education. The authors believe this system should provide quality child care and preschool experiences for all children and embrace a whole-child approach that nurtures not only cognitive development but physical and mental health and social-emotional behaviors that are also important to successful schooling. The School of the 21st Century provides an example of an effective early care and education system using the public schools. The authors' work with the School of the 21st Century shows that schools can provide high-quality, developmentally appropriate care and that these programs benefit later school performance. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  20. A high arctic experience of uniting research and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Niels Martin; Christensen, Torben R.; Roslin, Tomas

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring is science keeping our thumb on the pulse of the environment to detect any changes of concern for societies. Basic science is the question-driven search for fundamental processes and mechanisms. Given the firm root of monitoring in human interests and needs, basic sciences have often been regarded as scientifically "purer"—particularly within university-based research communities. We argue that the dichotomy between "research" and "monitoring" is an artificial one, and that this artificial split clouds the definition of scientific goals and leads to suboptimal use of resources. We claim that the synergy between the two scientific approaches is well distilled by science conducted under extreme logistic constraints, when scientists are forced to take full advantage of both the data and the infrastructure available. In evidence of this view, we present our experiences from two decades of uniting research and monitoring at the remote research facility Zackenberg in High Arctic Greenland. For this site, we show how the combination of insights from monitoring with the mechanistic understanding obtained from basic research has yielded the most complete understanding of the system—to the benefit of all, and as an example to follow. We therefore urge scientists from across the continuum from monitoring to research to come together, to disregard old division lines, and to work together to expose a comprehensive picture of ecosystem change and its consequences.

  1. Radioactivity and United Kingdom estuaries: an overview identifying research priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, E.I.; Clifton, R.J.; Stevens, H.E.

    1985-05-01

    The report consists of the results of an evaluation of research priorities for the environmental radioactivity of estuaries, (and near shore waters) of the United Kingdom. The format of this report is:(i) general conclusions for the future requirements for research in the field of environmental radioactivity; (ii) an overview of some specific recommendations for research; and (iii) an appendix in which a comprehensive evaluation of the research priorities for specific areas of research are given. On the basis that man is the prime target for concern and protection, special attention has been given to the environment in the vicinity of the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield, Cumbria, which is the source of major releases of a variety of radionuclides into the natural environment. Subjects covered in the Appendix are: site factors; pathways to man; source term; hot particles; terrestrial inputs; surveys and monitoring; analysis; organics; field versus laboratory data; biology; bioaccumulation factors; some bioaccumulators of radioactivity; bioturbation; bacteria; genetics; natural change; sediment; resuspension; surfaces; Ksub(d) factors; pore liquids; diagenesis and the ageing processes; airborne transport of radionuclides; models; natural radioactivity; public opinion; recreation; the ICRP; the ALARA principle; decommissioning of nuclear power stations; identification of research requirements; environmental radioactivity - the national effort. (U.K.)

  2. The United States of America and scientific research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Hather

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To gauge the current commitment to scientific research in the United States of America (US, we compared federal research funding (FRF with the US gross domestic product (GDP and industry research spending during the past six decades. In order to address the recent globalization of scientific research, we also focused on four key indicators of research activities: research and development (R&D funding, total science and engineering doctoral degrees, patents, and scientific publications. We compared these indicators across three major population and economic regions: the US, the European Union (EU and the People's Republic of China (China over the past decade. We discovered a number of interesting trends with direct relevance for science policy. The level of US FRF has varied between 0.2% and 0.6% of the GDP during the last six decades. Since the 1960s, the US FRF contribution has fallen from twice that of industrial research funding to roughly equal. Also, in the last two decades, the portion of the US government R&D spending devoted to research has increased. Although well below the US and the EU in overall funding, the current growth rate for R&D funding in China greatly exceeds that of both. Finally, the EU currently produces more science and engineering doctoral graduates and scientific publications than the US in absolute terms, but not per capita. This study's aim is to facilitate a serious discussion of key questions by the research community and federal policy makers. In particular, our results raise two questions with respect to: a the increasing globalization of science: "What role is the US playing now, and what role will it play in the future of international science?"; and b the ability to produce beneficial innovations for society: "How will the US continue to foster its strengths?"

  3. The United States of America and scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hather, Gregory J; Haynes, Winston; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Stewart, Elizabeth A; Arzberger, Peter; Chain, Patrick; Field, Dawn; Franza, B Robert; Lin, Biaoyang; Meyer, Folker; Ozdemir, Vural; Smith, Charles V; van Belle, Gerald; Wooley, John; Kolker, Eugene

    2010-08-16

    To gauge the current commitment to scientific research in the United States of America (US), we compared federal research funding (FRF) with the US gross domestic product (GDP) and industry research spending during the past six decades. In order to address the recent globalization of scientific research, we also focused on four key indicators of research activities: research and development (R&D) funding, total science and engineering doctoral degrees, patents, and scientific publications. We compared these indicators across three major population and economic regions: the US, the European Union (EU) and the People's Republic of China (China) over the past decade. We discovered a number of interesting trends with direct relevance for science policy. The level of US FRF has varied between 0.2% and 0.6% of the GDP during the last six decades. Since the 1960s, the US FRF contribution has fallen from twice that of industrial research funding to roughly equal. Also, in the last two decades, the portion of the US government R&D spending devoted to research has increased. Although well below the US and the EU in overall funding, the current growth rate for R&D funding in China greatly exceeds that of both. Finally, the EU currently produces more science and engineering doctoral graduates and scientific publications than the US in absolute terms, but not per capita. This study's aim is to facilitate a serious discussion of key questions by the research community and federal policy makers. In particular, our results raise two questions with respect to: a) the increasing globalization of science: "What role is the US playing now, and what role will it play in the future of international science?"; and b) the ability to produce beneficial innovations for society: "How will the US continue to foster its strengths?"

  4. Exploring the SCOAP3 Research Contributions of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsteller, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics (SCOAP3) is a successful global partnership of libraries, funding agencies and research centers. This presentation will inform the audience about SCOAP3 and also delve into descriptive statistics of the United States' intellectual contribution to particle physics via these open access journals. Exploration of the SCOAP3 particle physics literature using a variety of metrics tools such as Web of Science™, InCites™, Scopus® and SciVal will be shared. ORA or Sci2 will be used to visualize author collaboration networks.

  5. Impact of mobile intensive care unit use on total ischemic time and clinical outcomes in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients - real-world data from the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koifman, Edward; Beigel, Roy; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Shlomo, Nir; Biton, Yitschak; Sabbag, Avi; Asher, Elad; Atar, Shaul; Gottlieb, Shmuel; Alcalai, Ronny; Zahger, Doron; Segev, Amit; Goldenberg, Ilan; Strugo, Rafael; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic time has prognostic importance in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Mobile intensive care unit use can reduce components of total ischemic time by appropriate triage of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Data from the Acute Coronary Survey in Israel registry 2000-2010 were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with mobile intensive care unit use and its impact on total ischemic time and patient outcomes. The study comprised 5474 ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients enrolled in the Acute Coronary Survey in Israel registry, of whom 46% ( n=2538) arrived via mobile intensive care units. There was a significant increase in rates of mobile intensive care unit utilization from 36% in 2000 to over 50% in 2010 ( pcare unit use were Killip>1 (odds ratio=1.32, pcare units benefitted from increased rates of primary reperfusion therapy (odds ratio=1.58, pcare unit benefitted from shorter median total ischemic time compared with non-mobile intensive care unit patients (175 (interquartile range 120-262) vs 195 (interquartile range 130-333) min, respectively ( pcare unit use was the most important predictor in achieving door-to-balloon time care unit group (odds ratio=0.79, 95% confidence interval (0.66-0.94), p=0.01). Among patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, the utilization of mobile intensive care units is associated with increased rates of primary reperfusion, a reduction in the time interval to reperfusion, and a reduction in one-year adjusted mortality.

  6. 21st century natural product research and drug development and traditional medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Linh T; Okogun, Joseph I; Folk, William R

    2013-04-01

    Natural products and related structures are essential sources of new pharmaceuticals, because of the immense variety of functionally relevant secondary metabolites of microbial and plant species. Furthermore, the development of powerful analytical tools based upon genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, bioinformatics and other 21st century technologies are greatly expediting identification and characterization of these natural products. Here we discuss the synergistic and reciprocal benefits of linking these 'omics technologies with robust ethnobotanical and ethnomedical studies of traditional medicines, to provide critically needed improved medicines and treatments that are inexpensive, accessible, safe and reliable. However, careless application of modern technologies can challenge traditional knowledge and biodiversity that are the foundation of traditional medicines. To address such challenges while fulfilling the need for improved (and new) medicines, we encourage the development of Regional Centres of 'omics Technologies functionally linked with Regional Centres of Genetic Resources, especially in regions of the world where use of traditional medicines is prevalent and essential for health.

  7. Directions of ICF research in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Campbell, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research in the United States is in a dramatic upswing. Technical progress continues at a rapid pace and with the start of the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) this year the total U.S. budget for ICF for fiscal year 1997 stands at $380 million. The NIF is being built as an essential component of the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program which has been formulated to assure the continued safety, reliability, and performance of the downsized nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear tests. This paper will discuss some of the directions that the ICF research is now taking. (AIP) copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  8. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure - TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program is to provide fresh nuclear reactor fuel to United States universities at no, or low, cost to the university. The title of the fuel remains with the United States government and when universities are finished with the fuel, the fuel is returned to the United States government. The program is funded by the United States Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy division, managed by Department of Energy - Idaho Field Office, and contracted to the Idaho National Laboratory's Management and Operations Contractor - Battelle Energy Alliance. Program has been at Idaho since 1977 and INL subcontracts with 26 United States domestic reactor facilities (13 TRIGA facilities, 9 plate fuel facilities, 2 AGN facilities, 1 Pulstar fuel facility, 1 Critical facility). University has not shipped fuel since 1968 and as such, we have no present procedures for shipping spent fuel. In addition: floor loading rate is unknown, many interferences must be removed to allow direct access to the reactor tank, floor space in the reactor cell is very limited, pavement ends inside our fence; some of the surface is not finished. The whole approach is narrow, curving and downhill. A truck large enough to transport the cask cannot pull into the lot and then back out (nearly impossible / refused by drivers); a large capacity (100 ton), long boom crane would have to be used due to loading dock obstructions. Access to the entrance door is on a sidewalk. The campus uses it as a road for construction equipment, deliveries and security response. Large trees are on both sides of sidewalk. Spent fuel shipments have never been done, no procedures approved or in place, no approved casks, no accident or safety analysis for spent fuel loading. Any cask assembly used in this facility will have to be removed from one crane, moved on the floor and then attached to another crane to get from the staging area to the reactor room. Reactor

  9. Molecular image in biomedical research. Molecular imaging unit of the National Cancer Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Bruzon, J.; Mulero Anhiorte, F.

    2010-01-01

    This article has two basic objectives. firstly, it will review briefly the most important imaging techniques used in biomedical research indicting the most significant aspects related to their application in the preclinical stage. Secondly, it will present a practical application of these techniques in a pure biomedical research centre (not associated to a clinical facility). Practical aspects such as organisation, equipment, work norms, shielding of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) Imaging Unit will be shown. This is a pioneering facility in the application of these techniques in research centres without any dependence or any direct relationship with other hospital Nuclear Medicine services. (Author) 7 refs.

  10. The Thrill of Discovery: Nuclear Physics Research in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Khalili, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    To many people outside our field, both scientists and the general public, nuclear physics is no longer regarded as being at the forefront of scientific endeavour. Indeed it is often met with outright hostility. Other physicists will point out that the last time a Nobel Prize was awarded in the field was in 1975. This paper, based on a lecture delivered during an Open Plenary Session of the recent International Nuclear Physics Conference INPC2004, which was aimed at a non-specialist audience, will seek to dispel this myth. Nuclear physics is currently enjoying a period of rapid advances. Many new discoveries have been made in the past few years, from neutron halos and nuclear molecules to a new form of radioactive decay via two protons; from hints of a new particle consisting of five quarks to new 'superheavy' elements. This talk will give a personal perspective on why, far from looking with envy at our neighbours in areas of physics that currently enjoy a higher media profile, we have more than enough to keep us busy and excited in the 21st century

  11. Inernational research in health care management: its need in the 21st century, methodological challenges, ethical issues, pitfalls, and practicalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttigieg, Sandra C; Rathert, Cheryl; D'Aunno, Thomas A; Savage, Grant T

    2015-01-01

    This commentary argues in favor of international research in the 21st century. Advances in technology, science, communication, transport, and infrastructure have transformed the world into a global village. Industries have increasingly adopted globalization strategies. Likewise, the health sector is more internationalized whereby comparisons between diverse health systems, international best practices, international benchmarking, cross-border health care, and cross-cultural issues have become important subjects in the health care literature. The focus has now turned to international, collaborative, cross-national, and cross-cultural research, which is by far more demanding than domestic studies. In this commentary, we explore the methodological challenges, ethical issues, pitfalls, and practicalities within international research and offer possible solutions to address them. The commentary synthesizes contributions from four scholars in the field of health care management, who came together during the annual meeting of the Academy of Management to discuss with members of the Health Care Management Division the challenges of international research. International research is worth pursuing; however, it calls for scholarly attention to key methodological and ethical issues for its success. This commentary addresses salient issues pertaining to international research in one comprehensive account.

  12. 21st Annual Spring Research Festival Highlights Science, Celebrates Collaboration | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    For two days at the annual Spring Research Festival, Fort Detrick was abuzz with scientific discussion as researchers and visitors from the site’s many resident government agencies and contractors gathered to share findings and recognize collaborative research. Each year, the festival focuses on intermural scientific work, as well as challenges and discoveries in the fight

  13. Research in the United States relative to geochemistry and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, W.L.; Cannon, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    Increasing concern regarding the effects of the geochemical environment on health in the United States has fostered research studies in a number of universities and government agencies. The necessity to evaluate the effects of natural and man-made elemental excesses in the environment on health requires the establishment of requirements and tolerance limits for the various elements in water and crops. Maps of the geographic distribution of these elements in rocks, surficial materials and ground and surface waters are also essential for comparison with the occurrence of disease. Funding support for research projects that relate to various parameters of these problems emanates largely from a few federal agencies, and much of the work is conducted at government, university and private facilities. An example of the latter is the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, which has several components that are addressing a variety of comparative studies of the geochemical environment related to health; studies involve specific trace elements (like selenium and magnesium), diseases (like cancer, urolithiasis and cardiovascular disease), other health factors (like aging and nutrition) and links with timely major problems (like the health effects of greatly increasing the use of coal). ?? 1979.

  14. Status of reactor shielding research in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartine, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Shielding research in the United States continues to place emphasis on: (1) the development and refinement of shielding design calculational methods and nuclear data; and (2) the performance of confirmation experiments, both to evaluate specific design concepts and to verify specific calculational techniques and input data. The successful prediction of the radiation levels observed within the now-operating Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has demonstrated the validity of this two-pronged approach, which has since been applied to US fast breeder reactor programs and is now being used to determine radiation levels and possible further shielding needs at operating light water reactors, especially under accident conditions. A similar approach is being applied to the back end of the fission fuel cycle to verify that radiation doses at fuel element storage and transportation facilities and within fuel reprocessing plants are kept at acceptable levels without undue economic penalties

  15. Systematic Review of the Research on Motor Fitness of 1st-Year Students Attending Polish Institutions of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Podstawski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study. To establish: 1 the amount of research on general motor fitness of 1st-year students, conducted at selected Polish institutions of higher education between 1953-2010; 2 the number and kind of motor tests applied in this kind of research as well as the frequency of these tests during the period under study. Material and methods: The material for this research was composed of the publications on motor fitness of the first-year students taking part in specific motor trials applied at Polish tertiary institutions between 1953 - 2010. A diagnostic poll method was used in the research. Results: Fifty-four original research cases conducted in the period under study were observed. Within this period the trials such as: “100m run”, “jump from the run-up”, “grenade throw” and “ shot put” were more popular during the earlier years, while the trials such us: “zig-zag run”, “standing long jump”, and “medicine ball throw” were characteristic of more recent studies. Some of the most popular motor trials were: “standing long jump” – 38 cases, “medicine ball throw” – 30 cases, “zig-zag run” – 28 cases, “shuttle runs” – 9 cases, "short distance runs” – 12 cases, “downward bend from standing position” – 10 cases, and "vertical jump” – 8 cases. Conclusions: 1. Little research concerning the level of physical fitness of first-year students attending Polish tertiary institutions was conducted in the years 1953-2010; 2. The amount of motor fitness research carried out during this period fails to provide constant systematic assessment of the state of the students’ physical condition, which is a result of too large dispersions in time and territory where the measurements were taken; 3. In the motor fitness tests conducted with 1st-year students the determining variable was mainly gender, and only few research cases were found in which general motor fitness was analyzed according to

  16. Public and nonprofit funding for research on mental disorders in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevreul, Karine; McDaid, David; Farmer, Carrie M; Prigent, Amélie; Park, A-La; Leboyer, Marion; Kupfer, David J; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle

    2012-07-01

    To document the investments made in research on mental disorders by both government and nonprofit nongovernmental organizations in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States. An exhaustive survey was conducted of primary sources of public and nonprofit organization funding for mental health research for the year 2007 in France and the United Kingdom and for fiscal year 2007-2008 in the United States, augmented with an examination of relevant Web sites and publications. In France, all universities and research institutions were identified using the Public Finance Act. In the United Kingdom, we scrutinized Web sites and hand searched annual reports and grant lists for the public sector and nonprofit charitable medical research awarding bodies. In the United States, we included the following sources: the National Institutes of Health, other administrative entities within the Department of Health and Human Services (eg, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), the Department of Education, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and the National Science Foundation and, for nonprofit funding, The Foundation Center. We included research on all mental disorders and substance-related disorders using the same keywords. We excluded research on mental retardation and dementia and on the promotion of mental well-being. We used the same algorithm in each country to obtain data for only mental health funding in situations in which funding had a broader scope. France spent $27.6 million (2%) of its health research budget on mental disorders, the United Kingdom spent $172.6 million (7%), and the United States spent $5.2 billion (16%). Nongovernmental funding ranged from 1% of total funding for mental health research in France and the United States to 14% in the United Kingdom. Funding for research on mental disorders accounts for low proportions of research budgets compared with funding levels for research on other major health problems, whereas

  17. 1st PBWU status seminar on research in the field of 'air pollution and human health'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohmanns, B.; Kirchner, M.; Reuther, M.; Roesel, K.

    1993-08-01

    On February 25th and 26th, the first Status Seminar of the Bavarian Projekt Group for Research on the Effect of Environmental Pollutants (PBWU) concerning research in 'Air pollution and human health' was held at the GSF research centre, Neuherberg. Its aim was to present the current state of the research coordinated by PBWU and funded by the Bavarian ministry for land growth and the environment as a part of environment-related health research in Bavaria. The event centered around the discussion of possible influence of air pollutants on respiratory diseases and allergies. In order to round off the programme, the lectures on projects funded by the Bavarian ministry for land growth and the environment were complemented by lectures on non-Bavarian research initiatives. On all fourteen technical lectures the database contains individual entries. (orig.) [de

  18. Collaboratively Teaching and Doing History: Promoting Historical Research in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elaine; Pun, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative course introduced history students to a variety of digital tools and printed materials for historical research. The authors explore the development of this program by a historian and a librarian as a case study to address the value of teaching history outside of the classroom and allowing students to conduct research on-site. This…

  19. Optimizing the Nation's Investment in Academic Research: A New Regulatory Framework for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Research universities are critical contributors to our national research enterprise. They are the principal source of a world-class labor force and fundamental discoveries that enhance our lives and the lives of others around the world. These institutions help to create an educated citizenry capable of making informed and crucial choices as…

  20. Innovation and Research for Water Infrastructure for the 21st Century: Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through this $10 million cooperative agreement, The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) will increase its recognition as an active leader and supporter of research that seeks innovative solutions to problems posed by aging water i...

  1. Developing the 21st Century Academic Librarian: The Research Support Ambassador Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Claire; Kingsley, Danny

    2017-01-01

    The nature of academic librarianship is changing as librarians move away from the curation of material and into research support roles. Although this creates new opportunities it can be difficult for staff to learn the skills needed. The Office of Scholarly Communication at Cambridge University seeks to address this issue with the Research Support…

  2. Reform and Research: Re-connecting Prison and Society in the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Scharff Smith

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available IIn this contribution I briefly outline some of the historical and current trends in prison research and question how a prison researcher can work towards influencing policy and practice. I discuss the current role of ‘what works’ research and the way it is sometimes utilized in a time of penal populism and rising prison populations. I argue in favour of a broader approach which recognizes the wider societal effects of imprisonment and I provide a concrete example of how one can attempt to plan research and project work in order to facilitate progression from research and knowledge production to action and implementation. Finally I discuss some of the scientific and ethical implications which can arise when working with reform and implementation projects.

  3. Basic Research Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIlroy, A.; McRae, G.; Sick, V.; Siebers, D. L.; Westbrook, C. K.; Smith, P. J.; Taatjes, C.; Trouve, A.; Wagner, A. F.; Rohlfing, E.; Manley, D.; Tully, F.; Hilderbrandt, R.; Green, W.; Marceau, D.; O' Neal, J.; Lyday, M.; Cebulski, F.; Garcia, T. R.; Strong, D.

    2006-11-01

    To identify basic research needs and opportunities underlying utilization of evolving transportation fuels, with a focus on new or emerging science challenges that have the potential for significant long-term impact on fuel efficiency and emissions.

  4. The role of theory in advancing 21st-century biology: catalyzing transformative research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Defining and Advancing the Conceptual Basis of Biological Sciences in the 21st Century, National Research Council

    2008-01-01

    .... Biologists' theoretical and conceptual frameworks inform every step of their research, affecting what experiments they do, what techniques and technologies they develop and use, and how they interpret their data...

  5. Report of the 1st meeting of the "Vienna Initiative to Save European Academic Research (VISAER)".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druml, Christiane; Singer, Ernst A; Wolzt, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The European Directive 2001/20/EC ("Clinical Trials Directive") was aimed at simplifying and harmonising European clinical research. The directive's attempt represents an important step because many European Member States lack national laws that specifically address details of research, but the goal has been only partly achieved. For academic investigators doing national or multi-national research the new European law and the requirements following its implementation are likely to have the opposite effect. Some areas seem to be of particular concern: trial sponsorship, the ethical review process, the participation of patients who are temporarily not able to consent in clinical trials, in particular the informed consent process, an accepted European registry for all clinical trials, insurance and pharmacovigilance. Furthermore there are fundamental problems of the conduct of clinical trials that could have been foreseen at the time of implementation of the new law, which are impeding academic basic clinical research. The bureaucratic burden for academic investigators has tremendously increased without representing any contribution to patients' safety or to the scientific value of research. Furthermore some large European academic trials cannot be conducted anymore due to the new regulations. This result in a reduction in the number of trials and additionally in a reduction in the number of patients enrolled in a study. European research and thus European patients will suffer from the loss of potential benefits of research. The Vienna Initiative to Save European Academic Research (VISEAR) brings together leading stakeholders from academic research groups and interested parties from industry, international organisations and regulatory authorities to focus on the issues of concern regarding the organisational and funding of academic clinical research in order to improve the development and use of medicines in Europe. The first step of the initiative was a meeting held

  6. Tephritid taxonomy into the 21st century - Research opportunities and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drew, R.A.I.; Romig, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    We write with the firm conviction that taxonomic research forms the essential foundation for all other areas of investigation within the field of biology. This has been well demonstrated in the Tephritidae and is a position at which we have arrived through many years' experience in fruit fly systematic research covering taxonomy, behaviour, biology, ecology and pest control. The importance of sound taxonomic research is highlighted at this time by the known presence of many sibling species complexes across the family. Within the Dacinae, for example, major pest species often occur within groups of closely related species, most of which are not pests. The dorsalis complex of Southeast Asia and the musae complex of Papua New Guinea are examples. Tephritid taxonomy has a long history (over two centuries) and rich heritage with some 4,500 species having been described since the mid-1700s. This research has been carried out in major research centres around the world and particularly in Australia, Europe, Hawaii, mainland USA and South Africa. In Mexico in February 1998, a significant meeting was held on the biology/behaviour and taxonomy of Tephritidae. Specialist researchers in this area presented valuable and interesting data on 'Phylogeny and Evolution of Behaviour' in fruit flies. In summarising current knowledge on the taxonomy and biology of the Tephritidae, the meeting highlighted the outstanding achievements of taxonomy in its contributions to both basic research and pest management programmes over many decades of tephritid studies world-wide. This presentation provides a link between the meetings in Mexico and Penang and enables us to present a summary of our current knowledge and genuine valuable applications of tephritid taxonomy to the overall fruit fly research and pest management effort. In doing this, this presentation also fits into the theme of this conference in Penang, 'Fruit Flies- current global scenario'

  7. Nuclear research centres in the 21st century: An AECL perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbach, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear energy programme of Canada started at Chalk River Laboratories with the setting up of Zero Energy Experimental Site in 1945. One of the early research reactors of Canada, the National Research Universal (NRU) continues to provide 70% of the world requirement of isotopes for medical and industrial applications. A CANDU prototype (208 MW(e)) came on line in 1967 and based on this concept, Canada has a large nuclear power programme. The role of nuclear research centres has evolved with time starting with strategic research in the initial phases through to implementation of technology, building and supporting industry, and carrying out advanced technology development. Most of these centres have important assets in terms of licensed sites, trained personnel, research reactors, shielded facilities and expertise for handling large quantities of radioactivity and high tech laboratories for advanced R and D. These centres would, therefore, continue to play an important role in emission free and economic energy generation, nuclear medicine, food irradiation and industrial applications. Nuclear research centres in different countries are at various stages of development and have many unique features. However, there are generic issues and much will be gained by developing a shared vision for the future and implementing programmes in a collaborative manner. (author)

  8. Connecting Arctic Research Across Boundaries through the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, R. H.; Myers, B.; Wiggins, H. V.; Zolkos, J.

    2017-12-01

    The complexities inherent in Arctic research demand a unique focus on making connections across the boundaries of discipline, institution, sector, geography, knowledge system, and culture. Since 1988, ARCUS has been working to bridge these gaps through communication, coordination, and collaboration. Recently, we have worked with partners to create a synthesis of the Arctic system, to explore the connectivity across the Arctic research community and how to strengthen it, to enable the community to have an effective voice in research funding policy, to implement a system for Arctic research community knowledge management, to bridge between global Sea Ice Prediction Network researchers and the science needs of coastal Alaska communities through the Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook, to strengthen ties between Polar researchers and educators, and to provide essential intangible infrastructure that enables cost-effective and productive research across boundaries. Employing expertise in managing for collaboration and interdisciplinarity, ARCUS complements and enables the work of its members, who constitute the Arctic research community and its key stakeholders. As a member-driven organization, everything that ARCUS does is achieved through partnership, with strong volunteer leadership of each activity. Key organizational partners in the United States include the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, National Academy of Sciences Polar Research Board, and the North Slope Science Initiative. Internationally, ARCUS maintains strong bilateral connections with similarly focused groups in each Arctic country (and those interested in the Arctic), as well as with multinational organizations including the International Arctic Science Committee, the Association of Polar Early Career Educators, the University of the Arctic, and the Arctic Institute of North America. Currently, ARCUS is applying the best practices of the science of team science

  9. INNOVATION AND RESEARCH FOR WATER INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S. EPA'S RESEARCH PLAN FOR GRAVITY SEWERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) has long recognized the need for research and development in the area of drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. Most recently in support of the Agency’s Sustainable Water Infrastructu...

  10. Approaches, tools and methods used for setting priorities in health research in the 21(st) century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sachiyo

    2016-06-01

    Health research is difficult to prioritize, because the number of possible competing ideas for research is large, the outcome of research is inherently uncertain, and the impact of research is difficult to predict and measure. A systematic and transparent process to assist policy makers and research funding agencies in making investment decisions is a permanent need. To obtain a better understanding of the landscape of approaches, tools and methods used to prioritize health research, I conducted a methodical review using the PubMed database for the period 2001-2014. A total of 165 relevant studies were identified, in which health research prioritization was conducted. They most frequently used the CHNRI method (26%), followed by the Delphi method (24%), James Lind Alliance method (8%), the Combined Approach Matrix (CAM) method (2%) and the Essential National Health Research method (priorities were set. A further 19% used a combination of expert panel interview and focus group discussion ("consultation process") but provided few details, while a further 2% used approaches that were clearly described, but not established as a replicable method. Online surveys that were not accompanied by face-to-face meetings were used in 8% of studies, while 9% used a combination of literature review and questionnaire to scrutinise the research options for prioritization among the participating experts. The number of priority setting exercises in health research published in PubMed-indexed journals is increasing, especially since 2010. These exercises are being conducted at a variety of levels, ranging from the global level to the level of an individual hospital. With the development of new tools and methods which have a well-defined structure - such as the CHNRI method, James Lind Alliance Method and Combined Approach Matrix - it is likely that the Delphi method and non-replicable consultation processes will gradually be replaced by these emerging tools, which offer more

  11. Approaches, tools and methods used for setting priorities in health research in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sachiyo

    2016-01-01

    Background Health research is difficult to prioritize, because the number of possible competing ideas for research is large, the outcome of research is inherently uncertain, and the impact of research is difficult to predict and measure. A systematic and transparent process to assist policy makers and research funding agencies in making investment decisions is a permanent need. Methods To obtain a better understanding of the landscape of approaches, tools and methods used to prioritize health research, I conducted a methodical review using the PubMed database for the period 2001–2014. Results A total of 165 relevant studies were identified, in which health research prioritization was conducted. They most frequently used the CHNRI method (26%), followed by the Delphi method (24%), James Lind Alliance method (8%), the Combined Approach Matrix (CAM) method (2%) and the Essential National Health Research method (priorities were set. A further 19% used a combination of expert panel interview and focus group discussion (“consultation process”) but provided few details, while a further 2% used approaches that were clearly described, but not established as a replicable method. Online surveys that were not accompanied by face–to–face meetings were used in 8% of studies, while 9% used a combination of literature review and questionnaire to scrutinise the research options for prioritization among the participating experts. Conclusion The number of priority setting exercises in health research published in PubMed–indexed journals is increasing, especially since 2010. These exercises are being conducted at a variety of levels, ranging from the global level to the level of an individual hospital. With the development of new tools and methods which have a well–defined structure – such as the CHNRI method, James Lind Alliance Method and Combined Approach Matrix – it is likely that the Delphi method and non–replicable consultation processes will gradually be

  12. Research as a pedagogical strategy a step towards critical pedagogies for the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Luz Saavedra Salamanca

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper aims to promote the idea that the use of research in the fields of education and pedagogy is going to create a modification in these fields, as well as in the practical processes and actions that they have established. First of all, this paper provides a quick overview of the way in which education and pedagogy have been constituted in the Western, capitalist modern society, along with its paradigms, trends, concepts, methodological approaches, research areas and models. Next, this paper shows the way in which pedagogical thinking has been formed around research, that which gives rise to diverse methodological approaches which become the daily practice of educators. Finally, this paper closely examines one of these methodological lines, Research as a Pedagogical Strategy (Investigación como Estrategia Pedagógica - IEP, which emerged in the creation of the critical pedagogies developed in Latin American contexts, in dialogue with the emerging and dynamic approaches in different parts of the world.

  13. The Medical Research Council (UK)/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS--'25 years of research through partnerships'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleebu, P; Kamali, A; Seeley, J; Elliott, A M; Katongole-Mbidde, E

    2015-02-01

    For the past 25 years, the Medical Research Council/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS has conducted research on HIV-1, coinfections and, more recently, on non-communicable diseases. Working with various partners, the research findings of the Unit have contributed to the understanding and control of the HIV epidemic both in Uganda and globally, and informed the future development of biomedical HIV interventions, health policy and practice. In this report, as we celebrate our silver jubilee, we describe some of these achievements and the Unit's multidisciplinary approach to research. We also discuss the future direction of the Unit; an exemplar of a partnership that has been largely funded from the north but led in the south. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Technology of research of hydroturbine unit work using seismic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Liseikin, A. V.; Gromyko, P. V.; Soloviev, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    On August, 17, 2009 one of the most significant accident in hydropower engineering was happened at Sayano-Shushenskaya Hydroelectric Power Station. Specialists of Geophysical Survey SB RAS took part in the State Committee on investigation of the accident cause at Sayano-Shushenskaya HPS. It was determined, that the cause of the accident was a break of stud-bolts on the turbine cover. Why stud-bolts did not stand a load? There were assumptions that hydraulic shock provoked the accident. But, if it is so, seismic station "Cheremushky", situated in 4 km away from the HPS, should has a record of this event. First of all, investigating the record, got at the seismic station in the moment of the accident, it was determined that strength of seismic waves, recorded at the moment of the accident, did not exceed strength of waves got at trotyl explosion of 500 g at a distance to 4 km. The version of hydraulic shock was not proved. There were distinguished low-frequency oscillations and it was determined that the hydroturbine unit (HU) had been raised up more then 10 m in height for 10 sec. Analyzing the seismic station records during the period of more than a year before the accident and records of operating modes of different HU, there was determined that oscillations radiated by second (damaged) HU were approximately 1.5 times more intense than oscillations from all other HU. After the accident at Sayano-Shushenskaya HPS hydroturbine units were started in turns: at first there were started hydroturbine units of old construction (3, 4, 5, 6), then HP of new construction (1, 7, 8, 9). We installed 10 - 15 three-component seismic stations in different points around a HU and studied field of seismic oscillations from it's work. It was determined, that HU radiates a set of monochromatic oscillations divisible by speed of rotation equal to 2.381 Hz. Change of these signals amplitude is connected with change of HU operation modes. Research of changes in oscillations spectral

  15. Research and development of SCOPE21 (super coke oven for productivity and environment enhancement towards the 21st century)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, H.; Otsuka, J.; Nishioka, K.; Kamijo, T. [Japan Iron and Steel Federation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Coke ovens in Japan have 28 years of service on the average and the supply of coke is foreseen to suffer a shortage at the early years of the 21st century. Furthermore, the existing cokemaking process entails a lot of issues such as an effective use of coal resources, an adverse effect on environment. Thus, the Japan Iron and Steel Federation has launched a 9 year research programme called SCOPE 21 in collaboration with the Center for Coal Utilization, Japan in 1994. The programme pursues the following targets. The use ratio of poor coking coal increases from 20-50% with the improvement of coking property of coal by rapid heating and the increase of bulk density by mixing the briquetted coal. The coking time is reduced by rapid heating to 350 to 400{degree}C at the preheater, coking up to 750-850{degree}C at oven chamber, and reheating up to 1000{degree}C at the upgrading chamber, thus trebling productivity. The environment of coke oven is improved by emission free system and by improving the heating system of coke oven to reduce NOx in oven exhaust gas. After two years of preliminary feasible study the programme has advanced to basic research and to a bench scale test. It is in a stage of the construction of a pilot plant. This report describes the outline of the programme and the results obtained through the basic research and the bench scale plant tests. 2 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Medical researchers unite for study on cancer intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce Drs. Antoine Snijders and Jian-Hua Mao, whose article is published in this issue of AMOR and discuss their views on cancer genetics, targeted therapy, and personalized medicine.Having worked together in numerous joint investigations that have yielded significant results, Dr. Snijders and Dr. Mao would most definitely agree that two heads are better than one. “Researchers these days need to have the ability to collaborate across many different disciplines,” said the duo in an exclusive interview with AMOR. Dr. Snijders and Dr. Mao, both with PhDs in cancer genetics and genomics, are currently based at the Biological Systems and Engineering Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California, which is a member of the national laboratory system supported by the U.S Department of Energy through its Office of Science. The Berkeley Lab is well known for producing excellent scholars, as thirteen Nobel Prize winners are affiliated with the Lab and seventy of its scientists are members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, one of the highest honors for a scientist in the United States. Dr. Snijders, a Dutch who has conducted his research at Berkeley Lab for the past eight years, did his Masters in Science (Medical Biology at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands – an institute with a strong focus on scientific research and is home to five Spinoza Prize (a.k.a. the “Dutch Nobel” winners. Dr. Snijders’s PhD (cum laude in cancer and molecular biology was awarded by University Utrecht in Netherlands, but his research work was carried out at the University of California San Francisco. Subsequently, he continued his postdoctoral research in molecular cytogenetics at the same institution. A prolific author of 114 publications (with 3,851 citations according to ResearchGate, Dr. Snijders – who also volunteers with California’s Contra Costa County Search and Rescue team for missing persons – has interests in

  17. Coral reef health response to chronic and acute changes in water quality in St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Rosmin S; Brandt, Marilyn E; Wilson Grimes, Kristin R; Smith, Tyler B

    2016-10-15

    It is suspected that land cover alteration on the southern coast of St. Thomas, USVI has increased runoff, degrading nearshore water quality and coral reef health. Chronic and acute changes in water quality, sediment deposition, and coral health metrics were assessed in three zones based upon perceived degree of human influence. Chlorophyll (pturbidity (p=0.0113) were significantly higher in nearshore zones and in the high impact zone during heavy precipitation. Net sediment deposition and terrigenous content increased in nearshore zones during periods of greater precipitation and port activity. Macroalgae overgrowth significantly increased along a gradient of decreasing water quality (p<0.0001). Coral bleaching in all zones peaked in November with a regional thermal stress event (p<0.0001). However, mean bleaching prevalence was significantly greater in the most impacted zone compared to the offshore zone (p=0.0396), suggesting a link between declining water quality and bleaching severity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Pollination ecology in the 21st Century: Key questions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. Stout

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To inspire new ideas in research on pollination ecology, we list the most important unanswered questions in the field. This list was drawn up by contacting 170 scientists from different areas of pollination ecology and asking them to contribute their opinion on the greatest knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Almost 40% of them took part in our email poll and we received more than 650 questions and comments, which we classified into different categories representing various aspects of pollination research. The original questions were merged and synthesised, and a final vote and ranking led to the resultant list. The categories cover plant sexual reproduction, pollen and stigma biology, abiotic pollination, evolution of animal-mediated pollination, interactions of pollinators and floral antagonists, pollinator behaviour, taxonomy, plant-pollinator assemblages, geographical trends in diversity, drivers of pollinator loss, ecosystem services, management of pollination, and conservation issues such as the implementation of pollinator conservation. We focused on questions that were of a broad scope rather than case-specific; thus, addressing some questions may not be feasible within single research projects but constitute a general guide for future directions. With this compilation we hope to raise awareness of pollination-related topics not only among researchers but also among non-specialists including policy makers, funding agencies and the public at large.

  19. The 41st Chair: Defining Careers in the Current Biomedical Research Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F. W. B.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years academic capitalism and a distancing from Mertonian scientific norms have shifted the traditional reward of academic science from peer recognition to the award of grants. With the shrinking of the NIH budget in real terms since 2003, there are increasing numbers of researchers whose careers are at risk from lack of funding. This…

  20. Basic Research Needs for Geosciences: Facilitating 21st Century Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, D. J.; Orr, F. M.; Benson, S. M.; Celia, M.; Felmy, A.; Nagy, K. L.; Fogg, G. E.; Snieder, R.; Davis, J.; Pruess, K.; Friedmann, J.; Peters, M.; Woodward, N. B.; Dobson, P.; Talamini, K.; Saarni, M.

    2007-06-01

    To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

  1. Academic Listening in the 21st Century: Reviewing a Decade of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Tony

    2011-01-01

    This review article extends the conventional notion of academic listening to include reciprocal (two-way) listening events in academic settings, as well as (one-way) listening to lectures. The introductory section highlights the comparatively low profile of listening in EAP research, due in part to the inherent complexity of listening and its…

  2. New CALL-SLA Research Interfaces for the 21st Century: Towards Equitable Multilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    The majority of the world is multilingual, but inequitably multilingual, and much of the world is also technologized, but inequitably so. Thus, researchers in the fields of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and second language acquisition (SLA) would profit from considering multilingualism and social justice when envisioning new CALL-SLA…

  3. Broadening the focus of bat conservation and research in the USA for the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore Weller; Paul Cryan; O’Shea Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Appropriately, bat conservation in the USA during the 20th century focused on species that tend to aggregate in large numbers and locations (e.g. maternity roosts, hibernacula) where populations are most vulnerable. Extensive research into habitat needs (primarily for roosting) of reproductive females during the previous 2 decades has produced a wealth of information...

  4. Fisheries policy, research and the social sciences in Europe: Challenges for the 21st century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symes, D.; Hoefnagel, E.W.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite evidence of a broadening of the science base for European fisheries policy with the incorporation of an ecosystem approach and increasing use of economic modelling, the contribution of the social sciences to policy related research remains less conspicuous. Progress has occurred in the

  5. The Other Special Relationship: The United States and Australia at the Start of the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCausland, Jeffrey D; Stuart, Douglas T; Tow, William T; Wesley, Michael

    2007-01-01

    .... In that time, our relationship with the United States has gone through may changes which largely have been unremarked upon as major refinements of the original conceptualization behind the treaty...

  6. Nuclear research centres in the 21st century. Final report of a meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    During the last fifty years, a large number of countries have established nuclear research centres (NRCs) with the mission of developing indigenous expertise in nuclear science and technology, training scientists/engineers for research and development on nuclear power reactors and applications of radioisotopes and radiation, and facilitating commercial exploitation of nuclear technology. Many research centres have developed nuclear expertise on all aspects of nuclear science and technology through setting up and operating large nuclear facilities like research reactors, accelerators, fuel cycle facilities and the like. NRCs have been the cradle for a host of industries dealing with peaceful uses of nuclear energy. By virtue of their multidisciplinary nature, nuclear research centres have also been strategic elements of technology development in many countries and a number of industries have benefited by association with NRCs. For technologies which have already been deployed, there is a belief that less R and D from NRCs is required. Further, incidents like the Chernobyl accident have prompted many countries to re-evaluate the need for nuclear power. With increasing pressure on resources, the NRCs are facing a difficult situation in many countries, particularly in the developed countries. Government support and funding are dwindling and the infrastructure for nuclear R and D has aged as have the personnel. There is an apprehension that nuclear expertise itself may dwindle with time and the benefits of the nuclear science and technology may not be available in the future. The technology is less than 50 years old and there are many new avenues demanding R and D input. Co-operation among NRCs is one route to meet these challenges. Research and development in nuclear science and engineering has an international outlook. The IAEA has been active in promoting international co-operation ever since its formation more than 40 years ago. Towards the end of the last

  7. Troubling Futures: Can Participatory Design Research provide a Constitutive Anthropology for the 21st Century?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Light

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues there is value in considering participatory design as a form of anthropology at a time when we recognise that we need not only to understand cultures but to change them towards sustainable living. Holding up the democratically-oriented practices of some participatory design research to definitions of anthropology allows the essay to explore the role of intervention in social process. And, challenging definitional boundaries, it examines design as a participatory tool for cultural change, creating and interrogating futures (and the idea of futures. In analysing how designing moves towards change in the world, the paper brings together design research and anthropological concepts to help us better understand and operationalise our interventions and pursue them in a fair and sustainable manner.

  8. Meaningful metrics a 21st-century librarian's guide to bibliometrics, altmetrics, and research impact

    CERN Document Server

    Roemer, Robin Chin

    2015-01-01

    What does it mean to have meaningful metrics in today's complex higher education landscape? With a foreword by Heather Piwowar and Jason Priem, this highly engaging and activity-laden book serves to introduce readers to the fast-paced world of research metrics from the unique perspective of academic librarians and LIS practitioners. Starting with the essential histories of bibliometrics and altmetrics, and continuing with in-depth descriptions of the core tools and emerging issues at stake in the future of both fields, Meaningful Metrics is a convenient all-in-one resource that is designed to be used by a range of readers, from those with little to no background on the subject to those looking to become movers and shakers in the current scholarly metrics movement. Authors Borchardt and Roemer, offer tips, tricks, and real-world examples illustrate how librarians can support the successful adoption of research metrics, whether in their institutions or across academia as a whole.

  9. Nuclear research centres in the 21st century. Final report of a meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    During the last fifty years, a large number of countries have established nuclear research centres (NRCs) with the mission of developing indigenous expertise in nuclear science and technology, training scientists/engineers for research and development on nuclear power reactors and applications of radioisotopes and radiation, and facilitating commercial exploitation of nuclear technology. Many research centres have developed nuclear expertise on all aspects of nuclear science and technology through setting up and operating large nuclear facilities like research reactors, accelerators, fuel cycle facilities and the like. NRCs have been the cradle for a host of industries dealing with peaceful uses of nuclear energy. By virtue of their multidisciplinary nature, nuclear research centres have also been strategic elements of technology development in many countries and a number of industries have benefited by association with NRCs. For technologies which have already been deployed, there is a belief that less R and D from NRCs is required. Further, incidents like the Chernobyl accident have prompted many countries to re-evaluate the need for nuclear power. With increasing pressure on resources, the NRCs are facing a difficult situation in many countries, particularly in the developed countries. Government support and funding are dwindling and the infrastructure for nuclear R and D has aged as have the personnel. There is an apprehension that nuclear expertise itself may dwindle with time and the benefits of the nuclear science and technology may not be available in the future. The technology is less than 50 years old and there are many new avenues demanding R and D input. Co-operation among NRCs is one route to meet these challenges. Research and development in nuclear science and engineering has an international outlook. The IAEA has been active in promoting international co-operation ever since its formation more than 40 years ago. Towards the end of the last

  10. Pollination ecology in the 21st century: Key Questions for future research

    OpenAIRE

    STOUT, JANE CATHERINE

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED To inspire new ideas in research on pollination ecology, we list the most important unanswered questions in the field. This list was drawn up by contacting 170 scientists from different areas of pollination ecology and asking them to contribute their opinion on the greatest knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Almost 40% of them took part in our email poll and we received more than 650 questions and comments, which we classified into different categories repr...

  11. Pollination ecology in the 21st century:key questions for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Caroline; Adler, Lynn; Armbruster, W. Scott; Dafni, Amots; Eardley, Connal; Huang, Shuang-Quan; Kevan, Peter; Ollerton, Jeff; Packer, Laurence; Ssymank, Axel; Stout, Jane C.; Potts, Simon G.

    2011-01-01

    To inspire new ideas in research on pollination ecology, we list the most important unanswered questions in the field. This list was drawn up by contacting 170 scientists from different areas of pollination ecology and asking them to contribute their opinion on the greatest knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Almost 40% of them took part in our email poll and we received more than 650 questions and comments, which we classified into different categories representing various aspects of p...

  12. Pollination ecology in the 21st Century: key questions for future research\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Carolin; Adler, Lynn; Armbruster, W Scott; Dafni, Amots; Eardley, Connal; Huang, Shuang-Quan; Kevan, Peter G; Ollerton, Jeff; Packer, Laurence; Ssymank, Axel; Stout, Jane C; Potts, Simon G

    2011-01-01

    To inspire new ideas in research on pollination ecology, we list the most important unanswered questions in the field. This list was drawn up by contacting 170 scientists from different areas of pollination ecology and asking them to contribute their opinion on the greatest knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Almost 40% of them took part in our email poll and we received more than 650 questions and comments, which we classified into different categories representing various aspects of p...

  13. Changing the Translational Research Landscape: A Review of the Impacts of Biomedical Research Units in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Sonja; Soper, Bryony; Ismail, Sharif; Reding, Anais; Ling, Tom

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a review of the Biomedical Research Units (BRU) scheme, undertaken for the Department of Health. This review was a perceptions audit of senior executives involved in the scheme, and explored what impact they felt the scheme is having on the translational research landscape. More specifically, we investigated whether and how institutional relationships between NHS and academic partners, industry and other health research system players are changing because of the scheme; how the scheme is helping build critical mass in specific priority disease areas; and the effects of any changes on efforts to deliver the broader goals set out in Best Research for Best Health. The views presented are those of study informants only. The information obtained through our interviews suggests that the BRU scheme is significantly helping shape the health research system to pursue translational research and innovation, with the clear goal of realising patient benefit. The BRUs are already contributing to observable changes in institutional relationships between the NHS and academic partners: trusts and medical schools are collaborating more closely than in the past, have signed up to the same vision of translational research from bench to bedside, and are managing and governing targeted research resources more professionally and transparently than in the past. There is also a stronger emphasis on engaging industry and more strategic thinking about strengthening regional and national collaboration with other hospital trusts, PCTs, research organisations, networks and development agencies. The scheme is also transforming capacity building in the health research system. This includes (i) developing and modernising facilities and equipment for translation; (ii) building a critical mass of human resources through recruitment and training, as well as improving retention of existing expertise; and (iii) helping ensure a steady flow of funds needed to sustain research

  14. The countries and languages that dominate biological research at the beginning of the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Nájera, Julian; Nielsen, Vanessa

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, studies of scientific productivity are biased in two ways: they are based on Current Contents, an index centered in British and American journals, and they seldom correct for population size, ignoring the relative effort that each society places in research. We studied national productivity for biology using a more representative index, the Biological Abstracts, and analyzed both total and relative productivity. English dominates biological publications with 87% (no other individual language reaches 2%). If the USA is considered a region by itself, it occupies the first place in per capita production of biology papers, with at least twice the productivity of either Asia or Europe. Canada, Oceania and Latin America occupy an intermediate position. The global output of scientific papers is dominated by Europe, USA. Japan, Canada, China and India. When corrected for population size, the countries with the greatest productivity of biology papers are the Nordic nations, Israel, Switzerland, Netherlands, Australia, Saint Lucia and Montserrat. The predominance of English as the language of biological research found in this study shows a continuation of the trend initiated around the year 1900. The large relative productivity of the USA reflects the importance that American society gives to science as the basis for technological and economic development, but the USA's share of total scientific output has decreased from 44% in 1983 to 34% in 2002, while there is a greater growth of science in India, Japan and Latin America, among others. The increasing share obtained by China and India may reflect a recent change in attitude towards funding science. The leadership of Nordic nations, Israel, Switzerland, Netherlands and Australia can be explained by cultural attitude. Apparently, a positive trend is emerging in Latin America, where Chile improved its ranking in per capita productivity but Argentina, Costa Rica, Uruguay, Brazil and Cuba fell. Nevertheless, the

  15. Minutes of 'Technical Committee for Geological Isolation Research and Development (1st time)'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yasuo; Torata, Shinichiro

    2007-03-01

    In order to plan and conduct a program of research and development (R and D) for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in JAEA-Tokai, JAEA decided to receive technical comments and advices from the Technical Committee for geological isolation R and D. This committee, which is constituted of specialists who do not belong to JAEA, has evaluated the program, taking into account of the status of geological disposal technology in Japan as well as foreign countries. This report compiles the minutes of the first meeting held in July 2006. (author)

  16. Transgender Research in the 21st Century: A Selective Critical Review From a Neurocognitive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sven C; De Cuypere, Griet; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2017-12-01

    Gender dysphoria describes the psychological distress caused by identifying with the sex opposite to the one assigned at birth. In recent years, much progress has been made in characterizing the needs of transgender persons wishing to transition to their preferred gender, thus helping to optimize care. This critical review of the literature examines their common mental health issues, several individual risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity, and current research on the underlying neurobiology. Prevalence rates of persons identifying as transgender and seeking help with transition have been rising steeply since 2000 across Western countries; the current U.S. estimate is 0.6%. Anxiety and depression are frequently observed both before and after transition, although there is some decrease afterward. Recent research has identified autistic traits in some transgender persons. Forty percent of transgender persons endorse suicidality, and the rate of self-injurious behavior and suicide are markedly higher than in the general population. Individual factors contributing to mental health in transgender persons include community attitudes, societal acceptance, and posttransition physical attractiveness. Neurobiologically, whereas structural MRI data are thus far inconsistent, functional MRI evidence in trans persons suggests changes in some brain areas concerned with olfaction and voice perception consistent with sexual identification, but here too, a definitive picture has yet to emerge. Mental health clinicians, together with other health specialists, have an increasing role in the assessment and treatment of gender dysphoria in transgender individuals.

  17. Nuclear research centres in the 21st century: The French perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graviere, M. de la

    2001-01-01

    In France the reactor technology is mature and R and D needs for reactors are small. However, there are substantial R and D needs in the electro-nuclear field. These include optimization of operation of nuclear power plants and the associated factories and to have a long term vision for the nuclear technologies. The State continues to be a major provider of resources for the long term strategic objectives. However, lack of resources has resulted in shutting down of some large facilities and it is becoming difficult to refurbish some large experimental tools. The possibility of earning resources through solving complex problems beyond the nuclear field is, therefore, under exploration. Nuclear research centres are also looking into new advanced technologies (energy, micro electronics, materials, bio-technology) and for development of partnership with other public research organisations. The issue of preservation of expertise is being addressed by development of networks between the European centres working in the same field. Cost and risk sharing of nuclear R and D is being pursued by collaboration with countries outside Europe, namely the USA, Japan and China. Public perception of nuclear energy is being enhanced by opening CEA centres to the public. (author)

  18. From bench to clinic and back: Perspective on the 1st IQPC Translational Research conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hörig Heidi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Translational Research (TR provides a set of tools and communication context for scientists and clinicians to optimize the drug discovery and development process. In the proceedings of a Princeton conference on this timely topic, the strengths and needs of this developing field were debated. Outcomes and key points from these discussions are summarized in this article which covers the topics of defining what we mean by translational research (both theoretically and in operational terms, ways in which to engender the TR mindset and embed it in organizations such as the pharmaceutical industry in order to optimize the impact of available technologies (including imaging methods, the scientific basis and under-pinnings of TR including genomics knowledge, information sharing, as well as examples of application to drug discovery and development. Importantly, it should be noted that collaborations and communications between the stakeholders in this field, namely academia, industry and regulatory authorities, must be strengthened in order for the promise of TR to be delivered as better therapies to patients.

  19. Chronic Pancreatitis in the 21st Century - Research Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uc, Aliye; Andersen, Dana K.; Bellin, Melena D.; Bruce, Jason I.; Drewes, Asbjørn M.; Engelhardt, John F.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Lerch, Markus M.; Lowe, Mark E.; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A.; O’Keefe, Stephen J.; Palermo, Tonya M.; Pasricha, Pankaj; Saluja, Ashok K.; Singh, Vikesh K.; Szigethy, Eva M.; Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Conwell, Darwin L.

    2016-01-01

    A workshop was sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to focus on research gaps and opportunities in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and its sequelae. This conference marked the 20th year anniversary of the discovery of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene mutation for hereditary pancreatitis. The event was held on July 27, 2016, and structured into 4 sessions: (1) pathophysiology; (2) exocrine complications; (3) endocrine complications; and (4) pain. The current state of knowledge was reviewed; many knowledge gaps and research needs were identified that require further investigation. Common themes included the need to design better tools to diagnose CP and its sequelae early and reliably, identify predisposing risk factors for disease progression, develop standardized protocols to distinguish type 3c diabetes mellitus from other types of diabetes and design effective therapeutic strategies through novel cell culture technologies, animal models mimicking human disease, and pain management tools. Gene therapy and cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiators as possible treatments for CP were discussed. Importantly, the need for chronic pancreatitis endpoints and intermediate targets for future drug trials was emphasized. PMID:27748719

  20. Research on Anoplophora glabripennis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack

    2003-01-01

    In the mid-1990s it was estimated that more than 400 exotic (non-native) forest insects had already become established in the United States (HAACK and BYLER, 1993; MATTSON et al., 1994; NIEMELA and MATTSON, 1996). This number has continued to grow with new exotics discovered annually in the United States (HAACK, 2002; HAACK and POLAND, 2001; HAACK et al., 2002). One...

  1. Bond Market Analysis: the Main Constraints in the Research of 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Astrauskaitė

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Searching for alternative source of bank financing, the view on capital market is taken. Recent research on capital market issues are arranged into four dimensions: theory and assumptions of efficient capital market, government’s role in it, other distortions and global interrelatedness. Main investigations are decentralized and visualized in “theoretical eight” model. Conclusions made on the diversity of interpretation of market efficiency, strongly expressed demand of information symmetry, soft actions of governments and the value of foreign performance in domestic markets. Furthermore, new approach to the classification of countries by their maturity in capital market is argued. The state of art of 2009-2012 of bond market and government debt is briefly described.

  2. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1986, the NASA-Langley Research Center has sponsored the NASA-UVa Light Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program at the University of Virginia (UVa). The fundamental objective of the LA2ST program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures. The LA2ST program has aimed to product relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The scope of the LA2ST Program is broad. Research areas include: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, (3) Mechanics of materials for Aerospace Structures, and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures. A substantial series of semi-annual progress reports issued since 1987 documents the technical objectives, experimental or analytical procedures, and detailed results of graduate student research in these topical areas.

  3. The Other Special Relationship: The United States and Australia at the Start of the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Post columnist Charles Krauthammer highlighted this reality in noting that “Australia is the only country that has fought with the United States in...scenarios in which terrorist networks, WMD proliferation, state weakness, and criminal syndicates might feed off each other in malign ways. The real

  4. The countries and languages that dominate biological research at the beginning of the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Monge-Nájera

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally,studies of scientific productivity are biased in two ways: they are based on Current Contents, an index centered in British and American journals, and they seldom correct for population size, ignoring the relative effort that each society places in research. We studied national productivity for biology using a more representative index, the Biological Abstracts, and analyzed both total and relative productivity. English dominates biological publications with 87% (no other individual language reaches 2%. If the USA is considered a region by itself, it occupies the first place in per capita production of biology papers, with at least twice the productivity of either Asia or Europe. Canada, Oceania and Latin America occupy an intermediate position. The global output of scientific papers is dominated by Europe, USA, Japan, Canada, China and India. When corrected for population size, the countries with the greatest productivity of biology papers are the Nordic nations, Israel, Switzerland, Netherlands, Australia, Saint Lucia and Montserrat. The predominance of English as the language of biological research found in this study shows a continuation of the trend initiated around the year 1900. The large relative productivity of the USA reflects the importance that American society gives to science as the basis for technological and economic development, but the USA’s share of total scientific output has decreased from 44% in 1983 to 34% in 2002, while there is a greater growth of science in India, Japan and Latin America, among others. The increasing share obtained by China and India may reflect a recent change in attitude towards funding science. The leadership of Nordic nations, Israel, Switzerland, Netherlands and Australia can be explained by cultural attitude. Apparently, a positive trend is emerging in Latin America, where Chile improved its ranking in per capita productivity but Argentina, Costa Rica, Uruguay, Brazil and Cuba fell

  5. China's S&T Emergence: A Proposal for U.S. DOD-China Collaboration in Fundamental Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berry, William; Loeb, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    ...). China has committed to an ambitious strategy to increase its investments in S&T and in a workforce capable of making it a world class center for technological innovation that will drive its future economic and national security...

  6. Business investment in research and development (R-D: business strategy for the 21st century in Puerto Rico?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Lobato Vico

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Two thirds (67% of total investment in Research and Development (R-D activities in Puerto Rico is made by the business sector. This paper analyzes the data from the Pilot Survey on Research and Development and finds that a group of startups or new enterprises focused on R-D activities has been developed, but the total amount of R-D investment is not enough to consider this as a generalized strategy or one of deep impact on the economy. Corporate investment in R-D in Puerto Rico is strongly associated with subsidiaries of multinational corporations from the United States, as well as with specific industrial subsectors, in particular with the chemical industry (pharmaceutical and the subsector of research and development services.

  7. 21st Century Changes in Precipitation Extremes Over the United States: Can Climate Analogues Help or Hinder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.; Schlosser, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Global warming is expected to alter the frequency and/or magnitude of extreme precipitation events. Such changes could have substantial ecological, economic, and sociological consequences. However, climate models in general do not correctly reproduce the frequency and intensity distribution of precipitation, especially at the regional scale. In this study, gridded data from a dense network of surface precipitation gauges and a global atmospheric analysis at a coarser scale are combined to develop a diagnostic framework for the large-scale meteorological conditions (i.e. flow features, moisture supply) that dominate during extreme precipitation. Such diagnostic framework is first evaluated with the late 20th century simulations from an ensemble of climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), and is found to produce more consistent (and less uncertain) total and interannaul number of extreme days with the observations than the model-based precipitation over the south-central United States and the Western United States examined in this study. The framework is then applied to the CMIP5 multi-model projections for two radiative forcing scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 and 8.5) to assess the potential future changes in the probability of precipitation extremes over the same study regions. We further analyze the accompanying circulation features and their changes that may be responsible for shifts in extreme precipitation in response to changed climate. The results from this study may guide hazardous weather watches and help society develop adaptive strategies for preventing catastrophic losses.

  8. Reactor aging research. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilaros, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    The reactor ageing research activities in USA described, are focused on the research of reactor vessel integrity, including regulatory issues and technical aspects. Current emphasis are described for fracture analysis, embrittlement research, inspection capabilities, validation od annealing rule, revision of regulatory guide

  9. Research Note Topographical units and soil types prove more ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The floristic data (species presence at each site) were grouped into Land Types, topographical units and broad soil types. Each group was analysed independently using multivariate detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and the mean similarity test. The floristic data in each Land Type showed a 42% range of ...

  10. Statement to the 41st session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 29 September 1997; Statement to the 52nd session of the United Nations General Assembly 12 November 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1997-12-01

    The document presents Statement to the 41st Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Statement to the 52nd Session of the United Nations General Assembly made at the 40th anniversary of the IAEA

  11. Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, Yemen Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in 17 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, and…

  12. Computational fluid dynamics research at the United Technologies Research Center requiring supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of research activities at the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is presented. The requirement and use of various levels of computers, including supercomputers, for the CFD activities is described. Examples of CFD directed toward applications to helicopters, turbomachinery, heat exchangers, and the National Aerospace Plane are included. Helicopter rotor codes for the prediction of rotor and fuselage flow fields and airloads were developed with emphasis on rotor wake modeling. Airflow and airload predictions and comparisons with experimental data are presented. Examples are presented of recent parabolized Navier-Stokes and full Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic shock-wave/boundary layer interaction, and hydrogen/air supersonic combustion. In addition, other examples of CFD efforts in turbomachinery Navier-Stokes methodology and separated flow modeling are presented. A brief discussion of the 3-tier scientific computing environment is also presented, in which the researcher has access to workstations, mid-size computers, and supercomputers.

  13. Tribal wilderness research needs and issues in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan McDonald; Tom McDonald; Leo H. McAvoy

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents a dialogue between tribal wilderness managers and researchers on the primary research needs of tribal wilderness in the United States and Canada. The authors identify a number of research priorities for tribal wildlands. The paper also discusses some major issues and challenges faced by researchers conducting research in areas that are culturally...

  14. Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela K. Miller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives . This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI, Alaska, during the years 2000–2012. Methods . As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b–d 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site at Northeast Cape – using sediment cores and plants, semi-permeable membrane devices and blackfish, respectively; and (e a study of traditional foods. Results . Blood serum in residents of SLI showed elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs with higher levels among those exposed to the military site at Northeast Cape, an important traditional subsistence-use area. Environmental studies at the military site demonstrated that the site is a continuing source of PCBs to a major watershed, and that clean-up operations at the military site generated PCB-contaminated dust on plants in the region. Important traditional foods eaten by the people of SLI showed elevated concentrations of PCBs, which are primarily derived from the long-range transport of persistent pollutants that are transported by atmospheric and marine currents from more southerly latitudes to the north. Interventions . An important task for all CBPR projects is to conduct intervention strategies as needed in response to research results. Because of the findings of the CBPR projects on SLI, the CBPR team and the people of the Island are actively engaging in interventions to ensure cleanup of the formerly used military sites; reform chemicals policy on a national level; and eliminate persistent pollutants internationally. The goal is to make the Island and other northern/Arctic communities safe for themselves and future generations. Conclusions . As part of the CBPR projects conducted from 2000 to 2012

  15. Key considerations for the success of Medical Education Research and Innovation units in Canada: unit director perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; Bidlake, Erin; Humphrey-Murto, Sue; Sutherland, Stephanie; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2014-08-01

    Growth in the field of medical education is evidenced by the proliferation of units dedicated to advancing Medical Education Research and Innovation (MERI). While a review of the literature discovered narrative accounts of MERI unit development, we found no systematic examinations of the dimensions of and structures that facilitate the success of these units. We conducted qualitative interviews with the directors of 12 MERI units across Canada. Data were analyzed using qualitative description (Sandelowski in Res Nurs Health 23:334-340, 2000). Final analysis drew on Bourdieu's (Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1977; Media, culture and society: a critical reader. Sage, London, 1986; Language and symbolic power. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1991) concepts of field, habitus, and capital, and more recent research investigating the field of MERI (Albert in Acad Med 79:948-954, 2004; Albert et al. in Adv Health Sci Educ 12:103-115, 2007). When asked about the metrics by which they define their success, directors cited: teaching, faculty mentoring, building collaborations, delivering conference presentations, winning grant funding, and disseminating publications. Analyzed using Bourdieu's concepts, these metrics are discussed as forms of capital that have been legitimized in the MERI field. All directors, with the exception of one, described success as being comprised of elements (capital) at both ends of the service-research spectrum (i.e., Albert's PP-PU structure). Our analysis highlights the forms of habitus (i.e., behaviors, attitudes, demeanors) directors use to negotiate, strategize and position the unit within their local context. These findings may assist institutions in developing a new-or reorganizing an existing-MERI unit. We posit that a better understanding of these complex social structures can help units become savvy participants in the MERI field. With such insight, units can improve their academic output and

  16. The research of high voltage switchgear detecting unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tong; Xie, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jinbo

    2017-07-01

    In order to understand the status of the high voltage switch in the whole life circle, you must monitor the mechanical and electrical parameters that affect device health. So this paper gives a new high voltage switchgear detecting unit based on ARM technology. It can measure closing-opening mechanical wave, storage motor current wave and contactor temperature to judge the device’s health status. When something goes wrong, it can be on alert and give some advice. The practice showed that it can meet the requirements of circuit breaker mechanical properties temperature online detection.

  17. The United States Advanced Reactor Technologies Research and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The following aspects are addressed: • Nuclear energy mission; • Reactor research development and deployment (RD&D) programs: - Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program; - Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support; - Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART)

  18. Market research of window units and doors industry in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Grishankova, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze macro-environmental and competitive forces in the Russian market and to determine possible entry modes for a new company. Some practical information on legal issues and regulatory organizations is also included in the paper in order to create a comprehensive overview of any potentially influential factors. The conceptual framework is based on the macro-environmental market research approach, Michael Porter’s five forces framework and internationa...

  19. United States Crystalline Repository Project - key research areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patera, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Crystalline Repository Project is responsible for siting the second high-level nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock for the US Department of Energy. A methodology is being developed to define data and information needs and a way to evaluate that information. The areas of research the Crystalline Repository Project is involved in include fluid flow in a fractured network, coupled thermal, chemical and flow processes and cooperation in other nations and OECD research programs

  20. Uniting Resilience Research and Practice With an Inequalities Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie Hart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of resilience has evolved, from an individual-level characteristic to a wider ecological notion that takes into account broader person–environment interactions, generating an increased interest in health and well-being research, practice and policy. At the same time, the research and policy-based attempts to build resilience are increasingly under attack for responsibilizing individuals and maintaining, rather than challenging, the inequitable structure of society. When adversities faced by children and young people result from embedded inequality and social disadvantage, resilience-based knowledge has the potential to influence the wider adversity context. Therefore, it is vital that conceptualizations of resilience encompass this potential for marginalized people to challenge and transform aspects of their adversity, without holding them responsible for the barriers they face. This article outlines and provides examples from an approach that we are taking in our research and practice, which we have called Boingboing resilience. We argue that it is possible to bring resilience research and practice together with a social justice approach, giving equal and simultaneous attention to individuals and to the wider system. To achieve this goal, we suggest future research should have a co-produced and inclusive research design that overcomes the dilemma of agency and responsibility, contains a socially transformative element, and has the potential to empower children, young people, and families.

  1. Geographic Information System (GIS) characterization of historical seagrass coverage in St. Andrew Bay, Florida, 1953 (NODC Accession 0000608)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Graphical representation of historical seagrass coverage in St. Andrew Bay from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC) in...

  2. Activities of the summer party of the 31st Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition in 1989–1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Sano

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The 31st Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE consisted of 55 members, of which the 30 members of the wintering party at Syowa Station were led by Y. NAITO, 8 members of the wintering party at Asuka Station by K. SHIRAISHI and 17 members of the summer party by M. SANO. In addition, two Chinese scientists and two Belgian scientists participated. The icebreaker SHIRASE, leaving Tokyo on 14 November 1989,after calling at Fremantle, Western Australia, arrived at Breid Bay on 17 December. The helicopter and surface transportation of 173t of cago including two AS-350 helicopters, 8 wintering members and 14 members of the summer SΦr Rondane Mountains expedition from the ship to Asuka Station were completed by 30 December. The ship reached Syowa Station on 14 January 1990,it needed 15 days to approach Syowa Station because the pack ice and first ice in Lutzow-Holm Bay were very thick and heavy compared with a normal year. Unloading of 624t of the cargo, and the summer operations including field research work, relief of the observation team, and construction and renewal of some facilities were completedby 31 January 1990. The SHIRASE left Syowa Station 1 February and arrived again at Breid Bay on 7 February, and picked up the field party and two AS-350 helicopters. On the way from Breid Bay to Sydney, Australia, the ship stopped over at Amundsen Bay for field work between 12-19 February 1990. The SHIRASE arrived at Sydney on 20 March 1990. Members of the summer party of JARE-31 and the wintering party of JARE-30 returned to Narita by air on 28 March 1990. The SHIRASE arrived at Tokyo on 13 April 1990. The following scientific activities were carried out during the summer operations of JARE-31 : a geological, biological and geodetic observations by helicopter in the SΦr Rondane Mountains region; b biological and oceanographic observations in the Syowa Station area; c an oversnow traverse for unmanned meteorology and upper atmosphere physics observations

  3. Creating Research-Rich Learning Experiences and Quantitative Skills in a 1st Year Earth Systems Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P. L.; Eggins, S.; Jones, S.

    2014-12-01

    We are creating a 1st year Earth Systems course at the Australian National University that is built around research-rich learning experiences and quantitative skills. The course has top students including ≤20% indigenous/foreign students; nonetheless, students' backgrounds in math and science vary considerably posing challenges for learning. We are addressing this issue and aiming to improve knowledge retention and deep learning by changing our teaching approach. In 2013-2014, we modified the weekly course structure to a 1hr lecture; a 2hr workshop with hands-on activities; a 2hr lab; an assessment piece covering all face-to-face activities; and a 1hr tutorial. Our new approach was aimed at: 1) building student confidence with data analysis and quantitative skills through increasingly difficult tasks in science, math, physics, chemistry, climate science and biology; 2) creating effective learning groups using name tags and a classroom with 8-person tiered tables; 3) requiring students to apply new knowledge to new situations in group activities, two 1-day field trips and assessment items; 4) using pre-lab and pre-workshop exercises to promote prior engagement with key concepts; 5) adding open-ended experiments to foster structured 'scientific play' or enquiry and creativity; and 6) aligning the assessment with the learning outcomes and ensuring that it contains authentic and challenging southern hemisphere problems. Students were asked to design their own ocean current experiment in the lab and we were astounded by their ingenuity: they simulated the ocean currents off Antarctica; varied water density to verify an equation; and examined the effect of wind and seafloor topography on currents. To evaluate changes in student learning, we conducted surveys in 2013 and 2014. In 2014, we found higher levels of student engagement with the course: >~80% attendance rates and >~70% satisfaction (20% neutral). The 2014 cohort felt that they were more competent in writing

  4. United Kingdom health research analyses and the benefits of shared data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James G; Sherbon, Beverley J; Viney, Ian S

    2016-06-24

    To allow research organisations to co-ordinate activity to the benefit of national and international funding strategies requires assessment of the funding landscape; this, in turn, relies on a consistent approach for comparing expenditure on research. Here, we discuss the impact and benefits of the United Kingdom's Health Research Classification System (HRCS) in national landscaping analysis of health research and the pros and cons of performing large-scale funding analyses. The first United Kingdom health research analysis (2004/2005) brought together the 11 largest public and charity funders of health research to develop the HRCS and use this categorisation to examine United Kingdom health research. The analysis was revisited in 2009/2010 and again in 2014. The most recent quinquennial analysis in 2014 compiled data from 64 United Kingdom research organisations, accounting for 91% of all public/charitable health research funding in the United Kingdom. The three analyses summarise the United Kingdom's health research expenditure in 2004/2005, 2009/2010 and 2014, and can be used to identify changes in research activity and disease focus over this 10 year period. The 2004/2005 analysis provided a baseline for future reporting and evidence for a United Kingdom Government review that recommended the co-ordination of United Kingdom health research should be strengthened to accelerate the translation of basic research into clinical and economic benefits. Through the second and third analyses, we observed strategic prioritisation of certain health research activities and disease areas, with a strong trend toward increased funding for more translational research, and increases in specific areas such as research on prevention. The use of HRCS in the United Kingdom to analyse the research landscape has provided benefit both to individual participatory funders and in coordinating initiatives at a national level. A modest amount of data for each project is sufficient for a

  5. 1st IAEA research coordination meeting on tritium retention in fusion reactor plasma facing components. October 5-6, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the 1st IAEA research Coordination Meeting on ''Tritium Retention in Fusion Reactor Plasma Facing Components'' held on October 5 and 6, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the retention, release and removal of tritium from plasma facing components, a summary of data evaluation, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). 4 tabs

  6. Mapping Investments and Published Outputs in Norovirus Research: A Systematic Analysis of Research Funded in the United States and United Kingdom During 1997-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Lichtman, Amos B; Soyode, Damilola T; Harris, Jennifer N; Atun, Rifat

    2016-02-01

    Norovirus accounts for a considerable portion of the global disease burden. Mapping national or international investments relating to norovirus research is limited. We analyzed the focus and type of norovirus research funding awarded to institutions in the United States and United Kingdom during 1997-2013. Data were obtained from key public and philanthropic funders across both countries, and norovirus-related research was identified from study titles and abstracts. Included studies were further categorized by the type of scientific investigation, and awards related to vaccine, diagnostic, and therapeutic research were identified. Norovirus publication trends are also described using data from Scopus. In total, US and United Kingdom funding investment for norovirus research was £97.6 million across 349 awards; 326 awards (amount, £84.9 million) were received by US institutions, and 23 awards (£12.6 million) were received by United Kingdom institutions. Combined, £81.2 million of the funding (83.2%) was for preclinical research, and £16.4 million (16.8%) was for translational science. Investments increased from £1.7 million in 1997 to £11.8 million in 2013. Publication trends showed a consistent temporal increase from 48 in 1997 to 182 in 2013. Despite increases over time, trends in US and United Kingdom funding for norovirus research clearly demonstrate insufficient translational research and limited investment in diagnostics, therapeutics, or vaccine research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Academia in the 21st century. An analysis of trends and perspectives in higher education and research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Harry F.; Huisman, Jeroen; Klemperer, A.M.; van der Meulen, Barend; Neave, Guy; Theisens, H.C.; van der Wende, Marijk

    2002-01-01

    What are world wide the main trends that will or should have an impact on the future of academia? What is expected from academia by different stakeholders in the years to come? These and related questions are addressed in CHEPS¿s report ¿Academia in the 21st century. An analysis of trends and

  8. Uncited Research Articles in Popular United States General Radiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Chung, Ryan; Duszak, Richard

    2018-05-03

    This study aimed to characterize articles in popular general radiology journals that go uncited for a decade after publication. Using the Web of Science database, we identified annual citation counts for 13,459 articles published in Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology, and Academic Radiology between 1997 and 2006. From this article cohort, we then identified all original research articles that accrued zero citations within a decade of publication. A concurrent equal-sized cohort of most cited articles was created. Numerous characteristics of the uncited and most cited articles were identified and compared. Only 47 uncited articles went uncited for a decade after publication. When compared to the 47 most cited articles over that same window, the uncited articles were significantly (P articles, uncited articles also had significantly (P articles published in popular general radiology journals, only a very small number of original research investigations remained uncited a decade after publication. Given that citations reflect the impact of radiology research, this observation suggests that journals are appropriately selecting meaningful work. Investigators seeking to avoid futile publication might consider their research initiatives in light of these characteristics. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxic Hazards Research Unit Annual Technical Report: 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    varnish makers’ and painters’ naphtha, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol., 32:263-281. Carpenter, C. P.. E. R. Kinkead, D. L. Geary, L. J. Sullivan, Jr., and J...and Pharmacology of Inorganic and Fluorine Contairnin Compounds, AMRL-TR-67-224, Aerospace Medical Research Laboiatory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

  10. Emergence of hospital- and community-associated panton-valentine leukocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genotype ST772-MRSA-V in Ireland and detailed investigation of an ST772-MRSA-V cluster in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Gráinne I

    2012-03-01

    Sequence type 22 (ST22) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) harboring staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) IV (ST22-MRSA-IV) has predominated in Irish hospitals since the late 1990s. Six distinct clones of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) have also been identified in Ireland. A new strain of CA-MRSA, ST772-MRSA-V, has recently emerged and become widespread in India and has spread into hospitals. In the present study, highly similar MRSA isolates were recovered from seven colonized neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a maternity hospital in Ireland during 2010 and 2011, two colonized NICU staff, one of their colonized children, and a NICU environmental site. The isolates exhibited multiantibiotic resistance, spa type t657, and were assigned to ST772-MRSA-V by DNA microarray profiling. All isolates encoded resistance to macrolides [msr(A) and mpb(BM)] and aminoglycosides (aacA-aphD and aphA3) and harbored the Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin genes (lukF-PV and lukS-PV), enterotoxin genes (sea, sec, sel, and egc), and one of the immune evasion complex genes (scn). One of the NICU staff colonized by ST772-MRSA-V was identified as the probable index case, based on recent travel to India. Seven additional hospital and CA-ST772-MRSA-V isolates recovered from skin and soft tissue infections in Ireland between 2009 and 2011 exhibiting highly similar phenotypic and genotypic characteristics to the NICU isolates were also identified. The clinical details of four of these patients revealed connections with India through ethnic background or travel. Our study indicates that hospital-acquired and CA-ST772-MRSA-V is currently emerging in Ireland and may have been imported from India on several occasions.

  11. Toxic Hazards Research Unit Annual Technical Report: 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    exposed to TOCP exhibited the classic lesions of delayed neuropathy (Smith and Lillie, 1931; Barnes and Denz, 1953; (avanagh, 1954; and Fenton , 1955...Safety of *.i Chemicals in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics , The staff of the Divi- sion of Pharmacology of the Federal Food and Drug Administration, Austin...Annual Technical Report: 1967, AMRL-TR-67-137 (AD 834723), Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Fenton , J. C

  12. Wind Energy in the United States: Market and Research Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, P.R.; Thresher, R.W.; Hock, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    U.S. market activity has increased over the last two years. In 1998, new capacity totaled about 150 MW and projected 1999 capacity additions are over 600 MW. As the electricity market continues to evolve under restructuring, the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Wind Energy Program has positioned itself to work with industry to meet current challenges and opportunities, and prepare for the market of tomorrow. Some opportunities include green power markets and distributed applications, although a primary challenge involves the fact that avoided cost payments to renewable generators are not high enough to economically support projects. A recently incorporated power exchange in California, APX, Inc., has demonstrated that green power does attract a premium over prices on the conventional power exchange. The key elements of the U.S. DOE Wind Program are (1) Applied Research, which is critical for achieving advanced turbine designs capable of competing in a restructured market that emphasizes low cost generation; (2) Turbine Research, which supports the U.S. industry in developing competitive, high performance, reliable wind turbine technology for global energy markets; and (3) Cooperative Research and Testing, under which standards development and certification testing are the key activities for the current year

  13. An Overview of Research Infrastructure for Medieval Studies in the United States: Associations, Institutes, and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zan Kocher

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This overview of research infrastructure in the United States brieflymentions some institutes, universities, associations, conferences,sources of funding, types of courses, research databases, academicjournals and book publishers. It intends to make American medievalistresources better accessible to colleagues from other countries, and toencourage those who wish to study in the United States and those whoare using the Internet to seek printed or digital materials for theirteaching or research.

  14. Enabling International Safeguards Research and Development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwight, John E.; Schanfein, Mark J.; Bjornard, Trond A.

    2009-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the lead laboratory in nuclear energy research and development within the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory complex. INL is tasked with the advancement of nuclear energy research and development, and leadership in the renaissance of nuclear power globally. INL scientists have been central to the assessment of needs and the integration of technical programs aimed at the world-wide growth of nuclear power. One of the grand challenges of the nuclear energy resurgence is nuclear nonproliferation. Nonproliferation technology development is key to meeting this challenge. The needed advances in nonproliferation technologies are being made more difficult by the growing gap between increasing demands for nuclear materials to support technology development, and reduced availability of these materials. The gap is caused by the reduction, consolidation and more stringent lockdown of nuclear materials, made necessary by heightened and evolving security concerns, in the face of increased demand for materials to support technology development. Ironically, the increased demand for materials for technology development is made necessary by these same security concerns. The situation will continue to worsen if safeguards and security budgets remain limited for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and many member states, while growth in global nuclear energy becomes a reality. Effective U.S. leadership in the closing of this gap is vital to homeland security and global stability. INL has taken positive steps, described in this paper, to close this gap by reestablishing a viable base for the development, testing and demonstration of safeguards and security technologies. Key attributes of this technology development base are (1) the availability of a wide variety of special nuclear materials in forms that allow for enhanced accessibility; (2) ease of access by U.S. government, national laboratory, industry and academic institution

  15. An overview of enabling technology research in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    The mission of the US Fusion Energy Sciences Program is to advance plasma science, fusion science, and fusion technology--the knowledge base needed for an economically and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. In support of this overall mission, the Enabling Technology Program in the US incorporates both near and long term R and D, contributes to material and engineering sciences as well as technology development, contributes to spin-off applications, and performs global systems assessments and focused design studies. This work supports both magnetic and inertial fusion energy (IFE) concepts. The Enabling Technology research mission is to contribute to the national science and technology base by developing the enabling technology for existing and next-step experimental devices, by exploring and understanding key materials and technology feasibility issues for attractive fusion power sources, by conducting advanced design studies that integrate the wealth of our understanding to guide R and D priorities and by developing design solutions for next-step and future devices. The Enabling Technology Program Plan is organized around five elements: plasma technologies, fusion (chamber) technologies, materials sciences, advanced design, and IFE chamber and target technologies. The principal technical features and research objectives are described for each element

  16. PREFACE: 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván Vargas-Blanco, V.; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.

    2015-03-01

    Written contributions from participants of the Joint 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) - 21st IAEA Technical Meeting on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (21st IAEA TM RUSFD). The International Advisory Committees of the 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and the 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD), agreed to carry out together this Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st RUSFD in San José, Costa Rica, on 27-31 January 2014. The Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st RUSFD meeting, organized by the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, and Ad Astra Rocket Company in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP) is a series of events which has been held periodically since 1982, with the purpose of providing a forum in which the research of the Latin American plasma physics community can be displayed, as well as fostering collaborations among plasma scientists within the region and with researchers from the rest of the world. Recognized plasma scientists from developed countries are specially invited to the meeting to present the state of the art on several "hot" topics related to plasma physics. It is an open meeting, with an International Advisory Committee, in which the working language is English. It was firstly held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by workshops in Medellín, Colombia (1985), Santiago de Chile, Chile (1988), Buenos Aires, Argentina (1990), Mexico City, Mexico (1992), Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil (1994, combined with the International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP)), Caracas, Venezuela (1997), Tandil, Argentina (1998), La Serena, Chile (2000), Sao Pedro, Brazil (2003), Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Caracas, Venezuela (2007), Santiago de Chile, Chile (2010, combined with the ICPP) and Mar de Plata, Argentina (2011). The 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices is an ideal forum for

  17. 1st IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Longhurst, G.

    1998-12-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 1st IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on December 19 and 20, 1998 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by meeting participants, a review of the data availability and data needs in the areas from the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the subject of the meeting, and recommendations regarding the future work within this CRP. (author)

  18. Globalisation as we enter the 21st century: reflections and directions for nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia M; Meleis, Afaf; Daly, John; Douglas, Marilyn Marty

    2003-10-01

    The events of September 11th, 2001 in the United States and the Bali bombings of October 2002 are chastening examples of the entangled web of the religious, political, health, cultural and economic forces we experience living in a global community. To view these forces as independent, singular, linearly deterministic entities of globalisation is irrational and illogical. Understanding the concept of globalisation has significant implications not only for world health and international politics, but also the health of individuals. Depending on an individual's political stance and world-view, globalisation may be perceived as an emancipatory force, having the potential to bridge the chasm between rich and poor or, in stark contrast, the very essence of the divide. It is important that nurses appreciate that globalisation does not pertain solely to the realms of economic theory and world politics, but also that it impacts on our daily nursing practice and the welfare of our patients. Globalisation and the closer interactions of human activity that result, have implications for international governance, policy and theory development as well as nursing education, research and clinical practice. Nurses, individually and collectively, have the political power and social consciousness to influence the forces of globalisation to improve health for all. This paper defines and discusses globalisation in today's world and its implications for contemporary nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

  19. Public Spending on Health Service and Policy Research in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States: A Modest Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhi Thakkar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Health services and policy research (HSPR represent a multidisciplinary field which integrates knowledge from health economics, health policy, health technology assessment, epidemiology, political science among other fields, to evaluate decisions in health service delivery. Health service decisions are informed by evidence at the clinical, organizational, and policy level, levels with distinct, managerial drivers. HSPR has an evolving discourse spanning knowledge translation, linkage and exchange between research and decision-maker partners and more recently, implementation science and learning health systems. Local context is important for HSPR and is important in advancing health reform practice. The amounts and configuration of national investment in this field remain important considerations which reflect priority investment areas. The priorities set within this field or research may have greater or lesser effects and promise with respect to modernizing health services in pursuit of better value and better population outcomes. Within Canada an asset map for HSPR was published by the national HSPR research institute. Having estimated publiclyfunded research spending in Canada, we sought identify best available comparable estimates from the United States and the United Kingdom. Investments from industry and charitable organizations were not included in these numbers. This commentary explores spending by the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom on HSPR as a fraction of total public spending on health and the importance of these respective investments in advancing health service performance. Proposals are offered on the merits of common nomenclature and accounting for areas of investigation in pursuit of some comparable way of assessing priority HSPR investments and suggestions for earmarking such investments to total investment in health services spending.

  20. International stem cell collaboration: how disparate policies between the United States and the United Kingdom impact research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyuan; Flynn, Jesse M; Solnick, Rachel E; Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Matthews, Kirstin R W

    2011-03-08

    As the scientific community globalizes, it is increasingly important to understand the effects of international collaboration on the quality and quantity of research produced. While it is generally assumed that international collaboration enhances the quality of research, this phenomenon is not well examined. Stem cell research is unique in that it is both politically charged and a research area that often generates international collaborations, making it an ideal case through which to examine international collaborations. Furthermore, with promising medical applications, the research area is dynamic and responsive to a globalizing science environment. Thus, studying international collaborations in stem cell research elucidates the role of existing international networks in promoting quality research, as well as the effects that disparate national policies might have on research. This study examined the impact of collaboration on publication significance in the United States and the United Kingdom, world leaders in stem cell research with disparate policies. We reviewed publications by US and UK authors from 2008, along with their citation rates and the political factors that may have contributed to the number of international collaborations. The data demonstrated that international collaborations significantly increased an article's impact for UK and US investigators. While this applied to UK authors whether they were corresponding or secondary, this effect was most significant for US authors who were corresponding authors. While the UK exhibited a higher proportion of international publications than the US, this difference was consistent with overall trends in international scientific collaboration. The findings suggested that national stem cell policy differences and regulatory mechanisms driving international stem cell research in the US and UK did not affect the frequency of international collaborations, or even the countries with which the US and UK most

  1. Sanford Underground Research Facility - The United State's Deep Underground Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, D.

    2012-12-01

    The 2.5 km deep Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is managed by the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority (SDSTA) at the former Homestake Mine site in Lead, South Dakota. The US Department of Energy currently supports the development of the facility using a phased approach for underground deployment of experiments as they obtain an advanced design stage. The geology of the Sanford Laboratory site has been studied during the 125 years of operations at the Homestake Mine and more recently as part of the preliminary geotechnical site investigations for the NSF's Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory project. The overall geology at DUSEL is a well-defined stratigraphic sequence of schist and phyllites. The three major Proterozoic units encountered in the underground consist of interbedded schist, metasediments, and amphibolite schist which are crosscut by Tertiary rhyolite dikes. Preliminary geotechnical site investigations included drift mapping, borehole drilling, borehole televiewing, in-situ stress analysis, laboratory analysis of core, mapping and laser scanning of new excavations, modeling and analysis of all geotechnical information. The investigation was focused upon the determination if the proposed site rock mass could support the world's largest (66 meter diameter) deep underground excavation. While the DUSEL project has subsequently been significantly modified, these data are still available to provide a baseline of the ground conditions which may be judiciously extrapolated throughout the entire Proterozoic rock assemblage for future excavations. Recommendations for facility instrumentation and monitoring were included in the preliminary design of the DUSEL project design and include; single and multiple point extensometers, tape extensometers and convergence measurements (pins), load cells and pressure cells, smart cables, inclinometers/Tiltmeters, Piezometers, thermistors, seismographs and accelerometers, scanners (laser

  2. The Contemporary Use of Angiography and Revascularization Among Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction in the United States Compared With South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Jae; Simon, Dajuanicia; Wang, Tracy Y; Alexander, Karen P; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Bates, Eric R; Henry, Timothy D; Peterson, Eric D; Roe, Matthew T

    2015-12-01

    Practice guidelines recommend an early invasive strategy for high-risk non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients, but international differences in the use of invasive strategies are unknown. Profiling NSTEMI patient management in the United States (U.S.) and South Korea could provide insight into how patients are triaged for an early invasive strategy in different health care environments and geographical regions. We evaluated the use of angiography and revascularization for NSTEMI patients treated at revascularization-capable hospitals (2007-2010) in both the ACTION Registry-GWTG (U.S.: n = 133,835; 433 hospitals) and KAMIR/KorMI Registry (South Korea: n = 7,901; 72 hospitals). Compared with South Korean patients, U.S. NSTEMI patients more commonly had established cardiovascular risk factors, disease, and prior cardiovascular events and procedures. From 2007-2010, the use of angiography for NSTEMI patients rose steadily in both countries, but the use of revascularization only rose in South Korea. Patients from South Korea more commonly underwent angiography and revascularization. Percutaneous coronary intervention was the most common type of revascularization in both countries, but coronary artery bypass grafting was less common in South Korea. The use of both angiography and revascularization was incrementally lower with a higher predicted mortality risk for patients from both countries, but greater differences between low- and high-risk patients occurred in the U.S. The profile, characteristics, and use of angiography and revascularization for NSTEMI patients in the U.S. vs South Korea differed substantially from 2007-2010, underscoring the heterogeneity of NSTEMI patients and treatment selection among different countries. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Developing a clinical trial unit to advance research in an academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croghan, Ivana T; Viker, Steven D; Limper, Andrew H; Evans, Tamara K; Cornell, Alissa R; Ebbert, Jon O; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-11-01

    Research, clinical care, and education are the three cornerstones of academic health centers in the United States. The research climate has always been riddled with ebbs and flows, depending on funding availability. During a time of reduced funding, the number and scope of research studies have been reduced, and in some instances, a field of study has been eliminated. Recent reductions in the research funding landscape have led institutions to explore new ways to continue supporting research. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN has developed a clinical trial unit within the Department of Medicine, which provides shared resources for many researchers and serves as a solution for training and mentoring new investigators and study teams. By building on existing infrastructure and providing supplemental resources to existing research, the Department of Medicine clinical trial unit has evolved into an effective mechanism for conducting research. This article discusses the creation of a central unit to provide research support in clinical trials and presents the advantages, disadvantages, and required building blocks for such a unit. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Clinic. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The care unit in nursing home research: evidence in support of a definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, Carole A; Morgan, Debra G; Squires, Janet E; Boström, Anne-Marie; Slaughter, Susan E; Cummings, Greta G; Norton, Peter G

    2011-04-14

    Defining what constitutes a resident care unit in nursing home research is both a conceptual and practical challenge. The aim of this paper is to provide evidence in support of a definition of care unit in nursing homes by demonstrating: (1) its feasibility for use in data collection, (2) the acceptability of aggregating individual responses to the unit level, and (3) the benefit of including unit level data in explanatory models. An observational study design was used. Research (project) managers, healthcare aides, care managers, nursing home administrators and directors of care from thirty-six nursing homes in the Canadian prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba provided data for the study. A definition of care unit was developed and applied in data collection and analyses. A debriefing session was held with research managers to investigate their experiences with using the care unit definition. In addition, survey responses from 1258 healthcare aides in 25 of the 36 nursing homes in the study, that had more than one care unit, were analyzed using a multi-level modeling approach. Trained field workers administered the Alberta Context Tool (ACT), a 58-item self-report survey reflecting 10 organizational context concepts, to healthcare aides using computer assisted personal interviews. To assess the appropriateness of obtaining unit level scores, we assessed aggregation statistics (ICC(1), ICC(2), η², and ω²), and to assess the value of using the definition of unit in explanatory models, we performed multi-level modeling. In 10 of the 36 nursing homes, the care unit definition developed was used to align the survey data (for analytic purposes) to specific care units as designated by our definition, from that reported by the facility administrator. The aggregation statistics supported aggregating the healthcare aide responses on the ACT to the realigned unit level. Findings from the multi-level modeling further supported unit level aggregation. A

  5. Report by the AERES on the unit: Research unit on the environment under the supervision of establishments and bodies: IRSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory. The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved and risks, productions and publications, scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. These same aspects are then discussed and commented for each research axis: study of the seismic hazard, study of risk management related to waste storage in deep geological layer, radionuclide transfer in the biosphere, study of the effects on ecosystems of a chronic exposure to radioactive materials

  6. 21st September 2010 - Representatives of the German Federal Ministry of eEducation and Research accompanied by M. Hauschield, ATLAS Collaboration, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Department Head F. Bordry and R. Schmidt.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    21st September 2010 - Representatives of the German Federal Ministry of eEducation and Research accompanied by M. Hauschield, ATLAS Collaboration, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Department Head F. Bordry and R. Schmidt.

  7. 1st October 2010 - Chinese Vice President of the Academy of Sciences signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, witnessed by Adviser R. Voss

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    1st October 2010 - Chinese Vice President of the Academy of Sciences signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, witnessed by Adviser R. Voss

  8. Coordinated Research Projects of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2011-05-01

    The IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit is dedicated to the provision of databases for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (AM/PMI) data that are relevant for nuclear fusion research. IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) are the principal mechanism by which the Unit encourages data evaluation and the production of new data. Ongoing and planned CRPs on AM/PMI data are briefly described here.

  9. Coordinated Research Projects of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2011-01-01

    The IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit is dedicated to the provision of databases for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (AM/PMI) data that are relevant for nuclear fusion research. IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) are the principal mechanism by which the Unit encourages data evaluation and the production of new data. Ongoing and planned CRPs on AM/PMI data are briefly described here.

  10. Are Large Scale (Brigade Combat Team or Regimental Level and Above) United States Army Airborne Operations Effective in the Context of 21st Century Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Childress, Mark S

    2008-01-01

    Several recommendations, in regards to the use of large scale airborne operations in the context of 21st century warfare and identified shortfalls in airborne organization, are presented in this monograph...

  11. Final environmental statement related to the operation of St. Lucie Plant, Unit No. 2. Docket No. 50-389, Florida Power and Light Company, Orlando Utilities Commission of the City of Orlando, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This final environmental statement was prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (the staff) in accordance with the Commission's Regulations, set forth in 10 CFR Part 51, which implement the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Sections related to the aquatic environment were prepared in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV. This statement reviews the impact of operation of the St. Lucie Plant, Unit 2. Assessments that are found in this statement supplement those described in the Final Environmental Statement (FES-CP) that was issued in May 1974 in support of issuance of a construction permit for the unit

  12. The NEIL Memory Research Unit: psychosocial, biological, physiological and lifestyle factors associated with healthy ageing: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, Caoimhe; Coen, Robert F; Lawlor, Brian A; Robertson, Ian H; Brennan, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Population ageing is a global phenomenon that has characterised demographic trends during the 20th and 21st century. The rapid growth in the proportion of older adults in the population, and resultant increase in the incidence of age-related cognitive decline, dementia and Alzheimer's disease, brings significant social, economic and healthcare challenges. Decline in cognitive abilities represents the most profound threat to active and healthy ageing. Current evidence suggests that a significant proportion of cases of age-related cognitive decline and dementia may be preventable through the modification of risk factors including education, depressive symptomology, physical activity, social engagement and participation in cognitively stimulating activities. The NEIL Memory Research Unit cohort study was established to investigate factors related to brain health and the maintenance of cognitive function. A cohort of 1000 normally ageing adults aged 50 years and over are being recruited to participate in comprehensive assessments at baseline, and at follow-up once every 2 years. The assessment protocol comprises a comprehensive neuropsychological battery, some basic physical measures, psychosocial scales, questionnaire measures related to a range of health, lifestyle and behavioural factors, and a measure of resting state activity using electroencephalography (EEG). The NEIL Memory Research Unit cohort study will address key questions about brain health and cognitive ageing in the population aged 50+, with a particular emphasis on the influence of potentially modifiable factors on cognitive outcomes. Analyses will be conducted with a focus on factors involved in the maintenance of cognitive function among older adults, and therefore will have the potential to contribute significant knowledge related to key questions within the field of cognitive ageing, and to inform the development of public health interventions aimed at preventing cognitive decline and promoting

  13. Research and demonstration to improve air quality for the U.S. animal feeding operations in the 21st century – A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Ji-Qin

    2015-01-01

    There was an increasing interest in reducing production and emission of air pollutants to improve air quality for animal feeding operations (AFOs) in the U.S. in the 21st century. Research was focused on identification, quantification, characterization, and modeling of air pollutions; effects of emissions; and methodologies and technologies for scientific research and pollution control. Mitigation effects were on pre-excretion, pre-release, pre-emission, and post-emission. More emphasis was given on reducing pollutant emissions than improving indoor air quality. Research and demonstrations were generally continuation and improvement of previous efforts. Most demonstrated technologies were still in a limited scale of application. Future efforts are needed in many fundamental and applied research areas. Advancement in instrumentation, computer technology, and biological sciences and genetic engineering is critical to bring major changes in this area. Development in research and demonstration will depend on the actual political, economic, and environmental situations. - Highlights: • More emphasis was placed on pollutant emissions than indoor air quality. • Basic research dedicated to new pollutants, modeling, and baseline emissions. • Applied research focused on developing monitoring and mitigation technologies. • Field demonstrations combined with projects to evaluate new mitigation approaches. • Future efforts are needed in many fundamental and applied research areas. - Different scales of basic and applied research were conducted and 15 mitigation technologies were demonstrated. Future work is needed in many fundamental and applied research areas

  14. The nursing professorial unit: translating acute and critical care nursing research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Christensen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and context: Implementation of current research in practice is challenging for ward-based nursing staff. However, university-based nursing academics are seen as the research experts and are perhaps well placed to support clinical nursing research. The problem lies with the divide between practice and academia; universities often use the clinical environment as the place to conduct research but this is often not translated effectively into practice. The development of a nursing professorial unit for acute and critical care was undertaken to meet this challenge. The unit’s key aim is to develop, mentor and support a nursing research culture that is wholly situated within and driven by the requirements of the clinical environment. Aim: The aim of this article is to offer some insights as to how staff set about engaging with and developing the nursing professorial unit to support nursing research in our local hospital. Conclusions: The article highlights how an effective and coordinated approach to supporting clinical nursing research is possible. The nursing professorial unit has been successful in bridging the divide between academia and practice by using a non-university approach to supporting nursing research. Instead we have adopted the philosophy that practice is the sole driver for research and as academics our role is to support that position. Implications for practice: The adoption of the nursing professorial unit model for supporting clinical nursing research is beneficial in closing the divide between clinical practice and the university The continual presence of the academics in the clinical environment has had a positive impact on research development and implementation in practice The nursing professorial unit has become an integral part of the nursing culture in the hospital environment

  15. Rock-Mechanics Research. A Survey of United States Research to 1965, with a Partial Survey of Canadian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The results of a survey, conducted by the Committee on Rock Mechanics, to determine the status of training and research in rock mechanics in presented in this publication. In 1964 and 1965 information was gathered by questionnaires sent to industries, selected federal agencies, and universities in both the United States and Canada. Results are…

  16. Calculating the Unit Cost Factors for Decommissioning Cost Estimation of the Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Lee, Dong Gyu; Jung, Chong Hun; Lee, Kune Woo

    2006-01-01

    The estimated decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor is calculated by applying a unit cost factor-based engineering cost calculation method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor is composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Labor cost of decommissioning costs in decommissioning works are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects. In this paper, the unit cost factors and work difficulty factors which are needed to calculate the labor cost in estimating decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor are derived and figured out.

  17. FFUSION yearbook 1997. Annual report of the Finnish fusion research unit. Association EURATOM-TEKES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, S; Paettikangas, T [eds.; VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-02-01

    Finnish fusion programme (FFUSION) is one of the eleven national energy research programmes funded by the Technological Development Centre of Finland (TEKES). The FFUSION programme was fully integrated into European Fusion Programme just after Finland joined the European Union. The contract of Association Euratom and Tekes was signed in 1995 and extends to the end of 1999. Finland became a member of JET Joint Undertaking in 1996, other contracts with Euratom include NET agreement and the Staff Mobility Agreement. FFUSION programme with participating research institutes and universities forms the Fusion Research Unit of the Association Euratom-Tekes. This annual report summarises the research activities of the Finnish Research Unit in 1997. The programme consists of two parts: Physics and Technology. The research areas of the physics are: Fusion plasma engineering, and Radio-frequency heating and Plasma diagnostics. The technology is focused into three areas: Fusion reactor materials (first wall components and joining techniques), Remote handling and viewing systems, and Superconductors

  18. Clonal emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae ST14 co-producing OXA-48-type and NDM carbapenemases with high rate of colistin resistance in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubareck, Carole Ayoub; Mouftah, Shaimaa F; Pál, Tibor; Ghazawi, Akela; Halat, Dalal H; Nabi, Anju; AlSharhan, Mouza A; AlDeesi, Zulfa O; Peters, Christabel C; Celiloglu, Handan; Sannegowda, Manjunath; Sarkis, Dolla K; Sonnevend, Ágnes

    2018-03-09

    Few studies have addressed the molecular epidemiology of carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) isolates in the Arabian Peninsula, and such investigations have been missing from Dubai, a major economical, tourism and medical centre of the region. The antibiotic susceptibility, the carbapenemase type produced, and the clonality of 89 CRE strains isolated in five major Dubai hospitals in June 2015 - June 2016 were determined. Thirty three percent of the collection of 70 K. pneumoniae, 13 E. coli and 6 other Enterobacteriaceae were extremely drug resistant, 27% were resistant to colistin, and 4.5% (four K. pneumoniae isolates) were resistant to all antibiotics tested. The colistin resistance rate in K. pneumoniae was 31.4%. None of the isolates carried mobile colistin resistance genes. Seventy-seven isolates produced carbapenemase: 53.3% OXA-48-like, 24.7% NDM, and 22.1% both OXA-48-like and NDM, respectively. PFGE clustered 50% of K. pneumoniae into a 35-membered group, which showed significant association with double carbapenemase production, with extreme drug resistance, and with being isolated from Emirati patients. Members of the cluster belonged to sequence type ST14. The rate of colistin resistance in K. pneumoniae ST14 was 37.1% vs. 27.1% of K. pneumoniae isolates outside of the cluster. Two of the panresistant K. pneumoniae isolates also belonged to ST14, whereas the other two were ST15 and ST231, respectively. In conclusion, beyond the overall high colistin resistance rate in CRE, the emergence of a highly resistant clone of K. pneumoniae ST14 in all Dubai hospitals investigated is a serious problem requiring immediate attention. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Intensive Care Units in Iran: ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 Emerges as the Major Clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Goudarzi, Hossein; Sá Figueiredo, Agnes Marie; Udo, Edet E; Fazeli, Maryam; Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in different patient populations is a major public health concern. This study determined the prevalence and distribution of circulating molecular types of MRSA in hospitalized patients in ICU of hospitals in Tehran. A total of 70 MRSA isolates were collected from patients in eight hospitals. Antimicrobial resistance patterns were determined using the disk diffusion method. The presence of toxin encoding genes and the vancomycin resistance gene were determined by PCR. The MRSA isolates were further analyzed using multi-locus sequence, spa, SCCmec, and agr typing. The MRSA prevalence was 93.3%. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed a high resistance rate (97.1%) to ampicillin and penicillin. The rate of resistance to the majority of antibiotics tested was 30% to 71.4%. Two isolates belonging to the ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone (MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml) had intermediate resistance to vancomycin. The majority of MRSA isolates (24.3%) were associated with the ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone; the other MRSA clones were ST859-SCCmec IV/t969 (18.6%), ST239-SCCmec III/t037 (17.1%), and ST291-SCCmec IV/t030 (8.6%). The circulating MRSA strains in Iranian hospitals were genetically diverse with a relatively high prevalence of the ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone. These findings support the need for future surveillance studies on MRSA to better elucidate the distribution of existing MRSA clones and detect emergence of new MRSA clones.

  20. Job satisfaction and importance for intensive care unit research coordinators: results from binational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Claire M; Roberts, Brigit L; Foote, Jonathon; McGrail, Matthew R

    2007-09-01

    To measure Intensive Care Unit Research coordinator job satisfaction and importance and to identify priorities for role development. Research coordinator numbers are growing internationally in response to increasing clinical research activity. In Australia, 1% of registered nurses work principally in research, many as Research coordinators. Internationally, the Association of Clinical Research Professionals currently has 6536 certified Research coordinators in 13 countries, with likely additional large numbers practicing without the voluntary certification. Research coordinators are almost always nurses, but little is know about this emerging specialty. Design. Cross-sectional study using anonymous self-report questionnaire. After ethics approval, the McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale and McCloskey-Mueller Importance Scale were administered via the Internet. The sample was 49 (response rate 71%) Research coordinators from the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Unit Research coordinators' Interest Group. Research coordinators were satisfied with structural aspects of the position working business hours; flexibility of working hours; high levels of responsibility and control over their work. Dissatisfaction was expressed regarding: remuneration and recognition; compensation for weekend work; salary package; career advancement opportunities; and childcare facilities. High priorities for role development are those rated highly important but with much lower satisfaction. These are: compensation for weekend call-out work; salary and remuneration package; recognition by management and clinicians; career advancement opportunities; departmental research processes; encouragement and feedback; and number of working hours. Increasing numbers of nurses have been attracted to this clinically based research position. These data contribute to the understanding and development of the role.

  1. Making Research Matter Comment on "Public Spending on Health Service and Policy Research in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States: A Modest Proposal".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David J; Frank, John

    2017-08-13

    We offer a UK-based commentary on the recent "Perspective" published in IJHPM by Thakkar and Sullivan. We are sympathetic to the authors' call for increased funding for health service and policy research (HSPR). However, we point out that increasing that investment - in any of the three countries they compare: Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom- will ipso facto not necessarily lead to any better use of research by health system decision-makers in these settings. We cite previous authors' descriptions of the many factors that tend to make the worlds of researchers and decision-makers into "two solitudes." And we call for changes in the structure and funding of HSPR, particularly the incentives now in place for purely academic publishing, to tackle a widespread reality: most published research in HSPR, as in other applied fields of science, is never read or used by the vast majority of decision-makers, working out in the "real world. © 2018 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  2. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2017 year in review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, John F.; Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2018-02-08

    The Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program was involved in a number of notable events during 2017, many concerning our personnel. Dr. Barry Grand left his position as Leader of the Alabama Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit to become the Cooperative Units Program Supervisor for the South, replacing Dr. Kevin Whalen who took over as Supervisor for the West. We welcomed Dr. Sarah Converse who left the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to become Leader of the Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Dr. Amanda Rosenberger joined the Tennessee Cooperative Fishery Research Unit as Assistant Leader, transferring from the Missouri Cooperative Unit. Dr. Scott Carleton left his position as Assistant Unit Leader in New Mexico to become Chief of the Region 2 Migratory Bird Program of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.We said farewell to many colleagues who retired. Their departure is bittersweet as we wish them health, happiness, and wellness in retirement. We will miss their companionship and the extraordinary contributions they have made to the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program and conservation.The Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program has a record high number of vacant scientist positions due to a combination of retirements and base funding short-falls. These issues are affecting our ability to meet cooperator needs. Yet, we remain highly productive. For example, this year we released a report (https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1427) containing abstracts of nearly 600 of our research projects, covering thematic areas ranging from advanced technologies to wildlife diseases. We provided highly competent, trained scientists and natural resource managers for our cooperators’ workforce. We delivered technical training and guidance to professional practitioners. We provided critical information to cooperators for decisions on species status assessments and management of species of greatest conservation need

  3. The uranium bearing shale ore-body at St-Hippolyte (Haut-Rhin). An example of research with statistical methods; Le gisement des schistes uraniferes de St-Hippolyte (Haut-Rhin). Exemple d'etude par calculs statistiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlier, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The uranium bearing shale ore-body at St-Hippolyte was mainly proved by drillings, the results of which were studied through statistical methods. The author gives an account of his conclusions regarding the distribution of mineralization, its origin and, the estimate of reserves. The uranium mineralization is irregularly distributed in shales. On a vertical line, levels could be singled out: they are similar, as far as lithology is concerned, but each of them is characterized by a grade-population, according to a lognormal distribution. Horizontally, a connection is noted between grades and the overlying barren sandstone bed. These considerations, as well as a statistical study of U/Ra ratio, induced the author to consider that the mineralization of the richest level has an hydrothermal origin. It is only through an uranium diffusion from that level that the others are mineralized. The uranium which is contained in poorest beds has a syn-genetic origin. Furthermore, statistical methods bring us to an evaluation of reserves. In such a case, the evaluation is equivalent to the ore obtained by common arithmetical methods. Moreover, we are able to state precisely the upper and lower limits where a true tonnage or a true grade could be given with a definite value of statistical certainty. Then the author has been able to study the separation of reserves in grade-groups and to foresee the effect of sorting in connection with the lower possible grade and with extraction units (wagons, lorries, etc...), on which the sorting will be done. To conclude, the author indicates the value of both classical and statistical methods. These two techniques are completing each other and they solve different problems. (author) [French] Le gisement des schistes uraniferes de St-Hippolyte a ete reconnu essentiellement par sondages, dont les resultats ont ete etudies par les methodes du calcul statistique. L'auteur expose les conclusions auxquelles il a ete amene et qui concernent: la

  4. Chemical process research and development in the 21st century: challenges, strategies, and solutions from a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federsel, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-05-19

    In process research and development (PR&D), the generation and manipulation of small-molecule drugs ranges from bench-scale (laboratory) chemistry to pilot plant manufacture to commercial production. A broad range of disciplines, including process chemistry (organic synthesis), analytical chemistry, process engineering (mass and heat transfer, unit operations), process safety (chemical risk assessment), regulatory compliance, and plant operation, must be effectively applied. In the critical handover between medicinal chemistry and PR&D, compound production is typically scaled up from a few hundred grams to several kilograms. Can the methodologies applied to the former also satisfy the technical, safety, and scalability aspects that come into play in the latter? Occasionally, the transition might occur smoothly, but more often the situation is the opposite: much work and resources must be invested to design a process that is feasible for manufacturing on pilot scale and, eventually, for commercial production. Authentic examples provide enlightening illustrations of dos and don'ts for developing syntheses designed for round-flask operation into production-scale processes. Factors that are easily underestimated or even neglected in the laboratory, such as method robustness, chemical hazards, safety concerns, environmental impact, availability of starting materials and building blocks in bulk quantities, intellectual property (IP) issues, and the final cost of the product, will come into play and need to be addressed appropriately. The decision on which route will be the best for further development is a crucial event and should come into focus early on the R&D timeline. In addition to scientific and technical concerns, the parameter of speed has come to the forefront in the pharmaceutical arena. Although historically the drug industry has tolerated a total time investment of far more than 10 years from idea to market, the current worldwide paradigm requires a

  5. United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service research in application technology for pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L A; Thomson, S J

    2003-01-01

    A research summary is presented that emphasizes ARS achievements in application technology over the past 2-3 years. Research focused on the improvement of agricultural pesticide application is important from the standpoint of crop protection as well as environmental safety. Application technology research is being actively pursued within the ARS, with a primary focus on application system development, drift management, efficacy enhancement and remote sensing. Research on application systems has included sensor-controlled hooded sprayers, new approaches to direct chemical injection, and aerial electrostatic sprayers. For aerial application, great improvements in on-board flow controllers permit accurate field application of chemicals. Aircraft parameters such as boom position and spray release height are being altered to determine their effect on drift. Other drift management research has focused on testing of low-drift nozzles, evaluation of pulsed spray technologies and evaluation of drift control adjuvants. Research on the use of air curtain sprayers in orchards, air-assist sprayers for row crops and vegetables, and air deflectors on aircraft has documented improvements in application efficacy. Research has shown that the fate of applied chemicals is influenced by soil properties, and this has implications for herbicide efficacy and dissipation in the environment. Remote sensing systems are being used to target areas in the field where pests are present so that spray can be directed to only those areas. Soil and crop conditions influence propensity for weeds and insects to proliferate in any given field area. Research has indicated distinct field patterns favorable for weed growth and insect concentration, which can provide further assistance for targeted spraying.

  6. St. Lucia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    The population of St Lucia was 123,000 in 1986, with an annual growth rate of 2%. The infant mortality rate stands at 22.2/1000 live births, and life expectancy is 70.3 years for males and 74.9 years for females. The literacy rate is 78%. St Lucia's labor force is allocated as follows: agriculture, 36.6%; industry and commerce, 20.1%; and services, 18.1%. The gross national product (GNP) was US$146 million in 1985, with an annual growth rate of 3% and a per capita GNP of $1071. St Lucia is a parliamentary democracy modeled on the British Westminster system. The island is divided into 16 parishes and 1 urban area (the capital, Castries). St Lucia is currently a politically stable country, although the high level of youth unemployment is a cause for concern. Ongoing stability may depend on the government's ability to provide services such as jobs and housing. The economy has evolved from a monocrop sugar plantation type to a diversified economy based on agriculture, industry, and tourism. Agriculture, dominated by the banana industry, is characterized by the participation of a large number of small and medium-sized enterprises. Industry is being encouraged through the provision of incentives such as tax rebates. The government is attempting to maintain a sound investment climate through a tripartite dialogue with the private sector and trade unions. Overall economic policy is predicated on the attraction of sound investments, by both local and foreign entities, to accelerate the rate of economic growth, solve the unemployment problem, and generate a solid balance-of-payments position.

  7. Current researches on safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Hiroshi; Kiyose, Ryohei

    1980-01-01

    Recently, the problem of safe disposal of radioactive waste generated from nuclear fuel cycle becomes more important in Japan. On the other hand, many researches on shallow land burial of low-level wastes and geologic isolation of high-level wastes have been carried out in the United States of America. In this report, the researches on the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal in the United States of America were briefly introduced with emphasis on the studies on behavior and migration of radionuclide from disposed waste in geosphere. (author)

  8. The United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN): Enhancing Microbial Genomics Research through Living Microbe Culture Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Hess, Matthias; Bennett, A. Rick; Ryan, Matthew; Kang, Seogchan; Nobles, David; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Torok, Tamas; Brown, Daniel R.; Cho, Juliana; Wertz, John E.; Mukherjee, Supratim; Cady, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN; http://usccn.org) is “to facilitate the safe and responsible utilization of microbial resources for research, education, industry, medicine, and agriculture for the betterment of human kind.” Microbial culture collections are a key component of life science research, biotechnology, and emerging global biobased economies. Representatives and users of several microbial culture collections from the United States and Europe gathered at the University of California, Davis, to discuss how collections of microorganisms can better serve users and stakeholders and to showcase existing resources available in public culture collections. PMID:26092453

  9. Salamander chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans) in the United States—Developing research, monitoring, and management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Muths, Erin L.; Katz, Rachel A.; Canessa, Stefano; Adams, Michael J.; Ballard, Jennifer R.; Berger, Lee; Briggs, Cheryl J.; Coleman, Jeremy; Gray, Matthew J.; Harris, M. Camille; Harris, Reid N.; Hossack, Blake R.; Huyvaert, Kathryn P.; Kolby, Jonathan E.; Lips, Karen R.; Lovich, Robert E.; McCallum, Hamish I.; Mendelson, Joseph R.; Nanjappa, Priya; Olson, Deanna H.; Powers, Jenny G.; Richgels, Katherine L. D.; Russell, Robin E.; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Spitzen-van der Sluijs, Annemarieke; Watry, Mary Kay; Woodhams, Douglas C.; White, C. LeAnn

    2016-01-20

    The recently (2013) identified pathogenic chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal), poses a severe threat to the distribution and abundance of salamanders within the United States and Europe. Development of a response strategy for the potential, and likely, invasion of Bsal into the United States is crucial to protect global salamander biodiversity. A formal working group, led by Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Fort Collins Science Center, and Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, was held at the USGS Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis in Fort Collins, Colorado, United States from June 23 to June 25, 2015, to identify crucial Bsal research and monitoring needs that could inform conservation and management strategies for salamanders in the United States. Key findings of the workshop included the following: (1) the introduction of Bsal into the United States is highly probable, if not inevitable, thus requiring development of immediate short-term and long-term intervention strategies to prevent Bsal establishment and biodiversity decline; (2) management actions targeted towards pathogen containment may be ineffective in reducing the long-term spread of Bsal throughout the United States; and (3) early detection of Bsal through surveillance at key amphibian import locations, among high-risk wild populations, and through analysis of archived samples is necessary for developing management responses. Top research priorities during the preinvasion stage included the following: (1) deployment of qualified diagnostic methods for Bsal and establishment of standardized laboratory practices, (2) assessment of susceptibility for amphibian hosts (including anurans), and (3) development and evaluation of short- and long-term pathogen intervention and management strategies. Several outcomes were achieved during the workshop, including development

  10. Review of the research proposal for the steam generator retired from Kori unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joung Soo; Han, Joung Ho; Kim, Hong Pyo; Lim, Yun Soo; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hwang, Seong Sik; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The tubes of the steam generator retired form Kori unit 1 have many different kinds of failures, such as denting pitting, wastage, ODSCC, PWSCC.Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI) submitted a research proposal for the steam generator to the Korea Institute S and T Evaluation and Planning (KSITEP). The KISTEP requested Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute to review the proposal by organizing a committee which should be composed of the specialists of the related domestic research institutes. Opinions of the committee on the objectives, research fields, economic benefit and validity in the research proposal were reviewed and suggested optimal research fields to be fulfilled successfully for the retired steam generator. Also, the rolls for the participants in the research works were allocated, which is critical in order to do the project effectively. 6 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  11. Alzheimer disease research in the 21st century: past and current failures, new perspectives and funding priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistollato, Francesca; Ohayon, Elan L; Lam, Ann; Langley, Gillian R; Novak, Thomas J; Pamies, David; Perry, George; Trushina, Eugenia; Williams, Robin S B; Roher, Alex E; Hartung, Thomas; Harnad, Stevan; Barnard, Neal; Morris, Martha Clare; Lai, Mei-Chun; Merkley, Ryan; Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi

    2016-06-28

    Much of Alzheimer disease (AD) research has been traditionally based on the use of animals, which have been extensively applied in an effort to both improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease and to test novel therapeutic approaches. However, decades of such research have not effectively translated into substantial therapeutic success for human patients. Here we critically discuss these issues in order to determine how existing human-based methods can be applied to study AD pathology and develop novel therapeutics. These methods, which include patient-derived cells, computational analysis and models, together with large-scale epidemiological studies represent novel and exciting tools to enhance and forward AD research. In particular, these methods are helping advance AD research by contributing multifactorial and multidimensional perspectives, especially considering the crucial role played by lifestyle risk factors in the determination of AD risk. In addition to research techniques, we also consider related pitfalls and flaws in the current research funding system. Conversely, we identify encouraging new trends in research and government policy. In light of these new research directions, we provide recommendations regarding prioritization of research funding. The goal of this document is to stimulate scientific and public discussion on the need to explore new avenues in AD research, considering outcome and ethics as core principles to reliably judge traditional research efforts and eventually undertake new research strategies.

  12. 76 FR 48797 - Notice of the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Research Service Notice of the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture Meeting AGENCY: Office of the Under Secretary, Research, Education... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App., the United States Department of Agriculture...

  13. 77 FR 11064 - Notice of the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Research Service Notice of the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture Meeting AGENCY: Office of the Under Secretary, Research, Education... with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, the United States Department of Agriculture...

  14. The NIHR Public Health Research Programme: responding to local authority research needs in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorling, Hannah; Cook, Andrew; Ollerhead, Liz; Westmore, Matt

    2015-12-11

    The remit of the National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research (PHR) Programme is to evaluate public health interventions, providing new knowledge on the benefits, costs, acceptability and wider impacts of interventions, set outside of the National Health Service, intended to improve the health of the public and reduce inequalities. This paper illustrates how the PHR Programme is providing new knowledge for public health decision makers, based on the nine key areas for local authority public health action, described by the King's Fund. Many funded PHR projects are evaluating interventions, applied in a range of settings, across the identified key areas for local authority influence. For example, research has been funded on children and young people, and for some of the wider determinants of health, such as housing and travel. Other factors, such as spatial planning, or open and green spaces and leisure, are less represented in the PHR Programme. Further opportunities in research include interventions to improve the health of adolescents, adults in workplaces, and communities. Building evidence for public health interventions at local authority level is important to prioritise and implement effective changes to improve population health.

  15. The Cerebral Palsy Research Registry: Development and Progress Toward National Collaboration in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Donna S.; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Msall, Michael E.; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Dewald, Julius P.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common neurodevelopmental motor disability in children. The condition requires medical, educational, social, and rehabilitative resources throughout the life span. Several countries have developed population-based registries that serve the purpose of prospective longitudinal collection of etiologic, demographic, and functional severity. The United States has not created a comprehensive program to develop such a registry. Barriers have been large population size, poor interinstitution collaboration, and decentralized medical and social systems. The Cerebral Palsy Research Registry was created to fill the gap between population and clinical-based cerebral palsy registries and promote research in the field. This is accomplished by connecting persons with cerebral palsy, as well as their families, to a network of regional researchers. This article describes the development of an expandable cerebral palsy research registry, its current status, and the potential it has to affect families and persons with cerebral palsy in the United States and abroad. PMID:21677201

  16. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2017 year in review postcard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, John F.; Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2018-02-08

    This postcard provides details about the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2017 Year in Review, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1438, now available at https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1438. In this report, you will find details about the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units (CRU) Program relating to its background, fish and wildlife science, students, staffing, vacancies, research funding, outreach and training, science themes, accolades, and professional services. You will see snapshots of CRU projects with information on how results have been or are being applied by cooperators. This is the essence of what we do: science that matters.Throughout the year, keep up with CRU research projects at http://www.coopunits.org.

  17. The ConocoPhillips Center for a Sustainable WE2ST (Water-Energy Education, Science, and Technology): Lessons Learned from an Innovative Research-Education-Outreach Center at Colorado School of Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, T. S.; Blaine, A. C.; Martin, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The ConocoPhillips Center for a Sustainable WE2ST (Water-Energy Education, Science, and Technology) is a testament to the power of collaboration and innovation. WE2ST began as a partnership between ConocoPhillips (foundation gift) and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) with the goal of fostering solutions to water-energy challenges via education, research and outreach. The WE2ST center is a training ground for the next generation of water-energy-social scientists and engineers and is a natural fit for CSM, which is known for its expertise in water resources, water treatment technologies, petroleum engineering, geosciences, and hydrology. WE2ST has nine contributing faculty researchers that combine to create a web of expertise on sustainable energy and water resources. This research benefits unconventional energy producers, water-reliant stakeholders and the general public. Areas of focus for research include water sources (quality and quantity), integrated water-energy solution viability and risk, and social-corporate responsibility. The WE2ST Center currently provides annual support for 8-9 Graduate Fellows and 13 Undergraduate Scholars. Top-tier graduate students are recruited nationally and funded similar to an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (GRF). Undergraduate Scholars are also recruited from across the CSM campus to gain experience in faculty laboratories and on research teams. All WE2ST students receive extensive professional skills training, leadership development, communication skills training, networking opportunities in the water-energy industries, and outreach opportunities in the community. The corner stone of the WE2ST Center is a focus on communication with the public. Both in social science research teams and in general interactions with the public, WE2ST seeks to be "an honest broker" amidst a very passionate and complex topic. WE2ST research is communicated by presentations at technical conferences, talking with people at public gatherings

  18. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of St. Lucie Plant, Unit No. 2, Docket No. 50-389. Florida Power and Light Company, Orlando Utilities Commission of the City of Orlando, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    On October 9, 1981, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff issued a safety evaluation report (SER) related to the operation of St. Lucie Plant Unit 2. Supplement No. 1 (SSER 1) to the SER was issued in December, 1981. In the SER and SSER 1 the staff identified certain issues where either further information or additional staff effort was necessary to complete the review. The purpose of this supplement is to update the SER by providing (1) evaluation of additional information submitted by the applicant since SSER 1 to the SER was issued and (2) evaluation of the matters the staff had under review when the SSER 1 was issued

  19. The Need for Comparative Education Research to Concentrate on the Cultural Revolution within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, M. Loretta

    Comparative education research and courses are needed to identify real revolutionary movements in the current cultural revolution in the United States. The presence of cultural revolution is indicated by, among other things, the development of microcultures. Intranational instead of cross-national studies are of importance in the next few years to…

  20. United States Air Force Research Initiation Program. 1984 Research Reports. Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    right terminal of lamp 13. Position the second switch below switch A such that the handle may be pulled toward you or pushed away from you. The second...position. 42. Pull the handle of s.itch B toward you to light lamp B. 47. Fush.the handle of switch B all the way forward to light both lamps A and B... goalI was to obtain information that could lead to the stabilization of a . Nd:YAG laser. III. APPROACH At the beginning of this research, some of the

  1. WATER INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S. EPA’S RESEARCH PLANS FOR GRAVITY SEWERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) has long recognized the need for research and development in the area of drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. Most recently in support of the Agency’s Sustainable Water Infrastruct...

  2. A Comparison of Four Different Beach Profiling Techniques at St Leonards, Victoria - An Example of a Collaborative Stakeholder Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N. L.; Miner, A. S.; Wynn, N.; Turner, D.

    2015-12-01

    Many beaches in Australia are under attack from shoreline erosion due rising sea levels and the action of waves. St Leonard's beach, a tourist town on the Victorian coastline, is of concern from this destructive erosion and the threat to the economic stability of the town. The major cause of erosion in this area is related to waves created from strong to gale force north to north-easterly winds. This in turn produces a northerly longshore current along with sediment suspension leading to a negative sediment budget. Ongoing and systematic monitoring of the shoreline movement is important to ensure the coast is understood and effectively managed now and into the future. Coastal land managers and agencies are required to find 'cost-effective' and 'fit-for-purpose' coastal monitoring methodologies which are affordable and efficient. This project forges a collaboration of stakeholders from academia, public sector land manager, local government and the private sector to compare four different methods of obtaining beach profiles. The four methods of obtaining beach profiles used for comparison are: 1. traditional survey method along transects using a total station theodolite, 2. traditional survey method along transects using a builder's grade laser level, 3. a small multi-rotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to produce a full 3D digital surface model of the study area, and 4. an experimental stationary device to produce a limited 3D model along a designated transect using terrestrial photogrammetric approach via a small GPS enabled camera. Assessment is made by comparing the method's precision, spatial coverage, expertise and equipment requirements/costs, preparation time, field acquisition time, number of people required in the field, post-acquisition processing time, and applicability for community use. Whilst is must be very clearly stated that all methods proved to be successful, the preliminary results of the "workflow and resourcing" assessment ranked the methods in

  3. CDC WONDER: Population - Bridged-Race July 1st Estimates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Population - Bridged-Race July 1st Estimates online databases report bridged-race population estimates of the July 1st resident population of the United States,...

  4. Challenges and strategies for quantitative and qualitative field research in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Tar-Ching; Zoubeidi, Taoufik; Al-Maskari, Fatma; Blair, Iain

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and public health research depends on factors including national systems, socio-cultural influences, and access to organisations and individuals. As a 'new' country, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has yet to develop strong support for population research. However, there is interest in research. The challenges for quantitative and qualitative research include the varied composition and mobility of the UAE population, with limited health records and disease registries. Long-term follow-up of patients, and tracing foreign workers who may only be in the UAE for a few years, are two major obstacles for longitudinal studies. There can also be a reluctance shown by parts of the population to participate in studies, especially those that require responding to what is perceived as sensitive questions. Successful execution of population research in the UAE requires an understanding of socio-cultural aspects of the study population, and good communication between researchers and participants.

  5. Research on unit commitment with large-scale wind power connected power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Ran; Zhang, Baoqun; Chi, Zhongjun; Gong, Cheng; Ma, Longfei; Yang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale integration of wind power generators into power grid brings severe challenges to power system economic dispatch due to its stochastic volatility. Unit commitment including wind farm is analyzed from the two parts of modeling and solving methods. The structures and characteristics can be summarized after classification has been done according to different objective function and constraints. Finally, the issues to be solved and possible directions of research and development in the future are discussed, which can adapt to the requirements of the electricity market, energy-saving power generation dispatching and smart grid, even providing reference for research and practice of researchers and workers in this field.

  6. [Ethics of research in psychiatry. Comparison of France and the United States].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, P; Pacault-Legendre, V

    1983-01-01

    This article presents a comparison of research ethics in psychopharmacology in France and the United States. The authors present some elements of definition, etymology and of history. In addition, they study how this very specific research is actually done. Many questions are discussed, including the right of the patient, and the problem of normal volunteers. Other aspects are more technical i.e. remuneration, protocol, and the product. Finally the role of the ethics committees is investigated. These committees comprise the third component of the trial that consists of the research and the subject.

  7. Product- and Process Units in the CRITT Translation Process Research Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael

    than 300 hours of text production. The database provides the raw logging data, as well as Tables of pre-processed product- and processing units. The TPR-DB includes various types of simple and composed product and process units that are intended to support the analysis and modelling of human text......The first version of the "Translation Process Research Database" (TPR DB v1.0) was released In August 2012, containing logging data of more than 400 translation and text production sessions. The current version of the TPR DB, (v1.4), contains data from more than 940 sessions, which represents more...

  8. Developing nursing research in the United Arab Emirates: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreaddie, M; Kuzemski, D; Griffiths, J; Sojka, E M; Fielding, M; Al Yateem, N; Williams, J J

    2018-03-01

    This article identified, critically analysed and synthesized the literature on international nursing and midwifery research capacity building and standards. The United Arab Emirates is heavily dependent up on expatriate nurses. Only 4% of nurses working within the country are Emirati. The nation is therefore committed to developing nurses and nursing as a profession. The United Arab Emirates' Nursing and Midwifery Council was formed in 2009 and initially focused on regulation, education and specialization. This review was undertaken to inform the work of the Council's newly established Scientific Research Sub-Committee. A rapid narrative review was conducted using the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature database, key words, Boolean operators, parameters and a journal-specific search. An inclusion/exclusion criterion was identified. The search provided 332 articles with 45 included in the final review. The literature on nursing research 'standards' and 'capacity building' is diverse and inconsistent across continents and in approaches. Nursing research has evolved to varying degrees across the globe. Nevertheless, irrespective of the locale, there are similar problems encountered in growing research, for example nursing faculty shortage, lack of collaborative research, funding. There are also specific challenges in the Middle East and North Africa region. The review was constrained by time and access. There are specific challenges for the United Arab Emirates. However, the country is well placed to learn from the experiences of colleagues elsewhere. Time and commitment is required to build the solid foundations necessary to ensure robust, sustained growth. Identifying research capacity as both a process and outcome at the outset may also assist. Further, it may be prudent to consider initiating a Gulf Coast Countries' collaborative approach to building research capacity to harness scare resources and create a larger critical mass. © 2017

  9. Towards a 21st-century roadmap for biomedical research and drug discovery: consensus report and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Gillian R; Adcock, Ian M; Busquet, François; Crofton, Kevin M; Csernok, Elena; Giese, Christoph; Heinonen, Tuula; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Landesmann, Brigitte; Marshall, Lindsay J; McIvor, Emily; Muotri, Alysson R; Noor, Fozia; Schutte, Katrin; Seidle, Troy; van de Stolpe, Anja; Van Esch, Hilde; Willett, Catherine; Woszczek, Grzegorz

    2017-02-01

    Decades of costly failures in translating drug candidates from preclinical disease models to human therapeutic use warrant reconsideration of the priority placed on animal models in biomedical research. Following an international workshop attended by experts from academia, government institutions, research funding bodies, and the corporate and non-governmental organisation (NGO) sectors, in this consensus report, we analyse, as case studies, five disease areas with major unmet needs for new treatments. In view of the scientifically driven transition towards a human pathways-based paradigm in toxicology, a similar paradigm shift appears to be justified in biomedical research. There is a pressing need for an approach that strategically implements advanced, human biology-based models and tools to understand disease pathways at multiple biological scales. We present recommendations to help achieve this. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. FINAL INTERIM REPORT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FINAL STATUS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 and 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadick, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) facilities were constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium. SPRU operated between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction/oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes that were subsequently used by the Hanford and the Savannah River sites.

  11. A continuing success - The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustin, Tracy P.; Clapper, Maureen; Reilly, Jill E.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy, in consultation with the Department of State, adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. To date, the Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program, established under this policy, has completed 16 spent fuel shipments. 2,651 material test reactor (MTR) assemblies, one Slowpoke core containing less than 1 kilogram of U.S.-origin enriched uranium, 824 Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomic (TRIGA) rods, and 267 TRIGA pins from research reactors around the world have been shipped to the United States so far under this program. As the FRR SNF Acceptance Program progresses into the fifth year of implementation, a second U.S. cross country shipment has been completed, as well as a second overland truck shipment from Canada. Both the cross country shipment and the Canadian shipment were safely and successfully completed, increasing our knowledge and experience in these types of shipments. In addition, two other shipments were completed since last year's RERTR meeting. Other program activities since the last meeting included: taking pre-emptive steps to avoid license amendment pitfalls/showstoppers for spent fuel casks, publication of a revision to the Record of Decision allowing up to 16 casks per ocean going vessel, and the issuance of a cable to 16 of the 41 eligible countries reminding their governments and the reactor operators that the U.S.-origin uranium in their research reactors may be eligible for return to the United States under the Acceptance Program and urging them to begin discussions on shipping schedules. The FRR SNF program has also supported the Department's implementation of the competitive pricing policy for uranium and resumption of shipments of fresh uranium for fabrication into assemblies for research reactors. The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program continues

  12. U.S. Geological Survey Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2016–2017 Research Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2017-04-20

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has several strategic goals that focus its efforts on serving the American people. The USGS Ecosystems Mission Area has responsibility for the following objectives under the strategic goal of “Science to Manage and Sustain Resources for Thriving Economies and Healthy Ecosystems”:Understand, model, and predict change in natural systemsConserve and protect wildlife and fish species and their habitatsReduce or eliminate the threat of invasive species and wildlife diseaseThis report provides abstracts of the majority of ongoing research investigations of the USGS Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program and is intended to complement the 2016 Cooperative Research Units Program Year in Review Circular 1424 (https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1424). The report is organized by the following major science themes that contribute to the objectives of the USGS:Advanced TechnologiesClimate ScienceDecision ScienceEcological FlowsEcosystem ServicesEndangered Species Conservation, Recovery, and Proactive StrategiesEnergyHuman DimensionsInvasive SpeciesLandscape EcologySpecies of Greatest Conservation NeedSpecies Population, Habitat, and Harvest ManagementWildlife Health and Disease

  13. Ethnographic research into nursing in acute adult mental health units: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Acute inpatient mental health units are busy and sometimes chaotic settings, with high bed occupancy rates. These settings include acutely unwell patients, busy staff, and a milieu characterised by unpredictable interactions and events. This paper is a report of a literature review conducted to identify, analyse, and synthesize ethnographic research in adult acute inpatient mental health units. Several electronic databases were searched using relevant keywords to identify studies published from 1990-present. Additional searches were conducted using reference lists. Ethnographic studies published in English were included if they investigated acute inpatient care in adult settings. Papers were excluded if the unit under study was not exclusively for patients in the acute phase of their mental illness, or where the original study was not fully ethnographic. Ten research studies meeting our criteria were found (21 papers). Findings were grouped into the following overarching categories: (1) Micro-skills; (2) Collectivity; (3) Pragmatism; and (4) Reframing of nursing activities. The results of this ethnographic review reveal the complexity, patient-orientation, and productivity of some nursing interventions that may not have been observed or understood without the use of this research method. Additional quality research should focus on redefining clinical priorities and philosophies to ensure everyday care is aligned constructively with the expectations of stakeholders and is consistent with policy and the realities of the organisational setting. We have more to learn from each other with regard to the effective nursing care of inpatients who are acutely disturbed.

  14. Securing the Future of Communication Education: Advancing an Advocacy and Research Agenda for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Stephen; Wright, Anna; Simonds, Cheri

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1980s, noted communication scholar Cassandra Book laid out a comprehensive rationale and agenda for communication education research specifically focusing on pedagogical content knowledge for Communication courses in K-12 education. It has been 25 years since Book published her call for those in our discipline to pursue research…

  15. The 21st Century Digital Student: Google Books as a Tool in Promoting Undergraduate Research in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Lara; Dietz, Lauri

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we contend that publically available, mass digitization projects, such as Google Books, present faculty, regardless of their specific institutional context, with an exciting opportunity to promote meaningful undergraduate research in the humanities. By providing a classroom case study and by proposing an institutional model, we…

  16. China’s S&T Emergence: A Proposal for U.S. DOD-China Collaboration in Fundamental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    electronics, and has a very strong innovative and entrepreneurial focus. An innovative research program exploring the active components of herbs used...for Japan, Korea and Taiwan to get to the same point. China, contrary to popular perception, has made good progress.”33 As mentioned previously, in

  17. International Education in the 21st Century: The Importance of Faculty in Developing Study Abroad Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedt, Todd; Gokcek, Gigi; Ghosh, Jayati

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues for a reimagining of education abroad that fuses short-term programming with some kind of experiential research component led by home campus disciplinary faculty, especially those in the sciences, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, in order to better integrate the study abroad program into the core undergraduate…

  18. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute's education and public outreach program: Working toward a global 21st century space exploration society

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Thomson, William A.; Moreno, Nancy P.

    2011-05-01

    Space Exploration educators worldwide are confronting challenges and embracing opportunities to prepare students for the global 21st century workforce. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), established in 1997 through a NASA competition, is a 12-university consortium dedicated to space life science research and education. NSBRI's Education and Public Outreach Program (EPOP) is advancing the Institute's mission by responding to global educational challenges through activities that: provide teacher professional development; develop curricula that teach students to communicate with their peers across the globe; provide women and minority US populations with greater access to, and awareness of science careers; and promote international science education partnerships. A recent National Research Council (NRC) Space Studies Board Report, America's Future in Space: Aligning the Civil Program with National Needs, acknowledges that "a capable workforce for the 21st century is a key strategic objective for the US space program… (and that) US problems requiring best efforts to understand and resolve…are global in nature and must be addressed through mutual worldwide action". [1] This sentiment has gained new momentum through a recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) report, which recommends that the life of the International Space Station be extended beyond the planned 2016 termination. [2] The two principles of globalization and ISS utility have elevated NSBRI EPOP efforts to design and disseminate science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) educational materials that prepare students for full participation in a globalized, high technology society; promote and provide teacher professional development; create research opportunities for women and underserved populations; and build international educational partnerships. This paper describes select EPOP projects and makes the case for using innovative, emerging information

  19. United States private-sector physicians and pharmaceutical contract research: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jill A; Kalbaugh, Corey A

    2012-01-01

    There have been dramatic increases over the past 20 years in the number of nonacademic, private-sector physicians who serve as principal investigators on US clinical trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. However, there has been little research on the implications of these investigators' role in clinical investigation. Our objective was to study private-sector clinics involved in US pharmaceutical clinical trials to understand the contract research arrangements supporting drug development, and specifically how private-sector physicians engaged in contract research describe their professional identities. We conducted a qualitative study in 2003-2004 combining observation at 25 private-sector research organizations in the southwestern United States and 63 semi-structured interviews with physicians, research staff, and research participants at those clinics. We used grounded theory to analyze and interpret our data. The 11 private-sector physicians who participated in our study reported becoming principal investigators on industry clinical trials primarily because contract research provides an additional revenue stream. The physicians reported that they saw themselves as trial practitioners and as businesspeople rather than as scientists or researchers. Our findings suggest that in addition to having financial motivation to participate in contract research, these US private-sector physicians have a professional identity aligned with an industry-based approach to research ethics. The generalizability of these findings and whether they have changed in the intervening years should be addressed in future studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  20. United States private-sector physicians and pharmaceutical contract research: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Fisher

    Full Text Available There have been dramatic increases over the past 20 years in the number of nonacademic, private-sector physicians who serve as principal investigators on US clinical trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. However, there has been little research on the implications of these investigators' role in clinical investigation. Our objective was to study private-sector clinics involved in US pharmaceutical clinical trials to understand the contract research arrangements supporting drug development, and specifically how private-sector physicians engaged in contract research describe their professional identities.We conducted a qualitative study in 2003-2004 combining observation at 25 private-sector research organizations in the southwestern United States and 63 semi-structured interviews with physicians, research staff, and research participants at those clinics. We used grounded theory to analyze and interpret our data. The 11 private-sector physicians who participated in our study reported becoming principal investigators on industry clinical trials primarily because contract research provides an additional revenue stream. The physicians reported that they saw themselves as trial practitioners and as businesspeople rather than as scientists or researchers.Our findings suggest that in addition to having financial motivation to participate in contract research, these US private-sector physicians have a professional identity aligned with an industry-based approach to research ethics. The generalizability of these findings and whether they have changed in the intervening years should be addressed in future studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  1. FFUSION yearbook 1996. Annual report of the Finnish research unit. Association EURATOM-TEKES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, S; Paettikangas, T [eds.; VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-05-01

    Finnish fusion programme (FFUSION) is one of the eleven national energy research programmes funded by the Technological Development Centre of Finland (TEKES). The FFUSION programme was fully integrated into European Fusion Programme just after Finland joined the European Union. The contract of Association Euratom and Tekes was signed in 1995 and extends to the end of 1999. Finland became a member of JET Joint Undertaking in 1996, other contracts with Euratom include NET agreement and the Staff Mobility Agreement. FFUSION programme with participating research institutes and universities forms the Fusion Research Unit of the Association Euratom-Tekes. This annual report summarises the research activities of the Finnish Research Unit in 1996. The programme consists of two parts: Physics and Technology. The research areas of the physics are: Fusion plasma engineering, Radio-frequency heating and plasma diagnostics, and Plasma-wall interactions - ion-beam studies. The technology is focused into three areas: Fusion reactor materials (first wall components and joining techniques), Remote handling and viewing systems, and Superconductors

  2. Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility

  3. Research on Key Technologies of Unit-Based CNC Machine Tool Assembly Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqi Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Assembly is the part that produces the maximum workload and consumed time during product design and manufacturing process. CNC machine tool is the key basic equipment in manufacturing industry and research on assembly design technologies of CNC machine tool has theoretical significance and practical value. This study established a simplified ASRG for CNC machine tool. The connection between parts, semantic information of transmission, and geometric constraint information were quantified to assembly connection strength to depict the assembling difficulty level. The transmissibility based on trust relationship was applied on the assembly connection strength. Assembly unit partition based on assembly connection strength was conducted, and interferential assembly units were identified and revised. The assembly sequence planning and optimization of parts in each assembly unit and between assembly units was conducted using genetic algorithm. With certain type of high speed CNC turning center, as an example, this paper explored into the assembly modeling, assembly unit partition, and assembly sequence planning and optimization and realized the optimized assembly sequence of headstock of CNC machine tool.

  4. Synergy between indigenous knowledge systems, modern health care system and scientific research – a vision for the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fhumulani Mavis Mulaudzi

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Research already conducted in African countries indicates that the majority of patients still seek help from the traditional indigenous health care systems. Opsomming Navorsing wat reeds in Afrika-lande onderneem is, dui aan dat die meerderheid pasiënte steeds hulp soek vanaf die tradisioneel inheemse gesondheidsorgsisteme. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  5. The United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program: Proposal to modify the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. The policy was slated to expire in May 2009. However, in October 2003, a petition requesting a program extension was delivered to the United States Secretary of Energy from a group of research reactor operators from foreign countries. In April 2004, the Secretary directed DOE undertake an analysis, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to consider potential extension of the Program. On December 1, 2004, a Federal Register Notice was issued approving the program extension. This paper discusses the findings from the NEPA analysis and the potential changes in the program that may result from implementation of the proposed changes. (author)

  6. The Applied Meteorology Unit: Nineteen Years Successfully Transitioning Research Into Operations for America's Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, John T.; Bauman, William H., III; Merceret, Francis J.; Roeder, William P.; Brody, Frank C.; Hagemeyer, Bartlett C.

    2011-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) provides technology development and transition services to improve operational weather support to America's space program . The AMU was founded in 1991 and operates under a triagency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the United States Air Force (USAF) and the National Weather Service (NWS) (Ernst and Merceret, 1995). It is colocated with the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) and funded by the Space Shuttle Program . Its primary customers are the 45WS, the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) operated for NASA by the NWS at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, TX, and the NWS forecast office in Melbourne, FL (MLB). The gap between research and operations is well known. All too frequently, the process of transitioning research to operations fails for various reasons. The mission of the AMU is in essence to bridge this gap for America's space program.

  7. Research priorities for specialized nursing practice in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yateem, N; Al-Tamimi, M; Brenner, M; Altawil, H; Ahmad, A; Brownie, S

    2017-08-25

    Globally, nurses are undertaking expanded and more specialized roles in healthcare planning and service delivery in response to changing patterns and levels of health service demand. This means the nursing profession is increasingly considered as leaders in health service policy, research and practice. The United Arab Emirates has strengthened nursing governance and practice by establishing a Nursing and Midwifery Council and increasing the activity of nursing specialization, service leadership and research. This study aimed to identify clinically relevant research priorities to facilitate nursing contributions to evidence-based care and strengthening health services in the country. A two-stage Delphi study design was used. The first round involved 783 participants. The second round involved 1116 participants, as more clinical settings were accessed. In total, 58 research priorities across a variety of nursing specialties (paediatrics, emergency care, intensive care, labour and maternity care, operating theatre and long-term care) were identified as highly important. These identified priorities will guide a more informed programme of research in each nursing specialty, with the aim of strengthening the evidence base to improving outcomes for patients and their families in the United Arab Emirates. The findings provide guidance on key areas for nurses to focus research contributions to enhance evidence-based care and strengthen health systems. The identified priorities may also guide researchers in academic institutions to conduct research informed by current, clinically relevant issues. The findings may help inform funders and policymakers to support allocation of funding to research that has potential to contribute to enhancing nursing care in specialist areas. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  8. 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Stable Funding for Innovation and Continuous Improvement. Research Update: Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Number 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimer, Christopher; Harris, Erin

    2012-01-01

    As the only federal funding stream that provides dedicated funds for afterschool programs across the country, the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) initiative plays an important role in supporting the innovation that takes place in afterschool programs. Social innovation has been defined as "a novel solution to a social…

  9. Meeting a Binational Research Challenge: Substance Abuse Among Transnational Mexican Farmworkers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Victor

    2011-01-01

    To help in understanding the manner in which community, individual, and other factors in the United States and Mexico contribute to drug use among transnational migrants, this paper introduces a binational social ecology model of substance abuse in this population. We draw on our 2 NIH-funded ethnographic studies—1 on problem drinking and the other on drug abuse—among transnational Mexican workers in the mushroom industry of southeastern Pennsylvania. Our model demonstrates that major reasons for substance abuse among transnational migrants include nontraditional living arrangements in labor camps and overcrowded apartments, the absence of kin and community deterrents to drug use, social isolation, the presence of drug use and binge drinking subcultures, the availability of drugs, family history of drugs, previous drug use or witnessing of drug use in Mexico, and drug use norms and drug availability in Mexico. It suggests the need for US and Mexican researchers to collaborate in binational teams and address factors on both sides of the border. Our binational social ecology model, together with our research recommendations, will assist alcohol and drug researchers to discover how community and individual factors in both the United States and abroad fit and interact beyond mere association and provide a more comprehensive research approach to substance abuse research among transnational migrants. PMID:18237326

  10. Characteristics and lessons learned from practice-based research networks (PBRNs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Melinda M Davis,1,2 Sara Keller,1 Jennifer E DeVoe,1,3 Deborah J Cohen11Department of Family Medicine, 2Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 3OCHIN Practice-based Research Network, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Practice-based research networks (PBRNs are organizations that involve practicing clinicians in asking and answering clinically relevant research questions. This review explores the origins, characteristics, funding, and lessons learned through practice-based research in the United States. Primary care PBRNs emerged in the USA in the 1970s. Early studies explored the etiology of common problems encountered in primary care practices (eg, headache, miscarriage, demonstrating the gap between research conducted in controlled specialty settings and real-world practices. Over time, national initiatives and an evolving funding climate have shaped PBRN development, contributing to larger networks, a push for shared electronic health records, and the use of a broad range of research methodologies (eg, observational studies, pragmatic randomized controlled trials, continuous quality improvement, participatory methods. Today, there are over 160 active networks registered with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's PBRN Resource Center that engage primary care clinicians, pharmacists, dentists, and other health care professionals in research and quality-improvement initiatives. PBRNs provide an important laboratory for encouraging collaborative research partnerships between academicians and practices or communities to improve population health, conduct comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research, and study health policy reform. PBRNs continue to face critical challenges that include: (1 adapting to a changing landscape; (2 recruiting and retaining membership; (3 securing infrastructure support; (4 straddling two worlds (academia and community and managing

  11. INNOVATION AND RESEARCH FOR WATER INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE 21ST CENTURY: U.S. EPA’S RESEARCH PLANS FOR GRAVITY SEWERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) has long recognized the need for research and development in the area of drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. Most recently in support of the Agency’s Sustainable Water ...

  12. Academic Research in the 21st Century: Maintaining Scientific Integrity in a Climate of Perverse Incentives and Hypercompetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Marc A.; Roy, Siddhartha

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Over the last 50 years, we argue that incentives for academic scientists have become increasingly perverse in terms of competition for research funding, development of quantitative metrics to measure performance, and a changing business model for higher education itself. Furthermore, decreased discretionary funding at the federal and state level is creating a hypercompetitive environment between government agencies (e.g., EPA, NIH, CDC), for scientists in these agencies, and for academics seeking funding from all sources—the combination of perverse incentives and decreased funding increases pressures that can lead to unethical behavior. If a critical mass of scientists become untrustworthy, a tipping point is possible in which the scientific enterprise itself becomes inherently corrupt and public trust is lost, risking a new dark age with devastating consequences to humanity. Academia and federal agencies should better support science as a public good, and incentivize altruistic and ethical outcomes, while de-emphasizing output. PMID:28115824

  13. The Best Practice Unit: a model for learning, research and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Pierre Wilken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Best Practice Unit: a model for learning, research and development The Best Practice Unit (BPU model constitutes a unique form of practice-based research. A variant of the Community of Practice model developed by Wenger, McDermott and Snyder (2002, the BPU has the specific aim of improving professional practice by combining innovation and research. The model is used as a way of working by a group of professionals, researchers and other relevant individuals, who over a period of one to two years, work together towards a desired improvement. The model is characterized by interaction between individual and collective learning processes, the development of new or improved working methods, and the implementation of these methods in daily practice. Multiple knowledge resources are used, including experiential knowledge, professional knowledge and scientific knowledge. The research serves diverse purposes: articulating tacit knowledge, documenting learning and innovation processes, systematically describing the working methods that have been revealed or developed, and evaluating the efficacy of the new methods. Each BPU is supported by a facilitator, whose main task is to optimize learning processes. An analysis of ten different BPUs in different professional fields shows that this is a successful model. The article describes the methodology and results of this study. De Best Practice Unit: een model voor leren, onderzoek en ontwikkeling Het model van de Best Practice Unit (BPU is een unieke vorm van praktijkgericht onderzoek. De Best Practice Unit is een variant van de Community of Practice zoals ontwikkeld door Wenger, McDermott en Snyder (2002 met als specifiek doel om de professionele praktijk te verbeteren door innovatie en onderzoek te combineren. Het model wordt gebruikt om in een periode van 1-2 jaar met een groep professionals, onderzoekers en andere betrokkenen te werken aan een gewenste verbetering. Kenmerkend is de wisselwerking tussen

  14. What should autism research focus upon? Community views and priorities from the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsmore, Adam; Charman, Tony

    2014-01-01

    The rise in the measured prevalence of autism has been accompanied by much new research and research investment internationally. This study sought to establish whether the pattern of current UK autism research funding maps on to the concerns of the autism community. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with autistic adults, family members, practitioners and researchers to identify their priorities for research. We also captured the views of a large number of stakeholders via an online survey. There was a clear disparity between the United Kingdom’s pattern of funding for autism research and the priorities articulated by the majority of participants. There was general consensus that future priorities for autism research should lie in those areas that make a difference to people’s day-to-day lives. There needs to be greater involvement of the autism community both in priority setting and in research more broadly to ensure that resources reach where they are most needed and can make the most impact. PMID:24789871

  15. Research nurses in New Zealand intensive care units: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackle, Diane; Nelson, Katherine

    2018-04-20

    This study explored the role of the research nurse in New Zealand (NZ) Level III intensive care units (ICU). Little was known about this role in NZ prior to this study. To describe the role and responsibilities of NZ ICU research nurses. A qualitative, descriptive approach, using semi structured interviews was used. The study was conducted in six Level III ICUs throughout NZ that employed a research nurse. Interviews were conducted with research nurses (n = 11), principal investigators (n = 6) and nurse managers (n = 6), and the findings were triangulated. The views across all ICUs and stakeholders were generally similar, with differences only being in some operational areas. This study found that the primary role of the research nurse was trial management, where they coordinated all elements of trial conduct. Almost half of the research nurses were involved in trial design through their positions on management committees. Research nurses also played a vital role in patient and trial advocacy, and they bridged the knowledge gap by bringing research to staff nurses, patients and their families. The majority of research nurses reported to a nursing line manager, and had an informal accountability to the PI. The role of NZ ICU research nurses is similar to their international counterparts. This study provides clarity about the research nurse role and showcases their key contribution in ensuring that NZ ICUs undertake high quality research, thus contributing to potential improvements for future patients' outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The CNSE Public-Private Partnership Paradigm: A Driver for New York State and U.S. Educational, Research and Economic Excellence in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupoli, Edward M.

    2009-10-01

    The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany-SUNY is the first college in the world dedicated to education, research, development, and deployment in the emerging disciplines of nanoscience, nanoengineering, nanobioscience, and nanoeconomics. Envisioned and developed as a bold and unique educational, technological and business paradigm, the CNSE model has produced outcomes that are both significant and unparalleled: preparation of a highly educated, highly skilled workforce that is critical to driving opportunity and growth at all levels; acceleration of nanoscale research and development that is vital to advancing the commercialization of cutting-edge technologies and applications; and, generation of unmatched high-tech investment and job creation that are serving to foster a positive economic and societal impact throughout New York State, while also enhancing national competitiveness in the global innovation economy of the 21^st century. In less than a decade of operation, CNSE has become a globally recognized entity. CNSE's Albany NanoTech Complex is the most advanced research enterprise of its kind at any university in the world: a 5 billion, 800,000-square-foot complex that continuously attracts corporate partners from around the world, offers students a one-of-a-kind academic experience, and educates society on the implications of advances in nanotechnology. CNSE's Albany NanoTech houses the only fully-integrated 300mm wafer, computer chip pilot prototyping and demonstration line within 80,000 square feet of Class 1 capable cleanrooms. More than 2,500 scientists, researchers, engineers, students, and faculty work on site at CNSE's Albany NanoTech, with a network of global corporate partners that includes more than 250 leading nanotechnology companies, such as IBM, AMD, GlobalFoundries, SEMATECH, Toshiba, ASML, Applied Materials, Tokyo Electron, Vistec Lithography and Atotech, among many others.

  17. Essential diagnostics - the role of the Department of Biomedical Research of the Royal Tropical Institute in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Klatser

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In the light of emerging and overlooked infectious diseases and widespread drug resistance, diagnostics have become increasingly important in supporting surveillance, disease control and outbreak management programs. In many low-income countries the diagnostic service has been a neglected part of health care, often lacking quantity and quality or even non-existing at all. High-income countries have exploited few of their advanced technical abilities for the much-needed development of low-cost, rapid diagnostic tests to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and accelerate the start of appropriate treatment. As is now also recognized by World Healt Organization, investment in the development of affordable diagnostic tools is urgently needed to further our ability to control a variety of diseases that form a major threat to humanity. The Royal Tropical Institute's Department of Biomedical Research aims to contribute to the health of people living in the tropics. To this end, its multidisciplinary group of experts focuses on the diagnosis of diseases that are major health problems in low-income countries. In partnership we develop, improve and evaluate simple and cheap diagnostic tests, and perform epidemiological studies. Moreover, we advice and support others - especially those in developing countries - in their efforts to diagnose infectious diseases.

  18. Overall Assessment of Human Research and Ethics Committees in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Mahera; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar

    2017-04-01

    Growing demand for human health research in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has prompted the need to develop a robust research ethics oversight. Examination of the structure, function, and practices of the human research ethics committees (HRECs), followed by evaluation of standards for measuring research output, was conducted. Results indicate that among the HRECs, 90% followed International Council for Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice guidelines, 66.6% have been in operation for more than 5 years, 95% reviewed proposals within 8 weeks, and 56% reviewed for scientific merit apart from ethics. However, systems to recognize accomplishments of researchers, funding transparency, and adverse event reporting were deployed in less than 30% of all HRECs. Research was incorporated into the vision and mission statements of many (65%) organizations. Research publications, collaborations, and recognitions were used to measure research output and report key performance indicators. In spite, resources to generate research output such as dedicated budget (20%), support staff (20%), and continuous training and mentoring program for medical residents (15%) and HREC members (25%) were somehow lacking. HREC structure and operations in the UAE are similar to other regions of the world. Systems to conduct research and report outcomes are defined in the UAE. Regulatory legislation and allocation of resources to support the clinical research enterprise will not only help to meet growing demand for clinical trials but also transform the quality of patient care in the UAE. It is anticipated that the results of this study will benefit investigators, regulators, pharmaceutical sponsors, and the policy makers in the region.

  19. Progress in human embryonic stem cell research in the United States between 2001 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Vakili

    Full Text Available On August 9th, 2001, the federal government of the United States announced a policy restricting federal funds available for research on human embryonic stem cell (hESCs out of concern for the "vast ethical mine fields" associated with the creation of embryos for research purposes. Until the policy was repealed on March 9th, 2009, no U.S. federal funds were available for research on hESCs extracted after August 9, 2001, and only limited federal funds were available for research on a subset of hESC lines that had previously been extracted. This paper analyzes how the 2001 U.S. federal funding restrictions influenced the quantity and geography of peer-reviewed journal publications on hESC. The primary finding is that the 2001 policy did not have a significant aggregate effect on hESC research in the U.S. After a brief lag in early 2000s, U.S. hESC research maintained pace with other areas of stem cell and genetic research. The policy had several other consequences. First, it was tied to increased hESC research funding within the U.S. at the state level, leading to concentration of related activities in a relatively small number of states. Second, it stimulated increased collaborative research between US-based scientists and those in countries with flexible policies toward hESC research (including Canada, the U.K., Israel, China, Spain, and South Korea. Third, it encouraged independent hESC research in countries without restrictions.

  20. Provide for the Common Defence: Rebalancing Constitutional War Powers in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    followed those with an additional declarations against Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania in June 1942. Congressional Research Service, Instances of Use...Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Administration of William J. Clinton: 1995, no. 2, 1917- 1918 . 31 Cong. Rec., 104th Cong., 1st

  1. FFUSION yearbook 1995. Annual report of the Finnish research unit. Association EURATOM-TEKES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, S; Paettikangas, T [eds.; VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-03-01

    Finnish Fusion Research Programme (FFUSION) is one of the eleven national energy research programmes funded by the Technological Development Centre of Finland (TEKES). All fusion related research in Finland is included in the FFUSION programme and it made it possible to establish a dialogue with the European Fusion Programme already two years before Finland joined the European Union. The process led to the founding of the Association Euratom-TEKES in early 1995. The contract of Association was signed in Helsinki on March 13 1995, to establish the 14th Association in the EU FFusion Programme. This annual report summarises the research activities of the Finnish Research Unit in 1995. The emphasis is on research supported by the EU Commission. The programme consists of two parts: Physics and Technology. The research areas of the physics are: Fusion plasma engineering, Radio-frequency heating and plasma diagnostics, and Plasma-wall interactions - ion-beam studies of the reactor materials. The technology is focused into three areas: Fusion reactor materials (first wall components and joining techniques), and Remote handling

  2. Current nondestructive evaluation research and development trends in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    An underlying theme present in much of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) research and development occurring in the United States as well as worldwide is the application of physics and engineering principles toward understanding and optimizing NDE processes. Expanding this trend of using mathematical models for NDE processes is critical to the entire spectrum of NDE technology. In NDE research, modeling anchors the investigation in scientific, proven principles and establishes a firm technical basis to guide the design and development of inspection equipment and approaches. It also provides for understanding the capabilities and the limitations of whatever designs are selected and ultimately applied in the field. This paper reviews the status of these efforts, presents several examples where mathematical modeling is being profitably used for practical inspection work, and shows the path being taken in ongoing research.

  3. Application of the partitive analytical forecasting (PAF) technique to the United States controlled thermonuclear research effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, S.P.

    1975-01-01

    The Partitive Analytical Forecasting (PAF) technique is applied to the overall long-term program plans for the Division of Controlled Thermonuclear Research (DCTR) of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). As part of the PAF technique, the Graphical Evaluation and Review Technique (GERTS) IIIZ computer code is used to perform simulations on a logic network describing the DCTR long-term program plan. Logic networks describing the tokamak, mirror, and theta-pinch developments are simulated individually and then together to form an overall DCTR program network. The results of the simulation of the overall network using various funding schemes and strategies are presented. An economic sensitivity analysis is provided for the tokamak logic networks. An analysis is also performed of the fusion-fission hybrid concept in the context of the present DCTR goals. The results mentioned above as well as the PAF technique itself are evaluated, and recommendations for further research are discussed

  4. Testing of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) is a high-efficiency generator being developed for potential use on a Discovery 12 space mission. Lockheed Martin designed and fabricated the ASRG Engineering Unit (EU) under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit was delivered to NASA Glenn Research Center in 2008 and has been undergoing extended operation testing to generate long-term performance data for an integrated system. It has also been used for tests to characterize generator operation while varying control parameters and system inputs, both when controlled with an alternating current (AC) bus and with a digital controller. The ASRG EU currently has over 27,000 hours of operation. This paper summarizes all of the tests that have been conducted on the ASRG EU over the past 3 years and provides an overview of the test results and what was learned.

  5. Research ethics committees in the regulation of clinical research: comparison of Finland to England, Canada, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Elina

    2016-01-19

    The aim of this paper is to compare common features and variation in the work of research ethics committees (RECs) in Finland to three other countries - England, Canada, the United States of America (USA) - in the late 2000s. Several approaches and data sources were used, including semi- or unstructured interviews of experts, documents, previous reports, presentations in meetings and observations. A theoretical framework was created and data from various sources synthesized. In Finland, RECs were regulated by a medical research law, whereas in the other countries many related laws and rules guided RECs; drug trials had specific additional rules. In England and the USA, there was a REC control body. In all countries, members were voluntary and included lay-persons, and payment arrangements varied. Patient protection was the main ethics criteria, but other criteria (research advancement, availability of results, payments, detailed fulfilment of legislation) varied. In all countries, RECs had been given administrative duties. Variations by country included the mandate, practical arrangements, handling of multi-site research, explicitness of proportionate handlings, judging scientific quality, time-limits for decisions, following of projects, role in institute protection, handling conflicts of interests, handling of projects without informed consent, and quality assurance research. The division of work between REC members and secretariats varied in checking of formalities. In England, quality assurance of REC work was thorough, fairly thorough in the USA, and not performed in Finland. The work of RECs in the four countries varied notably. Various deficiencies in the system require action, for which international comparison can provide useful insights.

  6. Maritime Education and Research to Face the XXI-st Century Challenges in Gdynia Maritime University’s Experience Part I – Maritime Universities Facing Today and Tomorrow’s Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Mindykowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, divided into two parts, a problem of advancements in maritime education and research facing the 21st century challenges, based on the case study of the Gdynia Maritime University (GMU experience is discussed. Part I is devoted to the main directions of advances in the maritime education and research towards the challenges in a global meaning. In this context, the education and research potential of the Gdynia Maritime University, as one of the world-leading maritime universities, is shortly presented. Part II is dedicated to the Gdynia Maritime University experiencing the 21st century challenges. The GMU’s contribution and good practices concerning the participation in modification of the processes of the IMO STCW 78/2010 convention, adoption of programmes into the international and national qualification frameworks’ standards and procedures, as well as the development of research addressed to a new technological and organizational solution are described and analyzed.

  7. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Methods Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). Results The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. Conclusions We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials. PMID:23433341

  8. National funding for mental health research in Finland, France, Spain and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazo, Jean-Baptiste; Gandré, Coralie; Leboyer, Marion; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Belli, Stefano; McDaid, David; Park, A-La; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Wykes, Til; van Os, Jim; Haro, Josep Maria; Chevreul, Karine

    2017-09-01

    As part of the Roamer project, we aimed at revealing the share of health research budgets dedicated to mental health, as well as on the amounts allocated to such research for four European countries. Finland, France, Spain and the United Kingdom national public and non-profit funding allocated to mental health research in 2011 were investigated using, when possible, bottom-up approaches. Specifics of the data collection varied from country to country. The total amount of public and private not for profit mental health research funding for Finland, France, Spain and the UK was €10·2, €84·8, €16·8, and €127·6 million, respectively. Charities accounted for a quarter of the funding in the UK and less than six per cent elsewhere. The share of health research dedicated to mental health ranged from 4·0% in the UK to 9·7% in Finland. When compared to the DALY attributable to mental disorders, Spain, France, Finland, and the UK invested respectively €12·5, €31·2, €39·5, and €48·7 per DALY. Among these European countries, there is an important gap between the level of mental health research funding and the economic and epidemiologic burden of mental disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. Final report for the 1st ex-vessel neutron dosimetry installations and evaluations for Kori unit 2 reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Lim, Nam Jin; Hong, Joon Wha; Cheon, Byeong Jin

    2006-11-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori unit 2 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in regulatory guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. During cycle 20 of reactor operation, an ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program was instituted at Kori unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of cycle 20.

  10. Final report for the 1st ex-vessel neutron dosimetry installation and evaluations for Kori unit 4 reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Lim, Nam Jin; Hong, Joon Wha; Cheon, Byeong Jin

    2006-11-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori unit 4 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in regulatory guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. During cycle 16 of reactor operation, an ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program was instituted at Kori unit 4 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of cycle 16.

  11. Progress of the United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, D.G.; Clapper, M.; Thrower, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. To date, the Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program has completed 23 shipments. Almost 5000 spent fuel assemblies from eligible research reactors throughout the world have been accepted into the United States under this program. Over the past year, another cross-country shipment of fuel was accomplished, as well as two additional shipments in the fourth quarter of calendar year 2001. These shipments attracted considerable safeguards oversight since they occurred post September 11. Recent guidance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pertaining to security and safeguards issues deals directly with the transport of nuclear material. Since the Acceptance Program has consistently applied above regulatory safety enhancements in transport of spent nuclear fuel, this guidance did not adversely effect the Program. As the Program draws closer to its termination date, an increased number of requests for program extension are received. Currently, there are no plans to extend the policy beyond its current expiration date; therefore, eligible reactor operators interested in participating in this program are strongly encouraged to evaluate their inventory and plan for future shipments as soon as possible. (author)

  12. The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

  13. Home of the 151st Air Refueling Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    History HRA Alley Public Affairs SAPR Units Contact Us Search 151st ARW: 151st ARW The Roland R. Wright woman in the profession of arms President Trump visits Roland R. Wright Air National Guard Base 151st Commentaries Women's History Month: looking around as important as looking back Veterans Day: Pay tribute with

  14. The characteristics analysis of torque and rotation speed of working unit of branch grinder - introductory research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warguła Łukasz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrying out a realistic research on working units of machines that grinder waste coming from tree and bush trimming requires designing machines that would be more efficient. It is neccesary both to introduce the analysis of already existing solutions as well as searching for innovative ones that would result in the increase of efficiency, lowering the costs and time needed as well as lower exhaust emission into the atmosphere. The results presented below will be used for the following purposes: the analysis of grinding process that supplies data to cunstruct simulating models that reflect the real working conditions of grinding machines. The results of the experiments will allow to estimate the influence of construction featrures, including the ones connected with automatisation. The importance of the carried out research is also applicable to the analisys of influence of grinding process on the form of flakes that result from the process, energy consumption. It also allows to make conclusions leading to the improvement of the processes that use grinded mass.The construction specifity of ths kind of machines and their working principles results from the fact, that the cutting process they perform concerns orthotropic plant material that has inhomogenic structure and physical-chemical properties requires further analysis. The article presents the construcion of a research stand designed to record the characteristisc of changes of the torque and rotation speed of working unit of mill chopper type MQS2800 Macalister. The introductory research results presented below point out that depending on the position of the sample (along the grain against the mill chopper significantly influences on the form of generated changes of the torque. The research stand that has been designed and constructed allows the analysis of both construction features of the chopper as well via the assessment of grinding process also separte paremeters of processed wood.

  15. Accounting for Diversity in Suicide Research: Sampling and Sample Reporting Practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Christine B; Tezanos, Katherine M; Peros, Olivia M; Ng, Mei Yi; Ribeiro, Jessica D; Nock, Matthew K; Franklin, Joseph C

    2018-04-01

    Research on suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STB) has identified many risk factors, but whether these findings generalize to diverse populations remains unclear. We review longitudinal studies on STB risk factors over the past 50 years in the United States and evaluate the methodological practices of sampling and reporting sample characteristics. We found that articles frequently reported participant age and sex, less frequently reported participant race and ethnicity, and rarely reported participant veteran status or lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender status. Sample reporting practices modestly and inconsistently improved over time. Finally, articles predominantly featured White, non-Hispanic, young adult samples. © 2017 The American Association of Suicidology.

  16. Scoping Study on Research and Development Priorities for Distribution-System Phasor Measurement Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stewart, Emma M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Travis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Buckner, Mark [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kirkham, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tuffner, Francis [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schoenwald, David A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report addresses the potential use of phasor measurement units (PMUs) within electricity distribution systems, and was written to assess whether or not PMUs could provide significant benefit, at the national level. We analyze examples of present and emerging distribution-system issues related to reliability, integration of distributed energy resources, and the changing electrical characteristics of load. We find that PMUs offer important and irreplaceable advantages over present approaches. However, we also find that additional research and development for standards, testing and calibration, demonstration projects, and information sharing is needed to help industry capture these benefits.

  17. Research and development activities on Three Mile Island Unit Two. Annual report for 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The year 1985 was significant in the cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). Major milestones in the project included lifting the plenum assembly from the reactor vessel and the start of operations to remove the damaged fuel from the reactor. This report summarizes these milestones and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include the following: waste immobilization and management; fuel shipping cask delivery and testing; sample acquisition and evaluation; and decontamination and dose reduction. 26 figs.

  18. Energy research and development in the United Kingdom: a discussion document. [Monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for the future planning of United Kingdom research and development in energy technologies. It contains the first steps in the formulation of a national energy R and D strategy. Decision on energy R and D must be taken in the light of the overall aims of energy policies. The main objectives of energy policy are to meet the energy needs of the country at minimum cost in real resources over time, while paying due regard to security of supply, to public safety, to protection of the environment and, where major change is in prospect, to the social consequences of change.

  19. Research on collaborative innovation mechanism of green construction supply chain based on united agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; He, Weiyi

    2018-06-01

    Under the guidance of principal-agent theory and modular theory, the collaborative innovation of green technology-based companies, design contractors and project builders based on united agency will provide direction for the development of green construction supply chain in the future. After analyzing the existing independent agencies, this paper proposes the industry-university-research bilateral collaborative innovation network architecture and modularization with the innovative function of engineering design in the context of non-standard transformation interfaces, analyzes the innovation responsibility center, and gives some countermeasures and suggestions to promote the performance of bilateral cooperative innovation network.

  20. Assessing and improving health in the workplace: an integration of subjective and objective measures with the STress Assessment and Research Toolkit (St.A.R.T. method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panari Chiara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this work was to introduce a new combined method of subjective and objective measures to assess psychosocial risk factors at work and improve workers’ health and well-being. In the literature most of the research on work-related stress focuses on self-report measures and this work represents the first methodology capable of integrating different sources of data. Method An integrated method entitled St.A.R.T. (STress Assessment and Research Toolkit was used in order to assess psychosocial risk factors and two health outcomes. In particular, a self-report questionnaire combined with an observational structured checklist was administered to 113 workers from an Italian retail company. Results The data showed a correlation between subjective data and the rating data of the observational checklist for the psychosocial risk factors related to work contexts such as customer relationship management and customer queue. Conversely, the factors related to work content (workload and boredom measured with different methods (subjective vs. objective showed a discrepancy. Furthermore, subjective measures of psychosocial risk factors were more predictive of workers’ psychological health and exhaustion than rating data. The different objective measures played different roles, however, in terms of their influence on the two health outcomes considered. Conclusions It is important to integrate self-related assessment of stressors with objective measures for a better understanding of workers’ conditions in the workplace. The method presented could be considered a useful methodology for combining the two measures and differentiating the impact of different psychological risk factors related to work content and context on workers’ health.

  1. Assessing and improving health in the workplace: an integration of subjective and objective measures with the STress Assessment and Research Toolkit (St.A.R.T.) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panari, Chiara; Guglielmi, Dina; Ricci, Aurora; Tabanelli, Maria Carla; Violante, Francesco Saverio

    2012-09-20

    The aim of this work was to introduce a new combined method of subjective and objective measures to assess psychosocial risk factors at work and improve workers' health and well-being. In the literature most of the research on work-related stress focuses on self-report measures and this work represents the first methodology capable of integrating different sources of data. An integrated method entitled St.A.R.T. (STress Assessment and Research Toolkit) was used in order to assess psychosocial risk factors and two health outcomes. In particular, a self-report questionnaire combined with an observational structured checklist was administered to 113 workers from an Italian retail company. The data showed a correlation between subjective data and the rating data of the observational checklist for the psychosocial risk factors related to work contexts such as customer relationship management and customer queue. Conversely, the factors related to work content (workload and boredom) measured with different methods (subjective vs. objective) showed a discrepancy. Furthermore, subjective measures of psychosocial risk factors were more predictive of workers' psychological health and exhaustion than rating data. The different objective measures played different roles, however, in terms of their influence on the two health outcomes considered. It is important to integrate self-related assessment of stressors with objective measures for a better understanding of workers' conditions in the workplace. The method presented could be considered a useful methodology for combining the two measures and differentiating the impact of different psychological risk factors related to work content and context on workers' health.

  2. Recruiting bereaved parents for research after infant death in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Erin R; Roche, Cathy; Christian, Becky J; Bakitas, Marie; Meneses, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Understanding parental experiences following infant death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a high research priority and a necessary first step to improving health services. However, recruiting bereaved parents to discuss their experiences on such an extremely sensitive topic can be challenging and research procedures must be planned carefully in order to get an adequate sample. There is little published in the literature detailing specific strategies for recruiting bereaved parents for grief research, especially strategies for contacting parents and identifying factors that might affect participation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of recruiting bereaved parents into a qualitative research study exploring parental NICU experiences and grief responses following infant death. We describe a successful recruitment plan that led to the enrollment of difficult to recruit participants such as fathers, and individuals representing minorities and those from lower socioeconomic (SES) groups. Bereaved parents of infants after an NICU hospitalization should continue to be recruited for research studies for their unique perspectives and valuable insights about the devastating experience of infant death. Participants in this study reported more benefits than harm and the results addressed a critical gap in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research degree-granting PhD programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slejko, Julia F; Libby, Anne M; Nair, Kavita V; Valuck, Robert J; Campbell, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is missing on showcasing current practices of degree programs specific to the field of pharmaceutical outcomes research. To measure current practices of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research PhD programs in the United States and synthesize recommendations for improving the success of programs and prospective students. A 23-question online survey instrument was created and distributed to 32 program directors identified in the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research educational directory. Descriptive statistics summarized both the program characteristics (including observed and desired number of faculty and students) and training recommendations (traits of program and student success). Of 30 eligible programs that conferred a PhD in pharmacoeconomics, pharmaceutical outcomes research, or a related field, 16 respondents (53%) completed the survey. Seventy-five percent of respondents were located in a school of pharmacy. The average observed number of faculty (7.5) and students (11.5) was lower than the average desired numbers (8.1) and (14.7), respectively. Reputation of faculty research and a collaborative environment with other disciplines were rated highest for a program's success. Faculty's mentoring experience and reputation and student funding opportunities were rated highest for prospective students' success. Existing and emerging programs as well as prospective students can use these findings to further their chances of success. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. "FACILS 2014: Microbially-driven facilitation systems in environmental biotechnology" (hereafter "FACILS") presented here by the European Commission (EC)-United States (US) Task Force on Biotechnology Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Methe, Barbara

    2016-02-03

    As we enter the 21st century, the sustainability of the biosphere is a global challenge that can best be met with a global response. This includes how we train and promote our next generation of research scientists in the emerging arenas of genome-enabled biology and a bio-based economy. It is this fundamental issue that formed the motivation for designing and conducting a shortcourse entitled “FACILIS 2014: Microbially-driven facilitation systems in environmental biotechnology” (hereafter “FACILIS”) presented here by the European Commission (EC)-United States (US) Task Force on Biotechnology Research. This WG was established in 1994 under the umbrella of the US-EC Task Force on Biotechnology Research, a transatlantic collaborative group overseen by the US Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the EC. The Environmental Biotechnology Working Group maintains several goals, including establishing research links between scientists in EU countries and the US and fostering the careers of junior scientists from both sides of the Atlantic to the global nature of scientific cooperation. To that end, a shortcourse was held at the University of Milan in Italy on July 12-25 2014 organized around cross-cutting themes of genomic science and designed to attract a stellar group of interdisciplinary early carrier researchers. A total of 22 students, 10 from the US and 12 from the EU participated. The course provided them with hands-on experience with the latest scientific methods in genomics and bioinformatics; using a format that combines lectures, laboratory research and field work with the final goal to enable researchers to finally turn data into knowledge.

  5. EVALUATION OF THE LEARNING SYSTEM BASED ON RESEARCH (SABI IN THE CICS UMA IPN BIOCHEMISTRY UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Elisa Pérez-Magaña

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning is a steward, permanent, and participatory process where: the apprentice, teacher, classmates, institution and other social factors where the student performs. As detonator of learning is research, which is made from real events that are addressed on the basis of the scientific development of the State of the art. One of the key elements in the professional training of students is the method that is used. Research-based learning system is an educational innovation (SABI, which was used in the learning of basic sciences of the Cardiovascular apparatus in generations unit 33rd, 34th, 35th, 36th and 37th generations in the years of 2008 to 2012's career in medicine and as a result was a decrease in the number of students reproachedimproving achievement. This method is an excellent alternative in the teaching-learning process and can be used both in groups with a variable number of students.

  6. Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy's Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006

  7. Overview of feedstock research in the United States, Canada, and Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Tardif, M.L. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Couto, L. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (Brazil); Garca, L.R. [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Florestas, Colombo (Brazil); Betters, D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Ashworth, J. [Meridian Corp., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This is an overview of the current biomass feedstock efforts in Brazil, Canada, and the United States. The report from Brazil provides an historical perspective of incentive programs, the charcoal and fuelwood energy programs, the alcohol program, and other biomass energy efforts. The efforts in Brazil, particularly with the sugar cane to ethanol and the charcoal and fuelwood programs, dwarfs other commercial biomass systems in the Americas. One of the bright spots in the future is the Biomass Integrated Gasification/Gas Turbine Electricity Project initially funded in 1992. The sugar cane-based ethanol industry continues to develop higher yielding cane varieties and more efficient microorganisms to convert the sugar cane carbohydrates into alcohol. In Canada a number of important institutions and enterprises taking part in the economical development of the country are involved in biomass research and development including various aspects of the biomass such as forestry, agricultural, industrial, urban, food processing, fisheries and peat bogs. Biomass feedstock research in the United States is evolving to reflect Department of Energy priorities. Greater emphasis is placed on leveraging research with the private sector contributing a greater share of funds, for both research and demonstration projects. The feedstock program, managed by ORNL, is focused on limited model species centered at a regional level using a multidisciplinary approach. Activities include a stronger emphasis on emerging environmental issues such as biodiversity, sustainability and habitat management. DOE also is a supporter of the National Biofuels Roundtable, which is developing principles for producing biomass energy in an economically viable and ecologically sound manner. Geographical Information Systems are also being developed as tools to quantify and characterize the potential supply of energy crops in various regions.

  8. Status Report and Research Plan for Cables Harvested from Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-20

    Harvested cables from operating or decommissioned nuclear power plants present an important opportunity to validate models, understanding material aging behavior, and validate characterization techniques. Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant is a pressurized water reactor that was licensed to operate from 1976 to 2013. Cable segments were harvested and made available to the Light Water Reactor Sustainability research program through the Electric Power Research Institute. Information on the locations and circuits within the reactor from whence the cable segments came, cable construction, sourcing and installation information, and photographs of the cable locations prior to harvesting were provided. The cable variations provided represent six of the ten most common cable insulations in the nuclear industry and experienced service usage for periods from 15 to 42 years. Subsequently, these cables constitute a valuable asset for research to understand aging behavior and measurement of nuclear cables. Received cables harvested from Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant consist of low voltage, insulated conductor surrounded by jackets in lengths from 24 to 100 feet each. Cable materials will primarily be used to investigate aging under simultaneous thermal and gamma radiation exposure. Each cable insulation and jacket material will be characterized in its as-received condition, including determination of the temperatures associated with endothermic transitions in the material using differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis. Temperatures for additional thermal exposure aging will be selected following the thermal analysis to avoid transitions in accelerated laboratory aging that do not occur in field conditions. Aging temperatures above thermal transitions may also be targeted to investigate the potential for artifacts in lifetime prediction from rapid accelerated aging. Total gamma doses and dose rates targeted for each material

  9. The Status of Beryllium Research for Fusion in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2003-01-01

    Use of beryllium in fusion reactors has been considered for neutron multiplication in breeding blankets and as an oxygen getter for plasma-facing surfaces. Previous beryllium research for fusion in the United States included issues of interest to fission (swelling and changes in mechanical and thermal properties) as well as interactions with plasmas and hydrogen isotopes and methods of fabrication. When the United States formally withdrew its participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, much of this effort was terminated. The focus in the U.S. has been mainly on toxic effects of beryllium and on industrial hygiene and health-related issues. Work continued at the INEEL and elsewhere on beryllium-containing molten salts. This activity is part of the JUPITER II Agreement. Plasma spray of ITER first wall samples at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed under the European Fusion Development Agreement. Effects of irradiation on beryllium structure are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Numerical and phenomenological models are being developed and applied to better understand important processes and to assist with design. Presently, studies are underway at the University of California Los Angeles to investigate thermo-mechanical characteristics of beryllium pebble beds, similar to research being carried out at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and elsewhere. Additional work, not funded by the fusion program, has dealt with issues of disposal, and recycling

  10. The status of beryllium research for fusion in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Snead, L.L.; Abou-Sena, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Use of beryllium in fusion reactor has been considered for neutron multiplication in breeding blankets an as an oxygen getter for plasma - facing surface. Previous beryllium research for fusion in the United States included issues of interest to fission (swelling an changes in mechanical and thermal properties) as well as interactions with plasmas and hydrogen isotopes and methods of fabrication. When the United States formally withdrew its participation in the International Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, much of this effort was terminated. The focus in the U.S. has been mainly on toxic effects of beryllium and on industrial hygiene and health-related issues. Work continued at the INEEL (Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory) and elsewhere on beryllium-containing molten salts. This activity is part of the JUPITER II Agreement. Plasma spray of ITER first wall samples at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed under the European Fusion Development Agreement. Effects of irradiation on beryllium structure are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Numerical and phenomenological models are being developed and applied at the University of California Los Angels to investigate thermo-mechanical characteristics of beryllium pebble beds, similar to research being carried out at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and elsewhere. Additional work, not funded by the fusion program, has dealt with issues of disposal, and recycling. (author)

  11. Contraceptive choices among women attending the fertility research unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance E Shehu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most sensitive and intimate decisions made by any individual or couple is that of fertility control . The knowledge of the factors which influence contraceptive choices may increase its acceptance and uptake. This study determines the choice and reason for contraception among new clients attending the Fertility Research Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study a structured questionnaire was administered to 251 consecutive clients, who attended the Fertility Research Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto between 1 July 2008 and 31 December 2008. Results: Most (58.2% of the clients were between 21 and 30 years of age. Many (42.6% were grand multipara. Majority (76.9% of the clients were married. The main source of knowledge of contraception and referral (45.8% was the physicians. Child spacing (87.7% was the most common reason given for contraceptive use. Majority (55.8% of the clients chose Implanon and the least preferred method of contraception was the condom (2.0%. Conclusion: Our data shows that the most commonly chosen contraceptive method in the study population was the Implanon. Child spacing was the main reason for seeking family planning while the source of contraceptive knowledge was the physicians.

  12. Research on the Current Telecommuting Trends in United States and European Union Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Georgiana PICU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of globalization and due to the accelerated progress made in information and communication technology, more and more companies offer their employees the option of telecommuting. For the past twenty years, telecommuting has been on an asceding trend, an incresing number of people embracing the ability to work from home, using a computer and internet connection to communicate for their jobs. The goal of the paper is to explain the overall notion of telecommuting and to analyze the current trends in the United States and European Union markets. Another objective is to assess the advantages and disadvantages of telecommuting and the important role played by this concept within the striving purpose of corporations to achieve their strategic targets. The study is based upon specialized literature reviews regarding the emergence of telecommuting and the role it plays in organizations. A comparative analysis was conducted by the authors on two regional markets, United States and the European Union, in order to assess the trend in telecommuting and the factors that influence it. The outcome of the research shows that although the benefits of telecommuting are numerous, it does not come without challenges, both being applicable for both the employer, as well as for the employee. The research results of this study can be used by organizations when considering to offer their employees flexible work opportunities which can positively influence the long term business performance.

  13. Overview on advanced nuclear reactors: research and deployment in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandell, L.; Rohrer, S.

    2004-01-01

    For the United States of America, the electricity requirement is expected to continue to rise at rates of approximately 1.8% over the next few years. This means that some 300,000 MW of additional generating capacity need to be made available by 2025. The Energy Policy Act of 2003 is to minimize this expected future growth of electricity consumption and promote research in favor of a diversified energy mix. As a consequence, the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives passed legislation on electricity generation, on the promotion of, and research into, specific energy sources, and on energy conservation. Currently, coal-fired power plants contribute the largest share to the overall generating capacity. Considerable additions to the generating capacity have been made in the past ten years in gas-fired plants. In the light of the high present gas prices and market volatilities, the construction of new coal-fired power plants is currently under discussion. 103 out of the 436 nuclear power plants at present in operation worldwide are located in the United States. They represent by far the largest share of emission-free generating capacity in the United States. Considerable capacities have been added over the past few years by, up to now, 99 power increases by 0.4 to 17.8%. The Nuclear Power 2010 Program is a joint initiative by the government and industry seeking to further develop advanced nuclear power plant technologies and elaborate a new licensing procedure for nuclear power plants. The proposed licensing procedure and the Westinghouse AP1000, General Electric ESBWR, and AECL ACR-700 advanced reactor lines are presented. (orig.)

  14. Challenge theme 2: assuring water availability and quality in the 21st century: Chapter 4 in United States-Mexican Borderlands: Facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegary, James; Langeman, Jeff; Leenhouts, Jim; Martin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Along the United States–Mexican border, the health of communities, economies, and ecosystems is inextricably intertwined with the availability and quality of water, but effective water management in the Borderlands is complicated. Water users compete for resources, and their needs are increasing. Managers are faced with issues such as finding a balance between agriculture and rapidly growing cities or maintaining public supplies while ensuring sufficient resources for aquatic ecosystems. In addition to human factors, the dry climate of the Borderlands, as compared to more temperate regions, also increases the challenge of balancing water supplies between humans and ecosystems. Warmer, drier, and more variable conditions across the southwestern United States—the projected results of climate change (Seager and others, 2007)—would further stress water supplies.

  15. First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Peter B.; Sopka, Dennis M.; Kathpal, Madeera; Haynes, Jeffrey C.; Lally, Brian E.; Li, Linna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published ≥1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented ≥1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

  16. The regulation and licensing of research reactors and associated facilities in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weightman, M.W.; Willby, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) licenses nuclear facilities, including research reactors, on behalf of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The legislation, the regulatory organizations and the methods of operation that have been developed over the last 30 years result in a largely non-prescriptive form of control that is well suited to research reactors. The most important part of the regulatory system is the license and the attachment of conditions which it permits. These conditions require the licensee to prepare arrangements to control the safety of the facility. In doing so the licensee is encouraged to develop a 'safety culture' within its organization. This is particularly important for research reactors which may have limited staff resources and where the ability, and at times the need, to have access to the core is much greater than for nuclear power plants. Present day issues such as the ageing of nuclear facilities, public access to the rationale behind regulatory decisions, and the emergence of more stringent safety requirements, which include a need for quantified safety criteria, have been addressed by the NII. This paper explores the relevance of such issues to the regulation of research reactors. In particular, it discusses some of the factors associated with research reactors that should be considered in developing criteria for the tolerability of risk from these nuclear facilities. From a consideration of these factors, it is the authors' view that the range of tolerable risk to the public from the operation of new research reactors may be expected to be more stringent than similar criteria for new nuclear power plants, whereas the criteria for tolerable risk for research reactor workers are expected to be about the same as those for power reactor workers

  17. ST Microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01 : Prof. Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes, Dr Salvatore Castorina, Corporate Vice President, DSG, Prof. Gigi Rolandi, CMS Tracker Project Manager. Photo 02 : Dr Salvatore Castorina signing the Guest Book. Photo 03 : Prof. Roger Cashmore, Dr Salvatore Castorina.

  18. Climate change and health in the United States of America: impacts, adaptations, and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan, R.; Magaud, M.

    2009-11-01

    After a description of the various impacts of climate change on human health, this report describes and comments the impacts of climate change on health in the USA: impacts of heat waves, of air quality degradation, of extreme climate events, of climate change on infectious diseases and allergies, regional impacts of climate change. In a second part, it describes the strategies of adaptation to the 'climate change and health' issue in the USA: mitigation and adaptation to climate change, adaptation challenges, insufficiently prepared public health system, adaptation to heat waves, adaptation to air quality degradation, adaptation to extreme climate events, adaptation to food- and water-based diseases and to vector-based diseases, examples of proactive adaptation. The last part describes the organisation of research on 'climate change and health' in the USA: nowadays and in the future, role of federal agencies, priority research axes. The 'United States Global Change Research Program' is presented in appendix, as well as the most important research centres (mostly in universities)

  19. 78 FR 1 - Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the United Soybean Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... practice and procedure; Advertising; Agricultural research; Marketing agreements; Soybeans and soybean...] Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the United Soybean Board... occurred since the Board was reapportioned in 2009. As required by the Soybean Promotion, Research, and...

  20. The 1999 activities and the 1st seminar on human resources development in the nuclear field as part of Asian regional cooperation (contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    In August, 1999, the Project for Human Resources Development (HRD) was initiated as defined in the framework of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia, organized by the Atomic Energy Commission based on a resolution of the 10th International Conference for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia, held in March, 1999. The resolution was adopted as a recognition that 'human resources development' was an important area that should be added to the existing fields of cooperation. The Project was organized by the Atomic Energy Bureau of the Science and Technology Agency (STA) and is administrated by the Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The objective of the HRD Project is to solidify the foundation of technologies for nuclear development and utilization in Asia by promoting human resources development in Asian countries. In the Project there are two kind of activities: in-workshop activities and outside-of-workshop activities, as the time of the workshops themselves is too short to achieve the objectives. As In-workshop activities, 1st Seminar on Human Resources Development in the Nuclear Field was held on November 25 and 26, 1999, at the Tokyo International Forum. Participating countries were China, Indonesia, South Korea, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam, with Australia submitting a study report only. This report consists of presentation papers at the Seminar as in-workshop activities, and a letter of proposal from the project leader of Japan to the project leaders of participating countries after the Seminar and a presentation paper on Human Resources Development at the First Coordinators Meeting on March 7 and 8, 2000 as outside-of-workshop activities. The 10 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. The 1999 activities and the 1st seminar on human resources development in the nuclear field as part of Asian regional cooperation (contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    In August, 1999, the Project for Human Resources Development (HRD) was initiated as defined in the framework of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia, organized by the Atomic Energy Commission based on a resolution of the 10th International Conference for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia, held in March, 1999. The resolution was adopted as a recognition that 'human resources development' was an important area that should be added to the existing fields of cooperation. The Project was organized by the Atomic Energy Bureau of the Science and Technology Agency (STA) and is administrated by the Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The objective of the HRD Project is to solidify the foundation of technologies for nuclear development and utilization in Asia by promoting human resources development in Asian countries. In the Project there are two kind of activities: in-workshop activities and outside-of-workshop activities, as the time of the workshops themselves is too short to achieve the objectives. As In-workshop activities, 1st Seminar on Human Resources Development in the Nuclear Field was held on November 25 and 26, 1999, at the Tokyo International Forum. Participating countries were China, Indonesia, South Korea, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam, with Australia submitting a study report only. This report consists of presentation papers at the Seminar as in-workshop activities, and a letter of proposal from the project leader of Japan to the project leaders of participating countries after the Seminar and a presentation paper on Human Resources Development at the First Coordinators Meeting on March 7 and 8, 2000 as outside-of-workshop activities. The 10 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Assessing the research and education needs of the organic dairy industry in the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A B D; Brito, A F; Townson, L L; Townson, D H

    2013-01-01

    Demographic and management data about organic dairies have been reported previously, but the current study is the first needs assessment of research and educational priorities of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States based directly upon their input. Our objectives were to (1) develop an initial understanding of the emerging research and educational needs of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States via focus group interviews, and (2) prioritize the needs identified by the focus groups with a broader population of organic dairy farmers via survey methods. Focus group interviews determined the questions used for the survey questionnaire distributed to 1,200 members of the Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance. The members were asked about demographic information, but more importantly, challenges concerning business management and marketing, organic certification, and animal nutrition, health, and reproduction. The results (183 respondents, 15% response rate) were parsed by region (New England farms compared with New York and Pennsylvania farms), herd size (i.e., 12 to 37, 38 to 59, and >60 cows), and years of organic certification (organic treatments for mastitis (92% respondents), growing forages for organic production (84%), and developing value-added products (84%). Farms with organic certification were concerned with level of knowledge and experience of local certifiers, whereas organic producers with ≥ 4 yr of organic certification were more interested in field testing of new organic products. Opportunities for educational programs included learning about direct marketing possibilities (76% respondents) and providing training to regional veterinarians interested in organic remedies (91%). In conclusion, the information obtained from the current needs assessment provides a foundation for future research proposals and educational outreach programs, germane to stakeholder needs, which could benefit the organic dairy industry

  3. Fiscal 1999 research report. Basic research for promotion of joint implementation programs (Scrap and build for Central Heat-Power Station No. 2, St. Petersburg City, and others); 1999 nendo St. Petersburg shi netsuden heikyusho No.2 hoka Scrap and Build chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Japan intends to resort to various means, including joint implementations with advanced countries, to fulfill its greenhouse gas reduction target in compliance with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Exerting one of Japan's efforts, Mitsui and Co., Ltd., has signed a protocol with LENENEGRO on a survey of the Central Heat-Power Station, St. Petersburg City. The heat-power station started its operation in the 1910s and is now quite superannuated. Its efficiency and operating rate have extremely lowered, and its early modernization is earnestly wished for. The aim of the survey is to have the existing old facilities scrapped for the installation of gas combined cycle cogeneration facilities which are high in efficiency and low in greenhouse gas emissions. The new facilities will consist of three 67MW-class gas turbines, three exhaust heat recovery boilers, and one backpressure turbine, capable of 200MW power generation and 200Gcal/hour heat supply. A total of 140-million dollars will have to be invested and the construction work will require 36 months to complete. A reduction of 1,481,979.0 tons/year in CO2 emissions and an energy saving effect of 546,301 tons/year are expected. (NEDO)

  4. Federal research, development, and demonstration priorities for carbon dioxide removal in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel L.; Amador, Giana; Funk, Jason; Mach, Katharine J.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies may be critical to achieving deep decarbonization. Yet a lack of technical and commercial maturity of CDR technologies hinders potential deployment. Needs for commercialization span research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities, including development of new materials, reactors, and processes, and rigorous monitoring of a portfolio of demonstration projects. As a world leader in supporting science and engineering, the United States (US) can play an important role in reducing costs and clarifying the sustainable scale of CDR. To date, federal agencies have focused on voluntary or piecemeal CDR programs. Here, we present a synthesis of research and developement needs, relevant agency authority, barriers to coordination, and interventions to enhance RD&D across the federal government of the US. On the basis of agency authority and expertise, the Department of Energy, Department of Agriculture, Department of the Interior, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and National Science Foundation are most central to conducting research, funding projects, monitoring effects, and promulgating regulations. Key enablers for successful programs include embracing technological diversity and administrative efficiency, fostering agency buy-in, and achieving commercial deployment. Based on these criteria, the executive branch could effectively coordinate RD&D strategy through two complementary pathways: (1) renewing intra-agency commitment to CDR in five primary agencies, including both research and demonstration, and (2) coordinating research prioritization and outcomes across agencies, led by the Office of Science and Technology Policy and loosely based on the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Both pathways can be stimulated by executive order or Congressional mandate. Executive branch implementation can begin at any time; future Farm and Energy Bills provide legislative vehicles for enhancing programs.

  5. United Nations and human cloning: a slender and fortunate defence for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R G

    2003-12-01

    Numerous biomedical scientists have contributed to the wide knowledge on the growth of preimplantation human embryos in vitro, now improving every aspect of the form of clinical care. These data were gained ethically in many countries, to open new vistas including the alleviation of infertility, preimplantation genetic diagnosis and stem cells, combined with some recent reports on human reproductive cloning. After detailed consultations with scientists, clinicians, ethicists and lawyers, many governments passed legislation permitting research under their own particular socially-defined conditions. Virtually all of them rejected reproductive cloning; a few have accepted therapeutic cloning. These legislatures saluted the many biomedical scientists striving to improve IVF and its derivatives, recognizing their immense medical potential. A motion recently placed before the United Nations then recommended a worldwide ban on all forms of human cloning. Proponents included the Vatican and many Roman Catholic countries, the USA and others. Opponents included Belgium, China, Japan, Brazil, UK, Germany and France. Mediation was achieved by Iran and other Muslim nations, and led to a motion passed by single vote for a two-year delay. This may be the first-ever proposal to ban worldwide a particular form of research. It sounds the alarm bells for further research. It raises questions about the UN being an appropriate forum for ethical decisions affecting the entire world and its future medicine. Large blocs of nations committed to particular religions and outlooks confronted each other, a situation in total contrast to the detailed and widespread consultations made by individual governments when deciding their own individual ethics. This event was clearly a narrow escape for free research as defined by each country's own jurisprudence. It also places research on human embryology and reproductive biomedicine into a more critical situation than before. Current liberalism in

  6. Acidification research: evaluation and policy applications; a United Kingdom policy response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derwent, R.G.; Wilson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The United Kingdom environmental research into the mechanisms of the atmospheric transport and deposition of acidity, to understand the impacts of that acidity on soils, surface waters, forests, crops and the built environment and the consequences for fishery status, freshwater and soil ecosystems. The Critical Loads Approach opens the possibility of more subtle and sensitive ways of tackling the problems of environmental acidification on the European scale. The United Kingdom is contributing vigorously to the Critical Loads Approach through the mapping exercises, the environmental studies that underpin them and the understanding of the driving deposition mechanisms which lead both to pollutant removal and ecosystem contamination. Future progress with the UN ECE Convention on the Long Range Transport of Air Pollution and the revision of the NO x , SO 2 and VOC protocols will rest in very large measure on the shared confidence within Europe in the knowledge of the underpinning environmental science. The Critical Loads Approach should provide an important policy focus within the international scientific community to set environmentally-based targets for future co-ordinated emission control programmes

  7. Software architecture for a multi-purpose real-time control unit for research purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epple, S.; Jung, R.; Jalba, K.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    A new, freely programmable, scalable control system for academic research purposes was developed. The intention was, to have a control unit capable of handling multiple PT1000 temperature sensors at reasonable accuracy and temperature range, as well as digital input signals and providing powerful output signals. To take full advantage of the system, control-loops are run in real time. The whole eight bit system with very limited memory runs independently of a personal computer. The two on board RS232 connectors allow to connect further units or to connect other equipment, as required in real time. This paper describes the software architecture for the third prototype that now provides stable measurements and an improvement in accuracy compared to the previous designs. As test case a thermal solar system to produce hot tap water and assist heating in a single-family house was implemented. The solar fluid pump was power-controlled and several temperatures at different points in the hydraulic system were measured and used in the control algorithms. The software architecture proved suitable to test several different control strategies and their corresponding algorithms for the thermal solar system.

  8. Research Regarding the Anticorosiv Protection of Atmospheric and Vacuum Distillation Unit that Process Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Morosanu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to high boiling temperature, organic acids are present in the warmer areas of metal equipment from atmospheric and vacuum distillation units and determine, increased corrosion processes in furnace tubes, transfer lines, metal equipment within the distillation columns etc. In order to protect the corrosion of metal equipment from atmospheric and vacuum distillation units, against acids, de authors researched solution which integrates corrosion inhibitors and selecting materials for equipment construction. For this purpose, we tested the inhibitor PET 1441, which has dialchilfosfat in his composition and inhibitor based on phosphate ester. In this case, to the metal surface forms a complex phosphorous that forms of high temperature and high fluid speed. In order to form the passive layer and to achieve a 90% protection, we initially insert a shock dose, and in order to ensure further protection there is used a dose of 20 ppm. The check of anticorrosion protection namely the inhibition efficiency is achieved by testing samples made from steel different.

  9. Oil and chemical spill research and development in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU) falls within the UK Department of Transport's Marine Directorate and is the lead agency in the UK for the control of marine pollution. The MPCU assumes central government's responsibility for controlling two aspects of marine pollution: at sea response to oil and chemical spills from ships, and coordinating beach cleaning activities. All research funded by the MPCU is therefore directed at these two responsibilities. The MPCU was established in 1978 after a series of major tanker incidents in European waters (notably the AMOCO CADIZ, France) in recognition of the fact that it was not reasonable to expect the owners of tankers which operate on a world-wide basis to make arrangements for dealing with oil spills wherever they may occur. The UK Government therefore decided to set up a response unit, the MPCU, with specific responsibilities for dealing with oil and chemical spills from ships at sea. The responsibility for dealing with pollution once it comes ashore lies with the local authorities. However, to avoid expenditure by individual authorities on specialized equipment which will be rarely required, the government decided to set up stockpiles of such equipment in strategic locations to be drawn on by authorities as and when necessary. The government also provides training in the use of this equipment, offers scientific and technical advice and, for major spills, will coordinate beach cleaning activities

  10. Galleria mellonella infection model demonstrates high lethality of ST69 and ST127 uropathogenic E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed F Alghoribi

    Full Text Available Galleria mellonella larvae are an alternative in vivo model for investigating bacterial pathogenicity. Here, we examined the pathogenicity of 71 isolates from five leading uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC lineages using G. mellonella larvae. Larvae were challenged with a range of inoculum doses to determine the 50% lethal dose (LD50 and for analysis of survival outcome using Kaplan-Meier plots. Virulence was correlated with carriage of a panel of 29 virulence factors (VF. Larvae inoculated with ST69 and ST127 isolates (10(4 colony-forming units/larvae showed significantly higher mortality rates than those infected with ST73, ST95 and ST131 isolates, killing 50% of the larvae within 24 hours. Interestingly, ST131 isolates were the least virulent. We observed that ST127 isolates are significantly associated with a higher VF-score than isolates of all other STs tested (P≤0.0001, including ST69 (P<0.02, but one ST127 isolate (strain EC18 was avirulent. Comparative genomic analyses with virulent ST127 strains revealed an IS1 mediated deletion in the O-antigen cluster in strain EC18, which is likely to explain the lack of virulence in the larvae infection model. Virulence in the larvae was not correlated with serotype or phylogenetic group. This study illustrates that G. mellonella are an excellent tool for investigation of the virulence of UPEC strains. The findings also support our suggestion that the incidence of ST127 strains should be monitored, as these isolates have not yet been widely reported, but they clearly have a pathogenic potential greater than that of more widely recognised clones, including ST73, ST95 or ST131.

  11. Renewable energies in the United States: support policies and tendencies for research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    Illustrated by figures, graphs and tables of data, nine articles give overviews of the present evolutions and tendencies for research and development in the energy sector in the United States of America. After a first article commenting the possible evolution of the energy model in this country, the authors are commenting the priority given to innovation for clean energies, the evolution of patents claimed by US companies, the smart-grid-based energy strategy, the evolution of the wind energy sector, the technological evolutions and decreasing prices of the solar energy, the large investments required for a large scale development of geothermal energy, the voluntary policy and the ambitious objectives in the field of bio-energies and bio-fuels, and California as a leader in the field of renewable energies

  12. Research on optimization of combustion efficiency of thermal power unit based on genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongyang

    2018-04-01

    In order to improve the economic performance and reduce pollutant emissions of thermal power units, the characteristics of neural network in establishing boiler combustion model are analyzed based on the analysis of the main factors affecting boiler efficiency by using orthogonal method. In addition, on the basis of this model, the genetic algorithm is used to find the best control amount of the furnace combustion in a certain working condition. Through the genetic algorithm based on real number encoding and roulette selection is concluded: the best control quantity at a condition of furnace combustion can be combined with the boiler combustion system model for neural network training. The precision of the neural network model is further improved, and the basic work is laid for the research of the whole boiler combustion optimization system.

  13. 21st Century Skills Map: The Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Colleen; Ebert, Christie M. Lynch; McGreevy-Nichols, Susan; Quinn, Betsy; Sabol, F. Robert; Schmid, Dale; Shauck, R. Barry; Shuler, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    This 21st Century Skills Map is the result of hundreds of hours of research, development and feedback from educators and business leaders across the nation. The Partnership for 21st Century Skills has issued this map for the core subject of the Arts.

  14. 21st Century Skills Map: Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This 21st Century Skills Map is the result of hundreds of hours of research, development and feedback from educators and business leaders across the nation. The Partnership for 21st Century Skills has issued this map for the core subject of Geography.

  15. 21st Century Skills Map: World Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This 21st Century Skills Map is the result of hundreds of hours of research, development and feedback from educators and business leaders across the nation. The Partnership for 21st Century Skills has issued this map for the core subject of World Languages. [Funding for this paper was provided by EF Education.

  16. Developmental process and early phases of implementation for the United States Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research National Nutrition Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Congress first called for improved coordination of human nutrition research within and among federal departments and agencies in the 1977 Farm Bill. Today, the Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research (ICHNR) is charged with improving the planning, coordination, and commu...

  17. Arthropod genomics research in the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service: Applications of RNA interference and CRISPR gene editing technologies in pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is the intramural research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) which addresses basic scientific questions and develops applied solutions to a range of agricultural problems, and in doing so protects national food security and supports ...

  18. ACRR fission product release tests: ST-1 and ST-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.D.; Stockman, H.W.; Reil, K.O.; Grimley, A.J.; Camp, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments (ST-1 and ST-2) have been performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under light water reactor (LWR) severe accident conditions. Both experiments were conducted in a highly reducing environment at maximum fuel temperatures of greater than 2400 K. These experiments were designed specifically to investigate the effect of increased total pressure on fission product release; ST-1 was performed at approximately 0.16 MPa and ST-2 was run at 1.9 MPa, whereas other parameters were matched as closely as possible. Release rate data were measured for Cs, I, Ba, Sr, Eu, Te, and U. The release rates were higher than predicted by existing codes for Ba, Sr, Eu, and U. Te release was very low, but Te did not appear to be sequestered by the zircaloy cladding; it was evenly distributed in the fuel. In addition, in posttest analysis a unique fuel morphology (fuel swelling) was observed which may have enhanced fission product release, especially in the high pressure test (ST-2). These data are compared with analytical results from the CORSOR correlation and the VICTORIA computer model

  19. St. John's Wort (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or ...

  20. In Search of Validity Evidence in Support of the Interpretation and Use of Assessments of Complex Constructs: Discussion of Research on Assessing 21st Century Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercikan, Kadriye; Oliveri, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Assessing complex constructs such as those discussed under the umbrella of 21st century constructs highlights the need for a principled assessment design and validation approach. In our discussion, we made a case for three considerations: (a) taking construct complexity into account across various stages of assessment development such as the…

  1. Preparing Chemistry Majors for the 21st Century through a Comprehensive One-Semester Course Focused on Professional Preparation, Contemporary Issues, Scientific Communication, and Research Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteel-Parrish, Anne E.; Lipchock, James M.

    2018-01-01

    Success in chemistry in the 21st century requires not only a mastery of important chemical concepts, but also the skills to apply this knowledge to important societal issues and the ability to effectively convey scientific information using a range of media. In response to this challenge we have developed an innovative four-credit seminar that…

  2. Research needs for strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.S.; Young, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    This report identifies reservoir characterization and reservoir management research needs and IOR process and related research needs for the fourth geologic class, strandplain/barrier island reservoirs. The 330 Class 4 reservoirs in the DOE Tertiary OH Recovery Information System (TORIS) database contain about 30.8 billion barrels of oil or about 9% of the total original oil-in-place (OOIP) in all United States reservoirs. The current projection of Class 4 ultimate recovery with current operations is only 38% of the OOIP, leaving 19 billion barrels as the target for future IOR projects. Using the TORIS database and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (surfactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, California, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000, which emphasizes the urgent need for the development and demonstration of cost-effective recovery technologies.

  3. Estimating the returns to United Kingdom publicly funded musculoskeletal disease research in terms of net value of improved health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Matthew; Montague, Erin; Pollitt, Alexandra; Guthrie, Susan; Hanney, Stephen; Buxton, Martin; Grant, Jonathan

    2018-01-10

    Building on an approach applied to cardiovascular and cancer research, we estimated the economic returns from United Kingdom public- and charitable-funded musculoskeletal disease (MSD) research that arise from the net value of the improved health outcomes in the United Kingdom. To calculate the economic returns from MSD-related research in the United Kingdom, we estimated (1) the public and charitable expenditure on MSD-related research in the United Kingdom between 1970 and 2013; (2) the net monetary benefit (NMB), derived from the health benefit in quality adjusted life years (QALYs) valued in monetary terms (using a base-case value of a QALY of £25,000) minus the cost of delivering that benefit, for a prioritised list of interventions from 1994 to 2013; (3) the proportion of NMB attributable to United Kingdom research; and (4) the elapsed time between research funding and health gain. The data collected from these four key elements were used to estimate the internal rate of return (IRR) from MSD-related research investments on health benefits. We analysed the uncertainties in the IRR estimate using a one-way sensitivity analysis. Expressed in 2013 prices, total expenditure on MSD-related research from 1970 to 2013 was £3.5 billion, and for the period used to estimate the rate of return, 1978-1997, was £1.4 billion. Over the period 1994-2013 the key interventions analysed produced 871,000 QALYs with a NMB of £16 billion, allowing for the net NHS costs resulting from them and valuing a QALY at £25,000. The proportion of benefit attributable to United Kingdom research was 30% and the elapsed time between funding and impact of MSD treatments was 16 years. Our best estimate of the IRR from MSD-related research was 7%, which is similar to the 9% for CVD and 10% for cancer research. Our estimate of the IRR from the net health gain to public and charitable funding of MSD-related research in the United Kingdom is substantial, and justifies the research investments

  4. The UF GEM Research Center Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanner System M-TLSS Applied to Beach Morphology Studies in St. Augustine, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J. C.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Slatton, C. K.; Singhania, A.

    2006-12-01

    The UF GEM Research Center is working towards developing a Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning System (M- TLSS). The core of the M-TLSS is a commercial 2-axis ground based laser scanner, Optech ILRIS-36D, which is capable of generating XYZ with laser intensity or RGB textured point clouds in a range from 3m to 1500m. The laser operates at a wavelength of 1535 nm. The sample separation can be adjusted down to 0.00115°, and the scanning speed is 2,000 points per second. The scanner is integrated to a mobile telescoping, rotating and tilting platform which is essentially a telescopic lift mounted on the back of a pick up truck. This provides up to 6 degrees of freedom for performing scanning operations. A scanner built-in 6 megapixel digital camera and a digital video camera provide the M-TLSS moving and still imagining capability. The applications of the M-TLSS data sets are numerous in both the fields of science and engineering. This paper will focus on the application of M-TLSS as a complement to ALSM in the study of beach morphology in the St. Augustine, Florida area. ALSM data covers a long stretch of beach with a moderate sample density of approximately 1 laser return per square meter, which enables the detection of submeter-scale changes in shoreline position and dune heights over periods of few months. The M-TLSS, on the other hand, can provide high density point clouds (centimeter scale point spacing) of smaller areas known to be highly prone to erosion. From these point clouds centimeter level surface grids are created. These grids will be compared with the ALSM data and with a time series of M-TLSS data over the same area to provide high resolution, short term beach erosion monitoring. Surface morphological parameters that will be compared among the ALSM and M-TLSS data sets include shoreline position and gradients and standard deviations of elevations on cross- shore transects.

  5. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy... comments on the proposed United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual... requirements for certain categories of life sciences research at institutions that accept Federal funding for...

  6. A Review of Underground Coal Gasification Research and Development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, D. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-26

    An intense and productive period of research and development on underground coal gasification (UCG) took place in the United States from the mid-1970’s through the late 1980’s. It began with the translation and review of Soviet literature and ended with the Rocky Mountain 1 field test. This demonstrated the feasibility of newly-developed technologies that form the basis of many UCG projects around the world today. This period began with little domestic understanding of UCG and ended with an accurate observation-based conceptual model and a corresponding predictive multi-physics mathematical model of the process. The many accomplishments of this period form the main content of this report. This report also covers recent U.S. activities and accomplishments during the period 2004-2015, and touches briefly on the Bureau of Mines efforts between 1948 and 1963. Most of the activities were funded by the United States Department of Energy and its predecessors. While private/commercially-funded activities are reviewed here, the emphasis is on government-funded work. It has a much greater extent of publicly available reports and papers, and they generally contain much greater technical detail. Field tests were the marquis activities around which an integrated multi-faceted program was built. These are described in detail in Section 4. Highlights from modeling efforts are briefly covered, as the program was integrated and well-rounded, with field results informing models and vice-versa. The primary goal of this report is to review what has been learned about UCG from the U.S. experience in aggregate. This includes observations, conclusions, lessons-learned, phenomena understood, and technology developed. The latter sections of this report review these things.

  7. Protection of human subjects of biomedical research in the United States. A contrast with recent experience in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R J

    1988-01-01

    In the U.S., the development of extensive regulations for the protection of human subjects of research began in the 1960s and continued through the 1970s. The substance of these regulations reflects the American social and political climate of the time. There is a focus on rights--e.g., to be left alone, to be self-determining--reflected in elaborate requirements to assure the validity and documentation of informed consent. There is also a focus on systems of disinterested review and monitoring procedures to assure uniform adherence to the requirements of the regulations. To the extent that the U.S. has developed extensive regulations in this field, it may be viewed as more advanced than the U.K. And yet, it is apparent that there remain on both sides of the Atlantic very difficult and similar problems regarding the definition of responsible research. Such problems are illustrated by consideration of current controversies about the ethical justification of RCTs. There are some features of the U.S. regulatory system that I can commend to the attention of other nations as they develop policies for the protection of human research subjects. For example, a uniform requirement for informed consent and committee review appears to be responsive to some problems currently encountered in the conduct of RCTs in the U.K. A note of caution is in order, however. Some features of our regulatory policy and practices are excessively inflexible, wasteful of human resources, and occasionally counterproductive.

  8. Preregistration research training of speech and language therapists in the United Kingdom: a nationwide audit of quantity, content and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnamenta, Emma; Joffe, Victoria L

    2018-04-24

    To carry out an audit of the quantity and content of research teaching on UK preregistration speech and language therapy (SLT) degree programmes. Lecturers delivering research teaching from each higher education institution providing preregistration training were invited to complete an online survey. Amount of research teaching, content of research teaching (including final-year projects), perceived confidence by staff of graduates in research awareness, research activity and leading research. Responses were received for 14 programmes (10 undergraduate and four postgraduate), representing 73% of all undergraduate courses and 44% of all postgraduate courses in the United Kingdom. Fifty percent of courses included over 30 h of research teaching, with wide variability across both undergraduate and postgraduate courses in number of hours, modules and credits devoted to research. There was no association between quantity of research teaching and perception of adequacy of quantity of teaching. Critical appraisal, statistical software and finding literature were the most common topics taught. Conversely, service evaluation and audit was the least common topic covered. All institutions provided a final-year project, with 11/14 requiring empirical research. Perceived confidence of graduates was higher for research awareness than active research and leading research, but this varied across institutions. There was a strong correlation between lecturers' perceived confidence of graduates in research awareness and number of hours of research teaching. Despite the requirements for healthcare professionals to engage in evidence-based practice, the amount and nature of research training in preregistration courses for SLTs in the United Kingdom is highly variable. Levels of perceived confidence of graduates were also variable, not only for active participation in research, and for leading research, but also for research awareness. This has implications for the ability of SLTs to

  9. Building visual identity of scientific and research units and the role of visualization in cooperation with business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfreda Kamińska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for commercialization of scientific research leads to the necessity of changing the orientation of scientific-research units to marketing orientation, which is characterized by, among others, conducting research aimed at learning the clients’ needs and building better communication with the recipients. What is an important element of a unit’s marketing communication is its visual identity system, which the recipients use to build their opinion and their picture of the unit. The goal of this article is an attempt to define the key rules of designing visual identity of scientific and research institutions, as well as presenting the role of visualization in their cooperation with business. In the article the notions of image, identity, corporate identity and visual identity are subject to analysis. The article also presents the significance of visualization in the functioning of research and scientific units, elements of visual identity system and the rules of designing visual identity of scientific and research institutions. An analysis of chosen research-scientific units was carried out with regard to visualization.

  10. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  11. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Claire L; Thompson, Lindsay C; Murphy, Claire; Forcat, Silvia; Hanley, Bec

    2012-01-13

    We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009) were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86%) were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31%) had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG) [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development of a unit policy on consumer involvement, to guide future

  12. Talent Development Research, Policy, and Practice in Europe and the United States: Outcomes from a Summit of International Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotnik, Rena F.; Stoeger, Heidrun; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this article is to convey a summary of research and conversation on talent development on the part of a small group of European and American researchers who participated in the Inaugural American European Research Summit in Washington. In the final hours of the summit, participants discussed the state of research on talent development…

  13. Report by the AERES on the unit: Research Unit on Reactor Safety under the supervision of the establishments and bodies: Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory whose activity is organized according to the following themes: behaviour of nuclear fuel under accidental conditions, core fusion accidents, fire in confined environment, and civil engineering and structure behaviour. The authors discuss an assessment of the unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved and recommendations, productions and publications. A more detailed assessment is presented in terms of scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. Each research theme is analyzed in the same way

  14. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: The Alcohol & Drug Abuse Research Unit at the South African Medical Research Council - strengthening substance abuse research and policy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Charles; Morojele, Neo; Myers, Bronwyn; Plüddemann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit (ADARU) was established at the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) at the beginning of 2001, although its origins lie in the activities of the Centre for Epidemiological Research in Southern Africa and other MRC entities. Initial challenges included attracting external funding, recruiting new staff, developing the skills of junior staff, publishing in international journals and building national and international collaborative networks. ADARU currently comprises a core staff of 33 members who work on 22 projects spanning substance use epidemiology and associated consequences, intervention studies with at-risk populations and services research. A large component of this portfolio focuses on the link between alcohol and other drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviour, with funding from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Junior staff members are encouraged to develop independent research interests and pursue PhD studies. Research outputs, such as the 20 papers that were published in 2010 and the 35 conference presentations from that year, form an important part of the unit's research translation activities. We engage actively with policy processes at the local, provincial, national and international levels, and have given particular attention to alcohol policy in recent years. The paper includes an analysis of major challenges currently facing the unit and how we are attempting to address them. It ends with some thoughts on what the unit intends doing to enhance the quality of its research, the capacity of its staff and its international standing. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. The Applied Meteorology Unit: Nineteen Years Successfully Transitioning Research into Operations for America's Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, John T.; Bauman, William H.; Merceret, Francis J.; Roeder, William P.; Brody, Frank C.; Hagemeyer, Bartlett C.

    2010-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) provides technology transition and technique development to improve operational weather support to the Space Shuttle and the entire American space program. The AMU is funded and managed by NASA and operated by a contractor that provides five meteorologists with a diverse mix of advanced degrees, operational experience, and associated skills including data processing, statistics, and the development of graphical user interfaces. The AMU's primary customers are the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron at Patrick Air Force Base, the National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group at NASA Johnson Space Center, and the National Weather Service Melbourne FL Forecast Office. The AMU has transitioned research into operations for nineteen years and worked on a wide range of topics, including new forecasting techniques for lightning probability, synoptic peak winds,.convective winds, and summer severe weather; satellite tools to predict anvil cloud trajectories and evaluate camera line of sight for Space Shuttle launch; optimized radar scan strategies; evaluated and implemented local numerical models; evaluated weather sensors; and many more. The AMU has completed 113 projects with 5 more scheduled to be completed by the end of 2010. During this rich history, the AMU and its customers have learned many lessons on how to effectively transition research into operations. Some of these lessons learned include collocating with the operational customer and periodically visiting geographically separated customers, operator submitted projects, consensus tasking process, use of operator primary advocates for each project, customer AMU liaisons with experience in both operations and research, flexibility in adapting the project plan based on lessons learned during the project, and incorporating training and other transition assistance into the project plans. Operator involvement has been critical to the AMU's remarkable success and many awards

  16. A survey of working conditions within biomedical research in the United Kingdom [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Riddiford

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent articles have presented a bleak view of career prospects in biomedical research in the US. Too many PhDs and postdocs are trained for too few research positions, creating a “holding-tank” of experienced senior postdocs who are unable to get a permanent position. Coupled with relatively low salaries and high levels of pressure to publish in top-tier academic journals, this has created a toxic environment that is perhaps responsible for a recently observed decline in biomedical postdocs in the US, the so-called “postdocalypse”. Methods: To address the gulf of information relating to working habits and attitudes of UK-based academic biomedical researchers, a link to an online survey was included in an article published in the Guardian newspaper. Survey data were collected between 21st March 2016 and 6th November 2016 and analysed to examine discrete profiles for three major career stages: PhD, postdoc and principal investigator. Results: Overall, the data presented here echo trends observed in the US: The 520 UK-based biomedical researchers responding to the survey reported feeling disillusioned with academic research, due to the low chance of getting a permanent position and the long hours required at the bench. Also like the US, large numbers of researchers at each distinct career stage are considering leaving biomedical research altogether. Conclusions: There are several systemic flaws in the academic scientific research machine – for example the continual overproduction of PhDs and the lack of stability in the early-mid stages of a research career - that are slowly being addressed in countries such as the US and Germany. These data suggest that similar flaws also exist in the UK, with a large proportion of respondents concerned about their future in research. To avoid lasting damage to the biomedical research agenda in the UK, addressing such concerns should be a major priority.

  17. Government financial support for civil aircraft research, technology and development in four European countries and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, B.; Golaszewski, R.; Patten, C.; Rudman, B.; Scott, R.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the levels of government financial support for civil aircraft airframe and engine (CAAE) research and technology (R&T) in the United States and Europe (United Kingdom, West Germany, France and The Netherlands) and means of comparing these levels are provided. Data are presented for the years 1974-1977. European R&T expenditure data were obtained through visits to each of the four European countries, to the Washington office of the European Communities, and by a search of applicable literature. CAAE R&T expenditure data for the United States were obtained from NASA and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  18. Pilot research projects for underground disposal of radioactive wastes in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.; Collyer, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    Disposal of commercial radioactive waste in the United States of America in a deep underground formation will ensure permanent isolation from the biosphere with minimal post-closure surveillance and maintenance. The siting, design and development, performance assessment, operation, licensing, certification and decommissioning of an underground repository have stimulated the development of several pilot research projects throughout the country. These pilot tests and projects, along with their resulting data base, are viewed as important steps in the overall location and construction of a repository. Beginning in the 1960s, research at pilot facilities has progressed from underground spent fuel tests in an abandoned salt mine to the production of vitrified nuclear waste in complex borosilicate glass logs. Simulated underground repository experiments have been performed in the dense basalts of Washington State, the volcanic tuffaceous rock of Nevada and both domal and bedded salts of Louisiana and Kansas. In addition to underground pilot in situ tests, other facilities have been constructed or modified to monitor the performance of spent fuel in dry storage wells and self-shielded concrete casks. As the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) programme advances to the next stage of underground site characterization for each of three different geological sites, additional pilot facilities are under consideration. These include a Test and Evaluation Facility (TEF) for site verification and equipment performance and testing, as well as a salt testing facility for verification of in situ simulation equipment. Although not associated with the NWTS programme, the construction of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the bedded salts of New Mexico is well under way for deep testing and experimentation with the defence programme's transuranic nuclear waste. (author)

  19. Summary and abstracts: Applied Research Units and Projects 1996 UCETF Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-21

    The Urban Consortium (UC), created by PTI, is a network of jurisdictions with populations of over 250,000. The UC provides a platform for research and enterprise through its Energy, Environmental, Transportation, and Telecommunications and Information Task Forces. The UC provides a unique creative forum where elected and appointed officials and technical managers identify, test, and validate practical ways to improve the provision of public services and, where possible, generate new revenue opportunities. Public Technology, Inc., is the non-profit technology organization of the National League of Cities, the National Association of Counties, and the International City/County Management Association. PTI creates and advances technology-based products, services, and enterprises in cities and counties nationwide. Staffed by PTI, the UC addresses the critical needs of local governments through its Task Forces. The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF) program has, since its inception, acted as a laboratory to develop, test solutions and share the resulting products or management approaches with the wider audience of local governments. It has addressed the overlap between energy and environment and economic development policy issues, and, is the nation's most extensive cooperative local government program to improve energy management and decision-making through applied research and technology cooperation. Proposals to meet the specific objectives of the UCETF annual R and D program are solicited from major urban jurisdictions. Projects based on these proposals are then selected by the UCETF for direct conduct and management by staff of city and county governments. Projects selected for each year's program are organized in thematic units to assure effective management and ongoing peer-to-peer experience exchange, with results documented at the end of each program year.

  20. Gender Authorship Trends of Plastic Surgery Research in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Wu, Liza C; Lin, Ines C; Serletti, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    An increasing number of women are entering the medical profession, but plastic surgery remains a male-dominated profession, especially within academia. As academic aspirations and advancement depend largely on research productivity, the authors assessed the number of articles authored by women published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Original articles in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery published during the years 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, and 2014 were analyzed. First and senior authors with an M.D. degree and U.S. institutional affiliation were categorized by gender. Authorship trends were compared with those from other specialties. Findings were placed in the context of gender trends among plastic surgery residents in the United States. The percentage of female authors in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery increased from 2.4 percent in 1970 to 13.3 percent in 2014. Over the same time period, the percentage of female plastic surgery residents increased from 2.6 percent to 32.5 percent. By 2014, there were more female first authors (19.1 percent) than senior authors (7.7 percent) (p < 0.001). As a field, plastic surgery had fewer female authors than other medical specialties including pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, general surgery, internal medicine, and radiation oncology (p < 0.05). The increase in representation of female authors in plastic surgery is encouraging but lags behind advances in other specialties. Understanding reasons for these trends may help improve gender equity in academic plastic surgery.

  1. Radioisotope Heater Unit-Based Stirling Power Convertor Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Geng, Steven M.; Penswick, Lawrence; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A variety of mission concepts have been studied by NASA and the U. S. Department of Energy that would utilize RPS for landers, probes, and rovers and only require milliwatts to tens of watts of power. These missions would contain science measuring instruments that could be distributed across planetary surfaces or near objects of interest in space solar flux insufficient for using solar cells. A low power Stirling convertor is being developed to provide an RPS option for future low power applications. Initial concepts convert heat available from several Radioisotope Heater Units to electrical power for spacecraft instruments and communication. Initial development activity includes defining and evaluating a variety of Stirling configurations and selecting one for detailed design, research of advanced manufacturing methods that could simplify fabrication, evaluating thermal interfaces, characterizing components and subassemblies to validate design codes, and preparing for an upcoming demonstration of proof of concept in a laboratory environment.

  2. United States Air Force Graduate Student Research Program for 1990. Program Technical Report. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-05

    v25, n3, p275. Parsons, F., P.R. Wood , and J. DeMarcos. "Transformations of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene in microcosms and ground water...7 REFERENCES 1. Turbo Pascal: Reference Guide, Borland Int’l, 1989. 2. Turbo Pascal: User’s Guide, Borland Int’l, 1989. 3. Dale, Nell and Chip Weems...8217, -Psvcnr.atr .c at en:S, anc;an .ourr a :11 Behaviorai Scci ce, 1983, 15k1), pp. 43-5’. Schretlen, . J., The Jae of =sycno!o-; lca ; T--st to

  3. Vulnerability of Coastal Wetlands in the Southeastern United States: Climate Change Research Results, 1992-97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Zieman 1989), the Big Bend area of Florida between St. Marks and Tarpon Springs (300,000 ha; Iverson and Bittaker 1986) and the Laguna Madre of Texas...through the canopies of taller neighbors. Light attenuation was calcu- lated with Beer’s Law based on a maximum leaf area index of 5.5. Growth was...meadows of the Laguna Madre of Texas. Pages 275-277 in E.T. LaRoe, G.S. Farris, C.E. Puckett, P.D. Doran, and M.J. Mac, editors. Our living

  4. Adherence: a review of education, research, practice, and policy in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown TA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the education, research, practice, and policy related to pharmacist interventions to improve medication adherence in community settings in the United States.Methods: Authors used MEDLINE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (since 1990 to identify community and ambulatory pharmacy intervention studies which aimed to improve medication adherence. The authors also searched the primary literature using Ovid to identify studies related to the pharmacy teaching of medication adherence. The bibliographies of relevant studies were reviewed in order to identify additional literature. We searched the tables of content of three US pharmacy education journals and reviewed the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy website for materials on teaching adherence principles. Policies related to medication adherence were identified based on what was commonly known to the authors from professional experience, attendance at professional meetings, and pharmacy journals.Results: Research and Practice: 29 studies were identified: 18 randomized controlled trials; 3 prospective cohort studies; 2 retrospective cohort studies; 5 case-controlled studies; and one other study. There was considerable variability in types of interventions and use of adherence measures. Many of the interventions were completed by pharmacists with advanced clinical backgrounds and not typical of pharmacists in community settings. The positive intervention effects had either decreased or not been sustained after interventions were removed. Although not formally assessed, in general, the average community pharmacy did not routinely assess and/or intervene on medication adherence. Education: National pharmacy education groups support the need for pharmacists to learn and use adherence-related skills. Educational efforts involving adherence have focused on students’ awareness of adherence barriers and communication skills needed to engage patients in behavioral

  5. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2016 year in review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, John F.; Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2017-02-22

    SummaryThe Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units (CRU) Program had a productive year in 2016. Despite vacancies in our scientist ranks exceeding 20 percent, our research, training, and teaching portfolio was full and we graduated 93 students and published 398 manuscripts primarily focused on addressing the real conservation challenges of our cooperators. As I’ve stated before, our mission is our legacy: meeting the actionable science needs of our cooperators, providing them technical guidance and assistance in interpreting and applying new advances in science, and developing the future workforce through graduate education and mentoring. Our scientists and the manner in which they approach our mission continue to inspire me. The most rewarding part of my job is meeting and engaging with the students they recruit—the conservation professionals of the future. I cannot help but feel uplifted after discussions with and presentations by these young men and women. Personally, I owe my place in the profession today to the mentoring I received as a CRU student, and today’s CRU scientists have raised the bar. It gives me hope for the future of conservation, and added motivation to see our vacancies filled so that we can expand our portfolio.The National Cooperators’ Coalition has been active and is strategically working to build support on our behalf. Sincere thanks to the American Fisheries Society, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, the Boone and Crockett Club, the National Association of University Fish and Wildlife Programs, the Wildlife Management Institute, and The Wildlife Society for their efforts and those of their affiliated members.We co-sponsored a workshop at the 2016 North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference along with the American Fisheries Society, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, the Wildlife Management Institute, and The Wildlife Society, titled “Barriers and Bridges in Reconnecting Natural Resources

  6. Status of anesthesiology resident research education in the United States: structured education programs increase resident research productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shireen; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; McCarthy, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The enhancement of resident research education has been proposed to increase the number of academic anesthesiologists with the skills and knowledge to conduct meaningful research. Program directors (PDs) of the U.S. anesthesiology residency programs were surveyed to evaluate the status of research education during residency training and to test the hypothesis that structured programs result in greater resident research productivity based on resident publications. Survey responses were solicited from 131 anesthesiology residency PDs. Seventy-four percent of PDs responded to the survey. Questions evaluated department demographic information, the extent of faculty research activity, research resources and research funding in the department, the characteristics of resident research education and resident research productivity, departmental support for resident research, and perceived barriers to resident research education. Thirty-two percent of programs had a structured resident research education program. Structured programs were more likely to be curriculum based, require resident participation in a research project, and provide specific training in presentation and writing skills. Productivity expectations were similar between structured and nonstructured programs. Forty percent of structured programs had > 20% of trainees with a publication in the last 2 years compared with 14% of departments with unstructured programs (difference, 26%; 99% confidence interval [CI], 8%-51%; P = 0.01). The percentage of programs that had research rotations for ≥2 months was not different between the structured and the nonstructured programs. A research rotation of >2 months did not increase the percentage of residents who had published an article within the last 2 months compared with a research rotation of 20% of residents with a publication in the last 2 years compared with 36% in programs with >20% of faculty involvement (difference, 21%; 99% CI, -4% to 46%; P = 0.03). Our

  7. The Danish St. Croix Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. Douma, Michael; Rasmussen, Anders Bo

    2014-01-01

    H. Seward, commonly viewed as an anti-colonizationist, was at least a mild proponent of colonization in its earliest stages. The paper demonstrates further that in the summer of 1862 the St. Croix colonization project was an important stepping stone in the Lincoln administration’s legal......Working from previously unknown sources in Danish archives, this article establishes for the first time the important role that the island of St. Croix played in the Lincoln Administration’s considerations on colonizing African Americans abroad. The paper argues that U.S. Secretary of State William....... The substantial conclusion of the paper is that, contrary to earlier perceptions in the historiography, African American colonization during the Civil War was not led and directed entirely from Washington. Rather, in this case, the Danish minister proposed a colonization plan and then worked with the United...

  8. Long-term follow-up of patients treated with primary radiotherapy for supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amit B.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Poquette, Catherine A.; Luo Xiaolong; Wilimas, Judith A.; Kun, Larry E.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess disease control, patterns of relapse, factors predictive of relapse, and late effects of treatment, we reviewed all cases of supradiaphragmatic (SD) Hodgkin's disease (HD) treated with primary radiation therapy (RT) at our institution. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the disease characteristics, treatment history, and long-term outcome of the 106 patients with Stage I and II supradiaphragmatic HD who received definitive irradiation at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between 1970 and 1995. As of the date of analysis, 95 patients are alive, with a median follow-up of 13.3 years (range, 1.9-24.2 years). Results: The median age at diagnosis was 14.7 years (range, 3.7-22.7). Involved-field RT was given to 13 patients (12%), whereas 37 (35%) had mantle RT, 51 patients (48%) had subtotal nodal irradiation, and 5 (5%) had total nodal irradiation. Relapsed disease developed in 26 patients at a median of 1.8 years (range, 0.2-9.3 years). The 5- and 10-year estimated cumulative incidences of relapse were 20.9% ± 4.0% and 25.1% ± 4.3%, respectively. With a median dose of 36 Gy (range, 32-40), in-field failure rate was 6.2%, whereas subdiaphragmatic relapse in sites irradiated prophylactically was 1.5%. There was a trend toward an increased incidence of relapse with higher ESR (p 0.088) and greater number of sites of disease (p = 0.087). Age, stage, histology, nodal disease ≥6 cm, the presence of bulky mediastinal disease, and the method of staging did not affect the incidence of relapse. The pattern of failure could not be predicted based on the stage of disease, the extent of subdiaphragmatic staging, the extent of radiation therapy, or the sequence of RT fields - 'ping pong' vs. sequential. Subset analysis of Stage II patients revealed significantly more relapses in clinically staged patients. Excluding Stage IA patients with high cervical disease or peripheral nodal disease, nodal extension failures were more common for patients

  9. Earth Science Research in DUSEL; a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, C.; Onstott, T. C.; Tiedje, J. M.; McPherson, B.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Wang, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    A summary of efforts to create one or more Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratories (DUSEL) in the United States is presented. A workshop in Berkeley, August 11-14, 2004, explored the technical requirements of DUSEL for research in basic and applied geological and microbiological sciences, together with elementary particle physics and integrated education and public outreach. The workshop was organized by Bernard Sadoulet, an astrophysicist and the principal investigator (PI) of a community-wide DUSEL program evolving in coordination with the National Science Foundation. The PI team has three physicists (in nuclear science, high-energy physics, and astrophysics) and three earth scientists (in geoscience, biology and engineering). Presentations, working group reports, links to previous workshop/meeting talks, and information about DUSEL candidate sites, are presented in http://neutrino.lbl.gov/DUSELS-1. The Berkeley workshop is a continuation of decades of efforts, the most recent including the 2001 Underground Science Conference's earth science and geomicrobiology workshops, the 2002 International Workshop on Neutrino and Subterranean Science, and the 2003 EarthLab Report. This perspective (from three earth science co-PIs, the lead author of EarthLab report, the lead scientist of education/outreach, and the local earth science organizer) is to inform the community on the status of this national initiative, and to invite their active support. Having a dedicated facility with decades-long, extensive three-dimensional underground access was recognized as the most important single attribute of DUSEL. Many research initiatives were identified and more are expected as the broader community becomes aware of DUSEL. Working groups were organized to evaluate hydrology and coupled processes; geochemistry; rock mechanics/seismology; applications (e.g., homeland security, environment assessment, petroleum recovery, and carbon sequestration); geomicrobiology and

  10. Financing the Business. PACE Revised. Level 3. Unit 8. Research & Development Series No. 240CB8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This individualized, competency-based unit on financing businesses, the eighth of 18 modules, is on the third level of the revised Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). Intended for the advanced secondary and postsecondary levels and for adults wanting training or retraining, this unit, together with the other materials at…

  11. FY 2006 annual report. 21st century COE program isotope science and engineering from basics to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The 06' activity on 21st century COE program, Nagoya University, Isotopes open the future' is reported. The contents are: Research and educational execution planning; Operational reports (research activities, educational activities, international conferences, etc.); Research activities (1. the basic research field...isotope separation, isotope production, isotope measurement, and isotope materials, 2. the composite and development field...isotopes in biology, cultural science, and environment, 3. the young researchers unit for composite research, 4. research contributions); Educational activities (1. programs for assist of young researchers, 2. lectures on English, 3. lectures for postgraduate students). (J.P.N.)

  12. Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O' Neil, D.J. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Research Inst.)

    1991-08-01

    An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

  13. A human dietary arachidonic acid supplementation study conducted in a metabolic research unit: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G J; Kelley, D S; Emken, E A; Phinney, S D; Kyle, D; Ferretti, A

    1997-04-01

    While there are many reports of studies that fed arachidonic acid (AA) to animals, there are very few reports of AA feeding to humans under controlled conditions. This 130-d study was conceived as a controlled, symmetrical crossover design with healthy, adult male volunteers. They lived in the metabolic research unit (MRU) of the Western Human Nutrition Research (WHNRC) for the entire study. All food was prepared by the WHNRC kitchen. The basal (low-AA) diet consisted of natural foods (30 en% fat, 15 en% protein, and 55 en% carbohydrate), containing 210 mg/d of AA, and met the recommended daily allowance for all nutrients. The high-AA (intervention) diet was similar except that 1.5 g/d of AA in the form of a triglyceride containing 50% AA replaced an equal amount of high-oleic safflower oil in the basal diet. The subjects (ages 20 to 39) were within -10 to +20% of ideal body weight, nonsmoking, and not allowed alcohol in the MRU. Their exercise level was constant, and their body weights were maintained within 2% of entry level. Subjects were initially fed the low-AA diet for 15 d. On day 16, half of the subjects (group A) wee placed on the high-AA diet, and the other group (B) remained on the low-AA diets. On day 65, the two groups switched diets. On day 115, group B returned to the low-AA diet. This design, assuming no carryover effect, allowed us to merge the data from the two groups, with the data comparison days being 65 (low-AA) and 115 (high-AA) for group B and 130 (low-AA) and 65 (high-AA) for group A. The main indices studied were the fatty acid composition of the plasma, red blood cells, platelets, and adipose tissue; in vitro platelet aggregation, bleeding times, clotting factors; immune response as measured by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests, cellular proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to various mitogens and antigens, natural killer cell activity, and response to measles/mumps/rubella and influenza vaccines; the

  14. Proceedings of the Conference on the Design of Experiments in Army Research Development and Testing (31st) Held at the Madison, Wisconsin on 23-25 October 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    indicates a ne ed for corrective action. If the scheme is applied to each of three employe es, the total sample is n = 6,000, about 12 percent of workload...x8 implies B. It should be noted that the calculations of xA and x8 yield wor st case va 1 ues if the null hypotheses are inequa 1 iti es. Each...parameter n is assumed to be independent of ~· Glaser (1984) employes a more general formulation with the Weibull distribution assuming that the

  15. Achievement report on contract research. Large-scale project - Results of 1st-phase research and development of MHD power generation system; Plant system no hyoka. Ogata project dai 1 ki MHD hatsuden system kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-03-01

    Described in detail involving the results of component development, assessment, and the indication of problems are the power generation channel, superconductive magnets and a helium refrigeration and liquefaction unit, seeds collector, heat exchanger, combustor, etc. Described involving the result and effect of power generation system research and development and the indication of problems is the research on Mark V and Mark VI operation tests. Described in relation to thermal performance calculation, economic effectiveness calculation, and environmental conservation involving an MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power plant are the combustion of heavy oil, combustion of natural gas, plant having a 1,000MW power generator as its base load, control of NOx and sulfur in MHD power generation, etc. As for planning for the next stage, the configuration of a 10MW MHD power generation plant, its equipment, construction cost, and preliminary element research, etc., are described. Furthermore, propositions are presented concerning future plans and the prospect of commercial MHD power generators, technological ripple effects due to MHD power generation research and development, and research and development in the future. (NEDO)

  16. Proceedings of the seminar on the joint research project between JAERI and Universities. 'Actinide researches for 21st century - fusion between chemistry and engineering'. August 20-21, 1999, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-01

    The Seminar on the Joint Research Project between JAERI and Universities was held in Tokai, August 20-21, 1999, to discuss future perspectives of the actinide researches for the nuclear fuel cycle. The papers related to the Joint Research Project on the Backend Chemistry were presented and discussed. The present report complies the papers contributed to the Seminar. (author)

  17. Proceedings of the seminar on the joint research project between JAERI and Universities. 'Actinide researches for 21st century - fusion between chemistry and engineering'. August 20-21, 1999, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    The Seminar on the Joint Research Project between JAERI and Universities was held in Tokai, August 20-21, 1999, to discuss future perspectives of the actinide researches for the nuclear fuel cycle. The papers related to the Joint Research Project on the Backend Chemistry were presented and discussed. The present report complies the papers contributed to the Seminar. (author)

  18. Realising participation within an action research project on two Care Innovation Units providing care for older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs Miranda Snoeren; MSc Donna Frost

    2011-01-01

    Background: On two Care Innovation Units in the Netherlands, staff, students and Lecturer Practitioners work intensively together to provide care, create a rich learning environment, and to foster innovation and research. In striving to advance the quality of care and to develop person centred

  19. Contemporary Patterns of Early Coronary Angiography Use in Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction in the United States: Insights From the National Cardiovascular Data Registry Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Wang, Tracy Y; Chen, Anita Y; Chiswell, Karen; Bhatt, Deepak L; Enriquez, Jonathan R; Henry, Timothy; Roe, Matthew T

    2018-02-26

    The study sought to characterize patient- and hospital-level variation in early angiography use among non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients. Contemporary implementation of guideline recommendations for early angiography use in NSTEMI patients in the United States have not been described. The study analyzed NSTEMI patients included in ACTION (Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network) registry (2012 to 2014) who underwent in-hospital angiography. Timing of angiography was categorized as early (≤24 h) vs. delayed (>24 h). The study evaluated factors associated with early angiography, hospital-level variation in early angiography use, and the relationship with quality-of-care measures. A total of 79,760 of 138,688 (57.5%) patients underwent early angiography. Factors most strongly associated with delayed angiography included weekend or holiday presentation, lower initial troponin ratio values, higher initial creatinine values, heart failure on presentation, and older age. Median hospital-level use of early angiography was 58.5% with wide variation across hospitals (21.7% to 100.0%). Patient characteristics did not differ substantially across hospitals grouped by tertiles of early angiography use (low, middle, and high). Hospitals in the highest tertile tended to more commonly use guideline-recommended medications and had higher defect-free care quality scores. In contemporary U.S. practice, high-risk clinical characteristics were associated with lower use of early angiography in NSTEMI patients; hospital-level use of early angiography varied widely despite few differences in case mix. Hospitals that most commonly utilized early angiography also had higher quality-of-care metrics, highlighting the need for improved NSTEMI guideline adherence. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program 1989. Program Technical Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Nebel Limb Radiances Under Sunlit Conditions in the 50-120 KM Altitude Range 61 Estimating Solar Flare Proton Fluences Dr. Hugh Nutley From 1850 with...MCD spectrum. The y axis units are, therefore, absorbance/ Tesla . The sensitivity of the apparatus was estimated to be 0.01 absorbance unit with 1000...the roof and walls, is placed. As a final step the excavated soil is used to cover the structure leaving the entrance and exit ramps open. The

  1. Science review of the Beaufort Institute of Oceanography, the Halifax Fisheries Research Laboratory, and the St. Andrews Biological Station, 1990-91. Revue des sciences de l'Institut oceanographique de Bedford, du Laboratoire de recherche halieutique de Halifax, et de la Station biologique de St. Andrews, 1990-91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T E; Cook, J [eds.

    1992-01-01

    A review is presented of the research and survey programs being undertaken in 1990-91 at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, the Halifax Fisheries Research Laboratory, and the St. Andrews Biological Station (all in Nova Scotia). The broad objectives of these programs are to perform applied research leading to the provision of advice on the management of marine and freshwater environments, including fisheries and offshore hydrocarbon resources; to perform targeted basic research in accordance with the mandates of Canada's Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Environment Canada, and Energy, Mines and Resources; to perform surveys and cartographic work; and to respond to major marine environmental emergencies. The research and survey work encompasses the fields of marine geology and geophysics, physical oceanography, marine chemistry, biological oceanography, fisheries research, seabird research, and navigational surveys and cartography. Topics of specific projects reviewed include marine pollution detection, phytoplankton profiling, seal populations, ocean mapping, geographic information systems, fish and invertebrate nutrition, shellfish culture, lobster habitat ecology, physics and biology of the Georges Bank frontal system, water-level instrumentation, data acquisition techniques, sea ice monitoring, salmon management, nearshore sedimentary processes, and oil/gas distribution in offshore basins. Separate abstracts have been prepared for three project reports from this review.

  2. Shoreline Units with Results from the 2014 Study Entitled "Characterizing Participation in Non-Commercial Fishing and other Shore-based Recreational Activities on St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands"

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project "Characterizing participation in non-commercial fishing and other shore-based recreational activities on St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands" was conducted in...

  3. Surveys in 1961 on St. Thomas & St. Croix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Thorkel; Licht, Kjeld de Fine

    Registration of towns and buildings erected during the Danish reign of the Caribbean Isles of St. Thomas, St. Jan and St. Croix 1671-1917 (now belonging to the USA under the name of Virgin Islands)....

  4. Research and photovoltaic industry at the United States; Recherche et industrie photovoltaique (PV) aux Etats-Unis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, Ch; Herino, R; Delville, R; Allegre, R

    2006-06-15

    For a big country as the United States, the solar energy can be a solution for the air quality improvement, the greenhouse gases fight and the reduction of the dependence to the imported petroleum and also for the economic growth by the increase of the employment in the solar industry sector. This document takes stock on the photovoltaic in the United States in the industrial and research domains. The american photovoltaic industry is the third behind the Japan and the Germany. (A.L.B.)

  5. Basic Research about Calculation of the Decommissioning Unit Cost based on The KRR-2 Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Hee-Seong; Ha, Jea-Hyun; Jin, Hyung-Gon; Park, Seung-Kook

    2015-01-01

    The KAERI be used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage the data of decommissioning activity experience through systems such as the decommissioning information management system (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), decommissioning work-unit productivity calculation system (DEWOCS). Some country such as Japan and The United States have the information for decommissioning experience of the NPP and publish reports on decommissioning cost analysis. These reports as valuable data be used to compare with the decommissioning unit cost. In particular, need a method to estimate the decommissioning cost of the NPP because there is no decommissioning experience of NPP in case of Korea. makes possible to predict the more precise prediction about the decommissioning unit cost. But still, there are many differences on calculation for the decommissioning unit cost in domestic and foreign country. Typically, it is difficult to compare with data because published not detailed reports. Therefore, field of estimation for decommissioning cost have to use a unified framework in order to the decommissioning cost be provided to exact of the decommissioning cost

  6. Basic Research about Calculation of the Decommissioning Unit Cost based on The KRR-2 Decommissioning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Hee-Seong; Ha, Jea-Hyun; Jin, Hyung-Gon; Park, Seung-Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The KAERI be used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage the data of decommissioning activity experience through systems such as the decommissioning information management system (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), decommissioning work-unit productivity calculation system (DEWOCS). Some country such as Japan and The United States have the information for decommissioning experience of the NPP and publish reports on decommissioning cost analysis. These reports as valuable data be used to compare with the decommissioning unit cost. In particular, need a method to estimate the decommissioning cost of the NPP because there is no decommissioning experience of NPP in case of Korea. makes possible to predict the more precise prediction about the decommissioning unit cost. But still, there are many differences on calculation for the decommissioning unit cost in domestic and foreign country. Typically, it is difficult to compare with data because published not detailed reports. Therefore, field of estimation for decommissioning cost have to use a unified framework in order to the decommissioning cost be provided to exact of the decommissioning cost.

  7. Aligning Business and Education: 21st Century Skill Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles L., Jr.; Kresyman, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore stakeholder perceptions concerning four key 21st century skills required for graduates to be successful in today's workplace, and to report on common themes surrounding how a post-secondary school in the Southwest United States is preparing graduates with predominant 21st Century skills: interpersonal…

  8. Epidemic potential of Escherichia coli ST131 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautzenberg, M J D; Haverkate, M R; Bonten, M J M; Bootsma, M C J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Observational studies have suggested that Escherichia coli sequence type (ST) 131 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 have hyperendemic properties. This would be obvious from continuously high incidence and/or prevalence of carriage or infection with these bacteria in specific patient populations. Hyperendemicity could result from increased transmissibility, longer duration of infectiousness, and/or higher pathogenic potential as compared with other lineages of the same species. The aim of our research is to quantitatively estimate these critical parameters for E. coli ST131 and K. pneumoniae ST258, in order to investigate whether E. coli ST131 and K. pneumoniae ST258 are truly hyperendemic clones. Primary outcome measures A systematic literature search was performed to assess the evidence of transmissibility, duration of infectiousness, and pathogenicity for E. coli ST131 and K. pneumoniae ST258. Meta-regression was performed to quantify these characteristics. Results The systematic literature search yielded 639 articles, of which 19 data sources provided information on transmissibility (E. coli ST131 n=9; K. pneumoniae ST258 n=10)), 2 on duration of infectiousness (E. coli ST131 n=2), and 324 on pathogenicity (E. coli ST131 n=285; K. pneumoniae ST258 n=39). Available data on duration of carriage and on transmissibility were insufficient for quantitative assessment. In multivariable meta-regression E. coli isolates causing infection were associated with ST131, compared to isolates only causing colonisation, suggesting that E. coli ST131 can be considered more pathogenic than non-ST131 isolates. Date of isolation, location and resistance mechanism also influenced the prevalence of ST131. E. coli ST131 was 3.2 (95% CI 2.0 to 5.0) times more pathogenic than non-ST131. For K. pneumoniae ST258 there were not enough data for meta-regression assessing the influence of colonisation versus infection on ST258 prevalence. Conclusions With the currently available data

  9. The Research of Utilization Hours of Coal-Fired Power Generation Units Based on Electric Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junhui; Yang, Jianlian; Wang, Jiangbo; Yang, Meng; Tian, Chunzheng; He, Xinhui

    2018-01-01

    With grid-connected scale of clean energy such as wind power and photovoltaic power expanding rapidly and cross-province transmission scale being bigger, utilization hours of coal-fired power generation units become lower and lower in the context of the current slowdown in electricity demand. This paper analyzes the influencing factors from the three aspects of demand, supply and supply and demand balance, and the mathematical model has been constructed based on the electric energy balance. The utilization hours of coal-fired power generation units have been solved considering the relationship among proportion of various types of power installed capacity, the output rate and utilization hours. By carrying out empirical research in Henan Province, the utilization hours of coal-fired units of Henan Province in 2020 has been achieved. The example validates the practicability and the rationality of the model, which can provide a basis for the decision-making for coal-fired power generation enterprises.

  10. Opening up animal research and science-society relations? A thematic analysis of transparency discourses in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Carmen; Hobson-West, Pru

    2016-10-01

    The use of animals in scientific research represents an interesting case to consider in the context of the contemporary preoccupation with transparency and openness in science and governance. In the United Kingdom, organisations critical of animal research have long called for more openness. More recently, organisations involved in animal research also seem to be embracing transparency discourses. This article provides a detailed analysis of publically available documents from animal protection groups, the animal research community and government/research funders. Our aim is to explore the similarities and differences in the way transparency is constructed and to identify what more openness is expected to achieve. In contrast to the existing literature, we conclude that the slipperiness of transparency discourses may ultimately have transformative implications for the relationship between science and society and that contemporary openness initiatives might be sowing the seeds for change to the status quo. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Developing information technology at the Medical Research Unit of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibacka, Paterne Lessihuin; Bounda, Yann; Nguema, Davy Ondo; Lell, Bertrand

    2010-03-01

    Information technology has become a key resource for research institutions, providing services such as hardware, software and network maintenance, as well as data management services. The IT department of the Medical Research Unit (MRU) of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon is a good example of how IT has developed at African Research Centres in recent years and demonstrates the scope of work that a modern research centre needs to offer. It illustrates the development in the past 15 years--from single computers maintained by investigators to the present situation of a group of well-trained local IT personal who are in charge of a variety of hardware and software and who also develop applications for use in a research environment. Open source applications are particularly suited for these needs and various applications are used in data management, data analysis, accounting, administration and quality management.

  12. Opening up animal research and science–society relations? A thematic analysis of transparency discourses in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Carmen; Hobson-West, Pru

    2015-01-01

    The use of animals in scientific research represents an interesting case to consider in the context of the contemporary preoccupation with transparency and openness in science and governance. In the United Kingdom, organisations critical of animal research have long called for more openness. More recently, organisations involved in animal research also seem to be embracing transparency discourses. This article provides a detailed analysis of publically available documents from animal protection groups, the animal research community and government/research funders. Our aim is to explore the similarities and differences in the way transparency is constructed and to identify what more openness is expected to achieve. In contrast to the existing literature, we conclude that the slipperiness of transparency discourses may ultimately have transformative implications for the relationship between science and society and that contemporary openness initiatives might be sowing the seeds for change to the status quo. PMID:26009149

  13. An Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs in the United States: Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lyle V., Ed.; And Others

    The quality of doctoral-level chemical engineering (N=79), civil engineering (N=74), electrical engineering (N=91), and mechanical engineering (N=82) programs at United States universities was assessed, using 16 measures. These measures focused on variables related to: (1) program size; (2) characteristics of graduates; (3) reputational factors…

  14. Magnets for fusion reactors and plasma physics research: state of the art in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The breadth of magnet development in the United States is covered briefly and a few of the difficult technical issues are touched on. Toroidal field coils for tokamaks and superconducting field coils for mirror devices are covered. Parameters of the magnets of various devices are tabulated

  15. Magnets for fusion reactors and plasma physics research: state of the art in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The breadth of magnet development in the United States is covered briefly and a few of the difficult technical issues are touched on. Toroidal field coils for tokamaks and superconducting field coils for mirror devices are covered. Parameters of the magnets of various devices are tabulated. (MHR)

  16. Priority research and management issues for the imperiled Great Basin of the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanne C. Chambers; Michael J. Wisdom

    2009-01-01

    Like many arid and semiarid regions, the Great Basin of the western United States is undergoing major ecological, social, and economic changes that are having widespread detrimental effects on the structure, composition, and function of native ecosystems. The causes of change are highly interactive and include urban, suburban, and exurban growth, past and present land...

  17. Financing the Business. PACE Revised. Level 2. Unit 8. Research & Development Series No. 240BB8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This unit on financing a small business, the eighth in a series of 18 modules, is on the second level of the revised PACE (Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship) comprehensive curriculum. Geared to advanced secondary and beginning postsecondary or adult students, the modules provide an opportunity to learn about and try out…

  18. Financing the Business. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 8. Research & Development Series No. 240AB8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on financing a business, the eighth in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  19. United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service research programs on microbes for management of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Susan L F

    2003-01-01

    Restrictions on the use of conventional nematicides have increased the need for new methods of managing plant-parasitic nematodes. Consequently, nematode-antagonistic microbes, and active compounds produced by such organisms, are being explored as potential additions to management practices. Programs in this area at the USDA Agricultural Research Service investigate applied biocontrol agents, naturally occurring beneficial soil microbes and natural compounds. Specific research topics include use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and cultural practices for management of root-knot and ring nematodes, determination of management strategies that enhance activity of naturally occurring Pasteuria species (bacterial obligate parasites of nematodes), studies on interactions between biocontrol bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes, and screening of microbes for compounds active against plant-parasitic nematodes. Some studies involve biocontrol agents that are active against nematodes and soil-borne plant-pathogenic fungi, or combinations of beneficial bacteria and fungi, to manage a spectrum of plant diseases or to increase efficacy over a broader range of environmental conditions. Effective methods or agents identified in the research programs are investigated as additions to existing management systems for plant-parasitic nematodes.

  20. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network: a history of multicenter collaboration in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzimenatos, Leah; Kim, Emily; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we review the history and progress of a large multicenter research network pertaining to emergency medical services for children. We describe the history, organization, infrastructure, and research agenda of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network and highlight some of the important accomplishments since its inception. We also describe the network's strategy to grow its research portfolio, train new investigators, and study how to translate new evidence into practice. This strategy ensures not only the sustainability of the network in the future but the growth of research in emergency medical services for children in general.

  1. International topical meeting on research reactor fuel management (RRFM) - United States foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) acceptance program: 2010 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Taylor, J.L.; Niehus, M.T.; Landers, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, adopted by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS) in May 1996, scheduled to expire May 12, 2016, to return research reactor fuel until May 12, 2019 to the U.S. is in its fourteenth year. This paper provides a brief update on the program, part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and discusses program initiatives and future activities. The goal of the program continues to be recovery of U.S.-origin nuclear materials, which could otherwise be used in weapons, while assisting other countries to enjoy the benefits of nuclear technology. The NNSA is seeking feedback from research reactor operators to help us understand ways to include eligible research reactors who have not yet participated in the program. (author)

  2. Report on the 1st research co-ordination meeting of the co-ordinated research project on standardized high current solid targets for cyclotron production of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Radioisotopes produced with a cyclotron and their corresponding radiopharmaceuticals have already been shown to be extremely valuable in basic medical research, disease diagnosis and radiotherapy treatment. There are more than 200 cyclotron facilities worldwide and the number is growing every year. A number of the Member States have acquired cyclotrons for the purpose of producing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine and a number of others have expressed an interest in acquiring such facilities. This report is concerned with the production of four radiotracers: Iodine-123, Iodine-124, Thallium-201 and Palladium-103. Iodine-123 is already widely used in SPECT studies, I-124 has shown great promise and can be used for PET studies as well as in radiotherapy. Tl-201 is widely used throughout the world as 201 Tl + for measuring cardiac blood flow. It is a routine tool that is needed for the Nuclear Medicine communities and can be made available by those countries possessing a cyclotron facility with 30 MeV protons. Moreover, as preliminary results dealing with the labelling of chelated polypeptides with trivalent cationic Tl-201 are very promising; the nuclide can also be tried as a potential substitute for Indium tracers in SPECT diagnosis involving polypeptides. Palladium-103, an Auger electron emitter, has become an extremely important radionuclide for therapy. The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) focuses on the optimisation and standardisation of solid phase cyclotron target technology for the production of I-123, I-124, Tl-201 and Pd-103. In particular, as originally proposed and further discussed and agreed upon during the 1st Research Co-ordination Meeting, the main technical goals of the CRP are described as follows: (i) to investigate the possibility of using electrodeposited tellurium and melted tellurium oxide as target material for the production of I-123 and I-124. For the oxide target, the following parameters and techniques will be explored: 1) methods

  3. Industry-funded dermatologic research within academia in the United States: fiscal and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, I H

    1992-03-01

    Private-sector funding of biomedical research within academia may come from industry, foundations, the dermatologists themselves, and the public at large. Industry-funding is of benefit to both academia and industry. Industry may fund clinical and basic research and product testing. Industry is more willing to fund product testing and clinical research than basic research. Funds for dermatologic research may be obtained from manufacturers of drugs, medical devices, cosmetics, soaps, and detergents. Questions of academic freedom arise when research is funded by industry. The results of academic research are in the public domain; the results of intramural industry research are often proprietary, i.e., "trade secrets." When there is industry funding within academia, any restraints on publication should be held to a minimum and be temporary. Publication should occur in a timely fashion, although recognizing the need for delayed publication if the results concern patentable material. When there is a consultantship, pre-arranged terms of agreement may restrict communication. Patents usually are held by the investigator's institution. The funding company may be granted world-wide, royalty-bearing licenses. Conflicts of interest may arise during any research endeavor; this warrants close attention when the research is industry funded. Stock ownership, speaker fees, blind contracts, etc., should be avoided. In any communication, funding agreements should be stated. Indirect costs are a "necessary evil." There are non-research expenditures associated with all research projects for which the institution is justified in requesting compensation. Indirect costs must have definite connections to a project. As industrial funding of research within academia increases, various facets of the academia-industry relationship are receiving increasing attention. Several aspects of conflicts of interest and indirect costs must yet be resolved. When faced openly and directly, all of these

  4. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

    2000-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

  5. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhart, Susan M.; Filipy, Ronald E.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000

  6. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit

    OpenAIRE

    Rapport, Frances; Clement, Clare

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundQualitative research methods are increasingly used within trials to address broader research questions than quantitative methods can address alone. Qualitative methods enable health professionals, service users and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences when evaluating health care treatments, interventions or policies. They can influence trial design, allowing for a fuller engagement with research questions, aims and objectives and clarify the complexities of p...

  7. Report by the AERES on the unit: Unit of researches on neutron transport and radioactivity confinement in nuclear installations under the supervision of the establishments and bodies: IRSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory whose activity is organized in three departments: neutron transport and criticality (themes: numerical methods, maths and statistics related to the simulation of neutral particle propagation, nuclear data, uncertainty propagation and bias estimation, code qualification and associated experimental programs, neutron transport in reactors and fuel cycle, criticality accidents), radionuclide transfer in radioactive waste disposals (site identification strategy, hydro-mechanical phenomena affecting storage performance, physical-chemical evolution factors, storage modelling), and metrology and confinement of radioactive gases and aerosols. The authors discuss an assessment of the unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved and recommendations, productions and publications. A more detailed assessment is presented for each department in terms of scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project

  8. Progress report to United States Energy Research and Development Administration, November 1, 1976--October 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported for research completed and in progress at Vanderbilt University in the following areas: in beam spectroscopy, coulomb excitation, nucleon transfer reactions, nuclear theory, radioactivity studies

  9. Beyond Bullying: Consideration of Additional Research for the Assessment and Prevention of Potential Rampage School Violence in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evonn Welton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For approximately 15 years there have been a number of episodes of rampage school violence in elementary/high school and higher education in the United States. Initial responses included implementation of antibullying programs, disciplinary measures, and increased law security measures. As the incidences have continued, it has become apparent that a more collaborative and interdisciplinary approach is needed for prevention. This paper offers a review of research literature as it applies to proposed innovative strategies for collaborative research, prevention, and intervention in the school setting.

  10. Design and implementation of the Molecular Imaging Unit for large animais at the National Center for Cardiovascular Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.; Delgado Alberquilla, R.; Moreno Lopez, J.; Escudero Toro, R.

    2011-01-01

    in this paper describes the most iraportant imaging techniques to be used with the latest equipment as well as the future of PET-MRI combination, its application in research on large animals and the implications for the design of the units, shielding calculation management, sources of radiation and waste. This has reguired value and integrate the specific requirements of a research center in terms of bio security, care of large animals (pigs), health status of animals in an environment of highly demanding conditions PR.

  11. A RESEARCH ON ACCIDENTS RISKS AND CAUSES IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Tanrıverdi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate the relationship between the qualifications of neonatal intensive care units of hospitals (physical conditions, standard applications, employee qualifications and use of personal protective equipment and work related causes and risks, employee related causes and risks when occupational accidents occur. Accordingly, a survey was prepared and was made among 105 nurses working in 3 public and 3 private hospital's neonatal intensive care units, in the January of 2010. The survey consists of questions about the qualifications of neonatal intensive care units, work related causes and risks, and employee related causes and risks. From the regression analysis conducted, it has been found that confirmed hypotheses in several studies in the literature were not significant in this study. The sub-dimensions in which relationships has been found show that the improvement of the physical environment in workplace, the improvement of the employee qualifications and standard applications can reduce the rate of occupational accidents. According to the results of this study management should take care of the organizational factors besides to improvement of the physical environment in workplace, the improvement of the employee qualifications and standard applications.

  12. Maximising value from a United Kingdom Biomedical Research Centre: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Ovseiko, Pavel V; Fahy, Nick; Shaw, Sara; Kerr, Polly; Rushforth, Alexander D; Channon, Keith M; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki

    2017-08-14

    Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. Their mission is to generate novel treatments, technologies, diagnostics and other interventions that increase the country's international competitiveness, to rapidly translate these innovations into benefits for patients, and to improve efficiency and reduce waste in healthcare. As NIHR Oxford BRC (Oxford BRC) enters its third 5-year funding period, we seek to (1) apply the evidence base on how best to support the various partnerships in this large, multi-stakeholder research system and (2) research how these partnerships play out in a new, ambitious programme of translational research. Organisational case study, informed by the principles of action research. A cross-cutting theme, 'Partnerships for Health, Wealth and Innovation' has been established with multiple sub-themes (drug development, device development, business support and commercialisation, research methodology and statistics, health economics, bioethics, patient and public involvement and engagement, knowledge translation, and education and training) to support individual BRC research themes and generate cross-theme learning. The 'Partnerships' theme will support the BRC's goals by facilitating six types of partnership (with patients and citizens, clinical services, industry, across the NIHR infrastructure, across academic disciplines, and with policymakers and payers) through a range of engagement platforms and activities. We will develop a longitudinal progress narrative centred around exemplar case studies, and apply theoretical models from innovation studies (Triple Helix), sociology of science (Mode 2 knowledge production) and business studies (Value Co-creation). Data sources will be the empirical research studies within individual BRC research themes (who will apply separately for NHS ethics approval), plus documentary analysis and interviews and ethnography with research

  13. Turning health research into health promotion: a study of causality and 'critical insights' in a United Kingdom health campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggin, Joe

    2012-10-01

    This article examines how important decisions about health can alter between public health policy formulation and eventual marketing implementation. Specifically, the article traces the development and production of a major United Kingdom social marketing campaign named Change4Life, and examines how ideas about the causes of and solutions to the obesity epidemic are produced in differing ways throughout the health promotion process. This study examines a variety of United Kingdom health research, policy, marketing strategy and marketing messages between 2008 and 2011. This research demonstrates that claims about causality oscillate and alter throughout the research, policy and Change4Life marketing process. These oscillations are problematic, since the Department of Health described the original consumer research as 'critical'. Given both the importance of the health issues being addressed and the amount of funding dedicated to Change4Life, that 'critical' research was directly contradicted in the campaign requires urgent review. To conclude, the article discusses the utility of social marketing when considering causal claims in health promotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  15. United States Geological Survey uranium and thorium resource assessment and exploration research program, fiscal year 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offield, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Research is being conducted by the USGS for the NURE program in six fields: geochemistry and mineralogy, sedimentary environments, igneous and metamorphic environments, geophysical exploration techniques, U resource assessment, and Th resource assessment. Some FY 1979 research results are reported and discussed

  16. A Resurgence of United Kingdom Nuclear Power Research (2011 EFRC Forum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, Robin W.

    2011-01-01

    Robin W. Grimes, Professor at Imperial College, London, was the third speaker in the May 26, 2011 EFRC Forum session, 'Global Perspectives on Frontiers in Energy Research.' In his presentation, Professor Grimes discussed recent research endeavors in advanced nuclear energy systems being pursued in the UK. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss 'Science for our Nation's Energy Future.' In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  17. Foreign-Born Women Faculty Work Roles and Productivity at Research Universities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiseishvili, Ketevan

    2010-01-01

    Using the data from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) survey, the study examined foreign-born women faculty members' work roles and productivity in the areas of teaching, research, and service in comparison with their US-born counterparts at research universities in the US. The findings provided some evidence to suggest…

  18. Moving from a Predominantly Teaching Oriented Culture to a Research Productivity Mission: The Case of Mexico and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gregorutti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study qualitatively analyzes the culture conflicts professors in the United States and Mexico are experiencing with the increasing pressures to produce more research about higher education. The first dataset was collected from 36 faculty members from 12 small and medium sized private, doctorate-granting universities. These universities are located in 11 states across the United States. The remaining data came from 44 faculty members employed at four small and medium sized private, doctoral granting universities in four states across Mexico. Results showed that universities in the US are transitioning from a predominantly teaching college culture to a more research orientation. Although the sampled universities continue to offer established graduate programs, faculty members continue to struggle with their teaching requirements and conflicts research productivity pressures place on their teaching and mentoring time with students. Participating faculty members employed in the US were not evenly interested in research opportunities due to the diverse mission objectives promoted by their respective institutions. On the other hand, faculty members employed in Mexico were generally more concerned with their research productivity and subsequent factors, which negatively impact their research productivity. Mexican faculty members rarely cited conflicts between their institutional missions and teaching objectives. This study is highly relevant to policy makers, higher education administrators, and scholars interested in comparative and international higher education. Administrators can benefit from the findings in this study, which provides faculty members’ perceptions and describes departmental structures and organizational dynamics employed to advance greater research and development opportunities. This study concludes with a discussion on how administrators and faculty members should handle the pressures for research productivity and

  19. Survived so what? Identifying priorities for research with children and families post-paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Joseph C; Hemingway, Pippa; Redsell, Sarah A

    2018-03-01

    The involvement of patients and the public in the development, implementation and evaluation of health care services and research is recognized to have tangible benefits in relation to effectiveness and credibility. However, despite >96% of children and young people surviving critical illness or injury, there is a paucity of published reports demonstrating their contribution to informing the priorities for aftercare services and outcomes research. We aimed to identify the service and research priorities for Paediatric Intensive Care Unit survivors with children and young people, their families and other stakeholders. We conducted a face-to-face, multiple-stakeholder consultation event, held in the Midlands (UK), to provide opportunities for experiences, views and priorities to be elicited. Data were gathered using write/draw and tell and focus group approaches. An inductive content analytical approach was used to categorize and conceptualize feedback. A total of 26 individuals attended the consultation exercise, including children and young people who were critical care survivors; their siblings; parents and carers; health professionals; academics; commissioners; and service managers. Consultation findings indicated that future services, interventions and research must be holistic and family-centred. Children and young people advisors reported priorities that focused on longer-term outcomes, whereas adult advisors identified priorities that mapped against the pathways of care. Specific priorities included developing and testing interventions that address unmet communication and information needs. Furthermore, initiatives to optimize the lives and longer-term functional and psycho-social outcomes of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit survivors were identified. This consultation exercise provides further evidence of the value of meaningful patient and public involvement in identifying the priorities for research and services for Paediatric Intensive Care Unit survivors

  20. Validation of the "United Registries for Clinical Assessment and Research" (UR-CARE), a European online registry for clinical care and research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Gisbert, Javier P; Siegmund, Britta

    2018-01-01

    Background: The "United Registries for Clinical Assessment and Research" (UR-CARE) database is an initiative of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) to facilitate daily patient care and research studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Herein, we sought to validate the database......-99%); Case 5: 91% (87-93%)]. These numbers did not differ significantly from those found 6 weeks later (NcNemar's test p>0.05). Conclusion: The UR-CARE database appears to be feasible, valid and reliable as a tool and easy to use regardless of prior user experience and level of clinical IBD experience. UR......-CARE has the potential to enhance future European collaborations regarding clinical research in IBD....

  1. Health and medical research funding agencies' promotion of public engagement within research: a qualitative interview study exploring the United Kingdom context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bekkum, Jennifer E; Fergie, Gillian M; Hilton, Shona

    2016-03-24

    Public engagement (PE) has become a common feature of many liberal governmental agendas worldwide. Since the turn of this century there has been a succession of United Kingdom policy initiatives to encourage research funding agencies, universities and researchers to reconsider how they engage with citizens and communities. Although most funding agencies now explicitly promote PE within research, little empirical work has been carried out in this area. In this study, we explored why and how health and medical research funding agencies in the United Kingdom have interpreted and implemented their role to promote PE within research. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 30 key informants from 10 agencies that fund health or medical research. Data were also gathered from agencies' websites and documentation. The analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Across agencies, we found that PE was being interpreted and operationalised in various different ways. The terminology used within funding agencies to describe PE seems to be flexibly applied. Disciplinary differences were evident both in the terminology used to describe PE and the drivers for PE highlighted by participants - with applied health science funders more aligned with participatory models of PE. Within the grant funding process PE was rarely systematically treated as a key component of research. In particular, PE was not routinely incorporated into the planning of funding calls. PE was more likely to be considered in the application and assessment phases, where it was largely appraised as a tool for enhancing science. Concerns were expressed regarding how to monitor and evaluate PE within research. This study suggests funding agencies working within specific areas of health and medicine can promote particular definitions of PE and aligned practices which determine the boundaries in which researchers working in these areas understand and practice PE. Our study also highlights how the

  2. Operational experience of decommissioning techniques for research reactors in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, M.R.; McCool, T.M.

    2002-01-01

    In previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted by the IAEA no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. As experience was gained and technology advanced it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. It was within this context that a CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1997 to 2001. This paper considers the experience gained from the decommissioning of two research reactors during the course of the CRP namely: (a) the ICI Triga Mk I reactor at Billingham UK which was largely complete by the end of the research project and (b) the Argonaut 100 reactor at the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor centre at East Kilbride in Scotland which is currently is the early stages of dismantling/site operations. It is the intention of this paper with reference to the two case studies outlined above to compare the actual implementation of these works against the original proposals and identify areas that were found to be problematical and/or identify any lessons learnt. (author)

  3. Stroke care: Experiences and clinical research in stroke units in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobindram Arjundas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: S troke is the second commonest cause of death in India with crude overall prevalence rate of 220 per 100,000. With an increasing aging population at risk, the stroke burden in India can be expected to reach epidemic proportions. Materials and Methods: The first protocol-based prospective studies, funded by private agencies was conducted in Madras Institute of Neurology in 1984-86. The results led to establishment of the first stroke unit in Tamil Nadu state, in the institute. The first all-India hospital-based studies in acute stroke was completed as INDIAN COOPERATIVE ACUTE STROKE STUDIES (ICASS I and ICASS II with WHO STEP ONE by members of the Indian Stroke Association between 2000-2005. This has generated very useful data for our country. Results: Mortality in 1984-86 was 40%. Stroke unit in the institute dropped it to 12%. About 10 years later, ICASS studies showed a further fall of mortality to 8%, which is the current international figure in the west. Morbidity pattern showed about half return to their original activities. But about one third are left totally disabled needing prolonged care, for which fiscal, social and rehab provisions have to be done on a national basis. Conclusions: The progress and success of care of Stroke in the last three decades, from treatment in medical and neurology wards to specialized stroke units is presented. The main risk factors are hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease across the country. Hypertension alone or with the other two diseases was present in 72% of cases. Prevention and treatment of these factors will reduce the stroke burden, mortality and morbidity of strokes. The Stroke-team concept can be extended to the smallest hospitals in our country.

  4. ST Product Characteristics and Relationships with Perceptions and Behaviors among Rural Adolescent Males: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Elizabeth T.; Darius, Ellen F.; Walsh, Margaret M.; Chaffee, Benjamin W.

    2017-01-01

    Although smoking declines in the United States, the prevalence of male adolescent smokeless tobacco (ST; moist snuff and chewing tobacco) use remains unchanged. ST product characteristics, such as flavoring, packaging, and branding, could influence adolescents' ST initiation and continued use. This qualitative study examines the potential role of…

  5. The rise of pathophysiologic research in the United States: the role of two Harvard hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishler, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiologic research, the major approach to understanding and treating disease, was created in the 20th century, and two Harvard-affiliated hospitals, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and Boston City Hospital, played a key role in its development. After the Flexner Report of 1910, medical students were assigned clinical clerkships in teaching hospitals. Rockefeller-trained Francis Weld Peabody, who was committed to investigative, pathophysiologic research, was a critical leader in these efforts. At the Brigham, Harvard medical students observed patients closely and asked provocative questions about their diseases. Additionally, physicians returned from World War I with questions concerning the pathophysiology of wartime injuries. At the Boston City Hospital's new Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Peabody fostered investigative question-based research by physicians. These physicians expanded pathophysiologic investigation from the 1920s. Post-war, Watson and Crick's formulation of the structure of DNA led shortly to modern molecular biology and new research approaches that are being furthered at the Boston Hospitals.

  6. United States of America. Report 7 [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsley, S.J.

    1967-01-01

    Present research programme (long-term): Interrelationship of environmental salt concentration and concentration of dissolved radionuclides to the rate of accumulation of these nuclides by euryhaline teleosts. Objectives of this research are designed toward the definition of a function that will adequately described the rate of accumulation of selected radionuclides by euryhaline teleosts from littoral or estuarine environments. Concurrent studies are being made to determine the maximum concentration accumulated by these fish under conditions of chronic exposure to selected concentrations in the medium

  7. United Kingdom. Report 1 [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, W.L.

    1967-01-01

    Present research programme (long-term): There are five separate research projects in this Group, viz: A. Low-level irradiation studies on marine and fresh-water fish eggs. B. Accumulation and. metabolism of radionuclides by marine organisms. C. Physico-chemical states of radionuclides in sea water, D. Dispersion and transport of radionuclides in the coastal waters of Windscale. E. Mechanisms of the toxicity of zinc to fish. Details of each project are outlined

  8. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1986). Program Technical Report. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    Villa- nueva bone stain for 48 hours. After staining the sections were cleaned in tap water, lightly sanded (600 grit wet/dry paper), washed and...research collaborator. 92-2 I. INTRODUCTION 5 I have been a microbiologist since 1957. I have done research on bacteria , yeasts and filamentous fungi, and...C. Tests for Bacterial Contamination. To determine if bacteria were contaminating the algal cultures, 0.1 ml of algal material was aseptically

  9. Survey on astrobiology research and teaching activities within the United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Burchell, Mark J

    2009-10-01

    While astrobiology is apparently growing steadily around the world, in terms of the number of researchers drawn into this interdisciplinary area and teaching courses provided for new students, there have been very few studies conducted to chart this expansion quantitatively. To address this deficiency, the Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB) conducted a questionnaire survey of universities and research institutions nationwide to ascertain the current extent of astrobiology research and teaching in the UK. The aim was to provide compiled statistics and an information resource for those who seek research groups or courses of study, and to facilitate new interdisciplinary collaborations. The report here summarizes details gathered on 33 UK research groups, which involved 286 researchers (from undergraduate project students to faculty members). The survey indicates that around 880 students are taking university-level courses, with significant elements of astrobiology included, every year in the UK. Data are also presented on the composition of astrobiology students by their original academic field, which show a significant dominance of physics and astronomy students. This survey represents the first published systematic national assessment of astrobiological academic activity and indicates that this emerging field has already achieved a strong degree of penetration into the UK academic community.

  10. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (31st, Orlando, FL, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    For the thirty-first year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) sponsored the publication of these Proceedings. Papers were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. This year's Proceedings has two sections--Section 1 includes research and development papers and…

  11. Annual progress report 1993. Work in controlled thermonuclear fusion research performed in the fusion research unit under the contract of association between Euratom and Risoe National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom-Risoe National Laboratory covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics group has activities within (a) studies of nonlinear dynamical processes in magnetized plasmas, (b) development of pellet injectors for fusion experiments, and (c) development of diagnostics for fusion plasmas. The activities in technology cover radiation damage of fusion reactor materials. A summary of the activities in 1993 is presented. (au) (4 tabs., 21 ills., 64 refs.)

  12. Quantifying the economic impact of government and charity funding of medical research on private research and development funding in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussex, Jon; Feng, Yan; Mestre-Ferrandiz, Jorge; Pistollato, Michele; Hafner, Marco; Burridge, Peter; Grant, Jonathan

    2016-02-24

    Government- and charity-funded medical research and private sector research and development (R&D) are widely held to be complements. The only attempts to measure this complementarity so far have used data from the United States of America and are inevitably increasingly out of date. This study estimates the magnitude of the effect of government and charity biomedical and health research expenditure in the United Kingdom (UK), separately and in total, on subsequent private pharmaceutical sector R&D expenditure in the UK. The results for this study are obtained by fitting an econometric vector error correction model (VECM) to time series for biomedical and health R&D expenditure in the UK for ten disease areas (including 'other') for the government, charity and private sectors. The VECM model describes the relationship between public (i.e. government and charities combined) sector expenditure, private sector expenditure and global pharmaceutical sales as a combination of a long-term equilibrium and short-term movements. There is a statistically significant complementary relationship between public biomedical and health research expenditure and private pharmaceutical R&D expenditure. A 1% increase in public sector expenditure is associated in the best-fit model with a 0.81% increase in private sector expenditure. Sensitivity analysis produces a similar and statistically significant result with a slightly smaller positive elasticity of 0.68. Overall, every additional £1 of public research expenditure is associated with an additional £0.83-£1.07 of private sector R&D spend in the UK; 44% of that additional private sector expenditure occurs within 1 year, with the remainder accumulating over decades. This spillover effect implies a real annual rate of return (in terms of economic impact) to public biomedical and health research in the UK of 15-18%. When combined with previous estimates of the health gain that results from public medical research in cancer and

  13. Hazardous-waste landfill research, US EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomaker, N.B.

    1988-08-01

    The Land Pollution Control Division (LPCD), Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Lab. (HWERL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in Cincinnati, Ohio, has responsibility for research in solid- and hazardous-waste management with respect to land disposal of wastes. To fulfill the responsibility, the LPCD is developing concepts and is documenting the environmental effects of various waste-disposal practices; and is collecting data necessary to support implementation of disposal guidelines mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). This paper presents an overview of the land-disposal research associated with the LPCD hazardous waste program plan and will report the current status of work in the following categorical areas: Hazardous-waste facilities - landfills and surface impoundments; Non-Hazardous waste facilities; and Technology transfer.

  14. Analyses of the transportation of spent research reactor fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, J.W.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Transportation Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories has analyzed the impacts of transportation of research reactor spent fuel from US and foreign reactors for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Defense Programs. This effort represents the first comprehensive analytical evaluation of the risks of transporting high-, medium-, and low-enriched uranium spent research reactor fuel by both sea and land. Two separate shipment programs have been analyzed: the shipment of research reactor spent fuel from Taiwan to the US (Fuel Movement Program), and the return of research reactor spent fuels of US origin from foreign and domestic reactors (Research Reactor Fuel Return Program). In order to perform these analyses, a comprehensive methodology for analyzing the probabilities and consequences of transportation in coastal waters and port facilities, handling at the port, and shipment by truck to reprocessing facilities was developed. The Taiwanese fuel consists of low-burnup aluminum-clad metallic uranium research reactor spent fuel; the other fuels are primarily aluminum-clad oxide fuels. The Fuel Movement Program is ongoing, while the Fuel Return Program addresses future shipments over a ten-year period. The operational aspects of the Taiwanese shipments have been uniform, but several possible shipping configurations are possible for the Fuel Return Program shipments. Comprehensive assessments, which bound the impacts of spent fuel transport, demonstrate that when shipments are made in compliance with applicable regulations, the risks for all such transport are low. For comparison with previously licensed transport activities and to provide continuity with earlier analyses, the results for shipment of 150-day-old commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel are presented as part of this study

  15. Reliability research based experience with systems and events at the Kozloduy NPP units 1-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khristova, R; Kaltchev, B; Dimitrov, B [Energoproekt, Sofia (Bulgaria); Nedyalkova, D; Sonev, A [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    An overview of equipment reliability based on operational data of selected safety systems at the Kozloduy NPP is presented. Conclusions are drawn on reliability of the service water system, feed water system, emergency power supply - category 2, emergency high pressure ejection system and spray system. For the units 1-4 all recorded accident protocols in the period 1974-1993 have been processed and the main initiators identified. A list with 39 most frequent initiators of accidents/incidents is compiled. The human-caused errors account for 27% of all events. The reliability characteristics and frequencies have been calculated for all initiating events. It is concluded that there have not been any accidents with consequences for fuel integrity or radioactive release. 14 refs.

  16. The regulatory process, nuclear safety research and the fuel cycle in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, P.

    1996-01-01

    The main legislation governing the safety of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom is the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HSWA) and the associated relevant statutory provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 (as amended). The HSWA sought to simplify and unify all industrial safety legislation and set in place the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) and its executive arm, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The Health and Safety Executive's Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) regulates the nuclear activities on such sites through HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). Under the Nuclear Installations Act (NIA) no corporate body may use any site for the purpose of installing or operating any reactor, other than such a reactor comprised in a means of transport, or other prescribed installation unless the operator has been granted a nuclear site licence by the Health and Safety Executive. Nuclear fuel cycle facilities are examples of such prescribed installations. (J.P.N.)

  17. Reliability research based experience with systems and events at the Kozloduy NPP units 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristova, R.; Kaltchev, B.; Dimitrov, B.; Nedyalkova, D.; Sonev, A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of equipment reliability based on operational data of selected safety systems at the Kozloduy NPP is presented. Conclusions are drawn on reliability of the service water system, feed water system, emergency power supply - category 2, emergency high pressure ejection system and spray system. For the units 1-4 all recorded accident protocols in the period 1974-1993 have been processed and the main initiators identified. A list with 39 most frequent initiators of accidents/incidents is compiled. The human-caused errors account for 27% of all events. The reliability characteristics and frequencies have been calculated for all initiating events. It is concluded that there have not been any accidents with consequences for fuel integrity or radioactive release. 14 refs

  18. Communication barriers to applying federal research in support of land management in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita Wright

    2007-01-01

    Barriers to effective communication between researchers and managers can ultimately result in barriers to the application of scientific knowledge and technology for land management. Both individual and organizational barriers are important in terms of how they affect the first three stages of the innovation-decision process: 1) knowledge, where an individual is exposed...

  19. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Drilling 1976-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    This report, the second in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in drilling and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  20. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Exploration 1976-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    This report, the first in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in exploration and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  1. Innovation and change in a rehabilitation unit for the elderly : Through action research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogwerf, Lucienne Josepha Rosalia

    2002-01-01

    This report describes an eighteen-month action research project in an assessment, treatment and rehabilitation ward for older people in a large metropolitan hospital in New Zealand. The study aimed at developing participative care and the clinical nurse consultant role, and advancing nursing

  2. Learning to Become Graduate Students: Japanese Women's Experience in the Research Unit in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Masako

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analysis of 16 interviews with women first-year master's students at two national engineering schools in Japan, this article examines the socialisation role of compulsory undergraduate research experience in Japanese women's decisions to pursue graduate education and choices of the programme. The findings suggest that research…

  3. United States-Latin America Cancer Research Network (US-LA CRN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US–LA CRN was established in 2009 to increase cancer research capacity in Latin America. NCI formalized bilateral agreements with the governments of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, and Uruguay, to facilitate interactions at the government, institution, and investigator levels.

  4. Census of Institutional Repositories in the United States: MIRACLE Project Research Findings. CLIR Publication No. 140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Karen; Rieh, Soo Young; St. Jean, Beth; Kim, Jihyun; Yakel, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe results of a nationwide census of institutional repositories in U.S. academic institutions. The census is one of several activities of the MIRACLE Project, an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-funded research program based at the University of Michigan. The acronym MIRACLE means "Making…

  5. United States of America. Report 8 [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, R.F.

    1967-01-01

    Present research programme: Occurrence of radioactive materials in the environment with emphasis on potential exposure to people. A wide variety of substances that are most apt to transmit: radionuclides to man are (or have been) sampled and analysed. On the basis of these data, human intake of individual nuclides is estimated and the result transformed into estimates of dose

  6. Action Research as Professional Development: Its Role in Education Reform in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorn, Conley; Dillon, Anna Marie

    2018-01-01

    This paper is concerned with exploring the microsystem of teachers' experiences with education reform within the action research (AR) model for professional development (PD). Within the macrosystem of current major education reform in the UAE, it is timely to explore teachers' experiences of AR as PD to improve pedagogy. The process of engaging in…

  7. Urban forestry research in the United State: the state of art and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; David J. Nowak; Gary W. Watson

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings include 15 papers presented during four group sessions at the IUFRO XXI World Congress held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during August 2000. Six papers were presented during two sessions organized by IUFRO Research Group (RG) 6.01.00 'Forest recreation, landscape and nature conservation'. The first of session was titled 'Integration of...

  8. United States Geological Survey: uranium and thorium resource assessment and exploration research program, fiscal year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offield, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Objectives and current plans are given for the following projects: uranium geochemistry and mineralogy; uranium in sedimentary environments; uranium in igneous and metamorphic environments; geophysical techniques in uranium and thorium exploration; and thorium investigations and resource assessment. Selected noteworthy results of FY 1978 research are given

  9. United Kingdom. Report 3 [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, A.

    1967-01-01

    Present research programmes: There are two current programmes, one in the Irish Sea (fission product distribution in coastal water environments) and one in the Blackwater Estuary - North Sea (effects of discharge of neutron activation radionuclides, e.g, 65 Zn, 51 Cr, 60 Co, 54 Mn, on an estuarine environment)

  10. Analyses of the transportation of spent research reactor fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, J.W.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed the impacts of transportation of research reactor spent fuel from US and foreign reactors for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Defense Programs. Two separate shipment programs were analyzed. The shipment of research reactor spent fuel from Taiwan to the US (Fuel Movement Program), and the return of research reactor spent fuels of US origin from foreign and domestic reactors (Research Reactor Fuel Return Program). To perform these analyses, a comprehensive methodology for analyzing the probabilities and consequences of transportation in coastal waters and port facilities, handling at the port, and shipment by truck to reprocessing facilities was developed. The Taiwanese fuel consists of low-burnup aluminum-clad metallic uranium research reactor spent fuel; the other fuels are primarily aluminum-clad oxide fuels. The Fuel Movement Program is ongoing, while the Fuel Return Program addresses future shipments over a ten-year period. The operational aspects of the Taiwanese shipments have been uniform, but several possible shipping configurations are possible for the Fuel Return Program shipments. The risks of transporting spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials by all modes have been analyzed extensively. Comprehensive assessments, which bound the impacts of spent fuel transport, demonstrate that when shipments are made in compliance with applicable regulations, the risks for all such transport are low. For comparison with previously licensed transport activities and to provide continuity with earlier analyses, the results for shipment of 150-day-old commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel are presented as part of this study

  11. Opportunities and Challenges in Establishing a Cohort Study: An Example From Cleft Lip/Palate Research in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Nicola Marie; Humphries, Kerry; Pourcain, Beate St; Bailey, Maggie; Persson, Martin; Ho, Karen M; Ring, Susan; Marsh, Cathy; Albery, Liz; Rumsey, Nichola; Sandy, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) is one of the most common birth conditions in the world, but little is known about its causes. Professional opinion remains divided as to which treatments may be the most beneficial for patients with CL/P, and the factors that contribute to psychological adjustment are poorly understood. The use of different methodological approaches and tools plays a key role in hampering efforts to address discrepancies within the evidence base. A new UK-wide program of research, The Cleft Collective, was established to combat many of these methodological challenges and to address some of the key research questions important to all CL/P stakeholders. To describe the establishment of CL/P cohort studies in the United Kingdom and to consider the many opportunities this resource will generate. To date, protocols have been developed and implemented within most UK cleft teams. Biological samples, environmental information, and data pertaining to parental psychological well-being and child development are being collected successfully. Recruitment is currently on track to meet the ambitious target of approximately 9800 individuals from just more than 3000 families. The Cleft Collective cohort studies represent a significant step forward for research in the field of CL/P. The data collected will form a comprehensive resource of information about individuals with CL/P and their families. This resource will provide the basis for many future projects and collaborations, both in the United Kingdom and around the world.

  12. Luminescent unit computerization to research spectral characteristics of fine film alkali halide crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhalimbetov, T.; Zhabetov, A.; Moldagaliev, A.; Sarmukhanov, E.; Shunkeev, K.; Shunkeev, S.; Abdullin, K.; Tokmoldin, C.

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental optical absorption of ion crystals characterizes the creation of different free low energetic electronic excitation (the excitons and electron-hole pairs), but their straight registration is not possible because of incommensurable big absorption factor of alkali halide monocrystals. So to registration the spectrums of alkali halide monocrystal very fine layers are necessary. We have received fine films of Nal and KCl in system of KCl-Nal-KCl, KCl-KI-KCl on the base of universal vacuum post VUP-4, VUP-5 by thermal evaporation. A unique spectral unit has been created For this on the basic the SDL-2 complex. Complex consists of radiator, systems of condensers, monochromators MDR-12 and MDR-23, receivers of radiation, controller by unit. Connect and control of monochromators by means of IBM-compatible computer has been created. Kinematics schemes of monochromators provide consequent removing on output slot of monochromatic radiation in operating range of each diffraction lattice and indication its wavelength. The tumbling diffraction lattices is done the crossbar engines SHDR-711. For this special plate of control and block of reinforcement for crossbar engines in monochromators MDR-12 and MDR-23 are designed and constructed. Created controller of monochromators consists of double cascade preamplifier on transistors n-p-n type (815G) and logical scheme, constructed on summers and K555 series triggers. The preamplifier is used for reinforcement of signal to available amplifier on transistors KT837D. The logical scheme reduces the number of used categories of bidirectional port and enables unhooking the feeding to the windings of crossbar engine at conservation of previous combination of signals. The connection controller of monochromators is done through controller of port of computer with use the parallel interface. For installing computerized system of collection and data processing is provided marketed by means of modern object-oriented programming

  13. Implementing evidence in an onco-haematology nursing unit: a process of change using participatory action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Corpa, Eva; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Cabrero-García, Julio; Meseguer-Liza, Cristobal; Zárate-Riscal, Carmen Lourdes; Carrillo-Alcaraz, Andrés; Martínez-Corbalán, José Tomás; Caravaca-Hernández, Amor

    2013-03-01

    To implement evidence in a nursing unit and to gain a better understanding of the experience of change within a participatory action research. Study design of a participatory action research type was use from the constructivist paradigm. The analytical-methodological decisions were inspired by Checkland Flexible Systems for evidence implementation in the nursing unit. The study was carried out between March and November 2007 in the isolation unit section for onco-haematological patients in a tertiary level general university hospital in Spain. Accidental sampling was carried out with the participation of six nurses. Data were collected using five group meetings and individual reflections in participants' dairies. The participant observation technique was also carried out by researchers. Data analysis was carried out by content analysis. The rigorous criteria were used: credibility, confirmability, dependence, transferability and reflexivity. A lack of use of evidence in clinical practice is the main problem. The factors involved were identified (training, values, beliefs, resources and professional autonomy). Their daily practice (complexity in taking decisions, variability, lack of professional autonomy and safety) was compared with an ideal situation (using evidence it will be possible to normalise practice and to work more effectively in teams by increasing safety and professional recognition). It was decided to create five working areas about several clinical topics (mucositis, pain, anxiety, satisfaction, nutritional assessment, nauseas and vomiting, pressure ulcers and catheter-related problems) and seven changes in clinical practice were agreed upon together with 11 implementation strategies. Some reflections were made about the features of the study: the changes produced; the strategies used and how to improve them; the nursing 'subculture'; attitudes towards innovation; and the commitment as participants in the study and as healthcare professionals. The

  14. Sectoral risk research about input-output structure of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mao

    2018-02-01

    There exist rare researches about economic risk in sectoral level, which is significantly important for risk prewarning. This paper employed status coefficient to measure the symmetry of economic subnetwork, which is negatively correlated with sectoral risk. Then, we do empirical research in both cross section and time series dimensions. In cross section dimension, we study the correlation between sectoral status coefficient and sectoral volatility, earning rate and Sharpe ratio respectively in the year 2015. Next, in the perspective of time series, we first investigate the correlation change between sectoral status coefficient and annual total output from 1997 to 2015. Then, we divide the 71 sectors in America into agriculture, manufacturing, services and government, compare the trend terms of average sectoral status coefficients of the four industries and illustrate the causes behind it. We also find obvious abnormality in the sector of housing. At last, this paper puts forward some suggestions for the federal government.

  15. Hazardous waste landfill research: U. S. E. P. A. (United States Environmental Protection Agency) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomaker, N.B.

    1984-06-01

    The hazardous waste land disposal research program is collecting data necessary to support implementation of disposal guidelines mandated by the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA) PL 94-580. This program relating to the categorical areas of landfills, surface impoundments, and underground mines encompasses state-of-the-art documents, laboratory analysis, economic assessment, bench and pilot studies, and full-scale field verification studies. Over the next five years the research will be reported as Technical Resource Documents in support of the RCRA Guidance Documents. These documents will be used to provide guidance for conducting the review and evaluation of land disposal permit applications. This paper will present an overview of this program and will report the current status of the work.

  16. United Kingdom. Report 5 [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauchline, J.

    1967-01-01

    Four research programmes are suggested: Physical/chemical states of radionuclides in sea water related to their absorption rates by marine organisms; Studies of sea-water/ fresh-water interphases; To discover effects of raising the levels of background radiation by small amounts over long periods; Special studies of neutron-induced radioisotopes of elements such as chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt,, zinc, antimony, beryllium and iodine

  17. United States Air Force Graduate Student Research Program. Program Technical rept. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    patients with coronary artery disease routinely have continuous LV pressures recorded, applying the nuclear stethoscope concurrently will allow...research project. 73-3 I. INTRODUCTION: Bone defects can result from removal of bone from donor sites, diseased bone, excision of tumors, pathologic...large body of data which has clearly documented the existence of a " respiratory burst" of metabolic activity associated with phagocytosis El]. The

  18. Maximising value from a United Kingdom Biomedical Research Centre: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Ovseiko, Pavel V.; Fahy, Nick; Shaw, Sara; Kerr, Polly; Rushforth, Alexander D.; Channon, Keith M.; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    Background Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) are partnerships between healthcare organisations and universities in England. Their mission is to generate novel treatments, technologies, diagnostics and other interventions that increase the country’s international competitiveness, to rapidly translate these innovations into benefits for patients, and to improve efficiency and reduce waste in healthcare. As NIHR Oxford BRC (Oxford BRC) enters its third 5-year funding period, we seek to (1) a...

  19. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program 1989. Program Technical Report. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    968, June 1987. 22. E. Zielinski , H. Schweizer, S. Hausser, R. Stuber, M. H. Pilkuhn, and G. Weimann,"Systematics of laser operation in GaAs/AlGaAs...Mike Hinman, John Wagnon, Dave Froehlich, Scott Huse, Scott Shyne, and Ken Taylor. 79-3 I. Introduction Pattern Recognition (PR) is an important...many aspects of this research was also greatly appreciated. Finally, I want to thank Audrey Martinez, Al Leverette, Lt. Georke, Dave Fernald and

  20. The important role of public-sector research in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Between 1970 and 2009, US public institutions participated in the research and development of 153 drugs, including 15 vaccines. Between 1990 and 2007, nearly 10% of all the new drugs and vaccines marketed in the US and about 20% of those representing a therapeutic advance originated in public institutions. The proportion of these drugs that represented a substantial therapeutic advance was over twice that of those produced exclusively by the private sector.

  1. Research on Key Technologies of Unit-Based CNC Machine Tool Assembly Design

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongqi Sheng; Lei Zhang; Hualong Xie; Changchun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Assembly is the part that produces the maximum workload and consumed time during product design and manufacturing process. CNC machine tool is the key basic equipment in manufacturing industry and research on assembly design technologies of CNC machine tool has theoretical significance and practical value. This study established a simplified ASRG for CNC machine tool. The connection between parts, semantic information of transmission, and geometric constraint information were quantified to as...

  2. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. 1980 Program Management Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    COIVERECP _,-NITED ARFORCE_~~ 14ME FINAL f4- RESEARC - PROGRAM, AAEETRPOT 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NURE 7. AUTH s4 ) ’..---- 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBFR(si...Winkofsky Multiband Airborne Radio System (MFBARS) Operational Impact Study: A Marketing Perspective 85 Application of Risk Analysis In the Dr. George...OPERATIONAL IMPACT STUDY: A MARKETING PEHSPECTIVE by E.P. WINKOFSKY ABSTRACT In order to transition technological advancements, research laboratories

  3. United States Air Force Research Initiation Program for 1988. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    Proposal among the ones which were funded as follow-on research projects. 128-13 F. References 1. L. Wallentin and B. Moberg, Lecithin -cholesterol Acyl...Amicon YMT membrane) was evaluated for use in the separation of non-protein-bound cholesterol and hydrolyzable cholesterol esters. This system was...the cholesterol in whole urine passed through the membrane. As shown in Figure 1, about 23% of the total cholesterol and hydrolyzable conjugates in a

  4. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. 1985 Technical Report. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    this research effort was to evaluate the column technique for determining sorption coefficients of organic compounds onto soils. It was intended to... SORPTION COEFFICIENTS DETERMINED BY PULSE DISPLACEMENT Compound Flow Rate (mL/min) K,,q(mL/g) Trichioroethylene 0.2 0.054 0.2 0.057 Naphthalene 1.5...Vernon R. Allen Perfluorinated Polyalkylene Linked Polyimide 4 Quantifying Experience in the Cost Dr. Jihad A. Alsadek of Human Capital 5 The Effects

  5. United States Air Force Graduate Student Research Program. 1989 Program Management Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    regular meetings and loneliness. Other weaknesses mentioned were specific to research problems faced by fellows. 8. Has this been a fruitful, worthwhile...Object Recognitio *** Same Report as Augustus Morr*** 61 Damage in Graphite/Epoxy Plates Bryan Foos Subjected to Low Velocity Impact (1988 Participant... face during the impact event. The depth of surface indentation and the extent of internal damage were measured and correlated with the impact energy

  6. JNC-JAERI united research report. A study on degradation of structural materials under irradiation environment in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiya, Taiji; Takaya, Shigeru; Nagae, Yuji; Aoto, Kazumi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yasuo; Ueno, Fumiyoshi; Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Miwa, Yukio; Tsukada, Takashi; Ohmi, Masao; Saito, Junichi; Shimizu, Michio

    2004-10-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have started a JNC-JAERI united research program cooperatively in fiscal year 2003, which has been aimed for efficient progress and synergistic effect on the research activities of both Institutes in order to lead the facing task of unification between JNC and JAERI. This study has been chosen one of the united research themes because it has been common objective for both Institutes in the research field of structural materials such as Fast Breeder Reactor and Light Water Reactors components. The purpose of the study is to clarify damage mechanism of structural materials under irradiation, and then to develop the methods for damage evaluation and detection in earlier stage of progressing process of damage along grain boundaries. In fiscal year 2003, magnetic flux density distribution (JNC) and micro-corrosion (JAERI) measurement apparatus were newly developed and equipped in Hot Facilities in two Institutes, respectively. The former apparatus, supersensitive Flux Gate sensor was installed, could detector leaked magnetic flux from material damaged by neutron irradiation. The latter one, Atomic Force Microscope was installed, could detect grain boundary corrosion loss after an electrochemical corrosion test of irradiated material. These apparatus were designed and produced in consideration of radiation resistance and remote-controlled operation to equip in hot cells. As the results of preliminary studies using Ni ion irradiated specimen, damage detection by corrosion property in grain boundary was possible but magnetic property change could not detect. We will start the study on neutron irradiation damage by employing the two apparatus as the next step. (author)

  7. Speaking of sex workers: How suppression of research has distorted the United States' domestic HIV response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Sex workers remain a vulnerable population at risk for HIV acquisition and transmission. Research suggests that interventions at the individual level, such as condom distribution, are less effective in preventing HIV among sex workers than structural changes such as allowing safer work settings and reducing the harassment and abuse of sex workers by clients and police. In the US, HIV incidence has not declined in the last decade. This may be due in part to its policy of wilful ignorance about sex work, but the data to resolve the question simply do not exist. Political actions such as PEPFAR's prostitution pledge and a congressional campaign against "waste, fraud and abuse" in research are products of an ideological environment that suppresses research on HIV prevention and treatment needs of sex workers. Even basic prevalence data are missing because there is no "sex worker" category in the US National HIV Behavior Surveillance System. However, international efforts are taking a public health approach and are calling for decriminalization of sex work, as the most effective public health strategy for reducing HIV incidence among sex workers. Although such an approach is not yet politically feasible in the US, some urgent practical policy changes can be implemented to improve data collection and generation of evidence to support HIV prevention and treatment programs targeting sex workers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Reflexivity and the "Acting Subject": Conceptualizing the Unit of Analysis in Qualitative Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, James A

    2016-07-06

    The ways in which social scientists conceptualize the "reflexive" human subject have important consequences for how we go about our research. Whether and how we understand human subjects to be the authors of our own actions helps to structure what we say about health, health care, and the many other topics addressed in qualitative health research. In this article, I critically discuss assumptions of human reflexivity that are built into qualitative social science of health and medicine. I describe three alternative ways of understanding reflexive thought and human action derived from the theoretical works of Pierre Bourdieu, Bruno Latour, and George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, respectively. I then apply these three different ways of thinking about reflexivity and the acting subject to the analysis of an excerpt of participant observation data from a health services research study of transitions from hospital to home, illuminating the different kinds of analyses that arise from each perspective. I conclude with a call for social scientists to commit to the search for better ways of understanding the human subject, resisting the temptation to "settle" on theoretical statements that close down the path to more sophisticated conceptualizations of human thought and action. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. RINGOs. Research and Independent Non-governmental Organisations to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    RINGOs are organizations engaged in independent research and analysis aimed at developing sound strategies to address both the causes and consequences of global climate change. They form a constituency in their own right to contribute to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), in a parallel way to ENGOs (Environment), BINGOs (Business and Industry), LGMAs (Local governments and municipal authorities) and the IPOs (Indigenous peoples organizations). During the COP and SB meetings of the UNFCCC the RINGOs organize meetings to discuss the developments of the negotiations. RINGOs have also been represented at workshops organized by the UNFCCC Secretariat. RINGO activities are co-ordinated by a steering committee

  10. The millstone industry a summary of research on quarries and producers in the United States, Europe and elsewhere

    CERN Document Server

    Hockensmith, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Since prehistoric times, the process of cutting rock to make millstones has been one of the most important industries in the world. The first part of this book compiles information on the millstone industry in the United States, which dates between the mid-1600s and the mid-1900s. Primarily based on archival research and brief accounts published in geological and historical volumes, it focuses on conglomerate, granite, flint, quartzite, gneiss, and sandstone quarries in different regions and states. The second part focuses on the millstone quarrying industry in Europe and other areas.

  11. Design of a microprocessor-based Control, Interface and Monitoring (CIM unit for turbine engine controls research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaat, J. C.; Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    High speed minicomputers were used in the past to implement advanced digital control algorithms for turbine engines. These minicomputers are typically large and expensive. It is desirable for a number of reasons to use microprocessor-based systems for future controls research. They are relatively compact, inexpensive, and are representative of the hardware that would be used for actual engine-mounted controls. The Control, Interface, and Monitoring Unit (CIM) contains a microprocessor-based controls computer, necessary interface hardware and a system to monitor while it is running an engine. It is presently being used to evaluate an advanced turbofan engine control algorithm.

  12. Research on Dynamic Facility Layout Problem of Manufacturing Unit Considering Human Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinying Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As many said, industry 4.0 is an epoch-making revolution which brought the manufacturing market much faster changes and severer competitions. As an important part of the manufacturing system, facility layout has direct impact on business benefit; at the same time, despite the intelligent factory, intelligent production has its own characteristics. However, there is one point on which industry and academia have basically formed a consensus: it is not true that industry 4.0 does not need human beings; on the contrary, human initiative plays an unabated role in the development of industry 4.0. This paper will focus on the dynamic facility layout of the manufacturing unit. Based on the system above and the traditional optimization model, a mathematic model is built to find the best solution combining safety, sustainability, high efficiency, and low cost. And penalty function with adaptive penalty factor and advanced artificial bee colony algorithm is used to solve the constrained model. In the end, by studying few cases, the model is proved to be effective in both efficiency improvement and the implementation of safe and comfort human-machine interaction.

  13. Fiscal 1999 achievement report on regional consortium research and development project. Regional consortium research and development in its 1st year (Research for development of high-performance mini-scale manufacturing system for very small precision machine parts); 1999 nendo kogata seimitsu kiki buhin'yo kokino mini seisan system no kaihatsu kenkyu seika hokokusho. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Research and development is conducted of a flexible manufacturing system which uses mini-scale production cells capable of dealing with environmental and energy conservation problems, to be operated for the manufacture of small quantities of multiple kinds of goods. The concept of total system is that work pieces fall within the dimensions 15mm diameter times 50mm in length and that 14 kinds of cells be built out of 36 kinds of units. A control system chart is prepared, in which the units, the cells, and the whole are to be allotted to their respective control units according to their functions. In the development and designing of units to constitute mini-scale production cells and functional elements for them, problems to arise from miniaturization are considered, miniaturized tool rests are designed, built-in motor type main shafts are designed, and it is now expected that cylinder grinding cells will roughly satisfy the target dimensions and weight. In the development and fabrication of mini-scale production cells and units, cylinder grinding stone spindle units, traverse table units, grinding cell control devices, etc., are fabricated. (NEDO)

  14. Research productivity of doctor of physical therapy faculty promoted in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Marissa A; Sonne, James W; Smith, Gerald V

    2017-01-01

    Little information exists on the research productivity of successfully promoted tenure-track Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) faculty. To determine the research productivity that typically results in successful promotion. We collected publicly available curriculum vitae (CVs) from faculty currently in accredited DPT programs and who had been successfully promoted from an institution in the southeastern USA from 2000 through 2016. Total publication count, journal impact factor, funding, citations, and other metrics were analysed from 45 subjects of 22 of the 64 CAPTE-accredited DPT programs in the southeast. None of the studied metrics were normally distributed with time to promotion as determined by a Shapiro-Wilk test. These faculty exhibited a median publication count of 4, range 0 to 43; median of average citation count of 12.4, range 0 to 87.25; median of average journal impact factor of 2.866, range 0 to 6.280; median external funding received of $9910, range $0.00 to $19 543 198; and median author h-index of 3, range 0 to 17. The median number of years before promotion was 6, ranging from 3 to 13 years. Linear regression analysis indicates a poor fit with no significant correlation between years before promotion and any of the studied metrics. No correlation between journal impact factor and number of citations was observed (m = -0.22, p = 0.728, R 2  = 0.0003). Prior to promotion 31% (14 of 45) did not receive external funding and 24% (11 of 45) had a 0 h-index. The Carnegie Classification of the institution did not significantly correlate with research productivity metrics in this dataset (p = 0.213). While faculty unsuccessful in promotion were not identifiable using this method, this research can be used by faculty and committees to evaluate research productivity against regional data and promote competitive standards with peer institutions. CAPTE: Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapist Education; DPT: Doctor of Physical Therapy.

  15. Research and development of basic technologies for next-generation industry. Evaluation of 1st-phase research and development of 3-dimensional circuit devices; Jisedai sangyo kiban gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu. Sanjigen kairo soshi daiikki kenkyu kaihatsu hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-03-30

    The aim is to develop basic technologies relating to 3-dimensional circuit devices with an ultrahigh-density accumulation of functions therein for the embodiment of ultra-small high-performance data processing devices or artificial brain-like multiple-function data processing devices. To be developed are laminate-structure devices which have an ultrahigh-density accumulation of logic and memory functions or a complex accumulation of functions including signal and sensor functions. In the 1st phase, importance is attached to the development of a multilayer crystalline structure, which is the most elementary in the development of 3-dimensional circuit devices, and of processing technologies for them. Propositions are made and analyses are conducted relating to the enlargement of exposure region in synchrotron radiation lithography, development of a maskless beam process of a resolution of 0.1{mu}m, development of a focused ion beam device, etc. Recrystallization methods using a laser beam or a linear electron beam are developed for the growth of multilayer crystals, and are proved to be effective. The application feasibility of a flat deposition dry process etc. to laminate processing technologies is demonstrated. Concerning integration technologies, some laminated circuit devices are experimentally fabricated, and their behavior is determined. The goals of the 1st phase are found achieved. (NEDO)

  16. Report by the AERES on the unit: Research unit for man radiation protection under the supervision of establishments and bodies: IRSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory, whose activity is dedicated to man radiation protection, and is organized about four main themes: means to determine in any circumstances the dose received by a victim of an external irradiation or internal contamination, characterization of the biological effects ionizing radiations may create in a sane tissue, epidemiological approaches to the assessment of the exceeding risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation on different populations, and experimental toxicology for the identification of biological effects induced par long duration and low dose exposures to some radionuclides. The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, productions and publications, scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. These same aspects are then discussed and commented for each theme: dosimetry, ionizing radiation pathology and experimental therapies, epidemiology of ionizing radiations, experimental and post-accidental radio-toxicology

  17. American Indian and Indigenous Geoscience Program: Ensuring the Evolution of Diverse STEM Scientists and Researchers in the 21st Century and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J. R.

    2013-05-01

    Have you ever been lost? Knowing where you want to go yet unsure how to get there? In today's contemporary society you deploy the use of a navigator or navigation system. This is also one component of a cultural geoscience program in ensuring diverse students complete with excellence and success their route to research and education. The critical components of a cultural geoscience program and the role of cultural mentors are broad and the opportunity to expand one's own personal and professional success in science and society is immense. There remains a critical need and challenge to increase the representation of underrepresented people in the sciences. To address this challenge a navigational geoscience program approach was developed centered on the incorporation of traditional knowledge into modern research and education. The approach incorporates defining cultural/personal choices for a STEM vocation, developing science research with a "purpose", and refining leadership. The program model incorporates a mentor's personal oral histories and experiences in education, research and life. The goal is to ensure the next generation of scientists and researchers are more diverse, highly educated, experienced and leadership orientated by the time they complete STEM programs - then by the time they are our age, have our level of education and experience.

  18. The Navigator: Role of the Cultural Mentor in Ensuring the Evolution of Diverse STEM Scientists and Researchers in the 21st Century and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Have you ever been lost? Knowing where you want to go yet unsure how to get there? In today's contemporary society you deploy the use of a navigator or navigation system. This is also one role of the cultural mentor in ensuring diverse students complete with excellence and success their route to research and education. The responsibilities of the cultural mentor are broad and the opportunity to expand one's own personal and professional success in science and society is immense. There remains a critical need and challenge to increase the representation of underrepresented people in the sciences. To address this challenge a navigational mentoring approach was developed centered on the incorporation of traditional knowledge into modern research and education. The approach incorporates defining cultural/personal choices for a STEM vocation, developing science research with a "purpose", and refining leadership. The model incorporates a mentor's personal oral histories and experiences in education, research and life. The goal is to ensure the next generation of scientists and researchers are more diverse, highly educated, experienced and leadership orientated by the time they complete STEM programs - then by the time they are our age, have our level of education and experience.

  19. Priorities for research for oral health in the 21st century--the approach of the WHO Global Oral Health Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    research in the developed and developing world to reduce risk factors and the burden of oral disease, and to improve oral health systems and the effectiveness of community oral health programmes. Building and strengthening research capacity in public health are highly recommended by WHO for effective......The World Health Organization (WHO) "World Oral Health Report 2003" emphasized that despite great improvements in the oral health status of populations across the world, problems persist. The major challenges of the future will be to translate existing knowledge and sound experiences of disease...... prevention and health promotion into action programmes, this is particularly the case with developing countries that have not yet benefited from advances in oral health science to the fullest extent possible. The WHO Oral Health programme gives priority to research helping correct the so called 10/90 gap...

  20. Community Extreme Tonnage User Service (CETUS): A 5000 Ton Open Research Facility in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Vander Kaaden, K. E.; Rowland, R. L., II; Draper, D. S.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-12-01

    Large sample volume 5000 ton multi-anvil presses have contributed to the exploration of deep Earth and planetary interiors, synthesis of ultra-hard and other novel materials, and serve as a sample complement to pressure and temperature regimes already attainable by diamond anvil cell experiments. However, no such facility exists in the Western Hemisphere. We are establishing an open user facility for the entire research community, with the unique capability of a 5000 ton multi-anvil and deformation press, HERA (High pressure Experimental Research Apparatus), supported by a host of extant co-located experimental and analytical laboratories and research staff. We offer wide range of complementary and/or preparatory experimental options. Any required synthesis of materials or follow up experiments can be carried out controlled atmosphere furnaces, piston cylinders, multi-anvil, or experimental impact apparatus. Additionally, our division houses two machine shops that would facilitate any modification or custom work necessary for development of CETUS, one for general fabrication and one located specifically within our experimental facilities. We also have a general sample preparation laboratory, specifically for experimental samples, that allows users to quickly and easily prepare samples for ebeam analyses and more. Our focus as contract staff is on serving the scientific needs of our users and collaborators. We are seeking community expert input on multiple aspects of this facility, such as experimental assembly design, module modifications, immediate projects, and future innovation initiatives. We've built a cooperative network of 12 (and growing) collaborating institutions, including COMPRES. CETUS is a coordinated effort leveraging HERA with our extant experimental, analytical, and planetary process modelling instrumentation and expertise in order to create a comprehensive model of the origin and evolution of our solar system and beyond. We are looking to engage