WorldWideScience

Sample records for research reactor safety

  1. Safety analysis for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of safety analysis for research reactors is to establish and confirm the design basis for items important to safety using appropriate analytical tools. The design, manufacture, construction and commissioning should be integrated with the safety analysis to ensure that the design intent has been incorporated into the as-built reactor. Safety analysis assesses the performance of the reactor against a broad range of operating conditions, postulated initiating events and other circumstances, in order to obtain a complete understanding of how the reactor is expected to perform in these situations. Safety analysis demonstrates that the reactor can be kept within the safety operating regimes established by the designer and approved by the regulatory body. This analysis can also be used as appropriate in the development of operating procedures, periodic testing and inspection programmes, proposals for modifications and experiments and emergency planning. The IAEA Safety Requirements publication on the Safety of Research Reactors states that the scope of safety analysis is required to include analysis of event sequences and evaluation of the consequences of the postulated initiating events and comparison of the results of the analysis with radiological acceptance criteria and design limits. This Safety Report elaborates on the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-4 on the Safety of Research Reactors, and the guidance given in IAEA Safety Series No. 35-G1, Safety Assessment of Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report, providing detailed discussion and examples of related topics. Guidance is given in this report for carrying out safety analyses of research reactors, based on current international good practices. The report covers all the various steps required for a safety analysis; that is, selection of initiating events and acceptance criteria, rules and conventions, types of safety analysis, selection of

  2. Safety of Research Reactors. Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this Safety Requirements publication is to provide a basis for safety and a basis for safety assessment for all stages in the lifetime of a research reactor. Another objective is to establish requirements on aspects relating to regulatory control, the management of safety, site evaluation, design, operation and decommissioning. Technical and administrative requirements for the safety of research reactors are established in accordance with these objectives. This Safety Requirements publication is intended for use by organizations engaged in the site evaluation, design, manufacturing, construction, operation and decommissioning of research reactors as well as by regulatory bodies

  3. Meeting on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The meeting 'Reactor Safety Research' organized for the second time by the GRS by order of the BMFT gave a review of research activities on the safety of light water reactors in the Federal Repulbic of Germany, international co-operation in this field and latest results of this research institution. The central fields of interest were subjects of man/machine-interaction, operational reliability accident sequences, and risk. (orig.) [de

  4. Research for enhancing reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    Recent research for enhanced reactor safety covers extensive and numerous experiments and computed modelling activities designed to verify and to improve existing design requirements. The lectures presented at the meeting report GRS research results and the current status of reactor safety research in France. The GRS experts present results concerning expert systems and their perspectives in safety engineering, large-scale experiments and their significance in the development and verification of computer codes for thermohydraulic modelling of safety-related incidents, the advanced system code ATHLET for analysis of thermohydraulic processes of incidents, the analysis simulator which is a tool for fast evaluation of accident management measures, and investigations into event sequences and the required preventive emergency measures within the German Risk Study. (DG) [de

  5. RB research reactor Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This RB reactor safety report is a revised and improved version of the Safety report written in 1962. It contains descriptions of: reactor building, reactor hall, control room, laboratories, reactor components, reactor control system, heavy water loop, neutron source, safety system, dosimetry system, alarm system, neutron converter, experimental channels. Safety aspects of the reactor operation include analyses of accident causes, errors during operation, measures for preventing uncontrolled activity changes, analysis of the maximum possible accident in case of different core configurations with natural uranium, slightly and highly enriched fuel; influence of possible seismic events

  6. Power reactor core safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.; Kim, W.C.; Shon, D.S.; Kim, J.

    1981-01-01

    As a part of nuclear safety research program, a project was launched to develop a model to predict fuel failure, to produce the data required for the localizaton of fuel design and fabrication technology, to establish safety limits for regulation of nuclear power plants and to develop reactor operation method to minimize fuel failure through the study of fuel failure mechanisms. During 1980, the first year of this project, various fuel failure mechanisms were analyzed, an experimental method for out-of-pile tests to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of Zircaloy cladding underiodine environment was established, and characteristics of PWR and CANDU Zircaloy specimens were examined. Also developed during 1980 were the methods and correlations to evaluate fuel failures in the reactor core based on operating data from power reactors

  7. Reactor safety research in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1980-02-01

    Objectives, means and results of Swedish light water reactor safety research during the 1970s are reviewed. The expenditure is about 40 Million Swkr per year excluding industry. Large efforts have been devoted to experimental studies of loss of coolant accidents. Large scale containment response tests for simulated pipe breaks were carried out at the Marviken facility. At Studsvik a method for testing fuel during fast power changes has been developed. Stress corrosion, crack growth and the effect of irradiation on the strength ductility of Zircaloy tube was studied. A method for determining the fracture toughness of pressure vessel steel was developed and it was shown that the fracture toughness was lower than earlier assumed. The release of fission products to reactor water was studied and so was the release, transport and removal of airborne radioactive matter for Swedish BWRs and PWRs. Test methods for iodine filter systems were developed. A system for continuous monitoring of radioactive noble gas stack release was developed for the Ringhals plant. Attention was drawn to the importance of the human factor for reactor safety. Probabilistic methods for risk analysis were applied to the Barsebaeck 2 and Forsmark 3 boiling water reactors. Procedures and working conditions for operator personnel were investigated. (GBn)

  8. RB research reactor safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This new version of the safety report is a revision of the safety report written in 1962 when the RB reactor started operation after reconstruction. The new safety report was needed because reactor systems and components have been improved and the administrative procedures were changed. the most important improvements and changes were concerned with the use of highly enriched fuel (80% enriched), construction of reactor converter outside the reactor vessel, improved control system by two measuring start-up channels, construction of system for heavy water leak detection, new inter phone connection between control room and other reactor rooms. This report includes description of reactor building with installations, rector vessel, reactor core, heavy water system, control system, safety system, dosimetry and alarm systems, experimental channels, neutron converter, reactor operation. Safety aspects contain analyses of accident reasons, method for preventing reactivity insertions, analyses of maximum hypothetical accidents for cores with natural uranium, 2% enriched and 80% enriched fuel elements. Influence of seismic events on the reactor safety and well as coupling between reactor and the converter are parts of this document

  9. IAEA safety standards for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.

    2007-01-01

    The general structure of the IAEA Safety Standards and the process for their development and revision are briefly presented and discussed together with the progress achieved in the development of Safety Standards for research reactor. These documents provide the safety requirements and the key technical recommendations to achieve enhanced safety. They are intended for use by all organizations involved in safety of research reactors and developed in a way that allows them to be incorporated into national laws and regulations. The author reviews the safety standards for research reactors and details their specificities. There are 4 published safety standards: 1) Safety assessment of research reactors and preparation of the safety analysis report (35-G1), 2) Safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors (35-G2), 3) Commissioning of research reactors (NS-G-4.1), and 4) Maintenance, periodic testing and inspection of research reactors (NS-G-4.2). There 5 draft safety standards: 1) Operational limits and conditions and operating procedures for research reactors (DS261), 2) The operating organization and the recruitment, training and qualification of personnel for research reactors (DS325), 3) Radiation protection and radioactive waste management in the design and operation of research reactors (DS340), 4) Core management and fuel handling at research reactors (DS350), and 5) Grading the application of safety requirements for research reactors (DS351). There are 2 planned safety standards, one concerning the ageing management for research reactor and the second deals with the control and instrumentation of research reactors

  10. Safety research for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, W.T.

    1982-10-01

    Continuing research to develop and verify computer models of CANDU-PHW reactor process and safety systems is described. It is focussed on loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) because they are the precursors of more serious accidents. Research topics include: (i) fluid-dynamic and heat-transfer processes in the heat transport system during the blowdown and refilling phases of LOCAs; (ii) thermal and mechanical behaviour of fuel elements; (iii) thermal and mechanical behaviour of the fuel and the fuel-channel assembly in situations where the heavy-water moderator is the sink for decay heat produced in the fuel; (iv) chemical behaviour of fission gases that might be released into the reactor coolant and transported to the containment system; and (v) combustion of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures that would be produced if fuel temperatures were sufficiently high to initiate the zirconium-water reaction. The current status of the research on each of these topics is highlighted with particular emphasis on the conclusions reached to date and their impact on the continuing program

  11. IAEA programme on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala, F.; Di Meglio, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the IAEA programme on research reactor safety and includes the safety related areas of conversions to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The program is based on the IAEA statutory responsibilities as they apply to the requirements of over 320 research reactors operating around the world. The programme covers four major areas: (a) the development of safety documents; (b) safety missions to research reactor facilities; (c) support of research programmes on research reactor safety; (d) support of Technical Cooperation projects on research reactor safety issues. The demand for these activities by the IAEA member states has increased substantially in recent years especially in developing countries with increasing emphasis being placed on LEU conversion matters. In response to this demand, the IAEA has undertaken an extensive programme for each of the four areas above. (author)

  12. Safety of research reactors (Design and Operation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirar, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to conduct a comprehensive up-to-date literature review on the current status of safety of research reactor both in design and operation providing the future trends in safety of research reactors. Data and technical information of variety selected historical research reactors were thoroughly reviewed and evaluated, furthermore illustrations of the material of fuel, control rods, shielding, moderators and coolants used were discussed. Insight study of some historical research reactors was carried with considering sample cases such as Chicago Pile-1, F-1 reactor, Chalk River Laboratories,. The National Research Experimental Reactor and others. The current status of research reactors and their geographical distribution, reactor category and utilization is also covered. Examples of some recent advanced reactors were studied like safety barriers of HANARO of Korea including safety doors of the hall and building entrance and finger print identification which prevent the reactor from sabotage. On the basis of the results of this research, it is apparent that a high quality of safety of nuclear reactors can be attained by achieving enough robust construction, designing components of high levels of efficiency, replacing the compounds of the reactor in order to avoid corrosion and degradation with age, coupled with experienced scientists and technical staffs to operate nuclear research facilities.(Author)

  13. Safety of research reactors - A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Due to historical reasons research reactors have received less regulatory attention in the world than nuclear power plants. This has given rise to several safety issues which, if not addressed immediately, may result in an undesirable situation. However, in Pakistan, research reactors and power reactors have received due attention from the regulatory authority. The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 has been under regulatory surveillance since 1965, the year of its commissioning. The second reactor has also undergone all the safety reviews and checks mandated by the licensing procedures. A brief description of the regulatory framework, the several safety reviews carried out have been briefly described in this paper. Significant activities of the regulatory authority have also been described in verifying the safety of research reactors in Pakistan along with the future activities. The views of the Pakistani regulatory authority on the specific issues identified by the IAEA have been presented along with specific recommendations to the IAEA. We are of the opinion that there are more Member States operating nuclear research reactors than nuclear power plants. Therefore, there should be more emphasis on the research reactor safety, which somehow has not been the case. In several recommendations made to the IAEA on the specific safety issues the emphasis has been, in general, to have a similar documentation and approach for maintaining and verifying operational safety at research reactors as is currently available for nuclear power reactors and may be planned for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (author)

  14. The IAEA programme on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.

    2007-01-01

    According to the research reactor database of IAEA (RRDB), 250 reactors are operating worldwide, 248 have been shut down and 170 have been decommissioned. Among the 248 reactors that do not run, some will resume their activities, others will be dismantled and the rest do not face a clear future. The analysis of reported incidents shows that the ageing process is a major cause of failures, more than two thirds of operating reactors are over 30 years old. It also appears that the lack of adequate regulations or safety standards for research reactors is an important issue concerning reactor safety particularly when reactors are facing re-starting or upgrading or modifications. The IAEA has launched a 4-axis program: 1) to set basic safety regulations and standards for research reactors, 2) to provide IAEA members with an efficient help for the application of these safety regulations to their reactors, 3) to foster international exchange of information on research reactor safety, and 4) to provide IAEA members with a help concerning safety issues linked to malicious acts or sabotage on research reactors

  15. Light water reactor safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Aksan, S.N.; Behringer, K.; Prodan, M.; Stierli, F.; Ullrich, G.

    1980-07-01

    The research and development activities for the safety of Light Water Power Reactors carried out 1979 at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research are described. Considerations concerning the necessity, objectives and size of the Safety Research Project are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of the activities in the five tasks of the program, covering fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing, thermal-hydraulics, reactor noise analysis and pressure vessel steel surveillance. (Auth.)

  16. Nuclear reactor safety research in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeile, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed information about the performance of nuclear reactor systems, and especially about the nuclear fuel, is vital in determining the consequences of a reactor accident. Fission products released from the fuel during accidents are the ultimate safety concern to the general public living in the vicinity of a nuclear reactor plant. Safety research conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has provided the NRC with detailed data relating to most of the postulated nuclear reactor accidents. Engineers and scientists at the INEL are now in the process of gathering data related to the most severe nuclear reactor accident - the core melt accident. This paper describes the focus of the nuclear reactor safety research at the INEL. The key results expected from the severe core damage safety research program are discussed

  17. Commissioning of research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on meeting the requirements for the commissioning of research reactors on the basis of international best practices. Specifically, it provides recommendations on fulfilling the requirements established in paras 6.44 and 7.42-7.50 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety of Research Reactors, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-4, IAEA, Vienna (2005) and guidance and specific and consequential recommendations relating to the recommendations presented in paras 615-621 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors, Safety Series No. 35-G2, IAEA, Vienna (1994) and paras 228-229 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety Assessment of Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report, Safety Series No. 35-G1, IAEA, Vienna (1994). This Safety Guide is intended for use by all organizations involved in commissioning for a research reactor, including the operating organization, the regulatory body and other organizations involved in the research reactor project

  18. Safety of Research Reactors. Specific Safety Requirements (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements for all main areas of safety for research reactors, with particular emphasis on requirements for design and operation. It explains the safety objectives and concepts that form the basis for safety and safety assessment for all stages in the lifetime of a research reactor. Technical and administrative requirements for the safety of new research reactors are established in accordance with these objectives and concepts, and they are to be applied to the extent practicable for existing research reactors. The safety requirements established in this publication for the management of safety and regulatory supervision apply to site evaluation, design, manufacturing, construction, commissioning, operation (including utilization and modification), and planning for decommissioning of research reactors (including critical assemblies and subcritical assemblies). The publication is intended for use by regulatory bodies and other organizations with responsibilities in these areas and in safety analysis, verification and review, and the provision of technical support.

  19. IAEA activities on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.

    1995-01-01

    Since its inception in 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included activities in its programme to address aspects of research reactors such as safety, utilization and fuel cycle considerations. These activities were based on statutory functions and responsibilities, and on the current situation of research reactors in operation around the world; they responded to IAEA Member States' general or specific demands. At present, the IAEA activities on research reactors cover the above aspects and respond to specific and current issues, amongst which safety-related are of major concern to Member States. The present IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP) is a response to the current situation of about 300 research reactors in operation in 59 countries around the world. (orig.)

  20. Reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned reactor safety research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The reactor safety research program, sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, is described in terms of its program objectives, current status, and future plans. Elements of safety research work applicable to water reactors, fast reactors, and gas cooled reactors are presented together with brief descriptions of current and planned test facilities. (U.S.)

  1. Probabilistic safety assessment for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    Increasing interest in using Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methods for research reactor safety is being observed in many countries throughout the world. This is mainly because of the great ability of this approach in achieving safe and reliable operation of research reactors. There is also a need to assist developing countries to apply Probabilistic Safety Assessment to existing nuclear facilities which are simpler and therefore less complicated to analyse than a large Nuclear Power Plant. It may be important, therefore, to develop PSA for research reactors. This might also help to better understand the safety characteristics of the reactor and to base any backfitting on a cost-benefit analysis which would ensure that only necessary changes are made. This document touches on all the key aspects of PSA but placed greater emphasis on so-called systems analysis aspects rather than the in-plant or ex-plant consequences

  2. IRSN research programs concerning reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardelay, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is made up of 3 parts. The first part briefly presents the missions of IRSN (French research institute on nuclear safety), the second part reviews the research works currently led by IRSN in the following fields : -) the assessment of safety computer codes, -) thermohydraulics, -) reactor ageing, -) reactivity accidents, -) loss of coolant, -) reactor pool dewatering, -) core meltdown, -) vapor explosion, and -) fission product release. In the third part, IRSN is shown to give a major importance to experimental programs led on research or test reactors for collecting valid data because of the complexity of the physical processes that are involved. IRSN plans to develop a research program concerning the safety of high or very high temperature reactors. (A.C.)

  3. Physics and safety of advanced research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Hardt, P. von der

    1987-01-01

    Advanced research reactor concepts are presently being developed in order to meet the neutron-based research needs of the nineties. Among these research reactors, which are characterized by an average power density of 1-10 MW per liter, highest priority is now generally given to the 'beam tube reactors'. These provide very high values of the thermal neutron flux (10 14 -10 16 cm -2 s -1 ) in a large volume outside of the reactor core, which can be used for sample irradiations and, in particular, for neutron scattering experiments. The paper first discusses the 'inverse flux trap concept' and the main physical aspects of the design and optimization of beam tube reactors. After that two examples of advanced research reactor projects are described which may be considered as two opposite extremes with respect to the physical optimization principle just mentioned. The present situation concerning cross section libraries and neutronic computer codes is more or less satisfactory. The safety analyses of advanced research reactors can largely be updated from those of current new designs, partially taking advantage of the immense volume of work done for power reactors. The paper indicates a few areas where generic problems for advanced research reactor safety are to be solved. (orig.)

  4. Experts' discussion on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The experts' discussion on reactor safety research deals with risk analysis, political realization, man and technics, as well as with the international state of affairs. Inspite of a controversy on individual issues and on the proportion of governmental and industrial involvment in reactor safety research, the continuation and intensification of corresponding research work is said to be necessary. Several participants demanded to consider possible 'conventional accidents' as well as a stronger financial commitment by the industry in this sector. The ratio 'man and technics' being an interface decisive for the proper functioning or failure of complex technical systems requires even more research work to be done. (GL) [de

  5. Reactor safety research. The CEC contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krischer, W.

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of the EC Commission in the reactor safety research dates back almost to the implementation of the EURATOM Treaty and has thus lasted for thirty years. The need for close collaboration and for general consensus on some crucial problems of concern to the public, has made the role of international organizations and, as far as Europe is concerned, the role of the European Community particularly important. The areas in which the CEC has been active during the last five years are widespread. This is partly due to the fact that, after TMI and Chernobyl, the effort and the interest of the different countries in reactor safety was considerable. Reactor Safety Research represents the proceedings of a seminar held by the Commission at the end of its research programme 1984-88 on reactor safety. As such it gives a comprehensive overview of the recent activities and main results achieved in the CEC Joint Research Centre and in national laboratories throughout Europe on the basis of shared cost actions. In a concluding chapter the book reports on the opinions, expressed during a panel by a group of major exponents, on the needs for future research. The main topics addressed are, with particular reference to Light Water Reactors (LWRS): reliability and risk evaluation, inspection of steel components, primary circuit components end-of-life prediction, and abnormal behaviour of reactor cooling systems. As far as LMFBRs are concerned, the topics covered are: severe accident modelling, material properties and structural behaviour studies. There are 67 pages, all of which are indexed separately. Reactor Safety Research will be of particular interest to reliability and safety engineers, nuclear engineers and technicians, and mechanical and structural engineers. (author)

  6. Safety upgrades to the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeAbreu, B.; Mark, J.M.; Mutterback, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The NRU (National Research Universal) Reactor is a 135 MW thermal research facility located at Chalk River Laboratories, and is owned and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. One of the largest and most versatile research reactors in the world, it serves as the R and D workhorse for Canada's CANDU business while at the same time filling the role as one of the world's major producers of medical radioisotopes. AECL plans to extend operation of the NRU reactor to approximately the year 2005 when a new replacement, the Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) will be available. To achieve this, AECL has undertaken a program of safety reassessment and upgrades to enhance the level of safety consistent with modem requirements. An engineering assessment/inspection of critical systems, equipment and components was completed and seven major safety upgrades are being designed and installed. These upgrades will significantly reduce the reactor's vulnerability to common mode failures and external hazards, with particular emphasis on seismic protection. The scheduled completion date for the project is 1999 December at a cost approximately twice the annual operating cost. All work on the NRU upgrade project is planned and integrated into the regular operating cycles of the reactor; no major outages are anticipated. This paper describes the safety upgrades and discusses the technical and managerial challenges involved in extending the operating life of the NRU reactor. (author)

  7. MAPLE research reactor safety uncertainty assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sills, H.E.; Duffey, R.B.; Andres, T.H.

    1999-01-01

    The MAPLE (multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experiment) reactor is a low pressure, low temperature, open-tank-in pool type research reactor that operates at a power level of 5 to 35 MW. MAPLE is designed for ease of operation, maintenance, and to meet today's most demanding requirements for safety and licensing. The emphasis is on the use of passive safety systems and environmentally qualified components. Key safety features include two independent and diverse shutdown systems, two parallel and independent cooling loops, fail safe operation, and a building design that incorporates the concepts of primary containment supported by secondary confinement

  8. The emphasis is on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    For the second time the Association for Reactor Safety mbH (GRS), Koeln, organised on behalf of the BMFT the conference 'Reactor safety research'. About 400 visitors took part. The public who were interested were given a review of the activities which are being undertaken by the BMFT in the programme 'Research and safety of light-water reactors'. The series of conference papers initiated by the BMFT is to be developed into a permanent information source which will be of interest to those working on nuclear questions such as official quarters, industry and high schools, and experts who have to give judgements. The most important statements by various research groups in industry, high schools and also associations of experts, are summarised. (orig.) [de

  9. Reactor safety research - results and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaschik, M.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed so far is an essential contribution to the determination of the safety margins of nuclear facilities and their systems and to the further development of safety engineering. The further development of safety engineering involves a shift of emphasis in reactor safety research towards event sequences beyond the design basis. The aim of this shift in emphasis is the further development of the preventive level. This is based on the fact that the conservative design of the operating and safety systems involves and essential safety potential. The R and D work is intended to help develop accident management measures and to take the plant back into the safe state even after severe accidents. In this context, it is necessary to make full use of the safety margins of the plant and to include the operating systems for coping with accidents. As a result of the aims, the research work approaches operating and plant-specific processes. (orig./DG) [de

  10. Reactor safety research in times of change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1970ies reactor safety research sponsored by the German Ministry of Economics an Technology and its predecessors and pursued independently from interests of industry or industrial associations as well as from current licensing issues significantly contributed to the extension of knowledge regarding risks and possible threats associated with the operation of nuclear power plants. The results of these research activities triggered several measures taken by industry and utilities to further enhance the internationally recognized high safety standards of nuclear power plants in Germany. Furthermore, by including especially universities in the distinguished research activities a large number of young scientists were given the opportunity to qualify in the field of nuclear reactor technology and safety thus contributing to the preservation of competence during the demographic change. The nuclear phase out in Germany affects also issues of reactor safety research in Germany. While Germany will progressively decrease and terminate the use of nuclear energy for public power supply other countries in Europe and in other parts of the world are continuing, expanding and even starting the use of nuclear power. As generally recognized, nuclear safety is an international issue and in the wake of the Fukushima disaster there are several initiatives to launch a system of internationally binding safety rules and guide lines. The German Competence Alliance therefore has elaborated a framework of areas were future reactor safety research will still be needed to support German efforts based on own and independent expertise to continuously develop and establish highest safety standards for the use of nuclear power supply domestic and abroad.

  11. Safety evaluation of the Dalat research reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, V.H.; Lam, P.V.; An, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    After an introduction presenting the essential characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor, the document presents i) The safety assurance condition of the reactor, ii) Its safety behaviour after 5 years of operation, iii) Safety research being realized on the reactor. Following is questionnaire of safety evaluation and a list of attachments, which concern the reactor

  12. Safety status of Russian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    Gosatomnadzor of Russia is conducting the safety regulation and inspection activity related to nuclear and radiation safety at nuclear research facilities, including research reactors, critical assemblies and sub-critical assemblies. It implies implementing three major activities: 1) establishing the laws and safety standards in the field of research reactors nuclear and radiation safety; 2) research reactors licensing; and 3) inspections (or license conditions tracking and inspection). The database on nuclear research facilities has recently been updated based on the actual status of all facilities. It turned out that many facilities have been shutdown, whether temporary or permanently, waiting for the final decision on their decommissioning. Compared to previous years the situation has been inevitably changing. Now we have 99 nuclear research facilities in total under Gosatomnadzor of Russia supervision (compared to 113 in previous years). Their distribution by types and operating organizations is presented. The licensing and conduct of inspection processes are briefly outlined with emphasis being made on specific issues related to major incidents that happened in 2000, spent fuel management, occupational exposure, effluents and emissions, emergency preparedness and physical protection. Finally, a summary of problems at current Russian research facilities is outlined. (author)

  13. Reactor safety research in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, J.; Zammite, R.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals withs PWR research only and covers programs performed in CEA or in cooperation between CEA and EDF or Framatome. Emphasis is being given to core cooling faults and associated procedures, primary circuit two-phase thermohydraulics, core damage, safeguarding of confinement, evaluation of accidental releases, and management of accident consequences. Most of the design and construction adequacy problems have already been solved in a generic manner, nevertheless new designs are now being studied and may require complementary research. (DG)

  14. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; Holland, D.F.; Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g. for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions. 18 refs

  15. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions

  16. Reactor safety research and safety technology. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theenhaus, R.; Wolters, J.

    1987-01-01

    The state of HTR safety research work reached permits a comprehensive and reliable answer to be given to questions which have been raised by the reactor accident at Chernobyl, regarding HTR safety. Together with the probability safety analyses, the way to a safety concept suitable for an HTR is cleared; instructions are given for design optimisation with regard to safety technique and economy. The consequences of a graphite fire, the neutron physics design and the consequenes of the lack of a safety containment are briefly described. (DG) [de

  17. Hydrogen problems in reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, H.

    1984-01-01

    The BMFT and BMI have initiated a workshop 'Hydrogen Problems in Reactor Safety Research' that took place October 3./4., 1983. The objective of this workshop was to present the state of the art in the main areas - Hydrogen-Production - Hydrogen-Distribution - Hydrogen-Ignition - Hydrogen-Burning and Containment Behaviour - Mitigation Measures. The lectures on the different areas are compiled. The most important results of the final discussion are summarized as well. (orig.) [de

  18. Research reactors: design, safety requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Abobaker Mohammed Rahmtalla

    2014-09-01

    There are two types of reactors: research reactors or power reactors. The difference between the research reactor and energy reactor is that the research reactor has working temperature and fuel less than the power reactor. The research reactors cooling uses light or heavy water and also research reactors need reflector of graphite or beryllium to reduce the loss of neutrons from the reactor core. Research reactors are used for research training as well as testing of materials and the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and for industrial application. The difference is also that the research reactor smaller in terms of capacity than that of power plant. Research reactors produce radioactive isotopes are not used for energy production, the power plant generates electrical energy. In the world there are more than 284 reactor research in 56 countries, operates as source of neutron for scientific research. Among the incidents related to nuclear reactors leak radiation partial reactor which took place in three mile island nuclear near pennsylvania in 1979, due to result of the loss of control of the fission reaction, which led to the explosion emitting hug amounts of radiation. However, there was control of radiation inside the building, and so no occurred then, another accident that lead to radiation leakage similar in nuclear power plant Chernobyl in Russia in 1986, has led to deaths of 4000 people and exposing hundreds of thousands to radiation, and can continue to be effect of harmful radiation to affect future generations. (author)

  19. Self Assessment for the Safety of Research Reactor in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melani, Ai; Chang, Soon Heung

    2008-01-01

    At the present Indonesia has no nuclear power plant in operation yet, although it is expected that the first nuclear power plant will be operated and commercially available in around the year of 2016 to 2017 in Muria Peninsula. National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) has three research reactor; which are: Reactor Triga Mark II at Bandung, Reactor Kartini at Yogyakarta and Reactor Serbaguna (Multi Purpose Reactor) at Serpong. The Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors establishes 'best practice' guidelines for the licensing, construction and operation of research reactors. In this paper the author use the requirement in code of conduct to review the safety of research reactor in Indonesia

  20. Research reactor safety - an overview of crucial aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverie, M.

    1998-01-01

    Chronology of the commissioning orders of the French research reactors illustrates the importance of the time factor. When looking at older reactors, one must, on one hand, demonstrate, not only the absence of risks tied to the reactor's ageing, but, on the other hand, adapt the reactor's original technical designs to today's safety practices and standards. The evolution of reactor safety requirements over the last twenty years sometimes makes this adaptation difficult. The design of the next research reactors, after a one to two decades pause in construction, will require to set up new safety assessment bases that will have to take into account the nuclear power plant safety evolution. As a general statement, research reactor safety approaches will require the incorporation of specific design rules for research reactors: experience feedback for one of a kind design, frequent modifications required by research programmes, special operational requirements with operators/researchers interfaces. (author)

  1. Research reactor safety - an overview of crucial aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverie, M. [Atomic Energy Commission, Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1998-07-01

    Chronology of the commissioning orders of the French research reactors illustrates the importance of the time factor. When looking at older reactors, one must, on one hand, demonstrate, not only the absence of risks tied to the reactor's ageing, but, on the other hand, adapt the reactor's original technical designs to today's safety practices and standards. The evolution of reactor safety requirements over the last twenty years sometimes makes this adaptation difficult. The design of the next research reactors, after a one to two decades pause in construction, will require to set up new safety assessment bases that will have to take into account the nuclear power plant safety evolution. As a general statement, research reactor safety approaches will require the incorporation of specific design rules for research reactors: experience feedback for one of a kind design, frequent modifications required by research programmes, special operational requirements with operators/researchers interfaces. (author)

  2. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  3. The organization of research reactor safety in the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, W.

    1983-01-01

    The present state of organization and development of research reactor safety in the UKAEA are outlined by addressing the fundamental safety principles which have been adopted in keeping with national health and safety requirement. The organisation, assessment and monitoring of research reactor safety on complex multi-discipline and multi-activity nuclear research and development site are discussed. Methods of safety assessment, such as probabilistic risk assessment and risk acceptance criteria, which have been developed and applied in practice are explained, and some indication of the directions in which some of the current developments in the safety of UKAEA research reactors is also included. (A.J.)

  4. Improving nuclear safety at international research reactors: The Integrated Research Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (IRRSEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David; Newton, Douglas; Connery, Joyce

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear energy continues to play a major role in the world's energy economy. Research and test reactors are an important component of a nation's nuclear power infrastructure as they provide training, experiments and operating experience vital to developing and sustaining the industry. Indeed, nations with aspirations for nuclear power development usually begin their programs with a research reactor program. Research reactors also are vital to international science and technology development. It is important to keep them safe from both accident and sabotage, not only because of our obligation to prevent human and environmental consequence but also to prevent corresponding damage to science and industry. For example, an incident at a research reactor could cause a political and public backlash that would do irreparable harm to national nuclear programs. Following the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, considerable efforts and resources were committed to improving the safety posture of the world's nuclear power plants. Unsafe operation of research reactors will have an amplifying effect throughout a country or region's entire nuclear programs due to political, economic and nuclear infrastructure consequences. (author)

  5. Safety in decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Guide covers the technical and administrative considerations relevant to the nuclear aspects of safety in the decommissioning of reactors, as they apply to the reactor and the reactor site. While the treatment, transport and disposal of radioactive wastes arising from decommissioning are important considerations, these aspects are not specifically covered in this Guide. Likewise, other possible issues in decommissioning (e.g. land use and other environmental issues, industrial safety, financial assurance) which are not directly related to radiological safety are also not considered. Generally, decommissioning will be undertaken after planned final shutdown of the reactor. In some cases a reactor may have to be decommissioned following an unplanned or unexpected event of a series or damaging nature occurring during operation. In these cases special procedures for decommissioning may need to be developed, peculiar to the particular circumstances. This Guide could be used as a basis for the development of these procedures although specific consideration of the circumstances which create the need for them is beyond its scope

  6. Ageing Management for Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    This Safety Guide was developed under the IAEA programme for safety standards for research reactors, which covers all the important areas of research reactor safety. It supplements and elaborates upon the safety requirements for ageing management of research reactors that are established in paras 6.68-6.70 and 7.109 of the IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Safety of Research Reactors. The safety of a research reactor requires that provisions be made in its design to facilitate ageing management. Throughout the lifetime of a research reactor, including its decommissioning, ageing management of its structures, systems and components (SSCs) important to safety is required, to ensure continued adequacy of the safety level, reliable operation of the reactor, and compliance with the operational limits and conditions. Managing the safety aspects of research reactor ageing requires implementation of an effective programme for the monitoring, prediction, and timely detection and mitigation of degradation of SSCs important to safety, and for maintaining their integrity and functional capability throughout their service lives. Ageing management is defined as engineering, operation, and maintenance strategy and actions to control within acceptable limits the ageing degradation of SSCs. Ageing management includes activities such as repair, refurbishment and replacement of SSCs, which are similar to other activities carried out at a research reactor in maintenance and testing or when a modification project takes place. However, it is important to recognize that effective management of ageing requires the use of a methodology that will detect and evaluate ageing degradation as a consequence of the service conditions, and involves the application of countermeasures for prevention and mitigation of ageing degradation. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on managing ageing of SSCs important to safety at research reactors on the basis of international

  7. Ageing Management for Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Safety Guide was developed under the IAEA programme for safety standards for research reactors, which covers all the important areas of research reactor safety. It supplements and elaborates upon the safety requirements for ageing management of research reactors that are established in paras 6.68-6.70 and 7.109 of the IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Safety of Research Reactors. The safety of a research reactor requires that provisions be made in its design to facilitate ageing management. Throughout the lifetime of a research reactor, including its decommissioning, ageing management of its structures, systems and components (SSCs) important to safety is required, to ensure continued adequacy of the safety level, reliable operation of the reactor, and compliance with the operational limits and conditions. Managing the safety aspects of research reactor ageing requires implementation of an effective programme for the monitoring, prediction, and timely detection and mitigation of degradation of SSCs important to safety, and for maintaining their integrity and functional capability throughout their service lives. Ageing management is defined as engineering, operation, and maintenance strategy and actions to control within acceptable limits the ageing degradation of SSCs. Ageing management includes activities such as repair, refurbishment and replacement of SSCs, which are similar to other activities carried out at a research reactor in maintenance and testing or when a modification project takes place. However, it is important to recognize that effective management of ageing requires the use of a methodology that will detect and evaluate ageing degradation as a consequence of the service conditions, and involves the application of countermeasures for prevention and mitigation of ageing degradation. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on managing ageing of SSCs important to safety at research reactors on the basis of international

  8. Development of Safety Review Guidance for Research and Training Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kju-Myeng; Shin, Dae-Soo; Ahn, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Hoon-Joo

    2007-01-01

    The KINS already issued the safety review guidance for pressurized LWRs. But the safety review guidance for research and training reactors were not developed. So, the technical standard including safety review guidance for domestic research and training reactors has been applied mutates mutandis to those of nuclear power plants. It is often difficult for the staff to effectively perform the safety review of applications for the permit by the licensee, based on peculiar safety review guidance. The NRC and NSC provide the safety review guidance for test and research reactors and European countries refer to IAEA safety requirements and guides. The safety review guide (SRG) of research and training reactors was developed considering descriptions of the NUREG- 1537 Part 2, previous experiences of safety review and domestic regulations for related facilities. This study provided the safety review guidance for research and training reactors and surveyed the difference of major acceptance criteria or characteristics between the SRG of pressurized light water reactor and research and training reactors

  9. Guidelines for the review research reactor safety. Reference document for IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1992, the IAEA published new safety standards for research reactors as part of the set of publications considered by its Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP). This set also includes publications giving guidance for all safety aspects related to the lifetime of a research reactor. In addition, the IAEA has also revised the Safety Standards for radiation protection. Consequently, it was considered advisable to revise the Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) procedures to incorporate the new requirements and guidance as well as to extend the scope of the safety reviews to currently operating research reactors. The present report is the result of this revision. The purpose of this report is to give guidance on the preparation, execution, reporting and follow-up of safety review mission to research reactors as conducted by the IAEA under its INSARR missions safety service. However, it will also be of assistance to operators and regulators in conducting: (a) ad hoc safety assessments of research reactors to address individual issues such as ageing or safety culture; and (b) other types of safety reviews such as internal and peer reviews and regulatory inspections

  10. Water cooled reactor technology: Safety research abstracts no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD publish these Nuclear Safety Research Abstracts within the framework of their efforts to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants and to promote the exchange of research information. The abstracts are of nuclear safety related research projects for: pressurized light water cooled and moderated reactors (PWRs); boiling light water cooled and moderated reactors (BWRs); light water cooled and graphite moderated reactors (LWGRs); pressurized heavy water cooled and moderated reactors (PHWRs); gas cooled graphite moderated reactors (GCRs). Abstracts of nuclear safety research projects for fast breeder reactors are published independently by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD and are not included in this joint publication. The intention of the collaborating international organizations is to publish such a document biannually. Work has been undertaken to develop a common computerized system with on-line access to the stored information

  11. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.L.; Lerouge, B.

    1980-11-01

    This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. Some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion

  12. Safety research for evolutionary light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The development of nuclear energy has been characterized by a continuous evolution of the technological and philosophical underpinnings of reactor safety to enable operation of the plant without causing harm to either the plant operators or the public. Currently, the safety of a nuclear plant is assured through the combined use of procedures and engineered safety features together with a system of multiple protective barriers against the release of radioactivity. This approach is embodied in the concept of Design-Basis Accidents (DBA), which requires the designers to demonstrate that all credible accidents have been identified and that all safety equipment and procedures perform their functions extremely reliably. Particularly important functions are the automatic protection to shut the reactor down and to remove the decay heat while ensuring the integrity of the containment structure. Within the DBA concept, the so-called severe accidents were conveniently defined to be those accidents that lie beyond the DBA envelope; hence, they did not form part of the safety case. (author)

  13. Safety research for evolutionary light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacuci, D G [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Universitaetsbibliothek

    1996-12-01

    The development of nuclear energy has been characterized by a continuous evolution of the technological and philosophical underpinnings of reactor safety to enable operation of the plant without causing harm to either the plant operators or the public. Currently, the safety of a nuclear plant is assured through the combined use of procedures and engineered safety features together with a system of multiple protective barriers against the release of radioactivity. This approach is embodied in the concept of Design-Basis Accidents (DBA), which requires the designers to demonstrate that all credible accidents have been identified and that all safety equipment and procedures perform their functions extremely reliably. Particularly important functions are the automatic protection to shut the reactor down and to remove the decay heat while ensuring the integrity of the containment structure. Within the DBA concept, the so-called severe accidents were conveniently defined to be those accidents that lie beyond the DBA envelope; hence, they did not form part of the safety case. (author).

  14. Safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents guidelines, approved by international consensus, for the safe utilization and modification of research reactors. While the Guide is most applicable to existing reactors, it is also recommended for use by organizations planning to put a new reactor into operation. 1 fig

  15. Introduction to Safety Analysis Approach for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Suki

    2016-01-01

    The research reactors have a wide variety in terms of thermal powers, coolants, moderators, reflectors, fuels, reactor tanks and pools, flow direction in the core, and the operating pressure and temperature of the cooling system. Around 110 research reactors have a thermal power greater than 1 MW. This paper introduces a general approach to safety analysis for research reactors and deals with the experience of safety analysis on a 10 MW research reactor with an open-pool and open-tank reactor and a downward flow in the reactor core during normal operation. The general approach to safety analysis for research reactors is described and the design features of a typical open-pool and open-tank type reactor are discussed. The representative events expected in research reactors are investigated. The reactor responses and the thermal hydraulic behavior to the events are presented and discussed. From the minimum CHFR and the maximum fuel temperature calculated, it is ensured that the fuel is not damaged in the step insertion of reactivity by 1.8 mk and the failure of all primary pumps for the reactor with a 10 MW thermal power and downward core flow

  16. An overview-probabilistic safety analysis for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinlin; Peng Changhong

    2015-01-01

    For long-term application, Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) has proved to be a valuable tool for improving the safety and reliability of power reactors. In China, 'Nuclear safety and radioactive pollution prevention 'Twelfth Five Year Plan' and the 2020 vision' raises clearly that: to develop probabilistic safety analysis and aging evaluation for research reactors. Comparing with the power reactors, it reveals some specific features in research reactors: lower operating power, lower coolant temperature and pressure, etc. However, the core configurations may be changed very often and human actions play an important safety role in research reactors due to its specific experimental requirement. As a result, there is a necessary to conduct the PSA analysis of research reactors. This paper discusses the special characteristics related to the structure and operation and the methods to develop the PSA of research reactors, including initiating event analysis, event tree analysis, fault tree analysis, dependent failure analysis, human reliability analysis and quantification as well as the experimental and external event evaluation through the investigation of various research reactors and their PSAs home and abroad, to provide the current situation and features of research reactors PSAs. (author)

  17. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.L.; Lerouge, B.

    1983-01-01

    From the very beginning of the CEA up to now, a great deal of work has been devoted to the development and utilization of research reactors in France for the needs of fundamental and applied research, production of radioisotopes, and training. In recent years, new reactors were commissioned while others were decommissioned. Moreover some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors (Osiris and Isis). This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion. Safety of research reactors has been studied in detail and many improvements have been brought due to: implementation of a specific experimental program, and adaptation of safety principles and rules elaborated for power reactors. Research reactors in operation in France have been built within a 22 year period. Meanwhile, safety rules have been improved. Old reactors do not comply with all the new rules but modifications are continuously made: after analysis of incidents, when replacement of equipment has to be carried out, when an important modification (fuel conversion for example) is decided upon

  18. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J L; Lerouge, B [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France)

    1983-08-01

    From the very beginning of the CEA up to now, a great deal of work has been devoted to the development and utilization of research reactors in France for the needs of fundamental and applied research, production of radioisotopes, and training. In recent years, new reactors were commissioned while others were decommissioned. Moreover some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors (Osiris and Isis). This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion. Safety of research reactors has been studied in detail and many improvements have been brought due to: implementation of a specific experimental program, and adaptation of safety principles and rules elaborated for power reactors. Research reactors in operation in France have been built within a 22 year period. Meanwhile, safety rules have been improved. Old reactors do not comply with all the new rules but modifications are continuously made: after analysis of incidents, when replacement of equipment has to be carried out, when an important modification (fuel conversion for example) is decided upon.

  19. Safety assessment of research reactors and preparation of the safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents guidelines, approved by international consensus, for the preparation, review and assessment of safety documentation for research reactors such as the Safety Analysis Report. While the Guide is most applicable to research reactors in the design and construction stage, it is also recommended for use during relicensing or reassessment of existing reactors

  20. Progress report concerning safety research for nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Examination and evaluation of safety research results for nuclear reactor facilities have been performed, as more than a year has elapsed since the plan had been initiated in April, 1976, by the special sub-committee for the safety of nuclear reactor facilities. The research is carried out by being divided roughly into 7 items, and seems to be steadily proceeding, though it does not yet reach the target. The above 7 items include researches for (1) criticality accident, (2) loss of coolant accident, (3) safety for light water reactor fuel, (4) construction safety for reactor facilities, (5) reduction of release of radioactive material, (6) safety evaluation based on the probability theory for reactor facilities, and (7) aseismatic measures for reactor facilities. With discussions on the progress and the results of the research this time, research on the behaviour on fuel in abnormal transients including in-core and out-core experiments has been added to the third item, deleting the power-cooling mismatch experiment in Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of JAERI. Also it has been decided to add two research to the seventh item, namely measured data collection, classification and analysis, and probability assessment of failures due to an earthquake. For these 7 items, the report describes the concrete contents of research to be performed in fiscal years of 1977 and 1978, by discussing on most rational and suitable contents conceivable at present. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. IAEA activities in the field of research reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciuculescu, C.; Boado Magan, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities will be presented: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOC's); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors adopted by the Board of Governors on 8 March 2004, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors published on the IAEA website on February 2003 and the results obtained. (author)

  2. The experiences of research reactor accident to safety improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiranto, S.

    1999-01-01

    The safety of reactor operation is the main factor in order that the nuclear technology development program can be held according the expected target. Several experience with research reactor incidents must be learned and understood by the nuclear program personnel, especially for operators and supervisors of RSG-GA. Siwabessy. From the incident experience of research reactor in the world, which mentioned in the book 'Experience with research reactor incidents' by IAEA, 1995, was concluded that the main cause of research reactor accidents is understandless about the safety culture by the nuclear installation personnel. With learn, understand and compare between this experiences and the condition of RSG GA Siwabessy is expended the operators and supervisors more attention about the safety culture, so that RSG GA Siwabessy can be operated successfull, safely according the expected target

  3. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor; Rao, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-05-15

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  4. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  5. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  6. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions

  7. Code on the safety of nuclear research reactors: Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide the essential requirements and recommendations for the safe operation of research reactors, with emphasis on the supervisory and managerial aspects. However, the publication also provides some guidance and information on topics concerning all the organizations involved in operation. These objectives are expressed in terms of requirements and recommendations for the safe operation of research reactors. Emphasis is placed on the safety requirements that shall be met rather than on the ways in which they can be met. The requirements and recommendations may form the foundation necessary for a Member State to develop regulations and safety criteria for its research reactor programme.

  8. Safety re-assessment of AECL test and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited currently has four operating engineering test/research reactors of various sizes and ages; a new isotope-production reactor Maple-X10, under construction at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and a heating demonstration reactor, SDR, undergoing high-power commissioning at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE). The company is also performing design studies of small reactors for hot water and electricity production. The older reactors are ZED-2, PTR, NRX, and NRU; these range in age from 42 years (NRX) to 29 years (ZED-2). Since 1984, limited-scope safety re-assessments have been underway on three of these reactors (ZED-2, NRX AND NRU). ZED-2 and PTR are operated by the Reactor Physics Branch; all other reactors are operated by the respective site Reactor Operations Branches. For the older reactors the original safety reports produced were entirely deterministic in nature and based on the design-basis accident concept. The limited scope safety re-assessments for these older reactors, carried out over the past 5 years, have comprised both quantitative probabilistic safety-assessment techniques, such as event tree and fault analysis, and/or qualitative techniques, such as failure mode and effect analysis. The technique used for an individual assessment was dependent upon the specific scope required. This paper discusses the types of analyses carried out, specific insights/recommendations resulting from the analysis, and the plan for future analysis. In addition, during the last four years safety assessments have been carried out on the new isotope-, heat-, and electricity-producing reactors, as part of the safety design review, commissioning and licensing activities

  9. Proceedings of the seminar on nuclear safety research and the workshop on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The seminar on the nuclear safety research was held on November 20, 2000 according to the start of new five year safety research plan (FY2001-2005: established by Nuclear Safety Commission) with 79 participants. In the seminar, Commissioner Dr. Kanagawa gave the outline of the next five year safety research plan. Following this presentation, progresses and future scopes of safety researches in the fields of reactor facility, fuel cycle facility, radioactive waste and environmental impact on radiation at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were reported. After the seminar, the workshop on reactor safety research was held on November 21-22, 2000 with 141 participants. In the workshop, four sessions titled safety of efficient and economic utilization of nuclear fuel, safety related to long-term utilization of power reactors, research on common safety-related issues and toward further improvement of nuclear safety were organized and, outcomes and future perspectives in these wide research R and D in the related area at other organizations including NUPEC, JAPEIC and Kansai Electric Power Co. was presented in each session. This report compiles outlines of the presentations and used materials in the seminar and the workshop to form the proceedings for the both meetings. (author)

  10. Refurbishment and safety upgradation of research reactor Cirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marik, S.K.; Rao, D.V.H.; Bhatnagar, A.; Pant, R.C.; Tikku, A.C.; Sankar, S.

    2006-01-01

    Cirus, a 40 MW t, vertical tank type research reactor, having wide range of research facilities, was commissioned in the year 1960. This research reactor, situated at Mumbai, India has been operated and utilized extensively for isotope production, material testing and neutron beam research for nearly four decades. With a view to assess the residual life of the reactor, detailed ageing studies were carried out during the early 1990s. Based on these studies, refurbishment of Cirus for its life extension was taken up. During refurbishment, additional safety features were incorporated in various systems to qualify them for the current safety standards. This paper gives the details of the operating experiences, utilization of the reactor along with methodologies followed for carrying out detailed ageing studies, refurbishment and safety upgradation for its life extension

  11. Code on the safety of nuclear research reactors: Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of this publication is to provide a safety basis for the design of a research reactor and for the assessment of the design. Another objective is to cover certain aspects related to regulatory supervision, siting and quality assurance, as far as these are related to activities for the design of a research reactor. These objectives are expressed in terms of requirements and recommendations for the design of research reactors. Emphasis is placed on the safety requirements that shall be met rather than on ways in which they can be met. The requirements and recommendations may form the foundation necessary for a Member State to develop specific regulations and safety criteria for its research reactor programme.

  12. Safety research for LWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The current R and D activities are to be seen in connection with the LWR risk assessment studies. Two trends are emerging, of which the one concentrates more on BWR-specific problems, and the other on the efficiency or safety-related assessment of accident management activities. This annual report of 1988 reviews the progress of work done by the institutes and departments of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, (KfK), or on behalf of KfK by external institutions, in the field of safety research. The papers of this report present the state of work at the end of the year 1988. They are written in German, with an abstract in English. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Nordic reactor safety research 1981-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheelsen, B.

    1986-01-01

    National resources in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden were put together with Nordic funds in the four-year research programme 1981-85 on selected areas of nuclear safety. The outcome of the programme, edited in four separate reports, is summarized, and important findings are listed in the areas of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), loss-of-coolant accidents with small breaks, heat-transfer correlations, and corrosion in the nuclear industry. (author)

  14. The evaluation of research reactor TRIGA MARK II safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R.; Kozuh, M.; Mavko, B.

    1994-01-01

    In the paper the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of a research reactor is described. Five different initiating events were selected and analyzed with the use of event trees. Seven reactor systems were modeled with fault trees. Three groups of radiation releases were introduced - Success, Reactor-Hall, Environment - and their frequencies were estimated. The importance factors of initiating events, human errors and basic events were calculated regarding the consequence groups. (author)

  15. Safety of research reactors. Topical issues paper no. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.; Ferraz-Bastos, J.L.; Kim, S.C.; Voth, M.; Boeck, H.; Dimeglio, F.; Litai, D.

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) missions. The prime objective of these missions has been to conduct a comprehensive operational safety review of the research reactor facility and to verify compliance with the IAEA Safety Standards. The methods used during an INSARR mission have been collected and analysed. Some of the important issues identified are the following: general ageing of the facility; uncertain status of many research reactors (in extended shutdown); indefinite deferral of return to operation or decommissioning; inadequate regulatory supervision; insufficient systematic (periodic) reassessment of safety; lack of quality assurance (QA) programmes; lack of an international safety convention or arrangement; lack of financial support for safety measures (e.g. safety reassessment, safety upgrading, decommissioning) and utilization; lack of clear utilization programmes; inadequate emergency preparedness; inadequate safety documentation (e.g. safety analysis report, operating rules and procedures, emergency plan); inadequate funding of shutdown reactors; weak safety culture; loss of expertise and corporate memory; loss of information concerning radioactive materials contained in retired experimental devices stored in the facility indefinitely; obsolescence of equipment and lack of spare parts; inadequate training and qualifications of regulators and operators; safety implications of new fuel types. These issues have been addressed by the IAEA Secretariat and the chairman of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG). INSAG has identified three major safety issues that are: the increasing age of research reactors, the number of research reactors that are not operating anymore but have not been decommissioned, and the number of research reactors in countries that do not have appropriate regulatory authorities. This issue paper discusses the concerns generated by an analysis of the results of INSARR missions and those expressed by INSAG. The

  16. Core conversion effects on the safety analysis of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoussis, J.N.; Chrysochoides, N.G.; Papastergiou, C.N.

    1982-07-01

    The safety related parameters of the 5 MW Democritus research reactor that will be affected by the scheduled core conversion to use LEU instead of HEU are considered. The analysis of the safety related items involved in such a core conversion, mainly the consequences due to MCA, DBA, etc., is of a general nature and can, therefore, be applied to other similar pool type reactors as well. (T.A.)

  17. Safety regulations concerning instrumentation and control systems for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shanshoury, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    A brief study on the safety and reliability issues related to instrumentation and control systems in nuclear reactor plants is performed. In response, technical and strategic issues are used to accomplish instrumentation and control systems safety. For technical issues there are ; systems aspects of digital I and C technology, software quality assurance, common-mode software, failure potential, safety and reliability assessment methods, and human factors and human machine interfaces. The strategic issues are the case-by-case licensing process and the adequacy of the technical infrastructure. The purpose of this work was to review the reliability of the safety systems related to these technical issues for research reactors

  18. Advanced nuclear reactor safety issues and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    On 18-20 February 2002, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organised, with the co-sponsorship of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and in collaboration with the European Commission (EC), a Workshop on Advanced Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues and Research Needs. Currently, advanced nuclear reactor projects range from the development of evolutionary and advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs to initial work to develop even further advanced designs which go beyond LWR technology (e.g. high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and liquid metal-cooled reactors). These advanced designs include a greater use of advanced technology and safety features than those employed in currently operating plants or approved designs. The objectives of the workshop were to: - facilitate early identification and resolution of safety issues by developing a consensus among participating countries on the identification of safety issues, the scope of research needed to address these issues and a potential approach to their resolution; - promote the preservation of knowledge and expertise on advanced reactor technology; - provide input to the Generation IV International Forum Technology Road-map. In addition, the workshop tried to link advancement of knowledge and understanding of advanced designs to the regulatory process, with emphasis on building public confidence. It also helped to document current views on advanced reactor safety and technology, thereby contributing to preserving knowledge and expertise before it is lost. (author)

  19. Nuclear safety requirements for operation licensing of Egyptian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    From the view of responsibility for health and nuclear safety, this work creates a framework for the application of nuclear regulatory rules to ensure safe operation for the sake of obtaining or maintaining operation licensing for nuclear research reactors. It has been performed according to the recommendations of the IAEA for research reactor safety regulations which clearly states that the scope of the application should include all research reactors being designed, constructed, commissioned, operated, modified or decommissioned. From that concept, the present work establishes a model structure and a computer logic program for a regulatory licensing system (RLS code). It applies both the regulatory inspection and enforcement regulatory rules on the different licensing process stages. The present established RLS code is then applied to the Egyptian Research Reactors, namely; the first ET-RR-1, which was constructed and still operating since 1961, and the second MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2) which is now in the preliminary operation stage. The results showed that for the ET-RR-1 reactor, all operational activities, including maintenance, in-service inspection, renewal, modification and experiments should meet the appropriate regulatory compliance action program. Also, the results showed that for the new MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2), all commissioning and operational stages should also meet the regulatory inspection and enforcement action program of the operational licensing safety requirements. (author)

  20. Safety infrastructure for countries establishing their first research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.; Shokr, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Establishment of a research reactor is a major project requiring careful planning, preparation, implementation, and investment in time and human resources. The implementation of such a project requires establishment of sustainable infrastructures, including legal and regulatory, safety, technical, and economic. An analysis of the needs for a new research reactor facility should be performed including the development of a utilization plan and evaluation of site availability and suitability. All these elements should be covered by a feasibility study of the project. This paper discusses the elements of such a study with the main focus on the specific activities and steps for developing the necessary safety infrastructure. Progressive involvement of the main organizations in the project, and application of the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors and IAEA Safety Standards in different phases of the project are presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Safety considerations for research reactors in extended shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    According to the IAEA Research Reactor Database, in the last 20 years, 367 research reactors have been shut down. Of these, 109 have undergone decommissioning and the rest are in extended shutdown with no clear definition about their future. Still other research reactors are infrequently operated with no meaningful utilization programme. These two situations present concerns related to safety such as loss of corporate memory, personnel qualification, maintenance of components and systems and preparation and maintenance of documentation. There are many reasons to shut down a reactor; these may include: - the need to carry out modifications in the reactor systems; - the need for refurbishment to extend the lifetime of the reactor; - the need to repair reactor structures, systems, or components; - the need to remedy technical problems; - regulatory or public concerns; - local conflicts or wars; - political convenience; - the lack of resources. While any one of these reasons may lead to shutdown of a reactor, each will present unique problems to the reactor management. The large variations from one research reactor to the next also will contribute to the uniqueness of the problems. Any option that the reactor management adopts will affect the future of the facility. Options may include dealing with the cause of the shutdown and returning to normal operation, extending the shutdown period waiting a future decision, or decommissioning. Such options are carefully and properly analysed to ensure that the solution selected is the best in terms of reactor type and size, period of shutdown and legal, economic and social considerations. This publication provides information in support of the IAEA safety standards for research reactors

  2. Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    The Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) adopted the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors on 8 March 2004. The Board's action was the culmination of several years of work to develop the Code and obtain a consensus on its provisions. The process leading to the Code began in 1998, when the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) informed the Director General of concerns about the safety of research reactors. In 2000, INSAG recommended that the Secretariat begin developing an international protocol or a similar legal instrument to address those concerns. In September 2000, in resolution GC(44)/RES/14, the General Conference requested the Secretariat ''within its available resources, to continue work on exploring options to strengthen the international nuclear safety arrangements for civil research reactors, taking due account of input from INSAG and the views of other relevant bodies''. A working group convened by the Secretariat pursuant to that request recommended that ''the Agency consider establishing an international action plan for research reactors'' and that the action plan include preparation of a Code of Conduct ''that would clearly establish the desirable attributes for management of research reactor safety''. In September 2001, the Board requested that the Secretariat develop and implement, in conjunction with Member States, an international research reactor safety enhancement plan which included preparation of a Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. Subsequently, in resolution GC(45)/RES/10.A, the General Conference endorsed the Board's request. Pursuant to that request, a Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors was drafted at two meetings of an Open-ended Working Group of Legal and Technical Experts. This draft Code of Conduct was circulated to all Member States for comment. On the basis of the responses received, a revised draft of the Code was prepared by the Secretariat

  3. Current safety issues related to research reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.

    2000-01-01

    The Agency has included activities on research reactor safety in its Programme and Budget (P and B) since its inception in 1957. Since then, these activities have traditionally been oriented to fulfil the Agency's functions and obligations. At the end of the decade of the eighties, the Agency's Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP) consisted of a limited number of tasks related to the preparation of safety related publications and the conduct of safety missions to research reactor facilities. It was at the beginning of the nineties when the RRSP was upgraded and expanded as a subprogramme of the Agency's P and B. This subprogramme continued including activities related to the above subjects and started addressing an increasing number of issues related to the current situation of research reactors (in operation and shut down) around the world such as reactor ageing, modifications and decommissioning. The present paper discusses some of the above issues as recognised by various external review or advisory groups (e.g., Peer Review Groups under the Agency's Performance Programme Appraisal System (PPAS) or the standing International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG)) and the impact of their recommendations on the preparation and implementation of the part of the Agency's P and B relating to the above subject. (author)

  4. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Hauptmanns, Ulrich [Department of Plant Design and Safety, Otto-Von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  5. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Hauptmanns, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  6. Nuclear power reactor safety research activities in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shendi; Huang Yucai; Xu Hanming; Zhang Zhongyue

    1994-01-01

    The power reactor safety research activities in CIAE are briefly reviewed. The research work performed in 1980's and 1990's is mainly emphasised, which is closely related to the design, construction and licensing review of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant and the safety review of Guangdong Nuclear Power Station. Major achievements in the area of thermohydraulics, nuclear fuel, probabilistic safety assessment and severe accident researches are summarized. The foreseeable research plan for the near future, relating to the design and construction of 600 MWe PWR NPP at Qinshan Site (phase II development) is outlined

  7. Research and development program in reactor safety for NUCLEBRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, R.B.; Resende Lobo, A.A. de; Horta, J.A.L.; Avelar Esteves, F. de; Lepecki, W.P.S.; Mohr, K.; Selvatici, E.

    1984-01-01

    With technical assistance from the IAEA, it was established recently an analytical and experimental Research and Development Program for NUCLEBRAS in the area of reactor safety. The main objectives of this program is to make possible, with low investments, the active participation of NUCLEBRAS in international PWR safety research. The analytical and experimental activities of the program are described with some detail, and the main results achieved up to now are presented. (Author) [pt

  8. The nuclear safety case for the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, A.; Garea, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the safety case being used in the licensing of Australia's Replacement Research Reactor. The reactor is a 20 MW pool-type research reactor and is being constructed at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre in Sydney's south. It will be owned and operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and will take over the duties currently performed by HIFAR, a DIDO-type reactor currently operating at the site. The safety case for the RRR considers all aspects of normal operation and anticipated occurrences and will be subject to periodic review and updated in line with evolving methodologies and modifications to plant and procedures. Its scope and degree of detail ensure that the risk posed to members of the public, operators and environment are all adequately low and well in the regulatory limits

  9. Safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In June 1995, an OECD Support Group was set up to perform a broad study of the safety research needs of Russian-designed reactors. This Support Group was endorsed by the CSNI. The Support Group, which is composed of senior experts on safety research from several OECD countries and from Russia, prepared this Report. The Group reviewed the safety research performed to support Russian-designed reactors and set down its views on future needs. The review concentrates on the following main topics: Thermal-Hydraulics/Plant Transients for VVERs; Integrity of Equipment and Structures for VVERs; Severe Accidents for VVERs; Operational Safety Issues; Thermal-Hydraulics/Plant Transients for RBMKs; Integrity of Equipment and Structures for RBMKs; Severe Accidents for RBMKs. (K.A.)

  10. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  11. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D.A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.

    2012-01-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  12. Guidelines for Self-assessment of Research Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    Self-assessment is an organization’s internal process to review its current status, processes and performance against predefined criteria and thereby to provide key elements for the organization’s continual development and improvement. Self-assessment helps the organization to think through what it is expected to do, how it is performing in relation to these expectations, and what it needs to do to improve performance, fulfil the expectations and achieve better compliance with the predefined criteria. This publication provides guidelines for a research reactor operating organization to perform a self-assessment of the safety management and the safety of the facility and to identify gaps between the current situation and the IAEA safety requirements for research reactors. These guidelines also provide a methodology for Member States, regulatory bodies and operating organizations to perform a self-assessment of their application of the provisions of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. This publication also addresses planning, implementation and follow-up of actions to enhance safety and strengthen application of the Code. The guidelines are applicable to all types of research reactor and critical and subcritical assemblies, at all stages in their lifetimes, and to States, regulatory bodies and operating organizations throughout all phases of research reactor programmes. Research reactor operating organizations can use these guidelines at any time to support self-assessments conducted in accordance with the organization’s integrated management system. These guidelines also serve as a tool for an organization to prepare to receive an IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) mission. An important result of this is the opportunity for an operating organization to identify focus areas and make safety improvements in advance of an INSARR mission, thereby increasing the effectiveness of the mission and efficiency of the

  13. Safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors. Requirements situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R. Allan; Holmstrom, Heikki; Reocreux, Michel; Schulz, Helmut; Liesch, Klaus; Santarossa, Giampiero; Hayamizu, Yoshitaka; Asmolov, Vladimir; Bolshov, Leonid; Strizhov, Valerii; Bougaenko, Sergei; Nikitin, Yuri N.; Proklov, Vladimir; Potapov, Alexandre; Kinnersly, Stephen R.; Voronin, Leonid M.; Honekamp, John R.; Frescura, Gianni M.; Maki, Nobuo; Reig, Javier; ); Bekjord, Eric S.; Rosinger, Herbert E.

    1998-01-01

    In June 1995, an OECD Support Group was set up to perform a broad study of the safety research needs of Russian-designed reactors. The emphasis of the study is on the VVER-type reactors in part because of the larger base of knowledge within the NEA Member countries related to LWRs. For the RBMKs, the study does not make the judgement that such reactors can be brought to acceptable levels of safety but focuses on near term efforts that can contribute to reducing the risk to the public. The need for the safety research must be evaluated in context of the lifetime of the reactors. The principal outcome of the work of the Support Group is the identification of a number of research topics which the members believe should receive priority attention over the next several years if risk levels are to be reduced and public safety enhanced. These appear in the Conclusions and Recommendations section of the report, and are the following: - The most important near-term need for VVER and RBMK safety research is to establish a sound technical basis for the emergency operating procedures used by the plant staff to prevent or halt the progression of accidents (i.e., Accident Management) and for plant safety improvements. - Co-operation of Western and Eastern experts should help to avoid East-West know-how gaps in the future, as safety technology continues to improve. - Safety research in Eastern countries will make an important contribution to public safety as it has in OECD countries. - RBMK safety research, including verification of codes, starts from a smaller base of experience than VVER, and is at an earlier stage of development. Technical Conclusions: - Research to improve human performance and operational safety of VVER and RBMK plants is extremely important. - VVER thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics research should focus on full validation of codes to VVER-specific features, and on extension of experimental data base. - Methods of assessing VVER pressure boundary

  14. Research on the reactor physics and reactor safety of VVER reactors. AER Symposium 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliem, S.

    2017-09-15

    The selected paperscan be attributed to the following main subjects: Reactor start-up tests and use of corresponding data for code validation, code development and application, approaches for safety analyses, closure of nuclear fuel cycle, prospective reactor concepts.

  15. Evaluation of the Community's nuclear reactor safety research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Goedkoop, J.A.; Jaumotte, A.; Malhouitre, G.; Tomkins, B.; Zorzoli, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the 1980-85 CEC reactor safety programme prepared, at the invitation of the Commission, by a panel of six independent experts by means of examining the relevant document and by holding hearings with the responsible CEC staff. It contains the recommendations made by the panel on the following topics: the need for the JRC to continue to make its competence in the reactor safety field available to the Community; the importance of continuity in the JRC and shared-cost action programmes; the difficulty of developing reactor safety research programmes which satisfy the needs of users with diverse needs; the monitoring of the utilization of the research results; the maintenance of the JRC computer codes used by the Member States; the spin-off from research results being made available to other industrial sectors; the continued contact between the JRC researchers and the national experts; the coordination of LWR safety research with that of the Member States; and, the JRC work on fast breeders to be planned with regard to the R and D programmes of the Fast Reactor European Consortium

  16. Review of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1977-02-01

    A review is made of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research under way in both commercial power plants and test reactors. Such experiments are grouped in two; first, LWR fuel performance under normal and abnormal operating conditions, and second, irradiation effects on fracture toughness in LWR vessels. In the former are fuel densification, swelling, and the influence of power ramp and cycling on fuel rod, and also fuel rod behavior under accident conditions in in-reactor experiment. In the latter are the effects of neutron exposure level on the ferritic steel of pressure vessels, etc.. (auth.)

  17. Safety Committees for Argentinean Research Reactor - Regulatory Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, Carlos D.

    2009-01-01

    In the field of radiological and nuclear safety, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina controls three research reactors and three critical assemblies, by means of evaluations, audits and inspections, in order to ensure the fulfillment of the requirements established in the Licenses, in the Regulatory Standards and in the Mandatory Documentation in general. From the Nuclear Regulatory Authority's point of view, within the general process of research reactors safety management, the Operational Organization self verification of radiological and nuclear safety plays an outstanding role. In this aspect the ARN has established specific requirements in the Regulatory Standards, in the Operation Licenses and in the Operational Limits and Conditions. These requirements include the figure of different safety committees, which act as reviewers or advisers in diverse situations. This paper describes the main characteristics of the committees, their function, scope and the regulatory documents where the requirements are included. (author)

  18. European community light water reactor safety research projects. Experimental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Research programs on light water reactor safety currently carried out in the European Community are presented. They cover: accident conditions (LOCA, ECCS, core meltdown, external influences, etc...), fault and accident prevention and means of mitigation, normal operation conditions, on and off site implications and equipment under severe accident conditions, and miscellaneous subjects

  19. Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This Safety Guide is a revision of Safety Series No. 35-G2 on safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors. It provides recommendations on meeting the requirements for the categorization, safety assessment and approval of research reactor experiments and modification projects. Specific safety considerations in different phases of utilization and modification projects are covered, including the pre-implementation, implementation and post-implementation phases. Guidance is also provided on the operational safety of experiments, including in the handling, dismantling, post-irradiation examination and disposal of experimental devices. Examples of the application of the safety categorization process for experiments and modification projects and of the content of the safety analysis report for an experiment are also provided. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Management system for the utilization and modification of a research reactor; 3. Categorization, safety assessment and approval of an experiment or modification; 4. Safety considerations for the design of an experiment or modification; 5. Pre-implementation phase of a modification or utilization project; 6. Implementation phase of a modification or utilization project; 7. Post-implementation phase of a utilization or modification project; 8. Operational safety of experiments at a research reactor; 9. Safety considerations in the handling, dismantling, post-irradiation examination and disposal of experimental devices; 10. Safety aspects of out-of-reactor-core installations; Annex I: Example of a checklist for the categorization of an experiment or modification at a research reactor; Annex II: Example of the content of the safety analysis report for an experiment at a research reactor; Annex III: Examples of reasons for a modification at a research reactor.

  20. Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-15

    This Safety Guide is a revision of Safety Series No. 35-G2 on safety in the utilization and modification of research reactors. It provides recommendations on meeting the requirements for the categorization, safety assessment and approval of research reactor experiments and modification projects. Specific safety considerations in different phases of utilization and modification projects are covered, including the pre-implementation, implementation and post-implementation phases. Guidance is also provided on the operational safety of experiments, including in the handling, dismantling, post-irradiation examination and disposal of experimental devices. Examples of the application of the safety categorization process for experiments and modification projects and of the content of the safety analysis report for an experiment are also provided. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Management system for the utilization and modification of a research reactor; 3. Categorization, safety assessment and approval of an experiment or modification; 4. Safety considerations for the design of an experiment or modification; 5. Pre-implementation phase of a modification or utilization project; 6. Implementation phase of a modification or utilization project; 7. Post-implementation phase of a utilization or modification project; 8. Operational safety of experiments at a research reactor; 9. Safety considerations in the handling, dismantling, post-irradiation examination and disposal of experimental devices; 10. Safety aspects of out-of-reactor-core installations; Annex I: Example of a checklist for the categorization of an experiment or modification at a research reactor; Annex II: Example of the content of the safety analysis report for an experiment at a research reactor; Annex III: Examples of reasons for a modification at a research reactor.

  1. Current state of research on pressurized water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Schwarz, Michel; Roubaud, Sebastien; Lavarenne, Caroline; Mattei, Jean-Marie; Rigollet, Laurence; Scotti, Oona; Clement, Christophe; Lancieri, Maria; Gelis, Celine; Jacquemain, Didier; Bentaib, Ahmed; Nahas, Georges; Tarallo, Francois; Guilhem, Gilbert; Cattiaux, Gerard; Durville, Benoit; Mun, Christian; Delaval, Christine; Sollier, Thierry; Stelmaszyk, Jean-Marc; Jeffroy, Francois; Dechy, Nicolas; Chanton, Olivier; Tasset, Daniel; Pichancourt, Isabelle; Barre, Francois; Bruna, Gianni; Evrard, Jean-Michel; Gonzalez, Richard; Loiseau, Olivier; Queniart, Daniel; Vola, Didier; Goue, Georges; Lefevre, Odile

    2018-03-01

    For more than 40 years, IPSN then IRSN has conducted research and development on nuclear safety, specifically concerning pressurized water reactors, which are the reactor type used in France. This publication reports on the progress of this research and development in each area of study - loss-of-coolant accidents, core melt accidents, fires and external hazards, component aging, etc. -, the remaining uncertainties and, in some cases, new measures that should be developed to consolidate the safety of today's reactors and also those of tomorrow. A chapter of this report is also devoted to research into human and organizational factors, and the human and social sciences more generally. All of the work is reviewed in the light of the safety issues raised by feedback from major accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi, as well as the issues raised by assessments conducted, for example, as part of the ten-year reviews of safety at French nuclear reactors. Finally, through the subjects it discusses, this report illustrates the many partnerships and exchanges forged by IRSN with public, industrial and academic bodies both within Europe and internationally

  2. Evaluation of neutronic characteristics of in-pile test reactor for fast reactor safety research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uto, N.; Ohno, S.; Kawata, N. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1996-09-01

    An extensive research program has been carried out at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation for the safety of future liquid-metal fast breeder reactors to be commercialized. A major part of this program is investigation and planning of advanced safety experiments conducted with a new in-pile safety test facility, which is larger and more advanced than any of the currently existing test reactors. Such a transient safety test reactor generally has unique neutronic characteristics that require various studies from the reactor physics point of view. In this paper, the outcome of the neutronics study is highlighted with presenting a reference core design concept and its performance in regard to the safety test objectives. (author)

  3. Classification of research reactors and discussion of thinking of safety regulation based on the classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chenxiu; Zhu Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Research reactors have different characteristics in the fields of reactor type, use, power level, design principle, operation model and safety performance, etc, and also have significant discrepancy in the aspect of nuclear safety regulation. This paper introduces classification of research reactors and discusses thinking of safety regulation based on the classification of research reactors. (authors)

  4. Safety system upgrades to a research reactor: A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarre, G.B.; Martin, W.G.

    2003-01-01

    The NRU (National Research Universal) reactor, located at the Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), first achieved criticality November 3, 1957. AECL continues to operate NRU for research to support safety and reliability studies for CANDU reactors and as a major supplier of medical radioisotopes. Following a detailed systematic review and assessment of NRU's design and the condition of its primary systems, AECL formally notified the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) predecessor - the Atomic Energy Control Board - in 1992 of its intention to upgrade NRU's safety systems. AECL proposed seven major upgrades to provide improvements in shutdown capability, heat removal, confinement, and reactor monitoring, particularly during and after a seismic event. From a CNSC perspective, these upgrades were necessary to meet modern safety standards. From the start of the upgrades project, the CNSC provided regulatory oversight aimed at ensuring that AECL maintained a structured approach to the upgrades. The elements of the approach include, but are not limited to, the determination of project milestones and target dates; the formalization of the design process and project quality assurance requirements; the requirements for updated documentation, including safety reports, safety notes and commissioning reports; and the approval and authorization process. This paper details, from a regulatory perspective, the structured approach used in approving the design, construction, commissioning and subsequent operation of safety system upgrades for an existing and operating research reactor, including the many challenges faced when attempting to balance the requirements of the upgrades project with AECL's need to keep NRU operating to meet its important research and production objectives. (author)

  5. Monitoring and reviewing research reactor safety in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, R.C.; Greenslade, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    Th research reactors operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) comprise the 10 MW reactor HIFAR and the 100 kW reactor Moata. Although there are no power reactors in Australia the problems and issues of public concern which arise in the operation of research reactors are similar to those of power reactors although on a smaller scale. The need for independent safety surveillance has been recognized by the Australian Government and the ANSTO Act, 1987, required the Board of ANSTO to establish a Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) with responsibility to the Minister for monitoring and reviewing the safety of nuclear plant operated by ANSTO. The Executive Director of ANSTO operates HIFAR subject to compliance with requirements and arrangements contained in a formal Authorization from the Board of ANSTO. A Ministerial Direction to the Board of ANSTO requires the NSB to report to him, on a quarterly basis, matters relating to its functions of monitoring and reviewing the safety of ANSTO's nuclear plant. Experience has shown that the Authorization provides a suitable framework for the operational requirements and arrangements to be organised in a disciplined and effective manner, and also provides a basis for audits by the NSB by which compliance with the Board's safety requirements are monitored. Examples of the way in which the NSB undertakes its monitoring and reviewing role are given. Moata, which has a much lower operating power level and fission product inventory than HIFAR, has not been subject to a formal Authorization to date but one is under preparation

  6. Advanced nuclear reactor safety design technology research in NPIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.

    2014-01-01

    After the Fukushima accident happen, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) construction has been suspended in China for a time. Now the new regulatory rule has been proposed that the most advanced safety standard must be adopted for the new NPPs and practical elimination of large fission product release by design during the next five plans period. So the advanced reactor research is developing in China. NPIC is engaging on the ACP1000 and ACP100 (Small Module Reactor) design. The main design character will be introduced in this paper. The Passive Combined with Active (PCWA) design was adopted during the ACP1000 design to reduce the core damage frequency (CDF); the Cavity Injection System (CIS) is design to mitigation the consequence of the severe accident. Advance passive safety system was designed to ensure the long term residual heat removal during the Small Module Reactor (SMR). The SMR will be utilized to be the floating reactors, district heating reactor and so on. Besides, the Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory (LRSDT) also engaged on the fundamental thermal-hydraulic characteristic research in support of the system validation. (author)

  7. French studies and research program in pressurized water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, J.

    1986-06-01

    The aim of researches developed now in France on water reactor safety is to obtain means and knowledge allowing to control accidental situations, including severe situations beyond design basis accidents. The main studies and researches concerning water reactors and described in this report are the following ones: core cooling accident and prevention of severe accidents, fuel behavior in accidental situation, behavior of the containment building, fission product transfer and releases in case of accident, problems related to equipment aging, and, methodology of risk analysis and ''human factor'' studies. Most of these studies follow an analytic approach of phenomena [fr

  8. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  9. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  10. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the use of radioactive materials in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized, and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and requirements for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. This is accomplished within the IAEA Safety Standards Series in an internally consistent set of publications that reflect an international consensus. The publications will provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed publications to assist in the derivation of, and to complement, national criteria, standards and practices. The Safety Standards Series consists of three categories of publications: Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. With respect to the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme, the set of publications is currently undergoing review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Standards Series. This Safety Guide addresses the subject of decommissioning of nuclear power plants and research reactors. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. This Safety Guide has been prepared through a series of Consultants and Technical Committee meetings. It supersedes former Safety Series publications Nos 52, 74 and 105

  11. Safety-related parameters for the MAPLE research reactor and a comparison with the IAEA generic 10-MW research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, P.A.; Lee, A.G.; Smith, H.J.; Ellis, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    A summary is presented of some of the principle safety-related physics parameters for the MAPLE Research Reactor, and a comparison with the IAEA Generic 10-MW Reactor is given. This provides a means to assess the operating conditions and fuelling requirements for safe operation of the MAPLE Research Reactor under accepted standards

  12. Guidelines for the Review of Research Reactor Safety: Revised Edition. Reference Document for IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) is an IAEA safety review service available to Member States with the objective of supporting them in ensuring and enhancing the safety of their research reactors. This service consists of performing a comprehensive peer review and an assessment of the safety of the respective research reactor. The reviews are based on IAEA safety standards and on the provisions of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. The INSARR can benefit both the operating organizations and the regulatory bodies of the requesting Member States, and can include new research reactors under design or operating research reactors, including those which are under a Project and Supply Agreement with the IAEA. The first IAEA safety evaluation of a research reactor operated by a Member State was completed in October 1959 and involved the Swiss 20 MW DIORIT research reactor. Since then, and in accordance with its programme on research reactor safety, the IAEA has conducted safety review missions in its Member States to enhance the safety of their research reactor facilities through the application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors and the relevant IAEA safety standards. About 320 missions in 51 Member States were undertaken between 1972 and 2012. The INSARR missions and other limited scope safety review missions are conducted following the guidelines presented in this publication, which is a revision of Guidelines for the Review of Research Reactor Safety (IAEA Services Series No. 1), published in December 1997. This publication details those IAEA safety standards and guidance publications relevant to the safety of research reactors that have been revised or published since 1997. The purpose of this publication is to give guidance on the preparation, implementation, reporting and follow-up of safety review missions. It is also intended to be of assistance to operators and regulators in conducting

  13. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel; Agostinho Angelo Sordi, Gian Maria; Moralles, Mauricio; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64.

  14. A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, V. M.; Sordi, G. M. A. A.; Moralles, M.; Filho, T. M.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to evaluate the potential risks of incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were used: the Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) and the Incident Report System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). For this study, the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was used. To obtain the result of the probability calculations for PSA, the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC-636 were used. A specific program to analyse the probabilities was developed within the main program, Scilab 5.1.1. for two distributions, Fischer and chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90 %. Using Sordi equations, the maximum admissible doses to compare with the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were obtained. All results achieved with this probability analysis led to the conclusion that the incidents which occurred had radiation doses within the stochastic effects reference interval established by the ICRP-64. (authors)

  15. Thermal hydraulic and safety analyses for Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, I.H.; Israr, M.; Pervez, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic and safety analysis of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel have been performed using computer code PARET. The present core comprises of 29 standard and 5 control fuel elements. Results of the thermal hydraulic analysis show that the core can be operated at a steady-state power level of 10 MW for a flow rate of 950 m 3 /h, with sufficient safety margins against ONB (onset of nucleate boiling) and DNB (departure from nucleate boiling). Safety analysis has been carried out for various modes of reactivity insertions. The events studied include: start-up accident; accidental drop of a fuel element in the core; flooding of a beam tube with water; removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation etc. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released and clad surface temperature etc. were calculated. The results indicate that the peak clad temperatures remain well below the clad melting temperature during these accidents. It is therefore concluded that the reactor can be safely operated at 10 MW without compromising safety. (author)

  16. Some considerations for assurance of reactor safety from experiences in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Sunao; Nishihara, Hideaki; Shibata, Toshikazu

    1981-01-01

    For the purpose of assuring reactor safety and strengthening research in the related fields, a multi-disciplinary group was formed among university researchers, including social scientists, with a special allocation of the Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. An excerpt from the first year's report (1979 -- 1980) is edited here, which contains an interpretation of Murphy's reliability engineering law, a scope of reactor diagnostic studies to be pursued at universities, and safety measures already implemented or suggested to be implemented in university research reactors. (author)

  17. Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, Matthew; Lachance, Jeff; Sofu, Tanju; Wigeland, Roald; Flanagan, George; Bari, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan reports conclude a multi-year expert elicitation process. All information included in the studies are publicly available and the reports are UUR. These reports are intended to guide SFR researchers in the safety and licensing arena to important and outstanding issues Two (and a half) projects have been funded based on the recommendations in this report: • Modernization of SAS4A; • Incorporation of Contain/LMR with MELCOR; • (Data recovery at INL and PNNL)

  18. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hanson, A. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, L-Y [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cuadra, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  19. Panel plenary session: Status and future needs in the field of reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finzi, S.; Cicognani, G.; Heusener, G.; Geijzers, H.F.G.; Alonso-Santos, A.; Holtbecker, H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Status and future needs in the field of reactor safety research. Overviews are given of the nuclear programme in France and the Netherlands. Spanish and Italian reactor safety research both current and for the future is outlined. LWR safety and the continuation of the establishment of safety standards particularly for LMFBR reactors is discussed. The new framework for the research in reactor safety by the Commission of the European Communities for 1990-1994 is outlined. The discussion which followed is reported. (UK)

  20. Safety analysis calculations for research and test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S Y; MacDonald, R; MacFarlane, D [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1983-08-01

    The goal of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactor) Program at ANL is to provide technical means for conversion of research and test reactors from HEU (High-Enrichment Uranium) to LEU (Low-Enrichment Uranium) fuels. In exploring the feasibility of conversion, safety considerations are a prime concern; therefore, safety analyses must be performed for reactors undergoing the conversion. This requires thorough knowledge of the important safety parameters for different types of reactors for both HEU and LEU fuel. Appropriate computer codes are needed to predict transient reactor behavior under postulated accident conditions. In this discussion, safety issues for the two general types of reactors i.e., the plate-type (MTR-type) reactor and the rod-type (TRIGA-type) reactor, resulting from the changes associated with LEU vs. HEU fuels, are explored. The plate-type fuels are typically uranium aluminide (UAl{sub x}) compounds dispersed in aluminum and clad with aluminum. Moderation is provided by the water coolant. Self shut-down reactivity coefficients with EU fuel are entirely a result of coolant heating, whereas with LEU fuel there is an additional shut down contribution provided by the direct heating of the fuel due to the Doppler coefficient. In contrast, the rod-type (TRIGA) fuels are mixtures of zirconium hydride, uranium, and erbium. This fuel mixture is formed into rods ( {approx} 1 cm diameter) and clad with stainless steel or Incoloy. In the TRIGA fuel the self-shutdown reactivity is more complex, depending on heating of the fuel rather than the coolant. The two most important mechanisms in providing this feedback are: spectral hardening due to neutron interaction with the ZrH moderator as it is heated and Doppler broadening of resonances in erbium and U-238. Since these phenomena result directly from heating of the fuel, and do not depend on heat transfer to the moderator/coolant, the coefficients are prompt acting. Results of transient

  1. Thirteenth water reactor safety research information meeting: proceedings Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1986-02-01

    This six-volume report contains 151 papers out of the 178 that were presented at the Thirteenth Water Reactor Safety Research Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 22-25, 1985. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included thirty-one different papers presented by researchers from Japan, Canada and eight European countries. The title of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume presents information on: risk analysis PRA application; severe accident sequence analysis; risk analysis/dependent failure analysis; and industry safety research

  2. Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system -Research on the improvement of nuclear safety-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Park, Chun Kyeong; Yang, Seon Kyu; Chung, Chang Hwan; Chun, Shee Yeong; Song, Cheol Hwa; Chun, Hyeong Gil; Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yeon; Cho, Yeong Ro; Kim, Bok Deuk; Min, Kyeong Ho

    1994-07-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the reactor safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. (Author)

  3. A plan for safety and integrity of research reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moatty, Mona S. Abdel; Khattab, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A plan for in-service inspection of research reactor components is put. ► Section XI of the ASME Code requirements is applied. ► Components subjected to inspection and their classes are defined. ► Flaw evaluation and its acceptance–rejection criteria are reviewed. ► A plan of repair or replacement is prepared. -- Abstract: Safety and integrity of a research reactor that has been operated over 40 years requires frequent and thorough inspection of all the safety-related components of the facility. The need of increasing the safety is the need of improving the reliability of its systems. Diligent and extensive planning of in-service inspection (ISI) of all reactor components has been imposed for satisfying the most stringent safety requirements. The Safeguards Officer's responsibilities of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code ASME Code have been applied. These represent the most extensive and time-consuming part of ISI program, and identify the components subjected to inspection and testing, methods of component classification, inspection and testing techniques, acceptance/rejection criteria, and the responsibilities. The paper focuses on ISI planning requirements for welded systems such as vessels, piping, valve bodies, pump casings, and control rod-housing parts. The weld in integral attachments for piping, pumps, and valves are considered too. These are taken in consideration of safety class (1, 2, 3, etc.), reactor age, and weld type. The parts involve in the frequency of inspection, the examination requirements for each inspection, the examination method are included. Moreover the flaw evaluation, the plan of repair or replacement, and the qualification of nondestructive examination personnel are considered

  4. Reactor safety research and development in Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitheanandan, T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories provides three different services to stakeholders and customers. The first service provided by the laboratory is the implementation of Research and Development (R&D) programs to provide the underlying technological basis of safe nuclear power reactor designs. A significant portion of the Canadian R&D capability in reactor safety resides at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories, and this capability was instrumental in providing the science and technology required to aid in the safety design of CANDU power reactors. The second role of the laboratory has been in supporting nuclear facility licensees to ensure the continued safe operation of nuclear facilities, and to develop safety cases to justify continued operation. The licensing of plant life extension is a key industry objective, requiring extensive research on degradation mechanisms, such that safety cases are based on the original safety design data and valid and realistic assumptions regarding the effect of ageing and management of plant life. Recently, Chalk River Laboratories has been engaged in a third role in research to provide the technical basis and improved understanding for decision making by regulatory bodies. The state-of-the-art test facilities in Chalk River Laboratories have been contributing to the R&D needs of all three roles, not only in Canada but also in the international community, thorough Canada's participation in cooperative programs lead by International Atomic Energy Agency and the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency. (author)

  5. Safety Management and Safety Culture Self Assessment of Kartini Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip, S., E-mail: syarip@batan.go.id [Centre for Accelerator and Material Process Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2014-10-15

    The self-assessment of safety culture and safety management status of Kartini research reactor is a step to foster safety culture and management by identifying good practices and areas for improvement, and also to improve reactor safety in a whole. The method used in this assessment is based on questionnaires provided by the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), then reviewed by experts. Based on the assessment and evaluation results, it can be concluded that there were several good practices in maintaining the safety status of Kartini reactor such as: reactor operators and radiation protection workers were aware and knowledgeable of the safety standards and policies that apply to their operation, readily accept constructive criticism from their management and from the inspectors of regulatory body that address safety performance. As a proof, for the last four years the number of inspection/audit findings from Regulatory Body (BAPETEN) tended to decrease while the reactor utilization and its operating hour increased. On the other hands there were also some comments and recommendations for improvement of reactor safety culture, such as that there should be more frequent open dialogues between employees and managers, to grow and attain a mutual support to achieve safety goals. (author)

  6. German Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seipel, H.G.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rittig, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program, which is part of the energy program of the Federal Republic of Germany, is presented in this article. The program, for which the Federal Minister of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany is responsible, is subdivided into the following four main problem areas, which in turn are subdivided into projects: (1) improvement of the operational safety and reliability of systems and components (projects: quality assurance, component safety); (2) analysis of the consequences of accidents (projects: emergency core cooling, containment, external impacts, pressure-vessel failure, core meltdown); (3) analysis of radiation exposure during operation, accident, and decommissioning (project: fission-product transport and radiation exposure); and (4) analysis of the risk created by the operation of nuclear power plants (project: risk and reliability). Various problems, which are included in the above-mentioned projects, are concurrently studied within the Heiss-Dampf Reaktor experiments

  7. Points of emphasis and objectives of reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewer, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor safety research is part of the presently running second programme on energy research and energy-engineering with which the Federal Government is connecting a whole bundle of economic and ecological aims: medium- and long-term assurance of energy supply, provision and efficient utilization of energy at favourable economic total costs, improvement of the technological performance, consideration of the requirements of the environmental protection, of the careful treatment of the resources, as well as of the protection of the population and personnel from the risks of conversion and use of energy. (orig.) [de

  8. Safety and regulatory researches on the SMART reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Wee Kyong; Chang, Moo Hee

    2000-01-01

    The 330 MW thermal power of integral pressurized water reactor, named SMART (System integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), is under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for seawater desalination application and electricity generation. The plant is expected to install near the population zone. Thus, the public around the plant should be in depth protected from the possible release of radioactive materials, and also the fresh water should be prevented from radioactivity contamination. Currently, in parallel with the design development, the regulatory research is being conducted to identify and resolve the safety concerns of the nuclear desalination plant. Until now, some general items to be considered in the safety aspects have been identified for the conceptual design of SMART. They include the use of proven technology, application of strengthening defense-in-depth, event categorization and selection, effects of desalination plant, and maintainability of major components. These cooperative researches with regulatory body in the design stage are expected to provide an opportunity to early resolve the safety concerns and eventually the licensing stability of the SMART design. (author)

  9. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.; Hoshi, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Fujishiro, T.; Inabe, T.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental research program, named Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) Program, has been progressing in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a modified TRIGA-ACPR. This paper is prepared to describe the outline of the NSRR program. The purpose of the NSRR program is to examine the behaviors of fuel rods under various accidental conditions of power reactors so as to establish realistic safety criteria and to develop analytical models for prediction of fuel failures. We expect to contribute finally to the improvement of reactor design and fuel fabrication techniques based on these experimental results. The NSRR experiments will be performed in the large central experimental tube, which is one of the most excellent features of this reactor, using specially designed capsules or loops which can accommodate up to 49 BWR type test fuels. Many types of test fuels in various conditions will be examined by the NSRR program, such as BWR, PWR and FBR type fuels from the beginning of life to the end of life with and without simulated reactor internal structures. The experiments will be continued for more than 10 years divided into three phases. The first phase of the program will be devoted to the experiments pertaining to reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). In these experiments we will make use of the excellent pulsing capability of ACPR, which is expected to generate 100 MW-sec prompt energy release with 1.3 msec of minimum reactor period by 4.7 dollar reactivity insertion and to yield more than 280 cal/g-UO 2 heat deposit even in an approximately 10% enriched BWR type test fuel. (280 cal/g-UO 2 is believed enough heat deposit to cause fuel failure.) In general, heat flow behaviors from fuel meat to clad and from clad to coolant are very complex phenomena, but they are the key point in analyzing transient response of fuels. In the sudden heat transient conditions brought by pulsing, however, it will be possible to examine each phenomenon separately

  10. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, M; Hoshi, T; Ohnishi, N; Fujishiro, T; Inabe, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    1974-07-01

    An experimental research program, named Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) Program, has been progressing in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a modified TRIGA-ACPR. This paper is prepared to describe the outline of the NSRR program. The purpose of the NSRR program is to examine the behaviors of fuel rods under various accidental conditions of power reactors so as to establish realistic safety criteria and to develop analytical models for prediction of fuel failures. We expect to contribute finally to the improvement of reactor design and fuel fabrication techniques based on these experimental results. The NSRR experiments will be performed in the large central experimental tube, which is one of the most excellent features of this reactor, using specially designed capsules or loops which can accommodate up to 49 BWR type test fuels. Many types of test fuels in various conditions will be examined by the NSRR program, such as BWR, PWR and FBR type fuels from the beginning of life to the end of life with and without simulated reactor internal structures. The experiments will be continued for more than 10 years divided into three phases. The first phase of the program will be devoted to the experiments pertaining to reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). In these experiments we will make use of the excellent pulsing capability of ACPR, which is expected to generate 100 MW-sec prompt energy release with 1.3 msec of minimum reactor period by 4.7 dollar reactivity insertion and to yield more than 280 cal/g-UO{sub 2} heat deposit even in an approximately 10% enriched BWR type test fuel. (280 cal/g-UO{sub 2} is believed enough heat deposit to cause fuel failure.) In general, heat flow behaviors from fuel meat to clad and from clad to coolant are very complex phenomena, but they are the key point in analyzing transient response of fuels. In the sudden heat transient conditions brought by pulsing, however, it will be possible to examine each phenomenon

  11. State of arts and outlook of research reactor safety management promoted by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaofeng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the recent activities of IAEA on the research reactor safety, and the trends in the future. According to the present situation of national research reactors, some suggestions are proposed for the cooperation with IAEA on research reactor safety. (author)

  12. Research reactor management. Safety improvement activities in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jong-Sup; Jung, Hoan-Sung; Hong, Sung Taek; Ahn, Guk-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Safety activities in HANARO have been continuously conducted to enhance its safe operation. Great effort has been placed on a normalization and improvement of the safety attitude of the regular staff and other employees working at the reactor and other experimental facilities. This paper introduces the activities on safety improvement that were performed over the last few years. (author)

  13. Outline of the safety research results, in the power reactor field, fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has promoted the safety research in fiscal year of 1996 according to the Fundamental Research on Safety Research (fiscal year 1996 to 2000) prepared on March, 1996. Here is described on the research results in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5 years programme, and whole outline of the fundamental research on safety research, on the power reactor field (whole problems on the new nuclear converter and the fast breeder reactor field and problems relating to the power reactor in the safety for earthquake and probability theoretical safety evaluation field). (G.K.)

  14. Application of probabilistic safety assessment to research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This document has been prepared to assist in the performance of a research reactor probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). It offers examples of experience gained by a number of Member States in carrying out PSA for research reactors. These examples are illustrative of the types of approach adopted, the problems that arise and the judgements entered into when conducting a PSA. The illustrative examples of experiences gained are discussed in a series of thirteen chapters which address some of the issues that arise in a PSA. The examples are not exhaustive and offer evidence of how other analyses have approached the task of preparing a PSA, for their particular plant. The principles should be capable of being utilised and the various issues which are discussed should be translated into the needs of the analyst. Each PSA will make its own demands on the analyst depending on the reactor and so the illustrations must only be used as guidance and not adopted as published, without critical appreciation. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Current Status of Periodic Safety Review of HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjin; Ahn, Guk-Hoon; Lee, Choong Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A PSR for a research reactor became a legal requirement as the Nuclear Safety Act was amended and came into effect in 2014. This paper describes the current status and methodology of the first Periodic Safety Review (PSR) of HANARO that is being performed. The legal requirements, work plan, and process of implementing a PSR are described. Because this is the first PSR for a research reactor, it is our understating that the operating organization and regulatory body should communicate well with each other to complete the PSR in a timely manner. The first PSR of HANARO is under way. In order to achieve a successful result, activities of the operation organization such as scheduling, maintaining consistency in input data for review, and reviewing the PSR reports that will require intensive resources should be well planned. This means the operating organization needs to incorporate appropriate measures to ensure the transfer of knowledge and expertise arising from the PSR via a contractor to the operation organization. It is desirable for the Regulatory Body to be involved in all stage of the PSR to prevent any waste of resources and minimize the potential for a reworking of the PSR and the need for an additional assessment and review as recommended by foreign experts.

  16. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  17. Safety features and research needs of westinghouse advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Winters, J.W.; Cummins, W.E.; Bruschi, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The three Westinghouse advanced reactors - AP600, AP1000 and IRIS - are at different levels of readiness. AP600 has received a Design Certification, its larger size version AP1000 is currently in the design certification process and IRIS has just completed its conceptual design and will initiate soon a licensing pre-application. The safety features of the passive designs AP600/AP1000 are presented, followed by the features of the more revolutionary IRIS, a small size modular integral reactor. A discussion of the IRIS safety by design approach is given. The AP600/AP1000 design certification is backed by completed testing and development which is summarized, together with a research program currently in progress which will extend AP600 severe accident test data to AP1000 conditions. While IRIS will of course rely on applicable AP600/1000 data, a very extensive testing campaign is being planned to address all the unique aspects of its design. Finally, IRIS plans to use a risk-informed approach in its licensing process. (authors)

  18. Operational safety experience at 14 MW research reactor from Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.

    2007-01-01

    The main challenges identified in TRIGA Research Reactor operated in Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti, Romania, are in fact similar with challenges of many other research reactors in the world, those are: Ageing of work forces and knowledge management; Maintaining an enhanced technical and scientific competences; Ensuring adequate financial and human resources; Enhancing excellence in management; Ensuring confidence of stakeholders and public; Ageing of equipment and systems.To ensure safety availability of TRIGA Research Reactor in INR Pitesti, the financial resources were secured and a large refurbishment programme and modernization was undertaking by management of institute. This programme concern the modernization of reactor control and safety systems, primary cooling system instrumentation, radiation protection and releases monitoring with new spectrometric computerized abilities, ventilation filtering system and cooling towers. The expected life extension of the reactor will be about 15 years

  19. PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHENG, L.; HANSON, A.; DIAMOND, D.; XU, J.; CAREW, J.; RORER, D.

    2004-01-01

    Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D 2 O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed with the MCNP code to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim safety arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim safety arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the core

  20. Nuclear reactor safety research since Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynatt, F.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially

  1. Nuclear reactor safety research since three mile island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynatt, F R

    1982-04-09

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially.

  2. Research reactors for the social safety and prosperous neutron use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    The present status of nuclear reactors in Japan and the world was briefly described in this report. Aiming to construct a background of stable future society dependent on nuclear energy, the necessity to establish an organization for research reactors in Japan was pointed out. There are a total of 468 reactors in the world, but only 248 of them are running at present and most of them are superannuated. In Japan, 15 research reactors are running and 8 of them are under collaborative utilization, but not a few of them have various problems. In the education of atomic energy, a reactor is dispensable for understanding its working principle through practice learning. Furthermore, a research reactor has important roles for development of power reactor in addition to various basic studies such as activation analysis, fission track, biological irradiation, neutron scattering, etc. Application of a reactor has been also progressing in industrial and medical fields. However, operation of the reactors has become more and more difficult in Japan because of a large running cost and a lack of residential consensus for nuclear reactor. Here, the author proposed an establishment of organization of research reactor in order to promote utilization of a reactor in the field of education, rearing of professionals and science and engineering. (M.N.)

  3. Probabilistic safety assessment of the PLUTO Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, J.F.; Coates, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary finding of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) carried out in support of a licensing submission are presented. The research reactor, a 25 MW highly enriched thermal reactor moderated and cooled by D 2 O, is housed in a steel containment building equipped with an active extract system to mitigate any possible release. A full PSA (to level 3) was performed based on the current operational plant making as much use of the plant operational records as possible. A medium sized event tree-fault tree approach was used to allow realistic modelling of operator actions. For reasons of practicality only plant damage states of core melt, fuel damage, and tritium release were defined, all release accident sequences being assigned to one of these states. Prior to discharge to the environment the releases were further sub-divided dependent upon the success of the active extract system. The individual and societal risks were calculated taking account of meterological and demographic conditions. The provisional results indicate that the core melt frequency is in the region of 1 x 10 -4 /yr, the dominant contributor being an unisolatable gross leakage beyond the capabilities of the recovery systems. The core melt frequency is comparable with those of power reactors of a similar age; however, the core inventory and hence release is much smaller; therefore the consequences are much reduced. The risk to an individual at any fixed location 100 m from the plant is assessed as 1 x 10 -6 ; the societal risk is estimated as 6 x 10 -4 . The main contributor to the dose received is from the released iodine. Additional benefit is being obtained from the PSA in several ways: the insights obtained into the function and operation are being incorporated into the operational safety document, whilst the source term results are being used to assist in the refurbishment/improvement of the active extract system

  4. NRC/DAE reactor safety research Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    In 1976, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. This program has since grown from the conceptual stage to a useful, usable service for computer code development, code assessment, and experimentation groups in meeting the needs of the nuclear industry. Data from 20 facilities are now processed and permanently stored in the Data Bank, which utilizes the Control Data Corporation (CDC) CYBER 176 computer system located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). New data and data sources are continually being added to the Data Bank. In addition to providing data storage and access software, the Data Bank program supplies data entry, documentation, and training and advisory services to users and the NRC. Management of the NRC/DAE Data Bank is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc

  5. Activities on safety for the cross-cutting issue of research reactors in the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Boado Magan, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety and implemented by the Engineering Safety Section through its Research Reactor Safety Unit. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities are discussed in this paper: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOCs); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the (Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors) INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors developed, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors conducted in the year 2002 and the results obtained. (author)

  6. Application of fuzzy set theory for safety culture and safety management assessment of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Hauptmanns, U.

    2000-01-01

    The safety culture status of nuclear power plant is usually assessed through interview and/or discussions with personnel and management in plant, and an assessment of the pertinent documentation. The approach for safety culture assessment described in IAEA Safety Series, make uses of a questionnaire composed of questions which require 'Yes' or 'No' as an answer. Hence, it is basically a check-list approach which is quite common for safety assessments in industry. Such a procedure ignores the fact that the expert answering the question usually has knowledge which goes far beyond a mere binary answer. Additionally, many situations cannot readily be described in such restricted terms. Therefore, it was developed a checklist consisting of questions which are formulated such that they require more than a simple 'yes' or 'no' as an answer. This allows one to exploit the expert knowledge of the analyst appropriately by asking him to qualify the degree of compliance of each of the topics examined. The method presented has proved useful in assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of the research reactor. The safety culture status and the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is rated as 'average'. The method is also flexible and allows one to add questions to existing areas or to introduce new areas covering related topics

  7. Proceedings of the international symposium on research reactor safety operations and modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The International Symposium on Research Reactor Safety, Operations and Modifications was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in cooperation with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited-Research Company. The main objectives of this Symposium were: (1) to exchange information and to discuss current perspectives and concerns relating to all aspects to research reactor safety, operations, and modifications; and, (2) to present views and to discuss future initiatives and directions for research reactor design, operations, utilization, and safety. The symposium topics included: research reactor programmes and experience; research reactor design safety and analysis; research reactor modifications and decommissioning; research reactor licensing; and new research reactors. These topics were covered during eight oral sessions and three poster sessions. These Proceedings include the full text of the 93 papers presented. The subject of Symposium was quite wide-ranging in that it covered essentially all aspects of research reactor safety, operations, and modifications. This was considered to be appropriate and timely given the 326 research reactors currently in operation in some 56 countries; given the degree of their utilization which ranges from pure and applied research to radioisotopes production to basic training and manpower development; and given that many of these reactors are undergoing extensive modifications, core conversions, power upratings, and are becoming the subject of safety reassessment and regulatory reviews. Although the Symposium covered many topics, the majority of papers and discussions tended to focus mainly on research reactor safety. This was seen as a clear sign of the continuing recognition of the fundamental importance of identifying and addressing, particularly through international cooperation, issues and concerns associated with research reactor safety

  8. Safety requirements in the design of research reactors: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Langman, V.J.

    2000-01-01

    In Canada, the formal development of safety requirements for the design of research reactors in general began under an inter-organizational Small Reactor Criteria Committee. This committee developed safety and licensing criteria for use by several small reactor projects in their licensing discussions with the Atomic Energy Control Board. The small reactor projects or facilities represented included the MAPLE-X10 reactor, the proposed SES-10 heating reactor and its prototype, the SDR reactor at the Whiteshell Laboratories, the Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (a.k.a., HANARO) in Korea, the SCORE project, and the McMaster University Nuclear Reactor. The top level set of criteria which form a safety philosophy and serve as a framework for more detailed developments was presented at an IAEA Conference in 1989. AECL continued this work to develop safety principles and design criteria for new small reactors. The first major application of this work has been to the design, safety analysis and licensing of the MAPLE 1 and 2 reactors for the MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor Project. This paper provides an overview of the safety principles and design criteria. Examples of an implementation of these safety principles and design criteria are drawn from the work to design the MAPLE 1 and 2 reactors. (author)

  9. International symposium on research reactor utilization, safety and management. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Symposium, considered as an important meeting of the owners and operators of research reactors as well as scientists concerned with problems of research reactors operation, management and safety covered the following topics: global and regional overview of research reactors, research reactors utilisation, research reactors safety, research reactors management, research reactors engineering. IAEA Research Reactors Database (RRDB) contains data concerning 291 operational research reactors, 247 shutdown reactors, 106 decommissioned reactors, 15 under construction and 15 new reactors planned. There is quite an even distribution of operational research reactors among 58 countries. Although about 66% of operational research reactors described in the RRDB are over 30 years old, the number of research reactors under construction or planned appears to have increased in recent years. According to the RRDB, the major applications of research reactors are in the field of neutron activation analysis, isotope production and neutron scattering work. Great concern was shown for several aspects of research reactors safety, especially since the average age of the operating research reactors is almost 30 years. Ageing problems involve more than the degradation of properties of the materials. Issues such as outdated equipment, lack of spare parts, outdating of the control and documentation systems related to the reactor, as well as budgetary limitations, affect the safety of some reactors. There are serious problems related to the spent fuel condition and the ageing of fuel storage facilities, in particular corrosion and leakage. The outstanding issues of concern are life extension of the spent fuel storage facilities and the future of take-back programmes of foreign research reactor fuels that will not be continued. A number of discussions related to safety requirements were focused on licensing and regulatory issues, especially in the case of older research reactors and those

  10. International symposium on research reactor utilization, safety and management. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The Symposium, considered as an important meeting of the owners and operators of research reactors as well as scientists concerned with problems of research reactors operation, management and safety covered the following topics: global and regional overview of research reactors, research reactors utilisation, research reactors safety, research reactors management, research reactors engineering. IAEA Research Reactors Database (RRDB) contains data concerning 291 operational research reactors, 247 shutdown reactors, 106 decommissioned reactors, 15 under construction and 15 new reactors planned. There is quite an even distribution of operational research reactors among 58 countries. Although about 66% of operational research reactors described in the RRDB are over 30 years old, the number of research reactors under construction or planned appears to have increased in recent years. According to the RRDB, the major applications of research reactors are in the field of neutron activation analysis, isotope production and neutron scattering work. Great concern was shown for several aspects of research reactors safety, especially since the average age of the operating research reactors is almost 30 years. Ageing problems involve more than the degradation of properties of the materials. Issues such as outdated equipment, lack of spare parts, outdating of the control and documentation systems related to the reactor, as well as budgetary limitations, affect the safety of some reactors. There are serious problems related to the spent fuel condition and the ageing of fuel storage facilities, in particular corrosion and leakage. The outstanding issues of concern are life extension of the spent fuel storage facilities and the future of take-back programmes of foreign research reactor fuels that will not be continued. A number of discussions related to safety requirements were focused on licensing and regulatory issues, especially in the case of older research reactors and those

  11. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-05-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  12. Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, M.; Lachance, J.; Sofu, T.; Bari, R.; Flanagon, G.; Wigeland, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes potential research priorities for the US Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety related gaps in the available information, data and models needed to support the licensing of an SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology; accident sequences and initiators; source term characterization, codes and methods; and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this paper to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the applied technology access control designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust knowledge management and preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with applied technology and knowledge management. (author)

  13. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofu, Tanju; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R.; Wigeland, Roald; Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F.

    2012-01-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  14. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    type of reactors: low power reactors, graphite and natural uranium reactors, heavy water and natural uranium reactors (with water, gas or heavy water as coolant), heavy water and enriched uranium reactors, 'kettle' type reactors, pool type reactors and high power reactors. Finally, additional factors are considered as the correlation of the reactor type with the research program, safety considerations, size of the construction and economical considerations. (M.P.)

  15. Application of Code Of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligam, A.S.; Ahmad Nabil Abd Rahim; Zarina Masood

    2014-01-01

    The implementation and the practices of the effective safety system at research reactors are important to ensure that the worker, public and environment do not receive any abnormal causes. Many international safety related support agencies for research reactor such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) providing guidelines that can be applied to enhance and strengthen the enforcement of safety namely Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor (IAEA/CODEOC/RR/2006). The excellent safety management, reliability, and maintainability of RTP reactor structures, coupled with personnel numerous lessons and experiences learned, Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI research reactor providing Nuclear Malaysia personnel and visitor the very safe working and visiting environment. This paper will discuss the status, practices and improvement strategies over the past few years. (author)

  16. List of reports in reactor safety research by BMFT, EPRI, JSTA, and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from the United States of America and from Japan concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Safety classification of systems, structures, and components for pool-type research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ryong [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety of nuclear facilities shall be designed, fabricated, erected, and tested to quality standards commensurate with the importance of the safety functions. Although SSC classification guidelines for nuclear power plants have been well established and applied, those for research reactors have been only recently established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Korea has operated a pool-type research reactor (the High Flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) and has recently exported another pool-type reactor (Jordan Research and Training Reactor), which is being built in Jordan. Korea also has a plan to build one more pool-type reactor, the Kijang Research Reactor, in Kijang, Busan. The safety classification of SSCs for pool-type research reactors is proposed in this paper based on the IAEA methodology. The proposal recommends that the SSCs of pool-type research reactors be categorized and classified on basis of their safety functions and safety significance. Because the SSCs in pool-type research reactors are not the pressure-retaining components, codes and standards for design of the SSCs following the safety classification can be selected in a graded approach.

  18. Reactor core conversion studies of Ghana: Research Reactor-1 and proposal for addition of safety rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odoi, H.C.

    2014-06-01

    The inclusion of an additional safety rod in conjunction with a core conversion study of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) was carried out using neutronics, thermal hydraulics and burnup codes. The study is based on a recommendation by Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARP) mission to incorporate a safety rod to the reactor safety system as well as the need to replace the reactor fuel with LEU. Conversion from one fuel type to another requires a complete re-evaluation of the safety analysis. Changes to the reactivity worth, shutdown margin, power density and material properties must be taken into account, and appropriate modifications made. Neutronics analysis including burnup was studied followed by thermal hydraulics analyses which comprise steady state and transients. Four computer codes were used for the analysis; MCNP, REBUS, PLTEP and PARET. The neutronics analysis revealed that the LEU core must be operated at 34 Kw in order to attain the flux of 1.0E12 n/cm 2 .s as the nominal flux of the HEU core. The auxiliary safety rod placed at a modified irradiation site gives a better worth than the cadmium capsules. For core excess reactivity of 4 mk, 348 fuel pins would be appropriate for the GHARR-1 LEU core. Results indicate that flux level of 1.0E12 n/cm 2 .s in the inner irradiation channel will not be compromised, if the power of the LEU core is increased to 34 kW. The GHARR-1 core using LEU-U0 2 -12.5% fuel can be operated for 23 shim cycles, with cycles length 2.5 years, for over 57 years at the 17 kW power level. All 23 LEU cycles meet the ∼ 4.0 mk excess reactivity required at the beginning of cycle . For comparison, the MNSR HEU reference core can also be operated for 23 shim cycles, but with a cycle length of 2.0 years for just over 46 years at 15.0kW power level. It is observed that the GHARR-1 core with LEU UO 2 fuel enriched to 12.5% and a power level of 34 kW can be operated ∼25% longer than the current HEU core operated at

  19. Artificial neural network for research reactor safety status monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varde, P.V.

    2001-01-01

    During reactor upset/abnormal conditions, emphasis is placed on plant operator's ability to quickly identify the problem and perform diagnosis and initiate recovery action to ensure safety of the plant. However, the reliability of human action is adversely affected at the time of crisis, due to the time stress and psychological factors. Availability of operational aids capable of monitoring the status of the plant and quickly identifying the deviation from normal operation is expected to significantly improve the operator reliability. Artificial Neural Network (based on Back Propagation Algorithm) has been developed and applied for reactor safety status monitoring, as part of an Operator Support System. ANN has been trained for 14 different plant states using 42 input symptom patterns. Recall tests performed on the ANN show that the system was able to identify the plant state with reasonable accuracy. (author)

  20. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.

    The people of Ontario have begun to receive the benefits of a low cost, assured supply of electrical energy from CANDU nuclear stations. This indigenous energy source also has excellent safety characteristics. Safety has been one of the central themes of the CANDU development program from its very beginning. A great deal of work has been done to establish that public risks are small. However, safety design criteria are now undergoing extensive review, with a real prospect of more stringent requirements being applied in the future. Considering the newness of the technology it is not surprising that a consensus does not yet exist; this makes it imperative to discuss the issues. It is time to examine the policies and practice of reactor safety management in Canada to decide whether or not further restrictions are justified in the light of current knowledge

  1. Buff book 1: status summary report, water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Management Report, to provide information for monitoring and controlling the progress of LWR Safety Research Projects Associated with the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and other agencies and organizations engaged in nuclear safety research. It utilizes data pertaining to project schedules, cost, and status which have been integrated into a network-based management information system, The purpose of this publication is to provide a vehicle for review of the current status and overall progress of the safety Research Program from a managerial point of view

  2. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of two main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  3. Water reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsors confirmatory safety research on lightwater reactors in support of the NRC regulatory program. The principal responsibility of the NRC, as implemented through its regulatory program is to ensure that public health, public safety, and the environment are adequately protected. The NRC performs this function by defining conditions for the use of nuclear power and by ensuring through technical review, audit, and follow-up that these conditions are met. The NRC research program provides technical information, independent of the nuclear industry, to aid in discharging these regulatory responsibilities. The objectives of NRC's research program are the following: (1) to maintain a confirmatory research program that supports assurance of public health and safety, and public confidence in the regulatory program, (2) to provide objectively evaluated safety data and analytical methods that meet the needs of regulatory activities, (3) to provide better quantified estimates of the margins of safety for reactor systems, fuel cycle facilities, and transportation systems, (4) to establish a broad and coherent exchange of safety research information with other Federal agencies, industry, and foreign organization. Current and planned research toward these goals is described

  4. Organisation of safety research programmes and infrastructure for existing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micaelli, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviewed the main drivers of safety research, noting that challenging research is an excellent means to preserve know-how and professional skills. International efforts such the NEA-CSNI joint projects are an efficient means to support experimental infrastructure for safety research, while providing useful experimental results. Other initiatives, e.g. within the EU, aimed at developing networks of international expertise and infrastructure were also mentioned. (author)

  5. Proceedings of the nineteenth symposium of atomic energy research on WWER reactor physics and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovszky, I.

    2009-10-01

    The present volume contains 55 papers, presented on the nineteenth symposium of atomic energy research, held in Varna, Bulgaria, 21-25 September 2009. The papers are presented in their original form, i. e. no corrections or modifications were carried out. The content of this volume is divided into thematic groups: Fuel Management, Spectral and Core Calculations, Core Surveillance and Monitoring, CFD Analysis, Reactor Dynamics Thermal Hydraulics and Safety Analysis, Physical Problems of Spent Fuel Decommissioning and Radwaste, Actinide Transmutation and Spent Fuel Disposal, Core Operation, Experiments and Code Validation - according to the presentation sequence on the Symposium. (Author)

  6. Safety Assessment for Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    . The standards are also applied by regulatory bodies and operators around the world to enhance safety in nuclear power generation and in nuclear applications in medicine, industry, agriculture and research. Safety is not an end in itself but a prerequisite for the purpose of the protection of people in all States and of the environment - now and in the future. The risks associated with ionizing radiation must be assessed and controlled without unduly limiting the contribution of nuclear energy to equitable and sustainable development. Governments, regulatory bodies and operators everywhere must ensure that nuclear material and radiation sources are used beneficially, safely and ethically. The IAEA safety standards are designed to facilitate this, and I encourage all Member States to make use of them.

  7. Safety Assessment for Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    . The standards are also applied by regulatory bodies and operators around the world to enhance safety in nuclear power generation and in nuclear applications in medicine, industry, agriculture and research. Safety is not an end in itself but a prerequisite for the purpose of the protection of people in all States and of the environment - now and in the future. The risks associated with ionizing radiation must be assessed and controlled without unduly limiting the contribution of nuclear energy to equitable and sustainable development. Governments, regulatory bodies and operators everywhere must ensure that nuclear material and radiation sources are used beneficially, safely and ethically. The IAEA safety standards are designed to facilitate this, and I encourage all Member States to make use of them.

  8. Safety analysis calculations for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; MacDonald, R.; MacFarlane, D.

    1983-01-01

    Safety issues for the two general types of reactors, i.e., the plate-type (MTR-type) reactor and the rod-type (TRIGA-type) reactor, resulting from the changes associated with LEU vs HEU fuels, are explored. The plate-type fuels are typically uranium aluminide (UAl/sub x/) compounds dispersed in aluminum and clad with aluminum. Moderation is provided by the water coolant. Self shut-down reactivity coefficients with HEU fuel are entirely a result of coolant heating, whereas with LEU fuel there is an additional shut down contribution provided by the direct heating of the fuel due to the Doppler coefficient. In contrast, the rod-type (TRIGA) fuels are mixtures of zirconium hydride, uranium, and erbium. This fuel mixture is formed into rods (approx. 1 cm diameter) and clad with stainless steel or Incoloy. In the TRIGA fuel the self-shutdown reactivity is more complex, depending on heating of the fuel rather than the coolant. Results of transient calculations performed with existing computer codes, most suited for each type of reactor, are presented

  9. Best Safety Practices for the Operation of Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M. [Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-07-01

    A survey on administrative, organisational and technical aspects for the safe and efficient operation of a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II research reactor is given. The replacement of the I and C system is discussed, maintenance procedures are presented and the fuel management is described. (author)

  10. Best Safety Practices for the Operation of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2002-01-01

    A survey on administrative, organisational and technical aspects for the safe and efficient operation of a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II research reactor is given. The replacement of the I and C system is discussed, maintenance procedures are presented and the fuel management is described. (author)

  11. Safety and authorizations relating to the use of new fuel in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.-C.; Abou Yehia, H.

    1999-01-01

    After giving a brief reminder of the procedure applied in France for granting licences to modify research reactors, we outline in this paper the main safety aspects associated with using new fuel in these reactors. Finally, by way of an example, we focus on the procedure followed for converting the cores of the OSIRIS (70 MW) and ISIS (700 kW) reactors to U 3 Si 2 Al fuel and the conclusions of the corresponding safety assessments. (author)

  12. Main safety lessons from 5-year operation of the renovated Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anh, T.H.; Lam, P.V.; An, T.K.; Khang, N.P.; Tan, D.Q.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents main safety related characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR), which was reconstructed in 1982 at the site of the former TRIGA Mark II, while retaining some of its structures. Experience acquired from reactor operation is analysed. The programme of investigations aimed at better ensuring nuclear safety of the reactor, together with some of its results are presented. Finally some propositions to improve the present situation are suggested. (Authors). (2 Tables, 2 fig.)

  13. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  14. Research reactor utilization, safety, decommissioning, fuel and waste management. Posters of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    For more than 50 years research reactors have played an important role in the development of nuclear science and technology. They have made significant contributions to a large number of disciplines as well as to the educational and research programmes of about 70 countries world wide. About 675 research reactors have been built to date, of which some 278 are now operating in 59 countries (86 of them in 38 developing Member States). Altogether over 13,000 reactor-years of cumulative operational experience has been gained during this remarkable period. The objective of this conference was to foster the exchange of information on current research reactor concerns related to safety, operation, utilization, decommissioning and to provide a forum for reactor operators, designers, managers, users and regulators to share experience, exchange opinions and to discuss options and priorities. The topical areas covered were: a) Utilization, including new trends and directions for utilization of research reactors. Effective management of research reactors and associated facilities. Engineering considerations and experience related to refurbishment and modifications. Strategic planning and marketing. Classical applications (nuclear activation analysis, isotope production, neutron beam applications, industrial irradiations, medical applications). Training for operators. Educational programmes using a reactor. Current developments in design and fabrication of experimental facilities. Irradiation facilities. Projects for regional uses of facilities. Core management and calculation tools. Future trends for reactors. Use of simulators for training and educational programmes. b) Safety, including experience with the preparation and review of safety analysis reports. Human factors in safety analysis. Management of extended shutdown periods. Modifications: safety analysis, regulatory aspects, commissioning programmes. Engineering safety features. Safety culture. Safety peer reviews and

  15. USA NRC/RSR Data Bank System and Reactor Safety Research Data Repository (RSRDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskewitz, B.F.; Bankert, S.F.

    1979-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through its Division of Reactor Safety Research (RSR) of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the NRC/RSR Data Bank Program to collect, process, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. An increasing number of requests for data and/or calculations generated by NRC Contractors led to the initiation of the program which allows timely and direct access to water reactor safety data in a manner most useful to the user. The program consists of three main elements: data sources, service organizations, and a data repository

  16. Status of research reactors in China. Their utilization and safety upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hanming; Jin Huajin

    2000-01-01

    The main research reactors in China basically consist of several old reactors including HWRR, HFETR, SPR, MJTR and MNSR. Except the last one, all the other reactors operate at a high power density and represent themselves as main tools in China for engineering testing, radioactive isotope production, and neutron scattering research. The research and production activities by these reactors are briefed. Main equipment and research topics for neutron scattering are described. The production of radioisotope is summarized. Safety upgrading activities in recent years taken by these old reactors are described, which make the safety feature of each reactor significantly improved and on the whole more close to (even not completely consistent) with the targets set by the modern safety regulation. Since a new multi-purpose research reactor CARR is expected available around the year of 2005, a schedule about the construction of new reactor, reforming or decommissioning of old reactors and smoothly transition of research and production activities from old to new reactor during the coming years has been under careful planning. A suggestion of potential international cooperation items has been preliminarily given. (author)

  17. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  18. List of reports on reactor safety research from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Fusion Reactor Safety Research Program annual report, FY-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the program is the development, coordination, and execution of activities related to magnetic fusion devices and reactors that will: (a) identify and evaluate potential hazards, (b) assess and disclose potential environmental impacts, and (c) develop design standards and criteria that eliminate, mitigate, or reduce those hazards and impacts. The program will provide a sound basis for licensing fusion reactors. Included in this report are portions of four reports from two outside contractors, discussions of the several areas in which EG and G Idaho is conducting research activities, a discussion of proposed program plan development, mention of special tasks, a review of fusion technology program coordination by EG and G with other laboratories, and a brief view of proposed FY-80 activities

  20. List of reports on reactor safety research by the BMFT and the USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research which have been collected in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list or reports appears quarterly. This edition contains all reports as registered from January through March 1977. (orig./HK) [de

  1. Progress report - list of reports from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  2. The operating organization and the recruitment, training and qualification of personnel for research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations on meeting the requirements on the operating organization and on personnel for research reactors. It covers the typical operating organization for research reactor facilities; the recruitment process and qualification in terms of education, training and experience; programmes for initial and continuing training; the authorization process for those individuals having an immediate bearing on safety; and the processes for their requalification and reauthorization

  3. List of reports from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC concerning reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. According to the cooperation in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig.) [de

  4. Reactor safety research - visible demonstrations and credible computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenstein, W B; Divakaruni, S M

    1985-11-01

    EPRI has been conducting nuclear safety research for a number of years with the primary goal of assuring the safety and reliability of the nuclear plants. The visibility is emphasized by sponsoring or participating in large scale test demonstrations to credibly support the complex computations that are the basis for quantification of safety margins. Recognizing the success of the airline industry in receiving favorable public perception, the authors compare the design and operation practices of the airline industry with those of the nuclear industry practices to identify the elements contributing to public concerns and unfavorable perceptions. In this paper, authors emphasize the importance of proper communications of research results to the public in a manner that non-specialists understand. Further, EPRI supported research and results in the areas of source term, seismic and structural engineering research, analysis using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), quantification of safety margins, digital technology development and implementation, and plant transient and performance evaluations are discussed in the paper. (orig./HP).

  5. Reactor safety research - visible demonstrations and credible computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.; Divakaruni, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    EPRI has been conducting nuclear safety research for a number of years with the primary goal of assuring the safety and reliability of the nuclear plants. The visibility is emphasized by sponsoring or participating in large scale test demonstrations to credibly support the complex computations that are the basis for quantification of safety margins. Recognizing the success of the airline industry in receiving favorable public perception, the authors compare the design and operation practices of the airline industry with those of the nuclear industry practices to identify the elements contributing to public concerns and unfavorable perceptions. In this paper, authors emphasize the importance of proper communications of research results to the public in a manner that non-specialists understand. Further, EPRI supported research and results in the areas of source term, seismic and structural engineering research, analysis using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), quantification of safety margins, digital technology development and implementation, and plant transient and performance evaluations are discussed in the paper. (orig./HP)

  6. Reports of reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. the individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by he FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRS 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  7. Complementary Safety Assessments for Research Reactors for the French Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassiotis, Christophe; Rigaud, Antoine; Evrard, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    The 'Autorite de surete nucleaire' (ASN) requested licensees to undertake stress tests, called complementary safety assessments (CSA), of their installations on May 5th 2011, following the accident that occurred in Japan on March 11th 2011. Their mission consisted in providing feedback on the consequences of potential extreme events. In this process, all the French facilities were divided into three categories of decreasing priority, depending on two main factors: on the one hand, their vulnerability to the various phenomena that led to the Fukushima accident, and on the other hand, the amount of radioactive elements that would be dispersed in the event of a failure of the safety functions. On the 79 high-priority facilities, only five of them are research or experimental reactors (including two currently shutdown or in decommissioning) and their operators (the 'Comissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives' (CEA) and the 'Institut Laue Langevin') submitted their reports to the ASN on September 15 th 2011. Concerning the lower-priority facilities, including three other facilities (two research reactors operated by the CEA and a facility operated by ITER Organization) the deadline was September 15 th 2012. Finally, the remaining facilities were not asked to submit a report yet, but they will have to do it later, mainly on the occasion of their next periodic safety review. The analyses of the cliff-edge effects, that may occur in extreme situations (exceptional scale event, combination of several disasters...), led to the definition of a hardened safety core concept by the 'Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire' (IRSN). This hardened safety core of structures, equipment and organizational measures must ensure the ultimate protection of the concerned facilities in extreme situations : it is designed to prevent severe accidents (or curb their progression), limit large scale releases for extreme accidents, and enables the operating teams to

  8. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume VII. Reactor cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The Reactor Cooling System (RCS) will provide the required cooling during test operations of the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The RCS transfers the reactor energy generated in the core to a closed-loop water storage system located completely inside the reactor containment building. After the reactor core has cooled to a safe level, the stored heat is rejected through intermediate heat exchangers to a common forced-draft evaporative cooling tower. The RCS is comprised of three independent cooling loops of which any two can remove sufficient heat from the core to prevent structural damage to the system components

  9. List of the reports from reactor safety research of the BMFT and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-02-01

    This list presents a survey of reports from the FRG and USA issued on special problems of reactor safety research. The problems include emergency core cooling, the containment during loss of coolant, core meltdown, component safety, external impacts, risk and reliability, quality assurance, fission product transport, radiation exposure, as well as the LWR, HTR and the fast sodium-cooled reactor in general. (orig./HK) [de

  10. Validation of computer codes used in the safety analysis of Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, W.E.; Lee, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    AECL has embarked on a validation program for the suite of computer codes that it uses in performing the safety analyses for its research reactors. Current focus is on codes used for the analysis of the two MAPLE reactors under construction at Chalk River but the program will be extended to include additional codes that will be used for the Irradiation Research Facility. The program structure is similar to that used for the validation of codes used in the safety analyses for CANDU power reactors. (author)

  11. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the research program on reactor safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks also projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Reports of research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of his research program on reactor safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks also projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  13. The Oak Ridge Research Reactor: safety analysis: Volume 2, supplement 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, S.S.

    1986-11-01

    The Oak Ridge Research Reactor Safety Analysis was last updated via ORNL-4169, Vol. 2, Supplement 1, in May of 1978. Since that date, several changes have been effected through the change-memo system described below. While these changes have involved the cooling system, the electrical system, and the reactor instrumentation and controls, they have not, for the most part, presented new or unreviewed safety questions. However, some of the changes have been based on questions or recommendations stemming from safety reviews or from reactor events at other sites. This paper discusses those changes which were judged to be safety related and which include revisions to the syphon-break system and changes related to seismic considerations which were very recently completed. The maximum hypothetical accident postulated in the original safety analysis requires dynamic containment and filtered flow for compliance with 10CFR100 limits at the site boundary

  14. Design of Safety Parameter Monitoring Function in a Research Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jaekwan; Suh, Yongsuk

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the safety parameter monitoring system (SPDS) is to help operating personnel in the control room make quick assessments of the plant safety status. Thus, the basic function of the SPDS is a provision of a continuous indication of plant parameters or derived variables representative of the safety status of the plant. NUREG-0737 Supplement 1 provides details of the functional criteria for the SPDS, as one of the action plan requirements from TMI accident. The system provides various functions as follows: · Alerting based on safety function decision logics, · Success path analysis to achieve the integrity of the safety functions, · 3 layer display architecture - safety function, success path display for each safety function, system summary and equipment details for each safety function, · Integration with computer-based procedure. According to a Notice of the NSSC No. 2012-31, a research reactor facility generating more than 2 MW of power should also be furnished with the SPDS for emergency preparedness. Generally, a research reactor is a small size facility, and its number of instrumentations is fewer than that of NPPs. In particular, it is actually hard to have various and powerful functions from an economic perspective. Therefore, a safety parameter display system optimized for a research reactor facility must be proposed. This paper provides the requirement analysis results and proposes the design of safety parameter monitoring function for a research reactor. The safety parameter monitoring function supporting control room personnel during emergency conditions should be designed in a research reactor facility. The facility size and number of signals are smaller than that of the power plants. Also, it is actually hard to have various and powerful functions of nuclear power plants from an economic perspective. Thus, a safety parameter display system optimized to a research reactor must be proposed. First, we found important design items

  15. Design of Safety Parameter Monitoring Function in a Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaekwan; Suh, Yongsuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The primary purpose of the safety parameter monitoring system (SPDS) is to help operating personnel in the control room make quick assessments of the plant safety status. Thus, the basic function of the SPDS is a provision of a continuous indication of plant parameters or derived variables representative of the safety status of the plant. NUREG-0737 Supplement 1 provides details of the functional criteria for the SPDS, as one of the action plan requirements from TMI accident. The system provides various functions as follows: · Alerting based on safety function decision logics, · Success path analysis to achieve the integrity of the safety functions, · 3 layer display architecture - safety function, success path display for each safety function, system summary and equipment details for each safety function, · Integration with computer-based procedure. According to a Notice of the NSSC No. 2012-31, a research reactor facility generating more than 2 MW of power should also be furnished with the SPDS for emergency preparedness. Generally, a research reactor is a small size facility, and its number of instrumentations is fewer than that of NPPs. In particular, it is actually hard to have various and powerful functions from an economic perspective. Therefore, a safety parameter display system optimized for a research reactor facility must be proposed. This paper provides the requirement analysis results and proposes the design of safety parameter monitoring function for a research reactor. The safety parameter monitoring function supporting control room personnel during emergency conditions should be designed in a research reactor facility. The facility size and number of signals are smaller than that of the power plants. Also, it is actually hard to have various and powerful functions of nuclear power plants from an economic perspective. Thus, a safety parameter display system optimized to a research reactor must be proposed. First, we found important design items

  16. Research and development on reduced-moderation light water reactor with passive safety features (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Akie, Hiroshi; Kugo, Teruhiko; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Kureta, Masatoshi; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Araya, Fumimasa; Okajima, Shigeaki; Okumura, Keisuke; Suzuki, Motoe; Mineo, Hideaki; Nakatsuka, Toru

    2004-06-01

    The present report contains the achievement of 'Research and Development on Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features', which was performed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Hitachi Ltd., Japan Atomic Power Company and Tokyo Institute of Technology in FY2000-2002 as the innovative and viable nuclear energy technology (IVNET) development project operated by the Institute of Applied Energy (IAE). In the present project, the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) has been developed to ensure sustainable energy supply and to solve the recent problems of nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle, such as economical competitiveness, effective use of plutonium and reduction of spent fuel storage. The RMWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as high burnup, long operation cycle, multiple recycling of plutonium (Pu) and effective utilization of uranium resources based on accumulated LWR technologies. Our development target is 'Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactor with Passive Safety Features' with innovative technologies to achieve above mentioned requirement. Electric power is selected as 300 MWe considering anticipated size required for future deployment. The reactor core consists of MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement to increase the conversion ratio. Design targets of the core specification are conversion ratio more than unity, negative void reactivity feedback coefficient to assure safety, discharged burnup more than 60 GWd/t and operation cycle more than 2 years. As for the reactor system, a small size natural circulation BWR with passive safety systems is adopted to increase safety and reduce construction cost. The results obtained are as follows: As regards core design study, core design was performed to meet the goal. Sequence of startup operation was constructed for the RMWR. As the plant design, plant system was designed to achieve enhanced economy using passive safety system effectively. In

  17. List of reports on reactor safety research from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. According to the cooperation of the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available from the Society for Reactor Safety (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Safety aspects on dependability management for a TRIGA research reactor in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, Gheorghe

    2002-01-01

    Safety on the management for a nuclear research reactor involves a 'good dependability management' of the activities, such as: reliability, availability, maintainability and maintenance support. In order to evaluate the safety management aspects intended to be applied at a research reactor management, the performance dependability indicators and their impact over the availability and reactor safety have to be established. The document ISO 9000-4/IEC 300-1 'Dependability Management' (1995), describes five internationally agreed indicators of the reactor equipment dependability, each of them can be used for corrective maintenance or for preventive maintenance, such as: I 1 - equipment Maintenance Frequency; I 2 - equipment Maintenance Effort; I-3 - equipment Maintenance Downtime Factor; I 4 - equipment Maintenance Contribution to the System Function Downtime Factor; I 5 - equipment Maintenance Contribution to the reactor Capability Loss Factor. The paper presents an evaluation of those 5 mentioned indicators with referring only at the primary circuit of the INR's TRIGA research reactor and conclusion. The analyzed period was stated between 1994-1999. It is to be noted that this type of analyze is performed for the first time for a research reactor. (author)

  19. List of BMFT, USNRC, EPRI, and STA reports on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from the United States of America and from Japan concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA) these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit. The list pursues the following order : Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  20. List of reports in reactor safety research by BMFT, USNRC, EPRI and JSTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from the United States of America and from Japan concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA) these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig.) [de

  1. Proposal for a seismic facility for reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.A.; Dove, R.C.; Rhorer, R.L.

    1976-07-01

    Certain problem areas in the seismic analysis and design of nuclear reactors are enumerated and the way in which an experimental program might contribute to each area is examined. The use of seismic simulation testing receives particular attention, especially with regard to the verification of structural response analysis. The importance of scale modeling used in conjunction with seismic simulation is also stressed. The capabilities of existing seismic simulators are summarized, and a proposed facility is described which would considerably extend the ability to conduct, with confidence, confirmatory experiments on the behavior of reactor components when subjected to seismic excitation. Particular applications to gas-cooled and other reactor types are described

  2. French safety authority projects in the field of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint Raymond, P.; Duthe, M.; Abou Yehia, H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper gives an outline of some actions initiated by the French safety authority in the field of research and test reactors. An important action concerns the definition of the authorisation criteria for the implementation of experiments in these reactors. In particular, it is necessary to define clearly in which conditions an experiment may be authorised internally by the operating organisation or needs a formal approval by the safety authority. The practice related to the systematic safety reassessment of old facilities and the regulatory provisions associated with the decommissioning are presented after a discussion on the ageing issues. (author)

  3. OPAD: An expert system for research reactor operations and fault diagnosis using probabilistic safety assessment tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, A.K.; Varde, P.V.; Sankar, S.; Prakash, P.

    1996-01-01

    A prototype Knowledge Based (KB) operator Adviser (OPAD) system has been developed for 100 MW(th) Heavy Water moderated, cooled and Natural Uranium fueled research reactor. The development objective of this system is to improve reliability of operator action and hence the reactor safety at the time of crises as well as normal operation. The jobs performed by this system include alarm analysis, transient identification, reactor safety status monitoring, qualitative fault diagnosis and procedure generation in reactor operation. In order to address safety objectives at various stages of the Operator Adviser (OPAD) system development the Knowledge has been structured using PSA tools/information in an shell environment. To demonstrate the feasibility of using a combination of KB approach with PSA for operator adviser system, salient features of some of the important modules (viz. FUELEX, LOOPEX and LOCAEX) have been discussed. It has been found that this system can serve as an efficient operator support system

  4. A review of the probabilistic safety assessment application to the TR-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goektepe, G.; Adalioglu, U.; Anac, H.; Sevdik, B.; Menteseoglu, S.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to the TR-2 Research Reactor is presented. The level 1 PSA application involved: selection of accident initiators, mitigating functions and system definitions, event tree constructions and quantification, fault tree constructions and quantification, human reliability, component failure data base development, dependent failure analysis. Each of the steps of the analysis given above is reviewed briefly with highlights from the selected results. PSA application is found to be a practical tool for research reactor safety due to intense involvement of human interactions in an experimental facility. Insights gained from the application of PSA methodology to the TR-2 research reactor led to a significant safety review of the system

  5. Reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arien, B.

    1998-01-01

    Risk assessments of nuclear installations require accurate safety and reliability analyses to estimate the consequences of accidental events and their probability of occurrence. The objective of the work performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The four main activities of the research project on reactor safety analysis are: (1) the development of software for the reliable analysis of large systems; (2) the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; (3) the development and the application of a probabilistic reactor-dynamics method, and (4) to participate in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Progress in research during 1997 is described

  6. Self assessment of safety culture in HANARO using the code of conduct on the safety of research reactor by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, I.C.; Hwang, S.Y.; Woo, J.S.; Lee, M.; Jun, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The safety culture in HANARO was self-assessed in accordance with the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor drafted by IAEA. From 2002, IAEA has worked on the development of the Code of Conduct to achieve and maintain high level of nuclear safety in research reactors worldwide through the enhancement of national measures and international co-operation including, where appropriate, safety related technical cooperation. It defines the role of the state, the role of the regulatory body, the role of the operating organization and the role of the IAEA. As for the role of operating organization, the code specifies general requirements in assessment and verification of safety, financial and human resources, quality assurance, human factors, radiation protection and emergency preparedness. It also defines the role of operating organization for safety of research reactor in siting, design, operation, maintenance, modification and utilization as well. All of these items are the subjects for safety culture implementation, which means the Code could be a guideline for an operating organization to assess its safety culture. The self-assessment of safety culture in HANARO was made by using the sections of the Code describing the role of the operating organization for safety of research reactor. The major assessment items and the practices in HANARO for each items are as follow: The SAR of HANARO was reviewed by the regulatory body before the construction and the fuel loading of HANARO. Major design modifications and new installation of utilization facility needs the approval from regulatory body and safety assessment is a requirement for the approval. The Tech. Spec. for HANARO Operation specifies the analysis, surveillance, testing and inspection for HANARO operation. The reactor operation is mainly supported by the government and partly by nuclear R and D fund. The education and training of operation staff are one of major tasks of operating organization

  7. Status and some safety philosophies of the China advanced research reactor CARR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzheng Yuan

    2001-01-01

    The existing two research reactors, HWRR (heavy water research reactor) and SPR (swimming pool reactor), have been operated by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) since, respectively, 1958 and 1964, and are both in extending service and facing the aging problem. It is expected that they will be out of service successively in the beginning decade of the 21 st century. A new, high performance and multipurpose research reactor called China advanced research reactor (CARR) will replace these two reactors. This new reactor adopts the concept of inverse neutron trap compact core structure with light water as coolant and heavy water as the outer reflector. Its design goal is as follows: under the nuclear power of 60MW, the maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux in peripheral D 2 O reflector not less than 8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 . s while in central experimental channel, if the central cell to be replaced by an experimental channel, the corresponding value not less than 1 x 10 15 n/cm 2 . s. The main applications for this research reactor will cover RI production, neutron scattering experiments, NAA and its applications, neutron photography, NTD for monocrystaline silicon and applications on reactor engineering technology. By the end of 1999, the preliminary design of CARR was completed, then the draft of preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) was submitted to the relevant authority at the end of 2000 for being reviewed. Now, the CARR project has entered the detail design phase and safety reviewing procedure for obtaining the construction permit from the relevant licensing authority. This paper will only briefly introduce some aspects of safety philosophy of CARR design and PSAR. (orig.)

  8. Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Office of Reactor Safety. Research plans for the period 1997-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    Office of Reactor Safety research is carried out within the following areas: Safety evaluation, Safety analysis, MTO, Materials and chemistry, Non-Destructive Testing, Strength of materials, Thermohydraulics, Nuclear fuel, Serious accidents and Process control. Research is carried out to fulfill SKIs overall goals in accordance with the directives from the Swedish government and parliament, in particular to be a driving force in safety related work when justified by operating experience, research results and technical progress, towards licensees as well as in international cooperation in safety; to promote the maintenance and development of competence in the safety related work at the SKI as well as the licensees and generally in the country, and as a specific role for the Office of Reactor Safety as designated in the internal routines to take initiative to encourage and carry out research into areas of importance for the Office as well as ensuring that research results are disseminated and used both within SKI and in the general work concerning nuclear safety. Research efforts within the Office of Reactor safety are carried out in the form of separate projects which form part of the priority work plans. Project managers, the necessary personnel resources and the budget for each year are included in the Annual Plan and the work is followed up in the same manner as other efforts. Research is performed in different ways, that can vary from laboratory studies to more consultative efforts, and be organised in many different ways such as examination projects, post-graduate studies, work sponsored at research institutes and companies in Sweden and abroad, collaboration in larger international projects, and participation in conferences which provide an important contribution to keeping SKI personnel informed within their specialist areas

  9. Improvement of pulsing operation performance in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayasi, S.; Ishijima, K.; Tanzawa, S.; Fujishiro, T.; Horiki, O.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) is one of the TRIGA-type research reactors widely used in the world, and has mainly been used for studying reactor fuel behaviour during postulated reactivity-initiated accidents (RIAs). Its limited pulsing operation capability, however, could produce only a power burst from low power level simulating an RIA event from essentially zero power level. A computerized automatic reactor control system was developed and installed in the NSRR to simulate a wide range of abnormal events in nuclear power plants. This digitalized reactor control system requires no manipulation of the control rods by reactor operators during the course of the pulsing operation. Using this fully automated operation system, a variety of power transients such as power ramping, power bursts from high power level, and so on were made possible with excellent stability and safety. The present modification work in the NSRR and its fruitful results indicate new possibilities in the utilization of the TRIGA type research reactor

  10. Reports covering research projects in the field of reactor safety supported by the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the safety program 'Reactor Safety' are sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT - Secretary of State for Research and Technology). Objective of this program is to continue improving the safety of LWR, in order to minimize the risk for the environment. With grant assistance from the Bundesminister des Innern. (BMI - Secretary of State for Home Affairs) research cont racts in the field of reactor safety are being performed. Results of these projects should contribute to resolve questions arising nuclear licensing procedures. The Forschungsbetreuung (FB - research supervision department) at the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS), as consultants to BMFT and BMI, provides information about the progress of investigations. Individual reports will be prepared and put into standard forms by the research contractors. Each report gives information on: 1) the work accomplished, 2) the results obtained, 3) the work planned to be continued. Initial reports of research projects describe in addition the purpose of the work. A BMFT-research program on the safety of Fast Breeders (Schneller Brutreaktor - SBR) is presently under discussion. In order to define several problems, investigations included in the present compilation (RS 139, 140, 143, 162) will be previously performed. (orig.) [de

  11. Inherent Safety Feature of Hybrid Low Power Research Reactor during Reactivity Induced Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, DongHyun; Yum, Soo Been; Hong, Sung Teak; Lim, In-Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hybrid low power research reactor(H-LPRR) is the new design concept of low power research reactor for critical facility as well as education and training. In the case of typical low power research reactor, the purposes of utilization are the experiments for education of nuclear engineering students, Neutron Activation Analysis(NAA) and radio-isotope production for research purpose. H-LPRR is a light-water cooled and moderated research reactor that uses rod-type LEU UO{sub 2} fuels same as those for commercial power plants. The maximum core thermal power is 70kW and, the core is placed in the bottom of open pool. There are 1 control rod and 2 shutdown rods in the core. It is designed to cool the core by natural convection, retain negative feedback coefficient for entire fuel periods and operate for 20 years without refueling. Inherent safety in H-LPRR is achieved by passive design features such as negative temperature feedback coefficient and core cooling by natural convection during normal and emergency conditions. The purpose of this study is to find out that the inherent safety characteristics of H-LPRR is able to control the power and protect the reactor from the RIA(Reactivity induced accident). RIA analysis was performed to investigate the inherent safety feature of H-LPRR. As a result, it was found that the reactor controls its power without fuel damage in the event and that the reactor remains safe states inherently. Therefore, it is believed that high degree of safety inheres in H-LPRR.

  12. The safety culture change process performed in Polish research reactor MARIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golab, Andrzej

    2002-01-01

    The Safety Culture Change Process Performed in research reactor MARIA is described in this paper. The essential issues fulfilled in realization of the Safety Culture Enhancement Programme are related to the attitude and behaviour of top management, co-operating groups, operational personnel, relations between the operating organization and the supervising and advising organizations. Realization of this programme is based on changing the employees understanding of safety, changing their attitudes and behaviours by means of adequate training, requalification process and performing the broad self-assessment programme. Also a high level Quality Assurance Programme helps in development of the Safety Culture. (author)

  13. Fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in reactor safety. Current understanding and future research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speis, T.P. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Basu, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the current understanding of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in the context of reactor safety. With increased emphasis on accident management and with emerging in-vessel core melt retention strategies for advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, recent interest in FCI has broadened to include an evaluation of potential threats to the integrity of reactor vessel lower head and ex-vessel structural support, as well as the role of FCI in debris quenching and coolability. The current understanding of FCI with regard to these issues is discussed, and future research needs to address the issues from a risk perspective are identified. (author)

  14. Safety And Transient Analyses For Full Core Conversion Of The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong Ba Vien; Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Nguyen Kien Cuong

    2011-01-01

    Preparing for full core conversion of Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR), safety and transient analyses were carried out to confirm about ability to operate safely of proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) working core. The initial LEU core consisting 92 LEU fuel assemblies and 12 Beryllium rods was analyzed under initiating events of uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod, cooling pump failure, earthquake and fuel cladding fail. Working LEU core response were evaluated under these initial events based on RELAP/Mod3.2 computer code and other supported codes like ORIGEN, MCNP and MACCS2. Obtained results showed that safety of the reactor is maintained for all transients/accidents analyzed. (author)

  15. Operator reliability study for Probabilistic Safety Analysis of an operating research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, F.; Hassan, A.; Yahaya, R.; Rahman, I.; Maskin, M.; Praktom, P.; Charlie, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) for Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) is performed on research nuclear reactor. • Implemented qualitative HRA framework is addressed. • Human Failure Events of significant impact to the reactor safety are derived. - Abstract: A Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) for the TRIGA Mark II research reactor of Malaysian Nuclear Agency has been developed to evaluate the potential risk in its operation. In conjunction to this PSA development, Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is performed in order to determine human contribution to the risk. The aim of this study is to qualitatively analyze human actions (HAs) involved in the operation of this reactor according to the qualitative part of the HRA framework for PSA which is namely the identification, qualitative screening and modeling of HAs. By performing this framework, Human Failure Events (HFEs) of significant impact to the reactor safety are systematically analyzed and incorporated into the PSA structure. A part of the findings in this study will become the input for the subsequent quantitative part of the HRA framework, i.e. the Human Error Probability (HEP) quantification

  16. Reports on research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for research and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS - Projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power-plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks first projects on the safety of FBR type reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of quarterly and annually publication of progress reports within the series GRS - F - Fortschrittsberichte (GRS - F - Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work. The individual reports are arranged according to the amended LWR Safety Research Program of the BMFT in the near future. Another table contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC Communities and the OECD. (orig.) [de

  17. Reports on research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Minister for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS - Projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), der Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks first projects on the safety of FBR type reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of quarterly and annually publication of progress reports within the series GRS - F Fortschrittsberichte (GRS - F - Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work. The individual reports are arranged according to the amended LWR Safety Research Program of the BMFT. Another table contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC Communities and the OECD. (orig./HP) 891 HP [de

  18. Reports on research projects sponsored by the Federal Minister for Research and Technology in the field of reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS - Projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks first projects on the safety of FBR type reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of quarterly and annually publication of progress reports within the series GRS - F - Fortschrittsberichte (GRS - F - Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work. The individual reports are arranged according to the amended LWR Safety Research Program of the BMFT. Another table contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC European Communities and the OECD. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Report on the research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Minister for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS - Projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks first projects on the safety of FBR type reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of quarterly and annually publication of progress reports within the series GRS - F -Fortschrittsberichte (GRS - F - Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work, The individual reports are arranged according to the amended LWR Safety Research Program of the BMFT. Another table contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC Communities and the OECD. (orig./HP) 891 HP [de

  20. Modernization of Safety and Control Instrumentation of the IEA-R1 Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Carvalho, P.V., E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN), National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The research reactor IEA-R1 located in the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), São Paulo, Brazil, obtained its first criticality on 16 September 1957 and since then has served the scientific and medical community in the performance of experiments in applied nuclear physics, as well as the provision of radioisotopes for production of radiopharmaceuticals. The reactor produces radioisotopes {sup 82}Br and {sup 41}Ar for special processes in industrial inspection and {sup 192}Ir and {sup 198}Au as sources of radiation used in brachytherapy, {sup 153}Sm for pain relief in patients with bone metastasis, and calibrated sources of {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 57}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 241}Am and {sup 152}Eu used in medical clinics and hospitals practicing nuclear medicine and research laboratories. Services are offered in regular non-destructive testing by neutron radiography, neutron irradiation of silicon for phosphorous doping and other various irradiations with neutrons. The reactor is responsible for producing approximately 70% of radiopharmaceutical {sup 131}I used in Brazil, which saves about US$ 800 000 annually for the country. After more than 50 years of use, most of its equipment and systems have been modernized, and recently the reactor power was increased to 5 MW in order to enhance radioisotope production capability. However, the control room and nuclear instrumentation system used for reactor safety have operated more than 30 years and require constant maintenance. Many equipment and electronic components are obsolete, and replacements are not available in the market. The modernization of the nuclear safety and control instrumentation systems of IEA-R1 is being carried out with consideration for the internationally recognized criteria for safety and reliable reactor operations and the latest developments in nuclear electronic technology. The project for the new reactor instrumentation system specifies three wide range neutron monitoring

  1. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form

  2. Safety inspections to TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byszewski, W.

    1988-01-01

    The operational safety advisory programme was created to provide useful assistance and advice from an international perspective to research reactor operators and regulators on how to enhance operational safety and radiation protection on their reactors. Safety missions cover not only the operational safety of reactors themselves, but also the safety of associated experimental loops, isotope laboratories and other experimental facilities. Safety missions are also performed on request in other Member States which are interested in receiving impartial advice and assistance in order to enhance the safety of research reactors. The results of the inspections have shown that in some countries there are problems with radiation protection practices and nuclear safety. Very often the Safety Analysis Report is not updated, regulatory supervision needs clarification and improvement, maintenance procedures should be more formalised and records and reports are not maintained properly. In many cases population density around the facility has increased affecting the validity of the original safety analysis

  3. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume V. Reactor vessel and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel (PCRV) will serve as the primary pressure retaining structure for the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The reactor core, control rod drive room, primary heat exchangers, and gas circulators will be located in cavities within the PCRV. The orientation of these cavities, except for the control rod drive room, will be similar to the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs that are currently proposed or under design. Due to the nature of this type of structure, all biological and radiological shielding requirements are incorporated into the basic vessel design. At the midcore plane there are three radially oriented slots that will extend from the outside surface of the PCRV to the reactor core liner. These slots will accommodate each of the fuel motion monitoring systems which will be part of the observation apparatus used with the loop experiments

  4. Towards harmonised self assessment of research reactor safety status in operating organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchsteiger, C.; Boeck, H.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the development of a methodology and corresponding web-based tool for mapping and cross-comparing the safety approaches in European and other Research Reactor (RR) facilities in order to detect the principal similarities and differences. As an example, the performance of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for RRs is mapped, as follows: is PSA performed at all? (Yes/No); if so, is PSA mandatory or just recommended? (Yes/No); what is the scope of PSA?, its objective? and practical use? (set of more detailed questions), etc. In this way, information on different types of safety verification practices and requirements for RRs from Europe, Argentina, Australia, Canada, South Africa and the USA has been collected in a systematic way and included in the web-based benchmarking tool DARES (DAtabase for REsearch Reactor Safety). DARES has been developed and filled with sample data by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) together with members of the European Research Reactors Operator Group (RROG). A systematic mapping by using DARES in parallel to an international Working Group, consisting of both operators and authorities could be the starting point towards harmonisation of RR safety verification on an international level. In addition, the availability of a user-friendly Information System on the Internet such as DARES containing this information is considered a useful mechanism to exchange international experiences and practices in the area among qualified users. This approach is currently considered to be proposed to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAES) as one possible application of the recently adopted IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. The resulting process would be a self-assessment of the RR safety status in regulatory bodies and operating organisations relative to the guidance in the Code, practically realised and monitored by an Information System similar to DARES. (orig.)

  5. Fusion Reactor Safety Research program. Annual report, FY-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1981-06-01

    The report is in three sections. Outside contracts includes a report of newly-started study at the General Atomic Company to consider safety implications of low-activation materials, portions of two papers from ongoing work at PNL and ANL, reports of the lithium spill work at HEDL, the LITFIRE code development at MIT, and risk assessment at MIT, all of which are an expansion of FY-79 outside contracts. EG and G Activities includes adaptations of four papers of ongoing work in transient code development, tritium system risk assessment, heat transfer and fluid flow analysis, and fusion safety data base. Program Plan Development includes the Executive Summary of the Plan, which was completed in FY-80, and is accompanied by a list of publications and a brief outline of proposed FY-81 activities to be based on the Program Plan

  6. A risk characterization of safety research areas for integral fast reactor program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Hill, D.J.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Tibbrook, R.W.; Wei, T.Y.; Wright, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper characterizes the areas of integral fast reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure to critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR safety and related base technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorities

  7. A risk characterization of safety research areas for Integral Fast Reactor program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Hill, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper characterizes the areas of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure of critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR Safety and related Base Technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorites

  8. Results on safety research for five years (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000). A field of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This safety research carried out by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) for five years ranged from 1996 to 2000 fiscal year, was performed according to the safety research basic plan (from 1996 to 2000 fiscal year) established on March, 1996 (revised again on May, 2000). This report was arranged on a field on power reactors (all subjects on fields of advanced conversion reactor and a subject on power reactor in a field of seismic resistant and probability theoretical safety evaluation) by combining its research results for five years ranged from 1996 to 2000 fiscal year with general outlines on the safety research basic plan. Here were shown outlines on the safety research basic plan, aims and subjects on safety research at a field of power reactors, a list of survey sheets on safety research result, and survey sheets on safety research results. The survey sheets containing research field, title, organization, researcher name, researching period, names of cooperative organization, using facilities, research outline, research results, established contents, application, and research trends, are ranged to 5 items on advanced conversion reactor, 29 items on high breeder reactor, 1 item on seismic resistance, and 5 items on probability theoretical safety evaluation. (G.K.)

  9. General principles of nuclear safety management related to research reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banciu, Ortenzia; Vladescu, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    The paper contents the general principles applicable to the decommissioning of research reactors to ensure a proper nuclear safety management, during both decommissioning activities and post decommissioning period. The main objective of decommissioning is to ensure the protection of workers, population and environment against all radiological and non-radiological hazards that could result after a reactor shutdown and dismantling. In the same time, it is necessary, by some proper provisions, to limit the effect of decommissioning for the future generation, according to the new Romanian, IAEA and EU Norms and Regulations. Assurance of nuclear safety during decommissioning process involves, in the first step, to establish of some safety principles and requirements to be taken into account during whole process. In the same time, it is necessary to perform a series of analyses to ensure that the whole process is conducted in a planned and safe manner. The general principles proposed for a proper management of safety during research reactor decommissioning are as follows: - Set-up of all operations included in a Decommissioning Plan; - Set-up and qualitative evaluation of safety problems, which could appear during normal decommissioning process, both radiological and nonradiological risks for workers and public; - Set-up of accident list related to decommissioning process the events that could appear both due to some abnormal working conditions and to some on-site and off-site events like fires, explosions, flooding, earthquake, etc.); - Development and qualitative/ quantitative evaluation of scenarios for each incidents; - Development (and evaluation) of safety indicator system. The safety indicators are the most important tools used to assess the level of nuclear safety during decommissioning process, to discover the weak points and to establish safety measures. The paper contains also, a safety case evaluation (description of facility according to the decommissioning

  10. RETU. The Finnish research programme on reactor safety. Interim report 1995 - May 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanttola, T.; Puska, E.K.

    1997-08-01

    The Finnish national research programme on Reactor Safety (RETU, 1995-1998) concentrates on the search of safe limits of nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of the operation of nuclear power plants. The annual volume of the programme has been about 26 person years and the annual funding FIM 15 million. This report summarises the structure and objectives of the programme, research fields included and the main results obtained during the period 1995 - May 1997. In the field of operational margins of a nuclear reactor, the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel is studied both in normal operation and during power transients. The static and dynamic reactor analysis codes are developed and validated to cope with new fuel designs and complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients and accidents. Research on accident management aims at development and validation of calculation methods needed to plan preventive measures and to train the personnel to severe accident mitigation. Other goals are to reduce uncertainties in phenomena important in severe accidents and to study actions planned for accident management. In the field of risk management probabilistic methods are developed for safety related decision making and for complex phenomena and event sequences. Effects of maintenance on nuclear power plant safety are studied and more effective methods for the assessment of human reliability and safety critical organisations are searched

  11. RETU. The Finnish research programme on reactor safety. Interim report 1995 - May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanttola, T; Puska, E K [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy; eds.

    1997-08-01

    The Finnish national research programme on Reactor Safety (RETU, 1995-1998) concentrates on the search of safe limits of nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of the operation of nuclear power plants. The annual volume of the programme has been about 26 person years and the annual funding FIM 15 million. This report summarises the structure and objectives of the programme, research fields included and the main results obtained during the period 1995 - May 1997. In the field of operational margins of a nuclear reactor, the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel is studied both in normal operation and during power transients. The static and dynamic reactor analysis codes are developed and validated to cope with new fuel designs and complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients and accidents. Research on accident management aims at development and validation of calculation methods needed to plan preventive measures and to train the personnel to severe accident mitigation. Other goals are to reduce uncertainties in phenomena important in severe accidents and to study actions planned for accident management. In the field of risk management probabilistic methods are developed for safety related decision making and for complex phenomena and event sequences. Effects of maintenance on nuclear power plant safety are studied and more effective methods for the assessment of human reliability and safety critical organisations are searched. 135 refs.

  12. Safety case methodology for decommissioning of research reactors. Assessment of the long term impact of a flooding scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladescu, G.; Banciu, O.

    1999-01-01

    The paper contains the assessment methodology of a Safety Case fuel decommissioning of research reactors, taking into account the international approach principles. The paper also includes the assessment of a flooding scenario for a decommissioned research reactor (stage 1 of decommissioning). The scenario presents the flooding of reactor basement, radionuclide migration through environment and long term radiological impact for public. (authors)

  13. International assessment of application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor

    2015-11-15

    The self-assessments performed by thirty-eight countries on application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors were analyzed and discussed. The results of this analysis were used to identify areas of satisfactory application of the Code and area needing improvements, and therefore require more attention worldwide. The results showed improvement in application of the Code provisions; notably in aging management, regulatory supervision, and consideration of human factors. However, there is a continuing need for further improvement in these areas, as well as in operational radiation protection, emergency preparedness and decommissioning planning. Additionally, increased attention needs to be given to periodic safety reviews, evaluation of site-specific hazards, and assessment of extreme external events. The results showed consistency with the feedback from other sources of information on generic safety issues for research reactors.

  14. International assessment of application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The self-assessments performed by thirty-eight countries on application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors were analyzed and discussed. The results of this analysis were used to identify areas of satisfactory application of the Code and area needing improvements, and therefore require more attention worldwide. The results showed improvement in application of the Code provisions; notably in aging management, regulatory supervision, and consideration of human factors. However, there is a continuing need for further improvement in these areas, as well as in operational radiation protection, emergency preparedness and decommissioning planning. Additionally, increased attention needs to be given to periodic safety reviews, evaluation of site-specific hazards, and assessment of extreme external events. The results showed consistency with the feedback from other sources of information on generic safety issues for research reactors.

  15. Basic researches on thermo-hydraulic non-equilibrium phenomena related to nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Akira; Kataoka, Isao; Aritomi, Masanori.

    1989-01-01

    A review was made of recent developments of fundamental researches on thermo-hydraulic non-equilibrium phenomena related to light water reactor safety, in relation to problems to be solved for the improvement of safety analysis codes. As for the problems related to flow con ditions, fundamental researches on basic conservation equations and constitutive equations for transient two-phase flow were reviewed. Regarding to the problems related to thermal non-equilibrium phenomena, fundamental researches on film boiling in pool and forced convection, transient boiling heat transfer and flow behavior caused by pressure transients were reviewed. (author)

  16. The reactor safety research project of the Federal Government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewer, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    The research program is split up in four subjects, i.e. - measures for increasing the operational reliability and for reducing the probability of incidents to occur, analysis of incident progresses and their effects, analysis of the radiation load caused by operation and incidents, analysis of the risk of nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  17. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -Thermal hydraulic tests for reactor safety system-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Moon Kee; Park, Choon Kyung; Yang, Sun Kyoo; Chun, Se Yung; Song, Chul Hwa; Jun, Hyung Kil; Jung, Heung Joon; Won, Soon Yun; Cho, Yung Roh; Min, Kyung Hoh; Jung, Jang Hwan; Jang, Suk Kyoo; Kim, Bok Deuk; Kim, Wooi Kyung; Huh, Jin; Kim, Sook Kwan; Moon, Sang Kee; Lee, Sang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-01

    The present research aims at the development of the thermal hydraulic verification test technology for the safety system of the conventional and advanced nuclear power plant and the development of the advanced thermal hydraulic measuring techniques. In this research, test facilities simulating the primary coolant system and safety system are being constructed for the design verification tests of the existing and advanced nuclear power plant. 97 figs, 14 tabs, 65 refs. (Author).

  18. Experimental research on pressurized water reactor(PWR) safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Su; Chae, Sung Ki; Chang, Won Pyo

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this research is to analyze the experimental results already performed in BETHSY facility of CEA France and to establish essential technologies for the future implementation of both such an experiment and computer code assessment, which are not undergoing in Korea so far. The contents of the present study are divided into 2 categories; namely, analysis of the BETHSY experimental data received from CEA, and CATHARE computer code simulation for the selected experiments, i.e. 'Natural Circulation(Test 4.3a)' and '2 Cold Leg Break'. The later studies are performed under the aims of CATHARE assessment as well as qualification of KOSAC code developing at KAERI, which is the subject in the next year and will concern an adequacy of KOSAC for the prediction of low flow natural circulation and a small break transients. (Author)

  19. Safety challenges encountered during the operating life of the almost 40 year old research reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.; Joppen, F.; Gubel, P.

    2001-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is one of the major MTR-type research reactors in the world. Its operation started in the early 1960's. Two major refurbishment operations have been carried out since then. Several safety reassessments were carried out over the years in order to keep the safety level in line with modern standards and to enhance operational safety. This paper gives an overview of the safety challenges encountered over the years and how those were met. (author)

  20. List of reactor safety research reports from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special Problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technologie Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these Reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  1. List of reports from reactor safety research of BMFT, USNRC, EPRI and JSTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from the USA and from Japan concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the USNRC, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA) these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list of reports appears quarterly. Requests for reports should be adressed to GRS, Forschungsbetreuung. Contractual view points have to be considered for the distribution of the reports. (orig./HP) [de

  2. List of reports on reactor safety research from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special Problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technologie Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these Reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  3. List of reports on reactor safety research of BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. Requests for reports should be addressed to GRS, Forschungsbetreuung. Contractual points of view have to be considered for the distribitution of the reports. (orig.) [de

  4. List of reports from reactor safety research of BMFT, USNRC, EPRI and JSTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from the USA and from Japan concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the USNRC, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA) these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of BMFT, reporting organisation. The list of reports appears quarterly. Requests for reports should be addressed to GRS, Forschungsbetreuung. Contractual view points have to be considered for the distribution of the reports. (orig./HP) [de

  5. List of reports concerning reactor safety research from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA, and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technologie Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these Reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Achievements and future directions in the reactors physics and nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrache, Ion

    2001-01-01

    A historical overlook is presented with respect to inception and development of reactor physics research and on the job training in Romania. First these activities were carried out at the Institute for Atomic Physics and Institute for Power Reactors (IRNE) in Bucharest and afterward at the Institute for Nuclear Technologies, later on transformed in the Institute of Nuclear Research at Pitesti. CYBER Computer installed at Pitesti allowed formation in as early as 1971 reactor specialists who worked out computer programs for neutron physics calculations. These specialists were able to assimilate the characteristic of CANDU 6 type reactor as well as the AECL methodology of simulating processes of CANDU reactor physics. At present four programs are under way. These are: 1. The nuclear reactor physics; 2. The nuclear facility safety; 3. Safety analyses for the transport and radioactive waste disposal; 4. Analyses for radiation shielding and biological protection. There are presented results of the work associated to the CANDU type reactor: 1. Adapting and improving the code system for neutron and thermohydraulic calculation for CANDU type reactor, as supplied by AECL; 2. The IRNE manual for CANDU reactor neutron designing; 3. Final sizing of shim rods of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2; 4. Tests and measurements of reactor physics at the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioning; 5. Simulation and independent analysis of thermosiphoning carried out at Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 commissioning; 6. Static and dynamical response of the detectors in the CANDU reactor core and their time evolution following the burnup in the neutron flux and their ageing effects; 7. PSA studies at Unit 1; 8. Safety analyses for the radioactive waste disposal at Saligny repository. Also, reported are the results of the work associated to the TRIGA reactor, as follows: 1. Flux measurements and neutron computations necessary in the reactor commissioning; 2. Cleaning up controversial issues relating to neutron flux

  7. RETU The Finnish research programme on reactor safety 1995-1998. Final Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanttola, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Reactor Safety (RETU, 1995-1998) research programme concentrated on search of safe limits for nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of nuclear power plants. The total volume of the programme was 100 person years and funding FIM 58 million. This symposium report summarises the research fields, the objectives and the main results obtained. In the field of operational margins of a nuclear reactor, the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel was studied both in normal operation and during power transients. The static and dynamic reactor analysis codes were developed and validated to cope with new fuel designs and complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients. Advanced flow models and numerical solution methods for the dynamics codes were developed and tested. Research on accident management developed and validated calculation methods needed to plan preventive measures and to train the personnel to severe accident mitigation. Efforts were made to reduce uncertainties in phenomena important in severe accidents and to study actions planned for accident management. The programme included experimental work, but also participation in large international tests. The Finnish thermal-hydraulic test facility PACTEL was used extensively for the evaluation of the VVER-440 plant accident behaviour, for the validation of the accident analysis computer codes and for the testing of passive safety system concepts for future plant designs. In risk management probabilistic methods were developed for safety related decision making and for complex event sequences. Effects of maintenance on safety were studied and effective methods for assessment of human reliability and safety critical organisations were searched. To enhance human competencies in control of complex environments, practical tools for training and continuous learning were worked out, and methods to evaluate appropriateness of control room design were developed. (orig)

  8. Safety Culture Evaluation at Research Reactors of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, M.A.; Saeed, A.; Shah, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of safety culture was presented by IAEA in document INSAG-4 (1991), delineated as “assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establish that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance”. The purpose of this paper is to describe the evaluation of safety culture at research reactors of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). Evaluating the safety culture of a particular organization poses some challenges which can be resolved by using safety culture evaluation models like those of Sachein (1992) and Harber-Barrier(1998). In PAEC, safety culture is the integral part of management system which not only promotes safety culture throughout the organization but also enhances its significance. To strengthen the safety culture, PAEC is also participating in a number of international and regional meetings of IAEA regarding safety culture. PAEC and the national regulator Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) are also arranging workshops, peer reviews, sharing operational experiences and interacting with IAEA missions to enhance its capabilities in the field of safety culture. The Directorate General of Safety (DOS) is a corporate office of PAEC for safety and regulatory matters. DOS is in the process of implementing a program to evaluate safety culture at nuclear installations of PAEC to ensure that safety culture is included as a vital segment of the Integral Management System of the establishment. In this regard, training sessions and lectures on safety culture evaluation are normally conducted in PAEC for awareness and enhancement of the safety culture program. Safety culture is also addressed in PNRA Regulations like PAK-909 and PAK-913. In this paper we will focus on the safety culture evaluation in our research reactors, i.e., PARR-1 and PARR-2. The evaluation results will be based on observations, interviews of employees, group discussions

  9. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  10. Safety management at nuclear installations with research reactors. A comparison of five European installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troen, H.; Lauridsen, B.

    1997-11-01

    Five European institutions with nuclear research reactors were visited to compare safety management among institutions similar to Risoe. Risoe is a National Laboratory and the main activities are research and development. In 1996 it was decided to look into safety management at Risoe again; the last revision was in 1972. The purpose was to make it more efficient and to emphasise, that the responsibility lies in the operating organisation. Information such as nuclear facilities at the institutions, the safety management organisation, emergency preparedness, and lists of radiation doses to the employees from the years 1995 and 1996 is given in the report. Also international requirements and recommendations are given in short. Furthermore the report contains some reflections on the development in safety management organisations in resent years and the conclusions drawn from the information gathered

  11. Safety considerations of new critical assembly for the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Iwao; Matsuoka, Naomi; Harada, Yoshihiko; Miyamoto, Keiji; Kanazawa, Takashi

    1975-01-01

    The new critical assembly type of nuclear reactor having three cores for the first time in the world was completed successfully at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University in autumn of 1974. It is called KUCA (Kyoto University Critical Assembly). Safety of the critical assembly was considered sufficiently in consequence of discussions between the researchers of the institute and the design group of our company, and then many bright ideas were created through the discussions. This paper is described the new safety design of main equipments - oil pressure type center core drive mechanism, removable water overflow mechanism, core division mechanism, control rod drive mechansim, protection instrumentation system and interlock key system - for the critical assembly. (author)

  12. Self-assessment of application of the Code of Conduct on the safety of research reactors - Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamani-Alegria, Y.R.; Salgado-Gonzalez, J.R.; Miranda-Aldaco, J.

    2009-01-01

    In Mexico, the nuclear regulatory body is the National Commission on Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS), and there is one research reactor, a TRIGA MARK III, operated by the National Institute for Nuclear Research (ININ). The main aspects of the Self-assessment of application of The Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor are given for the case of the TRIGA reactor. Furthermore, in this paper we give a brief description of the legal framework of the licensing process, for nuclear activities in a research reactor, there are also highlights of the major reactor features, the uses of the reactor for isotope production, the management and verification of safety, the radiation protection management program, the emergency planning and the training and qualification of the operation personnel. (author)

  13. Reactor safety method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachon, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature

  14. Management of the Interface between Nuclear Safety and Security for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide technical guidelines and practical information to assist Member States, operating organizations and regulatory bodies, on the basis of international good practices, and to manage the interface between nuclear safety and security at research reactor facilities in an integrated and coordinated manner. The publication was developed based on input from IAEA technical and consultants' meetings held between 2013 and 2015

  15. Criticality safety of storage barrels for enriched uranium fresh fuel at the RB research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    Study on criticality safety of fresh low and high enriched uranium (LEU and HEU) fuel elements in the storage/transport barrels at the RB research reactor is carried out by using the well-known MCNP computer code. It is shown that studied arrays of tightly closed fuel barrels, each entirely loaded with 100 fresh (HEU or LEU) fuel slugs, are far away from criticality, even in cases of an unexpected flooding by light water.(author)

  16. IAEA Mission Sees High Commitment to Safety at Ghana's Research Reactor After HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team of experts said the operator of Ghana’s research reactor has demonstrated a high commitment to safety following the conversion of the reactor core to use low enriched uranium (LEU) as fuel instead of high enriched uranium (HEU). The team also made recommendations for further safety enhancements. The Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARR) team concluded a five-day mission today to assess the safety of the GHARR-1 research reactor, originally commissioned in 1994. The 30 kW reactor, operated by the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) at the National Nuclear Research Institute in the capital Accra, is used primarily for trace element analysis for industrial or agricultural purposes, research, education and training. In 2017, the reactor core was converted in a joint effort by Ghana, the United States and China, with assistance from the IAEA. The IAEA supported the operation to eliminate proliferation risks associated with HEU, while maintaining important scientific research. The team made recommendations for improvements to the GAEC, including: • Completing the revision of reactor safety and operating documents to reflect the results of the commissioning of the reactor after the core fuel conversion. • Enhancing the training and qualification programme for operating personnel. • Improving the capability for monitoring operational safety parameters under all conditions. • Strengthening radiation protection by establishing an effective radiation monitoring of workplace. The GAEC said it will request a follow-up INSARR mission by 2020.

  17. Human performance analysis in the frame of probabilistic safety assessment of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcasiu, Mita; Nitoi, Mirela; Apostol, Minodora; Turcu, I.; Florescu, Gh.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The analysis of operating experience has identified the importance of human performance in reliability and safety of research reactors. In Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of nuclear facilities, human performance analysis (HPA) is used in order to estimate human error contribution to the failure of system components or functions. HPA is a qualitative and quantitative analysis of human actions identified for error-likely situations or accident-prone situations. Qualitative analysis is used to identify all man-machine interfaces that can lead to an accident, types of human interactions which may mitigate or exacerbate the accident, types of human errors and performance shaping factors. Quantitative analysis is used to develop estimates of human error probability as effects of human performance in reliability and safety. The goal of this paper is to accomplish a HPA in the PSA frame for research reactors. Human error probabilities estimated as results of human actions analysis could be included in system event tree and/or system fault tree. The achieved sensitivity analyses determine human performance sensibility at systematically variations both for dependencies level between human actions and for operator stress level. The necessary information was obtained from operating experience of research reactor TRIGA from INR Pitesti. The required data were obtained from generic data bases. (authors)

  18. Development of several data bases related to reactor safety research including probabilistic safety assessment and incident analysis at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kensuke; Oikawa, Tetsukuni; Watanabe, Norio; Izumi, Fumio; Higuchi, Suminori

    1986-01-01

    Presented are several databases developed at JAERI for reactor safety research including probabilistic safety assessment and incident analysis. First described are the recent developments of the databases such as 1) the component failure rate database, 2) the OECD/NEA/IRS information retrieval system, 3) the nuclear power plant database and so on. Then several issues are discussed referring mostly to the operation of the database (data input and transcoding) and to the retrieval and utilization of the information. Finally, emphasis is given to the increasing role which artifitial intelligence techniques such as natural language treatment and expert systems may play in improving the future capabilities of the databases. (author)

  19. Source term derivation and radiological safety analysis for the TRICO II research reactor in Kinshasa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muswema, J.L.; Ekoko, G.B.; Lukanda, V.M.; Lobo, J.K.-K.; Darko, E.O.; Boafo, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Atmospheric dispersion modeling for two credible accidents of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Kinshasa (TRICO II) was performed. • Radiological safety analysis after the postulated initiating events (PIE) was also carried out. • The Karlsruhe KORIGEN and the HotSpot Health Physics codes were used to achieve the objectives of this study. • All the values of effective dose obtained following the accident scenarios were below the regulatory limits for reactor staff members and the public, respectively. - Abstract: The source term from the 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor core of the Democratic Republic of the Congo was derived in this study. An atmospheric dispersion modeling followed by radiation dose calculation were performed based on two possible postulated accident scenarios. This derivation was made from an inventory of peak radioisotope activities released in the core by using the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation code KORIGEN. The atmospheric dispersion modeling was performed with HotSpot code, and its application yielded to radiation dose profile around the site using meteorological parameters specific to the area under study. The two accident scenarios were picked from possible accident analyses for TRIGA and TRIGA-fueled reactors, involving the case of destruction of the fuel element with highest activity release and a plane crash on the reactor building as the worst case scenario. Deterministic effects of these scenarios are used to update the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of the reactor, and for its current version, these scenarios are not yet incorporated. Site-specific meteorological conditions were collected from two meteorological stations: one installed within the Atomic Energy Commission and another at the National Meteorological Agency (METTELSAT), which is not far from the site. Results show that in both accident scenarios, radiation doses remain within the limits, far below the recommended maximum effective

  20. Source term derivation and radiological safety analysis for the TRICO II research reactor in Kinshasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muswema, J.L., E-mail: jeremie.muswem@unikin.ac.cd [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Ekoko, G.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Lukanda, V.M. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Democratic Republic of the Congo' s General Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box AE1 (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Lobo, J.K.-K. [Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa, P.O. Box 190, KIN XI (Congo, The Democratic Republic of the); Darko, E.O. [Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Boafo, E.K. [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe St. North, Oshawa, ONL1 H7K4 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric dispersion modeling for two credible accidents of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Kinshasa (TRICO II) was performed. • Radiological safety analysis after the postulated initiating events (PIE) was also carried out. • The Karlsruhe KORIGEN and the HotSpot Health Physics codes were used to achieve the objectives of this study. • All the values of effective dose obtained following the accident scenarios were below the regulatory limits for reactor staff members and the public, respectively. - Abstract: The source term from the 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor core of the Democratic Republic of the Congo was derived in this study. An atmospheric dispersion modeling followed by radiation dose calculation were performed based on two possible postulated accident scenarios. This derivation was made from an inventory of peak radioisotope activities released in the core by using the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation code KORIGEN. The atmospheric dispersion modeling was performed with HotSpot code, and its application yielded to radiation dose profile around the site using meteorological parameters specific to the area under study. The two accident scenarios were picked from possible accident analyses for TRIGA and TRIGA-fueled reactors, involving the case of destruction of the fuel element with highest activity release and a plane crash on the reactor building as the worst case scenario. Deterministic effects of these scenarios are used to update the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of the reactor, and for its current version, these scenarios are not yet incorporated. Site-specific meteorological conditions were collected from two meteorological stations: one installed within the Atomic Energy Commission and another at the National Meteorological Agency (METTELSAT), which is not far from the site. Results show that in both accident scenarios, radiation doses remain within the limits, far below the recommended maximum effective

  1. Selecting of key safety parameters in reactor nuclear safety supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Fan; Yu Hong

    2014-01-01

    The safety parameters indicate the operational states and safety of research reactor are the basis of nuclear safety supervision institution to carry out effective supervision to nuclear facilities. In this paper, the selecting of key safety parameters presented by the research reactor operating unit to National Nuclear Safety Administration that can express the research reactor operational states and safety when operational occurrence or nuclear accident happens, and the interrelationship between them are discussed. Analysis shows that, the key parameters to nuclear safety supervision of research reactor including design limits, operational limits and conditions, safety system settings, safety limits, acceptable limits and emergency action level etc. (authors)

  2. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data

  3. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  4. The implementation and discussion on review of periodic safety reviews (PSRs) for research reactors in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Quanyuan

    2011-01-01

    The overview of regulations with which the review of PSRs for research reactors shall comply, the implementation of the review of PSRs for research reactors in China and its effects, the discussion on several issues about PSRs for research reactors and its review, and suggestions on reinforcing the PSRs for research reactors in China are concerned. (author)

  5. Criticality safety studies involved in actions to improve conditions for storing 'RA' research reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.; Marinkovic, N.

    1998-01-01

    A project has recently been initiated by the VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences to improve conditions in the spent fuel storage pool at the 6.5 MW research reactor RA, as well as to consider transferring this spent fuel into a new dry storage facility built for the purpose. Since quantity and contents of fissile material in the spent fuel storage at the RA reactor are such that possibility of criticality accident can not be a priori excluded, according to standards and regulations for handling fissile material outside a reactor, before any action is undertaken subcriticality should be proven under normal, as well as under credible abnormal conditions. To perform this task, comprehensive nuclear criticality safety studies had to be performed. (author)

  6. Application of best estimate thermalhydraulic codes for the safety analysis of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adorni, M.; Bousbia-salah, A.; D'Auria, F.; Hamidouche, T.

    2006-01-01

    An established international expertise in relation to computational tools, procedures for their application including Best Estimate (BE) methods supported by uncertainty evaluation, and comprehensive experimental database exists within the safety technology of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The importance of transferring NPP safety technology tools and methods to RR safety technology has been noted in recent IAEA activities. However, the ranges of parameters of interest to RR are different from those for NPP: this is namely true for fuel composition, system pressure, adopted materials and overall system geometric configuration. The large variety of research reactors prevented so far the achievement of systematic and detailed lists of initiating events based upon qualified Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies with results endorsed by the international community. However, bounding and generalized lists of events are available from IAEA documents and can be considered for deeper studies in the area. In the area of acceptance criteria, established standards accepted by the international community are available. Therefore no major effort is needed, but an effort appears worthwhile to check that those standards are adopted and that the related thresholds are fulfilled. The importance of suitable experimental assessment is recognized. A large amount of data exists as the kinetic dynamic core behaviour form SPERT reactors tests. However, not all data are accessible to all institutions and the relationship between the range of parameters of experiments and the range of parameters relevant to RR technology is not always established. However, code-assessment through relevant set of experimental data are recorded and properly stored. An established technology exists for development, qualification and application of system thermal-hydraulics codes suitable to be adopted for accident analysis in research reactors. This derives from NPP technology. The applicability of

  7. Nordic studies in reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, N.

    1993-01-01

    The Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Programme SIK programme in reactor safety is part of a major joint Nordic research effort in nuclear safety. The report summarizes the achievements of the SIK programme, which was carried out during 1990-1993 in collaboration between Nordic nuclear utilities, safety authorities, and research institutes. Three main projects were successfully completed dealing with: 1) development and application of a living PSA concept for monitoring the risk of core damage, and of safety indicators for early warning of possible safety problems; 2) review and intercomparison of severe accident codes, case studies of potential core melt accidents in nordic reactors, development of chemical models for the MAAP code, and outline of a system for computerized accident management support; 3) compilation of information about design and safety features of neighbouring reactors in Germany, Lithuania and Russia, and for naval reactors and nuclear submarines. The report reviews the state-of-the-art in each subject matter as an introduction to the individual project summaries. The main findings of each project are highlighted. The report also contains an overview of reactor safety research in the Nordic countries and a summary of fundamental reactor safety principles. (au) (69 refs.)

  8. Reports on BMBF-sponsored research projects in the field of reactor safety. Reporting period 1 July - 31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit informs of the status of LWR tasks and projects on the safety of advanced reactors. Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, and the next steps of the works. The individual reports of quality assurance, safety of reactor component, emergency core cooling, lors of coolant, meltdown, fission product release, risk and reliability, are classified according to projects to the reactor safety research program. Another table uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC. (DG)

  9. I and C safety research at the OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gran, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    The overall objective of the Halden Reactor Project research on software systems dependability is to contribute to the successful introduction of digital I and C systems into NPPs. When celebrating the 50 years of the Halden Project in 2008, about 100 written reports have been delivered within this research. This research covers a number of topics covering safety, reliability, validation and verification, quality assurance, risk assessment, requirement engineering, error propagation, qualitative and quantitative assessment. In the paper some activities are described, pinpointing the importance of good joint projects with organisations in the member countries

  10. Reports on the projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear energy plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of BMFT, informs continuously of the status of these investigations within the series 'GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte' (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the different projects of the search program. The individual reports are prepared by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the GRS-FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of the progress in reactor safety research. Each report describes the work performed, the results and the next steps of the work. The individual reports are attached to the classification system established by the CEC (Commission of the European Communities). The GRS-F-Progress Reports also include a list of the current investigations arranged according to the projects of the BMFT-Research Program Reactor Safety. This compilation, in addition to the LWR-investigations, also contains first contributions on the safety of advanced reactors. (orig.) [de

  11. Reports on the projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear energy plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of these investigations within the series 'GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte' (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the different projects of the search program. The individual reports are prepared by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the GRS-FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of the progress in reactor safety research. Each report describes the work performed, the results and the next steps of the work. The individual reports are attached to the classification system established by the CEC (Commission of the European Communities). The GRS-F-Progress Reports also include a list of the current investigations arranged according to the projects of the BMFT-Research Program Reactor Safety. This compilation, in addition to the LWR-investigations, also contains first contributions on the safety of advanced reactors. (orig.) [de

  12. Reports on the projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear energy plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of these investigations within the series 'GRS-F-Forschrittsberichte' (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the different projects of the search program. The individual reports are prepared by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the GRS-FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of the progress in reactor safety research. Each report describes the work performed, the results and the next steps of the work. The individual reports are attached to the classification system established by the CEC (Commission of the European Communities). The GRS-F-Progress Reports also include a list of the current investigations arranged according to the projects of the BMFT-Research Program Reactor Safety. This compilation, in addition to the LWR-investigations, also contains first contributions on the safety of advanced reactors. (orig.) [de

  13. Development of a computational database for application in Probabilistic Safety Analysis of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Vagner dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the computational database that was developed to store technical information and process data on component operation, failure and maintenance for the nuclear research reactors located at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN), in São Paulo, Brazil. Data extracted from this database may be applied in the Probabilistic Safety Analysis of these research reactors or in less complex quantitative assessments related to safety, reliability, availability and maintainability of these facilities. This database may be accessed by users of the corporate network, named IPEN intranet. Professionals who require the access to the database must be duly registered by the system administrator, so that they will be able to consult and handle the information. The logical model adopted to represent the database structure is an entity-relationship model, which is in accordance with the protocols installed in IPEN intranet. The open-source relational database management system called MySQL, which is based on the Structured Query Language (SQL), was used in the development of this work. The PHP programming language was adopted to allow users to handle the database. Finally, the main result of this work was the creation a web application for the component reliability database named PSADB, specifically developed for the research reactors of IPEN; furthermore, the database management system provides relevant information efficiently. (author)

  14. Overview of fast reactor safety research and development in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhold, R.J.; Avery, R.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The liquid metal reactor (LMR) safety R and D program in the U.S. is presently focused on support of two modular innovative reactor concepts: PRISM - the General Electric Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module and SAFR - the Rockwell International Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor. These reactor plant concepts accommodate the use of either oxide fuel or the metal fuel which is under development in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program. Both concepts emphasize prevention of accidents through enhancement of inherent and passive safety characteristics. Enhancement of these characteristics is expected to be a major factor in establishing new and improved safety criteria and licensing arrangements with regulatory authorities for advanced reactors. Limited work is also continuing on the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB), a large pool plant design. Major elements of the current and restructured safety program are discussed. (author)

  15. TRIGA Research Reactor Conversion to LEU and Modernization of Safety Related Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanda, R. M. [Institute for Nuclear Research Piteşti (SCN-Piteşti), Piteşti (Romania)

    2014-08-15

    The USA and IAEA proposed an international programme to reduce the enrichment of uranium in research reactors by converting nuclear fuel containing HEU into fuel containing 20% enriched uranium. The Government of Romania joined the programme and actively supported political, scientific, technical and economic actions that led to the conversion of the active area of the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Research in Piteşti in May 2006. This confirmed the continuity of the Romanian Government’s non-proliferation policy and their active support of international cooperation. Conversion of the Piteşti research reactor was made possible by completion of milestones in the Research Agreement for Reactor Conversion, a contract signed with the US Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory. This agreement provided scientific and technical support and the possibility of delivery of all HEU TRIGA fuel to the United States. Additionally, about 65% of the fresh LEU fuel needed to start the conversion was delivered in the period 1992–1994. Furthermore, conversion was promoted through IAEA Technical Cooperation project ROM/4/024 project funded primarily by the United States that supported technical and scientific efforts and the delivery of the remaining required LEU nuclear fuel to complete the conversion. Nuclear fuel to complete the conversion was made by the French company CERCA with a tripartite contract among the IAEA, CERCA and Romania. The contract was funded by the US Department of Energy with a voluntary contribution by the Romanian Government. The contract stipulated manufacturing and delivery of LEU fuel by CERCA with compliance measures for quality, delivery schedule and safety requirements set by IAEA standards and Romanian legislation. The project was supported by the ongoing technical cooperation, safeguards, legal and procurement assistance of the IAEA, in particular its Department of Nuclear Safety. For Romanian research, the

  16. List of reports from the BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC concerning reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special Problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA) the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Saftety Research Program of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Current state of the auto-evaluation process of the behaviour code in the safety of research reactors in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamani A, Y. R.; Salgado G, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    In Mexico, the regulator organism in nuclear matter is the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, and a nuclear research reactor exists, the TRIGA Mark III, operated by the National Institute of Nuclear Research. In this work the main aspects of the current state and the future challenges are presented with relationship to the installation of the auto-evaluation process of the behaviour code in the safety of research reactors for the TRIGA reactor case. Additionally, the legal mark of the licensing process for the nuclear activities in a research reactor is described in a brief way, and the main characteristics of the reactor, the uses for the isotopes production, the administration and the verification of the safety, the administration program of the radiological protection, the emergency plan and the operation personnel qualification are emphasized. (Author)

  18. Thermohydraulic and safety analysis on China advanced research reactor under station blackout accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Wenxi; Qiu Suizheng; Su Guanghui; Jia Dounan; Liu Xingmin; Zhang Jianwei

    2007-01-01

    A thermohydraulic and safety analysis code-TSACC has been developed using Fortran90 language to evaluate the transient thermohydraulic behavior of the China advanced research reactor (CARR) under station blackout accident (SBA). For the development of TSACC, a series of corresponding mathematical and physical models were applied. Point reactor neutron kinetics model was adopted for solving the reactor power. All possible flow and heat transfer conditions under station blackout accident were considered and the optional correlations were supplied. The usual finite difference method was abandoned and the integral technique was adopted to evaluate the temperature field of the plate type fuel elements. A new simple and convenient equation was proposed for the resolution of the transient behaviors of the main pump instead of the complicated four-quadrant model. Gear method and Adams method were adopted alternately for a better solution to the stiff differential equations describing the dynamic behavior of the CARR. The computational result of TSACC showed the adequacy of the safety margin of CARR under SBA. For the purpose of Verification and Validation (V and V), the simulated results of TSACC were compared with those of RELAP5/MOD3 and a good agreement was obtained. The adoption of modular programming techniques enables TASCC to be applied to other reactors by easily modifying the corresponding function modules

  19. Report on the projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS - Projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power-plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks first projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of quarterly and annually publication of progress reports within the series GRS - F - Fortschrittsberichte (GRS - F - Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of the progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are arranged according to the amended LWR Safety Research Program of the BMFT which will appear in the near future. Another table contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC and the OECD. (orig./HP) [de

  20. List of reports of BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC in the field of reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Major update of Safety Analysis Report for Thai Research Reactor-1/Modification 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tippayakul, Chanatip [Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-07-01

    Thai Research Reactor-1/Modification 1 (TRR-1/M1) was converted from a Material Testing Reactor in 1975 and it had been operated by Office of Atom for Peace (OAP) since 1977 until 2007. During the period, Office of Atom for Peace had two duties for the reactor, that is, to operate and to regulate the reactor. However, in 2007, there was governmental office reformation which resulted in the separation of the reactor operating organization from the regulatory body in order to comply with international standard. The new organization is called Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) which has the mission to promote peaceful utilization of nuclear technology while OAP remains essentially the regulatory body. After the separation, a new ministerial regulation was enforced reflecting a new licensing scheme in which TINT has to apply for a license to operate the reactor. The safety analysis report (SAR) shall be submitted as part of the license application. The ministerial regulation stipulates the outlines of the SAR almost equivalent to IAEA standard 35-G1. Comparing to the IAEA 35-G1 standard, there were several incomplete and missing chapters in the original SAR of TRR1/M1. The major update of the SAR was therefore conducted and took approximately one year. The update work included detail safety evaluation of core configuration which used two fuel element types, the classification of systems, structures and components (SSC), the compilation of detail descriptions of all SSCs and the review and evaluation of radiation protection program, emergency plan and emergency procedure. Additionally, the code of conduct and operating limits and conditions were revised and finalized in this work. A lot of new information was added to the SAR as well, for example, the description of commissioning program, information on environmental impact assessment, decommissioning program, quality assurance program and etc. Due to the complexity of this work, extensive knowledge was

  2. Incidents in nuclear research reactor examined by deterministic probability and probabilistic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Valdir Maciel

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the potential risks submitted by the incidents in nuclear research reactors. For its development, two databases of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, were used, the Incident Report System for Research Reactor and Research Reactor Data Base. For this type of assessment was used the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA), within a confidence level of 90% and the Deterministic Probability Analysis (DPA). To obtain the results of calculations of probabilities for PSA, were used the theory and equations in the paper IAEA TECDOC - 636. The development of the calculations of probabilities for PSA was used the program Scilab version 5.1.1, free access, executable on Windows and Linux platforms. A specific program to get the results of probability was developed within the main program Scilab 5.1.1., for two distributions Fischer and Chi-square, both with the confidence level of 90%. Using the Sordi equations and Origin 6.0 program, were obtained the maximum admissible doses related to satisfy the risk limits established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP, and were also obtained these maximum doses graphically (figure 1) resulting from the calculations of probabilities x maximum admissible doses. It was found that the reliability of the results of probability is related to the operational experience (reactor x year and fractions) and that the larger it is, greater the confidence in the outcome. Finally, a suggested list of future work to complement this paper was gathered. (author)

  3. RB research reactor safety report; Izvestaj o sigurnsti istrazivackog reaktora RB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotic, O; Pesic, M; Vranic, S [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1979-04-15

    This new version of the safety report is a revision of the safety report written in 1962 when the RB reactor started operation after reconstruction. The new safety report was needed because reactor systems and components have been improved and the administrative procedures were changed. the most important improvements and changes were concerned with the use of highly enriched fuel (80% enriched), construction of reactor converter outside the reactor vessel, improved control system by two measuring start-up channels, construction of system for heavy water leak detection, new inter phone connection between control room and other reactor rooms. This report includes description of reactor building with installations, rector vessel, reactor core, heavy water system, control system, safety system, dosimetry and alarm systems, experimental channels, neutron converter, reactor operation. Safety aspects contain analyses of accident reasons, method for preventing reactivity insertions, analyses of maximum hypothetical accidents for cores with natural uranium, 2% enriched and 80% enriched fuel elements. Influence of seismic events on the reactor safety and well as coupling between reactor and the converter are parts of this document.

  4. Severe accident assessment. Results of the reactor safety research project VAHTI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sairanen, R.

    1997-10-01

    The report provides a summary of the publicly funded nuclear reactor safety research project Severe Accident Management (VAHTI). The project has been conducted at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) during the years 1994-96. The main objective was to assist the severe accident management programmes of the Finnish nuclear power plants. The project was divided into five work packages: (1) thermal hydraulic validation of the APROS code, (2) core melt progression within a BWR pressure vessel, (3) failure mode of the BWR pressure vessel, (4) Aerosol behaviour experiments, and (5) development of a computerized severe accident training tool

  5. Multi purpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, V.K.; Sasidharan, K.; Sengupta, Samiran; Singh, Tej

    2006-01-01

    At present Dhruva and Cirus reactors provide the majority of research reactor based facilities to cater to the various needs of a vast pool of researchers in the field of material sciences, physics, chemistry, bio sciences, research and development work for nuclear power plants and production of radio isotopes. With a view to further consolidate and expand the scope of research and development in nuclear and allied sciences, a new 20 MWt multi purpose research reactor is being designed. This paper describes some of the design features and safety aspects of this reactor

  6. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research sponsored by BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  7. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research sponsored by BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of reactor safety research. The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Status of researches in the field of safety of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Schwarz, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This collective publication proposes a synthesis of the status of researches performed in the field of safety of pressurized water reactors. They may discuss past, current and projected research works, involved actors, or lessons learned from these works. The authors propose a presentation of some research tools privileged by the IRSN for these researches: the CABRI and PHEBUS reactors, the GALAXIE experimental platform, and some other installations. Then they address researches related to loss-of-coolant accidents (two-phase thermohydraulics, fuel rod behaviour), to reactivity accidents, to accidents related to dewatering of irradiated fuel storage pools, to fires, to extreme aggressions of natural origin (earthquake, extreme flooding), to core fusion accidents (core heating and fusion within the vessel, vessel failure and apron erosion by corium, containment enclosure dynamic loading, release of radioactive products), to the behaviour of nuclear plant important metallic or civil works components and notably to their ageing, to organisational and human factors or more generally to social and human sciences (design of control rooms, safety organisation and management in EDF nuclear plants), and to other issues and research perspectives

  9. Design of the Control System for Engineered Safety Features of KIJANG Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hagtae; Kim, Jun-Yeon; Chae, Hee-Taek

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to design an effective control system for the Engineered Safety Features (ESF) of KJRR such as the Safety Residual Heat Removal System (SRHRS) pumps and Siphon Break Valve (SBV) without an Engineered Safety Features-Component Control System (ESF-CCS). This control system is called a 'local motor starter', because this system controls motors in the SRHRS pumps and SBVs by receiving the signal from Reactor Protection System (RPS) and Alternate Protection System (APS) when the differential pressure or pool level reach the set points. In this paper, the design concepts and requirements of the local motor starter based on the design features of KJRR is proposed. An ESF is a safety system that mitigates consequences of the Anticipated Operational Occurrence (AOO) and Design Basis Accident (DBA). The results of this paper are able to be used for the development of control systems for research reactors similar to KJRR. The precondition for such application is to have a few ESFs and conduct simple logic. The proposed control system called a local motor starter is being designed, and a manufacture of the actual systems is expected in the foreseeable future

  10. Cost effective safety enhancements for research reactors in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan - results of a joint program with US DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, O.K.; Carlson, R.B.; Rakhmanov, A.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Chernyaev, V.; Chakrov, P.

    2004-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of International Nuclear Safety and Cooperation established the Integrated Research Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (IRRSEP) in February 2002 to support U.S. nonproliferation goals by implementing safety upgrades, or assisting with the safe shutdown and decommissioning of foreign test and research reactors which present security concerns. IRRSEP's key program components are: Phase I: Self-evaluation by facility using provided checklists followed by prioritization to identify the 20 highest risk facilities; Phase II: Site visits with technical evaluation to finalize a list of projects that will enhance safety consistent with IAEA observations; Phase III: Corrective measures to implement the projects. Phases I, II and III are accomplished on a rolling basis, such that work is ongoing at three or four reactors per year. IRRSEP's key objective is to resolve the highest-priority nuclear safety issues at the most vulnerable foreign research reactors as quickly as possible. The prioritization methodology employed identified which research reactors fell into this category. The corrective measures mutually developed with the host facility are based on the premise of developing a sustainable infrastructure within each country to deal with its own nuclear material safety, security, and response issues in the future. IRRSEP also assists in creating an international framework of cooperation and openness between research and test reactor operators, and national and international regulators. The initial projects under IRRSEP are underway at research reactors in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Romania. This paper focuses on the projects undertaken at the WWR-K research reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Alatau, Kazakhstan and the WWR-SM research reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Ulugbek, Uzbekistan. These projects demonstrate the success and cost effectiveness of the IRRSEP program

  11. Cost effective safety enhancements for research reactors in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan - results of a joint program with US DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, O.K.; Carlson, R.B.; Rakhmanov, A.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Chernyaev, V.; Chakrov, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The US Department of Energy's Office of International Nuclear Safety and Cooperation established the Integrated Research Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (IRRSEP) in February 2002 to support U.S. nonproliferation goals by (1) implementing safety upgrades, or (2) assisting with the safe shutdown and decommissioning of foreign test and research reactors which present security concerns. IRRSEP's key program components are: Phase I: Self-evaluation by facility using provided checklists followed by prioritization to identify the 20 highest risk facilities; Phase II: Site visits with technical evaluation to finalize a list of projects that will enhance safety consistent with IAEA observations; Phase III: Corrective measures to implement the projects. Phases I, II and III are accomplished on a rolling basis, such that work is ongoing at three or four reactors per year. IRRSEP's key objective is to resolve the highest-priority nuclear safety issues at the most vulnerable foreign research reactors as quickly as possible. The prioritization methodology employed identified which research reactors fell into this category. The corrective measures mutually developed with the host facility are based on the premise of developing a sustainable infrastructure within each country to deal with its own nuclear material safety, security, and response issues in the future. IRRSEP also assists in creating an international framework of cooperation and openness between research and test reactor operators, and national and international regulators. The initial projects under IRRSEP are underway at research reactors in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Romania. This paper focuses on the projects undertaken at the WWR-K research reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Alatau, Kazakhstan and the WWR-SM research reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Ulugbek, Uzbekistan. These projects demonstrate the success and cost effectiveness of the IRRSEP program

  12. Study of In-Pile test facility for fast reactor safety research: performance requirements and design features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, N.; Kawatta, N.; Niwa, H.; Kondo, S.; Maeda, K

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a program and the main design features of a new in-pile safety facility SERAPH planned for future fast reactor safety research. The current status of R and D on technical developments in relation to the research objectives and performance requirements to the facility design is given.

  13. Annual report on reactor safety research projects. Reporting period 2013. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS)mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRSF- Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the Internet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)''. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  14. Annual report on reactor safety research projects. Reporting period 2011. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS)mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRSF- Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the Internet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)''. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  15. Annual report on reactor safety research projects. Reporting period 2014. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the lnternet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)''. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. lt has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties.

  16. Annual report on reactor safety research projects. Reporting period 2015. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft tor Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are ·' prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the lnternet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)''. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. it has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties.

  17. Ageing of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, many of the research institutions were centred on a research reactor facility as main technological asset and major source of neutrons for research. Important achievements were made in time in these research institutions for development of nuclear materials technology and nuclear safety for nuclear energy. At present, ageing of nuclear research facilities among these research reactors and ageing of staff are considerable factors of reduction of competence in research centres. The safe way of mitigation of this trend deals with ageing management by so called, for power reactors, Plant Life Management and new investments in staff as investments in research, or in future resources of competence. A programmatic approach of ageing of research reactors in correlation with their actual and future utilisation, will be used as a basis for safety evaluation and future spending. (author)

  18. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB Forschungsbetreuung (research coordination department) at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  19. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Each progress report presents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, (FB) (Research Coordination Department), within the framework of general informations of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program of the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  20. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB (research coordination department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./PW) [de

  1. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB Forschungsbetreuung (Research Coordination Department) at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  2. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    Each progress report presents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, (FB) (Research Coordination Department), within the framework of general informations of progreess in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program of the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communitites) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRS 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB Forschungsbetreuung (research coordination department) at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  5. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB Forschungsbetreuung (Research Coordination Department) at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  6. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Each progress report presents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, (FB) (Research Coordination Department), within the framework of general informations of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program of the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communitites) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  7. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, (FB) (Research Coordination Department), within the framework of general informations of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program of the safety of LWR 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Research on application of system of neutron, thermohydraulic and safety analysis codes in order to simulation of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Van Lam; Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem

    2004-01-01

    Requirements of neutron, thermohydraulic and safety analysis calculation are very important because of issuing new version of SAR for DNRR, research on construction of new research reactor and nuclear power plant. Research on application of system of neutron, thermohydraulic and safety analysis codes in order to simulation of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor has been done in the frame work of research theme in the year 2002-2003. The purposes of the research are maintaining safety operation of the DNRR and enhancement of man power and calculation and safety analysis tool potential. (author)

  9. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    fuels as well as the applied methodologies. The IRSN proceeds in a relevant and independent assessment of the submitted safety reports. To achieve this goal and maintain over time an independent and relevant assessment capability, the IRSN relies on the excellence of its experts and on state of art techniques and knowledge. The IRSN contributes by its work in key area to cutting edge research and development in order to drive nuclear industry towards making the best use of scientific and technological progress for improving safety, environmental protection and health. To maintain at all times the state of the art knowledge and the operational expertise necessary to deal efficiently with major nuclear accident consequences, the IRSN carries out, on the one hand, its own research and development programs to gain accurate knowledge on still unknown phenomena for safety analysis. On the other hand, the IRSN works out its own scientific calculation methodologies involving industrial calculation chain. Concerning more particularly the 'two-phase flows' thematic, The ISRN must correctly simulate the primary fluid behavior in the reactor in normal operation as well as in accidental situations, to estimate if, in such situations, the core reactor state is fully safe and any safety risk is undergone The research and development programs launched at the ISRN on two-phase flows gather work on advanced thermohydraulic configurations encounter in various reactor states (normal operation or accidental situations), in particular: (i)The estimation of the margin to the critical heat flux in normal operation (DNBR), (ii) The pressurized thermal shock, which is due to mechanical important constraints in the reactor vessel resulting from the injection of a cold fluid in case of emergency cooling (PTS), (iii) The reactivity insertion accident (RIA), (iv) The loss of coolant accident (LOCA), (vi) The accidents in spent-fuel pools and (vii) The severe accident, which could lead to core

  10. Study on the Safety Classification Criteria of Mechanical Systems and Components for Open Pool-Type Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belal, Al Momani [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jong Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper describes a new compromised safety classification approach based on the comparative study of the different practices in safety classification of mechanical systems and components of open pool-type RRs, which have been adopted by several developed countries in the nuclear power area. It is hoped that the proposed safety classification criteria will be used to develop a harmonized consensus international standard. Different safety classification criteria for systems, structures, and components (SSCs) of nuclear reactors are used among the countries that export or import nuclear reactor technology, which may make the nuclear technology trade and exchange difficult. Thus, such various different approaches of safety classification need to be compromised to establish a global standard. This article proposes practicable optimized criteria for safety classification of SSCs for open pool-type research reactors (RRs)

  11. Study on the Safety Classification Criteria of Mechanical Systems and Components for Open Pool-Type Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belal, Al Momani; Jo, Jong Chull

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new compromised safety classification approach based on the comparative study of the different practices in safety classification of mechanical systems and components of open pool-type RRs, which have been adopted by several developed countries in the nuclear power area. It is hoped that the proposed safety classification criteria will be used to develop a harmonized consensus international standard. Different safety classification criteria for systems, structures, and components (SSCs) of nuclear reactors are used among the countries that export or import nuclear reactor technology, which may make the nuclear technology trade and exchange difficult. Thus, such various different approaches of safety classification need to be compromised to establish a global standard. This article proposes practicable optimized criteria for safety classification of SSCs for open pool-type research reactors (RRs)

  12. Synthesis of the IRSN report on the second safety re-examination of the EOLE and MINERVE research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This synthesis briefly discusses the results of the second safety re-examination of the EOLE and MINERVE research reactors which are operated by the CEA in a same building in Cadarache, and are presented in appendix. It addresses the seismic behaviour diagnosis of the EOLE and MINERVE installations, other possible external aggressions (plane crash, rising of underground water sheet, thunder, heat or cold wave, effects of wind and snow), the organisational processes, measures regarding radiation protection, the reactor operation safety, the safety of handling operations, the safety of warehousing sites, possible internal aggressions (fire, explosion), the confinement with respect to the environment

  13. Review on conformance of JMTR reactor facility to safety design examination guides for water-cooled reactors for test and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Naka, Michihiro; Sakuta, Yoshiyuki; Hori, Naohiko; Matsui, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Masataka

    2009-03-01

    The safety design examination guides for water-cooled reactors for test and research are formulated as fundamental judgements on the basic design validity for licensing from a viewpoint of the safety. Taking the refurbishment opportunity of the JMTR, the conformance of the JMTR reactor facility to current safety design examination guides was reviewed with licensing documents, annexes and related documents. As a result, it was found that licensing documents fully satisfied the requirements of the current guides. Moreover, it was found that the JMTR reactor facility itself also satisfied the guides requirements as well as the safety performance, since the facility with safety function such as structure, systems, devices had been installed based on the licensing documents under the permission by the regulation authority. Important devices for safety have been produced under authorization of regulating authority. Therefore, it was confirmed that the licensing was conformed to guides, and that the JMTR has enough performance. (author)

  14. Reports on research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Minister for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of quarterly and annually publication of progress reports within the series GRS-F-Fortschrittsbericht (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are arranged according to the Research Program on the Safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are marked by current numbers in sequence of their arrangement in this compilation. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Reports on research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Minister for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of quarterly and annually publication of progress reports within the series GRS-F-Fortschrittsbericht (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are arranged according to the Research Program on the Safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are marked by current numbers in sequence of their arrangement in this compilation. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Experience in the implementation of quality assurance program and safety culture assessment of research reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Suryopratomo, K.

    2001-01-01

    The implementation of quality assurance program and safety culture for research reactor operation are of importance to assure its safety status. It comprises an assessment of the quality of both technical and organizational aspects involved in safety. The method for the assessment is based on judging the quality of fulfillment of a number of essential issues for safety i.e. through audit, interview and/or discussions with personnel and management in plant. However, special consideration should be given to the data processing regarding the fuzzy nature of the data i.e. in answering the questionnaire. To accommodate this situation, the SCAP, a computer program based on fuzzy logic for assessing plant safety status, has been developed. As a case study, the experience in the assessment of Kartini research reactor safety status shows that it is strongly related to the implementation of quality assurance program in reactor operation and awareness of reactor operation staffs to safety culture practice. It is also shown that the application of the fuzzy rule in assessing reactor safety status gives a more realistic result than the traditional approach. (author)

  17. Regulatory Approach to Safety of Long Time Operating Research Reactors in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapozhnikov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In the Russian Federation more than 60% of operating Nuclear Research Facilities (NRFs) are of age over 30 years old or their usage exceeds originally conceived continuous operation. In this regard, important areas of regulatory body activity are: 1) a systematic assessment of the actual state of structures, systems and components (SSCs) important to safety, 2) control of implementation of organizational and technical measures to mitigate ageing impact on the basis of programmes to manage reliability (service life) of SSCs, and 3) issues of facility modification/reconstruction in line with up-to-day safety requirements. The practice of licensing NRFs with long operating times shows that the national regulations are generally in compliance with IAEA recommendations for ageing management of research reactors. In operating organizations, the ageing management is being effectively provided as a part of the integrated management system for NRFs, including the monitoring of the reliability of SSCs, a methodology to detect their ageing, reporting and investigation of events, analysis of their root causes, and measures to prevent and mitigate ageing effects to safety. The report outlines a good practice of safety regulation of NRFs with long operating times and based on lessons learned from experience, including challenges for future improvement of ageing management

  18. Regulatory Approach to Safety of Long Time Operating Research Reactors in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapozhnikov, Alexander [Industrial and Nuclear Supervision Service, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    In the Russian Federation more than 60% of operating Nuclear Research Facilities (NRFs) are of age over 30 years old or their usage exceeds originally conceived continuous operation. In this regard, important areas of regulatory body activity are: 1) a systematic assessment of the actual state of structures, systems and components (SSCs) important to safety, 2) control of implementation of organizational and technical measures to mitigate ageing impact on the basis of programmes to manage reliability (service life) of SSCs, and 3) issues of facility modification/reconstruction in line with up-to-day safety requirements. The practice of licensing NRFs with long operating times shows that the national regulations are generally in compliance with IAEA recommendations for ageing management of research reactors. In operating organizations, the ageing management is being effectively provided as a part of the integrated management system for NRFs, including the monitoring of the reliability of SSCs, a methodology to detect their ageing, reporting and investigation of events, analysis of their root causes, and measures to prevent and mitigate ageing effects to safety. The report outlines a good practice of safety regulation of NRFs with long operating times and based on lessons learned from experience, including challenges for future improvement of ageing management.

  19. Reports on the research projects in the field of reactor safety supported by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-03-01

    The Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) is promoting financial plans for reactor safety research. Objective research should improve the safety of light water reactors and minimize the risk for the environment. The Forschungsbetreuung at IRS (IRS-FB) as consultants to the BMFT provides information about the research planning. In addition, information is given about the projects RS 100 and At T 85a sponsored by the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI). Individual reports will be furnished and put into standard form by the research contractors. Each report gives informations about: the work accomplished, the results produced, the outlook extension of the work. The initial report of a research project describes in addition the purpose of the work. Reports of the project 'Nuclear Safety' (PNS) have been added to those ones concerning the projects sponsored by the BMFT or the BMI. The PNS is being conducted by the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH (GfK), Karlsruhe. IRS-F-23 is informing of the activities during the fourth quarter of 1974 (October 1st - December 31st 1974). Detailed technical information can be requested from IRS-FB. (orig.) [de

  20. Progress report - reports on reactor safety research programs sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC and the OECD. The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Reports on the research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the safety program 'Reactor Safety' are sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT - Secretary of State for Research and Technology). Objective of this program is to continue improving the safety of LWR, in order to minimize the risk for the environment. With grant assistance from the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI - Secretary of State for Home Affairs) research contracts in the field of reactor safety are being performed. Results of these projects should contribute to resolve questions arising nuclear licensing procedures. The Forschungsbetreuung (FB - research supervision department) at the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS), as consultants to BMFT and BMI, provides information about the progress of investigations. Individual reports will be prepared and put into standard forms by the research contractors. Each report gives information on: 1) the work accomplished, 2) the results obtained, 3) the work planned to be continued. Initial reports of research projects describe in addition the purpose of the work. A BMFT-research program on the safety of Fast Breeders (Schneller Brutreaktor - SBR) is presently under discussion. In order to define several problems, investigations included in the present compilation (RS 139, 140, 143, 162) will be previously performed. (orig.) [de

  2. Reports on the research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    Investigations on the safety of light water reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the safety program 'Reactor Safety' are sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT - Secretary of State for Research and Technology). Objective of this program is to continue improving the safety of LWR, in order to minimize the risk for the environment. With grant assistance from the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI - Secretary of State for Home Affairs) research contrcts in the field of reactor safety are being performed. Results of these projects should contribute to resolve questions arising nuclear licensing procedures. The Forschungsbetreuung (FB - research supervision department) at the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS), as consultants to BMFT and BMI, provides information about the progress of investigations. Individual reports will be prepared and put into standard forms by the research contractors. Each report gives information on: 1) the work accomplished, 2) the results obtained, 3) the work planned to be continued. Initial reports of research projects describe in addition the purpose of the work. A BMFT-research program on the safety of Fast Breeders (Schneller Brutreaktor - SRB) is presently under discussion. In order to define several problems, investigations included in the present compilation (RS 139, 140, 143, 162) will be previously performed. (orig.) [de

  3. Experimental study on the safety of Kyoto University Research Reactor at natural circulation cooling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Shen, Xiuzhong; Fujihara, Yasuyuki; Sano, Tadafumi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The natural circulation cooling capacity of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) was experimentally investigated. • The distributions of the outlet temperature of the fuel elements under natural circulation operations were measured. • The average temperature rise and the average natural circulation flow velocity in core were calculated. • The safety of KUR under all of the normal operations with natural circulation cooling mode has been analyzed. • The natural circulation flow after the reactor shutdown was confirmed. - Abstract: In this study, the natural circulation cooling capacity of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is experimentally investigated by measuring the inlet and outlet temperatures of the core under natural circulation operation at various thermal powers ranging from 10 kW to 100 kW and the shutdown state. In view of the uneven power distribution and the resultant inconsistent coolant outlet temperature in the core, eight measuring points located separately in the outlet of the fuel elements were chosen to investigate the distribution of the outlet temperature of the core. The natural circulation cooling capacity represented by the average natural circulation flow velocity in the core is calculated from the temperature difference between the outlet and inlet temperature of the core. The measured outlet temperature of the fuel elements shows a cross-sectional distribution agreeing with the distribution of the thermal output of the fuel elements in the core. Since the measured outlet temperatures decrease quickly in the flow direction in a small local region above the outlet of the core, the mixing of the hot water out of the core with the cold water around the core outlet is found to happen in the small region not more than 5 cm far from the core outlet. The natural circulation flow velocity in the core increases non-linearly with the thermal power. The safety of KUR has been analysed by conservatively estimating the

  4. Research and development program for PWR safety at the CEA reactor thermal hydraulics laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, M.

    1995-01-01

    Since the start of the French electronuclear program, the three partners Fermate, EDF and Cea (DRN and IPSN) have devoted considerable effort to research and development for safety issues. In particular an important program on thermal hydraulics was initiated at the beginning of the seventies. It is illustrated by the development of the CATHARE thermalhydraulic safety code which includes physical models derived from a large experimental support program and the construction of the BETHSY integral facility which is aimed to assess both the CATHARE code and the physical relevance of the accident management procedures to be applied on reactors. The state of the art on this program is described with particular emphasis on the capabilities and the assessment of the last version of CATHARE and the lessons drawn from 50 BETHSY tests performed so far. The future plans for safety research cover the following strategy: - to solve the few problems identified on present computing tools and extend the assessment - to solve the few problems identified on present computing tools and extend the assessment - to perform safety studies on the basis of plant operation feedback - to contribute to treating the safety issues related to the future reactors and in particular the case of severe accidents which have to be taken into account from the design stage. The program on severe accidents is aimed to support the design studies performed by the industrial partners and to provide computing tools which model the various phases of severe accidents and will be validated on experiments performed with real and simulating materials. The main lines of the program are: - the development of the TOLBIAC 3D code for the thermal hydraulics of core melt pools, which will be validated against the Bali experiment presently under construction - the Sultan experiment, to study the capability of cooling by external flooding of the reactor vessel - the development of the MC-3D code for core melt

  5. Reactor system safety assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattson, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy of reactor safety is that design should follow established and conservative engineering practices, there should be safety margins in all modes of plant operation, special systems should be provided for accidents, and safety systems should have redundant components. This philosophy provides ''defense in depth.'' Additionally, the safety of nuclear power plants relies on ''safety systems'' to assure acceptable response to design basis events. Operating experience has shown the need to study plant response to more frequent upset conditions and to account for the influence of operators and non-safety systems on overall performance. Defense in depth is being supplemented by risk and reliability assessment

  6. Experiments with preirradiated fuel rods in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiki, O.; Kobayashi, S.; Takariko, I.; Ishijima, K.

    1992-01-01

    In the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) owned and operated by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), extensive experimental studies on the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions have been continued since the start of the test program in 1975. Accumulated experimental data were used as the fundamental data base of the Japanese safety evaluation guideline for reactivity initiated events in light water cooled nuclear power plants established by the nuclear safety commission in 1984. All of the data used to establish the guideline were, however, limited to those derived from the tests with fresh fuel rods as test samples because of the lack of experimental facility to handle highly radioactive materials.The guideline, therefore, introduces the peak fuel enthalpy of 85 cal/g which was adopted from the SPERT-CDC data as a provisional failure threshold of preirradiated fuel rod and, says that this value should be revised based on the NSRR experiments in the future. According to the above requirement, new NSRR experimental program with the preirradiated fuel rods as test samples was started in 1989. Test fuel rods are prepared by refabrication of the long-sized fuel rods preirradiated in commercial PWRs and BWRs into short segments and by preirradiation of short-sized test fuel rods in the Japan Material Testing Reactor(JMTR). For the tests with preirradiated fuel rods as test samples, the special experimental capsules, the automatic instrumentation fitting device, the automatic capsule assembling device and the capsule loading device were newly developed. In addition, the existing hot cave was modified to mount the capsule assembling device and the other inspection tools and, a new small iron cell was established adjacent to the cave to store the instrumentation fitting device. (author)

  7. Reactor Safety Assessment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSAS is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  8. Reactor safety assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSA is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  9. Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-04-01

    This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water reactors (LWRs) and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  10. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear power reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon, G.A.

    1976-10-01

    This report is based on the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited submission to the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning on the safety of CANDU reactors. It discusses normal operating conditions, postulated accident conditions, and safety systems. The release of radioactivity under normal and accident conditions is compared to the limits set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. (author)

  12. SRP reactor safety evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant reactors have operated for over 100 reactor years without an incident of significant consequence to on or off-site personnel. The reactor safety posture incorporates a conservative, failure-tolerant design; extensive administrative controls carried out through detailed operating and emergency written procedures; and multiple engineered safety systems backed by comprehensive safety analyses, adapting through the years as operating experience, changes in reactor operational modes, equipment modernization, and experience in the nuclear power industry suggested. Independent technical reviews and audits as well as a strong organizational structure also contribute to the defense-in-depth safety posture. A complete review of safety history would discuss all of the above contributors and the interplay of roles. This report, however, is limited to evolution of the engineered safety features and some of the supporting analyses. The discussion of safety history is divided into finite periods of operating history for preservation of historical perspective and ease of understanding by the reader. Programs in progress are also included. The accident at Three Mile Island was assessed for its safety implications to SRP operation. Resulting recommendations and their current status are discussed separately at the end of the report. 16 refs., 3 figs

  13. Multimegawatt Space Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Multimegawatt (MMW) Space Reactor Project supports the Strategic Defense Initiative Office requirement to provide reliable, safe, cost-effective, electrical power in the MMW range. Specifically, power may be used for neutral particle beams, free electron lasers, electromagnetic launchers, and orbital transfer vehicles. This power plant technology may also apply to the electrical power required for other uses such as deep-space probes and planetary exploration. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Project, the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program, and Centaurus Program all support the Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program and form an important part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) space and defense power systems activities. A major objective of the MMW project is the development of a reference flight system design that provides the desired levels of public safety, health protection, and special nuclear material (SNM) protection when used during its designated missions. The safety requirements for the MMW project are a hierarchy of requirements that consist of safety requirements/regulations, a safety policy, general safety criteria, safety technical specifications, safety design specifications, and the system design. This paper describes the strategy and philosophy behind the development of the safety requirements imposed upon the MMW concept developers. The safety organization, safety policy, generic safety issues, general safety criteria, and the safety technical specifications are discussed

  14. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramrattana, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  15. The water reactor safety research project index: a description of the computerized system for its databank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Loggia, E.; Primavera, R.

    1993-01-01

    The water reactor nuclear safety research project index has been published by the CEC for many years as a compilation of information on research projects relating to LWR nuclear safety. Since 1981, it has been published, alternatively with NEA (OECD), every second year. The number of contributions from research organizations in Community member countries has steadily increased and reached the level of 1 700 pages, in which more than 600 project descriptions have been collected. In 1988, for the first time, the document was produced using a computerized system developed with the assistance of the ISEI (Institute for Systems Engineering and Informatics) of JRC Ispra. The data have been stored in a computer based in Ispra. The system allows searching a preselected set of subjects through the information stored in the computer: it makes the updating of the projects description much easier and makes the retrieval of the data possible. This report presents a short description of the computerized system developed for the databank of the index. The computerized system presented in this report is structured in a quite general way and for that reason can be adapted very easily to every field where a databank needs to be constituted in order to collect extended information on several projects. (authors). 6 figs., 5 tabs., 5 refs

  16. Introductory user's manual for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Reactor Safety Research Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scofield, N.R.; Hardy, H.A.; Laats, E.T.

    1984-03-01

    The United States NRC has established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank Program to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. Local direction of the program is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc., prime contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The NRC/DAE Data Bank Program provides a central computer storage mechanism and access software for data that is to be used by code development and assessment groups in meeting the code and correlation needs of the nuclear industry. The administrative portion of the program provides data entry, documentation, training, and advisory services to users and the NRC. The NRC/DAE Data Bank and the capabilities of the data access software are described in this document

  17. Introductory user's manual for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Reactor Safety Research Data Bank. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, H.A.; Laats, E.T.

    1985-03-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank Program to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. Local direction of the program is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc., prime contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The NRC/DAE Data Bank Program provides a central computer storage mechanism and access software for data to be used by code development and assessment groups in meeting the code correlation needs of the nuclear industry. The administrative portion of the program provides data entry, documentation, training, and advisory services to users and the USNRC. The NRC/DAE Data Bank and the capabilities of the data access software are described in this document

  18. Seismic safety review mission Almaty WWR 10 MW research reactor Almaty, Kazakhstan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurpinar, A.; Slemmons, D.B.; David, M.; Masopust, R.

    1995-06-01

    On the request of the government of Kazakhstan and within the scope of the TC project KAZ/0/004, a seismic safety review mission was conducted in Almaty, 8-19 May 1995 for the WWR 10 Mw research reactor. This review followed the fact finding mission which visited Almaty in November 1993 together with an INSARR mission. At that time some information regarding the seismotectonic setting of the site as well as the seismic capacity of the facility was obtained. This document presents the results of further work carried out on both the issues. It discusses technical session findings on geology, seismology, structures and equipments. In the end conclusions and recommendations of the mission are given. 4 refs, figs, tabs, 18 photos

  19. Improving Research Reactor Accident Response Capability at the Hungarian Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegh, J.; Gajdos, F.; Horvath, Cs.; Matisz, A.; Nyisztor, D.

    2013-06-01

    The paper describes the design and implementation of an on-line operation monitoring and accident response support system to be used at the CERTA emergency response centre of Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA). The monitored facility is the Budapest Research Reactor (BRR), which is a tank-type thermal reactor having 10 MW thermal power. The basic reason for the development of the on-line safety information system is to extend the emergency response capability of the CERTA crisis centre to include emergencies related to BRR, as well. CERTA is operated by HAEA at its Budapest headquarters and the centre already has an on-line system for monitoring the state of the four units of Paks NPP, Hungary. The system is called CERTA VITA and it is able to monitor the four VVER-440/V213 units during their normal operation, and during emergencies (including severe accidents). Ensuring appropriate emergency response capabilities, as well as improving the presently available systems and tools was one of the important recommendations resulting from the analyses following the severe accident at Fukushima. This task is valid not only for the operators of the nuclear facilities but also for the nuclear safety authorities, therefore HAEA decided to launch a project - together with the Centre for Energy Research, the operator of BRR - to establish an on-line information system similar to the CERTA VITA used for monitoring the four units of the Paks NPP. It is believed that by the introduction of this new on-line system the accident response capabilities of HAEA will be further enhanced and the BRR emergencies will be handled at the same professional level as potential emergencies at Paks NPP. (authors)

  20. Siting of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop criteria for siting and the site-related design basis for research reactors. The concepts presented in this document are intended as recommendations for new reactors and are not suggested for backfitting purposes for facilities already in existence. In siting research reactors serious consideration is given to minimizing the effects of the site on the reactor and the reactor on the site and the potential impact of the reactor on the environment. In this document guidance is first provided on the evaluation of the radiological impact of the installation under normal reactor operation and accident conditions. A classification of research reactors in groups is then proposed, together with a different approach for each group, to take into account the relevant safety problems associated with facilities of different characteristics. Guidance is also provided for both extreme natural events and for man-induced external events which could affect the safe operation of the reactor. Extreme natural events include earthquakes, flooding for river or coastal sites and extreme meteorological phenomena. The feasibility of emergency planning is finally considered for each group of reactors

  1. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  2. Space nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damon, D.; Temme, M.; Brown, N.

    1990-01-01

    Definition of safety requirements and design features of the SP-100 space reactor power system has been guided by a mission risk analysis. The analysis quantifies risk from accidental radiological consequences for a reference mission. Results show that the radiological risk from a space reactor can be made very low. The total mission risk from radiological consequences for a shuttle-launched, earth orbit SP-100 mission is estimated to be 0.05 Person-REM (expected values) based on a 1 mREM/yr de Minimus dose. Results are given for each mission phase. The safety benefits of specific design features are evaluated through risk sensitivity analyses

  3. Reactor safety research against the backdrop of the Energy-Omnibus Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, B.

    1995-01-01

    On July 19, 1994, the German Federal Parliament adopted the Coal/Nuclear Power Omnibus Law, in which a new quality of safety of future nuclear power plants has been laid down. The defense-in-depth safety concept underlying the nuclear power plants currently in operation is derived from the principle of safety precautions made against reactor accidents, and encompasses preventive measures of accident mangement and mitigating measures of containing possible consequences. Accident management leads to the requirement that even in the most unlikely accidents with core meltdown the consequences remain limited to the plant. A new quality in reactor safety is represented by the System 80+ advanced pressurized water reactor and by the European Pressurized Water Reactor, EPR. Despite different views about the approaches used to address individaul aspects in the achievement of safety goals, there is agreement on the principle that risk provisions, by achieving more transparency, are to result in better public acceptance of the peaceful uses of nuclear power. (orig.) [de

  4. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeraraghaven, N.

    1990-01-01

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  5. Safety assessments relating to the use of new fuels in research reactors: application to the case of FRM 2 reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.; Bars, G.; Tran Dai

    2001-01-01

    After giving a brief reminder of the procedure applied in France for the licensing of the use of a new fuel type or design in a research reactor, we outline the main safety aspects associated with such a modification. Finally, by way of an example, we focus on the safety assessment relating to the IRIS irradiation device used in SILOE reactor, in particular for the qualification of the fuel dedicated to FRM II reactor of the Technical University of Munich. This qualification was carried out on a U 3 Si 2 fuel plate enriched to about 90 % in weight of 235 U and containing 1.5 g of uranium per cm 3 . The evaluation performed by the IPSN for GRS did not call into question the choice of U 3 Si 2 fuel plates for the FRM-II reactor. (authors)

  6. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    Theses of proceedings of the 9 Topical Meeting on problems of nuclear power plant safety are presented. Reports include results of neutron-physical experiments carried out for reactor safety justification. Concepts of advanced reactors with improved safety are considered. Results of researches on fuel cycles are given too

  7. Probabilistic safety assessment of Tehran Research Reactor using systems analysis programs for hands-on integrated reliability evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, M.H.; Nematollahi, M.R.; Sepanloo, K.

    2004-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment application is found to be a practical tool for research reactor safety due to intense involvement of human interactions in an experimental facility. In this document the application of the probabilistic safety assessment to the Tehran Research Reactor is presented. The level 1 practicabilities safety assessment application involved: Familiarization with the plant, selection of accident initiators, mitigating functions and system definitions, event tree constructions and quantifications, fault tree constructions and quantification, human reliability, component failure data base development and dependent failure analysis. Each of the steps of the analysis given above is discussed with highlights from the selected results. Quantification of the constructed models is done using systems analysis programs for hands-on integrated reliability evaluations software

  8. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  9. Probabilistic safety analysis and risk-based inspection of nuclear research reactors: state-of-the-art and implementation proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Raíssa O.; Vasceoncelos, Vanderley de; Soares, Wellington A.; Silva Júnior, Silvério F.; Raso, Amanda L.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: raissaomarques@gmail.com, E-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, E-mail: soaresw@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, E-mail: amandaraso@hotmail.com, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Industrial facilities systems deteriorate over time during operation, thus increasing the possibility of accidents. Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) classifies such systems by their risk information with the purpose of prioritizing inspection efforts. RBI can reduce inspection activities, resulting in lower risk levels, and maintaining reliability and safety in acceptable levels. Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection (RI-ISI) is a RBI approach used in nuclear industry. RI-ISI uses outcomes from Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) to plan In-Service Inspections (ISI). Despite nuclear research reactors are simpler and have lower risks than power reactors, the application of PSA to them may be useful for safety improvements once they are more flexible, provide easier access to its core, and allow changes in fuel configurations in case of experimental tests. Ageing management of structures, systems and components important to safety of a nuclear research reactor throughout its lifetime is also required to assure continued adequacy of safety levels, reliable operation, and compliance with operational limits and conditions. This includes periodic review of ISI programs in which monitoring of material deterioration and aging effects are considered, and that can be supported by the RBI approach. A review of state-of-the-art of PSA and RBI applications to nuclear reactors is presented in this work. Advantages to apply these methodologies are also analyzed. PSA and RBI implementation proposal applied to nuclear research reactors is also presented, as well as its application to a TRIGA research nuclear reactor using computer codes developed by ReliaSoft® Corporation. (author)

  10. Probabilistic safety analysis and risk-based inspection of nuclear research reactors: state-of-the-art and implementation proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Raíssa O.; Vasceoncelos, Vanderley de; Soares, Wellington A.; Silva Júnior, Silvério F.; Raso, Amanda L.; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2017-01-01

    Industrial facilities systems deteriorate over time during operation, thus increasing the possibility of accidents. Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) classifies such systems by their risk information with the purpose of prioritizing inspection efforts. RBI can reduce inspection activities, resulting in lower risk levels, and maintaining reliability and safety in acceptable levels. Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection (RI-ISI) is a RBI approach used in nuclear industry. RI-ISI uses outcomes from Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) to plan In-Service Inspections (ISI). Despite nuclear research reactors are simpler and have lower risks than power reactors, the application of PSA to them may be useful for safety improvements once they are more flexible, provide easier access to its core, and allow changes in fuel configurations in case of experimental tests. Ageing management of structures, systems and components important to safety of a nuclear research reactor throughout its lifetime is also required to assure continued adequacy of safety levels, reliable operation, and compliance with operational limits and conditions. This includes periodic review of ISI programs in which monitoring of material deterioration and aging effects are considered, and that can be supported by the RBI approach. A review of state-of-the-art of PSA and RBI applications to nuclear reactors is presented in this work. Advantages to apply these methodologies are also analyzed. PSA and RBI implementation proposal applied to nuclear research reactors is also presented, as well as its application to a TRIGA research nuclear reactor using computer codes developed by ReliaSoft® Corporation. (author)

  11. Annual report on reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Minister for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    Investigations on the safety of light water reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of his research program on reactor safety are sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) (Federal Minister for Research and Technology). Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks also projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS), (Society for Reactor Safety), by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of semi-annual and annual publication of progress reports within the series GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, (FB) (Research Coordination Department), within the framework of general informations of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the same classification system as applied in the nuclear index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP)

  12. Evaluation of reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-04-15

    Although the operation of nuclear reactors has a remarkably good record of safety, the prevention of possible reactor accidents is one of the major factors that atomic planners have to contend with. At the same time, excessive caution may breed an attitude that hampers progress, either by resisting new development or by demanding unnecessarily elaborate and expensive precautions out of proportion to the actual hazards involved. The best course obviously is to determine the possible dangers and adopt adequate measures for their prevention, providing of course, for a reasonable margin of error in judging the hazards and the effectiveness of the measures. The greater the expert understanding and thoroughness with which this is done, the narrower need the margin be. This is the basic idea behind the evaluation of reactor safety

  13. Hualong One's nuclear reactor core design and relative safety issues research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H., E-mail: yuhong_xing@126.com [Nuclear Power Inst. of China, Design and Research Sub-Inst., Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2015-07-01

    'Full text:' Hualong One, a third generation 1000MWe-class pressurized water reactor, is developed by China National Nuclear Cooperation (CNNC), based on the self-reliant technologies and experiences from China 40 years designing, construction, operation and maintenance of NPPs. In China, it has been approved to construct at Fuqing 5&6 and Fangchenggang 3&4. The Hualong One adopts advanced design features to dramatically enhance plant safety, economic efficiency and convenience of operation and maintenance. It consists of three loops with nominal thermal power output 3060 MWt and a 60-year design life. Its reactor core has 177 fuel assemblies, 18 month refueling interval (after initial cycle), and more than 15% thermal margin. It adopts low leakage loading pattern which can achieve better economy of the neutron, higher reactivity and lower radiation damage of pressure vessel. For the safety design, incorporating the feedback of Fukushima accident, the Hualong One has a combination of active and passive safety systems, a single station layout, double containment structure, and comprehensive implementation of defence-in-depth design principles. The new design features has been successfully evaluated to ensure that they enhance the performance and safety of Hualong One. Several experimental activates have been conducted, such as cavity injection and cooling system testing, passive containment heat removal system testing, and passive residual heat removal system of secondary side testing. The future improvements of Hualong reactor will focus on better economic core design and more reliable safety system. (author)

  14. Research and development studies on the seismic behaviour of the PEC fast reactor (safety analysis detailed report no. 8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelli, A.; Forni, M.; Masoni, P.; Maresca, G.; Castoldi, A.; Muzzi, F. [ENEA, Rome (Italy); Ansaldo Spa, Genoa [Italy; ISMES Spa, Bergamo [Italy

    1988-01-15

    This paper presents the main features and results of the numerical and experimental studies that were carried out by ENEA (Italian Commission for Alternative Energy Sources) for the seismic verification of the Italian PEC fast reactor test facility. More precisely, the paper focuses on the wide-ranging research and development programme that has been performed (and recently completed) on the reactor building, the reactor-block, the main vessel, the core and the shutdown system. The needs of these detailed studies are stressed and the feed-backs on the design, necessary safisfy the seismic safety requirements, are recalled. The general validity of the analyses in the framework of the research and development activities for nuclear reactor is also pointed out.

  15. Perspectives on reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  16. Perspectives on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskin, F.E.

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course

  17. Safety evaluation for instrumentation and control system upgrading project of Malaysian TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI Research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridha Roslan; Nik Mohd Faiz Khairuddin

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Malaysian TRIGA MARK II research reactor has been in safe operation since its first criticality in 1982. The reactor is licensed to be operated by Malaysian Nuclear Agency to perform training and research development related activities. Due to its extensive operation since last three decades, the option of modifications for safety and safety-related item and component become a necessary to replace the outdated equipment to a stat-of-art, reliable technologies. This paper will present the current regulatory activities performed by Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) to ensure the upgrading of analogue to digital instrumentation and control system is implemented in safe manner. The review activity includes documentation review, manufacturer quality audit and on-site inspection for commissioning. The review performed by AELB is based on The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Requirements NS-R-4, entitled Safety of Research Reactors. During this endeavour, AELB seeks technical cooperation from Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), the nuclear experts organization of the country of origin of the instrumentation and control technology. The regulatory activity is still on-going and is expected to be completed by issuance of Authorization for Restart on December 2013. (author)

  18. New about research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorenkov, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    The multi-purpose research reactor MAPLE (Canada) and concept of new reactor MAPLE-CNF as will substitute the known Canadian research reactor NRU are described. New reactor will be used as contributor for investigations into materials, neutron beams and further developments for the CANDU type reactor. The Budapest research reactor (BRR) and its application after the last reconstruction are considered also [ru

  19. Research reactor support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Research reactors (RRs) have been used in a wide range of applications including nuclear power development, basic physics research, education and training, medical isotope production, geology, industry and other fields. However, many research reactors are fuelled with High Enriched Uranium (HEU), are underutilized and aging, and have significant quantities of spent fuel. HEU inventories (fresh and spent) pose security risks Unavailability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel hinders conversion and limits back-end options and represents a survival dilemma for many RRs. Improvement of interim spent fuel storage is required at some RRs. Many RRs are under-utilized and/or inadequately funded and need to find users for their services, or permanently shut down and eventually decommission. Reluctance to decommission affect both cost and safety (loss of experienced staff ) and many shut down but not decommissioned RR with fresh and/or spent fuel at the sites invoke serious concern. The IAEA's research reactor support helps to ensure that research reactors can be operated efficiently with fuels and targets of lower proliferation and security concern and that operators have appropriate technology and options to manage RR fuel cycle issues, especially on long term interim storage of spent research reactor fuel. Availability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel would expand and improve back end options. The International Atomic Energy Agency provides assistance to Member States to convert research reactors from High Enriched Uranium fuel and targets (for medical isotope production) to qualified Low Enriched Uranium fuel and targets while maintaining reactor performance levels. The assistance includes provision of handbooks and training in the performance of core conversion studies, advice for the procurement of LEU fuel, and expert services for LEU fuel acceptance. The IAEA further provides technical and administrative support for countries considering repatriation of its

  20. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, plenary session, high burnup fuel behavior, thermal hydraulic research. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 1, present topics on High Burnup Fuel Behavior, Thermal Hydraulic Research, and Plenary Session topics. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  1. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, plenary session, high burnup fuel behavior, thermal hydraulic research. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 1, present topics on High Burnup Fuel Behavior, Thermal Hydraulic Research, and Plenary Session topics. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  2. Experience and lessons learned in the assessment of safety justifications for experiments mounted in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Some experiments in research reactors are arguably a risky undertaking due to their uncertain outcome. The justifications for such experiments require careful assessment to validate their undertaking. The public, the operators and the installation itself must be safeguarded. Assessment of the potential risk is an acquired skill but in doing so the route can be eased by learning from the lessons experience can teach. This paper, essentially for the usage of safety managers, sets out some of the issues relating to the assessment process gained from our experience over a few tens of years in the assessment of experiments. Many of the conclusions reached may appear all too obvious viewed in retrospect, but they were not necessarily clear at the time. Those organizations setting up assessment teams may find some of the conclusions of value such that their proposed management system can embrace methodologies for assessment that can avoid or lessen the impact of some of the pitfalls we have tried to identify. Failure to recognise some of these points may run the risk of delayed clearances, dilated timescales and cost overruns. It is in the hope of reducing all these penalties that we offer our experiences

  3. Development of a computational database for probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Vagner S.; Oliveira, Patricia S. Pagetti de; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: vagner.macedo@usp.br, E-mail: patricia@ipen.br, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the database being developed at IPEN - CNEN / SP for application in the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of nuclear research reactors. The database can be accessed by means of a computational program installed in the corporate computer network, named IPEN Intranet, and this access will be allowed only to professionals previously registered. Data updating, editing and searching tasks will be controlled by a system administrator according to IPEN Intranet security rules. The logical model and the physical structure of the database can be represented by an Entity Relationship Model, which is based on the operational routines performed by IPEN - CNEN / SP users. The web application designed for the management of the database is named PSADB. It is being developed with MySQL database software and PHP programming language is being used. Data stored in this database are divided into modules that refer to technical specifications, operating history, maintenance history and failure events associated with the main components of the nuclear facilities. (author)

  4. Development of a computational database for probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Vagner S.; Oliveira, Patricia S. Pagetti de; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to describe the database being developed at IPEN - CNEN / SP for application in the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of nuclear research reactors. The database can be accessed by means of a computational program installed in the corporate computer network, named IPEN Intranet, and this access will be allowed only to professionals previously registered. Data updating, editing and searching tasks will be controlled by a system administrator according to IPEN Intranet security rules. The logical model and the physical structure of the database can be represented by an Entity Relationship Model, which is based on the operational routines performed by IPEN - CNEN / SP users. The web application designed for the management of the database is named PSADB. It is being developed with MySQL database software and PHP programming language is being used. Data stored in this database are divided into modules that refer to technical specifications, operating history, maintenance history and failure events associated with the main components of the nuclear facilities. (author)

  5. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research sponsored by BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of reactor safety research. According to the cooperation of the Federal Minister for Research and Technology (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  6. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research sponsored by BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of reactor safety research. According to the cooperation of the Federal Minister for Research and Technology (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafka, P.

    1975-01-01

    The spectrum of possible accidents may become characterized by the 'maximum credible accident', which will/will not happen. Similary, the performance of safety systems in a multitude of situations is sometimes simplified to 'the emergency system will/will not work' or even 'reactors are/ are not safe'. In assessing safety, one must avoid this fallacy of reducing a complicated situation to the simple black-and-white picture of yes/no. Similarly, there is a natural tendency continually to improve the safety of a system to assure that it is 'safe enough'. Any system can be made safer and there is usually some additional cost. It is important to balance the increased safety against the increased costs. (orig.) [de

  9. Inherent safety characteristics of innovative reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heil, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    The added safety value of innovative or third generation reactor designs has been evaluated in order to determine the most suitable candidate for Dutch government funded research and development support. To this end, four innovative reactor concepts, viz. PIUS (Process Inherent Ultimate Safety), PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small), HTR-M (High Temperature Reactor Module) and MHTGR (Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor), have been studied and their passive and inherent safety characteristics have been outlined. Also the outlook for further technological and industrial development has been considered. The results of the study confirm the perspective of the innovative reactors for reduced dependence on active safety provisions and for a further reduced vulnerability to technical failures and human errors. The accident responses to generic accident initiators, viz. reactivity and cooling accidents, and also to reactor specific accidents show that neither active safety systems nor short term operator actions are required for maintaining the reactor core in a controlled and coolable condition. Whether this gives rise to a higher total safety of the innovative reactor designs, compared to evolutionary or advanced reactors, cannot be concluded. Supplementary experimental and analytical analyses of reactor specific accidents are required to be able to assess the safety of these innovative designs in a more quantitative manner. It is believed that the safety case of innovative reactors, which are less dependent on active safety systems, can be communicated with the general public in a more transparent way. Considering the perspective for further technological and industrial development it is not expected that any of the considered innovative reactor concepts will become commercially available within the next one to two decades. However, they could be made available earlier if they would receive sufficient financial backing. Considering the added safety perspectives

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW to design new control safety rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoushtari, M.K.; Kakavand, T. [Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zanjan, P.O. Box 451-313 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadat Kiai, S.M., E-mail: sadatkiai@yahoo.co [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTR), Nuclear Science Research, A.E.O.I., P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaforian, H. [Faculty of Science and Technology of Marine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation has been established for a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW. A detailed model of the reactor core was employed including standard and control fuel elements, reflectors, irradiation channels, control rods, reactor pool and thermal column. The following physical parameters of reactor core were calculated for the present LEU core: core reactivity (rho), control rod (CR) worth, thermal and epithermal neutron flux distributions, shutdown margin and delayed neutron fraction. Reduction of unfavorable effects of blockage probability of control safety rod (CSR)s in their interiors because of not enough space in their sites, and lack of suitable capabilities to fabricate very thin plates for CSR cladding, is the main aim of the present study. Making the absorber rod thinner and CSR cladding thicker by introducing a better blackness absorbing material and a new stainless steel alloy, respectively, are two studied ways to reduce the effects of mentioned problems.

  11. Fuel safety research 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-07-01

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a result of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The laboratory was organized by combining three laboratories, the Reactivity Accident Laboratory, the Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of the Sever Accident Research Laboratory. Consequently, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is now in charge of all the fuel safety research in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of five research groups corresponding to each research fields. They are; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 1999 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  12. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research of BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programme of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig.) [de

  13. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of reactor safety research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig./HP) [de

  14. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research of BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig.) [de

  15. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research of BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programme of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig.) [de

  16. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research of BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA und USNRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Engergie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programme of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quarterly. (orig.) [de

  17. List of reports of BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC in the field of reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning special problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commisariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA), the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commision, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Programm of the BMFT, reporting organization. The list of reports appears quaterly. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Comparison of the Safety Critical Software V and V Requirements for the Research Reactor Instrumentation and Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Sungmoon; Suh, Yong-Suk; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This study was motivated by a research reactor project where the owner of the project and the equipment vendors are from two different standards frameworks. This paper reviews two major standards frameworks - NRC-IEEE and IAEA-IEC - and the software classification schemes as a background, then discuss the V and V issue. The purpose of this paper is by no means to solve the cross-standards-framework qualification issue, but, rather, is to remind the stakeholders of research reactor projects. V and V are also essential for the approval from regulatory bodies. As standards define or recommend consolidated engineering practices, methods, or criteria, V and V activities for software qualification are not exceptional. Within a standards framework, usually, the processes for the qualification of safety-critical software are well-established such that the safety is maximized while minimizing the compromises in software quality, safety, and reliability. When, however, multiple standards frameworks are involved in a research reactor project, it is difficult for equipment vendors to implement appropriate V and V activities as there is no unified view on this cross-standards-framework qualification issue yet. There are two major standards frameworks for safety-critical software development in nuclear industry. Unfortunately different safety classifications for software and thus different requirements for qualification are in place. What makes things worse is that (i) there are ambiguities in the standards and rooms for each stakeholders’ interpretation, and (ii) there is no one-to-one mapping between the associated V and V methods and activities. These may put the stakeholders of research reactor projects in trouble.

  19. Comparison of the Safety Critical Software V and V Requirements for the Research Reactor Instrumentation and Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Sungmoon; Suh, Yong-Suk; Park, Cheol

    2016-01-01

    This study was motivated by a research reactor project where the owner of the project and the equipment vendors are from two different standards frameworks. This paper reviews two major standards frameworks - NRC-IEEE and IAEA-IEC - and the software classification schemes as a background, then discuss the V and V issue. The purpose of this paper is by no means to solve the cross-standards-framework qualification issue, but, rather, is to remind the stakeholders of research reactor projects. V and V are also essential for the approval from regulatory bodies. As standards define or recommend consolidated engineering practices, methods, or criteria, V and V activities for software qualification are not exceptional. Within a standards framework, usually, the processes for the qualification of safety-critical software are well-established such that the safety is maximized while minimizing the compromises in software quality, safety, and reliability. When, however, multiple standards frameworks are involved in a research reactor project, it is difficult for equipment vendors to implement appropriate V and V activities as there is no unified view on this cross-standards-framework qualification issue yet. There are two major standards frameworks for safety-critical software development in nuclear industry. Unfortunately different safety classifications for software and thus different requirements for qualification are in place. What makes things worse is that (i) there are ambiguities in the standards and rooms for each stakeholders’ interpretation, and (ii) there is no one-to-one mapping between the associated V and V methods and activities. These may put the stakeholders of research reactor projects in trouble

  20. Role of research in the safety case of future reactor concepts definite needs, confirmatory areas, added value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timo, Okkonen; Juhani, Hyvarinen

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to describe the role(s) of research when assessing - and finally demonstrating - the safety of future reactor concepts. The term 'research' could be defined in quite a limited fashion, while in this paper, we will use it synonymously to all Research and Design (R and D) work. First, we will provide a top-down planning perspective by identifying the general set of safety factors related to new reactor projects; i.e., factors that have to be accounted for already in the safety case. The research needs can be based on such a set of safety factors and related challenges, and it is crucial that the research requirements remain reasonable. For this, suitable design choices have to be made, such that they limit the criticality of individual plant functions, related systems/ structures/components (SSC), and human actions. In this context, we will discuss the general ways of limiting excessive research needs. The critical plant functions and SSC, in their turn, will require a strong safety demonstration. Once major design decisions have been made according to the aforementioned lines, actual systems are designed, using available equipment or developing new. Research support is needed to establish the technological adequacy and confidence level of each decision at each design level; this is relatively easy where conventional technologies are used, but more challenging if novel technologies come into question. Maturity of technology also correlates strongly with the attainable certainty and qualification of analysis tools. Here, we will describe the general phases of R and D from exploratory work to safety demonstration, and also independent confirmation. We will also touch upon the roles of different actors - the vendor, the licensee and the regulator - as well as their strategies in attacking the above-mentioned safety factors through research. (authors)

  1. Fuel safety research 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is in charge of research activity which covers almost research items related to fuel safety of water reactor in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are being conducted by using some unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of JAERI. The research to confirm the safety of high burn-up fuel and MOX fuel under accident conditions is the most important item among them. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). Research group of radionuclides release and transport behavior from irradiated fuel under severe accident conditions (VEGA group). The research conducted in the year 2001 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, the fuel behavior data under BWR power oscillation conditions in the NSRR, the data on failure-bearing capability of hydrided cladding under LOCA conditions and the FP release data at very high temperature in steam which simulate the reactor core condition during severe accidents. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2001 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  2. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee`s annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee's annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors / report by an OECD Support Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Seven Task Teams were formed within the OECD Support Group, addressing the following topics: Thermal-Hydraulics/Plant Transients for VVERs, Integrity of Equipment and Structures for VVERs, Severe Accidents for VVERs, Operational Safety Issues, Thermal-Hydraulics/Plant Transients for RBMKs, Integrity of Equipment and Structures for RBMKs, Severe Accidents for RBMKs. Each Task Team prepared and presented its report to the Support Group as a whole for review and approval. Consequently, the report represents a consensus of the Support Group that outlines the arguments for the safely research needs with the focus on the main technical issues that justify the need and urgency. The written text addresses three basic questions: What is the safety concern? What are the open issues? What are the safety research needs? The safety research needs as identified by the seven Task Teams, and approved by the Support Group, are reflected in the structure of the report. The chapter on the Uses of Safety Research provides examples on how Western research has been applied to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. In addition, the chapter emphasises the need for a national safety research policy

  5. Euratom research and training in nuclear reactor safety: Towards European research and the higher education area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van

    2004-01-01

    In this invited lecture, research and training in nuclear fission are looked at from a European perspective with emphasis on the three success factors of any European policy, namely: common needs, vision and instruments, that ought to be strongly shared amongst the stakeholders across the Member States concerned. As a result, the following questions are addressed: What is driving the current EU trend towards more research, more education and more training, in general? Regarding nuclear fission, in particular, who are the end-users of Euratom 'research and training' and what are their expectations from EU programmes? Do all stakeholders share the same vision about European research and training in nuclear fission? What are the instruments proposed by the European Commission (EC) to conduct joint research programmes of common interest for the nuclear fission community? In conclusion, amongst the stakeholders in Europe, there seems to be a wide consensus about common needs and instruments, but not about a common vision regarding nuclear. (author)

  6. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.B.

    1977-04-01

    Light water reactor safety research performed October through December 1976 is discussed. An analysis to determine the effect of emergency core coolant (ECC) injection location and pump speed on system response characteristics was performed. An analysis to evaluate the capability of commonly used critical heat flux (CHF) correlations to calculate the time of the first CHF in the Semiscale core during a loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) was performed. A test program and study to determine the effect thermocouples mounted on the outside fuel rod surfaces would have on the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) phenomena in the LOFT core during steady state operation were completed. A correlation for use in predicting DNB heat fluxes in the LOFT core was developed. Tests of an experimental transit time flowmeter were completed. A nuclear test was performed to obtain fuel rod behavior data from four PWR-type rods during film boiling operation representative of PWR conditions. Preliminary results from the postirradiation examination of Test IE-1 fuel rods are given. Results of Irradiation Effects Tests IE-2 and IE-3 are given. Gap Conductance Test GC 2-1 was performed to evaluate the effects of fuel density, initial gap width, and fill gas composition on the pellet-cladding gap conductance

  7. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J. B. [ed.

    1977-04-01

    Light water reactor safety research performed October through December 1976 is discussed. An analysis to determine the effect of emergency core coolant (ECC) injection location and pump speed on system response characteristics was performed. An analysis to evaluate the capability of commonly used critical heat flux (CHF) correlations to calculate the time of the first CHF in the Semiscale core during a loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) was performed. A test program and study to determine the effect thermocouples mounted on the outside fuel rod surfaces would have on the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) phenomena in the LOFT core during steady state operation were completed. A correlation for use in predicting DNB heat fluxes in the LOFT core was developed. Tests of an experimental transit time flowmeter were completed. A nuclear test was performed to obtain fuel rod behavior data from four PWR-type rods during film boiling operation representative of PWR conditions. Preliminary results from the postirradiation examination of Test IE-1 fuel rods are given. Results of Irradiation Effects Tests IE-2 and IE-3 are given. Gap Conductance Test GC 2-1 was performed to evaluate the effects of fuel density, initial gap width, and fill gas composition on the pellet-cladding gap conductance.

  8. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Light water reactor safety activities performed during October--December 1975 are reported. The blowdown heat transfer tests series of the Semiscale Mod-1 test program was completed. In the LOFT Program, preparations were made for nonnuclear testing. The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program completed a power-cooling-mismatch test and an irradiation effects test on PWR-type fuel rods. Model development and verification efforts of the Reactor Behavior Program included developing new analysis models for the RELAP4 computer code, subroutines for the FRAP-S and FRAP-T codes, and new models for predicting reactor fuel restructuring and zircaloy cladding behavior; an analysis of post-CHF fuel behavior was made using FRAP-T

  9. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, October--December 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-01

    Light water reactor safety activities performed during October--December 1975 are reported. The blowdown heat transfer tests series of the Semiscale Mod-1 test program was completed. In the LOFT Program, preparations were made for nonnuclear testing. The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program completed a power-cooling-mismatch test and an irradiation effects test on PWR-type fuel rods. Model development and verification efforts of the Reactor Behavior Program included developing new analysis models for the RELAP4 computer code, subroutines for the FRAP-S and FRAP-T codes, and new models for predicting reactor fuel restructuring and zircaloy cladding behavior; an analysis of post-CHF fuel behavior was made using FRAP-T.

  10. Safety analysis of the present status of the research reactor 'RA' at 'Vinca' Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovic, V.; Jovic, L.; Zivotic, Z.; Milovanovic, Dj.

    1995-01-01

    Safety analysis of the nuclear facility which has been out of work for a long time and whose future is not defined at the present moment, can not be connected to the usual, normatively regulated system analysis procedure in both operational and accidental regimes. Therefore, the safety analysis of the present status of the present status of the reactor RA is related to system and components analysis which, in present conditions maintain their nuclear functions operational. In the first place, it refers to components and equipment in which radioactive radiation generation still exists and to installations and equipment maintaining radiation level below permitted limit. in the context of the analysis the following areas are being covered: present status characteristics, accidental events while operating period from 1959. to 1984., nuclear fuels and radioactive waste inventory, basic characteristics and status of safety-related systems and equipment, radiation protection, potential accident analysis at present status of the reactor RA, potential accidental situations due to natural events (earthquakes, water flood) or man-induced events and security. 8 refs

  11. Use of a Graded Approach in the Application of the Safety Requirements for Research Reactors. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    . The standards are also applied by regulatory bodies and operators around the world to enhance safety in nuclear power generation and in nuclear applications in medicine, industry, agriculture and research. Safety is not an end in itself but a prerequisite for the purpose of the protection of people in all States and of the environment - now and in the future. The risks associated with ionizing radiation must be assessed and controlled without unduly limiting the contribution of nuclear energy to equitable and sustainable development. Governments, regulatory bodies and operators everywhere must ensure that nuclear material and radiation sources are used beneficially, safely and ethically. The IAEA safety standards are designed to facilitate this, and I encourage all Member States to make use of them.

  12. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Westinghouse research reactor at Zion, Illinois (Docket No. 50-87)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report, for the application filed by the Westinghouse Electric Company, for renewal of operating license number R-119 to continue to operate the research reactor, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is operated by Westinghouse and is located in Zion, Illinois. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by Westinghouse without endangering the health and safety of the public

  13. Reports on research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology. Period covered: January 1 - June 30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of its research programme on reactor safety, the Bundesministerium fuer Bildung, Wissenschaft, Forschung und Technology (BMBF) (Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology) sponsors investigations into the safety of nuclear reactors. These investigations that are carried out within the framework of the programme are to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods contributing to realistic safety assessments of nuclear facilities, the further development of safety technology, and the use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) bmH, by order of the BMBF, continuously issues information on the status of such investigations by publishing semiannual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. (orig./SR) [de

  14. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  15. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Reactor operation safety information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  17. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Present trends in magnetic fusion research and development indicate the promise of commercialization of one of a limited number of inexhaustible energy options early in the next century. Operation of the large-scale fusion experiments, such as the Joint European Torus (JET) and Takamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) now under construction, are expected to achieve the scientific break even point. Early design concepts of power producing reactors have provided problem definition, whereas the latest concepts, such as STARFIRE, provide a desirable set of answers for commercialization. Safety and environmental concerns have been considered early in the development of magnetic fusion reactor concepts and recognition of proplem areas, coupled with a program to solve these problems, is expected to provide the basis for safe and environmentally acceptable commercial reactors. First generation reactors addressed in this paper are expected to burn deuterium and tritium fuel because of the relatively high reaction rates at lower temperatures compared to advanced fuels such as deuterium-deuterium. This paper presents an overwiew of the safety and environmental problems presently perceived, together with some of the programs and techniques planned and/or underway to solve these problems. A preliminary risk assessment of fusion technology relative to other energy technologies is made. Improvements based on material selection are discussed. Tritium and neutron activation products representing potential radiological hazards in fusion reactor are discussed, and energy sources that can lead to the release of radioactivity from fusion reactors under accident conditions are examined. The handling and disposal of radioactive waste are discussed; the status of biological effects of magnetic fields are referenced; and release mechanisms for tritium and activation products, including analytical methods, are presented. (orig./GG)

  18. The DRAGON aerosol research facility to study aerosol behaviour for reactor safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckow, Detlef; Guentay, Salih

    2008-01-01

    During a severe accident in a nuclear power plant fission products are expected to be released in form of aerosol particles and droplets. To study the behaviour of safety relevant reactor components under aerosol loads and prototypical severe accident conditions the multi-purpose aerosol generation facility DRAGON is used since 1994 for several projects. DRAGON can generate aerosol particles by the evaporation-condensation technique using a plasma torch system, fluidized bed and atomization of particles suspended in a liquid. Soluble, hygroscopic aerosol (i.e. CsOH) and insoluble aerosol particles (i.e. SnO 2 , TiO 2 ) or mixtures of them can be used. DRAGON uses state-of-the-art thermal-hydraulic, data acquisition and aerosol measurement techniques and is mainly composed of a mixing chamber, the plasma torch system, a steam generator, nitrogen gas and compressed air delivery systems, several aerosol delivery piping, gas heaters and several auxiliary systems to provide vacuum, coolant and off-gas treatment. The facility can be operated at system pressure of 5 bars, temperatures of 300 deg. C, flow rates of non-condensable gas of 900 kg/h and steam of 270 kg/h, respectively. A test section under investigation is attached to DRAGON. The paper summarizes and demonstrates with the help of two project examples the capabilities of DRAGON for reactor safety studies. (authors)

  19. Aspects of nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardt, P. von der; Rottger, H.

    1980-01-01

    The Colloquium on 'Irradiation Tests for Reactor Safety Programmes' has been organised by JRC Petten in order to determine the present state of technology in the field. The role of research and test reactors for studies of structural material and fuel elements under transient and off-normal conditions was to be explained. The Colloquium has been attended by 110 participants from outside and inside Europe. 27 papers were presented covering the major ongoing projects in Japan, the United States, and in Europe, and elaborating in particular: - design rationale and layout of safety irradiation experiments; - design, manufacture, and performance of irradiation equipment with particular attention to generation and control of transient conditions, fast response in-pile instrumentation and its out-of-pile data retrieval; - post-irradiation evaluation; - results and analytical support

  20. Reports on research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by BMFT (Federal Ministry for Science and Technology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of semi-annual and annual publication of progress reports within the series GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the Research Program on the Safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  1. The present status of iodine chemistry research in Canada and its application to reactor safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, K R [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada); Kupferschmid, W C.H.; Wren, J C; Ball, J M [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    The current need to understand iodine chemistry in a reactor safety context has become more sharply focussed as the level of that understanding has advanced. At the same time, the situations of most concern within containment, from an iodine perspective, are also being redefined in the light of that understanding. The present paper summarises these developments. Over the past five years, considerable advances have occurred in our understanding of iodine chemistry under conditions of interest in reactor accidents. A number of key experiments have yielded important results in the areas of solution chemistry, the role of surfaces, the importance of organics and the effects of impurities. This understanding supplements the already substantial gains made in characterising the key roles of pH and the effects of radiation. All these factors underline the now evident fact that the kinetics of iodine are the controlling factor when radiation is involved, and that a number of reactive species, not present in thermal reactions, effectively control the observed volatility of iodine. In this paper, recent advances are summarised and the present status of our understanding of iodine chemistry is reviewed. Specifically, an attempt is made to identify those areas where our understanding appears to be relatively complete, and to flag the remaining critical areas where our attention is currently focussed. The state of our modelling capability is reviewed, as is the significance or related areas such as the role of mass transfer. Finally, an overview is presented of the significance of this work for reactor safety, and our expectations for its application over the near term future. (author) 2 figs., 12 refs.

  2. The present status of iodine chemistry research in Canada and its application to reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.R.; Kupferschmid, W.C.H.; Wren, J.C.; Ball, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The current need to understand iodine chemistry in a reactor safety context has become more sharply focussed as the level of that understanding has advanced. At the same time, the situations of most concern within containment, from an iodine perspective, are also being redefined in the light of that understanding. The present paper summarises these developments. Over the past five years, considerable advances have occurred in our understanding of iodine chemistry under conditions of interest in reactor accidents. A number of key experiments have yielded important results in the areas of solution chemistry, the role of surfaces, the importance of organics and the effects of impurities. This understanding supplements the already substantial gains made in characterising the key roles of pH and the effects of radiation. All these factors underline the now evident fact that the kinetics of iodine are the controlling factor when radiation is involved, and that a number of reactive species, not present in thermal reactions, effectively control the observed volatility of iodine. In this paper, recent advances are summarised and the present status of our understanding of iodine chemistry is reviewed. Specifically, an attempt is made to identify those areas where our understanding appears to be relatively complete, and to flag the remaining critical areas where our attention is currently focussed. The state of our modelling capability is reviewed, as is the significance or related areas such as the role of mass transfer. Finally, an overview is presented of the significance of this work for reactor safety, and our expectations for its application over the near term future. (author) 2 figs., 12 refs

  3. International benchmark study of advanced thermal hydraulic safety analysis codes against measurements on IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hainoun, A., E-mail: pscientific2@aec.org.sy [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), Nuclear Engineering Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Doval, A. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Av. Cmdt. Luis Piedrabuena 4950, C.P. 8400 S.C de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Umbehaun, P. [Centro de Engenharia Nuclear – CEN, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242-Cidade Universitaria, CEP-05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chatzidakis, S. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Ghazi, N. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), Nuclear Engineering Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Park, S. [Research Reactor Design and Engineering Division, Basic Science Project Operation Dept., Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mladin, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Street No. 1, P.O. Box 78, 115400 Mioveni, Arges (Romania); Shokr, A. [Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, Research Reactor Safety Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A set of advanced system thermal hydraulic codes are benchmarked against IFA of IEA-R1. • Comparative safety analysis of IEA-R1 reactor during LOFA by 7 working teams. • This work covers both experimental and calculation effort and presents new out findings on TH of RR that have not been reported before. • LOFA results discrepancies from 7% to 20% for coolant and peak clad temperatures are predicted conservatively. - Abstract: In the framework of the IAEA Coordination Research Project on “Innovative methods in research reactor analysis: Benchmark against experimental data on neutronics and thermal hydraulic computational methods and tools for operation and safety analysis of research reactors” the Brazilian research reactor IEA-R1 has been selected as reference facility to perform benchmark calculations for a set of thermal hydraulic codes being widely used by international teams in the field of research reactor (RR) deterministic safety analysis. The goal of the conducted benchmark is to demonstrate the application of innovative reactor analysis tools in the research reactor community, validation of the applied codes and application of the validated codes to perform comprehensive safety analysis of RR. The IEA-R1 is equipped with an Instrumented Fuel Assembly (IFA) which provided measurements for normal operation and loss of flow transient. The measurements comprised coolant and cladding temperatures, reactor power and flow rate. Temperatures are measured at three different radial and axial positions of IFA summing up to 12 measuring points in addition to the coolant inlet and outlet temperatures. The considered benchmark deals with the loss of reactor flow and the subsequent flow reversal from downward forced to upward natural circulation and presents therefore relevant phenomena for the RR safety analysis. The benchmark calculations were performed independently by the participating teams using different thermal hydraulic and safety

  4. Operational limits and conditions and operating procedures for research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides practical guidance on all important aspects of developing, formulating and presenting the operational limits and conditions as well as the operating procedures for research reactors. It covers the concept of operational limits and conditions, their content, and the responsibilities of the operating organization with respect to their establishment, modification, documentation and compliance. The guidance also covers the training of operating personnel on performing periodic testing, established by the operational limits and conditions, and operating procedures

  5. Safety of VVER-440 reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Slugen, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Safety of VVER-440 Reactors endeavours to promote an increase in the safety of VVER-440 nuclear reactors via the improvement of fission products limitation systems and the implementation of special non-destructive spectroscopic methods for materials testing. All theoretical and experimental studies performed the by author over the last 25 years have been undertaken with the aim of improving VVER-440 defence in depth, which is one of the most important principle for ensuring safety in nuclear power plants. Safety of VVER-440 Reactors is focused on the barrier system through which the safety pri

  6. Technical report: technical development on the silicide plate-type fuel experiment at nuclear safety research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Hiroki

    1991-08-01

    According to a reduction of fuel enrichment from 45 w/o 235 U to 20 w/o, an aluminide plate-type fuel used currently in the domestic research and material testing reactors will be replaced by a silicide plate-type one. One of the major concern arisen from this alternation is to understand the fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, this is strongly necessary from the safety and licensing point of view. The in-core RIA experiments are, therefore, carried out at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The silicide plate-type fuel consisted of the ternary alloy of U-Al-Si as a meat with uranium density up to 4.8 g/cm 3 having thickness by 0.51 mm and the binary alloy of Al-3%Mg as a cladding by thickness of 0.38 mm. Comparison of the physical properties of this metallic plate fuel with the UO 2 -zircaloy fuel rod used conventionally in commercial light water reactors shows that the heat conductivity of the former is of the order of about 13 times greater than the latter, however the melting temperature is only one-half (1570degC). Prior to in-core RIA experiments, there were some difficulties lay in our technical path. This report summarized the technical achievements obtained through our four years work. (J.P.N.)

  7. Applications of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The purpose of the earlier publication, The Application of Research Reactors, IAEA-TECDOC-1234, was to present descriptions of the typical forms of research reactor use. The necessary criteria to enable an application to be performed were outlined for each one, and, in many cases, the minimum as well as the desirable requirements were given. This revision of the publication over a decade later maintains the original purpose and now specifically takes into account the changes in service requirements demanded by the relevant stakeholders. In particular, the significant improvements in

  8. Reliability database of IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor: Applications to the improvement of installation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, P.S.P.; Tondin, J.B.M.; Martins, M.O.; Yovanovich, M.; Ricci Filho, W.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the main features of the reliability database being developed at Ipen-Cnen/SP for IEA-R1 reactor are briefly described. Besides that, the process for collection and updating of data regarding operation, failure and maintenance of IEA-R1 reactor components is presented. These activities have been conducted by the reactor personnel under the supervision of specialists in Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). The compilation of data and subsequent calculation are based on the procedures defined during an IAEA Coordinated Research Project which Brazil took part in the period from 2001 to 2004. In addition to component reliability data, the database stores data on accident initiating events and human errors. Furthermore, this work discusses the experience acquired through the development of the reliability database covering aspects like improvements in the reactor records as well as the application of the results to the optimization of operation and maintenance procedures and to the PSA carried out for IEA-R1 reactor. (author)

  9. Progress in Methodologies for the Assessment of Passive Safety System Reliability in Advanced Reactors. Results from the Coordinated Research Project on Development of Advanced Methodologies for the Assessment of Passive Safety Systems Performance in Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-09-01

    Strong reliance on inherent and passive design features has become a hallmark of many advanced reactor designs, including several evolutionary designs and nearly all advanced small and medium sized reactor (SMR) designs. Advanced nuclear reactor designs incorporate several passive systems in addition to active ones — not only to enhance the operational safety of the reactors but also to eliminate the possibility of serious accidents. Accordingly, the assessment of the reliability of passive safety systems is a crucial issue to be resolved before their extensive use in future nuclear power plants. Several physical parameters affect the performance of a passive safety system, and their values at the time of operation are unknown a priori. The functions of passive systems are based on basic physical laws and thermodynamic principals, and they may not experience the same kind of failures as active systems. Hence, consistent efforts are required to qualify the reliability of passive systems. To support the development of advanced nuclear reactor designs with passive systems, investigations into their reliability using various methodologies are being conducted in several Member States with advanced reactor development programmes. These efforts include reliability methods for passive systems by the French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission, reliability evaluation of passive safety system by the University of Pisa, Italy, and assessment of passive system reliability by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. These different approaches seem to demonstrate a consensus on some aspects. However, the developers of the approaches have been unable to agree on the definition of reliability in a passive system. Based on these developments and in order to foster collaboration, the IAEA initiated the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Advanced Methodologies for the Assessment of Passive Safety Systems Performance in Advanced Reactors in 2008. The

  10. Prospects for nuclear safety research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a paper presented by Eric S. Beckjord (Director, Nuclear Regulatory Research/NRC) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 1994. The following topics are briefly reviewed: (1) Reactor vessel research, (2) Probabilistic risk assessment, (3) Direct containment heating, (4) Advanced LWR research, (5) Nuclear energy prospects in the US, and (6) Future nuclear safety research. Subtopics within the last category include economics, waste disposal, and health and safety.

  11. Basic considerations for the safety analysis report of the Greek Research Reactor-1 (GRR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoussis, J.N.; Chrysochoides, N.G.; Papastergiou, C.N.

    1980-09-01

    The basic considerations upon which the new revised Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the GRR-1 will be based are presented. The format and the content the SAR will follow are given. A number of credible and less credible accidents is briefly analysed on the basis of present knowledge and experience for similar reactors, as well as the experience gained in the last 10 years of the GRR-1 operation at 5 MW. The accident caused by partial blockage of the cooling flow is considered to be the Maximum Credible Accident (MCA) for the GRR-1. The MCA is analysed and its radiological impact to the environment is estimated using conservative assumptions. (T.A.)

  12. Fuel safety research 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a part of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The new laboratory was organized by combining three pre-existing laboratories, Reactivity Accident Laboratory, Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of Severe Accident Research Laboratory. The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory becomes to be in charge of all fuel safety research in JAERI. Various experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). The research activities in year 2000 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, failure of high burnup BWR fuel rod under RIA conditions, data on the behavior of hydrided Zircaloy cladding under LOCA conditions and FP release data from VEGA experiments at very high temperature/pressure condition. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2000 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Michigan (Docket No. 50-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Michigan (UM) for renewal of the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) operating license number R-28 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Michigan without endangering the health and safety of the public

  14. Safety device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquelin, Roland.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a safety device for a nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid metal (generally sodium) cooled fast reactor. This safety device includes an absorbing element with a support head connected by a disconnectable connector formed by the armature of an electromagnet at the end of an axially mobile vertical control rod. This connection is so designed that in the event of it becoming disconnected, the absorbing element gravity slides in a passage through the reactor core into an open container [fr

  15. Safety analysis of loss of flow transients in a typical research reactor by RELAP5/MOD3.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Maro, B.; Pierro, F.; Adorni, M.; Bousbia Salah, A.; D'Auria, F.

    2003-01-01

    The main aim of the following study is to assess the RELAP5/MOD3.3 code capability in simulating transient dynamic behaviour in nuclear research reactors. For this purpose typical loss of flow transient in a representative MTR (Metal Test Reactor) fuel type Research Reactor is considered. The transient herein considered is a sudden pump trip followed by the opening of a safety valve in order to allow passive decay heat removal by natural convection. During such transient the coolant flow decay, originally downward, leads to a flow reversal and the cooling process of the core passes from forced, mixed and finally to natural circulation. This fact makes it suitable for evaluating the new features of RELAP5 to simulate such specific operating conditions. The instantaneous reactor power is derived through the point kinetic calculation, both protected and unprotected cases are considered (with and without Scram). The results obtained from this analysis were also compared with previous results obtained by old version RELAP5/MOD2 code. (author)

  16. Reactor safety in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The papers presented to the GRS colloquium refer to the cooperative activities for reactor accident analysis and modification of the GRS computer codes for their application to reactors of the Russian design types of WWER or RBMK. Another topic is the safety of RBMK reactors in particular, and the current status of investigations and studies addressing the containment of unit 4 of the Chernobyl reactor station. All papers are indexed separately in report GRS--117. (HP)

  17. Improvement of research reactor sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Paunoiu, C.; Toma, C.; Preda, M.; Ionila, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Research Reactors as is well known have numerous applications in a wide range of science technology, nuclear power development, medicine, to enumerate only the most important. The requirements of clients and stack-holders are fluctuating for the reasons out of control of Research Reactor Operating Organization, which may ensure with priority the safety of facility and nuclear installation. Sustainability of Research Reactor encompasses several aspects which finally are concentrated on safety of Research Reactor and economical aspects concerning operational expenses and income from external resources. Ensuring sustainability is a continuous, permanent activity and also it requests a strategic approach. The TRIGA - 14 MW Research Reactor detains a 30 years experience of safe utilization with good performance indicators. In the last 4 years the reactor benefited of a large investment project for modernization, thus ensuring the previous performances and opening new perspectives for power increase and for new applications. The previous core conversion from LEU to HEU fuel accomplished in 2006 ensures the utilization of reactor based on new qualified European supplier of TRIGA LEU fuel. Due to reduction of number of performed research reactors, the 14 MW TRIGA modernized reactor will play a significant role for the following two decades. (author)

  18. The CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Two main research reactors, specifically designed, PEGASE reactor and Laue-Langevin high flux reactor, are presented. The PEGASE reactor was designed at the end of the 50s for the study of the gas cooled reactor fuel element behaviour under irradiation; the HFR reactor, was designed in the late 60s to serve as a high yield and high level neutron source. Historical backgrounds, core and fuel characteristics and design, flux characteristics, etc., are presented. 5 figs

  19. International seminar on the safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors: material presented at the international seminar 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This seminar on international, national and bilateral cooperation programmes on the safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors was held in Tokyo, Japan (1997) and hosted by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the Science and Technology Agency (STA) of Japan. More than 70 participants attended the seminar. Represented were experts from OECD/NEA member countries and Russia, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the ISTC, the INSC and the Russian INSC. Eighteen papers were presented in five sessions. The seminar was structured around four main areas of cooperation: cooperative programmes of the OECD/NEA, programmes of international organisations, bi-lateral programmes, and national programmes of OECD/NEA member countries having reactors of the VVER type. General conclusions, followed by specific technical conclusions are included

  20. Research on the state-of-the-art of probabilistic safety assessment for non-reactor nuclear facilities (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamane, Yuichi; Tashiro, Sinsuke; Muramatsu, Ken

    2007-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) entrusted with a research on the state-of-the-art of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of non-reactor nuclear facilities (NRNF) such as fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities to the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). The objectives of this research is to obtain the basic useful information related for establishing the quantitative performance requirement and for risk-informed regulation through qualifying issues needed to be resolved for applying PSA to NRNF. A special committee of 'Research on the analysis methods for accident consequence in NFRF' was organized by the AESJ. The research activities of the committee were mainly focused on the analysis method for upper bounding consequences of accidents such as events of criticality, explosion, fire and solvent boiling postulated in NRNF resulting in release of radio active material to the environment. This report summarizes the results of research conducted by the committee in FY 2005. (author)

  1. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1995-04-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting

  2. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1995-04-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

  3. Specialized meeting on 'Current topics of reactor safety research in Germany'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruessenberg, Anne

    2013-01-01

    On October 11 and 12, 2012, the 2-day specialized meeting organized by the Thermodynamics and Fluid Dynamics Group together with the Dresden-Rossendorf Helmholtz Center and TUeV NORD SysTec GmbH and Co.KG was held at the Dresden-Rossendorf Helmholtz Center within the series of events on 'Current Topics of Safety Research in Germany.' The program of lectures was supplemented by poster presentations and exhibitions by the members of the joint research groups and companies working in the fields. The meeting again was very well attended by over 100 persons. (orig.)

  4. Safety Evaluation Report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Texas for a construction permit and operating license to construct and operate a TRIGA research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Texas and is located at the university's Balcones Research Center, about 7 miles (11.6 km) north of the main campus in Austin, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can be constructed and operated by the University of Texas without endangering the health and safety of the public

  5. Building Newcomer Competence for NPP Safety Assessment through Learning by Doing: Development of Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmina, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Final remarks: • COMPASS-M project is a very fruitful study. 1. State-of-the-art competence for PSA technique in Malaysia (applicable to nuclear installations, incl. RR and NPP). 2. PSA model and report for the operating research reactor in Malaysia. → Risk estimate of core damage and ranking contributors to the risk; → Basis for further safety improvement of RR as appropriate. 3. Input for IAEA’s publications on PSA for research reactors. • The results will be available to interested Member States (security considerations be addressed); → Completion in mid-2014, paper to be published in PSAM-12; ► Managerial support is instrumental for success of learning-by-doing projects

  6. Research on the state-of-the-art of probabilistic safety assessment for non-reactor nuclear facilities (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamane, Yuichi; Tashiro, Sinsuke; Muramatsu, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) entrusted with research on the state-of-the-art of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for non-reactor nuclear facilities (NRNF) to the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). The objectives of this research is to obtain the basic useful information related for establishing the quantitative performance requirement and for risk-informed regulation through qualifying issues needed to be resolved for applying PSA to NRNF. A special committee of 'research on the analysis methods for accident consequence in NFRF' was organized in the AESJ. The research activities of the committee were mainly focused on the analysis method for upper bounding consequences of accidents such as events of criticality, explosion, fire and solvent boiling postulated in NRNF resulting in release of radio active material to the environment. (author)

  7. Management of research reactor ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    As of December 1993, about one quarter of the operating research reactors were over 30 years old. The long life of research reactors has raised some concern amongst research reactor operators, regulators and, to some extent, the general public. The International Atomic Energy Agency commenced activities on the topic of research reactor ageing by appointing an internal working group in 1988 and convening a Consultants Meeting in 1989. The subject was also discussed at an international symposium and a regional seminar held in 1989 and 1992 respectively. A draft document incorporating information and experience exchanged at the above meetings was reviewed by a Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in 1992. The present TECDOC is the outcome of this meeting and contains recommendations, guidelines and information on the management of research reactor ageing, which should be used in conjunction with related publications of the IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme, which are referenced throughout the text. This TECDOC will be of interest to operators and regulators involved with the safe operation of any type of research reactor to (a) understand the behaviour and influence of ageing mechanisms on the reactor structures, systems and components; (b) detect and assess the effect of ageing; (c) establish preventive and corrective measures to mitigate these effects; and (d) make decisions aimed at the safe and continued operation of a research reactor. 32 refs, tabs

  8. Management of research reactor ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    As of December 1993, about one quarter of the operating research reactors were over 30 years old. The long life of research reactors has raised some concern amongst research reactor operators, regulators and, to some extent, the general public. The International Atomic Energy Agency commenced activities on the topic of research reactor ageing by appointing an internal working group in 1988 and convening a Consultants Meeting in 1989. The subject was also discussed at an international symposium and a regional seminar held in 1989 and 1992 respectively. A draft document incorporating information and experience exchanged at the above meetings was reviewed by a Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in 1992. The present TECDOC is the outcome of this meeting and contains recommendations, guidelines and information on the management of research reactor ageing, which should be used in conjunction with related publications of the IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme, which are referenced throughout the text. This TECDOC will be of interest to operators and regulators involved with the safe operation of any type of research reactor to (a) understand the behaviour and influence of ageing mechanisms on the reactor structures, systems and components; (b) detect and assess the effect of ageing; (c) establish preventive and corrective measures to mitigate these effects; and (d) make decisions aimed at the safe and continued operation of a research reactor. 32 refs, tabs.

  9. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  10. Fast breeder reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    reactors of the future, the body of research aimed at developing liquid metal cooled fast reactors, national plans for work in 1976 on developing fast reactors - these were some of the topics discussed in connection with the national programmes. The development of power reactors involves a wide range of problems in the fields of nuclear and reactor physics, the thermophysics, chemistry, physics and technology of the cooling system, structural materials and nuclear fuel, the fabrication of reliable fuel elements and operating equipment, reactor monitoring and control, spent fuel reprocessing, the economics of constructing fast power reactors, nuclear safety, etc. The IWGFR, as at previous meetings, therefore paid great attention to the matter of holding international specialists' meetings. The working group recommended that the IAEA should organize the following IWGFR meetings in 1976: (1) In-Service Inspection and Monitoring (Bensberg, FRG, March 1976). (2) Cavitation in Sodium and Studies of Analogy with Water as Compared to Sodium (Cadarache, France, April 1976). (3) High Temperature Structural Design Technology (United States, May 1976) (4) Aerosol Formation, Vapour Deposits and Sodium Vapour Trapping (France, September-December 1976). The Group welcomed the IAEA's proposal to hold specialists' meetings on 'Fast Reactor Instrumentation' and 'Fuel Reprocessing and Recycling Techniques' within the framework of the Agency's programme of working groups in 1976. After discussing questions of co-ordinating and organizing international conferences on fast reactors, the IWGFR agreed to send representatives to the joint meeting of the American Nuclear Society and the American Institute of Metallurgical Engineers on 'Liquid Metal Technology', to be held at Champion, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. from 3-6 May 1976, and recommended that the IAEA should organize an international symposium on the 'Design, Construction and Operating Experience of Demonstration Fast Power Reactors' at Bologna

  11. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology. Reported period: January 1 to June 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, (FB) (Research Coordination Department), within the framework of general informations of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program of the safety of LWR 1977 - 1980 of the BMFT. Another table of uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commision of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  12. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology. Reported period: January 1 to June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, (FB) (Research Coordination Department), within the framework of general informations of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the research program of the safety of LWR 1977 - 1980 of the BMFT. Another table of uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  13. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume IV. Reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The principal purpose of the SAREF Reactor Containment Building (RCB) is to prevent the uncontrolled release of radioactive materials to the atmosphere as a result of accidental occurrences inside the containment. The RCB houses numerous reactor systems and components including the Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel (PCRV). The design of the RCB is of reinforced concrete (steel-lined). The containment building is embedded nearly 100 feet in lava rock. It has therefore been necessary to independently formulate an appropriate and conservative design approach

  14. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of Virginia open-pool research reactor. Docket No. 50-062

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Virginia for a renewal of Operating Licence R-66 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the University of Virginia and is located on the campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the University without endangering the health and safety of the public or endangering the environment

  15. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Utah (Docket No. 50-407)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Utah (UU) for a renewal of operating license R-126 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Utah and is located on its campus in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  16. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Maryland (Docket No. 50-166)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Maryland (UMD) for a renewal of operating license R-70 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Maryland and is located at a site in College Park, Prince Georges County, Maryland. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UMD without endangering the health and safety of the public

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of New Mexico Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-252)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of New Mexico (UNM) for renewal of Operating License No. R-102 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of New Mexico without endangering the health and safety of the public. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Purdue University: Docket No. 50-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Purdue University for a renewal of Operating License R-87 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by Purdue University and is located on the campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the enviroment

  19. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Michigan State University (Docket No. 50-294)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Michigan State University (MSU) for a renewal of operating license number R-114 to continue to operate the TRIGA Mark I research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Michigan State University and is located on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by MSU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  20. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Florida. Docket No. 50-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Florida (UF) for a renewal of Operating License R-56 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Florida and is located on the UF campus in Gainesville, Alachua County, Florida. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by UF without endangering the health and safety of the public

  1. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Lowell (Docket No. 50-223)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Lowell (UL) for renewal of operating license number R-125 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Lowell in Lowell, Massachusetts. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Lowell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  2. Safety-evaluation report related to renewal of the operating license for the Texas A and M University Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-128, License R-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) for a renewal of operating license number R-83 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Texas Engineering and Experiment Station of the Texas A and M University and is located on the campus in College Station, Brazos County, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Texas A and M University without endangering the health and safety of the public

  3. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Cornell University TRIGA Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-157

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Cornell University for a renewal of Operating License R-80 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Cornell University and is located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Cornell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  4. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Arizona (Docket No. 50-113)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Arizona for the renewal of Operating License R-52 to continue operating its research reactor at an increased operating power level has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, Arizona. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Arizona without endangering the health and safety of the public. 20 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Universiy of Missouri-Rolla (Docket No. 5-123)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Missouri-Rolla for a renewal of Operating License R-79 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the University of Missouri and is located on the campus in Rolla, Missouri. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  6. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    HTGR safety evaluation included studies on fission product release; materials, chemistry, and instrumentation; structural evaluation; and analytical safety evaluation. LMFBR safety evaluation included studies on accident sequences, technical coordination of structural integrity, and SSC code development and validation. LWR safety studies included thermal/hydraulic accident analysis, THOR code development, and stress corrosion cracking of PWR steam generator tubing

  7. Technical safety requirements for the Annular Core Research Reactor Facility (ACRRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldt, K.R.; Morris, F.M.; Talley, D.G.; McCrory, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) document is prepared and issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements. The bases for the TSR are established in the ACRRF Safety Analysis Report issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The TSR identifies the operational conditions, boundaries, and administrative controls for the safe operation of the facility

  8. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Pennsylvania State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Pennsylvania State University for a renewal of Operating License R-2 to continue to operate the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor (PSBR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus in University Park, Pennsylvania. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  9. Annual report on reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Ministry for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of semi-annual and annual publication of progress reports within the series GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress-Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the Research Program on the Safety of LWRs of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The report are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Safety studies concerning nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, Jean; Pelce, Jacques

    1980-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations poses different technical problems, whether concerning pressurized water reactors or fast reactors. But investigating methods are closely related and concern, on the one hand, the behavior of shields placed between fuel and outside and, on the other, analysis of accidents. The article is therefore in two parts based on the same plan. Concerning light water reactors, the programme of studies undertaken in France accounts for the research carried out in countries where collaboration agreements exist. Concerning fast reactors, France has the initiative of their studies owing to her technical advance, which explains the great importance of the programmes under way [fr

  11. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, January--March 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zane, J. O.; Farman, R. F.; Hanson, D. J.; Peterson, A. C.; Ybarrondo, L. J.; Berta, V. T.; Naff, S. A.; Crocker, J. G.; Martinson, Z. R.; Smolik, G. R.; Cawood, G. W.; Quapp, W. J.; Ramsthaler, J. H.; Ransom, V. H.; Scofield, M. P.; Dearien, J. A.; Bohn, M. P.; Burnham, B. W.; James, S. W.; Lee, W. H.; Lime, J. F.; Nalezny, C. L.; MacDonald, P. E.; Thompson, L. B.; Domenico, W. F.; Rice, R. E.; Hendrix, C. E.; Davis, C. B.

    1976-06-01

    Light water reactor sfaety research performed January through March 1976 is summarized. Results of the Semiscale Mod-1 blowdown heat transfer test series relating to those phenomena that influence core fluid and heat transfer effects are analyzed, and preliminary analyses of the recently completed reflood heat transfer test series are summarized for the forced and gravity feed reflood tests. The first nonnuclear LOCE in the LOFT program was successfully completed and preliminary results are presented. Preliminary results are given for the PCM 8-1 RF Test, the PCM-2A Test, and the Irradiation Effects Scoping Test 2 in the Thermal Fuel Behavior Program. Model development and verification efforts reported in the Reactor Behavior Program include checkout of RELAP4/MOD5 Update 1, development of a new hydrodynamic model for two-phase separated flows, development of the RACHET code to assess the assumptions in current fuel behavior codes of uniform stress and strain in the cladding, modifications of the containment code BEACON, analysis of results from the Halden Assembly IFA-429 helium sorption experiment, development of correlations for the thermal conductivity of UO/sub 2/ and (U,Pu)O/sub 2/, and evaluation of RALAP4 through comparison of calculated results with data from the GE Blowdown Heat Transfer and Semiscale experiments.

  12. Introductory user's manual for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Reactor Safety Research Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scofield, N.R.; Hardy, H.A.; Laats, E.T.

    1983-02-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank Program to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water safety research programs. Local direction of the program is provided by E G and G Idaho, Inc., prime contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The NRC/DAE Data Bank Program provides a central computer storage mechanism and access software for data that is to be used by code development and assessment groups in meeting the code and correlation needs of the nuclear industry. The administrative portion of the program provides data entry, documentation, training, and advisory services to users and the NRC. The NRC/DAE Data Bank and the capabilities of the data access software are described

  13. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC. Reported period: January 1 to June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesministerium fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technologie Agency (ISTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of the BMFT, reporting organization. (orig./HP) [de

  14. List of reports in the field of reactor safety research from BMFT, CEA, EPRI, JSTA and USNRC. Reported period: July 1 to December 31, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This list reviews reports from the Federal Republic of Germany, from France, from Japan and from the United States of America concerning single problems in the field of Reactor Safety Research. According to the cooperation of the Bundesministerium fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) with the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), the Japan Science and Technologie Agency (ISTA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, these reports are available in the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). The list pursues the following order: Country of origin, problem area concerned, according to the Reactor Safety Research Program of the BMFT, reporting organization. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Comparison of nuclear safety research reactor (TRIGA-ACPR) performance with analytical prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.B.; Whittemore, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    The NSRR was taken critical on June 30, 1975 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute - Tokai-mura, Japan. Following initial core loading and control rod calibration, a series of pulsing tests was performed to characterize the performance of the reactor. A comparison has been made of performance parameters actually measured in the 157 element core versus predicted values based upon design analyses. The nuclear parameters measured were quite close to prediction. A $4.70 pulse produced a minimum period of 1.12 msec, a peak power of 20,500 MW and yielded a prompt energy release of 103 MW-sec. Pulse tests with experimental UO 2 fuel pins in the central irradiation cavity have produced 320 cal/gm, averaged at the axial center of 10% enriched UO 2 , for a 100 MW-sec pulse. The pulse rods for the NSRR contain B 4 C enriched to about 93 percent in Boron-10 in order to achieve maximum design performance with only three pulse rods. The total worth for the three transient rods was measured to be about $5.05 (vs $5.07 calculated for the 165 element core), thus verifying the effectiveness of the Boron-10 enrichment to achieve the desired result. Analysis of fuel temperature measurements made in the NSRR show that, for fuel temperatures produced during pulsing greater than 900 deg. C, heat transfer in the 0.010-inch gap between fuel and clad is enhanced by the minor outgassing of hydrogen which is characteristic of that temperature region. The hydrogen is normally all reabsorbed within about 100 sec of maximum temperature, at which time the heat transfer is characteristic of air (or argon) in the gap. In some of the temperature-instrumented elements, however, all of the hydrogen was not reabsorbed and as a result these elements gave significantly lower temperatures for high power steady state operation than were recorded prior to pulsing. In general, the NSRR parameters measured during startup were quite close to analytical prediction and the overall performance of the

  16. 2012 review of French research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Proposed by the French Reactor Operators' Club (CER), the meeting and discussion forum for operators of French research reactors, this report first gives a brief presentation of these reactors and of their scope of application, and a summary of highlights in 2012 for each of them. Then, it proposes more detailed presentations and reviews of characteristics, activities, highlights, objectives and results for the different types of reactors: neutron beam reactors (Orphee, High flux reactor-Laue-Langevin Institute or HFR-ILL), technological irradiation reactors (Osiris and Phenix), training reactors (Isis and Azur), reactors for safety research purposes (Cabri and Phebus), reactors for neutronic studies (Caliban, Prospero, Eole, Minerve and Masurca), and new research reactors (the RES facility and the Jules Horowitz reactor or JHR)

  17. Reactor safety protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Tsuguo.

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of neutron detectors are disposed around a reactor core and detection signals from optional two neutron detectors are inputted into a ratio calculation device. If the ratio between both of the neutron flux level signals exceeds a predetermined value, a reactor trip signal is generated from an alarm setting device. Further, detection signals from all of the neutron detection devices are inputted into an average calculation device and the reactor trip signal is generated also in a case where the average value exceeds a predetermined set value. That is, when the reactor core power is increased locally, the detection signal from the neutron detector nearer to the point of power increase is greater than the increase rate for the entire reactor core power, while the detection signal from the neutron detector remote from the point of power increase is smaller. Thus, the local power increase ratio in the FBR reactor core can be detected efficiently by calculating the ratio for the neutron flux level signals from two neutron detectors, thereby enabling to exactly recognize the local power increase rate in the reactor core. (N.H.)

  18. Reactor safety device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yasumasa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To scram control rods by processing signals from a plurality of temperature detectors and generating abnormal temperature warning upon occurrence of abnormal temperature in a nuclear reactor. Constitution: A temperature sensor comprising a plurality of reactors each having a magnetic body as the magnetic core having a curie point different from each other and corresponding to the abnormal temperature against which reactor core fuels have to be protected is disposed in an identical instrumentation well near the reactor core fuel outlet/inlet of a reactor. A temperature detection device actuated upon detection of an abnormal temperature by the abrupt reduction of the reactance of each of the reactors is disposed. An OR circuit and an AND circuit for conducting OR and AND operations for each of the abnormal temperature detection signals from the temperature detection device are disposed. The output from the OR circuit is used as the abnormal temperature warning signal, while the output from the AND circuit is utilized as a signal for actuating the scram operation of control rod drive mechanisms. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability of the reactor scram system, particularly, improve the reliability under a high temperature atmosphere. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Annual report of contract research for the Metallurgy and Materials Research Branch, Division of Reactor Safety Research, Fiscal Year 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Research is reported in the areas of: fracture and structural mechanics; non-destructive testing; steam generator integrity and corrosion; pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry and piping system analysis

  20. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Iowa State University (Docket No. 50-116)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Iowa State University (ISU) for a renewal of the Class 104 Operating License R-59 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Iowa State University, and is located on the ISU campus in Ames, Story County, Iowa. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by ISU without endangering the health and safety of the public. The principal matters reviewed are: design, testing, and performance of the reactor components and systems; the expected consequences of credible accidents; the licensee's management organization; the method used for the control of radiological effluents; the licensee's technical specifications; financial data and information; the physical protection program; procedures for training reactor operators; and emergency plans. 11 references, 15 figures, 13 tables

  1. New perspectives on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past few years a number of changes and new perspectives have come about in our approach to reactor safety. These changes have occurred over a period of time extending from as long ago as 1975, when WASH-1400 came out representing the first major application of probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) to US reactor plants. The period of change has extended from that time to the present, and includes new areas of focus such as safety goals, source term studies, and severe accident policy statement and approaches, including the IDCOR Program. It has also included a greatly increased interest in inherent safety. These areas are discussed in this paper

  2. Safety features of TR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerker, T.

    2001-01-01

    TR-2 is a swimming pool type research reactor with 5 MW thermal power and uses standard MTR plate type fuel elements. Each standard fuel element consist of 23 fuel plates with a meat + cladding thickness of 0.127 cm, coolant channel clearance is 0.21 cm. Originally TR-2 is designed for %93 enriched U-Al. Alloy fuel meat.This work is based on the preparation of the Final Safety Analyses Report (FSAR) of the TR-2 reactor. The main aspect is to investigate the behaviour of TR-2 reactor under the accident and abnormal operating conditions, which cowers the accident spectrum unique for the TR-2 reactor. This presentation covers some selected transient analyses which are important for the safety aspects of the TR-2 reactor like reactivity induced startup accidents, pump coast down (Loss of Flow Accident, LOFA) and other accidents which are charecteristic to the TR-2

  3. Verification of reactor safety codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murley, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    The safety evaluation of nuclear power plants requires the investigation of wide range of potential accidents that could be postulated to occur. Many of these accidents deal with phenomena that are outside the range of normal engineering experience. Because of the expense and difficulty of full scale tests covering the complete range of accident conditions, it is necessary to rely on complex computer codes to assess these accidents. The central role that computer codes play in safety analyses requires that the codes be verified, or tested, by comparing the code predictions with a wide range of experimental data chosen to span the physical phenomena expected under potential accident conditions. This paper discusses the plans of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for verifying the reactor safety codes being developed by NRC to assess the safety of light water reactors and fast breeder reactors. (author)

  4. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology. Reported period: July 1 to December 31, 1986. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    Investigations on the safety of light water reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the research program on reactor safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks also projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  5. New research reactor proposed for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    A new research reactor has been proposed for construction within the next ten years, to replace the HIFAR reactor which operating capabilities have been over taken by later designs. This paper outlines the main research applications of the new reactor design and briefly examines issues related to its cost, economic benefits, safety and location

  6. Considerations on nuclear reactor passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having indicated some passive safety systems present in electronuclear reactors (control bars, safety injection system accumulators, reactor cooling after stoppage, hydrogen recombination systems), this report recalls the main characteristics of passive safety systems, and discusses the main issues associated with the assessment of new passive systems (notably to face a sustained loss of electric supply systems or of cold water source) and research axis to be developed in this respect. More precisely, the report comments the classification of safety passive systems as it is proposed by the IAEA, outlines and comments specific aspects of these systems regarding their operation and performance. The next part discusses the safety approach, the control of performance of safety passive systems, issues related to their reliability, and the expected contribution of R and D (for example: understanding of physical phenomena which have an influence of these systems, capacities of simulation of these phenomena, needs of experimentations to validate simulation codes)

  7. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Safety features of the MAPLE-X10 reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Bishop, W.E.; Heeds, W.

    1990-09-01

    The MAPLE-X10 reactor is a D 2 0-reflected, H 2 0-cooled and -moderated pool-type reactor under construction at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. This 10-MW reactor will produce key medical and industrial radio-isotopes such as 99 Mo, 125 I, and 192 Ir. As the prototype for the MAPLE research reactor concept, the reactor incorporates diverse safety features both inherent in the design and in the added engineered systems. The safety requirements are analogous to those of the Canadian CANDU power reactor since standards for the licensing of new research reactors have not been developed yet by the licensing authority in Canada

  9. Thermal reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport

  10. Thermal reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  11. A recommendation of the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection for the appointment of Nuclear Safety Control Officers for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, B.

    1990-01-01

    The Ordinance on the Implementation of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR requires that the managers of plants where nuclear facilities are operated appoint Control Officers for the fields of radiation protection, nuclear safety, physical protection, and accounting for and control of nuclear materials. The Control Officers are staff members of the operating organization but their appointment is subject to approval by the National Board and requires adequate qualification. The main task of the Control Officers as specialists is to give advice to the plant manager who retains responsibility for the safety of nuclear facilities, and to verify on his behalf that all requirements within their competence are met by the operating group. For this reason the Control Officer has to be absolutely independent of the head of the operating group. To enable the Control Officers to accomplish all necessary control activities and to guarantee independence from the head of the operating group, the plant manager has to establish adequate regulations of operation. As a pattern for such regulations the National Board has issued a Recommendation for the Appointment of Nuclear Safety Control Officers for Research Reactors, which provides a comprehensive survey of the requisite qualification features as well as the duties and rights of these Control Officers. This recommendation will be dealt with in the presentation

  12. The safety R and D for GEN-IV reactors in the European nuclear energy technology platform strategic research agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruna, G.

    2009-01-01

    In the fall 2007 EC launched the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE-TP). The SNE-TP governing board set-up three working groups (WG): 1) Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) WG, in charge of drafting road-maps to support research, development and demonstration for current and future NPPs; 2) Deployment Strategy (DS) WG, in charge of defining the research road-map implementation and 3) Education, Training and Knowledge management (ETKM) WG, which was aimed at issuing proposal to reinforce European education and attract young in the nuclear field. The SRA WG was mandated to prepare the SRA vision document based on the preliminary road-map sketched in the document published by the Commission earlier in 2007. The SRA WG was originally organized in 5 sub-groups covering specific topics (1) GEN II and III, III+, including Advanced LWR, 2) Advanced Fuel Cycle for waste minimization and resource optimization; 3) GEN IV Fast Systems (SFR, LFR, GFR, ADS); 4) GEN IV (V) HTR and non-electricity-production applications; 5) New Nuclear Large Research Infrastructures) and 5 other sub-groups dealing with more generic cross-cutting research activities applicable to many specific topics, namely: 1) Structural material research; 2) modeling, simulation and methods, including physical data and tools and means for qualification and validation; 3) Reactor Safety, including severe accidents and human factor; 4) Advanced Driver and Minor Actinide Fuels: science and properties; 5) Pre-normative Research, Codes and Standards.The present paper is mainly aimed at summarizing the content of the SRA Safety sub-chapter focusing on GEN-IV aspects

  13. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Use of deuterium-tritium burning fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control, (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment, (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions, (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices, and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power

  14. Fusion-Reactor-Safety Research Program. Annual report, Fiscal Year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1982-07-01

    The report contains four sections: Outside Contracts includes the continuation of the General Atomic Co. low-activation materials safety study, water-cooled transport activation products study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), studies of superconducting magnet safety conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) coupled with a new experimental superconducting magnet study program by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to verify analytical work, a continuation of safety methodology work by MIT, portions of papers on lithium safety studies conducted at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), and a new program to study tritium gas conversion to tritiated water at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The section EG and G idaho, Inc., Activities at INEL includes adaptations of papers of ongoing work in transient code development, tritium systems risk assessment, heat transfer activities, and a summary of a workshop on safety in design. A List of Publications and Proposed FY-82 Activities are also presented

  15. Developments in the regulation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loy, J.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has data on over 670 research reactors in the world. Fewer than half of them are operational and a significant number are in a shutdown but not decommissioned state. The International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) has expressed concerns about the safety of many research reactors and this has resulted in a process to draw up an international Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. The IAEA is also reviewing its safety standards applying to research reactors. On the home front, regulation of the construction of the Replacement Research Reactor continues. During the construction phase, regulation has centred around the consideration of Requests for Approval (RFA) for the manufacture and installation of systems, structures and components important for safety. Quality control of construction of systems, structures and components is the central issue. The process for regulation of commissioning is under consideration

  16. Fast Reactor Safety Research Program. Quarterly report, January--March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    Progress is summarized in the following study areas: (1) prompt burst excursion, (2) post-accident heat removal (PAHR) debris bed, (3) fuel motion detection, (4) PAHR molten pool behavior, (5) equation-of-state high-temperature fuel vapor data, and (6) fuel motion detection equipment for the upgraded Annular Core Pulsed Reactor

  17. Integral fast reactor safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents

  18. Integral fast reactor safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: a pool-type primary system, and advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents

  19. Influence of single-phase heat transfer correlations on safety analysis of research reactors with narrow rectangular fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawashdeh, A.; Altamimi, R.; Lee, B.; Chung, Y. J.; Park, S.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of different single-phase heat transfer correlations on the fuel temperature and minimum critical heat flux ratio (MCHFR) during a typical accident of a 5 MW research reactor is investigated. A reactor uses plate type fuel, of which the cooling channels have a narrow rectangular shape. RELAP5/MOD3.3 tends to over-predict the Nusselt number (Nu) at a low Reynolds number (Re) region, and therefore the correlation set is modified to properly describe the thermal behavior at that region. To demonstrate the effect of Nu at a low-Re region on an accident analysis, a two-pump failure accident was chosen as a sample problem. In the accident, the downward core flow decreases by a pump coast-down, and then reverses upward by natural convection. During the pump coast-down and flow reversal, the flow undergoes a laminar flow regime which has a different Nu with respect to the correlation sets. Compared to the results by the original RELAP5/MOD3.3, the modified correlation set predicts the fuel temperature to be a little higher than the original value, and the MCHFR to be a little lower than the original value. Although the modified correlation set predicts the fuel temperature and the MCHFR to be less conservative than those calculated from the original correlation of RELAP5/MOD3.3, the maximum fuel temperature and the MCHFR still satisfy the safety acceptance criteria

  20. Thermal Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods

  1. Thermal Reactor Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  2. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Ruben Calabrese

    1999-01-01

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compet