WorldWideScience

Sample records for research questions appended

  1. Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... function. A blockage inside of the appendix causes appendicitis. The blockage leads to increased pressure, problems with ... to pass gas Low fever Not everyone with appendicitis has all these symptoms. Appendicitis is a medical ...

  2. Patient-centered outcomes research in appendicitis in children: Bridging the knowledge gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Danielle B; Ciullo, Sean S; Watson-Smith, Debra; Chun, Thomas H; Kurkchubasche, Arlet G; Luks, Francois I

    2016-01-01

    Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) aims to give patients a better understanding of the treatment options to enable optimal decision-making. As nonoperative alternatives are now being evaluated in children for acute appendicitis, we surveyed patients and their families regarding their knowledge of appendicitis and evaluated whether providing basic medical information would affect their perception of the disease and allow them to more rationally consider the treatment alternatives. Families of children aged 5-18 presenting to the Emergency Department with suspected appendicitis were recruited for a tablet-based interactive educational survey. One hundred subjects (caregivers and patients ≥ 15 years) were questioned before and after an education session about their understanding of appendicitis, including questions on three hypothetical treatment options: urgent appendectomy, antibiotics alone, or initial antibiotics followed by elective appendectomy. Subjects were clearly informed that urgent appendectomy is currently the standard of care. Only 14% of respondents correctly identified the mortality rate of appendicitis (17 deaths/year according to the 2010 US census) when compared with other extremely rare causes of death. Fifty-four and 31% thought it was more common than death from lightning (40/year) and hunting-associated deaths (44/year), respectively. Eighty-two percent of respondents believed it "likely" or "very likely" that the appendix would rupture if operation was at all delayed, and 81% believed that rupture of the appendix would rapidly lead to severe complications and death. In univariate analysis, this perception was significantly more prevalent for mothers (odds ratio, (OR) 5.19, confidence interval (CI) 1.33-21.15), and subjects who knew at least one friend or relative who had a negative experience with appendicitis (OR 5.53, CI 1.40-25.47). Following education, these perceptions changed significantly (53% still believed that immediate

  3. Generating ethnographic research questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    ? By drawing on the conceptual history of anthropology, the aim of this article is to generate ethnographic-oriented research questions concerned with higher education. The first part of the article provides an ethnographic background, while the second part focuses on Paul Willis's reasoning on ethnographic......As part of recent complex transformations, it seems that higher educational organisations are being forced to reorganise, standardise and streamline in order to survive in the new political and economic context. How are ethnographers in general going to approach these contemporary phenomena...... imagination, as a prerequisite for generating alternative research questions. The third part makes explicit anthropologist Maurice Godelier's theoretical imagination, carving out some specific theoretical parts which may be used in the generating process. The conclusion then suggests a number of questions...

  4. When is a research question not a research question?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nancy E; Asano, Miho; Barbic, Skye Pamela

    2013-06-01

    Research is undertaken to answer important questions yet often the question is poorly expressed and lacks information on the population, the exposure or intervention, the comparison, and the outcome. An optimal research question sets out what the investigator wants to know, not what the investigator might do, nor what the results of the study might ultimately contribute. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent to which rehabilitation scientists optimally define their research questions. A cross-sectional survey of the rehabilitation research articles published during 2008. Two raters independently rated each question according to pre-specified criteria; a third rater adjudicated all discrepant ratings. The proportion of the 258 articles with a question formulated as methods or expected contribution and not as what knowledge was being sought was 65%; 30% of questions required reworking. The designs which most often had poorly formulated research questions were randomized trials, cross-sectional and measurement studies. Formulating the research question is not purely a semantic concern. When the question is poorly formulated, the design, analysis, sample size calculations, and presentation of results may not be optimal. The gap between research and clinical practice could be bridged by a clear, complete, and informative research question.

  5. Questions for Music Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Estelle R.

    2008-01-01

    In addressing the question-set "What questions do music education researchers need to address?", an illustrative list of juxtaposed descriptive and normative questions is sketched as follows: What are and should be the dimensions of music education? What are and should be the institutional agencies of music education? What are and should be the…

  6. Clinical research. Acute appendicitis in children. Review of 324 operated cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Furuta, Yasuhiko; Kamei, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    A retrospective review was made of 324 operated cases of acute appendicitis for sixteen years from 1989 to 2005. For seven years from 1999 to 2005, an additional review was made of 63 cases where patients visited our department on suspicion of acute appendicitis and received medical treatment without operation. Cases of hospitalization on suspicion of appendicitis averaged 18 a year for 1999 to 2005, with half these being appendicitis or peritonitis due to perforated appendicitis. The number of cases by age groups for those with acute appendicitis reached 25 per year in 1997 but fell off from 1998 onwards. Out of the total 324 cases, 179 were boys, 145 were girls, and there were 188 cases of acute appendicitis and 136 cases of perforated appendicitis. There were 23 cases of catarrhal appendicitis, with three cases out of the 63 cases overall of the last seven years. There were 66 cases for ages 0 to 6, 168 cases for ages 7 to 11, and 90 cases for ages 12 to 20, the peak age group being 7 to 11. Perforated appendicitis occurred in 65.2% of cases involving infants under six, which is relatively high compared to the 36.0% of the over seven age grouping. There were 112 cases of fecalith out of the 324 overall cases, 24.5% of acute appendicitis cases and 48.5% of perforated appendicitis cases. Over the last seven years ultrasound examination made visible the inflamed appendix in 41 cases of 46 (89.1%) for acute appendicitis and in 16 cases of 17 (94.1%) for perforated appendicitis. CT scans were used in five cases of acute appendicitis/perforated appendicitis out of the 324 overall cases. Five of the 63 cases of surgical operations from 1999 to 2005 involved surgery made after diagnosis of acute appendicitis after follow-up hospitalization. Types of operations involved 11 cases of laparoscopic appendectomy, the remaining 313 operations involving classical open appendectomy. (author)

  7. Four Principles for Selecting HCI Research Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil

    In this position paper, I present and explain the position that what we should study in HCI depends on the objective of the research and its political, social, cultural, technological, and historical context. I outline four principles for selecting research questions and give a personal account...... of how I have selected research questions using these four principles. The aim with the paper is to generate discussion and advance the understanding of what to study in HCI....

  8. Learning How to Ask Research Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative research is a demanding endeavor, and for a group of undergraduate students tasked with identifying their own interdisciplinary research problem, the challenges are even greater. "It was scary--we didn't know what to ask the professors, and we couldn't decide on a research question," says Miran Park, a student at the University of…

  9. Vacation appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redan, Jay A; Tempel, Michael B; Harrison, Shannon; Zhu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    When someone plans a vacation, one of the last things taken into consideration is the possibility of contracting an illness while away. Unfortunately, if people develop abdominal pain while planning for a vacation, they usually proceed with the vacation and do not consider getting medical attention for their pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of being on vacation and its association with ruptured appendicitis. From January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008, the incidence of ruptured appendicitis cases at Florida Hospital-Celebration Health, located 5 miles from Walt Disney World, was compared with that of Florida Hospital-Orlando, approximately 30 miles away from Walt Disney World. We evaluated whether patients "on vacation" versus residents of Orlando have an increased incidence of ruptured appendicitis. Of patients treated for presumed appendicitis, 60.59% at Florida Hospital-Celebration Health had ruptured appendicitis during this time versus 20.42% at Florida Hospital-Orlando. Of those 266 patients seen at Florida Hospital-Celebration Health, 155 were on vacation versus only 21 at Florida Hospital-Orlando. Although there is not a direct cause and effect, it is clear that there is a higher incidence of ruptured appendicitis in patients on vacation versus in the regular community in the Orlando, Florida area.

  10. Fifty important research questions in microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwis, Rachael E; Griffiths, Sarah M; Harrison, Xavier A; Aranega-Bou, Paz; Arce, Andres; Bettridge, Aimee S; Brailsford, Francesca L; de Menezes, Alexandre; Devaynes, Andrew; Forbes, Kristian M; Fry, Ellen L; Goodhead, Ian; Haskell, Erin; Heys, Chloe; James, Chloe; Johnston, Sarah R; Lewis, Gillian R; Lewis, Zenobia; Macey, Michael C; McCarthy, Alan; McDonald, James E; Mejia-Florez, Nasmille L; O'Brien, David; Orland, Chloé; Pautasso, Marco; Reid, William D K; Robinson, Heather A; Wilson, Kenneth; Sutherland, William J

    2017-05-01

    Microbial ecology provides insights into the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of microbial communities underpinning every ecosystem on Earth. Microbial communities can now be investigated in unprecedented detail, although there is still a wealth of open questions to be tackled. Here we identify 50 research questions of fundamental importance to the science or application of microbial ecology, with the intention of summarising the field and bringing focus to new research avenues. Questions are categorised into seven themes: host-microbiome interactions; health and infectious diseases; human health and food security; microbial ecology in a changing world; environmental processes; functional diversity; and evolutionary processes. Many questions recognise that microbes provide an extraordinary array of functional diversity that can be harnessed to solve real-world problems. Our limited knowledge of spatial and temporal variation in microbial diversity and function is also reflected, as is the need to integrate micro- and macro-ecological concepts, and knowledge derived from studies with humans and other diverse organisms. Although not exhaustive, the questions presented are intended to stimulate discussion and provide focus for researchers, funders and policy makers, informing the future research agenda in microbial ecology. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenger RH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roland H Wenger,1,2 Vartan Kurtcuoglu,1,2 Carsten C Scholz,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs1,2,4 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, 2National Center of Competence in Research “Kidney.CH”, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. Keywords: gas laws, hypoxia-inducible factor, Krogh tissue cylinder, oxygen diffusion, partial pressure, tissue oxygen levels

  12. Acute Appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tind, Sofie; Qvist, Niels

    2017-01-01

    and treatment of AA it is important that the classifications are consistent. Furthermore, in the clinical settings, incorrect classification might lead to over diagnosing and a prolonged antibiotic treatment. The aim of our study was to investigate the concordance between perioperative diagnosis made......BACKGROUND: The classification of acute appendicitis (AA) into various grades is not consistent, partly because it is not clear whether the perioperative or the histological findings should be the foundation of the classification. When comparing results from the literature on the frequency...

  13. Good science, bad science: Questioning research practices in psychological research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation we have questioned the current research practices in psychological science and thereby contributed to the current discussion about the credibility of psychological research. We specially focused on the problems with the reporting of statistical results and showed that reporting

  14. How to…write a good research question

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattick, Karen; Johnston, Jenny; de la Croix, Anne

    This paper, on writing research questions, is the first in a series that aims to support novice researchers within clinical education, particularly those undertaking their first qualitative study. Put simply, a research question is a question that a research project sets out to answer. Most research

  15. Water permeability is a measure of severity in acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Nicola; Pfeifle, Viktoria A; Kym, Urs; Keck, Simone; Galati, Virginie; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Gros, Stephanie J

    2017-12-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common indication for pediatric abdominal emergency surgery. Determination of the severity of appendicitis on clinical grounds is challenging. Complicated appendicitis presenting with perforation, abscess or diffuse peritonitis is not uncommon. The question remains why and when acute appendicitis progresses to perforation. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of water permeability on the severity of appendicitis. We show that AQP1 expression and water permeability in appendicitis correlate with the stage of inflammation and systemic infection parameters, leading eventually to perforation of the appendix. AQP1 is also expressed within the ganglia of the enteric nervous system and ganglia count increases with inflammation. Severity of appendicitis can be correlated with water permeability measured by AQP1 protein expression and increase of ganglia count in a progressive manner. This introduces the question if regulation of water permeability can present novel curative or ameliorating therapeutic options.

  16. Questioning the Federal Role in Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, David H.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the Reagan administration's proposed budget cuts for education, educational research, and social science research. Holds that examples used to bolster the administration's criticisms of social and behavioral research come from the late 1960s/early 1970s, and ignore federally funded work currently focusing on educational practice, policy,…

  17. Appendicitis in Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Appendicitis in Teens Page Content Article Body Early adolescence ... it has no known function. Symptoms that Suggest Appendicitis may Include: Persistent abdominal pain that migrates from ...

  18. Difficult Questions of Difficult Questions: The Role of The Researcher and Transcription Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Holly

    2018-01-01

    This paper refracts a comparison of three distinct transcription styles through questions of researcher reflexivity. It uses the data from a single question asked by the researcher in multiple interviews for a small empirical project. These data are transcribed in three ways, and the resulting transcripts are discussed in relation to the analysis…

  19. Frequently Asked Questions about Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Genomic Medicine Working Group New Horizons and Research Patient Management Policy and Ethics Issues Quick Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for ...

  20. Imaging of appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himal Gajjar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis is one of the commonest causes of abdominal pain requiring surgery. Early diagnosis and management are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. Imaging is valuable in the diagnosis of cases that are clinically atypical. Imaging also allows evaluation of the complications of appendicitis. In certain circumstances, conservative treatment of complicated appendicitis with percutaneous drainage is appropriate.

  1. Research Questions: Women and Mass Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Linda J.

    Typically, research concerning media presentations of women has involved six types of analysis: (1) content analysis (what is said), (2) cultural and social analysis (why it is said), (3) control or gatekeeper analysis (by whom it is said), (4) audience analysis (to whom it is said), (5) media analysis (in which channel), and (6) effects analysis…

  2. Psychotherapy Outcome Research: Issues and Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shean, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    Emphasis on identifying evidence-based therapies (EBTs) has increased markedly. Lists of EBTs are the rationale for recommendations for how psychotherapy provider training programs should be evaluated, professional competence assessed, and licensure and reimbursement policies structured. There are however methodological concerns that limit the external validity of EBTs. Among the most salient is the circularity inherent in randomized control trials (RCTs) of psychotherapy that constrains the manner in which the psychological problems are defined, psychotherapy can be practiced, and change evaluated. RCT studies favor therapies that focus of specific symptoms and can be described in a manual, administered reliably across patients, completed in relatively few sessions, and involve short-term evaluations of outcome. The epistemological assumptions of a natural science approach to psychotherapy research limit how studies are conducted and assessed in ways that that advantage symptom-focused approaches and disadvantage those approaches that seek to bring broad recovery-based changes. Research methods that are not limited to RCTs and include methodology to minimize the effects of "therapist allegiance" are necessary for valid evaluations of therapeutic approaches that seek to facilitate changes that are broader than symptom reduction. Recent proposals to adopt policies that dictate training, credentialing, and reimbursement based on lists of EBTs unduly limit how psychotherapy can be conceptualized and practiced, and are not in the best interests of the profession or of individuals seeking psychotherapy services.

  3. Priority water research questions for South Africa developed through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes a collaborative process of identifying and prioritising current and future water research questions from a wide range of water specialists within South Africa. Over 1 600 questions were collected, reduced in number and prioritised by specialists working in water research and practice. A total of 59 ...

  4. Socratic Questioning: A Teaching Philosophy for the Student Research Consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Marie Robinson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Brief Socratic questioning, the act of asking questions in order to prompt critical thinking and reflection, expands the boundaries of librarianship by borrowing from the fields of philosophy, pedagogy, and psychology. When employed during the research consultation, Socratic questioning establishes a cooperative relationship between librarian and student that empowers the student to take agency over the interaction. Engaging learners not only academically but emotionally encourages them to become more deliberate and cognizant as they articulate their research need. This paper demonstrates how reference librarians can adjust interactions with students in order to encourage, empathize, and engage with these learners.

  5. Developing critical thinking through Socratic Questioning: An Action Research Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husniah Sahamid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An action research study was conducted among 24 Form 4 level Malaysian students, aged 16. The duration of the study was five months and constituted 16 one-hour literature lessons (short stories from the secondary level Malaysian English Language Upper Secondary Level school syllabus. This paper describes my experience as a teacher-as-researcher to assist students to respond to teacher questions through Paul’s (1993 model of Socratic Questioning which claims to develop students’ critical thinking. Data was collected through researcher’s field notes, students’ writing tasks and student interviews which were analysed after each cycle of the action research study. Changes and adaptations were consequently made based on the data collected and upon teacher reflection to improve practice. The results of this study indicate that repeated practice of Socratic Questioning had a positive effect on student responses and writing tasks. Some of the factors affecting students’ performance included students’ language proficiency, weak reading ability and students’ anxiety towards the questioning method. These issues had to be addressed and dealt with, before Socratic Questioning could be properly implemented in the classroom. Keywords: Socratic questioning, teacher questioning, critical thinking, action research

  6. How Pollination Ecology research can help answer important questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalheiro, Luisa G.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pollination Ecology is a dynamic field of scientific research constantly adopting novel methods and making progress in understanding the interactions between plants and their pollinators. A recent paper listed the main scientific questions in this field focussing on the ecological and biological system itself. Here, we follow up on that paper and present some ideas on how to broaden our perspective and explore the role that pollination research can play in answering both ecological and societal questions relevant to a range of different stakeholders. We hope this paper may be useful to researchers aiming at improving both the scientific and societal impact of their research.

  7. Questions That Won't Go Away in Participatory Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan W. Long; Heidi L. Ballard; Larry A. Fisher; Jill M. Belsky

    2016-01-01

    Ethical issues are intrinsic to conducting research regarding society and natural resources, but they often become poignant when engaging in Participatory Action Research. We compiled common and persistent challenges into a list of "Questions That Won't Go Away" or "QTWGAs" that are relevant to people interested in conducting participatory...

  8. Appendicitis with Intraluminal Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Alfredo; Ramirez, Sandra M; Rodriguez, Cesar A; Uriza, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    The presentation of acute appendicitis with intraluminal air is an uncommon presentation. Ultrasound is a widely used and accepted to establish the diagnosis of appendicitis, but its performance is limited in situations where there is interposition of air. Inflamed appendix which presents with distension by gas can be source of error in ultrasound to establish a false negative diagnosis. In this article we present three patients with appendicitis where the interposition of intraluminal air hid their diagnostic by ultrasound. In all three cases the definitive diagnosis was established by computed tomography and surgical confirmation.

  9. FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions regarding the IDRC Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Questions. 1. If I am selected for a Research Award, do I need a work permit to ... Yes, you are responsible for obtaining a valid work permit and proper visa prior to ... is the deadline for awards starting in January of the following calendar year.

  10. Top 10 research questions related to children physical activity motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ang

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity is critical to healthy development of children. It is well documented that helping children develop and sustain a physically active lifestyle requires children to become motivated. Many studies have been conducted in the past 2.5 decades on determinants and correlates for children and adolescents' physical activity motivation. The findings have informed researchers and practitioners about motivation sources for children and effective strategies to motivate children in given physical activity settings. Built on the extensive knowledge base and theoretical platforms formed by these research studies, the purpose of this article is to take a look at the current research landscape and provide subjective thoughts about what we still need to know about children's physical activity motivation. The product of this subjective thinking process rendered 10 potential questions for future research on children's physical activity motivation in both in-school and out-of-school settings. These topics encompass those focusing on children's physical activity motivation as a mental dispositional process, those conceptualizing the motivation as an outcome of person-environment interactions, and those attempting to dissect the motivation as an outcome of social-cultural influences and educational policies. It is hoped that the topics can serve researchers interested in children's physical activity motivation as starting blocks from which they can extend their conceptual thinking and identify research questions that are personally meaningful. It is also hoped that the list of potential questions can be helpful to researchers in accomplishing the imperative and significant mission to motivate children to be physically active in the 21st century and beyond.

  11. 100 key research questions for the post-2015 development agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Oldekop, J. A.; Fontana, L. B.; Grugel, J.; Roughton, N.; Adu-Ampong, E. A.; Bird, G. K.; Dorgan, A.; Vera Espinoza, M. A.; Wallin, S.; Hammett, D.; Agbarakwe, E.; Agrawal, A.; Asylbekova, N.; Azkoul, C.; Bardsley, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) herald a new phase for international development. This article presents the results of a consultative exercise to collaboratively identify 100 research questions of critical importance for the post-2015 international development agenda. The final shortlist is grouped into nine thematic areas and was selected by 21 representatives of international and non-governmental organisations and consultancies, and 14 academics with diverse disciplinary expertise ...

  12. Storytelling as an Instructional Method: Descriptions and Research Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    computational brain . Cambridge, MA: Bradford/ MIT Press. Cianciolo, A. T., Prevou, M., Cianciolo, D., & Morris, R. (2007). Using digital storytelling to...volume 3, no. 2 (Fall 2009) 6–23 Storytelling as an Instructional Method: Descriptions and Research Questions Dee H. Andrews, Thomas D. Hull, and...Jennifer A. Donahue Abstract This paper discusses the theoretical and empirical foundations of the use of storytelling in instruction. The defi nition

  13. Question-based inquiry. an experience in research education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Plata Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article introduces the central elements of the research and pedagogical innovation project entitled: “The Use of Questions as a Pedagogical Strategy in the Construction of Research Problems”, developed by the students of the ‘Rizoma’ research training group of the School of Psychopedagogy, which began in the year 2009, and which forms part of the “Educational Innovations” research line of the Masters sin Education Program at UPTC. The question as strategy, pedagogy or didactics, becomes an educational option for the development of thinking processes, and contributes to an education that embraces uncertainty, in order to develop flexible thinking, as well as critical and creative attitudes towards knowledge. These qualities constitute the basis of all research tasks, and are fundamental in the education of professionals in the midst of the current, fast-moving and uncertain postmodern condition. Emerging from the students’ and teacher’s own voices, this article offers an account of this experience and characterizes the findings of this education and research work.

  14. Series: Practical guidance to qualitative research: part 2: context, research questions and designs

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Albine; Korstjens, Irene

    2017-01-01

    In the course of our supervisory work over the years, we have noticed that qualitative research tends to evoke a lot of questions and worries, so-called frequently asked questions (FAQs). This series of four articles intends to provide novice researchers with practical guidance for conducting high-quality qualitative research in primary care. By ‘novice’ we mean Master’s students and junior researchers, as well as experienced quantitative researchers who are engaging in qualitative research f...

  15. CT Diagnosis of Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Libby

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 19-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with 7/10 non-radiating, constant, sharp, periumbilical pain associated with nausea, and four episodes of vomiting. He was seen at urgent care where his labs showed a WBC of 16,000/mcL. He was subsequently sent to the emergency department (ED for concern of appendicitis. Of note, his pain worsened with bumps during the drive to the ED. After arriving to the ED the pain migrated to the right lower quadrant. Computed tomography (CT revealed acute appendicitis and the patient was admitted to the surgery service and taken to the operating room (OR for an appendectomy. Significant findings: The CT abdomen/pelvis with IV contrast shows a dilated appendix (see red outline with thickened, hyperenhancing wall (see blue outline best visualized in the axial and coronal planes. Discussion: Appendicitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department in patients presenting with abdominal pain, occurring most frequently in young adults with a peak incidence in those aged 10-19.1 Failure to quickly diagnose acute appendicitis can result in perforation rates as high as 80 percent.2 While the diagnosis of appendicitis can be made clinically, CT is a non-invasive modality that improves the detection of appendicitis with sensitivities of 88–100%, specificities of 91–99%, positive predictive values of 92–98%, negative predictive values of 95–100%, and accuracies of 94–98%.3-8 The major advantage of CT over both clinical exam and ultrasound is the ability of the radiologist to exclude acute appendicitis if the appendix appears normal. However, CT carries the risks associated with ionizing radiation. While previously there was some debate on the best choice for type of CT scan and use of IV and oral contrast, recent studies have shown that CT abdomen/pelvis with IV contrast alone is sufficient for diagnosis of appendicitis.9, 10

  16. Unsaturated flow and transport research questions and priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chery, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    A little over two years ago, a similar meeting (Workshop IV - Flow and Transport through Unsaturated Fractured Rock; Related to High-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal) was held her in Tucson, Arizona, to discuss the same issues discussed here the past 4 days. This presentation revisits what was said 2 years ago, reviews research needs that have been articulated by the licensing staff of the Division of High-Level Waste Management, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and presents some of the thoughts on research needs resulting from the deliberations of a special committee of the National Research Council. After considering these aspects the questions of what has been accomplished in the past 2 years and where attention and energies should be focused in the coming few years, can be asked. 3 refs

  17. Developmental regression in autism: research and conceptual questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Lampreia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of developmental regression in autism has gained importance and a growing number of studies have been conducted in recent years. It is a major issue indicating that there is not a unique form of autism onset. However the phenomenon itself and the concept of regression have been the subject of some debate: there is no consensus on the existence of regression, as there is no consensus on its definition. The aim of this paper is to review the research literature in this area and to introduce some conceptual questions about its existence and its definition.

  18. MRI in suspected appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, M.M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift richt zich op de optimalisatie van beeldvormende diagnostiek bij patiënten met een klinische verdenking op appendicitis, waarbij het gebruik van ‘magnetic resonance imaging’ (MRI) wordt verkend. Het proefschrift omvat de resultaten van de OPTIMAP-studie (OPTimisation of IMaging

  19. Hydronephrosis in acute uncomplicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schok, T; Austen, S; Lewicz, R B C B; van der Zande, F H R; Peters, N A L R; Janzing, H M J

    2015-01-01

    Right-sided hydronephrosis as a sign of appendicitis occurs rarely in the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first published account of the occurrence of right-sided hydronephrosis as a result of uncomplicated appendicitis. We describe a 15 year old patient referred to the emergency department with suspected appendicitis. Additional ultrasound examination showed a right-sided hydronephrosis. This finding was discussed with the urologist who noted the hydronephrosis as a chance finding. Because of persistent clinical suspicion of appendicitis, a diagnostic laparoscopy was performed. A retrocaecal appendicitis with secondary hydronephrosis was found. Right-sided hydronephrosis may be a sign of acute uncomplicated (retrocaecal) appendicitis. It is important to keep sight of these findings, especially in view of the emphasis on imaging techniques in the current Dutch guideline on appendicitis. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  20. Imaging diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vovc, Virgiliu

    2012-01-01

    The nontraumatic acute abdomen is one of the most common presentation to the emergency room, with appendicitis being one of the most common causes of the acute abdomen. Up to 30 % of patients suspected of having acute appendicitis will present with atypical signs and symptoms. There are many conditions that imitate acute appendicitis. The percentage of unnecessary appendectomies that result from a clinical false-positive diagnosis of appendicitis. The use of computed tomography (CT) before planned surgery has decreased the negative appendicectomy rate for patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Recognition of the typical and atypical CT signs of appendicitis is important to optimize the diagnosis yield of the examination. Visualization of an appendix with normal characteristics is the most important finding to exclude appendicitis. (author)

  1. Series: Practical guidance to qualitative research : part 2: context, research questions and designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albine Moser; Irene Korstjens

    2017-01-01

    In the course of our supervisory work over the years, we have noticed that qualitative research tends to evoke a lot of questions and worries, so-called frequently asked questions (FAQs). This series of four articles intends to provide novice researchers with practical guidance for conducting

  2. Series: Practical guidance to qualitative research. Part 2: Context, research questions and designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korstjens, Irene; Moser, Albine

    2017-12-01

    In the course of our supervisory work over the years, we have noticed that qualitative research tends to evoke a lot of questions and worries, so-called frequently asked questions (FAQs). This series of four articles intends to provide novice researchers with practical guidance for conducting high-quality qualitative research in primary care. By 'novice' we mean Master's students and junior researchers, as well as experienced quantitative researchers who are engaging in qualitative research for the first time. This series addresses their questions and provides researchers, readers, reviewers and editors with references to criteria and tools for judging the quality of qualitative research papers. This second article addresses FAQs about context, research questions and designs. Qualitative research takes into account the natural contexts in which individuals or groups function to provide an in-depth understanding of real-world problems. The research questions are generally broad and open to unexpected findings. The choice of a qualitative design primarily depends on the nature of the research problem, the research question(s) and the scientific knowledge one seeks. Ethnography, phenomenology and grounded theory are considered to represent the 'big three' qualitative approaches. Theory guides the researcher through the research process by providing a 'lens' to look at the phenomenon under study. Since qualitative researchers and the participants of their studies interact in a social process, researchers influence the research process. The first article described the key features of qualitative research, the third article will focus on sampling, data collection and analysis, while the last article focuses on trustworthiness and publishing.

  3. Research in thermal biology: Burning questions for coldwater stream fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, D.A.; Bartholow, J.M.; Jager, H.I.; Beschta, R.L.; Cheslak, E.F.; Deas, M.L.; Ebersole, J.L.; Foott, J.S.; Johnson, S.L.; Marine, K.R.; Mesa, M.G.; Petersen, J.H.; Souchon, Y.; Tiffan, K.F.; Wurtsbaugh, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation of global warming impacts on ecological systems, in addition to the myriad of land management effects on water quality, the number of literature citations dealing with the effects of water temperature on freshwater fish has escalated in the past decade. Given the many biological scales at which water temperature effects have been studied, and the growing need to integrate knowledge from multiple disciplines of thermal biology to fully protect beneficial uses, we held that a survey of the most promising recent developments and an expression of some of the remaining unanswered questions with significant management implications would best be approached collectively by a diverse research community. We have identified five specific topic areas of renewed research where new techniques and critical thought could benefit coldwater stream fishes (particularly salmonids): molecular, organism, population/species, community and ecosystem, and policy issues in water quality. Our hope is that information gained through examination of recent research fronts linking knowledge at various scales will prove useful in managing water quality at a basin level to protect fish populations and whole ecosystems. Standards of the past were based largely on incipient lethal and optimum growth rate temperatures for fish species, while future standards should consider all integrated thermal impacts to the organism and ecosystem. ?? Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  4. Improving the Development of Student's Research Questions and Hypotheses in an Introductory Business Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangman, Lauria; Knowles, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In an introductory research methods course, students often develop research questions and hypotheses that are vague or confusing, do not contain measurable concepts, and are too narrow in scope or vision. Because of this, the final research projects often fail to provide useful information or address the overall research problem. A Lesson Study…

  5. ACUTE APPENDICITIS- SONOLOGICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjani M. Reddy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to study the- 1. Correlation between sonological and histopathological diagnosis of acute appendicitis. 2. Prevalence of acute appendicitis in various age groups. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted in the Department of Radiodiagnosis, MVJ Medical College and Research Hospital, Bangalore, for a period of 2 years from March 2013 to February 2015. Data collection was prospective. A computer-assisted search of all the reports of ultrasonography with the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was conducted within the departmental database. A total of 244 patients (128 male patients and 116 female patients with acute appendicitis were identified and the study was conducted. RESULTS In the study, total of 244 patients were diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Out of these, 128 patients were males and 116 patients were females. The incidence of acute appendicitis was most prevalent in age group between 21 to 30 years (36.5% in our study. The least incidence was noted in age group of above 60 yrs. with only 1 out of 244 patients (0.4% was diagnosed with acute appendicitis. The histological features noted were suppuration/inflammation, gangrenous, lymphoid hyperplasia and perforation. In our study, 143 inflammation/suppuration (58.6%, 37 gangrenous (15.1%, 24 lymphoid hyperplastic (9.8% and 1 perforation (0.4% was noted. Hence, the incidence of inflammation/suppuration was found to be most common and perforation was found to be the least finding. The suppurative/inflammatory feature was most common histological type in all the age groups except for the age group above 60 yrs. The gangrenous features were most commonly seen in the age group between 11 to 20 yrs. followed by 20 to 30 yrs. Faecolith was most commonly found in age group of 21 to 30 yrs. (12 cases followed by age group of 11 to 20 yrs. (10 cases. CONCLUSION It was noted that the incidence of acute appendicitis was most commonly noted in younger age group

  6. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Teaching Games for Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmert, Daniel; Almond, Len; Bunker, David; Butler, Joy; Fasold, Frowin; Griffin, Linda; Hillmann, Wolfgang; Hüttermann, Stefanie; Klein-Soetebier, Timo; König, Stefan; Nopp, Stephan; Rathschlag, Marco; Schul, Karsten; Schwab, Sebastian; Thorpe, Rod; Furley, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we elaborate on 10 current research questions related to the "teaching games for understanding" (TGfU) approach with the objective of both developing the model itself and fostering game understanding, tactical decision making, and game-playing ability in invasion and net/wall games: (1) How can existing scientific approaches from different disciplines be used to enhance game play for beginners and proficient players? (2) How can state-of-the-art technology be integrated to game-play evaluations of beginners and proficient players by employing corresponding assessments? (4) How can complexity thinking be utilized to shape day-to-day physical education (PE) and coaching practices? (5) How can game making/designing be helpfully utilized for emergent learning? (6) How could purposeful game design create constraints that enable tactical understanding and skill development through adaptive learning and distributed cognition? (7) How can teacher/coach development programs benefit from game-centered approaches? (8) How can TGfU-related approaches be implemented in teacher or coach education with the goal of facilitating preservice and in-service teachers/coaches' learning to teach and thereby foster their professional development from novices to experienced practitioners? (9) Can the TGfU approach be considered a helpful model across different cultures? (10) Can physical/psychomotor, cognitive, affective/social, and cultural development be fostered via TGfU approaches? The answers to these questions are critical not only for the advancement of teaching and coaching in PE and sport-based clubs, but also for an in-depth discussion on new scientific avenues and technological tools.

  7. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Teaching Games for Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmert, Daniel; Almond, Len; Bunker, David; Butler, Joy; Fasold, Frowin; Griffin, Linda; Hillmann, Wolfgang; Hüttermann, Stefanie; Klein-Soetebier, Timo; König, Stefan; Nopp, Stephan; Rathschlag, Marco; Schul, Karsten; Schwab, Sebastian; Thorpe, Rod; Furley, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we elaborate on 10 current research questions related to the “teaching games for understanding” (TGfU) approach with the objective of both developing the model itself and fostering game understanding, tactical decision making, and game-playing ability in invasion and net/wall games: (1) How can existing scientific approaches from different disciplines be used to enhance game play for beginners and proficient players? (2) How can state-of-the-art technology be integrated to game-play evaluations of beginners and proficient players by employing corresponding assessments? (4) How can complexity thinking be utilized to shape day-to-day physical education (PE) and coaching practices? (5) How can game making/designing be helpfully utilized for emergent learning? (6) How could purposeful game design create constraints that enable tactical understanding and skill development through adaptive learning and distributed cognition? (7) How can teacher/coach development programs benefit from game-centered approaches? (8) How can TGfU-related approaches be implemented in teacher or coach education with the goal of facilitating preservice and in-service teachers/coaches’ learning to teach and thereby foster their professional development from novices to experienced practitioners? (9) Can the TGfU approach be considered a helpful model across different cultures? (10) Can physical/psychomotor, cognitive, affective/social, and cultural development be fostered via TGfU approaches? The answers to these questions are critical not only for the advancement of teaching and coaching in PE and sport-based clubs, but also for an in-depth discussion on new scientific avenues and technological tools. PMID:26452580

  8. The Heidelberg Appendicitis Score Predicts Perforated Appendicitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Michael; Günther, Patrick; Breil, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    In the future, surgical management of pediatric appendicitis might become limited to nonperforating appendicitis. Thus, it becomes increasingly important to differentiate advanced from simple appendicitis and to predict perforated appendicitis among a group of children with right-sided abdominal pain, which was the aim of this study. An institutionally approved, single-center retrospective analysis of all patients with appendectomy from January 2009 to December 2010 was conducted. All diagnostic aspects were evaluated to identify predictors and differentiators of perforated appendicitis. In 2 years, 157 children suffered from appendicitis. Perforation occurred in 47 (29.9%) of the patients. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels higher than 20 mg/dL ( P = .037) and free abdominal fluid on ultrasonography ( P = .031) are the most important features to differentiate perforated from simple appendicitis. Moreover, all children with perforation had a positive Heidelberg Appendicitis Score (HAS). A negative HAS excludes perforation in all cases (negative predictive value = 100%). Perforated appendicitis can be ruled out by the HAS. In a cohort with right-sided abdominal pain, perforation should be considered in children with high CRP levels and free fluids or abscess formation on ultrasound.

  9. Stercoral colitis mimicking appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelghafour Elkoundi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stercoral colitis is an inflammatory process involving the colonic wall related to fecal impaction. This rare condition is associated with high morbidity-mortality. Findings We report a case of a 78-year-old woman with a history of dementia under clozapine who presented a clinical and sonographic presentation of acute appendicitis. The worsening of her clinical condition prompted us to review our diagnosis and modify our approach using the CT scan which was consistent with stercoral colitis. This report concerns an atypical presentation of this condition. Conclusions The present case highlights the ability of severe forms of fecal impaction to precipitate very rare and life-threatening complications like stercoral colitis. It also points the importance of including stercoral colitis in the differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in altered patients under anticholenergic drugs and the critical role of the CT scan as a crucial radiologic adjunct.

  10. MRI imaging in pediatric appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Riley

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old male presents with two days of abdominal pain and emesis. Computed tomography was concerning for obstruction or reactive ileus with an apparent transition point in the right lower quadrant, possibly due to Crohn's. Magnetic resonance imaging was concerning for perforated appendicitis. As demonstrated by this case MRI can be as sensitive as CT in detecting pediatric appendicitis [2]. We recommend using MRI instead of CT to diagnose appendicitis to avoid ionizing radiation and increased cancer risk in the pediatric population. Keywords: Computer tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging, Pediatric appendicitis

  11. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Chang, Young Duk; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Kim, Ki Jung

    1988-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical disease of acute abdomen, But the diagnosis of acute appendicitis is often difficult, and not in frequently, operation for appendicitis is performed only to find a normal appendix. Various radiological examinations have been proposed to improve diagnostic accuracy of appendicitis. The purpose of this study was to improve the diagnostic accuracy of appendicitis, and to decline negative exploration. High resolution real time ultrasonographical examination using graded compression was performed in 57 consecutive patients who were clinically suspected of appendicitis. Autors analysed ultrasonographical, surgical, and clinical follow up findings. The results were are follows: 1. Ultrasonographical finding of acute appendicitis was visualization of appendix as a tubular structure with one bline end, or target phenomenon. 2. Hypoechoic area over the appendix was thought to be a sign of periappendiceal abscess. 3. The sensitivity of US diagnosis of acute appendicitis in this study was 92.8% with a specificity of 93.1%. The overall accuracy was 93.0%. 4. In control group of 50 individuals, the abnormal appendix was not visualized. 5. In cases of clinically suspected appendicitis, the US evaluation with graded compression technique is very accurate and effective examination.

  12. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Youth Aerobic Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Neil

    2017-06-01

    Peak oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text] 2 ) is internationally recognized as the criterion measure of youth aerobic fitness, but despite pediatric data being available for almost 80 years, its measurement and interpretation in relation to growth, maturation, and health remain controversial. The trainability of youth aerobic fitness continues to be hotly debated, and causal mechanisms of training-induced changes and their modulation by chronological age, biological maturation, and sex are still to be resolved. The daily physical activity of youth is characterized by intermittent bouts and rapid changes in intensity, but physical activity of the intensity and duration required to determine peak [Formula: see text] 2 is rarely (if ever) experienced by most youth. In this context, it may therefore be the transient kinetics of pulmonary [Formula: see text] 2 that best reflect youth aerobic fitness. There are remarkably few rigorous studies of youth pulmonary [Formula: see text] 2 kinetics at the onset of exercise in different intensity domains, and the influence of chronological age, biological maturation, and sex during step changes in exercise intensity are not confidently documented. Understanding the trainability of the parameters of youth pulmonary [Formula: see text] 2 kinetics is primarily based on a few comparative studies of athletes and nonathletes. The underlying mechanisms of changes due to training require further exploration. The aims of the present article are therefore to provide a brief overview of aerobic fitness during growth and maturation, increase awareness of current controversies in its assessment and interpretation, identify gaps in knowledge, raise 10 relevant research questions, and indicate potential areas for future research.

  14. The Theory Question in Research Capacity Building in Education: Towards an Agenda for Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesta, Gert; Allan, Julie; Edwards, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The question of capacity building in education has predominantly been approached with regard to the methods and methodologies of educational research. Far less attention has been given to capacity building in relation to theory. In many ways the latter is as pressing an issue as the former, given that good research depends on a combination of high…

  15. Echography in appendicitis acute diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripolles Gonzalez, T.; Sanguesa Nebot, C.; Ambit Capdevila, S.; Lazaro y de Molina, S.

    1993-01-01

    Over an 18-month period, high resolution ultrasound was used to assess 220 patients with doubtful clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The ultrasonographic findings were correlated with the surgical results and the pathological results in 115 cases, and with clinical follow-up in the rest. This technique has been found to be effective in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, with a sensitivity of 90.4%, and similar specificity and reliability (90.2%). The positive predictive value of the test was 89% and the negative predictive value, 91%. The ultrasonographic criteria applied for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was the detection of an understood appendix measuring over 6 mm. All cases with perforation were correctly diagnosed as acute appendicitis. The observation of an accumulation of fluid pooled in DIF in patients with ultrasonographic findings suggestive of appendicitis points to a diagnosis of perforation or complicated (gangrenous) appendicitis. A relationship between complicated appendicitis and the detection of appendicoliths within the enlarged appendix was also observed. The results obtained demonstrate that high resolution ultrasound is indicated in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in all cases in which the clinical findings are doubtful

  16. Radiologic diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Bok Hwan; Oh, Jang Suk

    1972-01-01

    Sixty-six cases of acute appendicitis were proved by surgery during the period from May 1969 to May 1971. The present study was designated to elucidate the findings of roentgen examination in acute appendicitis. The results obtained were summarized as follows: 1. Over 90 percent of cases of acute appendicitis showed significant radiographic findings. 2. Distension and fluid level in cecum and terminal ileum were disclosed approximately 75 percent of cases. It believe diagnostically significant in acute appendicitis. 3. About 10 percent of cases were found extra-alimentary free air. 4. The roentgen findings of the fluid interposed between colonic contents and frank stripesin the right lower quadrant was another interesting findings to suspect acute appendicitis

  17. Examining Research Questions on Germination from the Perspective of Scientific Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir Kaçan, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted with the participation of 31 pre-service science teachers. Participants were asked to develop various research questions on germination. The study aims to examine research questions on the subject germination from the perspective of scientific creativity. The research questions were examined using the fluency, science…

  18. [Chronic appendicitis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Jarquín, Alvaro José; Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Reyes-Páramo, Pedro; Romero-Briones, Carlos; Mendoza-García, Aurelio Valentín; García-Ramírez, Ulises Noel

    2008-01-01

    The term chronic appendicitis has been used to describe any type of chronic pain that originates in the appendix, with or without inflammation. This broad category can be divided more specifically into: chronic or recurrent appendicitis and appendiceal colic pain. a 41-year-old female, suffering intestinal chronic constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, hiporexia and febricula, treated with antibiotics, vermifuges, analgesics and antispasmodics, showing a slight and partial improvement. She was suffering chronic pain in lower abdomen, mostly on the right side along a year. With these symptoms, she underwent an exploratory laparotomy, that showed chronic appendicitis. Appendix had been removed. The histopathological report corresponded to chronic appendicitis. the histopathological characteristics and the clinical manifestations of the chronic appendicitis are different from those of acute appendicitis. Criteria for chronic appendicitis include: symptoms lasting longer than 4 weeks, confirmation of chronic swelling through histopathological examination, improvement of symptoms after appendectomy. The ultrasonic images, the barium enema and the computerized helicoidal tomography could be suggestive for its diagnosis.

  19. Composition of the cellular infiltrate in patients with simple and complex appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Ramon R; Wassenaar, Emma C E; de Boer, Onno J; Bakx, Roel; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Bunders, Madeleine J; van Heurn, L W Ernst; Heij, Hugo A

    2017-06-15

    It is now well established that there are two types of appendicitis: simple (nonperforating) and complex (perforating). This study evaluates differences in the composition of the immune cellular infiltrate in children with simple and complex appendicitis. A total of 47 consecutive children undergoing appendectomy for acute appendicitis between January 2011 and December 2012 were included. Intraoperative criteria were used to identify patients with either simple or complex appendicitis and were confirmed histopathologically. Immune histochemical techniques were used to identify immune cell markers in the appendiceal specimens. Digital imaging analysis was performed using Image J. In the specimens of patients with complex appendicitis, significantly more myeloperoxidase positive cells (neutrophils) (8.7% versus 1.2%, P appendicitis. In contrast, fewer CD8+ T cells (0.4% versus 1.3%, P = 0.016), CD20 + cells (2.9% versus 9.0%, P = 0.027), and CD21 + cells (0.2% versus 0.6%, P = 0.028) were present in tissue from patients with complex compared to simple appendicitis. The increase in proinflammatory innate cells and decrease of adaptive cells in patients with complex appendicitis suggest potential aggravating processes in complex appendicitis. Further research into the underlying mechanisms may identify novel biomarkers to be able to differentiate simple and complex appendicitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Infectious disease research investments follow colonial ties: questionable ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Head, Michael G; Atun, Rifat

    2014-03-01

    International funding for global health research is not systematically documented. We have assessed the level of research funding awarded by UK funders of international research to low- and middle-income countries or research institutions in these countries. We analysed 6165 studies; from these we selected 522 that matched our criteria and used them to evaluate research funding by pathogen, disease, research and development value chain, funding organisation and country. Investment in infectious disease research in the countries studied totalled £264 million. Distribution of research investments closely mirrored that of the UK's former colonial territories; the top five countries, and eight of the top 10, have historical links with the UK, being current or former members of the Commonwealth of Nations. HIV, malaria and neglected tropical diseases attracted the greatest investment (£219 million; 82.8%), with most studies focussing on operational and epidemiological research (£109 million; 41.3%). International financing of infectious disease research by UK funding organisations follows former colonial ties. Funding institutions should review their funding policies to ensure that they also assist low- and middle-income countries without colonial ties to address their disease burden. A global investment surveillance system is needed to map and monitor funding for international research and guide the allocation of scarce resources to reduce the global disease burden.

  1. APPENDICITIS: YOUNG ADULTS ARE SUSCEPTIBLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somashekhar V. Hiremath

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Appendicitis is the one of the most common emergencies of the acute abdomen encountered by the clinicians; peritonitis is the common cause due to appendicular perforation. Ultrasonography of abdomen is the preferred method of diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The study is done to diagnose acute appendicitis in a tertiary care hospital to ascertain early diagnosis prevalent in this part of the country, which might differ from other studies. AIM To ascertain prevalence, presentation and management of appendicitis in this part of India in a tertiary care government hospital with provisional diagnosis of appendicitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Cases of acute abdomen, clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis admitted in KIMS Hospital, Hubli, a tertiary care government hospital, from January 2014 to January 2015 for materials of this study. 100 cases have been taken for study; cases included in this study are acute appendicitis, appendicular abscess; method used is USG abdomen, a simple diagnostic tool. RESULTS In present study, 100 cases of acute abdomen with clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis were taken and laparotomy was done for 98 cases and two cases of appendicular abscess. Youngest patient was 7 years old and oldest was 65 years. Peak incidence between 11 to 30 years of age group and male to female ratio is 3:2. Postoperative wound infection was a common complication in 21 cases and retention of urine was noticed in 7 cases, and there was a death in one case due to septicaemia. CONCLUSION Acute appendicitis is a second most common indication for early laparotomy in KIMS Hospital, Hubli, first being perforative peritonitis. Acute appendicitis is common between 11 to 30 years of age group, early diagnosis and intervention is required to prevent appendicular perforation and its complications. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis is to be done in patients presenting with atypical pain, absence of vomiting does not rule out appendicitis. Anorexia

  2. Research, climate, energy : Questions of destiny for the chemical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastinen, A., email: aimo.kastinen@chemind.fi

    2010-07-01

    Registration for the first phase of Reach finishes at the end of November. Then we will see whether the standard of legislation has been set correctly in respect of the EU's operational ability. If it isn't, significant problems will result for the community's treatment of materials and the EU's competitiveness, and Reach's value as a global model will become questionable. Also, the CLP regulation concerning classification, labelling and packaging of chemicals will start to come into effect as from the beginning of December. In the first phase, the question is one of classification of substances, and gradually the requirements will be applied to mixtures too. At the same time, Safety Data Sheets shall be renewed in accordance with their own transition period. The current product legislation concerning chemicals shall be fully revised by the mid-point of the decade, but before then company safety officers will have to do lots of work to change the previous routines

  3. Research for the radiation therapist from question to culture

    CERN Document Server

    Gillan, Cailtin; Harnett, Nicole; Holden, Lori

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses a wide range of topics, from the principles of evidence-based practice to the process and dissemination of research to unique considerations such as clinical trials, patenting, and health services research. The case for evidence-based practice and a collaborative research culture is made first, followed by a series of chapters walking the reader through the research process by way of the scientific method. One of the more unique aspects of the scope of this book is the inclusion of chapters relating to the dissemination of knowledge, manuscript publication, and how to build an academic research program. Each chapter focuses on introducing the reader to foundational principles, methodology, and terminology, and highlight case studies of radiation therapist research or experience that is relevant to provide contextual examples and inspiration to the reader.

  4. On framing the research question and choosing the appropriate research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfrey, Patrick S; Ravani, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Clinical epidemiology is the science of human disease investigation with a focus on diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. The generation of a reasonable question requires definition of patients, interventions, controls, and outcomes. The goal of research design is to minimize error, to ensure adequate samples, to measure input and output variables appropriately, to consider external and internal validities, to limit bias, and to address clinical as well as statistical relevance. The hierarchy of evidence for clinical decision-making places randomized controlled trials (RCT) or systematic review of good quality RCTs at the top of the evidence pyramid. Prognostic and etiologic questions are best addressed with longitudinal cohort studies.

  5. Challenges in uncomplicated acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Resende

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is one of the most common abdominal emergencies requiring surgery. It still represents, however, a challenging diagnosis. In order to facilitate this process, several scoring systems were developed, namely, the Alvarado score, acute inflammatory response and Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha Appendicitis scores, which are the most used in clinical practice. This clinical condition encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, from the uncomplicated form to the one with diffuse peritonitis. Treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis remains a matter of discussion. Although appendectomy has been regarded as the gold-standard, conservative management with antibiotics is gaining more and more acceptance. The approach to appendectomy constitutes another controversial issue, namely, its performance through an open or a laparoscopic approach, which seems to be establishing itself, in some centers, as the standard of care. With this paper, we intend to give some insight on the aforementioned topics, through a review of the available literature on uncomplicated appendicitis.

  6. Laparoscopic treatment of perforated appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lai, I-Rue

    2014-01-01

    The use of laparoscopy has been established in improving perioperative and postoperative outcomes for patients with simple appendicitis. Laparoscopic appendectomy is associated with less wound pain, less wound infection, a shorter hospital stay, and faster overall recovery when compared to the open appendectomy for uncomplicated cases. In the past two decades, the use of laparoscopy for the treatment of perforated appendicitis to take the advantages of minimally invasiveness has increased. This article reviewed the prevalence, approaches, safety disclaimers, perioperative and postoperative outcomes of the laparoscopic appendectomy in the treatment of patients with perforated appendicitis. Special issues including the conversion, interval appendectomy, laparoscopic approach for elderly or obese patient are also discussed to define the role of laparoscopic treatment for patients with perforated appendicitis. PMID:25339821

  7. A Case of Appendicular Tuberculosis mimicking an Acute Appendicitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les auteurs rapportent un cas rare de tuberculose de siège apendiculaire mimant un tableau d'appendicite aigue. La littérature sur cette question est revisée. Mots clés : tuberculose, appendice. The author report a rare case of appendiceal tuberculosis clinically presenting as acute appendicitis. The litterature is reviewed.

  8. High Level Thinking and Questioning Strategies. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Ella

    2010-01-01

    Higher-order thinking is an instructional strategy supported by research. Often referred to as critical thinking skills, it is more than simple recall of facts or information. It is a function of the interaction between cognitive strategies, meta-cognition, and nonstrategic knowledge when solving problems. Higher-order thinking is based on the…

  9. Can Scientific Research Answer the "What" Question of Mathematics Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2005-01-01

    This paper problematizes the issue of how decisions about the content of mathematics education can be made. After starting with two examples where research in mathematics education resulted in different choices on the content of primary school teaching, I explore where and how, in the scientific enterprise within the domain of education, issues of…

  10. Collaborating in Life Science Research Groups: The Question of Authorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how life science postdocs' perceptions of contemporary academic career rationales influence how they relate to collaboration within research groups. One consequential dimension of these perceptions is the high value assigned to publications. For career progress, postdocs consider producing publications and…

  11. Developing Critical Thinking through Socratic Questioning: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahamid, Husniah

    2016-01-01

    An action research study was conducted among 24 Form 4 level Malaysian students, aged 16. The duration of the study was five months and constituted 16 one-hour literature lessons (short stories from the secondary level Malaysian English Language Upper Secondary Level school syllabus). This paper describes my experience as a teacher-as-researcher…

  12. Mapping research questions about translation to methods, measures, and models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berninger, V.; Rijlaarsdam, G.; Fayol, M.L.; Fayol, M.; Alamargot, D.; Berninger, V.W.

    2012-01-01

    About the book: Translation of cognitive representations into written language is one of the most important processes in writing. This volume provides a long-awaited updated overview of the field. The contributors discuss each of the commonly used research methods for studying translation; theorize

  13. Emancipatory Research and Disabled People: Some Observations and Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Len

    2005-01-01

    Many factors contribute to the oppression and discrimination of disabled people and to their exclusion from key decisions affecting the quality of their lives. In the last two decades in particular there has been an increasing interest in many societies over the role of research in relation to the empowerment and thus inclusion of disabled people.…

  14. Is the wrong question being asked in infertility research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara; Stern, Judy E; Hornstein, Mark D; Kotelchuck, Milton; Diop, Hafsatou; Cabral, Howard; Declercq, Eugene R

    2016-01-01

    A persistent finding is that assisted reproductive technology (ART) is associated with compromised birth outcomes, including higher risks for prematurity, low birthweight, and congenital malformations, even among singletons. Over the past decade, our research group, the Massachusetts Outcome Study of Assisted Reproductive Technology (MOSART), has evaluated pregnancy and birth outcomes among three groups of women, those women treated with ART, those with indicators of subfertility but without ART treatment, and fertile women. We have also explored the influence of infertility-related diagnoses on outcomes for women and infants. Over the course of our research, we have changed our perspective from an original focus on ART treatment parameters as the primary cause of excess morbidity to one centered instead on the underlying infertility-related diagnoses. This paper summarizes the research findings from our group that support this change in focus for infertility-based research from a primary emphasis on ART treatment to greater attention to the contribution of preexisting pathology underlying the infertility and suggests directions for future analyses.

  15. Reduced risk of UC in families affected by appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe Andersen, Nynne; Gørtz, Sanne; Frisch, Morten

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The possible aetiological link between appendicitis and UC remains unclear. In order to investigate the hereditary component of the association, we studied the risk of UC in family members of individuals with appendicitis. DESIGN: A cohort of 7.1 million individuals was established...... million person-years of follow-up between 1977 and 2011, a total of 190 004 cohort members developed appendicitis and 45 202 developed UC. Individuals having a first-degree relative with appendicitis before age 20 years had significantly reduced risk of UC (RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.86 to 0.95); this association...... was stronger in individuals with a family predisposition to UC (RR 0.66; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.83). CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with appendicitis before age 20 years are at reduced risk of UC, particularly when there is a family predisposition to UC. Our findings question...

  16. Questions raised over future of UK research council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Five senior physicists have written to the UK science minister, Lord Drayson, about the "dismal future" for researchers in the country in the wake of a £40m shortfall in the budget of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). The physicists, who chair the STFC's five advisory panels, have also called for structural reforms to be made to the council. They warn that unless the government takes action to reverse the situation, the UK will be "perceived as an untrustworthy partner in global projects" and predict that a brain drain of the best UK scientists to positions overseas will ensue.

  17. Vitamin D and the brain: key questions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoying; Gooch, Helen; Groves, Natalie J; Sah, Pankaj; Burne, Thomas H; Eyles, Darryl W; McGrath, John J

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade a convergent body of evidence has emerged from epidemiology, animal experiments and clinical trials which links low vitamin D status with a range of adverse neuropsychiatric outcomes. This research demonstrates that the timing of exposure to low vitamin D influences the nature of brain phenotypes, as exposures during gestation versus adulthood result in different phenotypes. With respect to early life exposures, there is robust evidence from rodent experiments indicating that transient developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency is associated with changes in brain structure, neurochemistry, gene and protein expression and behavior. In particular, DVD deficiency is associated with alterations in the dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems. In contrast, recently published animal experiments indicate that adult vitamin D (AVD) deficiency is associated with more subtle neurochemical and behavioral phenotypes. This paper explores key issues that need to be addressed in future research. There is a need to define the timing and duration of the 'critical window' during which low vitamin D status is associated with differential and adverse brain outcomes. We discuss the role for 'two-hit hypotheses', which propose that adult vitamin D deficiency leaves the brain more vulnerable to secondary adverse exposures, and thus may exacerbate disease progression. Finally, we explore the evidence implicating a role for vitamin D in rapid, non-genomic mechanisms that may involve L-type calcium channels and brain function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Some questions on the research in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, D.

    1978-01-01

    Some new developments in elementary particle physics and interaction processes are reviewed. Recent advances in the field of particle physics including the observation of an anomalous behaviour of interaction cross section at high energy levels, the deep inelastic scattering of electrons from protons, the existence of neutral currents and the relative frequency of events with high transverse pulses are pointed out. A special development is the discovery and identification of a number of new particles and processes. New advances in understanding of the structure of subelementary particles, and the combination of electromagnetic and weak interactions are described. After a discussion of the technical and instrumental requirements and possibilities in the field of elementary particle research, the role and achievements of Hungarian scientists in high-energy facilities of the Soviet Union are emphasized. (P.J.)

  19. Emotion theory and research: highlights, unanswered questions, and emerging issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Carroll E

    2009-01-01

    Emotion feeling is a phase of neurobiological activity, the key component of emotions and emotion-cognition interactions. Emotion schemas, the most frequently occurring emotion experiences, are dynamic emotion-cognition interactions that may consist of momentary/situational responding or enduring traits of personality that emerge over developmental time. Emotions play a critical role in the evolution of consciousness and the operations of all mental processes. Types of emotion relate differentially to types or levels of consciousness. Unbridled imagination and the ability for sympathetic regulation of empathy may represent both potential gains and losses from the evolution and ontogeny of emotion processes and consciousness. Unresolved issues include psychology's neglect of levels of consciousness that are distinct from access or reflective consciousness and use of the term "unconscious mind" as a dumpster for all mental processes that are considered unreportable. The relation of memes and the mirror neuron system to empathy, sympathy, and cultural influences on the development of socioemotional skills are unresolved issues destined to attract future research.

  20. Incidence of complicated acute appendicitis: a single-centre retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Piotrowska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Abdominal pain has been one of the most common reasons patients seek medical care for centuries. Nowadays, together with laboratory diagnostics and imaging, we are able to make an early diagnosis. This leads to the introduction of early adequate treatment. Aim of the research : To analyse the incidence and causes of complicated acute appendicitis in one medical centre in between 2004 and 2016. Material and methods : A retrospective study covered the period from December 23, 2004 to November 07, 2016. It included 2048 cases of children between 0 and 18 years of age undergoing surgery for suspected acute appendicitis.
 Demographic and clinical characteristics as well as length of hospitalisation, antibiotics schemes, and intraoperative diagnosis were reviewed. Complicated acute appendicitis cases were distinguished and compared with the incidence in world literature. Results : The percentage of complicated acute appendicitis ranged from 39% to 60%. Complicated acute appendicitis occurs much more often in children under 5 years of age. Conclusions : The delay and failure in diagnosis of acute appendicitis results in higher incidence of complicated acute appendicitis; consequently, there are higher costs of treatment. Improving the awareness of parents and primary care physicians may allow faster diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis. It was noted that the reform of the National Emergency Medical Services in Poland contributed to a reduction in the incidence of complicated appendicitis.

  1. Analysis of Recurrence Management in Patients Who Underwent Nonsurgical Treatment for Acute Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tsung-Jung; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Tsai, Chung-Yu; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Hong-Tai; Chen, I-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The recurrence rate for acute appendicitis treated nonoperatively varies between studies. Few studies have adequately evaluated the management of these patients when appendicitis recurs. We aimed to explore the recurrence rate and management of patients with acute appendicitis that were first treated nonoperatively. We identified patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database who were hospitalized due to acute appendicitis for the first time between 2000 and 2010 and received nonsurgical treatment. The recurrence and its management were recorded. Data were analyzed to access the risk factors for recurrence and factors that influenced the management of recurrent appendicitis. Among the 239,821 patients hospitalized with acute appendicitis for the first time, 12,235 (5.1%) patients were managed nonoperatively. Of these, 864 (7.1%) had a recurrence during a median follow-up of 6.5 years. Appendectomy was performed by an open and laparoscopic approach in 483 (55.9%) and 258 (29.9%) patients, respectively. The remaining 123 (14.2%) patients were again treated nonsurgically. Recurrence was independently associated with young age, male sex, percutaneous abscess drainage, and medical center admission by multivariable analysis. In addition, age appendicitis, percutaneous abscess drainage, nor length of first time hospital stay had an influence on the selection of surgical approach. In conclusion, a laparoscopic appendectomy can be performed in recurrent appendicitis cases, and its application may not be related to previous appendicitis severity. PMID:27015200

  2. Islam and tattooing: an old question, a new research topic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran Larsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most Muslim theologians have argued on the basis of the ḥadīth-literature that tattooing is ḥarām (forbidden, but it is nonetheless possible to find both historical and contemporary examples indicating that, at different times and in different places, this art was practiced by certain Islamic groups. With specific reference to washm,or tattooing, it has been well documented that certain Muslim groups (e.g., the Berbers and the Bedouins in places such as Africa, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Iran and West Pakistan have used tattoos for beautification, prophylaxis and the prevention of disease. Among Islam’s lay populations, tattooing has been considered significant as a healing practice for a very long time despite the formal opinions of Islamic scholars and theologians. And while in more recent times these Muslim groups appear to have abandoned past notions about the function of tattoos, which had caused a certain waning of the practice, of late it has had a resurgence—although for reasons that differ from those of distant times. The rise of interest in tattoos among Muslims has been directly observed by a handful of contemporary researchers, and is indirectly indicated by the fact that many contemporary Muslim authorities have expressed growing concern about the practice.This development has been further spurred on by the fact that many Muslims are actively seeking advice and clarification about where Islam stands on the matter of tattoos. The aim of of this article is to sketch the background of the more formal theological discussion on tattooing (especially in the ḥadīth-literature. It also aims to examine a number of contemporary religious texts that specifically deal with Muslim theological opinions about this practice: what is considered to be the problem; and what types of arguments are employed by the selected theologians in their attempts to provide answers. Is it possible to see the renewed interest in tattoos as an example of the

  3. MRI features associated with acute appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M. N.; Jensch, Sebastiaan; Gratama, Jan W. C.; Spilt, Aart; Wiarda, Bart M.; van Es, H. Wouter; Cobben, Lodewijk P. J.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Stoker, Jaap; Bouma, Wim H.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; Richir, Milan C.; Stockmann, Hein B. A. C.; Wiezer, Marinus J.; Verhagen, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    To identify MRI features associated with appendicitis. Features expected to be associated with appendicitis were recorded in consensus by two expert radiologists on 223 abdominal MRIs in patients with suspected appendicitis. Nine MRI features were studied: appendix diameter >7 mm, appendicolith,

  4. Top 40 questions in coupled human and natural systems (CHANS research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Boyd. Kramer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and managing coupled human and natural systems (CHANS is a central challenge of the 21st century, but more focus is needed to pursue the most important questions within this vast field given limited research capacity and funding. We present 40 important questions for CHANS research, identified through a two-part crowdsourcing exercise within the CHANS community. We solicited members of the International Network of Research on Coupled Human and Natural Systems (CHANS-Net to submit up to three questions that they considered transformative, receiving 540 questions from 207 respondents. After editing for clarity and consistency, we asked the network's members to each evaluate a random subset of 20 questions in importance on a scale from 1 (least important to 7 (extremely important. Questions on land use and agriculture topped the list, with a median importance ranking of 5.7, followed by questions of scale, climate change and energy, sustainability and development, adaptation and resilience, in addition to seven other categories. We identified 40 questions with a median importance of 6.0 or above, which we highlight as the current view of researchers active in the field as research questions to pursue in order to maximize impact on understanding and managing coupled human and natural systems for achieving sustainable development goals and addressing emerging global challenges.

  5. Reduced risk of UC in families affected by appendicitis: a Danish national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyboe Andersen, Nynne; Gørtz, Sanne; Frisch, Morten; Jess, Tine

    2017-08-01

    The possible aetiological link between appendicitis and UC remains unclear. In order to investigate the hereditary component of the association, we studied the risk of UC in family members of individuals with appendicitis. A cohort of 7.1 million individuals was established by linkage of national registers in Denmark with data on kinship and diagnoses of appendicitis and UC. Poisson regression models were used to calculate first hospital contact rate ratios (RR) for UC with 95% CIs between individuals with or without relatives with a history of appendicitis. During 174 million person-years of follow-up between 1977 and 2011, a total of 190 004 cohort members developed appendicitis and 45 202 developed UC. Individuals having a first-degree relative with appendicitis before age 20 years had significantly reduced risk of UC (RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.86 to 0.95); this association was stronger in individuals with a family predisposition to UC (RR 0.66; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.83). Individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with appendicitis before age 20 years are at reduced risk of UC, particularly when there is a family predisposition to UC. Our findings question a previously hypothesised direct protective influence of appendicitis on inflammation of the large bowel. Rather, genetic or environmental factors linked to an increased risk of appendicitis while being protective against UC may explain the repeatedly reported reduced relative risk of UC in individuals with a history of appendicitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. CT diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kenya; Matsuda, Masao; Iyomasa, Shinsuke

    2001-01-01

    Enhanced and 5 mm collimation CT was performed in patients suspected of having appendicitis. CT clearly showed the swollen appendix, appendolith, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid collection, and abscess in patients with phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis. These findings were not observed in patients with catarrhal appendicitis or normal appendix. To decide on operative indications of acute appendicitis in children, the following findings are important: the diameter of the swollen appendix exceeds 8 mm; on appendolith is observed; periappendiceal fluid collection and abscess is observed. We emphasize that enhanced CT is useful to diagnose appendicitis which is not obvious with US. (author)

  7. A bibliometric analysis of the citation classics of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzgalis, Manvydas; Bowden, Dermot J; Mc Donald, Ciaran K; Kerin, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most commonly encountered emergency surgical conditions. An understanding of the most highly cited research works in this field is key to good evidence based clinical practice. To perform a bibliometric analysis on the 100 most frequently cited articles in the field of acute appendicitis. The database of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science Expanded citation index was searched to identify the 100 most frequently cited articles in the field of acute appendicitis. The web of science expanded citation index tracks article citations made since 1946. The top 100 most frequently cited articles were selected for analysis in this series. The most frequently cited article was cited 649 times and the least cited three article 93 times. The average number of citations per article was 167.74. The top 100 cited articles originated from 17 countries. Over half of the papers originated from the USA. Fifty-one of the papers concentrated on diagnostics of acute appendicitis. Thirty-six papers looked at the treatment of acute appendicitis with 30 of these dealing with the surgical management of the disease. There were 6 studies at level 1a, 20 studies at level 1b and 43,5,17 and 9 studies at levels 2, 3, 4 and 5 respectively. Bibliometric analysis of the citation classics in a given field can provide interesting insights into the relationship between the quality of research outputs and clinical practice. The study of acute appendicitis remains an active field of research with a growing body of higher quality evidence underpinning our clinical practice.

  8. MRI features associated with acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M.N. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology (G1-223.1), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jensch, Sebastiaan [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gratama, Jan W.C. [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Spilt, Aart [Kennemer Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Haarlem (Netherlands); Wiarda, Bart M. [Alkmaar Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Es, H.W. van [Sint Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Cobben, Lodewijk P.J. [Haaglanden Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leidschendam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M.M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the OPTIMAP study group

    2014-01-15

    To identify MRI features associated with appendicitis. Features expected to be associated with appendicitis were recorded in consensus by two expert radiologists on 223 abdominal MRIs in patients with suspected appendicitis. Nine MRI features were studied: appendix diameter >7 mm, appendicolith, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration, peri-appendiceal fluid, absence of gas in the appendix, appendiceal wall destruction, restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall, lumen or focal fluid collections. Appendicitis was assigned as the final diagnosis in 117/223 patients. Associations between imaging features and appendicitis were evaluated with logistic regression analysis. All investigated features were significantly associated with appendicitis in univariate analysis. Combinations of two and three features were associated with a probability of appendicitis of 88 % and 92 %, respectively. In patients without any of the nine features, appendicitis was present in 2 % of cases. After multivariate analysis, only an appendix diameter >7 mm, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall were significantly associated with appendicitis. The probability of appendicitis was 96 % in their presence and 2 % in their absence. An appendix diameter >7 mm, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall have the strongest association with appendicitis on MRI. (orig.)

  9. Streptococcal Pharyngitis and Appendicitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jason W; Abel, Stuart A; Kenney, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Several pathologies, including pharyngitis, are associated with abdominal pain that can mimic appendicitis. We sought to further understand the link between appendicitis-like symptoms and streptococcal (strep) pharyngitis. All patients undergoing ultrasound imaging for appendicitis in our emergency department during 2013 were reviewed (n = 1572). A total of 207 patients were identified who underwent both ultrasound for appendicitis and testing for strep pharyngitis. Demographic and outcomes data between rule out appendicitis patients who underwent strep testing and those who did not were compared. Strep testing was more common in younger patients (mean age = 8.26 vs 10.26 years P appendicitis and 35 (16.9%) patients tested positive for strep pharyngitis. No cases of concurrent strep pharyngitis and appendicitis were identified. The negative appendectomy rate in the strep pharyngitis tested group was 38.5% (5/13), compared with 7.7% (23/296) ( P = .003) in the nontested group. The appendicitis rate among the strep tested group was 3.8% (8/207) compared with 20% (273/1365) in the nontested group ( P appendicitis, and had a higher rate of negative appendectomy. A diagnosis of concurrent appendicitis and strep pharyngitis is rare. In cases of patients with sufficient symptoms to warrant testing for strep pharyngitis a diagnosis of appendicitis is less likely and surgical intervention leads to higher negative appendectomy rates.

  10. MRI features associated with acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M.N.; Jensch, Sebastiaan; Gratama, Jan W.C.; Spilt, Aart; Wiarda, Bart M.; Es, H.W. van; Cobben, Lodewijk P.J.; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Stoker, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    To identify MRI features associated with appendicitis. Features expected to be associated with appendicitis were recorded in consensus by two expert radiologists on 223 abdominal MRIs in patients with suspected appendicitis. Nine MRI features were studied: appendix diameter >7 mm, appendicolith, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration, peri-appendiceal fluid, absence of gas in the appendix, appendiceal wall destruction, restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall, lumen or focal fluid collections. Appendicitis was assigned as the final diagnosis in 117/223 patients. Associations between imaging features and appendicitis were evaluated with logistic regression analysis. All investigated features were significantly associated with appendicitis in univariate analysis. Combinations of two and three features were associated with a probability of appendicitis of 88 % and 92 %, respectively. In patients without any of the nine features, appendicitis was present in 2 % of cases. After multivariate analysis, only an appendix diameter >7 mm, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall were significantly associated with appendicitis. The probability of appendicitis was 96 % in their presence and 2 % in their absence. An appendix diameter >7 mm, peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and restricted diffusion of the appendiceal wall have the strongest association with appendicitis on MRI. (orig.)

  11. WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Birindelli, Arianna; Kelly, Micheal D; Catena, Fausto; Weber, Dieter G; Sartelli, Massimo; Sugrue, Michael; De Moya, Mark; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Bhangu, Aneel; Agresta, Ferdinando; Moore, Ernest E; Soreide, Kjetil; Griffiths, Ewen; De Castro, Steve; Kashuk, Jeffry; Kluger, Yoram; Leppaniemi, Ari; Ansaloni, Luca; Andersson, Manne; Coccolini, Federico; Coimbra, Raul; Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Biffl, Walter; Chiara, Osvaldo; Moore, Fred; Peitzman, Andrew B; Fraga, Gustavo P; Costa, David; Maier, Ronald V; Rizoli, Sandro; Balogh, Zsolt J; Bendinelli, Cino; Cirocchi, Roberto; Tonini, Valeria; Piccinini, Alice; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Jovine, Elio; Persiani, Roberto; Biondi, Antonio; Scalea, Thomas; Stahel, Philip; Ivatury, Rao; Velmahos, George; Andersson, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics.

  12. Acute appendicitis with unusual dual pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddiough, Georgina E; Bhatti, Imran; Ratliff, David A

    2012-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is a rare congenital abnormality arising due to the persistence of the vitelline duct in 1-3% of the population. Clinical presentation is varied and includes rectal bleeding, intestinal obstruction, diverticulitis and ulceration; therefore diagnosis can be difficult. We report a case of acute appendicitis complicated by persistent post operative small bowel obstruction. Further surgical examination of the bowel revealed an non-inflamed, inverted Meckel's diverticulum causing intussusception. Intestinal obstruction in patients with Meckel's diverticulum may be caused by volvulus, intussusception or incarceration of the diverticulum into a hernia. Obstruction secondary to intussusception is relatively uncommon and frequently leads to a confusing and complicated clinical picture. Consideration of Meckel's diverticulum although a rare diagnosis is imperative and this case raises the question "should surgeons routinely examine the bowel for Meckel's diverticulum at laparoscopy?"

  13. On the question of pure or applied research in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioshansi, P.; Lodhi, A.S.; Payrovan, H.

    1977-01-01

    One particular approach to the question of pure versus applied research is discussed in this article. It is pointed out how a modest applied research project has been initiated in this laboratory and how this line of work has subsequently developed to include pure research in related areas

  14. Beyond Mere Debate: Research Questions Related to the Debate over the SED Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center, David B.

    This paper addresses research implications of proposed modifications of the definition of "severe emotional disturbance" to include students with conduct disorders. Research questions focus on understanding the nature of antisocial, aggressive behavior in children and youth and identifying what services they need. Research is cited suggesting that…

  15. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis with MSCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the CT appearance of acute appendicitis and investigate diagnostic value of MSCT on acute appendicitis. Methods: The type and CT appearance of 15 cases with acute appendicitis proved by surgery and histopathology or clinic was analyzed retrospectively. Multi-stages scanning was carried out on the whole abdomen with 16 row CT. Post processing techniques including MPR, CPR and MIP were performed to observe the lesions. Results: There were 3 acute suppurative appendicitis, 12 acute gangrene and perforative appendicitis and appendiceal abscess. Complication occurred in 10 cases with gangrene and perforative appendix or appendix molten. The complication included 4 pelvic abscess, 3 intra-abdminal abscess, 1 combined pelvic and intra-abdominal abscess, 4 conglutination bowel obstruction, 1 ureteritis stegnosis and 1 abdominal wall fistulae. The exact ratio of CT diagnosis on acute suppurative appendicitis and appendiceal abscess reached 93.3% preoperatively. It is difficult to distinguish between acute suppurative appendicitis and acute gangrenous appendicitis without perforation. Conclusion: The MSCT appearance of acute appendicitis was marked and of important value on diagnosis of acute appendicitis. (authors)

  16. Have the Most Relevant and Answerable Research Questions Facing Librarians Changed Between 2001 and 2006?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lewis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective ‐ To examine the similarities and differences between research questions asked by librarians in 2001 to those posed in 2006, and to explore to what extent the published research supports the questions being asked.Methods ‐ Questions collected in 2001 by members of the Evidence‐Based Librarianship Implementation Committee (EBLIC of the MLA Research Section were compared with questions collected in 2006 at a cross‐sectoral seminar introducing evidence based library and information practice to Australian librarians. Questions from each list were categorized using the domains of librarianship proposed by Crumley and Koufogiannakis in 2001, and examined with reference to a content analysis of the library and information studies (LIS research published in 2001 by Koufogiannakis, Slater, and Crumley in 2004.Results ‐ In 2001 and 2006 the most commonly asked questions were in the domain of management (29%, 33%, followed by education (24%, 18.5%. In 2001 questions in the marketing/promotion category ranked lowest (1%, however representation was much greater in 2006 (18.5% ranking an equal second with education. Questions in the lowest ranked domain in 2006 (collections, 6% had been more common in 2001 where collections ranked third, representing 19% of the questions. Koufogiannakis, Slater, and Crumley’s content analysis of LIS research published in 2001 revealed that the most popular domain for research was information access and retrieval (38% followed by collections (24%. Only 1% of published LIS research (seven articles was in the domain of marketing/promotion. In contrast, 36 articles originally assigned to one of the six established domains could more appropriately have been included in a proposed new domain of professional issues.Conclusion ‐ The disparity between questions being asked by practitioners and the evidence being generated by researchers suggests that the research‐practice gap is still an issue. A content

  17. Toward sustainable environmental quality: Identifying priority research questions for Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furley, Tatiana Heid; Brodeur, Julie; Silva de Assis, Helena C; Carriquiriborde, Pedro; Chagas, Katia R; Corrales, Jone; Denadai, Marina; Fuchs, Julio; Mascarenhas, Renata; Miglioranza, Karina SB; Miguez Caramés, Diana Margarita; Navas, José Maria; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Planes, Estela; Rodriguez‐Jorquera, Ignacio Alejandro; Orozco‐Medina, Martha; Boxall, Alistair BA; Rudd, Murray A

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Global Horizon Scanning Project (GHSP) is an innovative initiative that aims to identify important global environmental quality research needs. Here we report 20 key research questions from Latin America (LA). Members of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) LA and other scientists from LA were asked to submit research questions that would represent priority needs to address in the region. One hundred questions were received, then partitioned among categories, examined, and some rearranged during a workshop in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Twenty priority research questions were subsequently identified. These research questions included developing, improving, and harmonizing across LA countries methods for 1) identifying contaminants and degradation products in complex matrices (including biota); 2) advancing prediction of contaminant risks and effects in ecosystems, addressing lab‐to‐field extrapolation challenges, and understanding complexities of multiple stressors (including chemicals and climate change); and 3) improving management and regulatory tools toward achieving sustainable development. Whereas environmental contaminants frequently identified in these key questions were pesticides, pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors or modulators, plastics, and nanomaterials, commonly identified environmental challenges were related to agriculture, urban effluents, solid wastes, pulp and paper mills, and natural extraction activities. Several interesting research topics included assessing and preventing pollution impacts on conservation protected areas, integrating environment and health assessments, and developing strategies for identification, substitution, and design of less hazardous chemicals (e.g., green chemistry). Finally, a recurrent research need included developing an understanding of differential sensitivity of regional species and ecosystems to environmental contaminants and other stressors. Addressing these critical

  18. Early appendectomy reduces costs in children with perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Joseph T; Klein, Edwin J; Carr, Benjamin D; Bruch, Steven W

    2017-12-01

    Perforated appendicitis can be managed with early appendectomy, or nonoperative management followed by interval appendectomy. We aimed to identify the strategy with the lowest health care utilization and cost. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all children ≤18 years old with perforated appendicitis admitted to a single institution between January 2009 and March 2016. After excluding immunosuppressed patients and transfers from outside hospitals, we grouped the remaining patients by early or interval appendectomy. Cost accounting data were obtained from our institutional database. The primary outcome was total hospital cost over 2 y from initial admission for appendicitis. Other outcomes analyzed included initial admission costs, number of admissions, emergency room and clinic visits, percutaneous procedures, cross-sectional and overall imaging studies, and length of stay. A total of 203 children with perforated appendicitis were identified. After exclusion of immunosuppressed patients and outside hospital transfers, 94 patients were included in the study. Thirty-nine underwent early appendectomy and 55 initial nonoperative management; of these, 54 underwent elective interval appendectomy. Five of 55 patients (9%) failed initial nonoperative management and required earlier-than-planned appendectomy. Total cost over 2 y was significantly lower with early appendectomy than initial nonoperative management ($19,300 ± 14,300 versus $26,000 ± 17,500; P = 0.05). Early appendectomy resulted in fewer hospital admissions, clinic visits, invasive procedures, and imaging studies. Early appendectomy results in lower hospital costs and less health care utilization compared with initial nonoperative management with elective interval appendectomy. A prospective study will shed more light on this question and can assess the role of nonoperative management without interval appendectomy in children with perforated appendicitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  19. Closing the gap in travel medicine: reframing research questions for a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Leder, Karin; Wilson, Mary E

    2017-07-01

    Travel medicine needs are changing. New patterns of travel, including greater travel by individuals from emerging economies with different values in costs, risks and benefits, must be considered. This review aims to (1) highlight selected studies that have been published that address previously identified gaps in knowledge; (2) propose possible ways to consider questions regarding travel medicine practice for travelers from emerging economies, underscoring priorities for research focusing on these important populations; (3) highlight potential deficiencies in relevance of current international guidelines as they pertain to travelers from emerging economies; (4) frame research questions for travelers from emerging economies and (5) consider roles for ISTM in closing the gap. We reviewed past travel medicine research priorities published in 2010 to identify publications that responded to some research questions posed. We also reviewed CDC and WHO recommendations and assessed their applicability to travelers from emerging economies. Recent publications have responded to some research questions, but gaps remain and new questions have emerged. Re-framing of several key research questions is needed for travelers from emerging economies. A new challenge looms for traditional travel medicine fields to identify and attend to knowledge and guideline gaps, particularly to rethink questions regarding travel medicine to make them relevant for travelers from emerging economies. The International Society of Travel Medicine is well positioned to assist emerging economies assess their resources and needs, formulate research priorities and tailor the development of travel medicine into a framework aligned to their requirements. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Sonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ryazi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Graded compressive sonography may be useful as an adjuvant in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. To determine the role of sonography in the differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis, preappendectomy sonographic data of 164 consecutive cases in Fatemeh-Zahra Teaching Hospital were evaluated. Of 113 (68.9% patients who had acute appendicitis in histopathology, 64 (56.6% cases had preoperative sonographic diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Of 51 patients who had normal appendices, 40 (78.4% cases had normal appendices in sonographic evaluations. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of sonography for acute appendicitis were 56.7%, 78.4% and 0.63, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 85.3% and 44.49% respectively. As a result, sonographic evaluation is an additional diagnostic tool in acute appendicitis.

  1. Animal Encounters in Environmental Education Research: Responding to the "Question of the Animal"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Jan; Watson, Gavan P. L.; Russell, Constance L.; Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy; Fawcett, Leesa; Kuhl, Gail; Russell, Joshua; van der Waal, Marlon; Warkentin, Traci

    2010-01-01

    The "question of the animal" represents an area of emergent interest in the environmental education field, as researchers critically consider human-animal relations and animal advocacy in their work. Following a group discussion at the 10th Seminar in Health and Environmental Education Research, the authors of this paper share experiences,…

  2. Pollination ecology in the 21st century: Key Questions for future research

    OpenAIRE

    STOUT, JANE CATHERINE

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED To inspire new ideas in research on pollination ecology, we list the most important unanswered questions in the field. This list was drawn up by contacting 170 scientists from different areas of pollination ecology and asking them to contribute their opinion on the greatest knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Almost 40% of them took part in our email poll and we received more than 650 questions and comments, which we classified into different categories repr...

  3. Pollination ecology in the 21st century:key questions for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Caroline; Adler, Lynn; Armbruster, W. Scott; Dafni, Amots; Eardley, Connal; Huang, Shuang-Quan; Kevan, Peter; Ollerton, Jeff; Packer, Laurence; Ssymank, Axel; Stout, Jane C.; Potts, Simon G.

    2011-01-01

    To inspire new ideas in research on pollination ecology, we list the most important unanswered questions in the field. This list was drawn up by contacting 170 scientists from different areas of pollination ecology and asking them to contribute their opinion on the greatest knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Almost 40% of them took part in our email poll and we received more than 650 questions and comments, which we classified into different categories representing various aspects of p...

  4. Pollination ecology in the 21st Century: key questions for future research\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Carolin; Adler, Lynn; Armbruster, W Scott; Dafni, Amots; Eardley, Connal; Huang, Shuang-Quan; Kevan, Peter G; Ollerton, Jeff; Packer, Laurence; Ssymank, Axel; Stout, Jane C; Potts, Simon G

    2011-01-01

    To inspire new ideas in research on pollination ecology, we list the most important unanswered questions in the field. This list was drawn up by contacting 170 scientists from different areas of pollination ecology and asking them to contribute their opinion on the greatest knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Almost 40% of them took part in our email poll and we received more than 650 questions and comments, which we classified into different categories representing various aspects of p...

  5. CT findings of acute appendicitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae Seung; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young

    2005-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of surgical abdomen in children. Because of the various locations where you can find the appendix and the different presentation for the symptoms of appendicitis, the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis is often difficult in children, and radiologic diagnosis is becoming increasingly important. Being familiar with the findings of acute appendicitis on the MDCT axial image and the multiplanar reformation images may aid the physician in reaching an early diagnosis and so prevent complications and reduce negative appendectomy rates

  6. Predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students using an augmented Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah-Kanagasabai, Camilla J.; Roberts, Lynne D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior model, augmented by descriptive norms and justifications, for predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students. A convenience sample of 205 research active Western Australian university students (47 male, 158 female, ages 18–53 years, M = 22, SD = 4.78) completed an online survey. There was a low level of engagement in research misconduct, with approximately one in seven students reporting data fabrication and one in eight data falsification. Path analysis and model testing in LISREL supported a parsimonious two step mediation model, providing good fit to the data. After controlling for social desirability, the effect of attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms and perceived behavioral control on student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices was mediated by justifications and then intention. This revised augmented model accounted for a substantial 40.8% of the variance in student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices, demonstrating its predictive utility. The model can be used to target interventions aimed at reducing student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices. PMID:25983709

  7. Pollination ecology in the 21st Century: Key questions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. Stout

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To inspire new ideas in research on pollination ecology, we list the most important unanswered questions in the field. This list was drawn up by contacting 170 scientists from different areas of pollination ecology and asking them to contribute their opinion on the greatest knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Almost 40% of them took part in our email poll and we received more than 650 questions and comments, which we classified into different categories representing various aspects of pollination research. The original questions were merged and synthesised, and a final vote and ranking led to the resultant list. The categories cover plant sexual reproduction, pollen and stigma biology, abiotic pollination, evolution of animal-mediated pollination, interactions of pollinators and floral antagonists, pollinator behaviour, taxonomy, plant-pollinator assemblages, geographical trends in diversity, drivers of pollinator loss, ecosystem services, management of pollination, and conservation issues such as the implementation of pollinator conservation. We focused on questions that were of a broad scope rather than case-specific; thus, addressing some questions may not be feasible within single research projects but constitute a general guide for future directions. With this compilation we hope to raise awareness of pollination-related topics not only among researchers but also among non-specialists including policy makers, funding agencies and the public at large.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of fluoride and its in vivo importance: identification of research questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loveren, C

    2001-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the antimicrobial activity of fluoride and its in vivo importance in order to identify research questions. There is a lot of information on mechanisms by which fluoride may interfere with bacterial metabolism and dental plaque acidogenicity. The antimicrobial activity of fluoride products is enhanced when fluoride is associated with antimicrobial cations like Sn(2+) and amine. It is not clear whether the antimicrobial mechanisms of fluoride are operating in vivo or even to what extent antimicrobial activity can contribute to caries prevention. This latter question may be the most important one in research. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Using mixed methods to identify and answer clinically relevant research questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneerson, Catherine L; Gale, Nicola K

    2015-06-01

    The need for mixed methods research in answering health care questions is becoming increasingly recognized because of the complexity of factors that affect health outcomes. In this article, we argue for the value of using a qualitatively driven mixed method approach for identifying and answering clinically relevant research questions. This argument is illustrated by findings from a study on the self-management practices of cancer survivors and the exploration of one particular clinically relevant finding about higher uptake of self-management in cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy treatment compared with those who have not. A cross-sectional study generated findings that formed the basis for the qualitative study, by informing the purposive sampling strategy and generating new qualitative research questions. Using a quantitative research component to supplement a qualitative study can enhance the generalizability and clinical relevance of the findings and produce detailed, contextualized, and rich answers to research questions that would be unachievable through quantitative or qualitative methods alone. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Research Designs and Special Education Research: Different Designs Address Different Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Lysandra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide practitioners and other nonresearchers a basic understanding of research designs to aid in appropriately interpreting and applying research findings in special education. Research design provides the blueprint for conducting a research study and shapes what kind of knowledge is generated by the study. We…

  11. Toward sustainable environmental quality: Identifying priority research questions for Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furley, Tatiana Heid; Brodeur, Julie; Silva de Assis, Helena C; Carriquiriborde, Pedro; Chagas, Katia R; Corrales, Jone; Denadai, Marina; Fuchs, Julio; Mascarenhas, Renata; Miglioranza, Karina Sb; Miguez Caramés, Diana Margarita; Navas, José Maria; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Planes, Estela; Rodriguez-Jorquera, Ignacio Alejandro; Orozco-Medina, Martha; Boxall, Alistair Ba; Rudd, Murray A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2018-05-01

    The Global Horizon Scanning Project (GHSP) is an innovative initiative that aims to identify important global environmental quality research needs. Here we report 20 key research questions from Latin America (LA). Members of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) LA and other scientists from LA were asked to submit research questions that would represent priority needs to address in the region. One hundred questions were received, then partitioned among categories, examined, and some rearranged during a workshop in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Twenty priority research questions were subsequently identified. These research questions included developing, improving, and harmonizing across LA countries methods for 1) identifying contaminants and degradation products in complex matrices (including biota); 2) advancing prediction of contaminant risks and effects in ecosystems, addressing lab-to-field extrapolation challenges, and understanding complexities of multiple stressors (including chemicals and climate change); and 3) improving management and regulatory tools toward achieving sustainable development. Whereas environmental contaminants frequently identified in these key questions were pesticides, pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors or modulators, plastics, and nanomaterials, commonly identified environmental challenges were related to agriculture, urban effluents, solid wastes, pulp and paper mills, and natural extraction activities. Several interesting research topics included assessing and preventing pollution impacts on conservation protected areas, integrating environment and health assessments, and developing strategies for identification, substitution, and design of less hazardous chemicals (e.g., green chemistry). Finally, a recurrent research need included developing an understanding of differential sensitivity of regional species and ecosystems to environmental contaminants and other stressors. Addressing these critical questions will

  12. Acute Perforated Schistosomal Appendicitis: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appendicitis is occasionally the first clinical manifestation of schistosomal infestation which may require treatment. A rare case of perforated schistosomal appendicitis in a 12 –year old Nigerian boy diagnosed on the basis of histological evaluation of the appendectomy specimen is reported to highlight the clinical ...

  13. Echographic handling of the acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neira de Ortiz, Clara Lucia; Vela H, Gregorio

    1993-01-01

    This study made an evaluation of the echography as a diagnostic method of the acute appendicitis in 22 paediatric patients with clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis. It was found a sensibility of 95% and a specificity of 90% for this diagnosis

  14. Simultaneous acute appendicitis with right testicular torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanveer Akhtar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a child with both acute appendicitis and torsion of the right testis presenting at the same time. Testicular torsion possibly occurring due to vomiting in acute appendicitis so far has not been reported in the literature.

  15. Appendicitis, appendectomie en de wet van Murphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heij, H. A.; van Lieburg, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-surgical treatment of acute phlegmonous appendicitis has been receiving increasing attention in recent years, representing a reversal of policy. The appendectomy came into vogue at the beginning of the 20th century. It is true that prompt surgical intervention in all patients with appendicitis

  16. Discriminating between simple and perforated appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bröker, Mirelle E. E.; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; van der Elst, Maarten; Stassen, Laurents P. S.; Schepers, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have been performed in order to diagnose an acute appendicitis using history taking and laboratory investigations. The aim of this study was to create a model for the identification of a perforated appendicitis. All consecutive patients who have undergone an appendectomy in the

  17. Infantile perforated appendicitis: A forgotten diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine W. Gonzalez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis in the infant is a rare surgical diagnosis despite its frequency in older patients. The clinical presentation is often vague and can be misleading. We present the successful diagnosis and treatment of a 3 month old female with perforated appendicitis.

  18. Conservative treatment of acute appendicitis: an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojciechowicz, K. H.; Hoffkamp, H. J.; van Hulst, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Although the standard treatment for appendicitis (since 1883) is an appendectomy, this is not always possible in a maritime or military setting. To avoid relying on improvisation in such situations this study examines the evidence for conservative management of appendicitis. Material and

  19. Answering the Questions of Rape Prevention Research: A Response to Tharp et al. (2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Rape prevention programmers and researchers have long struggled to select the most appropriate theoretical models to frame their work. Questions abound regarding appropriate standards of evidence for success of program interventions. The present article provides an alternative point of view to the one put forward by seven staff members from the…

  20. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Establishing the key unanswered research questions within gastrointestinal endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rees, Colin J; Ngu, Wee Sing; Regula, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a rapidly evolving research field. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) plays a key role in shaping opinion and endoscopy activity throughout Europe and further afield. Establishing key unanswered questions within the fi...

  1. Cytological diagnosis of xanthogranulomatous appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Kaushik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomatous reaction can occur in any organ but the most common sites are kidney and gallbladder. Xanthogranulomatous appendicitis (XA is a rare clinical entity. There are a few case reports of XA diagnosed on histopathology but none on cytology. Here we report a case of a 47-year-old lady who presented with acute abdomen and was found to have a mass lesion in the right iliac fossa. She was diagnosed with XA intraoperatively on imprint cytology that was subsequently confirmed on histopathological examination. Due to the rarity of XA itself and the use of imprint cytology for intraoperative diagnosis the case is being presented.

  2. Neonatal appendicitis: a survival case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Linha Secco

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To report a case of neonatal appendicitis in a children’s hospital in southern Brazil, demonstrating the impact on neonatal survival. Method: Case study with data collection from medical records, approved by the Institution and Ethics Committee for Research with Human Beings. Results: The clinical picture is initially characterized by food intolerance, evolving to hypoactivity, alteration of vital signs and septicemia due to intestinal perforation. Management is exclusively surgical, since no case described in the literature was diagnosed preoperatively and the findings usually point to acute abdomen. Conclusion: A focused clinical surveillance should be established when the infant presents peritoneal irritation. Follow-up of the evolution and the worsening of the symptoms by nurses, as part of the care team in partnership with the medical team, enables an early surgical intervention, thereby avoiding complications such as septicemia and death.

  3. MRI use in acute appendicitis in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleeva, A.

    2017-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in pregnancy. The incidence of appendicitis in pregnancy was one in 766 births. The preoperative diagnosis was correct in 75% of the cases. Because of considerable fetal loss after appendectomy during pregnancy in the first and second trimester, surgeons decide to use diagnostic imaging to prove the diagnosis. The American College of Radiology (ACR) approves of MR imaging of the pregnant patient in any trimester, including the first. In this case -30 years old, pregnant 12 week gestation, present with right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Acute appendicitis is suspected, because of positive Romberg and ilio-psoas sign and high WBC and CRP. After MR imaging the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was proved together with intrauterine gestation. Key words: Acute Appendicitis. MRI. Pregnancy. Fetal Loss [bg

  4. A new adult appendicitis score improves diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis - a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to construct a new scoring system for more accurate diagnostics of acute appendicitis. Applying the new score into clinical practice could reduce the need of potentially harmful diagnostic imaging. Methods This prospective study enrolled 829 adults presenting with clinical suspicion of appendicitis, including 392 (47%) patients with appendicitis. The collected data included clinical findings and symptoms together with laboratory tests (white cell count, neutrophil count and C-reactive protein), and the timing of the onset of symptoms. The score was constructed by logistic regression analysis using multiple imputations for missing values. Performance of the constructed score in patients with complete data (n = 725) was compared with Alvarado score and Appendicitis inflammatory response score. Results 343 (47%) of patients with complete data had appendicitis. 199 (58%) patients with appendicitis had score value at least 16 and were classified as high probability group with 93% specificity.Patients with score below 11 were classified as low probability of appendicitis. Only 4% of patients with appendicitis had a score below 11, and none of them had complicated appendicitis. In contrast, 207 (54%) of non-appendicitis patients had score below 11. There were no cases with complicated appendicitis in the low probability group. The area under ROC curve was significantly larger with the new score 0.882 (95% CI 0.858 – 0.906) compared with AUC of Alvarado score 0.790 (0.758 – 0.823) and Appendicitis inflammatory response score 0.810 (0.779 – 0.840). Conclusions The new diagnostic score is fast and accurate in categorizing patients with suspected appendicitis, and roughly halves the need of diagnostic imaging. PMID:24970111

  5. Generation of priority research questions to inform conservation policy and management at a national level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Murray A; Beazley, Karen F; Cooke, Steven J; Fleishman, Erica; Lane, Daniel E; Mascia, Michael B; Roth, Robin; Tabor, Gary; Bakker, Jiselle A; Bellefontaine, Teresa; Berteaux, Dominique; Cantin, Bernard; Chaulk, Keith G; Cunningham, Kathryn; Dobell, Rod; Fast, Eleanor; Ferrara, Nadia; Findlay, C Scott; Hallstrom, Lars K; Hammond, Thomas; Hermanutz, Luise; Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Lindsay, Kathryn E; Marta, Tim J; Nguyen, Vivian M; Northey, Greg; Prior, Kent; Ramirez-Sanchez, Saudiel; Rice, Jake; Sleep, Darren J H; Szabo, Nora D; Trottier, Geneviève; Toussaint, Jean-Patrick; Veilleux, Jean-Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Integrating knowledge from across the natural and social sciences is necessary to effectively address societal tradeoffs between human use of biological diversity and its preservation. Collaborative processes can change the ways decision makers think about scientific evidence, enhance levels of mutual trust and credibility, and advance the conservation policy discourse. Canada has responsibility for a large fraction of some major ecosystems, such as boreal forests, Arctic tundra, wetlands, and temperate and Arctic oceans. Stressors to biological diversity within these ecosystems arise from activities of the country's resource-based economy, as well as external drivers of environmental change. Effective management is complicated by incongruence between ecological and political boundaries and conflicting perspectives on social and economic goals. Many knowledge gaps about stressors and their management might be reduced through targeted, timely research. We identify 40 questions that, if addressed or answered, would advance research that has a high probability of supporting development of effective policies and management strategies for species, ecosystems, and ecological processes in Canada. A total of 396 candidate questions drawn from natural and social science disciplines were contributed by individuals with diverse organizational affiliations. These were collaboratively winnowed to 40 by our team of collaborators. The questions emphasize understanding ecosystems, the effects and mitigation of climate change, coordinating governance and management efforts across multiple jurisdictions, and examining relations between conservation policy and the social and economic well-being of Aboriginal peoples. The questions we identified provide potential links between evidence from the conservation sciences and formulation of policies for conservation and resource management. Our collaborative process of communication and engagement between scientists and decision makers for

  6. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging in appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dos Remedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.; Sawicki, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Indium- 111 -labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was applied to the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Thirty-two patients observed in the hospital for possible appendicitis were prospectively studied. Scanning was done 2 hr after radiopharmaceutical injection. Thirteen scans were positive for acute appendicitis, and all but one were confirmed at laparotomy. In addition, two cases of colitis and two cases of peritonitis were detected. Of 15 negative studies, 11 had a benign course. Four patients with negative studies had laparotomy; two were found to have appendicitis and two had a normal appendix. Of 14 proven cases of appendicitis, 12 scans were positive for appendicitis with one false-positive scan, providing a sensitivity of 86%. Specificity was 93%: all negative cases except one had negative scans. Overall accuracy was 91% (29 of 32), comparing favorably with the accepted false-positive laparotomy rate of 25%. Use of In- 111 -labeled leukocyte scintigraphy serves to reduce the false-positive laparotomy rate and to shorten the clinical observation time in patients with acute appendicitis

  7. Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Definition & ...

  8. Appendiceal diverticulum associated with chronic appendicitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zubieta-O’Farrill, Gregorio; Guerra-Mora, José Raúl; Gudiño-Chávez, Andrés; Gonzalez-Alvarado, Carlos; Cornejo-López, Gilberto Bernabe; Villanueva-Sáenz, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Appendiceal diverticulosis is a rare entity, with a global incidence between 0.004% and 2.1% of all appendectomies. It has been related with an elevated risk of perforation in comparison to acute appendicitis, as well as an increased risk for synchronic appendicular cancer in 48% of the cases, and colonic cancer in 43%. The incidence of chronic appendicitis has been reported in 1.5% of all appendicitis cases. PRESENTATION OF CASE: We present a 73-year-old female, with no rele...

  9. How to diagnose acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mostbeck, Gerhard; Adam, E Jane; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2016-01-01

    appendicitis (AA). • Primary US for AA diagnosis will decrease ionizing radiation and cost. • Sensitivity of US to diagnose AA is lower than of CT/MRI. • Non-visualization of the appendix should lead to clinical reassessment. • Complementary MRI or CT may be performed if diagnosis remains unclear....... and complementary imaging with MRI/CT if indicated. Accordingly, both ionizing radiation to our patients and cost of pre-therapeutic diagnosis of AA will be low, with low negative appendectomy and perforation rates. Main Messages • Ultrasound (US) should be the first imaging modality for diagnosing acute...... specificity both in the paediatric and adult patient populations. As US sensitivity is limited, and non-diagnostic US examinations with non-visualization of the appendix are more a rule than an exception, diagnostic strategies and algorithms after non-diagnostic US should focus on clinical reassessment...

  10. Laparoscopic appendectomy in surgical treatment of acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Ohrimenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of the topic. At the present time laparoscopic appendectomy has taken its own place at the urgent surgery. In spite of this less is studied in the field of the use of the minimally invasive technologies in the cases of complicated acute appendicitis. The aim of research: to investigate the close results of the patients with acute appendicitis treatment with laparoscopic appendectomy, and to compare them with the open appendectomy results; to estimate the possibilities of laparoscopic appendectomy in the cases of complicated acute appendicitis. Materials and methods. The results of surgical treatment of 146 patients with acute appendicitis were analyzed – 59 patients in the main group, who undergone laparoscopic appendectomy, and 80 patients in the control group, who undergone open surgery. 7 patients who passed through conversion were included in the additional group. Results. The frequency of acute appendicitis complications, which were diagnosed during the operation, in the both groups had no significant distinction (50.8 % in the main group and 47.5% in the control group. But 5 patients with diffuse peritonitis and appendicular abscesses needed a conversion of laparoscopic operation into open one, because of the full sanitation necessity and technique difficulties. In the postoperative period among the patients of main group the suppuration of the wound was observed in 2 (3.4% cases, in the control group – in 10 (12.5%. The average duration of laparoscopic operation was 33.12±2.51 min, open surgery – 66.45±3.33 min. The average hospitalization period in the control group was 6.95±0.2 days and was statistically proved higher than in the main group – 4.72±0.21 days (p≤0.01. Conclusion. Laparoscopic appendectomy can be wide used in the cases of acute appendicitis, including complications, but it can be restricted in the cases of diffuse peritonitis and appendicular abscesses. This minimally invasive surgical operation

  11. Hospital preference of laparoscopic versus open appendectomy: Effects on outcomes in simple and complicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Jun; Einstein, Stephanie A; Perez, Eduardo A; Bronson, Steven N; Lasko, David S; Sola, Juan E

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesize that laparoscopic (LA) or open appendectomy (OA) outcomes are associated with hospital procedure preference. We queried Kids' Inpatient Database (1997-2009) for simple (ICD-9-CM 540.9) and complicated (540.0, 540.1) appendicitis. On PS-matched analysis of simple appendicitis (91,118 LA vs. 97,496 OA), LA had increased transfusion (1.7) rates, but lower wound infection (0.6) and perforation/laceration (0.3) rates. LA had shorter length of stay (LOS; 1.7 vs. 2.1days), but higher total charges (TC; 19,501 vs. 13,089 USD) and cost (7121 vs. 5968) vs. OA. For complicated appendicitis (28,793 LA vs. 30,782 OA), LA had increased nausea/vomiting rates (1.9), but lower wound infection (0.5) and transfusion (0.6) rates. LA had shorter LOS (5.1 vs. 5.9), but higher TC (32,251 vs. 28,209). MVA demonstrated shorter LOS (0.9) for LA at laparoscopic-preferring hospitals vs. open-preferring hospitals for simple appendicitis. For complicated appendicitis, higher complication rates (1.1) were associated with OA at laparoscopic-preferring hospitals. Laparoscopic-preferring hospitals had higher TC in all categories. Complications and resource utilization for appendicitis are associated with surgical technique and hospital procedure preference. Laparoscopic-preferring hospitals had higher complication rates with OA for complicated appendicitis and higher charges regardless of appendectomy technique or appendicitis type. 2c, Outcomes Research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Association Between Barium Examination and Subsequent Appendicitis: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao-Ming; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Huang, Ying-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and association between appendicitis and barium examination (BE) remain unclear. Such potential risk may be omitted. We conducted a longitudinal, nationwide, population-based cohort study to investigate the association between BE and appendicitis risk. From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, a total of 24,885 patients who underwent BE between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010 were enrolled in a BE cohort; an additional 98,384 subjects without BE exposure were selected as a non-BE cohort, matched by age, sex, and index date. The cumulative incidences of subsequent appendicitis in the BE and non-BE cohorts were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were employed to calculate the appendicitis risk between the groups. The cumulative incidence of appendicitis was higher in the BE cohort than in the non-BE cohort (P = .001). The overall incidence rates of appendicitis for the BE and non-BE cohorts were 1.19 and 0.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for sex, age, and comorbidities, the risk of appendicitis was higher in the BE cohort (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.23-1.73) compared with the non-BE cohort, especially in the first 2 months (adjusted hazard ratio = 9.72, 95% confidence interval = 4.65-20.3). BE was associated with an increased, time-dependent appendicitis risk. Clinicians should be aware of this potential risk to avoid delayed diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Research in education and concepts of knowledge: the production of knowledge in question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida, Natalia Regina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the field of knowledge in education, discussion about the treatment given to its definition as a field, investigative object and different possibilities theoretical-methodological, epistemological, was frequent in the last decades of the twentieth century. In this perspective, the aspects that relate to the process of construction and production of research in the field of education and knowledge of different theoretical and methodological possibilities deserve more theoretical and conceptual investment. Thus, this paper, from the literature, aims to present a brief discussion of the different conceptions of knowledge in the construction of research in the field of knowledge in education and two theoretical and methodological positions the practice of educational research. As a final consideration, the intention of this article is not to exhaust the issue in question, for there are many issues that permeate the practice of educational research.

  14. Acute appendicitis after blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Joudi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Appendecitis is one of the most frequent surgeries. Inflammation of appendix may be due to variable causes such as fecalit, hypertrophy of Peyer’s plaques, seeds of fruits and parasites. In this study we presented an uncommon type of appendicitis which occurred after abdominal blunt trauma. In this article three children present who involved acute appendicitis after blunt abdominal trauma. These patients were 2 boys (5 and 6-year-old and one girl (8-year-old who after blunt abdominal trauma admitted to the hospital with abdominal pain and symptoms of acute abdomen and appendectomy had been done for them.Trauma can induce intramural hematoma at appendix process and may cause appendicitis. Therefore, physicians should be aware of appendicitis after blunt abdominal trauma

  15. [Enterobius vermicularis causing symptoms of acute appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, András; Kocsis, Béla

    2008-08-01

    The authors present a case of enterobiasis of the appendix. Enterobius infection is an uncommon cause of acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis of pinworm infestation is almost impossible unless there is a strong clinical suspicion. Parasites may produce symptoms which resemble acute appendicitis. Careful observation of the appendix stump may lead to intraoperative diagnosis of enterobiasis. A quick diagnosis and appropriate treatment may prevent future complications.

  16. Outcomes of Nonoperative Management of Uncomplicated Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachur, Richard G; Lipsett, Susan C; Monuteaux, Michael C

    2017-07-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of uncomplicated pediatric appendicitis has promise but remains poorly studied. NOM may lead to an increase in resource utilization. Our objective was to investigate the trends in NOM for uncomplicated appendicitis and study the relevant clinical outcomes including subsequent appendectomy, complications, and resource utilization. Retrospective analysis of administrative data from 45 US pediatric hospitals. Patients appendicitis between 2010 and 2016 were studied. NOM was defined by an ED visit for uncomplicated appendicitis treated with antibiotics and the absence of appendectomy at the index encounter. The main outcomes included trends in NOM among children with uncomplicated appendicitis and frequency of subsequent diagnostic imaging, ED visits, hospitalizations, and appendectomy during 12-month follow-up. 99 001 children with appendicitis were identified, with a median age of 10.9 years. Sixty-six percent were diagnosed with nonperforated appendicitis, of which 4190 (6%) were managed nonoperatively. An increasing number of nonoperative cases were observed over 6 years (absolute difference, +20.4%). During the 12-month follow-up period, NOM patients were more likely to have the following: advanced imaging (+8.9% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.6% to 10.3%]), ED visits (+11.2% [95% CI 9.3% to 13.2%]), and hospitalizations (+43.7% [95% CI 41.7% to 45.8%]). Among patients managed nonoperatively, 46% had a subsequent appendectomy. A significant increase in NOM of nonperforated appendicitis was observed over 6 years. Patients with NOM had more subsequent ED visits and hospitalizations compared with those managed operatively at the index visit. A substantial proportion of patients initially managed nonoperatively eventually had an appendectomy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Imaging Acute Appendicitis: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to present the state of the art in imaging tests for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Relevant publications regarding performance and advantages/disadvantages of imaging modalities for the diagnosis of appendicitis in different clinical situations were reviewed. Articles were extracted from a computerized database (MEDLINE with the following activated limits: Humans, English, core clinical journals, and published in the last five years. Reference lists of relevant studies were checked manually to identify additional, related articles. Ultrasound (US examination should be the first imaging test performed, particularly among the pediatric and young adult populations, who represent the main targets for appendicitis, as well as in pregnant patients. A positive US examination for appendicitis or an alternative diagnosis of possible gastrointestinal or urological origin, or a negative US, either showing a normal appendix or presenting low clinical suspicion of appendicitis, should lead to a final diagnosis. A negative or indeterminate examination with a strong clinical suspicion of appendicitis should be followed by a computed tomography (CT scan or alternatively, a magnetic resonanace imaging (MRI scan in a pregnant patient. A second US examination in a patient with persistent symptoms, especially if the first one was performed by a less experienced imaging professional, is a valid alternative to a CT.

  18. Backward Dependencies and in-Situ wh-Questions as Test Cases on How to Approach Experimental Linguistics Research That Pursues Theoretical Linguistics Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablos, Leticia; Doetjes, Jenny; Cheng, Lisa L-S

    2017-01-01

    The empirical study of language is a young field in contemporary linguistics. This being the case, and following a natural development process, the field is currently at a stage where different research methods and experimental approaches are being put into question in terms of their validity. Without pretending to provide an answer with respect to the best way to conduct linguistics related experimental research, in this article we aim at examining the process that researchers follow in the design and implementation of experimental linguistics research with a goal to validate specific theoretical linguistic analyses. First, we discuss the general challenges that experimental work faces in finding a compromise between addressing theoretically relevant questions and being able to implement these questions in a specific controlled experimental paradigm. We discuss the Granularity Mismatch Problem (Poeppel and Embick, 2005) which addresses the challenges that research that is trying to bridge the representations and computations of language and their psycholinguistic/neurolinguistic evidence faces, and the basic assumptions that interdisciplinary research needs to consider due to the different conceptual granularity of the objects under study. To illustrate the practical implications of the points addressed, we compare two approaches to perform linguistic experimental research by reviewing a number of our own studies strongly grounded on theoretically informed questions. First, we show how linguistic phenomena similar at a conceptual level can be tested within the same language using measurement of event-related potentials (ERP) by discussing results from two ERP experiments on the processing of long-distance backward dependencies that involve coreference and negative polarity items respectively in Dutch. Second, we examine how the same linguistic phenomenon can be tested in different languages using reading time measures by discussing the outcome of four self

  19. Backward Dependencies and in-Situ wh-Questions as Test Cases on How to Approach Experimental Linguistics Research That Pursues Theoretical Linguistics Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablos, Leticia; Doetjes, Jenny; Cheng, Lisa L.-S.

    2018-01-01

    The empirical study of language is a young field in contemporary linguistics. This being the case, and following a natural development process, the field is currently at a stage where different research methods and experimental approaches are being put into question in terms of their validity. Without pretending to provide an answer with respect to the best way to conduct linguistics related experimental research, in this article we aim at examining the process that researchers follow in the design and implementation of experimental linguistics research with a goal to validate specific theoretical linguistic analyses. First, we discuss the general challenges that experimental work faces in finding a compromise between addressing theoretically relevant questions and being able to implement these questions in a specific controlled experimental paradigm. We discuss the Granularity Mismatch Problem (Poeppel and Embick, 2005) which addresses the challenges that research that is trying to bridge the representations and computations of language and their psycholinguistic/neurolinguistic evidence faces, and the basic assumptions that interdisciplinary research needs to consider due to the different conceptual granularity of the objects under study. To illustrate the practical implications of the points addressed, we compare two approaches to perform linguistic experimental research by reviewing a number of our own studies strongly grounded on theoretically informed questions. First, we show how linguistic phenomena similar at a conceptual level can be tested within the same language using measurement of event-related potentials (ERP) by discussing results from two ERP experiments on the processing of long-distance backward dependencies that involve coreference and negative polarity items respectively in Dutch. Second, we examine how the same linguistic phenomenon can be tested in different languages using reading time measures by discussing the outcome of four self

  20. Backward Dependencies and in-Situ wh-Questions as Test Cases on How to Approach Experimental Linguistics Research That Pursues Theoretical Linguistics Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Pablos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The empirical study of language is a young field in contemporary linguistics. This being the case, and following a natural development process, the field is currently at a stage where different research methods and experimental approaches are being put into question in terms of their validity. Without pretending to provide an answer with respect to the best way to conduct linguistics related experimental research, in this article we aim at examining the process that researchers follow in the design and implementation of experimental linguistics research with a goal to validate specific theoretical linguistic analyses. First, we discuss the general challenges that experimental work faces in finding a compromise between addressing theoretically relevant questions and being able to implement these questions in a specific controlled experimental paradigm. We discuss the Granularity Mismatch Problem (Poeppel and Embick, 2005 which addresses the challenges that research that is trying to bridge the representations and computations of language and their psycholinguistic/neurolinguistic evidence faces, and the basic assumptions that interdisciplinary research needs to consider due to the different conceptual granularity of the objects under study. To illustrate the practical implications of the points addressed, we compare two approaches to perform linguistic experimental research by reviewing a number of our own studies strongly grounded on theoretically informed questions. First, we show how linguistic phenomena similar at a conceptual level can be tested within the same language using measurement of event-related potentials (ERP by discussing results from two ERP experiments on the processing of long-distance backward dependencies that involve coreference and negative polarity items respectively in Dutch. Second, we examine how the same linguistic phenomenon can be tested in different languages using reading time measures by discussing the outcome of

  1. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolome R. Celli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS/European Respiratory Society (ERS Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  2. Good questions require good answers. Critics on current climate research contradicted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellinga, P.; Van Dorland, R.; Kabat, P.

    2008-01-01

    In some of the previous issues of this magazine (Spil 2007, issue 4 and 5-6, and Spil 2008, issue 1) the authors Labohm, Roersch and Thoenes started a frontal attack of the greenhouse theory and the researchers who report on the state of science in the framework of the IPCC. The author of this article addresses two main questions arising from the above-mentioned authors: (1) Does the use of fossil fuels affect global climate?; and (2) Is the warming of the last 30 years related to the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere? [mk] [nl

  3. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) in South Africa: engaging multiple constituents to shape the research question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavel, Maghboeba; Simon, Christian; van Stade, Debbie; Buchbinder, Mara

    2005-12-01

    Community engagement is an on-going, arduous, and necessary process for developing effective health promotion programs. The challenges are amplified when the particular health issue or research question is not prominent in the consciousness of the targeted community. In this paper, we explore the community-based participatory research (CBPR) model as a means to negotiate a mutual agenda between communities and researchers. The paper is focused on the (perceived) need for cervical cancer screening in an under-resourced community in Cape Town, South Africa. Cervical cancer is a significant health problem in this community and elsewhere in South Africa. Unlike HIV-AIDS, however, many Black South Africans have not been educated about cervical cancer and the importance of obtaining screening. Many may not consider screening a priority in their lives. Our research included extensive consultations and informal interviews with diverse community and regional stakeholders. Following these, we conducted 27 focus groups and 106 demographic surveys with randomly selected youth, parents, local health care personnel, educators and school staff. Focus group data were summarized and analyzed cross-sectionally. Community stakeholders were involved throughout this research. Our consultations, interviews, and focus group data were key in identifying the concerns and priorities of the community. By engaging community stakeholders, we developed a research framework that incorporated the community's concerns and priorities, and stressed the intersecting roles of poverty, violence, and other cultural forces in shaping community members' health and wellbeing. Community members helped to refocus our research from cervical cancer to 'cervical health,' a concept that acknowledged the impact on women's bodies and lives of HIV-AIDS and STDs, sexual violence, poverty, and multiple social problems. We conclude that the research agenda and questions in community-based health research should not be

  4. A diaper bank and home visiting partnership: Initial exploration of research and policy questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Lois S; Condon, Eileen M; Deng, Shirley Z; Ordway, Monica Roosa; Marchesseault, Crista; Miller, Andrea; Alfano, Janet Stolfi; Weir, Alison M

    2018-03-01

    The cost of diapering an infant can place a significant financial strain on families living in poverty. Partnerships between diaper banks and home visiting programs for young families may offer an innovative solution to expanding the reach and impact of diaper banks in low-income communities. The purpose of this pilot study was to uncover preliminary information about the functions of diaper distribution through home visiting programs, and to inform future research and policy questions regarding diaper distribution to families in need. In this descriptive qualitative pilot study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 6 home visitors from Minding the Baby ® (MTB), a home visiting intervention for young parents. MTB clinicians routinely distribute diapers in partnership with The Diaper Bank in Connecticut. We used directed content analysis to code and analyze interview transcripts. These preliminary findings indicate that partnerships between home visiting programs and diaper banks may benefit families by improving diaper access, reducing stigma, and fostering trusting relationships with home visitors. Home visiting program benefits including engagement or re-engagement with families may need to be balanced with potential effects on clinical and therapeutic relationships. Recommendations for next steps in research and related policy questions are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Preventing Sudden Death in Sport and Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katch, Rachel K; Scarneo, Samantha E; Adams, William M; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Belval, Luke N; Stamm, Julie M; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-09-01

    Participation in organized sport and recreational activities presents an innate risk for serious morbidity and mortality. Although death during sport or physical activity has many causes, advancements in sports medicine and evidence-based standards of care have allowed clinicians to prevent, recognize, and treat potentially fatal injuries more effectively. With the continual progress of research and technology, current standards of care are evolving to enhance patient outcomes. In this article, we provided 10 key questions related to the leading causes and treatment of sudden death in sport and physical activity, where future research will support safer participation for athletes and recreational enthusiasts. The current evidence indicates that most deaths can be avoided when proper strategies are in place to prevent occurrence or provide optimal care.

  6. The Association Between Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt and Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A 14-Year, Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sher-Wei; Ao, Kam-Hou; Ho, Chung-Han; Tseng, Chien-Jen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chio, Chung-Ching; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2017-07-01

    The association between preexisting ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt and the risk of new-onset acute appendicitis in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is not well established. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationships between VP shunt and acute appendicitis in patients with TBI. A longitudinal cohort study matched by a propensity score in patients with TBI with (4781 patients) or without (9562 patients) VP shunt was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan between January 1993 and December 2013. The main outcome studied was diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The cumulative probability of acute appendicitis was not different between these 2 groups (P = 0.6244). A Cox model showed central nervous system (CNS) infection to be an independent predictor of acute appendicitis with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.98. Patients with TBI with both a VP shunt and a CNS infection had a greater risk of developing new-onset acute appendicitis (hazard ratio 4.25; 95% confidence interval 1.84-9.81) compared patients with TBI without a VP shunt or CNS infection. We concluded that VP shunt is not a risk factor in the development of appendicitis in patients with TBI. Patients with TBI with a shunt and a CNS infection may have a greater risk of developing acute appendicitis. Therefore, care in avoiding CNS infection is a key for the prevention acute appendicitis in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel Reporting System to Improve Accuracy in Appendicitis Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Benjamin D.; Drake, Frederick T.; Simianu, Vlad V.; Shriki, Jabi E.; Hippe, Daniel S.; Dighe, Manjiri; Bastawrous, Sarah; Cuevas, Carlos; Flum, David; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to ascertain if standardized radiologic reporting for appendicitis imaging increases diagnostic accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS We developed a standardized appendicitis reporting system that includes objective imaging findings common in appendicitis and a certainty score ranging from 1 (definitely not appendicitis) through 5 (definitely appendicitis). Four radiologists retrospectively reviewed the preoperative CT scans of 96 appendectomy patients using our reporting system. The presence of appendicitis-specific imaging findings and certainty scores were compared with final pathology. These comparisons were summarized using odds ratios (ORs) and the AUC. RESULTS The appendix was visualized on CT in 89 patients, of whom 71 (80%) had pathologically proven appendicitis. Imaging findings associated with appendicitis included appendiceal diameter (odds ratio [OR] = 14 [> 10 vs appendicitis. In this initially indeterminate group, using the standardized reporting system, radiologists assigned higher certainty scores (4 or 5) in 21 of the 28 patients with appendicitis (75%) and lower scores (1 or 2) in five of the seven patients without appendicitis (71%) (AUC = 0.90; p = 0.001). CONCLUSION Standardized reporting and grading of objective imaging findings correlated well with postoperative pathology and may decrease the number of CT findings reported as indeterminate for appendicitis. Prospective evaluation of this reporting system on a cohort of patients with clinically suspected appendicitis is currently under way. PMID:26001230

  8. Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-06-01

    Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the EMF (electric and magnetic fields) produced by power lines and other electrical devices affect our health. Although no adverse health effects of electric power EMF have been confirmed, there is continued scientific uncertainty about this issue. Research on EMF is ongoing throughout the world. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions that the BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are debed. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns about potential health effects of power lines. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this booklet.

  9. How Tom Moon's research highlighted the question of glucose tolerance in carnivorous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakof, S; Panserat, S

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen years ago, Tom Moon wrote a review on this journal in order to propose some explanations to the exacerbated glycaemic response after a glucose load or a carbohydrate meal intake observed in fish, the so-called intolerance to glucose. Before, but in most of cases after this paper, several laboratories worldwide started to make important efforts in order to better understand this strange phenotype observed in fish and that so far seemed to belong to diabetic humans only. Tom had been worked on fish metabolism for at least 30years when he proposed that mini-review and the paths opened by him in 2001 were followed by tens of fish researchers, making this paper a breaking point on the field. Fifteen years later, we propose not only to have a look to the answers given to the questions rose in that paper, but also to summarize how his career over all these years impacted the domain of glucose metabolism in fish. In the review, we will show how Tom Moon analysed at different levels (from genes up to the whole organism), using distinct experimental tools (cells, hormone or glucose injection, pumps, drugs) the questions of glucose metabolism, tolerance and nutrition in fish species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence for eosinophil degranulation in acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Finding of increased numbers of eosinophils in the muscle in cases of acute appendicitis has led to the hypothesis that it may have an allergic origin. This study aimed to measure the eosinophil degranulation resulting in a rise in the serum of eosinophil granule proteins that would be expected in such cases. The levels of serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP measured by chemiluminescence assay in acute appendicitis were compared, with those of appropriate controls. Mean (95% CI serum ECP (µg/L levels were: acute appendicitis 45.3 (27.7-63.0; normal appendix 22.7 (16.0-29.3; asthma 24.2 (4.6-43.8; and healthy volunteers 13.2 (8.3-18.1. In cases of acute appendicitis, there is an inverse relationship between duration of symptoms and serum ECP. However, this was not statistically significant. Significant local eosinophil activation and degranulation occurs in acute appendicitis, enough to cause a rise in serum levels of eosinophil chemotactic protein

  11. The immune impact of mimic endoscopic retrograde appendicitis therapy and appendectomy on rabbits of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suqin; Pei, Fenghua; Wang, Xinhong; Li, Deliang; Zhao, Lixia; Song, Yanyan; Chen, Zhendong; Liu, Bingrong

    2017-09-12

    This study was conducted to evaluate the immune impact of mimic endoscopic retrograde appendicitis therapy and appendectomy on rabbits of acute suppurative appendicitis and to determine whether TLR4/MYD88/NF-κB signaling pathway was activated in this process. 48 rabbits were assigned into 4 groups: group I, the mimic endoscopic retrograde appendicitis therapy group; group II, the appendectomy group; group III, the model group; and group IV, the blank group. White blood cells decreased, while levels of C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-4, and interleukin-10 increased on the 2 nd day in group I and II. IgA in feces decreased at 2 weeks, while fecal microbiota changed at 2 and 4 weeks after appendectomy. CD8 + cells in appendix of group I increased within 8 weeks. Upregulated expression of TLR4, MYD88, and nuclear NF-κB were detected on the 2 nd day in group I and II. Mimic endoscopic retrograde appendicitis therapy and appendectomy are effective ways for acute suppurative appendicitis. Mimic endoscopic retrograde appendicitis therapy was more preferable due to its advantage in maintaining intestinal immune function. TLR4/MYD88/NF-κB signaling pathway was activated in acute phase of appendicitis.

  12. Appendicitis in Children: Evaluation of the Pediatric Appendicitis Score in Younger and Older Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Salö

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to evaluate Pediatric Appendicitis Score (PAS, diagnostic delay, and factors responsible for possible late diagnosis in children <4 years compared with older children who were operated on for suspected appendicitis. Method. 122 children, between 1 and 14 years, operated on with appendectomy for suspected appendicitis, were retrospectively analyzed. The cohort was divided into two age groups: ≥4 years (n=102 and <4 years (n=20. Results. The mean PAS was lower among the younger compared with the older patients (5.3 and 6.6, resp.; P=0.005, despite the fact that younger children had more severe appendicitis (75.0% and 33.3%, resp.; P=0.001. PAS had low sensitivity in both groups, with a significantly lower sensitivity among the younger patients. Parent and doctor delay were confirmed in children <4 years of age with appendicitis. PAS did not aid in patients with doctor delay. Parameters in patient history, symptoms, and abdominal examination were more diffuse in younger children. Conclusion. PAS should be used with caution when examining children younger than 4 years of age. Diffuse symptoms in younger children with acute appendicitis lead to delay and to later diagnosis and more complicated appendicitis.

  13. Pitfalls in CT diagnosis of appendicitis: pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shademan, Ashkan; Tappouni, Rafel F.R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high diagnostic accuracy of CT for appendicitis, numerous pitfalls exist that may result in a misdiagnosis. This pictorial review outlines the potential pitfalls in the CT diagnosis of appendicitis that includes atypical position of the appendix and coexisting pathologies. Various mimickers of appendicitis and clinical dilemmas will be highlighted. Upon completion, the reviewer should have an improved ability to recognise appendicitis mimickers and identify equivocal or atypical findings.

  14. ACT-CCREC Core Research Program: Study Questions and Design. ACT Working Paper Series. WP-2015-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruce, Ty M.

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a non-technical overview of the guiding research questions and research design for the ACT-led core research program conducted on behalf of the GEAR UP College and Career Readiness Evaluation Consortium (CCREC). The core research program is a longitudinal study of the effectiveness of 14 GEAR UP state grants on the academic…

  15. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, M.M.; Kulaylat, A.N.; Brian, J.M.; Khaku, A.; Hulse, M.A.; Engbrecht, B.W.; Methratta, S.T.; Boal, D.K.B.

    2015-01-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis–colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed

  16. Barium appendicitis after upper gastrointestinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Nathan M; Lillemoe, Keith D; Falimirski, Mark E

    2010-02-01

    Barium appendicitis (BA) is a rarely seen entity with fewer than 30 reports in the literature. However, it is a known complication of barium imaging. To report a case of BA in a patient whose computed tomography (CT) scan was initially read as foreign body ingestion. An 18-year-old man presented with right lower quadrant pain after upper gastrointestinal imaging 2 weeks prior. A CT scan was obtained of his abdomen and pelvis that revealed a finding that was interpreted as a foreign body at the area of the terminal ileum. A plain X-ray study of the abdomen revealed radiopaque appendicoliths. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of barium appendicitis. BA is a rare entity and the pathogenesis is unclear. Shorter intervals between barium study and presentation with appendicitis usually correlate with fewer complications. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perforated appendicitis presenting as a thigh abscess: A lethal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typical cases of acute appendicitis have excellent treatment outcomes, if managed appropriately.1 We discuss an unusual case of perforated retrocaecal appendicitis that presented as a right thigh abscess without prominent abdominal symptoms, which highlights the lethal nature of advanced appendicitis even when ...

  18. The Introduction of Adult Appendicitis Score Reduced Negative Appendectomy Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammalkorpi, H E; Mentula, P; Savolainen, H; Leppäniemi, A

    2017-09-01

    Implementation of a clinical risk score into diagnostics of acute appendicitis may provide accurate diagnosis with selective use of imaging studies. The aim of this study was to prospectively validate recently described diagnostic scoring system, Adult Appendicitis Score, and evaluate its effects on negative appendectomy rate. Adult Appendicitis Score stratifies patients into three groups: high, intermediate, and low risk of appendicitis. The score was implemented in diagnostics of adult patients suspected of acute appendicitis in two university hospitals. We analyzed the effects of Adult Appendicitis Score on diagnostic accuracy, imaging studies, and treatment. The study population was compared with a reference population of 829 patients suspected of acute appendicitis originally enrolled for the study of construction of the Adult Appendicitis Score. This study enrolled 908 patients of whom 432 (48%) had appendicitis. The score stratified 49% of all appendicitis patients into high-risk group with specificity of 93.3%. In the low-risk group, prevalence of appendicitis was 7%. The histologically confirmed negative appendectomy rate decreased from 18.2% to 8.7%, pAppendicitis Score is a reliable tool for stratification of patients into selective imaging, which results in low negative appendectomy rate.

  19. The value of hyperbilirubinaemia in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Emmanuel, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    No reliably specific marker for acute appendicitis has been identified. Although recent studies have shown hyperbilirubinaemia to be a useful predictor of appendiceal perforation, they did not focus on the value of bilirubin as a marker for acute appendicitis. The aim of this study was to determine the value of hyperbilirubinaemia as a marker for acute appendicitis.

  20. MODIFIED ALVARADO SCORING IN ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadarajan Sujath

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical emergencies with a lifetime presentation of approximately 1 in 7. Its incidence is 1.5-1.9/1000 in males and females. Surgery for acute appendicitis is based on history, clinical examination and laboratory investigations (e.g. WBC count. Imaging techniques add very little to the efficacy in the diagnosis of appendix. A negative appendicectomy rate of 20-40% has been reported in literature. A difficulty in diagnosis is experienced in very young patients and females of reproductive age. The diagnostic accuracy in assessing acute appendicitis has not improved in spite of rapid advances in management. MATERIALS AND METHODS The modified Alvarado score was applied and assessed for its accuracy in preparation diagnosis of acute appendicitis in 50 patients. The aim of our study is to understand the various presentations of acute appendicitis including the age and gender incidence and the application of the modified Alvarado scoring system in our hospital setup and assessment of the efficacy of the score. RESULTS Our study shows that most involved age group is 3 rd decade with male preponderance. On application of Alvarado score, nausea and vomiting present in 50% and anorexia in 30%, leucocytosis was found in 75% of cases. Sensitivity and specificity of our study were 65% and 40% respectively with positive predictive value of 85% and negative predictive value of 15%. CONCLUSION This study showed that clinical scoring like the Alvarado score can be a cheap and quick tool to apply in emergency departments to rule out acute appendicitis. The implementation of modified Alvarado score is simple and cost effective.

  1. Predictors of Nondiagnostic Ultrasound for Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Christine; Wang, Nancy E; Imler, Daniel L; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Bruzoni, Matias; Quinn, James V

    2017-03-01

    Ionizing radiation and cost make ultrasound (US), when available, the first imaging study for the diagnosis of suspected pediatric appendicitis. US is less sensitive and specific than computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, which are often performed after nondiagnostic US. We sought to determine predictors of nondiagnostic US in order to guide efficient ordering of imaging studies. A prospective cohort study of consecutive patients 4 to 30 years of age with suspected appendicitis took place at an emergency department with access to 24/7 US, MRI, and CT capabilities. Patients with US as their initial study were identified. Clinical (i.e., duration of illness, highest fever, and right lower quadrant pain) and demographic (i.e., age and sex) variables were collected. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria; BMI >85th percentile was categorized as overweight. Patients were followed until day 7. Univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Over 3 months, 106 patients had US first for suspected appendicitis; 52 (49%) had nondiagnostic US results. Eighteen patients had appendicitis, and there were no missed cases after discharge. On univariate analysis, male sex, a yearly increase in age, and overweight BMI were associated with nondiagnostic US (p appendicitis, and it may be more efficient to consider alternatives to US first for these patients. Also, this information about the accuracy of US to diagnose suspected appendicitis may be useful to clinicians who wish to engage in shared decision-making with the parents or guardians of children regarding imaging options for children with acute abdominal pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazee, Richard; Abernathy, Stephen; Davis, Matthew; Isbell, Travis; Regner, Justin; Smith, Randall

    2017-04-01

    Perforated appendicitis is associated with an increased morbidity and length of stay. "Fast track" protocols have demonstrated success in shortening hospitalization without increasing morbidity for a variety of surgical processes. This study evaluates a fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis. In 2013, a treatment pathway for perforated appendicitis was adopted by the Acute Care Surgery Service for patients having surgical management of perforated appendicitis. Interval appendectomy was excluded. Patients were treated initially with intravenous antibiotics and transitioned to oral antibiotics and dismissed when medically stable and tolerating oral intake. A retrospective review of patients managed on the fast track pathway was undertaken to analyze length of stay, morbidity, and readmissions. Thirty-four males and twenty-one females with an average age of 46.8 years underwent laparoscopic appendectomy for perforated appendicitis between January 2013 and December 2014. Pre-existing comorbidities included hypertension 42%, diabetes mellitus 11%, COPD 5% and heart disease 2%. No patient had conversion to open appendectomy. Average length of stay was 2.67 days and ranged from 1 to 12 days (median 2 days). Postoperative morbidity was 20% and included abscess (6 patients), prolonged ileus (3 patients), pneumonia (1 patient), and congestive heart failure (1 patient). Five patients were readmitted for abscess (3 patients), congestive heart failure (1 patient), and pneumonia (1 patient). A fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis produced shorter length of stay and acceptable postoperative morbidity and readmission. This offers the potential for significant cost savings over current national practice patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Extraintestinal heterotopic gastric tissue simulating acute appendicitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth Bender; Steven P Schmidt

    2008-01-01

    We describe the case of a 68-year-old otherwise healthy male who presented to our emergency room with signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis. Exploratory surgery revealed a normal appendix. Further examination revealed an enlarged lymph node-like mass of tissue near the appendix, in the ileocecal mesentery. This mass was removed and was found to be inflamed heterotopic gastric tissue. Although reports of heterotopic gastric tissue in the literature are common, we believe that this case represents the first report of inflamed heterotopic gastric tissue simulating appendicitis.

  4. Funiculitis mimicking appendicitis: A rare culprit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey L. Perea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is an extremely common cause for pediatric admissions, most notably presenting with right lower quadrant pain. There are few other etiologies for a young male to have pain aside from appendicitis. We present a young boy who presented with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and fevers, but was found to have funiculitis. Funiculitis, or inflammation of the spermatic cord, is a very rare condition in the pediatric population, almost always occurring in the elderly with urinary flow conditions. We share our case to remind providers the importance of a full differential diagnosis.

  5. Evaluation of the microbiome in children's appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salö, Martin; Marungruang, Nittaya; Roth, Bodil; Sundberg, Tiia; Stenström, Pernilla; Arnbjörnsson, Einar; Fåk, Frida; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    The role of the microbiome has been widely discussed in the etiology of appendicitis. The primary aim was to evaluate the microbiome in the normal appendix and in appendicitis specifically divided into the three clinically and histopathologically defined grades of inflammation. Secondary aims were to examine whether there were any microbiome differences between proximal and distal appendices, and relate the microbiome with histopathological findings. A prospective pilot study was conducted of children undergoing appendectomy for appendicitis. The diagnosis was based on histopathological analysis. Children with incidental appendectomy were used as controls. The proximal and distal mucosa from the appendices were analyzed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A total of 22 children, 3 controls and 19 appendicitis patients; 11 phlegmonous, 4 gangrenous, and 4 perforated appendices, were prospectively included. The amount of Fusobacterium increased and Bacteroides decreased in phlegmonous and perforated appendicitis compared to controls, but statistical significance was not reached, and this pattern was not seen in gangrenous appendicitis. No relation could be seen between different bacteria and the grade of inflammation, and there was a wide variation of abundances at phylum, genus, and species level within every specific group of patients. Further, no significant differences could be detected when comparing the microbiome in proximal and distal mucosa, which may be because the study was underpowered. A trend with more abundance of Fusobacteria in the distal mucosa was seen in appendicitis patients with obstruction (25 and 13 %, respectively, p = 0.06). The pattern of microbiome differed not only between groups, but also within groups. However, no statistically significant differences could be found in the microbiome between groups or clinical conditions. No correlation between a specific bacteria and grade of inflammation was found. In the vast majority of cases of

  6. Questioning the Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Goldberg, Stephanie; DiRocco, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Historical accounts of questioning used in the education process trace back to Socrates. One of the best examples of his use of questioning is found in Plato's "The Republic." Socrates used a series of strategic questions to help his student Glaucon come to understand the concept of justice. Socrates purposefully posed a series of…

  7. The Neurobiology of Emotion-Cognition Interactions: Fundamental Questions and Strategies for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadas eOkon-Singer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed the emergence of powerful new tools for assaying the brain and a remarkable acceleration of research focused on the interplay of emotion and cognition. This work has begun to yield new insights into fundamental questions about the nature of the mind and important clues about the origins of mental illness. In particular, this research demonstrates that stress, anxiety, and other kinds of emotion can profoundly influence key elements of cognition, including selective attention, working memory, and cognitive control. Often, this influence persists beyond the duration of transient emotional challenges, partially reflecting the slower molecular dynamics of catecholamine and hormonal neurochemistry. In turn, circuits involved in attention, executive control, and working memory contribute to the regulation of emotion. The distinction between the ‘emotional’ and the ‘cognitive’ brain is fuzzy and context-dependent. Indeed, there is compelling evidence that brain territories and psychological processes commonly associated with cognition, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and working memory, play a central role in emotion. Furthermore, putatively emotional and cognitive regions influence one another via a complex web of connections in ways that jointly contribute to adaptive and maladaptive behavior. This work demonstrates that emotion and cognition are deeply interwoven in the fabric of the brain, suggesting that widely held beliefs about the key constituents of ‘the emotional brain’ and ‘the cognitive brain’ are fundamentally flawed. We conclude by outlining several strategies for enhancing future research. Developing a deeper understanding of the emotional-cognitive brain is important, not just for understanding the mind but also for elucidating the root causes of its disorders.

  8. Reincarnation Revisited: Question format and the distribution of belief in reincarnation in survey research

    OpenAIRE

    Siegers, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Comparing frequency of belief in reincarnation from different international survey projects (RAMP, EVS, ISSP) reveals differences of about 15 to 20 percent depending on the specific question format. If single binary questions are used, then belief in reincarnation is more often reported than if a forced-choice question is used which offers respondents alternatives to belief in reincarnation (e.g. resurrection). One possible explanation for this result is that respondents confuse reincarnation...

  9. Acute amebic appendicitis: Report of a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Naorem

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis of amebic origin is considered a rare cause of acute appendicitis. We report a case of amebic appendicitis presenting with fever, severe pain in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen and rebound tenderness. Lab investigations revealed neutrophilic leukocytosis. The patient underwent appendectomy. Histopathological examination revealed numerous Entameba histolytica trophozoites in the mucosa of the appendix. Acute appendicitis of amebic origin does not appear frequently. Appendicular amebiasis can give the clinical features of acute appendicitis and should be treated accordingly.

  10. Usefulness and limit of CT diagnosis on appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchiki, Megumi; Takanashi, Toshiyasu; Yamaguchi, Koichi.

    1997-01-01

    CT was performed in 104 patients with abdominal pain suspected appendicitis. CT showed positive finding (abnormal appendix, appendicolith, pericecal inflammatory change, fluid collection, LN swelling, abscess) and complication of appendicitis clearly. CT diagnosis showed high accuracy than clinical diagnosis. CT proved its usefulness especially only CT imaging showed the correct diagnosis. On the other hand, diverticulitis and terminal ileitis common diagnostic disease of appendicitis showed similar clinical appearance and CT image, caused to be difficult to diagnose correctly. In the cases showing similar image to appendicitis or atypical image, CT also proved its limit of the diagnosis on appendicitis. (author)

  11. The Impact of Political Context on the Questions Asked and Answered: The Evolution of Education Research on Racial Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Amy Stuart; Roda, Allison

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines how the larger political context and policies enacted at different points in American history have affected the questions education researchers asked and answered. The authors argue that while education researchers are often quick to consider how their research should shape policy, they are less likely to contemplate the…

  12. Traveling questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that uncertainty and nonknowledge, and not just research results, can be important vehicles of translation through which genetic research participation comes to affect the lives of research participants. Based on interviews with participants in a genetic research project, I....... Research questions, and not just results, may serve as a generative form of knowledge that can travel as fast as any answer....

  13. The prime questions in authentic patient's consultations: a call for additional research on current and new paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hanh Thi

    2013-01-01

    Although the 3 prime questions ("What did your doctor tell you the medication is for?" "How did your doctor tell you to take the medication?," and "What did your doctor tell you to expect?") have been recommended as a way to implement an interactive approach to patient's counseling in pharmacy, research examining how these questions are actually used in practice is relatively sparse. Qualitative approaches might assist to inform pertinent questions that might challenge prevailing paradigms. This commentary calls for a close look at how novice pharmacists in training manage these questions in real-life patient's consultations. These examples are aimed to provide preliminary observations about (1) how the prime questions in their original and modified forms are treated by pharmacists in training and patients, and (2) the interactional functions that the prime questions and similar questions may serve. Preliminary observations based on a conversation analysis of these examples show that the open-ended nature of the original prime questions sometimes leads to interactional problems such as delays in patients' responses and pharmacists' revision of the questions. Modified question formats that involve the use of specific knowledge expected to be possessed by a pharmacist, such as declarative questions and Q-word questions with concrete information, may lead to smoother interaction. Finally, questions about the purpose of the therapy may also be used to create opportunities to express empathy toward the patient or to shift the zone of expertise to the doctor. These initial findings suggest a more context sensitive and adaptive approach to communication in pharmacy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Appendicitis in paediatric age group: Correlation between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Clinical diagnosis of appendicitis can be challenging, particularly in the paediatric age group. There is an increased risk of perforation in paediatrics; therefore, a need for sensitive and specific diagnostic tool is mandatory. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of preoperative inflammatory markers in ...

  15. Granulomatous appendicitis in children: A single institutional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Granulomatous appendicitis (GA) is a rare entity, mostly mentioned in adults. There have been anecdotal case reports describing GA in the paediatric population. This study was aimed at reviewing the cases of appendectomies to assess the incidence and characteristics of GA in children in a tertiary care ...

  16. SCHISTOSOMAL APPENDICITIS IN A SLIDING HERNIA (CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a rare case of a forty-seven year old Nigeria male with schistosomal appendicitis in a sliding hernia. The clinical and pathological features of the case are discussed, followed by a review of the literature. It is concluded that a high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose unusual presentations of ...

  17. Practical issues in treatment of appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossem, C.C.

    2016-01-01

    Appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and an appendectomy is still the gold standard of treatment. In spite of the high incidence, variance in diagnostic and treatment modalities remains an issue among surgeons. In this thesis several practical issues in the diagnosis and treatment

  18. Sarcopenia in children with perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Joseph J; Cooper, Jennifer N; Albert, Brett; Adler, Brent; King, Denis; Minneci, Peter C

    2017-12-01

    Decreased skeletal muscle mass, or sarcopenia, has been shown to be associated with worse postoperative recovery and a higher risk of complications in adult surgical patients. We hypothesized that pediatric patients with complicated appendicitis may experience sarcopenic changes over the course of their treatment. The medical records and computed tomography scans of 36 pediatric complex appendicitis patients who had both preoperative and postoperative computerized tomography scans at our hospital were reviewed. Changes in psoas muscle area were examined using linear mixed models with random patient-level intercept and time effects. The median change in body mass index among all patients from admission to discharge was -0.8 kg/m 2 (interquartile range: -1.3 to -0.2). The mean percentage change in psoas muscle area per day over the course of appendicitis-related treatment was -0.81% (95% confidence interval: -1.12 to -0.50) (P  0.10 for all interactions). Our data suggest that pediatric patients with complex appendicitis experience sarcopenic changes during their hospital admission. Given previous reports that sarcopenia is a significant predictor of worse surgical outcomes, more investigation is warranted to assess whether these changes are associated with postsurgical complications and to evaluate potential interventions that may prevent these changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CONTRACT Study - CONservative TReatment of Appendicitis in Children (feasibility): study protocol for a randomised controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Natalie; Wood, Wendy; Reading, Isabel; Walker, Erin; Blazeby, Jane M; Van't Hoff, William; Young, Bridget; Crawley, Esther M; Eaton, Simon; Chorozoglou, Maria; Sherratt, Frances C; Beasant, Lucy; Corbett, Harriet; Stanton, Michael P; Grist, Simon; Dixon, Elizabeth; Hall, Nigel J

    2018-03-02

    Currently, the routine treatment for acute appendicitis in the United Kingdom is an appendicectomy. However, there is increasing scientific interest and research into non-operative treatment of appendicitis in adults and children. While a number of studies have investigated non-operative treatment of appendicitis in adults, this research cannot be applied to the paediatric population. Ultimately, we aim to perform a UK-based multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the clinical and cost effectiveness of non-operative treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis in children, as compared with appendicectomy. First, we will undertake a feasibility study to assess the feasibility of performing such a trial. The study involves a feasibility RCT with a nested qualitative research to optimise recruitment as well as a health economic substudy. Children (aged 4-15 years inclusive) diagnosed with acute uncomplicated appendicitis that would normally be treated with an appendicectomy are eligible for the RCT. Exclusion criteria include clinical/radiological suspicion of perforated appendicitis, appendix mass or previous non-operative treatment of appendicitis. Participants will be randomised into one of two arms. Participants in the intervention arm are treated with antibiotics and regular clinical assessment to ensure clinical improvement. Participants in the control arm will receive appendicectomy. Randomisation will be minimised by age, sex, duration of symptoms and centre. Children and families who are approached for the RCT will be invited to participate in the embedded qualitative substudy, which includes recording of recruitment consultants and subsequent interviews with participants and non-participants and their families and recruiters. Analyses of these will inform interventions to optimise recruitment. The main study outcomes include recruitment rate (primary outcome), identification of strategies to optimise recruitment, performance of trial treatment

  20. Antibiotics versus appendectomy in the management of acute appendicitis: a review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Gerard J; McWilliams, Billy; Hurreiz, Hisham; Epanomeritakis, Emanuel

    2011-10-01

    Acute appendicitis remains the most common cause of the acute abdomen in young adults, and the mainstay of treatment in most centres is an appendectomy. However, treatment for other intra-abdominal inflammatory processes, such as diverticulitis, consists initially of conservative management with antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the role of antibiotics in the management of acute appendicitis and to assess if appendectomy remains the gold standard of care. A literature search using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library identified studies published between 1999 and 2009, and we reviewed all relevant articles. The articles were critiqued using the Public Health Resource Unit (2006) appraisal tools. Our search yielded 41 papers, and we identified a total of 13 papers within the criteria specified. All of these papers, while posing pertinent questions and demonstrating the role of antibiotics as a bridge to surgery, failed to adequately justify their findings that antibiotics could be used as a definitive treatment of acute appendicitis. Appendectomy remains the gold standard of treatment for acute appendicitis based on the current evidence.

  1. Antibiotics versus appendectomy in the management of acute appendicitis: a review of the current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Gerard J.; McWilliams, Billy; Hurreiz, Hisham; Epanomeritakis, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis remains the most common cause of the acute abdomen in young adults, and the mainstay of treatment in most centres is an appendectomy. However, treatment for other intra-abdominal inflammatory processes, such as diverticulitis, consists initially of conservative management with antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the role of antibiotics in the management of acute appendicitis and to assess if appendectomy remains the gold standard of care. Methods A literature search using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library identified studies published between 1999 and 2009, and we reviewed all relevant articles. The articles were critiqued using the Public Health Resource Unit (2006) appraisal tools. Results Our search yielded 41 papers, and we identified a total of 13 papers within the criteria specified. All of these papers, while posing pertinent questions and demonstrating the role of antibiotics as a bridge to surgery, failed to adequately justify their findings that antibiotics could be used as a definitive treatment of acute appendicitis. Conclusion Appendectomy remains the gold standard of treatment for acute appendicitis based on the current evidence. PMID:21651835

  2. [The mixed design in nursing sciences or when a question of research calls for qualitative and quantitative strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgault, Patricia; Gallagher, Frances; Michaud, Cécile; Saint-Cyr-Tribble, Denise

    2010-12-01

    The use of a mixed method research design raises many questions, especially regarding the paradigmatic position. With this paradigm, we may consider the mixed method design as the best way of answering a research question and the latter orients to one of the different subtypes of mixed method design. To illustrate the use of this kind of design, we propose a study such as conducted in nursing sciences. In this article, the challenges raised by the mixed method design, and the place of this type of research in nursing sciences is discussed.

  3. Scholar-Craftsmanship: Question-Type, Epistemology, Culture of Inquiry, and Personality-Type in Dissertation Research Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Thomas P.; Rogers, Katrina S.

    2013-01-01

    "Scholar-Craftsmanship" (SC) is a quadrant methodological framework created to help social science doctoral students construct first-time dissertation research. The framework brackets and predicts how epistemological domains, cultures of inquiries, personality indicators, and research question--types can be correlated in dissertation…

  4. Total antioxidant capacity in children with acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, M; Boleken, M E; Kanmaz, T; Erel, O; Yucesan, S

    2006-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate antioxidant capacity by using a novel automated method in children with acute appendicitis. Blood samples were obtained from consecutive patients with acute appendicitis (appendicitis group, n = 12) and acute abdominal pain due to non surgical disease (non-appendicitis group, n = 11), and from patients with inguinal hernia (healthy group, n = 12) as the control group. At admission, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels of plasma were evaluated in all patients by a method recently developed by Erel. Four other major individual plasma antioxidant components, the levels of total protein, albumin, uric acid and bilirubin, were also evaluated. Total antioxidant capacity in patients with acute appendicitis was statistically compared with the two other groups. While the TAC level in the appendicitis group was significantly greater than in the non-appendicitis group, no significant difference was found in healthy groups (p 0.05, 1.94 +/- 0.38, 1.40 +/- 0.36, and 1.99 +/- 0.35 respectively). Individual components of total antioxidant capacity, i.e. total protein, albumin, uric acid and bilirubin concentrations, were also higher in the patients with acute appendicitis than those of the other two control groups. Our data show that children with acute appendicitis do not have deficient blood plasma antioxidant capacity. These results provide evidence that acute appendicitis results in more induction of antioxidative response than non-surgical diseases.

  5. The computed tomography appearance of recurrent and chronic appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P M; Rhea, J T; Novelline, R A; McCabe, C J

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine computed tomography (CT) appearance of recurrent and chronic appendicitis. In 100 consecutive appendiceal CT examinations of proven appendicitis, 18 patients met criteria for recurrent (multiple discrete episodes) or chronic (continuous symptoms > 3 weeks, pathological findings) appendicitis. CT findings were reviewed. Ten patients had recurrent appendicitis, 3 had chronic appendicitis, 3 had both, and 2 had pathological chronic appendicitis. CT findings in 18 recurrent/chronic cases were identical to 82 acute appendicitis cases, including pericecal stranding (both 100%), dilated (> 6 mm) appendix (88.9% versus 93.9%), apical thickening (66.7% versus 69.5%), adenopathy (66.7% versus 61.0%), appendolith(s) (50% versus 42.7%), arrowhead (27.8% versus 22.0%), abscess (11.1% versus 11.0%), phlegmon (11.1% versus 6.1%), and fluid (5.6% versus 19.5%). CT findings in recurrent and chronic appendicitis are the same as those in acute appendicitis. Appendiceal CT can be beneficial for evaluating patients with suspected recurrent or chronic appendicitis.

  6. Early Uncomplicated Appendicitis-Who Can We Treat Nonoperatively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horattas, Mark C; Horattas, Ileana K; Vasiliou, Elya M

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated nonoperative treatment for mild appendicitis and reviewed selection criteria to be used in introducing this option into clinical practice. A retrospective review of 73 consecutive cases of appendicitis treated by a single surgeon from 2011 to 2013 was completed. Patients who were diagnosed with mild appendicitis meeting the criteria of an APPENDICITIS scoring algorithm proposed in this manuscript were considered for nonoperative management. An additional 17 patients with mild appendicitis were offered and successfully treated nonoperatively between 2014 and 2016 and reviewed. Of these original 73 patients, 37 had moderate to severe appendicitis and directly underwent appendectomy. The remaining patients were diagnosed with mild appendicitis and considered eligible for nonoperative management. Of these, 14 patients were offered nonoperative therapy. Thirteen responded successfully; one patient responded partially, but later opted for surgery. In 2014, this scoring system and preliminary results were shared with the other surgeons in our department. Nonoperative management was then selectively adopted by a few of the surgeons from 2014 to 2016 with another 17 patients (APPENDICITIS score of 0 or 1) being offered and successfully managed nonoperatively. Patients with mild or early appendicitis can be successfully managed nonoperatively. A proposed APPENDICITIS scoring system may provide a helpful mnemonic for successfully selecting patients for this option.

  7. Testing for Questionable Research Practices in a Meta-Analysis: An Example from Experimental Parapsychology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick J Bierman

    Full Text Available We describe a method of quantifying the effect of Questionable Research Practices (QRPs on the results of meta-analyses. As an example we simulated a meta-analysis of a controversial telepathy protocol to assess the extent to which these experimental results could be explained by QRPs. Our simulations used the same numbers of studies and trials as the original meta-analysis and the frequencies with which various QRPs were applied in the simulated experiments were based on surveys of experimental psychologists. Results of both the meta-analysis and simulations were characterized by 4 metrics, two describing the trial and mean experiment hit rates (HR of around 31%, where 25% is expected by chance, one the correlation between sample-size and hit-rate, and one the complete P-value distribution of the database. A genetic algorithm optimized the parameters describing the QRPs, and the fitness of the simulated meta-analysis was defined as the sum of the squares of Z-scores for the 4 metrics. Assuming no anomalous effect a good fit to the empirical meta-analysis was found only by using QRPs with unrealistic parameter-values. Restricting the parameter space to ranges observed in studies of QRP occurrence, under the untested assumption that parapsychologists use comparable QRPs, the fit to the published Ganzfeld meta-analysis with no anomalous effect was poor. We allowed for a real anomalous effect, be it unidentified QRPs or a paranormal effect, where the HR ranged from 25% (chance to 31%. With an anomalous HR of 27% the fitness became F = 1.8 (p = 0.47 where F = 0 is a perfect fit. We conclude that the very significant probability cited by the Ganzfeld meta-analysis is likely inflated by QRPs, though results are still significant (p = 0.003 with QRPs. Our study demonstrates that quantitative simulations of QRPs can assess their impact. Since meta-analyses in general might be polluted by QRPs, this method has wide applicability outside the domain of

  8. Testing for Questionable Research Practices in a Meta-Analysis: An Example from Experimental Parapsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Dick J; Spottiswoode, James P; Bijl, Aron

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method of quantifying the effect of Questionable Research Practices (QRPs) on the results of meta-analyses. As an example we simulated a meta-analysis of a controversial telepathy protocol to assess the extent to which these experimental results could be explained by QRPs. Our simulations used the same numbers of studies and trials as the original meta-analysis and the frequencies with which various QRPs were applied in the simulated experiments were based on surveys of experimental psychologists. Results of both the meta-analysis and simulations were characterized by 4 metrics, two describing the trial and mean experiment hit rates (HR) of around 31%, where 25% is expected by chance, one the correlation between sample-size and hit-rate, and one the complete P-value distribution of the database. A genetic algorithm optimized the parameters describing the QRPs, and the fitness of the simulated meta-analysis was defined as the sum of the squares of Z-scores for the 4 metrics. Assuming no anomalous effect a good fit to the empirical meta-analysis was found only by using QRPs with unrealistic parameter-values. Restricting the parameter space to ranges observed in studies of QRP occurrence, under the untested assumption that parapsychologists use comparable QRPs, the fit to the published Ganzfeld meta-analysis with no anomalous effect was poor. We allowed for a real anomalous effect, be it unidentified QRPs or a paranormal effect, where the HR ranged from 25% (chance) to 31%. With an anomalous HR of 27% the fitness became F = 1.8 (p = 0.47 where F = 0 is a perfect fit). We conclude that the very significant probability cited by the Ganzfeld meta-analysis is likely inflated by QRPs, though results are still significant (p = 0.003) with QRPs. Our study demonstrates that quantitative simulations of QRPs can assess their impact. Since meta-analyses in general might be polluted by QRPs, this method has wide applicability outside the domain of experimental

  9. Exploring Pre-Service Science Teacher Methods and Strategies for the Driving Questions in Research Inquiry: From Consulting an Instructor to Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Miraç

    2016-01-01

    An important stage in any research inquiry is the development of research questions that need to be answered. The strategies to develop research questions should be defined and described, but few studies have considered this process in greater detail. This study explores pre-service science teachers' research questions and the strategies they can…

  10. Young Children and E-Reading: Research to Date and Questions for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth B.; Warschauer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The practice of reading is rapidly moving from print to screen. Young children are not immune from this trend; indeed, many children's principal literacy experiences occur using iPads and other handheld digital devices. This transition raises important questions about how the emergence and development of literacy might change in these new…

  11. Clinical approach to a child with abdominal pain who might have appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Appendicitis can usually be diagnosed on completion of a history and physical examination (abdominal pain, vomiting, right lower quadrant tenderness and guarding), although laboratory evaluation with a urinalysis and white blood cell count can be of assistance. In the few cases where doubt remains, plain films of the chest and abdomen can be helpful. Whether and when further imaging is indicated remains controversial. We reviewed reports of studies published since 2003 in which the sensitivity and specificity of CT and sonography for diagnosing appendicitis were determined. Sonography had an average sensitivity of 87.1% and an average specificity of 89.2% in the nine studies reported during that period. The average sensitivity of CT was 90.8% in 11 studies during that period, and there was an average specificity of 94.2% in 10 studies. We also looked at data from 299 patients who underwent appendectomies at our hospital. Of the appendices removed, only 10.7% did not have appendicitis. In many cases, CT or US imaging data were available in the form of reports or images or both from outside institutions. CT and US images were also available from our institution when the diagnosis was in question. This is how patients present in the real world - with studies that might not be the best, might not have been indicated, and might not have images available for another interpretation. Among patients operated on with neither CT nor US images, 10.9% did not have appendicitis. Among those in whom US imaging had been performed, 11.1% were negative for appendicitis, and among those in whom CT had been performed, 9.7% were negative. Although these studies were necessary because they were performed in patients whose diagnosis was the most difficult, it is in every patient's best interest to have a thorough examination by a surgeon prior to having a CT scan. (orig.)

  12. Ultrasound Accuracy in Diagnosing Appendicitis in Obese Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Bryan E; Camelo, Monica; Nouri, Sarvenaz; Kriger, Diego; Ludi, Daniel; Nguyen, Henry

    2017-10-01

    The use of ultrasound to diagnose appendicitis in pediatric patients has been growing with the improvement of ultrasound technology and operator skills, but its utility in the increasingly obese pediatric population has not been thoroughly investigated. A retrospective review of all pediatric (≤18 years old) patients with appendicitis who were admitted at a single hospital from 2014 to 2016 was conducted. Patients were stratified into body mass index (BMI) percentile categories based on the centers for disease control guidelines. Comparisons were then made. There were 231 patients with an average BMI percentile of 72.6; 99 (42.9%) who had an ultrasound, of which 54 (54.5%) were positive for acute appendicitis, whereas 43 (43.4%) were nondiagnostic. In patients who had a nondiagnostic ultrasound, 37 had a CT demonstrating acute appendicitis. These were compared with 123 patients who had CT alone demonstrating acute appendicitis. The CT-only group was older (12 vs 9, P appendicitis.

  13. The sonographic features of neonatal appendicitis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Shu-Yu; Guo, Yi-Yi; Mu, Jian-Feng; Yan, Chao-Ying

    2017-11-01

    Neonatal appendicitis is extremely rare, and preoperative diagnosis is challenging. This study aimed to investigate the utility of ultrasound for the diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis. Four cases of neonatal appendicitis were included in this case series. One was a female infant and the other 3 were male infants; they were aged from 10 to 17 days. Neonatal appendicitis. Four newborns in our hospital were diagnosed with neonatal appendicitis by abdominal ultrasound. Their sonographic features were summarized and compared with surgical and pathological findings. In these infants, abdominal ultrasound demonstrated ileocecal bowel dilatation, intestinal and bowel wall thickening, and localized encapsulated effusion in the right lower quadrant and the abscess area, which was assumed to surround the appendix. Ultrasound is helpful for the diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis.

  14. Can common serum biomarkers predict complicated appendicitis in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Augusto; Teague, Warwick J; Clarke, Simon A; Haddad, Munther J; Khurana, Sanjeev; Tsang, Thomas; Nataraja, Ramesh M

    2017-07-01

    As appendicitis in children can be managed differently according to the severity of the disease, we investigated whether commonly used serum biomarkers on admission could distinguish between simple and complicated appendicitis. Admission white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil (NEU), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were analysed by ROC curve, and Kruskal-Wallis and contingency tests. Patients were divided according to age and histology [normal appendix (NA), simple appendicitis (SA), complicated appendicitis (CA)]. Of 1197 children (NA = 186, SA = 685, CA = 326), 7% were 40 mg/L in 58% CA and 37% SA (p 15 × 10 9 /L in 58% CA and 43% SA (p appendicitis in children older than 5 years of age. Early distinction of appendicitis severity using these tests may guide caregivers in the preoperative decision-making process.

  15. Primary epiploic appendicitis and echography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mederos Curbelo, Orestes Noel; Da Costa Fernandez, Jose Manuel; Jequin Savariego, Esther; Ramos Hernandez, Ricardo Ulises

    2010-01-01

    This is the case of a woman aged 55 presenting with localized acute abdominal pain in right inferior quadrant of 12 hours of course, leukocytosis and peritoneal reaction. The abdominal echography findings showed a supposed epiploitis but the pain intensity and persistence determined the surgical intervention. Epiploic acute appendicitis is a infrequent affection that must to be suspected in case of acute pain in inferior abdominal quadrants and imaging studies are essential for preoperative diagnosis. (author)

  16. Iliopsoas myositis mimicking appendicitis: MRI diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysoki, M.G. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital and Hahnemann University, 3300 Henry Avenue, Philadelphia PA 19129 (United States); Angeid-Backman, E. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital and Hahnemann University, 3300 Henry Avenue, Philadelphia PA 19129 (United States); Izes, B.A. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital and Hahnemann University, 3300 Henry Avenue, Philadelphia PA 19129 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Myositis of the truncal muscles can closely mimic acute appendicitis. Myositis is the early stage of muscular infection. It is characterized by diffuse muscular pain and swelling without a distinct mass. Early diagnosis of myositis improves the outcome and surgical debridement is usually avoided. Pyomyositis, the advanced stage of the disease, can be diagnosed by MRI examination. We present a case of early bacterial myositis that was diagnosed by MRI. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  17. Iliopsoas myositis mimicking appendicitis: MRI diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysoki, M.G.; Angeid-Backman, E.; Izes, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Myositis of the truncal muscles can closely mimic acute appendicitis. Myositis is the early stage of muscular infection. It is characterized by diffuse muscular pain and swelling without a distinct mass. Early diagnosis of myositis improves the outcome and surgical debridement is usually avoided. Pyomyositis, the advanced stage of the disease, can be diagnosed by MRI examination. We present a case of early bacterial myositis that was diagnosed by MRI. (orig.). With 3 figs

  18. Appendicitis in Pregnancy: Presentation, Management and Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulhossein Davoodabadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnancy is difficult. Delay operation, increase complications. Objectives This study focused on early operation on base of careful history, precise physical examination, and rational close observation and evaluates its results with conventional investigation in pregnant women suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and Methods A cross sectional study in100 pregnant women and 100 aged matched non pregnant women underwent appendectomy during Sep 2011 - Dec 2014. The data were analyzed by chi-square test through SPSS 16.0. Results Age 16 - 37 years, mean age in pregnant women and no pregnant women were24.75 ± 4.4 and 27.56 ± 6.53 years (P > 0.05, respectively. 20 - 25 years age group, were more frequent = 44%. 70% patients were gravid 1, mean hospital stay in pregnant women, and non-pregnant women were 48 ± 6 and 85.2 ± 43.19 hours (P value < 0.001. respectively. acute appendicitis was confirmed histological in non-pregnant was 72%, but In pregnant women 62%, most cases were in the third Trimester 66% (n = 41. Peri umbilical pain, with migration to the right lower quadrant, was in 75% of patients. Right-lower-quadrant pain was the most common presenting symptom. Diagnosis (62% was made on base care full history and precise physical examination and close observation of 12 ± 8 hours. there were no maternal and fetal complications related to all of the appendectomies during the all trimester up to delivery period. Conclusions There are no diagnostic laboratory findings in acute appendicitis during pregnancy. Careful history and physical examination and close observation of 12 ± 8 hours are sufficient for surgery decision making. In spite of high negative appendectomy since it has no Surgical and obstetric complication, early Appendectomy without aggressive investigation recommend.

  19. Gallbladder Volvulus Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Bauman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We encountered a case of gallbladder volvulus in an 88-year-old thin female in which the initial presentation was more consistent with that of acute appendicitis. After complete work-up, including physical exam, lab work, and computed tomography, the definite diagnosis of gallbladder volvulus was not made until intraoperative visualization was obtained. Gallbladder volvulus is a rare but serious condition, which requires a high clinical suspicion so prompt surgical intervention can be undertaken.

  20. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Current criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Fernandez, Zenen

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of present paper was to identify some features related to preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis, according the selected variables, as well as to establish comparisons with findings from other authors. METHODS: We made a prospective, descriptive and observational study of 560 patients operated on and discharged with the histopathology diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients were seen in General Surgery Service of the 'Saturnino Lora' Teaching Provincial Hospital of Santiago de Cuba during year 2006. RESULTS: Among the more significant results were the predominance of young males with a mean age of 25,2 years, and the preponderance of the clinical diagnosis. Mean time of preoperative course was greater in men, and there was a predominance of gangrenous and perforated varieties, although the primacy was for the suppurative appendicitis. In the deceased ones the more severe pathologic histology ways were detected, and these were elderlies presenting with atypical clinical manifestations of disease. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical method has nowadays is of capital significance, since thorough it is possible early to diagnose this so common urgency, and to reduce the preoperative course time, whose length is cause of a unnecessary morbidity and mortality. (author)

  1. Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-05-01

    Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this booklet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are debed. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns about potential health effects of power lines. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this booklet.

  2. Electric Power Lines : Questions and Answers on Research into Health Effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-11-01

    Most people know that electric power lines, like the wiring in our homes, can cause serious electric shocks if we`re not careful. Many people also want to know whether the electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by power lines and other electrical devices cause health effects. The purpose of this pamphlet is to answer some common questions that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) receives about the possible effects of power lines on health. (BPA is the Pacific Northwest`s Federal electric power marketing agency.) First, some basic electrical terms are defined, and electric and magnetic fields are described. Next, answers are given to several questions about recent scientific studies. We then describe how BPA is addressing public concerns raised by these studies. Some important information about electrical safety follows. The last section tells you how to obtain more detailed information about the health and safety issues summarized in this pamphlet.

  3. Antibiotika som primær behandling af appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hupfeld, Line; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis has traditionally been treated surgically. Conservative approach with antibiotic treatment has been suggested as an alternative to the surgical procedure. The available studies on surgery versus antibiotics may indicate the safe use of conservative treatment for uncomplicated...... appendicitis, but the available studies are typically of low quality. Thus, further studies are needed to clarify the role of conservative treatment, and in the meantime appendectomy remains the standard treatment for acute appendicitis....

  4. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Michael M.; Brian, James M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B.

    2014-01-01

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed. (orig.)

  5. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Brian, James M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed. (orig.)

  6. "While we are questioning we are progressing"—A Reply to the Ancestors of Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Götsch

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available REICHERTZ' reflections on the development of qualitative research during the Berlin Meeting on Qualitative Research Methods in 2009 (http://www.berliner-methodentreffen.de/ have led to the following central questions: Are we facing the end of critical social research? Is this possible end correlated with an uncritical mass of young scientists? In their reply to the ancestors of qualitative research the present authors advocate the abolition of a bipolar thinking about the issues and support a hybrid turn, standing the test through a fundamentally open-minded, reflexive, and deconstructive researcher`s attitude. Using the example of ethnography and gender studies we show that there are indeed opportunities for the future of critical social research: This approach would take place beyond the slaves of market-controlled contract research and ahead of the characters of the eternal hall of fame of social research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0903306

  7. On the question of leadership: the postwar Department of Education and Research at the AIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avigail Sachs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1946 the American Institute of Architects established a Department of Education and Research (E&R, under architect Walter A. Taylor. The name given the new department signaled the importance of research for architecture, and the AIA’s intended leadership role in promoting research-based architectural practice. E&R developed research policies under an advisory board and in 1959 convened a conference on research for architecture, funded by the National Science Foundation. Butthe AIA never assumed full leadership in research for architecture: The scope of the project was beyond the means of either academia or the profession, and postwar research policies remained decentralized. Although E&R played a role in directing applied research, academic institutions provedmore able to assume leadership of basic research. This history illustrates the complexity of leadership in a field that bridges academia and professional practice, as well as the importance of multiple leadership roles.

  8. Randomized clinical trial of Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score-based management of patients with suspected appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M; Kolodziej, B; Andersson, R E

    2017-10-01

    The role of imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis is controversial. This prospective interventional study and nested randomized trial analysed the impact of implementing a risk stratification algorithm based on the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score, and compared routine imaging with selective imaging after clinical reassessment. Patients presenting with suspicion of appendicitis between September 2009 and January 2012 from age 10 years were included at 21 emergency surgical centres and from age 5 years at three university paediatric centres. Registration of clinical characteristics, treatments and outcomes started during the baseline period. The AIR score-based algorithm was implemented during the intervention period. Intermediate-risk patients were randomized to routine imaging or selective imaging after clinical reassessment. The baseline period included 1152 patients, and the intervention period 2639, of whom 1068 intermediate-risk patients were randomized. In low-risk patients, use of the AIR score-based algorithm resulted in less imaging (19·2 versus 34·5 per cent; P appendicitis (6·8 versus 9·7 per cent; P = 0·034). Intermediate-risk patients randomized to the imaging and observation groups had the same proportion of negative appendicectomies (6·4 versus 6·7 per cent respectively; P = 0·884), number of admissions, number of perforations and length of hospital stay, but routine imaging was associated with an increased proportion of patients treated for appendicitis (53·4 versus 46·3 per cent; P = 0·020). AIR score-based risk classification can safely reduce the use of diagnostic imaging and hospital admissions in patients with suspicion of appendicitis. Registration number: NCT00971438 ( http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Role of CT scan in diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, O.A.; Khasawneh, M.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the spiral-CT in patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis. A total of 124 patients referred for CT scan with suspected appendicitis between January 2005 and October 2006 were assessed for the appendiceal size and the presence of signs of appendicitis. The findings were correlated with surgical histopathology. CT scan had a sensitivity of 95 percent and a specifity of 93 percent and an overall accuracy of 92 percent. The use of spiral CT in patients with equivocal clinical presentation suspected of having acute appendicitis can lead to significant improvement in the preoperative diagnosis. (author)

  10. Utility of Immature Granulocyte Percentage in Pediatric Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Eleanor K.; Griffin, Russell L.; Mortellaro, Vincent; Beierle, Elizabeth A.; Harmon, Carroll M.; Chen, Mike K.; Russell, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of abdominal surgery in children. Adjuncts are utilized to help clinicians predict acute or perforated appendicitis, which may affect treatment decisions. Automated hematologic analyzers can perform more accurate automated differentials including immature granulocyte percentages (IG%). Elevated IG% has demonstrated improved accuracy for predicting sepsis in the neonatal population than traditional immature to total neutrophil count (I/T) ratios. We intended to assess the additional discriminatory ability of IG% to traditionally assessed parameters in the differentiation between acute and perforated appendicitis. Materials and Methods We identified all patients with appendicitis from July 2012 to June 2013 by ICD-9 code. Charts were reviewed for relevant demographic, clinical, and outcome data, which were compared between acute and perforated appendicitis groups using Fischer’s exact and t-test for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. We utilized an adjusted logistic regression model utilizing clinical lab values to predict the odds of perforated appendicitis. Results 251 patients were included in the analysis. Those with perforated appendicitis had a higher white blood cell (WBC) count (p=0.0063), C-reactive protein (CRP) (pappendicitis. The c-statistic of the final model was 0.70, suggesting fair discriminatory ability in predicting perforated appendicitis. Conclusions IG% did not provide any additional benefit to elevated CRP and presence of left shift in the differentiation between acute and perforated appendicitis. PMID:24793450

  11. What Makes a Scientific Research Question Worth Investigating? Students' Epistemic Criteria and Considerations of Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Eric Bruckner

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation introduces the construct of "worthwhileness" as an important aspect of students' "practical" epistemologies of science (Sandoval, 2005). Specifically, it examines how students conceptualize what makes a scientific research question worthwhile, through a close analysis of the criteria they use for…

  12. Association between framing of the research question using the PICOT format and reporting quality of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabane Lehana

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts recommend formulating a structured research question to guide the research design. However, the basis for this recommendation has not been formally evaluated. The aim of this study was to examine if a structured research question using the PICOT (Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome, Time-frame format is associated with a better reporting quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Methods We evaluated 89 RCTs reports published in three endocrinology journals in 2005 and 2006, the quality of reporting of which was assessed in a previous study. We examined whether the reports stated each of the five elements of a structured research question: population, intervention, comparator, outcome and time-frame. A PICOT score was created with a possible score between 0 and 5. Outcomes were: 1 a 14-point overall reporting quality score (OQS based on the Consolidated Standards for Reporting Trials; and 2 a 3-point key score (KS, based on allocation concealment, blinding and use of intention-to-treat analysis. We conducted multivariable regression analyses using generalized estimating equations to determine if a higher PICOT score or the use of a structured research question were independently associated with a better reporting quality. Journal of publication, funding source and sample size were identified as factors associated with OQS in our previous report on this dataset, and therefore included in the model. Results A higher PICOT score was independently associated with OQS (incidence rate ratio (IRR = 1.021, 95% CI: 1.012 to 1.029 and KS (IRR = 1.142, 95% CI: 1.079 to 1.210. A structured research question was present in 33.7% of the reports and it was associated with a better OQS (IRR = 1.095, 95% CI 1.059-1.132 and KS (IRR = 1.530, 95% CI 1.311-1.786. Conclusions Better framing of the research question using the PICOT format is independently associated with better overall reporting quality - although the effect

  13. Beyond "on" or "with": Questioning Power Dynamics and Knowledge Production in "Child-Oriented" Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunleth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    By taking a reflexive approach to research methodology, this article contributes to discussions on power dynamics and knowledge production in the social studies of children. The author describes and analyzes three research methods that she used with children--drawing, child-led tape-recording and focus group discussions. These methods were carried…

  14. Theory and History, Questions and Methodology: Current and Future Issues in Research into ICT in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Anne; Jones, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Serious criticisms of research in information and communications technology (ICT) in education have been published recently in both the UK and the USA. This paper addresses several issues raised in these commentaries: a lack of sound theoretical underpinnings to our research, persistent neglect of the history of our sub-discipline, the choice of…

  15. Applications of Adaptive Quantum Control to Research Questions in Solar Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damrauer, Niels [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This award supported a broad research effort at the University of Colorado at Boulder comprising synthesis, applications of computational chemistry, development of theory, exploration of material properties, and advancement of spectroscopic tools including femtosecond pulse shaping techniques. It funded six graduate students and two postdoctoral researchers.

  16. A Return to the Gold Standard? Questioning the Future of Narrative Construction as Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Narrative construction is an approach to social research in which data are configured into any of a variety of diachronic, or storied, formats. Having recently gained popularity, this approach is now in danger of marginalization (along with other qualitative and quantitative forms of social research) as a result of politically charged attempts to…

  17. Reactions to Participating in Dating Violence Research: Are Our Questions Distressing Participants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Cornelius, Tara L.; Bell, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased research focus on dating violence, producing important information for reducing these violent relationships. Yet Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are often hesitant to approve research on dating violence, citing emotional distress of participants as a possible risk of participation. However, no known…

  18. Security and Health Research Databases: The Stakeholders and Questions to Be Addressed

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Health research database security issues abound. Issues include subject confidentiality, data ownership, data integrity and data accessibility. There are also various stakeholders in database security. Each of these stakeholders has a different set of concerns and responsibilities when dealing with security issues. There is an obvious need for training in security issues, so that these issues may be addressed and health research will move on without added obstacles based on misunderstanding s...

  19. Security and health research databases: the stakeholders and questions to be addressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Health research database security issues abound. Issues include subject confidentiality, data ownership, data integrity and data accessibility. There are also various stakeholders in database security. Each of these stakeholders has a different set of concerns and responsibilities when dealing with security issues. There is an obvious need for training in security issues, so that these issues may be addressed and health research will move on without added obstacles based on misunderstanding security methods and technologies.

  20. Expanding the Frontiers of Population Nutrition Research: New Questions, New Methods, and New Approaches12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, David L.; Porter, Christine M.; Aarons, Gregory A.; Wuehler, Sara E.; Neufeld, Lynnette M.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition research, ranging from molecular to population levels and all points along this spectrum, is exploring new frontiers as new technologies and societal changes create new possibilities and demands. This paper defines a set of frontiers at the population level that are being created by the increased societal recognition of the importance of nutrition; its connection to urgent health, social, and environmental problems; and the need for effective and sustainable solutions at the population level. The frontiers are defined in terms of why, what, who, and how we study at the population level and the disciplinary foundations for that research. The paper provides illustrations of research along some of these frontiers, an overarching framework for population nutrition research, and access to some of the literature from outside of nutrition that can enhance the intellectual coherence, practical utility, and societal benefit of population nutrition research. The frontiers defined in this paper build on earlier forward-looking efforts by the American Society for Nutrition and extend these efforts in significant ways. The American Society for Nutrition and its members can play pivotal roles in advancing these frontiers by addressing a number of well-recognized challenges associated with transdisciplinary and engaged research. PMID:23319128

  1. Risk stratification by the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score to guide decision-making in patients with suspected appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A J; Mason, S E; Arunakirinathan, M; Reissis, Y; Kinross, J M; Smith, J J

    2015-04-01

    Current management of suspected appendicitis is hampered by the overadmission of patients with non-specific abdominal pain and a significant negative exploration rate. The potential benefits of risk stratification by the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score to guide clinical decision-making were assessed. During this 50-week prospective observational study at one institution, the AIR score was calculated for all patients admitted with suspected appendicitis. Appendicitis was diagnosed by histological examination, and patients were classified as having non-appendicitis pain if histological findings were negative or surgery was not performed. The diagnostic performance of the AIR score and the potential for risk stratification to reduce admissions, optimize imaging and prevent unnecessary explorations were quantified. A total of 464 patients were included, of whom 210 (63·3 per cent) with non-appendicitis pain were correctly classified as low risk. However, 13 low-risk patients had appendicitis. Low-risk patients accounted for 48·1 per cent of admissions (223 of 464), 57 per cent of negative explorations (48 of 84) and 50·7 per cent of imaging requests (149 of 294). An AIR score of 5 or more (intermediate and high risk) had high sensitivity for all severities of appendicitis (90 per cent) and also for advanced appendicitis (98 per cent). An AIR score of 9 or more (high risk) was very specific (97 per cent) for appendicitis, and the majority of patients with appendicitis in the high-risk group (21 of 30, 70 per cent) had perforation or gangrene. Ultrasound imaging could not exclude appendicitis in low-risk patients (negative likelihood ratio (LR) 1·0) but could rule-in the diagnosis in intermediate-risk patients (positive LR 10·2). CT could exclude appendicitis in low-risk patients (negative LR 0·0) and rule-in appendicitis in the intermediate group (positive LR 10·9). Risk stratification of patients with suspected appendicitis by the AIR score could

  2. Acute Appendicitis in Children in Kumasi, Ghana:Macroscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background A lot has been written about acute appendicitis in children in the developed countries but very little is written about this condition among children in the sub Saharan region. It used to be said that acute appendicitis is rare in Africa but this is no longer the case. We are unable to find, in the literature, any reference ...

  3. Case Report: Perforated appendicitis in a septuagenarian | Sanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appendicitis in the elderly is becoming an increasingly frequent clinical encounter due to the increased life expectancy in the human race over the last half-century. Appendicitis in this age group has, therefore, become relatively more common with an atypical presentation that incurs delay in diagnosis with attendant ...

  4. Acute appendicitis in situs inversus- a case report | Shugaba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was a case of acute appendicitis in a patient with situs inversus found at Surgery for twisted left ovarian cyst in a 26 year old married woman. The case was interesting because the diagnosis of acute appendicitis as apposed to twisted left ovarian cyst was made intraoperatively when it was found in the left iliac fossa ...

  5. Treatment of acute appendicitis with one-port transumbilical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Laparoscopic appendectomy is a feasible and safe alternative to open appendectomy for uncomplicated appendicitis. In the past decade several laparoscopic procedures have been described using one or more ports. We report our experience in treating acute appendicitis with one-port transumbilical ...

  6. A paratubal cyst associated with flegmonous appendicitis: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These masses have been reported in all age groups, beginning from the premenarchial period up to menopause, and are mostly benign. A 14-year-old girl with flegmonous appendicitis diagnosed and treated during the management of PTC is presented. This report shows that PTC and flegmonous appendicitis can be seen ...

  7. Septic Mesenteric Venous Thrombophlebitis: A Rare Complication of Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Kykalos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis represents a very rare complication of acute appendicitis. Based on the findings of a 45-year-old patient with mesenteric venous thrombophlebitis due to acute appendicitis, we herein describe the diagnostic difficulties and therapeutic options in this uncommon disease. The treatment in our case consisted of simple appendectomy and perioperative anticoagulation therapy.

  8. Selective use of diagnostic laparoscopy in patients with suspected appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, W. T.; Bijnen, A. B.; van Eerten, P. V.; de Ruiter, P.; Gouma, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnostic laparoscopy has been introduced as a new diagnostic tool for patients with acute appendicitis. We performed diagnostic laparoscopy when the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis was in doubt. The aims of this study were to evaluate this strategy and to analyze the efficacy of

  9. Stratified computed tomography findings improve diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geon; Lee, Sang Chul; Choi, Byung-Jo; Kim, Say-June

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients with symptoms and signs of appendicitis, but without confirmative computed tomography (CT) findings. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the database of 224 patients who had been operated on for the suspicion of appendicitis, but whose CT findings were negative or equivocal for appendicitis. The patient population was divided into two groups: a pathologically proven appendicitis group (n = 177) and a non-appendicitis group (n = 47). The CT images of these patients were re-evaluated according to the characteristic CT features as described in the literature. The re-evaluations and baseline characteristics of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: The two groups showed significant differences with respect to appendiceal diameter, and the presence of periappendiceal fat stranding and intraluminal air in the appendix. A larger proportion of patients in the appendicitis group showed distended appendices larger than 6.0 mm (66.3% vs 37.0%; P appendicitis group. Furthermore, the presence of two or more of these factors increased the odds ratio to 6.8 times higher than baseline (95%CI: 3.013-15.454; P appendicitis with equivocal CT findings. PMID:25320531

  10. Acute Appendicitis in Port Harcourt, Nigeria | Mangete | Orient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute Appendicitis was also found to be commoner in the better educated social classes. The duration of hospitalization and postoperative complications were affected by late presentation to surgery but not by the status of the operating surgeon. Conclusion: Acute appendicitis was diagnosed more often in females than in ...

  11. Acute appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. Coincidence or causality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iván Latorre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is a common disease in clinical practice; some well-defined causes include luminal obstruction by fecoliths, lymphoid hyperplasia, foreign bodies and intestinal parasites. Closed abdominal trauma has been associated as an etiological factor, although, their causal relationship is still unclear. This paper presents the case of a patient with appendicitis after a closed abdominal trauma.

  12. Persistent Offenders in the North West of England, 1880-1940: Some Critical Research Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Cox, Steve Farrall and Barry Godfrey

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the concept of the persistent offender as a group within society, and the presumed impact of that discrete group upon society via a case study of offending in Crewe between 1880 and 1940. The findings of persistent offending in Crewe challenge the assumptions and prejudices of the period, about the links between unemployment and crime and the extent to which crime was an enduring ‘career’. There were no ‘hardened’ persistent offenders in the sample of the type envisaged by contemporary comment, though the role of drink in offending was sustained; and there was no clear ‘type’ of offender either. Examination of the life histories of a selection of offenders is shown to raise a number of interdisciplinary questions, challenging the assumptions of criminologists and legal scholars in relation to the role of legislation in the management of criminality, including the concept (of interest also to historians that reformation of the criminal was more achievable in the past than it is in the over-regulated present.

  13. Validity of samul's paediatric appendicitis score (pas) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Butt, M. Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To validate the paediatric appendicitis score for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children using histopathology as a gold standard. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital (MH) and Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Rawalpindi, Pakistan from Dec 2009 to Jul 2010. Patients and Methods: Eighty five children 1-7year old who came to our tertiary surgical department with the chief complaint of abdominal pain of less than 7 days duration were included in the study. Paediatric appendicitis score (PAS) components including fever > 380 C, anorexia, nausea/vomiting, cough/percussion/hopping tenderness, right-lower-quadrant tenderness, migration of pain, leukocytosis > 10,000 (109/1) and polymorphonuclear - neutrophilia > 7500 (109/1) were assessed and recorded on admission, but the sum was not calculated until later and the score did not play any role in the management of the patient. The diagnosis of appendicitis was made by the trainees and consultants clinically and with the aid of routine sonography of abdomen. After appendicetomies, resected specimens were sent for histopathological examination. Pre-operative PAS, histopathology report of resected appendix were endorsed on patient's performa. A two by two table was used to determine sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and diagnostic efficacy of PAS. Results: Sensitivity of PAS was 92.16%, specificity 88.23%, positive predictive value 92.16%, negative predictive value 88.23% and the diagnostic efficacy 90.59%. Conclusion: PAS is a highly sensitive test with fair degree of specificity in diagnosing acute appendicitis in children and its routine usage may improve the diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  14. Spontaneous splenic rupture and Anisakis appendicitis presenting as abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Joaquín

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anisakidosis, human infection with nematodes of the family Anisakidae, is caused most commonly by Anisakis simplex. Acquired by the consumption of raw or undercooked marine fish or squid, anisakidosis occurs where such dietary customs are practiced, including Japan, the coastal regions of Europe and the United States. Rupture of the spleen is a relatively common complication of trauma and many systemic disorders affecting the reticuloendothelial system, including infections and neoplasias. A rare subtype of rupture occurring spontaneously and arising from a normal spleen has been recognized as a distinct clinicopathologic entity. Herein we discuss the case of a woman who presented to our institution with appendicitis secondary to Anisakis and spontaneous spleen rupture. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with hemorrhagic shock and abdominal pain and was subsequently found to have spontaneous spleen rupture and appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex. She underwent open surgical resection of the splenic rupture and the appendicitis without any significant postoperative complications. Histopathologic examination revealed appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex and splenic rupture of undetermined etiology. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first of a woman with the diagnosis of spontaneous spleen rupture and appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex. Digestive anisakiasis may present as an acute abdomen. Emergency physicians should know and consider this diagnosis in patients with ileitis or colitis, especially if an antecedent of raw or undercooked fish ingestion is present. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen is an extremely rare event. Increased awareness of this condition will enhance early diagnosis and effective treatment. Further research is required to identify the possible risk factors associated with spontaneous rupture of the spleen.

  15. Acute appendicitis in a premature baby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beluffi, Giampiero; Alberici, Elisa

    2002-01-01

    A case of acute appendicitis in a premature baby in whom diagnosis was suggested on plain films of the abdomen is presented. In this baby air in a hollow viscus suspected of being an enlarged appendix was the clue to diagnosis. The diagnostic dilemma of this rare and life-threatening condition in premature babies and newborns is underlined. The relevance of different imaging modalities and of different findings in this age group is discussed. Awareness of this rare condition and possible differential diagnosis in newborns and premature babies is stressed. (orig.)

  16. Counter-Stereotypes and Images: An Exploratory Research and Some Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Messabel, Christine; Ferrière, Séverine; Martinez, Frederic; Devif, Julie; Reeb, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of the construction and perpetuation of gender stereotypes are classic research subjects in social psychology and in the field of educational guidelines in France. The most recent government decree aims to counter stereotypes in schools, by exposing pupils to counter-stereotypes. This study examines the effects of activating…

  17. Children's Media Use and Sleep Problems: Issues and Unanswered Questions. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Frederick J.

    2008-01-01

    Research shows that most children and adolescents do not get enough high-quality sleep, and that their sleep times appear to have declined over the last two decades. Coinciding with this trend has been the rise in popularity of new media forms including the Internet, video games, cell phones and DVDs. Because of the immediacy and interactivity of…

  18. Garbage in, Garbage out? Questioning Key Variable Face Validity in Contemporary Quantitative Crowdfunding Research

    OpenAIRE

    Grundy, David; Sloan, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Current Crowdfunding research, usually firmly rooted in quantitative analysis of backing progress towards a set funding goal, completely misses key business issues and makes substantial assumptions regarding the definition of success which are starkly naive and lacking in a understanding of how these systems are gamed by entrepreneurs to maximise both their commercial exposure and raised funds.

  19. Representing Refugee Youth in Qualitative Research: Questions of Ethics, Language and Authenticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensson Dávila, Liv

    2014-01-01

    This article speaks conceptually and methodologically about the ethics and politics of doing research with newcomer refugee youth and issues of representation. Feminist poststructuralist paradigms across a variety of fields have critically examined notions of experience, agency, and identity to in order to encompass more fluid understandings of…

  20. Unusual computed tomography findings and complications in acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio, Glaucia Andrade e Silva; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe and illustrate unusual computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with acute appendicitis. We reviewed the charts of 200 patients with clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis who were submitted to abdominal CT before surgery. Patients with unusual presentation or complications were selected for illustrating the main CT findings. Unusual complications of acute appendicitis were related to anomalous position of the appendix, contiguity to intraperitoneal organs such as the liver, gall bladder, annexes and the bladder and continuous use of anti inflammatory or antibiotics during the diagnostic process. We concluded that CT is a useful diagnostic tool in patients with complicated or unusual presentation acute appendicitis. The first step towards diagnosis in these cases i to have in mind the hypothesis of appendicitis in patients with acute abdominal pain. (author)

  1. Complications of acute appendicitis: a review of 120 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, I.; Bhatti, Y.; Abro, H.

    2009-01-01

    To find out the frequency of complications of acute appendicitis. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at surgical unit-I and III, Chandka Medical College Hospital, Larkana. Case records of patients who were admitted with complications of appendicitis from June 2004 to May 2007 were examined and data analysed. Most common complications of appendicitis were appendicular mass (38.3%) followed by appendicular perforation and peritonitis (37.5%), appendicular abscess (10%), gangrene of appendix (11.6%) and intestinal obstruction (2.5%). Majority (66.6 %) of the cases were operated while 33:3% were treated by conservative measures. Appendicular mass and perforation were the main complications of untreated acute appendicitis. Complications of appendicitis usually result due to delay in diagnosis and treatment. (author)

  2. No Circadian Variation in Surgeons' Ability to Diagnose Acute Appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Bech; Amirian, Ilda; Kehlet Watt, Sara

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if there were circadian variations in surgeons' ability to diagnose acute appendicitis. DESIGN: Retrospective database study of all patients admitted to an acute surgical procedure under the potential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in a 4-year period. The day was divided...... patients were included. There were no age limitations or selection in sex. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the ability to diagnose appendicitis in day-evening hours vs night hours (p = 0.391), nor was any significant difference found on weekdays (Monday-Thursday) vs weekends (Friday...... of imaging had no effect on the ability to diagnose appendicitis. Male sex showed a higher probability of the diagnosis being appendicitis compared with other or no pathology (odds ratio: 3.094; p

  3. Ultrasound for Appendicitis: Performance and Integration with Clinical Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfvenberg, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the performance of ultrasound in pediatric appendicitis and the integration of US with the pediatric appendicitis score (PAS) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Method. An institution-based, retrospective study of children who underwent abdominal US for suspected appendicitis between 2012 and 2015 at a tertiary pediatric surgery center. US results were dichotomized, with a nonvisualized appendix considered as a negative examination. Results. In total, 438 children were included (mean 8.5 years, 54% boys), with an appendicitis rate of 29%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for US were 82%, 97%, 92%, and 93%, respectively, without significant age or gender differences. Pediatric radiologists had significantly higher sensitivity compared to general radiologists, 88% and 71%, respectively (p appendicitis, regardless of age or gender, and should be the first choice of imaging modalities. Combining US with PAS and CRP may reduce several unnecessary admissions for in-hospital observation. PMID:28044133

  4. Big data and data repurposing - using existing data to answer new questions in vascular dementia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubal, Fergus N; Ali, Myzoon; Batty, G David; Charidimou, Andreas; Eriksdotter, Maria; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Kim, Yun-Hee; Levine, Deborah A; Mead, Gillian; Mucke, Hermann A M; Ritchie, Craig W; Roberts, Charlotte J; Russ, Tom C; Stewart, Robert; Whiteley, William; Quinn, Terence J

    2017-04-17

    Traditional approaches to clinical research have, as yet, failed to provide effective treatments for vascular dementia (VaD). Novel approaches to collation and synthesis of data may allow for time and cost efficient hypothesis generating and testing. These approaches may have particular utility in helping us understand and treat a complex condition such as VaD. We present an overview of new uses for existing data to progress VaD research. The overview is the result of consultation with various stakeholders, focused literature review and learning from the group's experience of successful approaches to data repurposing. In particular, we benefitted from the expert discussion and input of delegates at the 9 th International Congress on Vascular Dementia (Ljubljana, 16-18 th October 2015). We agreed on key areas that could be of relevance to VaD research: systematic review of existing studies; individual patient level analyses of existing trials and cohorts and linking electronic health record data to other datasets. We illustrated each theme with a case-study of an existing project that has utilised this approach. There are many opportunities for the VaD research community to make better use of existing data. The volume of potentially available data is increasing and the opportunities for using these resources to progress the VaD research agenda are exciting. Of course, these approaches come with inherent limitations and biases, as bigger datasets are not necessarily better datasets and maintaining rigour and critical analysis will be key to optimising data use.

  5. [The legal question of the obtention of human stem cells for biomedical research. Legislation policy considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo Casabona, Carlos María

    2006-01-01

    The future Law on Biomedical Research, whose draft bill has been approved by the Council of Ministers and that will soon begin its parliamentary process of approval, will regulate, among other matters, the research with embryos. Likewise, it will make a pronouncement on the so-called therapeutic cloning. This report makes a detailed analysis of different matters that must be borne in mind by the legislator in order to face the process of evaluation and approval of said Law in relation with the aforementioned matters. It makes a special analysis of the legal texts of an international nature to which Spain is unavoidably subjected to, in such a way that the legislative text that will finally be approved is not contrary to the dispositions that are within such.

  6. Caribou Co-Management Needs From Research: Simple questions - Tricky answers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Urquhart

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, northern Canada has experienced a substantial increase in government reliance on advisory co-management organizations to manage caribou populations. Such groups, which are usually composed of government and local representatives, constantly require information about caribou upon which to base their recommendations. However, the standard 'scientific' approach to obtaining and presenting such information is in many cases no longer appropriate. In order to readjust the scientific focus on caribou research so that it is better attuned to co-management, this paper examines the role that research plays in the Canadian management of the Porcupine Caribou Herd as practiced by the Porcupine Caribou Management Board - a co-management advisory organization with a majority of native representatives.

  7. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS, RUPTURED APPENDICITIS AND THE LEVEL OF LEUKOCYTOSIS IN PAEDIATRIC SURGICAL PATIENTS OF NELSON MANDELA CENTRAL HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtimba, L; Dhaffala, A; Molaoa, S Z

    2017-06-01

    Appendicectomy is the most commonly performed operation worldwide. The diagnosis is predominantly based on clinical findings. Some patients will clinically be unclear if ruptured or acute inflamed appendicitis; the level of white cell count has been used as the predictor for ruptured appendicitis. This was a retrospective chart review of paediatric surgical patients admitted at Nelson Mandela Central Hospital, Mthatha South Africa. A total of 214 patients with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Overall, the ruptured appendicitis was 62% and 38% were inflamed appendicitis. Nature of the acute appendicitis: White cell count, Inflamed, Ruptured, Total p-value 30 0 4 4. This study has demonstrated that in patients who are diagnosed with acute appendicitis clinically, the normal white cell count does not necessarily rule out ruptured acute appendicitis. But the risks of ruptured acute appendicitis increase with the increase level of white cell count.

  8. Incidence of Appendicitis over Time: A Comparative Analysis of an Administrative Healthcare Database and a Pathology-Proven Appendicitis Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Fiona; Zimmer, Scott; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G.; Heitman, Steven J.; Swain, Mark; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Importance At the turn of the 21st century, studies evaluating the change in incidence of appendicitis over time have reported inconsistent findings. Objectives We compared the differences in the incidence of appendicitis derived from a pathology registry versus an administrative database in order to validate coding in administrative databases and establish temporal trends in the incidence of appendicitis. Design We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study to identify all individuals with appendicitis from 2000 to2008. Setting & Participants Two population-based data sources were used to identify cases of appendicitis: 1) a pathology registry (n = 8,822); and 2) a hospital discharge abstract database (n = 10,453). Intervention & Main Outcome The administrative database was compared to the pathology registry for the following a priori analyses: 1) to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV) of administrative codes; 2) to compare the annual incidence of appendicitis; and 3) to assess differences in temporal trends. Temporal trends were assessed using a generalized linear model that assumed a Poisson distribution and reported as an annual percent change (APC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses were stratified by perforated and non-perforated appendicitis. Results The administrative database (PPV = 83.0%) overestimated the incidence of appendicitis (100.3 per 100,000) when compared to the pathology registry (84.2 per 100,000). Codes for perforated appendicitis were not reliable (PPV = 52.4%) leading to overestimation in the incidence of perforated appendicitis in the administrative database (34.8 per 100,000) as compared to the pathology registry (19.4 per 100,000). The incidence of appendicitis significantly increased over time in both the administrative database (APC = 2.1%; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.8) and pathology registry (APC = 4.1; 95% CI: 3.1, 5.0). Conclusion & Relevance The administrative database overestimated the incidence of appendicitis

  9. Synthesizing models useful for ecohydrology and ecohydraulic approaches: An emphasis on integrating models to address complex research questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Shannon K.; Worthington, Thomas; Mollenhauer, Robert; Stewart, David; McManamay, Ryan; Guertault, Lucie; Moore, Desiree

    2018-01-01

    Ecohydrology combines empiricism, data analytics, and the integration of models to characterize linkages between ecological and hydrological processes. A challenge for practitioners is determining which models best generalizes heterogeneity in hydrological behaviour, including water fluxes across spatial and temporal scales, integrating environmental and socio‐economic activities to determine best watershed management practices and data requirements. We conducted a literature review and synthesis of hydrologic, hydraulic, water quality, and ecological models designed for solving interdisciplinary questions. We reviewed 1,275 papers and identified 178 models that have the capacity to answer an array of research questions about ecohydrology or ecohydraulics. Of these models, 43 were commonly applied due to their versatility, accessibility, user‐friendliness, and excellent user‐support. Forty‐one of 43 reviewed models were linked to at least 1 other model especially: Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (linked to 21 other models), Soil and Water Assessment Tool (19), and Hydrologic Engineering Center's River Analysis System (15). However, model integration was still relatively infrequent. There was substantial variation in model applications, possibly an artefact of the regional focus of research questions, simplicity of use, quality of user‐support efforts, or a limited understanding of model applicability. Simply increasing the interoperability of model platforms, transformation of models to user‐friendly forms, increasing user‐support, defining the reliability and risk associated with model results, and increasing awareness of model applicability may promote increased use of models across subdisciplines. Nonetheless, the current availability of models allows an array of interdisciplinary questions to be addressed, and model choice relates to several factors including research objective, model complexity, ability to link to other models, and

  10. The question waiting to be asked: Innate immunity receptors in the perspective of zoological research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, Suppl. 1 (2009), s. 15-28 ISSN 0139-7893. [Central European Meeting on Mouse Epigenetics /1./. Nové Hrady, 14.08.2008-17.08.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0640; GA ČR GA206/08/1281; GA AV ČR IAA600930608; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : animal immunogenetics * ecological and evolutionary immunology * immunity genes * parasites * wild-living populations * ecoimmunology * immunoecology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.357, year: 2009

  11. Defining the questions: a research agenda for nontraditional authentication in arms control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Danielle K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Many traditional authentication techniques have been based on hardware solutions. Thus authentication of measurement system hardware has been considered in terms of physical inspection and destructive analysis. Software authentication has implied hash function analysis or authentication tools such as Rose. Continuity of knowledge is maintained through TIDs and cameras. Although there is ongoing progress improving all of these authentication methods, there has been little discussion of the human factors involved in authentication. Issues of non-traditional authentication include sleight-of-hand substitutions, monitor perception vs. reality, and visual diversions. Since monitor confidence in a measurement system depends on the product of their confidences in each authentication element, it is important to investigate all authentication techniques, including the human factors. This paper will present an initial effort to identify the most important problems that traditional authentication approaches in safeguards have not addressed and are especially relevant to arms control verification. This will include a survey of the literature and direct engagement with nontraditional experts in areas like psychology and human factors. Based on the identification of problem areas, potential research areas will be identified and a possible research agenda will be developed.

  12. Flood Risk Management Policy in Scotland: Research Questions Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Hastings, Emily; MacDonald, Jannette

    2016-04-01

    Scotland's Centre of Expertise for Waters (CREW) delivers accessible research and expert opinion to support the Scottish Government and its delivery partners in the development and implementation of water policy. It was established in 2011 by the Scottish Government (Rural and Environmental Science and Analytical Services) in recognition of a gap in the provision of short term advice and research to policy (development and implementation). Key policy areas include the Water Framework Directive, Floods Directive, Drinking Water Directive, Habitats Directive and Scotland's Hydro Nation Strategy. CREW is unique in its demand-driven and free service for policy makers and practitioners, managing the engagement between scientists, policy makers and practitioners to work effectively across this interface. The users of CREW are the Scottish Government, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Natural Heritage and Scottish Water. CREW has funded around 100 projects relating to water policy since its inception in 2011. Of these, a significant number relate to flood risk management policy. Based on a review of work to date, this poster will give an overview of these projects and a forward look at the challenges that remain. From learning from community led flood risk management to surface water flood forecasting for urban communities, links will be made between sustainable and traditional flood risk management while considering the perceptions of stakeholders to flood risk management. How can we deliver fully integrated flood risk management options? How policy makers, scientists and land managers can better work together will also be explored.

  13. Relation between Fiber Diet and Appendicitis Incidence in Children at H. Adam Malik Central Hospital, Medan, North Sumatra-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyke Damanik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Appendicitis is the most occurred acute abdominal case found in children.1 In United States of America alone, there were 250,000 cases annually. The ratio between boys and girls are 3:2, with most cases caused by late diagnosis and the morbidity factor. Previous studies found that there’s a relation between eating patterns, fiber diet and food hygiene as risk factors for appendicitis.1, 2 At the time this paper is written, there hasn’t been any study that explains the relation between appendicitis and the diet pattern of children from various places in Indonesia. Another condition that further motivates this study is a common conception that children hate to consume vegetables and fruits, which contain the much-needed fiber. Obstruction of the appendix lumen is the main cause of inflammation in the appendix. Fecalith makes up one third of appendicitis cases, which is consists of fats (coprosterols, inorganic salts (calcium phosphate, and organic residual (fibers.3 Other causes including obstruction process by hypertrophy of mural lymphoid follicle as a response from the inflammation of the appendix lumen.3 Obstruction of appendix lumen can be caused by low fiber diet, which causes fecalith to build up in appendix lumen.4 The mechanism of lumen appendix inflammation can be caused by lymphoid hyperplasia, fecalith buildup, foreign object or parasite.4 Therefore, a study needs to be done to determine the mortality prediction easier, more efficient, and not static, in which it’s harder to measure the therapeutic response. In this case, lactate clearance is hoped to have the capability to determine the mortality rate in patients with severe sepsis. Method: This research is an analytic with cross-sectional design. The subjects were 35 child patients with appendicitis in RSHAM which fulfilled the criteria of severe sepsis diagnosis, and were receiving treatment in the period of January-December 2014. Results: Male children are the

  14. Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis by Endoscopic Retrograde Appendicitis Therapy (ERAT): Combination of Colonoscopy and Endoscopic Retrograde Appendicography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingchao; Mi, Chen; Li, Weizhi; She, Junjun

    2016-11-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency, but the diagnosis of appendicitis remains a challenge. Endoscopic retrograde appendicitis therapy (ERAT) is a new and minimally invasive procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis. To investigate the diagnostic value of ERAT for acute appendicitis by the combination of colonoscopy and endoscopic retrograde appendicography (ERA). Twenty-one patients with the diagnosis of suspected uncomplicated acute appendicitis who underwent ERAT between November 2014 and January 2015 were included in this study. The main outcomes, imaging findings of acute appendicitis including colonoscopic direct-vision imaging and fluoroscopic ERA imaging, were retrospectively reviewed. Secondary outcomes included mean operative time, mean hospital stay, rate of complication, rate of appendectomy during follow-up period, and other clinical data. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis was established in 20 patients by positive ERA (5 patients) or colonoscopy (1 patient) alone or both (14 patients). The main colonoscopic imaging findings included mucosal inflammation (15/20, 75 %), appendicoliths (14/20, 70 %), and maturation (5/20, 25 %). The key points of ERA for diagnosing acute appendicitis included radiographic changes of appendix (17/20, 85 %), intraluminal appendicoliths (14/20, 70 %), and perforation (1/20, 5 %). Mean operative time of ERAT was 49.7 min, and mean hospital stay was 3.3 days. No patient converted to emergency appendectomy. Perforation occurred in one patient after appendicoliths removal was not severe and did not require invasive procedures. During at least 1-year follow-up period, only one patient underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. ERAT is a valuable procedure of choice providing a precise yield of diagnostic information for patients with suspected acute appendicitis by combination of colonoscopy and ERA.

  15. Sonographic study about differential diagnosis between acute appendicitis and non-appendicitis in appendices of borderline diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hwan Hoon; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Hong Won; Park, Seung Cheol; Lee, Eun Jeong; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    2000-01-01

    To find out the sonographic criteria which can be effectively used to differentiate acute appendicitis from non-appendicitis in patients with appendices with borderline diameter(5-8 mm). Sixteen patients diagnosed as acute appendicitis, another 16 patients diagnosed as non-appendicitis were included in this study. They complained of RLQ pain and their appendices measured 5-8 mm in diameter on sonogram. Features such as appendiceal wall thickness, presence or absence of air in appendiceal lumen, movability of tip of the appendix, compressibility of the appendix were evaluated on gray-scale sonogram and thereafter, presence or absence of color flow in the wall of the appendix was evaluated on color Doppler sonogram. Thickness of appendiceal wall is 2.98 ± 0.77 mm in acute appendicitis group and 1.73 ± 0.44 mm in non-appendicitis group (p<0.05). When 2.5 mm thickness of appendiceal wall is applied for diagnosis of acute appendicitis, sensitivity is 81.3%, specificity is 87.5% and accuracy is 84.4%. With absence of air in appendiceal lumen, sensitivity is 93.8%, specificity is 68.8% and accuracy is 81.3%. With absence of movability of appendiceal tip, sensitivity is 87.5%, specificity is 50% and accuracy is 68.8%. With absence of compressibility of the appendix, sensitivity is 100%, specificity is 31.3% and accuracy is 65.6%. With color flow in appendiceal wall, sensitivity is 81.3%, specificity is 62.5% and accuracy is 71.9%. The above mentioned criteria show statistically significant difference between acute appendicitis and non-appendicitis groups (p<0.05). When the diameter of the appendix measures 5-8 mm on sonogram, evaluation of thickness of appendiceal wall, air in appendiceal lumen, movability of tip, compressibility and color flow in the wall will be helpful to diagnose the acute appendicitis with confidence.

  16. What is the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwanseop [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kwanseop@hallym.or.kr; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Jeon, Eui Yong; Koh, Sung Hye [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kwangseon [Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The objective of our study was to estimate the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after abdominoplevic CT. A total of 104 patients initially underwent abdominopelvic CT before appendix US due to acute abdominal pain. All CT examinations were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of acute appendicitis. The findings of appendix on CT were classified into five categories (definite appendicitis, probably appendicitis, equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, probably not appendicitis, and normal looking appendix). Appendix US images and their radiologic reports were also evaluated retrospectively. Then, CT and US findings were correlated with clinical or pathologic diagnosis. Three all patients with definite appendicitis initially on CT again showed US findings of appendicitis. In the 32 patients of probably appendicitis on CT, US showed normal looking appendix in seven patients (21.8%, 7 of 32) who improved with medical treatment and discharged. In the 16 patients of equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, US showed appendicitis in seven patients (43.8%, 7 of 16) and normal looking appendix in nine patients. In the 12 patients of probably not appendicitis on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in two patients (16.7%, 2 of 12). In the 41 patients of normal looking appendix on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in five patients (12.2%, 5 of 41). US reevaluation enables us to avoid misdiagnosis of appendicitis on CT and improve diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis.

  17. Measuring sun exposure in epidemiological studies: Matching the method to the research question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laura; Xiang, Fan; Swaminathan, Ashwin; Lucas, Robyn M

    2015-12-01

    Sun exposure has risks and benefits for health. Testing these associations requires tools for measuring sun exposure that are feasible and relevant to the time-course of the health outcome. Recent sun exposure, e.g. the last week, is best captured by dosimeters and sun diaries. These can also be used for medium-term sun exposure e.g. over several weeks, but incur a high participant burden. Self-reported data on "typical time outdoors" for working and non-working days, is less detailed and not influenced by day-to-day variation. Over a longer period, e.g. the lifetime, or for particular life stages, proxies of sun exposure, such as latitude of residence or ambient ultraviolet (UV) radiation levels (from satellites or ground-level monitoring) can be used, with additional detail provided by lifetime sun exposure calendars that include locations of residence, usual time outdoors, and detail of sunburn episodes. Objective measures of lifetime sun exposure include microtopography of sun-exposed skin (e.g. using silicone casts) or conjunctival UV autofluorescence. Potential modifiers of the association between sun exposure and the health outcome, such as clothing coverage and skin colour, may also need to be measured. We provide a systematic approach to selecting sun exposure measures for use in epidemiological health research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. On the Question of Methodological Support of Research on Relationships of Interpersonal Significance in Kindergarten Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliyn V.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the importance of in-depth research (in particular, employing an algorithm developed by M.Yu. Kondratyev for defining integral status of an individual on child-child interpersonal relationship in kindergarten groups. Although relationships with significant adults are by all means essential for preschool children, interpersonal relation- ships on the child-child level to a great extent shape the content of the social situation of development in general. Still, when it comes to revealing status and role position of the child in the structure of interpersonal relationships within the kindergarten group, there’s the challenge of defining informal intragroup structure of power in contact community (due to the age specifics. The paper suggests how this challenge may be addressed and provides a version of the technique suitable for preschoolers that helps overcome age restrictions implied by the original technique. Also, the paper reports on the outcomes of approbation of this version which proved its heuristic nature. For instance, the outcomes show a high degree of correlation between the results of kindergarten group members ranking in accordance with their influence upon peers carried out by teachers working in these groups.

  19. The Medical Anthropologist as the Patient: Developing Research Questions on Hospital Food in Japan through Auto-Ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Runestad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available I was an inpatient at a small maternity clinic in Japan in 2012–13 and found it impossible to separate the way I experienced medical care and my training as a medical anthropologist. As I was encouraged to eat and monitor my weight so that I would “grow” a healthy baby, I recalled how interviewees from my HIV/AIDS project described nourishing their bodies so they could fight disease. Because of my experience in the healthcare system in Japan, I ended up reframing my data to add questions about the role of hospital food in patient care. Meanwhile, I developed the social networks necessary to execute a new project, which I would later undertake. In this essay I argue that medical anthropologists working from a phenomenological perspective may regard their own bodies as assets rather than hindrances in research, and that because bodies are gendered, focusing on this facet of habitus can be particularly informative. I also illustrate how systematic reflection on personal experience in the field (autoethnography aids in the development of research questions and reframing data. Finally, I discuss how highlighting these steps in research methods courses can demystify the research process for students.

  20. Collaborative Chat Reference Service Effectiveness Varies by Question Type for Public Library Patrons. A review of: Kwon, Nahyun. ʺPublic Library Patronsʹ Use of Collaborative Chat Reference Service: The Effectiveness of Question Answering by Question Type.ʺ Library & Information Science Research 29.1 (Mar. 2007: 70‐91.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Hall

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To assess the effectiveness of a collaborative chat reference service in answering different types of question. Specifically, the study compares the degree of answer completion and the level of user satisfaction for simple factual questions vs. more in‐depth subject‐based reference questions, and for ‘local’ (pertaining to a particular library and non‐local questions.Design – Content analysis of 415 transcripts of reference transactions, which were also compared to corresponding user satisfaction survey results.Setting – An online collaborative reference service offered by a large public library system (33 branch and regional locations. This service is part of the Metropolitan Cooperative Library System: a virtual reference consortium of U.S. libraries (public, academic, special, and corporate that provides 24/7 service.Subjects – Reference librarians from around the U.S. (49 different libraries, and users logging into the service via the public library system’s portal (primarily patrons of the 49 libraries. Method – Content analysis was used to evaluate virtual reference transcripts recorded between January and June, 2004. Reliability was enhanced through triangulation, with researchers comparing the content analysis of each transcript against the results of a voluntary exit survey. Of 1,387 transactions that occurred during the period of study, 420 users completed the survey and these formed the basis of the study, apart from 5 transactions that were omitted because the questions were incomprehensible. Questions were examined and assigned to five categories: “simple, factual questions; subject‐based research questions; resource access questions; circulation‐related questions; and local library information inquiries” (80‐81. Answers were classed as either “completely answered, partially answered or unanswered, referred, and problematic endings” (82. Lastly, user satisfaction was surveyed on three

  1. Does the Intestinal Parasite Enterobius vermicularis Cause Acute Appendicitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhan, Yavuz; Özen, Fatma Zeynep; Kılınç, Çetin; Güçkan, Rıdvan

    2017-06-01

    Although intestinal parasitic infections rarely cause acute appendicitis, they are common public health problems in undeveloped and developing countries. Parasitic infections should be kept in mind in patients clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis, and treatment procedures should be adopted according to the etiology. Herein we presented the cases of four patients with clinical findings of acute appendicitis. Patients were clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis, and Enterobius vermicularis was detected in the pathological examinations of specimens. Pinworm infections are common parasitic infections that may mimic appendicitis. The pathology of the four cases was noted when the file of 186 patients aged between 4 and 72 years who underwent surgery for acute appendicitis in my hospital was retrospectively reviewed. When the appendectomy specimen was examined histopathologically it was understood that acute appendicitis was caused by Enterobius vermicularis parasite. In Enterobius infections, performing systemic therapy for patients and their family members is sufficient. To prevent unnecessary appendectomy, this type of infection should be made to ask in the history and clinical findings of patients.

  2. Value of noncontrast spiral CT for suspected acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Pil Yeob; Lee, Sang Wook; Kwon, Jae Soo; Sung, Young Soon; Rho, Myoung Ho; Chang, Jeong A.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and clinical efficacy of noncontrast spiral CT in patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Over a six-month period, 100 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were prospectively evaluated with noncontrast spiral CT. All scans were obtained from the lower body of L3 to the symphysis pubis, with 5mm or 10mm collimation and pitch of 1 or 1.5, and without intravenous or oral contrast material. Diagnosis was established by means of surgical or clinical follow-up. Prospective diagnosis based on CT findings was compared with surgical results and clinical follow-up. Acute appendicitis was confirmed in 47 of 100 patients. On the basis of the Ct findings, SI patients were prospectively interpreted as positive for appendicitis, but in six the diagnosis was false-positive. Two of the 47 with acute appendicitis were prospectively interpreted as normal. The preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis was, thus, 45 true-positive, 47 true-negative, six false-positive and two false-negative yielding a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 89%, an accuracy of 92%, a positive predictive value of 88%, and a negative predictive value of 96%. Using CT, an alternative diagnosis was established in 14 patients. Noncontrast spiral CT is a useful technique for diagnosing acute appendicitis. =20

  3. Students as Researchers: What and Why Seventh-Grade Students Choose to Write When Investigating Their Own Research Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørkvold, Tuva; Blikstad-Balas, Marte

    2018-01-01

    All scientists depend on both reading and writing to do their scientific work. It is of paramount importance to ensure that students have a relevant repertoire of practices they can employ when facing scientific content inside and outside the school context. The present study reports on students in seventh grade acting as researchers. Over an…

  4. The SPARK Tool to prioritise questions for systematic reviews in health policy and systems research: development and initial validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Fadlallah, Racha; Ghandour, Lilian; Kdouh, Ola; Langlois, Etienne; Lavis, John N; Schünemann, Holger; El-Jardali, Fadi

    2017-09-04

    Groups or institutions funding or conducting systematic reviews in health policy and systems research (HPSR) should prioritise topics according to the needs of policymakers and stakeholders. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a tool to prioritise questions for systematic reviews in HPSR. We developed the tool following a four-step approach consisting of (1) the definition of the purpose and scope of tool, (2) item generation and reduction, (3) testing for content and face validity, (4) and pilot testing of the tool. The research team involved international experts in HPSR, systematic review methodology and tool development, led by the Center for Systematic Reviews on Health Policy and Systems Research (SPARK). We followed an inclusive approach in determining the final selection of items to allow customisation to the user's needs. The purpose of the SPARK tool was to prioritise questions in HPSR in order to address them in systematic reviews. In the item generation and reduction phase, an extensive literature search yielded 40 relevant articles, which were reviewed by the research team to create a preliminary list of 19 candidate items for inclusion in the tool. As part of testing for content and face validity, input from international experts led to the refining, changing, merging and addition of new items, and to organisation of the tool into two modules. Following pilot testing, we finalised the tool, with 22 items organised in two modules - the first module including 13 items to be rated by policymakers and stakeholders, and the second including 9 items to be rated by systematic review teams. Users can customise the tool to their needs, by omitting items that may not be applicable to their settings. We also developed a user manual that provides guidance on how to use the SPARK tool, along with signaling questions. We have developed and conducted initial validation of the SPARK tool to prioritise questions for systematic reviews in HPSR, along with

  5. Livstruende appendicitis forårsaget af Fusobacterium necrophorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Trine Langfeldt; Maeda, Yasuko; Lindberg, Jens Aage

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a well-known cause of Lemierre's syndrome. Recent studies suggest a causative association between F. necrophorum and acute appendicitis. We present a case of a 15-year-old previously healthy girl who presented with acute non-perforated appendicitis, intra......-abdominal abscesses and thrombosis that led to omental necrosis. This resulted in a life-threatening septic shock with the need for prolonged intensive care. We suggest that F. necrophorum identified in pus from the abdomen caused this fulminant variation of appendicitis with findings similar to those seen...

  6. High-Resolution Ultrasonography (US) of Appendiceal Specimens: Differentiation of Acute Non-perforated Appendicitis from Perforated Appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Gyo Chang; Kim, Suk; Im, Han Hyeok; Lee, Sang Jin; Yang, Seung Boo; Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Il Young [Soonchunhyang University Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae Kyung [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kui Hyang; Shin, Hyung Chul [Soonchunhyang University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To analyze surgical specimens from patients with acute non-perforated and perforated appendicitis using high-resolution ultrasonography (US), and to correlate the US features with the pathologic findings. One hundred and six surgical appendix specimens obtained from patients with suspected acute appendicitis were evaluated. The following US features were evaluated for differentiating acute non-perforated appendicitis from perforated appendicitis: circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, the sum of opposing walls {>=} 9 mm and the presence of appendicoliths. The sensitivity and specificity of the US findings for diagnosing perforated appendicitis were determined. All US features were detected significantly more often in the perforated appendicitis group of specimens. The disruption of the serosal layer was the most significant independent predictor of perforation (p < .001). The sensitivity for circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, wall thickness {>=} 9 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths individually was 84.6%, 69.2%, 61.5%, 73.1% and 46.2%, respectively. The specificity for all of these findings was 86.3%, 98.7%, 95.0%, 85.0% and 85.0%, respectively. High-resolution US of appendiceal specimens was very useful for differentiating acute non-perforated from perforated appendicitis

  7. Asking the right questions: Scoping studies in the commissioning of research on the organisation and delivery of health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peckham Stephen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Scoping studies have been used across a range of disciplines for a wide variety of purposes. However, their value is increasingly limited by a lack of definition and clarity of purpose. The UK's Service Delivery and Organisation Research Programme (SDO has extensive experience of commissioning and using such studies; twenty four have now been completed. This review article has four objectives; to describe the nature of the scoping studies that have been commissioned by the SDO Programme; to consider the impact of and uses made of such studies; to provide definitions for the different elements that may constitute a scoping study; and to describe the lessons learnt by the SDO Programme in commissioning scoping studies. Scoping studies are imprecisely defined but usually consist of one or more discrete components; most commonly they are non-systematic reviews of the literature, but other important elements are literature mapping, conceptual mapping and policy mapping. Some scoping studies also involve consultations with stakeholders including the end users of research. Scoping studies have been used for a wide variety of purposes, although a common feature is to identify questions and topics for future research. The reports of scoping studies often have an impact that extends beyond informing research commissioners about future research areas; some have been published in peer reviewed journals, and others have been published in research summaries aimed at a broader audience of health service managers and policymakers. Key lessons from the SDO experience are the need to relate scoping studies to a particular health service context; the need for scoping teams to be multi-disciplinary and to be given enough time to integrate diverse findings; and the need for the research commissioners to be explicit not only about the aims of scoping studies but also about their intended uses. This necessitates regular contact between researchers and

  8. Massive ovarian edema, due to adjacent appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Andrew L; Illangasekare, Tushani; Poder, Liina

    2017-04-01

    Massive ovarian edema is a benign clinical entity, the imaging findings of which can mimic an adnexal mass or ovarian torsion. In the setting of acute abdominal pain, identifying massive ovarian edema is a key in avoiding potential fertility-threatening surgery in young women. In addition, it is important to consider other contributing pathology when ovarian edema is secondary to another process. We present a case of a young woman presenting with subacute abdominal pain, whose initial workup revealed marked enlarged right ovary. Further imaging, diagnostic tests, and eventually diagnostic laparoscopy revealed that the ovarian enlargement was secondary to subacute appendicitis, rather than a primary adnexal process. We review the classic ultrasound and MRI imaging findings and pitfalls that relate to this diagnosis.

  9. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Mehrotra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomatous inflammation is a form of chronic inflammation where the exact eitiology is not known. It is commonly reported in organs like kidney and gall bladder Very few cases of xanthogranulomatous inflammation of appendix have been reported in the literature. We report a case of 30 year female presenting with pain abdomen and fever for which provisional diagnosis of appendicitis was made. Open appendicectomy was performed which on intraoperative examination showed that appendix was adherent to surrounding structures forming a mass. Resection of the mass was done and sent for histopathological examination. Gross examination of the received specimen revealed multiple irregular tissue bits and one tubular tissue bit. Multiple sections studied from resected tissue showed features of xanthogranulomatous inflammation in appendix and periappendicular tissue.

  10. Appendicitis: Trends in incidence, age, sex, and seasonal variations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:Appendicitis is a common clinical condition worldwide. Differences in ... Aim:To assess the trends in incidence and pattern of variation with age, sex, and seasons of the year. .... population of 465000 (an annual population growth.

  11. Caecal diverticulitis presenting as acute appendicitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayantunde Abraham A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solitary caecal diverticulum is an uncommon entity and therefore difficult to diagnose except at surgery. Caecal diverticulitis is an infrequent cause of acute abdomen and usually presents in a manner similar to acute appendicitis. It is extremely difficult to differentiate it preoperative from acute appendicitis and such distinction is usually made in the operating room. The optimal management of this clinical condition is still controversial, ranging from conservative treatment with antibiotics to aggressive surgical resections. We report a case of a 61 year old Caucasian who presented with acute onset right iliac fossa pain indistinguishable from acute appendicitis. The true diagnosis of a perforated acute caecal diverticulitis with an abscess mass was only made at operation in the presence of a macroscopically normal appendix. We reviewed the literature to highlight the difficulty of a preoperative diagnosis and the need for a high index of suspicion especially in the older age group presenting in manner similar to acute appendicitis.

  12. Study of 150 cases of acute appendicitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallahi Gh

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is the most common condidition, requiring emergency operation in children. Late appendicitis is still a major sours of morbidity and potential mortality. The charts of all pediatric appendectomy patients (150 cases treated between 1367-1373 (Iranian calender in Amir Kabir Medical Center were reviewed. Mean hospital stay was 4.7 days. Mean ages of patients was 8.5 years. Male to female ratio was 1.2/1. Most common symptom was abdominal pain (100% and deep tenderness in right lower quadrant in 94.6%. Mean temprature was 37.2 and leucocytosis (more than 10000 were in the 76.3%. 14 patients had perforated appendicitis and most common pathology was acut supporative appendicitis. Accuracy of diagnosis was 96.6% and post operative pelvic abccess was 2%. Mortality occurred in one case (0.6%

  13. Acute appendicitis in inguinal hernia: report of two cases | Kidmas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amyand's hernia). One patient had gangrenous appendicitis that affected the adjoining caecum. A limited right hemicolectomy was done by extending the groin incision laterally and proximally. The second patient had simple appendicectomy.

  14. Endometriosis of the mesoappendix mimicking appendicitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Mewa Kinoo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although appendicitis is largely a clinical diagnosis, on occasions diagnostic modalities may be needed to aid with the diagnosis. Despite the use of adjuncts and exploratory surgery, the diagnosis may not be clear until a histological diagnosis is achieved. Endometriosis of the appendix mimicking appendicitis is one of these diagnoses described in several case reports. Endometriosis of the meso-appendix has been described in association with intussusception of the appendix in several case reports. However, to our knowledge, endometriosis of the meso-appendix mimicking appendicitis has not been reported to date. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with classic clinical signs and symptoms of appendicitis endorsed on computed tomography imaging. The patient underwent a laparoscopic appendicectomy with the postoperative histology demonstrating a normal appendix with endometriosis of the meso-appendix.

  15. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Achiam, Michael

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. MATERIALS...... radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. RESULTS: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14...... patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate (kappa=0.51) and fair (kappa=0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute...

  16. Can New Inflammatory Markers Improve the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Manne; Rubér, Marie; Ekerfelt, Christina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of appendicitis is difficult and resource consuming. New inflammatory markers have been proposed for the diagnosis of appendicitis, but their utility in combination with traditional diagnostic variables has not been tested. Our objective is to explore the potential of new...... inflammatory markers for improving the diagnosis of appendicitis.METHODS: The diagnostic properties of the six most promising out of 21 new inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6, chemokine ligand [CXCL]-8, chemokine C-C motif ligand [CCL]-2, serum amyloid A [SAA], matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-9......, and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) were compared with traditional diagnostic variables included in the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score (right iliac fossa pain, vomiting, rebound tenderness, guarding, white blood cell [WBC] count, proportion neutrophils, C-reactive protein and body temperature) in 432 patients...

  17. Scoring system to distinguish uncomplicated from complicated acute appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atema, J. J.; van Rossem, C. C.; Leeuwenburgh, M. M.; Stoker, J.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-operative management may be an alternative for uncomplicated appendicitis, but preoperative distinction between uncomplicated and complicated disease is challenging. This study aimed to develop a scoring system based on clinical and imaging features to distinguish uncomplicated from complicated

  18. An unusual manifestation of acute appendicitis with left flank pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Talanow, MD, PhD

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The author presents a case with an unusual presentation of early appendicitis. The patient presented initially with left sided flank pain. Workup for nephrolithiasis, including non-contrast CT of the abdomen and pelvis was negative for renal stones or hydronephrosis. After discharge, the patient presented one week later in the ED with right lower quadrant pain. Contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen revealed perforated appendicitis.

  19. A Rare Complication of Acute Appendicitis: Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Koncoro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric vein (SMV thrombosis caused by acute appendicitis is quite rare nowadays. These conditions occurs secondary to infection in the region drained by the portal venous system. In this case, we report a successfully treated case of SMV thrombosis and liver abscess associated with appendicitis with antibiotics and anticoagulant.Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are basic to a favorable clinical course.

  20. Hyperbilirubinaemia: its utility in non-perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Anna; Grieve, David A

    2017-07-01

    The diagnosis of acute appendicitis is made using clinical findings and investigations. Recent studies have suggested that serum bilirubin, a cheap and simple biochemical test, is a positive predictor in the diagnosis of appendiceal perforation and may be more specific than C-reactive protein (CRP) and white cell count (WCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of the serum bilirubin level in patients with suspected acute but non-perforative appendicitis. A retrospective chart review of 213 patients who presented with suspected appendicitis in a 6-month period to Nambour General Hospital was performed. Serum bilirubin, WCC and CRP were recorded and analysed as to their utility in relation to the final diagnosis. A total of 196 patients underwent an appendicectomy and 41 of these were negative. The specificity of hyperbilirubinaemia for appendicitis overall was 0.83 with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.86, compared with CRP (specificity 0.40, PPV 0.75) and WCC (specificity 0.67, PPV 0.85). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for bilirubin was 0.6289 compared to 0.6171 for CRP and 0.7219 for WCC. A subgroup analysis of those with complicated appendicitis demonstrated a PPV for bilirubin of 0.66 compared to 0.58 for WCC and 0.34 for CRP in agreement with the literature. Subgroup analysis of hyperbilirubinaemia in simple appendicitis demonstrated a PPV of 0.81 compared to CRP (0.71) and WCC (0.82). Bilirubin had a higher specificity than CRP and WCC overall in patients with appendicitis. Hyperbilirubinaemia had a high PPV in patients with simple appendicitis. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. Computed tomography of the normal appendix and acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiatas, A.A.; Chopra, S.; Chintapalli, K.N.; Esola, C.C.; Daskalogiannaki, M.; Dodd, G.D. III; Gourtsoyiannis, N.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present pictorially the spectrum of appearances of the appendix and appendicitis on CT. The images presented were selected from the database of our hospitals. The various appearances of the normal appendix on CT are shown. Appendicitis can be divided into four categories on the basis of CT findings. Examples of each category are shown. (orig.). With 14 figs

  2. Can simply answering research questions change behaviour? Systematic review and meta analyses of brief alcohol intervention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim McCambridge

    Full Text Available Participant reports of their own behaviour are critical for the provision and evaluation of behavioural interventions. Recent developments in brief alcohol intervention trials provide an opportunity to evaluate longstanding concerns that answering questions on behaviour as part of research assessments may inadvertently influence it and produce bias. The study objective was to evaluate the size and nature of effects observed in randomized manipulations of the effects of answering questions on drinking behaviour in brief intervention trials.Multiple methods were used to identify primary studies. Between-group differences in total weekly alcohol consumption, quantity per drinking day and AUDIT scores were evaluated in random effects meta-analyses. Ten trials were included in this review, of which two did not provide findings for quantitative study, in which three outcomes were evaluated. Between-group differences were of the magnitude of 13.7 (-0.17 to 27.6 grams of alcohol per week (approximately 1.5 U.K. units or 1 standard U.S. drink and 1 point (0.1 to 1.9 in AUDIT score. There was no difference in quantity per drinking day.Answering questions on drinking in brief intervention trials appears to alter subsequent self-reported behaviour. This potentially generates bias by exposing non-intervention control groups to an integral component of the intervention. The effects of brief alcohol interventions may thus have been consistently under-estimated. These findings are relevant to evaluations of any interventions to alter behaviours which involve participant self-report.

  3. Chronic appendicitis in a patient with 15 years abdominal pain

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    bizhan Khorasani

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Khorasani B1, Gholizadeh Pasha A2 1. Assistant professor, Department of surgery, Faculty of medicine, Tehran University of rehabilitation 2. Assistant professor, Department of surgery, Faculty of medicine, Babol University of medical sciences Abstract Background: Acute appendicitis is a completely known disease but for many physicians chronic appendicitis is unknown and some of them don believe in it. Although the number of people suffer from chronic appendicitis is much fewer than those who suffer from acute appendicitis, we shouldn ignore it. Clinical symptoms for these patients are chronic, longtime and recurrent abdominal pain, which is usually in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. In the Para clinical examinations there isn any considerable pathological problem (in urine, stool, and sonography of the abdomen and pelvis. By recognizing appendicitis and appendectomy, the symptoms will be vanished and the patients will recover. Case presentation: The case was a 57-year-old man who has complained from chronic abdominal pain in the RLQ area since 15years ago. No pathological problem had been found in all diagnostic process. Conclusion: The problem was diagnosed as the chronic appendicitis and he underwent the appendectomy by laparoscopic procedure and was completely recovered.

  4. Acute appendicitis: most common clinical presentation and causative microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, M.Y.; Shukr, I.; Mahmood, M.A.; Qasmi, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the most common clinical presentation and causative microorganism for acute appendicitis. Study Design: Descriptive. Place and duration of study: Department of Surgery, Combined Military Hospital Multan, from June 2002 to May 2004. Patients and Methods: Clinical features of all the patients, older than 5 years of age diagnosed with acute appendicitis were recorded. Patients presented with other pathology which mimic acute appendicitis were excluded from the study. Surgery was done under general anaesthesia. Appendices of all the patient as well as pus swabs from abdominal cavity were sent to the laboratory for histopathology and microbiological cultures to confirm the diagnoses of acute appendicitis and causative organism. Results: The mean age of 75 subjects was 32.56 +- 11.93 years. The most common symptom was pain in right iliac fossa (80 % cases) and the most common physical sign was tenderness (92% cases). Some of the patients(9.3%) had a histologically normal appendix. Maximum isolates on culture were E. coli. Conclusion: The most common presentation of acute appendicitis was pain in right iliac fossa while the most sensitive sign was tenderness. Proper history and sharp clinical examination is the key to diagnosis. The most frequent organism of appendicitis was Escherichia Coli. (author)

  5. Hydatidosis as a cause of acute appendicitis: a case report

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    Maryam Hajizadeh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is considered the most common cause of emergency surgery in children and young adults. The association between parasitic infections and appendicitis has been widely investigated. Hydatidosis, a zoonotic helminthic disease caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus granulosus, may cause illness in intermediate hosts, generally human and herbivorous animals. This disease is considered hyper endemic in northwest of Iran and is a serious public health problem. Hydatidosis predominantly is located in internal organs especially liver and lung but is considered a rare cause of acute appendicitis. Our aim was to study hydatid cyst that causes appendicitis. In this retrospective descriptive, 275 appendectomies performed during the years 2007-2012 in Tabriz Emam Reza hospital. Depending on the clinical notes, serological method, laboratory, surgical findings and attention to the histopathologic results, we found a patient with appendiceal hydatidosis. Acute appendicitis of hydatidosis origin is not seen frequently even in the hyper endemic area. Therefore, described an unusual cases of hydatidosis, should be considered in the differential diagnoses of appendicitis also education on how to prevent hydatidosis and eradication of stray dogs should be included in training programs to avoid and decrease the appendectomy operations.

  6. Acute appendicitis in children: not only surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Anna Maria; Pane, Alessandro; Garau, Roberto; Atzori, Pietro; Podda, Marcello; Casuccio, Alessandra; Mascia, Luigi

    2017-03-01

    An accurate diagnosis of acute appendicitis is important to avoid severe outcome or unnecessary surgery but management is controversial. The aim of study was to evaluate, in younger and older children, the efficacy of conservative management for uncomplicated appendicitis and the outcome of complicated forms underwent early surgery. Children with acute appendicitis were investigated by clinical, laboratory variables and abdominal ultrasound and divided in two groups: complicated and uncomplicated. Complicated appendicitis underwent early surgery; uncomplicated appendicitis started conservative treatment with antibiotic. If in the next 24-48h it was worsening, the conservative approach failed and patients underwent late surgery. A total of 362 pediatric patients were included. One hundred sixty-five underwent early appendectomy; 197 patients were at first treated conservatively: of these, 82 were operated within 24-48h for failure. The total percentage of operated patients was 68.2%. An elevated association was found between surgery and ultrasound. Conservative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis had high percentage of success (58%). Complications in operated patients were infrequent. Our protocol was effective in order to decide which patients treat early surgically and which conservatively; specific red flags (age and onset) can identified patients at most risk of complications or conservative failure. treatment study. II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CT following US for possible appendicitis: anatomic coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, Martin E. [University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Hospital, 3-920, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Alharbi, Fawaz [University of Toronto, Toronto General Hospital, NCSB 1C572, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Qassim University, Department of Medical Imaging, Buraydah, Qassim (Saudi Arabia); Chawla, Tanya P. [University of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital, Room 567, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moshonov, Hadas [University of Toronto, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-15

    To determine superior-inferior anatomic borders for CT following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US for possible appendicitis. Ninety-nine patients with possible appendicitis and inconclusive/nondiagnostic US followed by CT were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists reviewed CT images and determined superior-inferior anatomic borders required to diagnose or exclude appendicitis and diagnose alternative causes. This ''targeted'' coverage was used to estimate potential reduction in anatomic coverage compared to standard abdominal/pelvic CT. The study group included 83 women and 16 men; mean age 32 (median, 29; range 18-73) years. Final diagnoses were: nonspecific abdominal pain 50/99 (51 %), appendicitis 26/99 (26 %), gynaecological 12/99 (12 %), gastrointestinal 9/99 (10 %), and musculoskeletal 2/99 (2 %). Median dose-length product for standard CT was 890.0 (range, 306.3 - 2493.9) mGy.cm. To confidently diagnose/exclude appendicitis or identify alternative diagnoses, maximum superior-inferior anatomic CT coverage was the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis, for both reviewers. Targeted CT would reduce anatomic coverage by 30-55 % (mean 39 %, median 40 %) compared to standard CT. When CT is performed for appendicitis following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US, targeted CT from the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis can be used resulting in significant reduction in exposure to ionizing radiation compared to standard CT. (orig.)

  8. Diagnosis of Appendicitis with Left Lower Quadrant Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Kuang Hou

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain is one of the most common chief complaints of patients presenting to the emergency department and, among the diagnoses of abdominal pain, appendicitis is the most common surgical disorder. Traditionally, the diagnosis of appendicitis is based on well-established clinical criteria combined with physician experience. However, appendicitis presenting with rare and misleading left lower quadrant (LLQ pain may result in an initial false-negative diagnosis by the physician and even result in failure to order the subsidiary examination of computed tomography (CT or ultrasound, so increasing the risk of perforation/abscess formation and prolonged hospital stay. In this report, we present 2 cases of atypical appendicitis with LLQ pain where the correct diagnosis was not initially considered. One patient had right-sided appendicitis; the inflamed appendix was 12 cm in length and projected into the LLQ. Local peritonitis developed during observation. With the aid of CT, the diagnosis was established in time. The other patient had left-sided appendicitis with situs inversus totalis. Adverse outcomes with appendiceal rupture and abscess formation occurred due to inadvertent physical examinations and inadequate observation. Early clinical suspicion and adequate observation are indicated in patients with uncertain clinical features. However, in patients with unresolved clinical symptoms and/or local peritonitis that develop during observation, imaging studies play a significant role in preoperative diagnosis and determination of proper treatment.

  9. Do we need imaging to diagnose appendicitis in children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Di Cesare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the role of clinical assessment with selective use of imaging studies in the management of suspected acute appendicitis in children. Patients and Methods: Medical records of children referred to Emergency Room in 2010 for suspected appendicitis were retrospectively reviewed. Diagnostic investigations divided by age and sex were related to pathological findings. Negative appendectomy and complication rates were calculated. Results: 923 children needed surgical assessment : i0 n 75.7% of them surgical indication was excluded and 24.3% were admitted to surgical ward for observation. Appendectomy was eventually performed in 137 patients (61.9%, 82.4% of them without any preoperative imaging while 17.6% underwent selective studies, mainly abdominal ultrasonography (14.6%. Imaging was requested twice as frequently in not operated admitted children (39.3% than in the operated ones (17.5%, P < 0.001. Overall complicated appendicitis rate (peritonitis and abscess resulted 26.4% and negative appendectomy rate 8.8%. Females older than 10 years presented histologically not-confirmed appendicitis in 22.2% of cases, while the younger ones presented more frequently complicated appendicitis (29.3%. Conclusions: Clinical assessment is the key to diagnose appendicitis. Nevertheless, in girls older than 10 years, selected use of imaging should be implemented to avoid unnecessary appendectomies. Imaging of choice in equivocal cases should be ultrasonography.

  10. Diagnostic Value of Plasma Pentraxin-3 in Acute Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Ali; Katipoglu, Burak; Ïmamoglu, Melih; Demir, Selim; Yadigaroglu, Metin; Tatli, Ozgur; Yurtsever, Selim; Usta, Arif; Mentese, Ahmet; Turkmen, Suha

    2017-10-11

    To measure serum PTX3 levels in patients admitted with right lower quadrant pain to emergency department and to investigate whether this parameter will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. This study was conducted with a group of 89 patients over 17 years of age who were admitted with the complaint of right lower quadrant pain to ED and had a preliminary diagnosis of acute appendicitis clinically and the control group of 31 healthy volunteers in a tertiary university hospital for 3 months. Median PTX3 levels were 3.28 (1.08-30.24) ng/mL in the acute appendicitis groups and 0.97 (0.34-2.62) ng/mL in the control group. A significant difference was observed between acute appendicitis groups and the control group (p < 0.05). PTX3 was found to be significantly higher in patient with acute appendicitis compared to the control group and the patients with non-specific abdominal pain. PTX3 can be used as an aid in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

  11. CT following US for possible appendicitis: anatomic coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Malley, Martin E.; Alharbi, Fawaz; Chawla, Tanya P.; Moshonov, Hadas

    2016-01-01

    To determine superior-inferior anatomic borders for CT following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US for possible appendicitis. Ninety-nine patients with possible appendicitis and inconclusive/nondiagnostic US followed by CT were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists reviewed CT images and determined superior-inferior anatomic borders required to diagnose or exclude appendicitis and diagnose alternative causes. This ''targeted'' coverage was used to estimate potential reduction in anatomic coverage compared to standard abdominal/pelvic CT. The study group included 83 women and 16 men; mean age 32 (median, 29; range 18-73) years. Final diagnoses were: nonspecific abdominal pain 50/99 (51 %), appendicitis 26/99 (26 %), gynaecological 12/99 (12 %), gastrointestinal 9/99 (10 %), and musculoskeletal 2/99 (2 %). Median dose-length product for standard CT was 890.0 (range, 306.3 - 2493.9) mGy.cm. To confidently diagnose/exclude appendicitis or identify alternative diagnoses, maximum superior-inferior anatomic CT coverage was the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis, for both reviewers. Targeted CT would reduce anatomic coverage by 30-55 % (mean 39 %, median 40 %) compared to standard CT. When CT is performed for appendicitis following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US, targeted CT from the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis can be used resulting in significant reduction in exposure to ionizing radiation compared to standard CT. (orig.)

  12. Value of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Seok Ho; Jung, Kun Sik; Kim, Jung Sik; Woo, Seong Ku; Chung, Ki Yong; Kim, Hee Jin

    1993-01-01

    During a 12-month period high-resolution, real-time ultrasonography (US) with graded compression was performed on 268 consecutive patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis and its complications. US visualization of a fluid-filled, non-compressed appendix or a decompressed, thick-walled appendix was the primary criterion for a diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The sonographic findings were correlated with surgical-pathologic outcome in 92 cases and with the findings of clinical follow-ups in the remainder. US was found to be accurate in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and its complication with a sensitivity of 93.3%, a specificity of 98.9%, and an accuracy of 97%. The predictive value of a positive test was 97.7%; that of a negative test was 96.7%. There were two false-positive examinations in patients with a thick-walled appendix or periapperdiceal abscess, which were surgically confirmed as appendiceal adenocarcinoma and perforated cecal diverticulitis respectively. There were six false-negative examinations in patients with a sonographically no-visible appendix, which were confirmed surgically as acute appendicitis (n=5) and perforated appendicitis (n=1). Our results show that high-resolution, real-time US is an accurate imaging modality in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and the evaluation of its complications

  13. Early operative management of complicated appendicitis is associated with improved surgical outcomes in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symer, Matthew M; Abelson, Jonathan S; Sedrakyan, Art; Yeo, Heather L

    2018-04-19

    There is no consensus on the ideal management of complicated appendicitis. The New York State Planning and Research Cooperative database was used to identify all patients admitted with complicated appendicitis and undergoing appendectomy within 1-year. Primary outcome was any complication. Secondary outcomes included length of stay (LOS), hospital charges, and laparoscopy use. Outcomes were compared in appendectomy before or after 48h from admission. 31,167 patients ≥18yo were identified for analysis, 28,015(89.9%) underwent early appendectomy. Early appendectomy patients were more likely to be White (69.8% vs. 64.2% p < 0.01), and commercially insured (53.1% vs. 45.4%, p < 0.01). Of the 3152 undergoing delayed surgery, 1610(51.1%) had surgery later during the index admission, 715(22.7%) were readmitted urgently and underwent appendectomy, and 827(26.2%) had elective appendectomy. Patients undergoing delayed surgery had more complications (OR 1.34 95%CI 1.23-1.45), readmissions (OR 1.55 95%CI 1.42-1.70), high hospital charges (OR 4.79 95%CI 4.35-5.27), and prolonged LOS (OR 6.12 95%CI 5.61-6.68). In this population-level study of complicated appendicitis we found more complications, longer LOS, and higher charges in patients undergoing delayed surgery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Delta neutrophil index: A reliable marker to differentiate perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Hyuk; Cho, Young Suk; Kim, Yoon Sung; Ahn, Hee Cheol; Oh, Young Taeck; Park, Sang O; Won, Moo-Ho; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young Myeong; Seo, Jeong Yeol; Lee, Young Hwan

    2018-01-01

    Delta neutrophil index (DNI) is a new inflammatory marker and the present study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of the DNI for the presence of a perforation in elderly with acute appendicitis. This retrospective observational study was conducted on 108 consecutive elderly patients (≥65 years old) with acute appendicitis treated over a 24-month period. Sixty-nine of the 108 patients (median, IQR: 72, 67-77 years) were allocated to the perforated appendicitis group (63.9%) and 39 to the non-perforated appendicitis group (36.1%). WBC, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio and DNI were significantly higher in the perforated group. In multiple logistic regression analyses, initial DNI was the only independent marker that can significantly predict the presence of perforation in multiple regression [odds ratio 9.38, 95% confidence interval (2.51-35.00), P=.001]. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed that DNI is a good predictor for the presence of appendiceal perforation at an optimal cut-off for DNI being 1.4% (sensitivity 67.7%, specificity 90.0%, AUC 0.807). Clinicians can reliably differentiate acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis by DNI level of 1.4 or more in elderly patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Four Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark-Weber, Amara G., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The author is pleased to introduce a new section in "TAJ," Four Questions. The structure is simple: four questions are asked to teaching artists working in various media and locations. The questions are always the same, but because each teaching artist's approach is unique, their answers will provide an insight into particular methodologies that…

  16. Ultrasound signs of acute appendicitis in children - clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegar-Zubovic, S.; Lincender, L.; Dizdarevic, S.; Sefic, I.; Dalagija, F.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Acute appendicitis is a leading cause of the abdominal pain in children that need an urgent surgical treatment. Neither of individually clinical variables doesn't have a real discriminational nor predictive strength to be used as the only diagnostic test. A goal of this study is to define ultrasound criteria of the acute appendicitis by appointing of ultrasound parameters for this pathological condition, determine the relation between ultrasound signs and pathohistological finding, determine the connection of several ultrasound signs with a degree of the inflammation of the acute appendicitis. Methods. In the prospective study with an ultrasound method we examine 50 patients with clinical signs of the acute abdomen. In these patients, the sonographic diagnosis is confirmed by the surgical finding, in fact with a pathohistological diagnosis. A basic, positive sonograph finding of the acute appendicitis was the identification of tubular, noncompresive, aperistaltic bowel which demonstrates a connection with coecum and blind terminal. In our work we analysed the lasting of the symptoms until the hospital intervention in patients stratified according to the pathohistological finding. We used ultrasound equipment- Toshiba Sonolayer with convex 3.75 MHz and linear 8 MHz probes. Results. From 8 ultrasound signs of the acute appendicitis, only an anterior-posterior (AP) diameter of appendices, FAT (width of periappendicular fat tissue) and a peristaltic absence are positive ultrasound signs of the acute appendicitis. Appendicitis phlegmonosa is the most common pathohistological finding in our study (44%). Perforate gangrenous appendicitis and gangrenous appendicitis are represented in more than half of patients (30% + 22%), which suggests a long period of persisting symptoms until a hospital treatment. A statistic analysis shows a great possibility for using values of AP diameter, width of periapendicular fat tissue, just like the values of mural thickness in

  17. Initial non-operative management of uncomplicated appendicitis in children: a protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial (APAC trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaapen, Max; van der Lee, Johanna H.; Bakx, Roel; The, Sarah-May L.; van Heurn, Ernst W. E.; Heij, Hugo A.; Gorter, Ramon R.; Rippen, H.; Bet, P. M.; Kazemier, G.; Kneepkens, C. M. F.; Wijnen, R.; Offringa, M.; Ahmadi, N.; Bonjer, H. J.; van Rijn, R. R.; Benninga, M. A.; Bemelman, W. A.; Hilarius, D. L.; van Veen, S. A. J. M.; Go, P. M. N. Y. H.; Cense, H. A.; de Vries, A.; Straatman, J.; in ’t Hof, K. H.; van Beek, E. J. A. H.; Bender, M. H. M.; van den Hill, L. C. L.; Bolhuis, H. W.; Treskes, K.; Bijlsma, T. S.; Geubbels, N.; de Blaauw, I.; Botden, S. M. B. I.; Leijdekkers, V. J.; Boonstra, M. C.; Rongen, L. H.; Boerma, E. J. G.; Luyer, M. D. P.; Vugts, G.; Copper, T.; Garssen, F. P.; Hulsker, C.; Visschers, R. G. J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Based on epidemiological, immunological and pathology data, the idea that appendicitis is not necessarily a progressive disease is gaining ground. Two types are distinguished: simple and complicated appendicitis. Non-operative treatment (NOT) of children with simple appendicitis has

  18. Asking Questions in Academia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity In academia the most important skill is to ask academically relevant and sound questions. This is not easy and students need to practice asking questions orally and in writing before they write research papers.......Motivation for the activity In academia the most important skill is to ask academically relevant and sound questions. This is not easy and students need to practice asking questions orally and in writing before they write research papers....

  19. The diagnostic value of barium enema in acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ga; Chung, Duck Soo; Kim, Ok Dong

    1986-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common acute surgical condition of the abdomen. When the clinical presentation is atypical, barium enema has proven to be safe and useful in confirming the diagnosis and reducing the negative surgical exploration. However, the performance of barium enema in acute appendicitis has known contraindication primarily because of fear of leakage by perforation of the inflamed appendix. This study using barium enema as a diagnostic aid in acute appendicitis with atypical clinical presentation was performed to further support the previously noted efficacy and safety of this procedure. The results were as followings: 1. In case of acute appendicitis with atypical clinical presentation, the use of barium enema as a diagnostic aid increased the accuracy of diagnosis and decreased the negative surgical exploration. In women between 11 to 50 years old age, especially, it played important role differentiating appendicitis from nonsurgical acute abdomen. 2. The results of the study were 92.31% in sensitivity, 7.69% in false positive, 6.9% in false negative, and 10.26% in negative appendectomy. 3. None of case of leakage of barium by perforation of the inflamed appendix was noted, therefore, barium enema was thought to be safe as a diagnostic aid in acute appendicitis. 4. A simple partial or non filling of appendix without other associated positive finding could not exclude appendicitis, therefore, close clinical observation was necessary. 5. The positive findings of barium enema and their sensitivity were as followings: 1. Non filling of appendix: 90% 2. Partial filling of appendix: 91.7% 3. Displacement or a local impression on terminal ileum: 100%

  20. Appendicitis with appendicular atresia: a rare presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Irfan; Majid, Zain; Rafiq, Ali; Fatima, Saba; Siddiqui, Osama Bin Zia

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common acute surgical condition; making appendectomy the most commonly performed emergency surgical procedure in the world. Anomalies of the appendix are relatively uncommon. However, their presence may alter the course of pre-operative diagnosis and the surgical treatment provided, leading to medico-legal issues in certain cases as well. We hereby present the case of a 17 year-old female who had the suggestive signs, symptoms and investigations of appendicular lump. She was managed according to the Ochsner-Sherren regimen and then underwent interval open appendectomy 6 weeks later. During the procedure, the findings of a 5 cm long appendix were noted. The base of the appendix was attached to the caecum, however there was complete mucosal discontinuity between the base and the remaining portion of the appendix. A fibrous strand connected the two blind ending parts together. After thorough literature search, the authors concluded that this is only the fourth reported case of appendicular atresia ever to have been reported. Considering the rarity of this finding we feel this could be of valuable interest to surgeons and readers alike PMID:26090015

  1. Questions and Answers about School-Age Children in Self-Care: A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan Work and Family Research Network, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Sloan Work and Family Research Network has prepared Fact Sheets that provide statistical answers to some important questions about work-family and work-life issues. This Fact Sheet includes statistics about Children in Self-Care, and answers the following questions about school-age children in self-care: (1) How many school-age children are in…

  2. CRP in acute appendicitis--is it a necessary investigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalesh, T; Shankar, M; Shankar, R

    2004-01-01

    Appendectomy is one of the commonest procedures in surgery. In spite of various investigations used to improve the accuracy of diagnosis, the rate of normal appendices removed is still about 15-30%. Many studies have investigated the role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in acute appendicitis, but with conflicting results. In a prospective, double blind study, blood for the measurement of serum C-reactive protein was collected pre-operatively from 192 children before going to the operating theatre for appendectomy. The histopathology was grouped into positive (acute appendicitis) and negative (normal appendix) and this was correlated with CRP values. CRP was normal in 14 out of 33 negative explorations (normal appendix on histopathology). The specificity and sensitivity of serum CRP was 42% and 91% respectively. The predictive value of a positive (raised CRP) and negative (normal CRP) test is 88% and 48% respectively. We conclude that neither raised nor normal CRP value is helpful in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. CRP is not a good tool for helping the surgeon make the diagnosis of appendicitis and it should not be measured in suspected appendicitis.

  3. Diagnosing perforated appendicitis in pediatric patients: a new model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogaard, Veerle A B; Euser, Sjoerd M; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; de Korte, Niels; Sanders, Dave G M; de Winter, Derek; Vergroesen, Diederik; van Groningen, Krijn; de Winter, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Studies have investigated sensitivity and specificity of symptoms and tests for diagnosing appendicitis in children. Less is known with regard to the predictive value of these symptoms and tests with respect to the severity of appendicitis. The aim of this study was to determine the predictive value of patient's characteristics and tests for discriminating between perforated and nonperforated appendicitis in children. Pediatric patients who underwent an appendectomy at Spaarne Hospital Hoofddorp, the Netherlands, between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013, were included. Baseline patient's characteristics, history, physical examination, laboratory data and results of ultrasounds were collected. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to determine predictors of perforation. In total, 375 patients were included in this study of which 97 children (25.9%) had significant signs of perforation. Univariate analysis showed that age, duration of complaints, temperature, vomiting, CRP, WBC, different findings on ultrasound and the diameter of the appendix were good predictors of a perforated appendicitis. The final multivariate prediction model included temperature, CRP, clearly visible appendix and free fluids on ultrasound and diameter of the appendix and resulted in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.91 showing sensitivity and specificity of respectively 85.2% and 81.2%. This prediction model can be used for identification of 'high-risk' children for a perforated appendicitis and might be helpful to prevent complications and longer hospitalization by bringing these children to theater earlier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The expert group health research and care after disasters and environmental crises: an analysis of research questions formulated by Dutch health authorities for the expert group between 2006 and 2016.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, D.; Dückers, M.L.; Yzermans, J.

    2017-01-01

    Study/Objective: The aim of this study is (1) to examine developments in the research questions, submitted to the Expert Group Health Research and Care after Disasters and Environmental Crises between 2006 and 2016, and (2) to explore implications of the research questions for the nature of advice

  5. Curiosity Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Jane; DeLorenzo, Chip

    2010-01-01

    Have you ever found yourself lecturing a child, with the best of intentions, in an attempt to help him or her learn a lesson or process a situation in a manner that you feel will be productive? Curiosity questions, which the authors also call What and How questions, help children process an experience, event, or natural consequence so that they…

  6. Nuclear questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Civilian and military nuclear questions fill a multitude of publications these days, especially after the Japanese tsunami and the Fukushima disaster. The author analyses some of them and highlights the links between civil and military nuclear industries, the realities of the nuclear cycle and related industrial questions before concluding on the controversial issue of weapons and their proliferation potential

  7. The Frequency Of Fungi In Doubtful Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Hashemi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: While nowadays,great attainments have been achieved in curing and preventing the pathogenic fungal infections, and some how there has been reduction in the number of occurrences, the occurrences of opportunistic infections have been increased. Since the study of fungal infections in various organs (e.g.digestive system is crucial ,and because of few study were done in this field in the world, it is decided to examine the apendectomide tissue for fungal contamination in Iran. Materials and Methods: The work has been done for six months. After oparation sergery the appendix tissue in two media (formalin & normal salin were carried out in the medical mycology laboratory at Tehran University of medical sciences. The specimens were examined directly and cultured in sabourauds dextrose agar with chloramphenicol (sc. In this experiment 200 appendicular tissues were examined. Results: Out of them some fungi were isolated in 10 cases included 4 Candida albican (40%, 2 Candida tropicalis (20%,1 Cryptococcus sp. (10%,1 Candida sp.and 2 Geotrichum sp. Cryptococcus sp. was identified with mycological methods. This isolation related to a young man that has a history for long contact to pigeon.some of the fungi specially yeast can be a part of mycoflora in digestive system but the finding of Cryptococcus is uncommon. Conclusion: In this study the fungi were isolated from 5% of appendisits and with pay attention to this finding that the most patients hadn.t background factors causing the proliferation of the fungal agents in the intestine, so with further studies it is probable to consider the fungi as the agents causing appendicitis in this patients.

  8. Value of ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.M.; Sandoval, E.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the utility of ultrasound in the diagnosis of diseases that can be confused with appendicitis or presenting with atypical clinical signs of appendiceal inflammation. Graded-compression ultrasound was performed in 226 patients presenting with pain in right iliac fossa. Twenty-three patients were excluded because of inconclusive examination. Appendicitis was confirmed intraoperatively in 98 cases. There was no appendiceal inflammation in 105 patients. A final diagnosis could not be reached in 26 cases (4.7%) and was considered to represent abdominal pain of unknown origin. Ultrasound provided the correct diagnosis in 72 of the 79 patients in whom a definitive diagnosis was reached (91.1%). A wide spectrum of pathologies was identified by ultrasound, including gastrointestinal complaints (n=51), gynecological disorders (n=10), bioliopancreatic abnormalities (n=4), urological diseases (n=3) and others (n=3). Ultrasound is useful in the differential diagnosis of patients with confusing clinical signs of appendicitis. (Author) 34 refs

  9. Recovery and convalescence after laparoscopic surgery for appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleif, Jakob; Vilandt, Jesper; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information about predictors for the duration of convalescence and the overall general wellbeing after laparoscopic surgery for suspected appendicitis is missing in the scientific literature. We aimed to describe and identify predictors for the duration of convalescence and the quality...... of recovery for patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for suspected appendicitis. METHODS: A prospective cohort of adult patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for suspected appendicitis was performed between July 2014 and December 2014. Patients completed a QoR-15 questionnaire six times during the 30-d...... predictors of the quality of recovery during the 30-d postoperative period. A 10% increase in the QoR-15 score increased the hazard ratio of 1.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.43, P = 0.002) for ending the period of convalescence. CONCLUSIONS: Duration of convalescence after laparoscopic surgery...

  10. Laparoscopic management of acute appendicitis in situs inversus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golash Vishwanath

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Situs inversus is often detected incidentally in adults during imaging for a acute surgical emergency. We present a case of acute appendicitis in an adult who was previously unaware about his situs anomaly. A laparoscopic approach is helpful to deal with this condition. A 40 year old man was admitted with history of acute left lower abdominal pain, with uncontrolled diabetic keto-acidosis. Clinically, he was diagnosed as acute diverticulitis with localized peritonitis. Subsequent imaging studies and laparoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of situs inversus and acute left- sided appendicitis. He successfully underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. His postoperative recovery was uneventful. Although technically more challenging because of the reverse laparoscopic view of the anatomy, the laparoscopic diagnosis and management of acute appendicitis is indicated in situs inversus.

  11. Imaging of appendicitis in adults; Bildgebung der Appendizitis beim Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karul, M.; Berliner, C.; Keller, S.; Yamamura, J. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tsui, T.Y. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of General, Visceral- and Thoracic Surgery

    2014-06-15

    Three imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Transabdominal ultrasound should be the first-line imaging test. Abdominal CT is superior to US and is required immediately in patients with atypical clinical presentation of appendicitis and suspected perforation. However, low-dose unenhanced CT is equal to standard-dose CT with intravenous contrast agents in the detection of five signs of acute appendicitis (thickened appendiceal wall more than 2 mm, cross-sectional diameter greater than 6 mm, periappendicitis, abscess, and appendicolith). MRI is necessary in pregnant women and young adults. This review illustrates the principles of state-of-the-art imaging techniques and their clinical relevance. (orig.)

  12. The impact of ultrasound in suspected acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracey, D.; McClure, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate prospectively the impact of an appendix ultrasound (US) service on the clinical management of patients presenting with suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and methods: The referring clinician completed a proforma for patients presenting with suspected acute appendicitis. Two visual analogue scales assessed clinical suspicion before and after knowledge of laboratory results. The clinician also indicated if they intended to operate had US been unavailable. During a 3-year period, 327 patients were examined by graded-compression US and diagnosed 'positive' or 'negative' for acute appendicitis. Findings were correlated with histopathology results. The referring clinician completed a retrospective audit questionnaire to assess user satisfaction. Results: Clinical suspicion was altered by knowledge of laboratory results. The decision to operate if US had been unavailable, was 'yes' in 70 cases (group A), 'no' in 231 (group B), and incomplete in 26 (group C). In group A, 31 patients (44.3%) had a negative US and 25 avoided surgery. US identified 39 cases of appendicitis and 37 appendicectomies confirmed appendicitis in 34 cases. In group B, 72 (31.2%) patients had a positive US and 66 appendicectomies confirmed 51 cases of appendicitis. The sensitivity of US was 94.7% in group A, 93.3% in group B and 93.8% overall. Specificity was 90.6% in group A, 91.2% in group B and 91.3% overall. US findings were contrary to intended surgical management in 103 cases. Management was altered in 97 cases (32.2%), with a positive outcome in 85 (28.2%). The referrers found US of appendix very useful in planning appropriate management. Conclusion: US of the appendix increases diagnostic accuracy, alters management and is more sensitive and specific than clinical impression, either alone, or in conjunction with laboratory results

  13. COMPARISON BETWEEN RIPASA AND ALVARADO SCORING IN DIAGNOSING ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Subramani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute appendicitis is one of the most common cause of acute abdominal pain and emergency appendicectomy is the most common emergency surgery. The diagnosis of appendicitis is confirmed by histopathological examination that is not possible before appendicectomy. The negative exploration remains high in the rate of about 15-30%. 1 Scoring systems based on history, clinical examination and basic investigations are there in aiding the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and decreasing negative exploration. This study compares RIPASA and ALVARADO scoring systems in diagnosing acute appendicitis. 2 MATERIALS AND METHODS A comparative study was done between November 2014 to June 2015. Patients diagnosed as acute appendicitis in Department of General Surgery, Government Royapettah Hospital. 100 of them are to be selected on the basis of nonprobability (purposive sampling method. After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 96 were enrolled into the study. A full history, clinical examination and both scoring systems were done on the patients. RESULTS In 96 patients, 46 patients (48% were male and 50 patients (52% were female. 65 patients underwent emergency appendicectomy based on the clinical decision. The sensitivity and specificity of the RIPASA scoring system was 98.0% and 80.43%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the ALVARADO scoring system was 80.43% and 86.95%, respectively. The PPV (positive predictive value of RIPASA and ALVARADO was 84% and 85%, respectively. The NPP (negative predictive value of RIPASA and ALVARADO was 97% and 71%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy was 89% for RIPASA and 77% for ALVARADO. CONCLUSION The RIPASA scoring is better than ALVARADO scoring in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

  14. Risk of appendicitis in patients with incidentally discovered appendicoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Sohaib; Chaudhry, Mustafa Belal Hafeez; Shahzad, Noman; Tariq, Marvi; Memon, Wasim Ahmed; Alvi, Abdul Rehman

    2018-01-01

    An appendicolith-related appendiceal obstruction leading to appendicitis is a commonly encountered surgical emergency that has clear evidence-based management plans. However, there is no consensus on management of asymptomatic patients when appendicoliths are found incidentally. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of appendicitis in patients with an incidental finding of the appendicolith. A retrospective matched cohort study of patients with appendicolith discovered incidentally on computed tomographic scan from January 2008 to December 2014 at our institution was completed. The size and position of the appendicolith were ascertained. The study group was matched by age and gender to a control group. Both groups were contacted and interviewed regarding development of appendicitis. In total, 111 patients with appendicolith were successfully contacted and included in the study. Mean age was found to be 38 ± 15 y with 36 (32%) of the study population being females. Mean length of appendix was 66 ± 16 mm, and mean width was 5.8 ± 0.9 mm. Mean size of the appendicolith was 3.6 ± 1.1 mm (1.4-7.8 mm). Fifty-eight percent of appendicoliths was located at the proximal end or whole of appendix, 31% at mid area, and 11% at the distal end of appendix. All patients of the study and control groups were contacted, and at a mean follow-up of 4.0 ± 1.7 y, there was no occurrence of acute appendicitis in either group. Patients with incidentally discovered appendicolith on radiological imaging did not develop appendicitis. Hence, the risk of developing acute appendicitis for these patients does not seem higher than the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: an implemented program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Gustas, Cristy N.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Mail Code H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Geeting, Glenn [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Emergent MRI is now a viable alternative to CT for evaluating appendicitis while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. However, primary employment of MRI in the setting of clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis has remained significantly underutilized. To describe our institution's development and the results of a fully implemented clinical program using MRI as the primary imaging evaluation for children with suspected appendicitis. A four-sequence MRI protocol consisting of coronal and axial single-shot turbo spin-echo (SS-TSE) T2, coronal spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and axial SS-TSE T2 with fat saturation was performed on 208 children, ages 3 to 17 years, with clinically suspected appendicitis. No intravenous or oral contrast material was administered. No sedation was administered. Data collection includes two separate areas: time parameter analysis and MRI diagnostic results. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for pediatric appendicitis indicated a sensitivity of 97.6% (CI: 87.1-99.9%), specificity 97.0% (CI: 93.2-99.0%), positive predictive value 88.9% (CI: 76.0-96.3%), and negative predictive value 99.4% (CI: 96.6-99.9%). Time parameter analysis indicated clinical feasibility, with time requested to first sequence obtained mean of 78.7 +/- 52.5 min, median 65 min; first-to-last sequence time stamp mean 14.2 +/- 8.8 min, median 12 min; last sequence to report mean 57.4 +/- 35.2 min, median 46 min. Mean age was 11.2 +/- 3.6 years old. Girls represented 57% of patients. MRI is an effective and efficient method of imaging children with clinically suspected appendicitis. Using an expedited four-sequence protocol, sensitivity and specificity are comparable to CT while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  16. Phonological loop affects children's interpretations of explicit but not ambiguous questions: Research on links between working memory and referent assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianwei; Murakami, Taro; Hashiya, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the referent of other's utterance by referring the contextual information helps in smooth communication. Although this pragmatic referential process can be observed even in infants, its underlying mechanism and relative abilities remain unclear. This study aimed to comprehend the background of the referential process by investigating whether the phonological loop affected the referent assignment. A total of 76 children (43 girls) aged 3-5 years participated in a reference assignment task in which an experimenter asked them to answer explicit (e.g., "What color is this?") and ambiguous (e.g., "What about this?") questions about colorful objects. The phonological loop capacity was measured by using the forward digit span task in which children were required to repeat the numbers as an experimenter uttered them. The results showed that the scores of the forward digit span task positively predicted correct response to explicit questions and part of the ambiguous questions. That is, the phonological loop capacity did not have effects on referent assignment in response to ambiguous questions that were asked after a topic shift of the explicit questions and thus required a backward reference to the preceding explicit questions to detect the intent of the current ambiguous questions. These results suggest that although the phonological loop capacity could overtly enhance the storage of verbal information, it does not seem to directly contribute to the pragmatic referential process, which might require further social cognitive processes.

  17. Phonological loop affects children's interpretations of explicit but not ambiguous questions: Research on links between working memory and referent assignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwei Meng

    Full Text Available Understanding the referent of other's utterance by referring the contextual information helps in smooth communication. Although this pragmatic referential process can be observed even in infants, its underlying mechanism and relative abilities remain unclear. This study aimed to comprehend the background of the referential process by investigating whether the phonological loop affected the referent assignment. A total of 76 children (43 girls aged 3-5 years participated in a reference assignment task in which an experimenter asked them to answer explicit (e.g., "What color is this?" and ambiguous (e.g., "What about this?" questions about colorful objects. The phonological loop capacity was measured by using the forward digit span task in which children were required to repeat the numbers as an experimenter uttered them. The results showed that the scores of the forward digit span task positively predicted correct response to explicit questions and part of the ambiguous questions. That is, the phonological loop capacity did not have effects on referent assignment in response to ambiguous questions that were asked after a topic shift of the explicit questions and thus required a backward reference to the preceding explicit questions to detect the intent of the current ambiguous questions. These results suggest that although the phonological loop capacity could overtly enhance the storage of verbal information, it does not seem to directly contribute to the pragmatic referential process, which might require further social cognitive processes.

  18. Appendiceal and ovarian Burkitt's lymphoma presenting as acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donovan Hui

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Burkitt's lymphoma is an extremely aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with the sporadic form of Burkitt's lymphoma typically present with a rapidly growing abdominal mass, pain and distension. Involvement of either the appendix and/or ovaries in females is a rare manifestation of the disease. We present an unusual case of a 13 year old girl with appendiceal and ovarian Burkitt's lymphoma presenting with signs of acute appendicitis. This case demonstrates the potential for secondary involvement of the appendix and/or ovaries from Burkitt's lymphoma as well as the importance of the histopathology. Keywords: Appendicitis, Appendix, Burkitt's lymphoma, Lymphoma, Ovarian tumor

  19. Case report of recurrent acute appendicitis in a residual tip.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, Donal P

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Residual appendicitis involving the stump of the appendix has been well described in the literature in the past. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 43 year old male with acute onset of abdominal pain who had undergone an appendicectomy ten years previously. Ultrasound revealed the presence of an inflamed tubular structure. Subsequent laparotomy and histology confirmed that this structure was an inflamed residual appendiceal tip. CONCLUSION: Residual tip appendicitis has not been reported in the literature previously and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of localised peritonitis in a patient with a history of a previous open appendicectomy.

  20. Imaging findings of perforative appendicitis: a pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, K.L.; Patrick, L.E.; Ball, T.I. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Egleston, GA (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Appendicitis is common in children. Early diagnosis depends on recognition of characteristic signs and symptoms: right lower quadrant or periumbilical pain, localized tenderness, fever, and leukocytosis. Because these classic features may be difficult to elicit or masked by other complaints, the incidence of perforative appendicitis in children is high. This paper reviews the imaging sequelae with emphasis on CT and sonography findings. Areas of focus include abdominopelvic abscess, peritonitis, pyelephlebitis, pyelethrombosis, and hepatic abscess. Secondary involvement of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts is also discussed. (orig.)

  1. Oral antibiotics for perforated appendicitis is not recommended

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    In the majority of surgical departments in Denmark, the postoperative treatment for acute perforated appendicitis comprises three days of intravenous antibiotics. Recently, it has been proposed that such antibiotic regimen should be replaced by orally administered antibiotics. The aim of this paper...... was to give an overview of studies on acute perforated appendicitis with postoperative oral antibiotics. Five studies were found in a database search covering the 1966-2009 period. There is no evidence to support a conversion of the postoperative antibiotic regimen from intravenous to oral administration...

  2. Acute appendicitis mistaken as acute rejection in renal transplant recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talwalkar N

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Case histories of 2 renal transplant recipients are reported who had presenting features of fever, leukocytosis and pain/tenderness over right iliac fossa and were diagnosed to be due to acute appendicitis rather than more commonly suspected acute rejection episode which has very similar features. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis was suspected on the basis of rectal examination and later confirmed by laparotomy. The purpose of this communication is to emphasize the need for proper diagnosis in patient with such presentation; otherwise wrong treatment may be received.

  3. Cecal diverticulitis mimicking acute Appendicitis: a report of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtulus Idris

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diverticulum of the cecum is a rare, benign, generally asymptomatic lesion that manifests itself only following inflammatory or hemorrhagic complications. Most patients with inflammation of a solitary diverticulum of the cecum present with abdominal pain that is indistinguishable from acute appendicitis. The optimal management of this condition is still controversial, ranging from conservative antibiotic treatment to aggressive resection. We describe four cases that presented with symptoms suggestive of appendicitis, but were found at operation to have an inflamed solitary diverticulum.

  4. Legacy question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    The legacy question discussed refers to the definition of appropriate actions in this generation to provide a world that will allow future generations to use the earth without excessive limitations caused by our use and disposal of potentially hazardous materials

  5. The role of imaging in children with suspected appendicitis: the UK perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of uncomplicated acute appendicitis is often straightforward, allowing timely appendicectomy without the need for expensive tests or imaging. Repeated clinical examination by an experienced surgeon has traditionally been the key to making the diagnosis in both straightforward and difficult cases. Nonetheless, all surgeons will remove some normal appendices. Sometimes it can be particularly difficult to make the diagnosis, especially in the child under 5 years of age, in teenage girls, in young women and in the elderly. When difficult to make, the diagnosis may be significantly delayed and since the pathology is progressive, the patient may suffer potentially avoidable complications. This paper looks at two potential roles for imaging. Firstly, can imaging, applied selectively, help make the difficult diagnosis less difficult and so reduce delays and morbidity? Secondly, could imaging all patients with suspected appendicitis reduce the number of normal appendices removed from children who seem to have all the signs and symptoms of straightforward uncomplicated acute appendicitis but who actually have presumed self-resolving non-appendiceal pathology? The answer to these questions may depend on three factors that are not entirely independent: a surgical unit's current audited negative appendicectomy rate, population base/case mix and the expertise of the examining surgeon. Individual surgeons and some surgical units, by policy, use modern imaging techniques with quite different frequencies that may be appropriate depending on these three factors. This article argues that a careful history and repeated clinical examination is the key to making the diagnosis, with imaging, primarily ultrasonography, being used in patients with a palpable mass or in those having had 48 h of hospital observation without progress. In Europe, imaging has played a limited role in the investigation of the child with suspected appendicitis with the diagnosis relying on repeated

  6. Research and Teaching: Correlations between Students' Written Responses to Lecture-Tutorial Questions and Their Understandings of Key Astrophysics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrode, Jeffrey; Prather, Edward E.; Wallace, Colin S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the correlations between students' understandings of introductory astronomy concepts and the correctness and coherency of their written responses to targeted Lecture-Tutorial questions.

  7. A Question of Control? Examining the Role of Control Conditions in Experimental Psychopathology using the Example of Cognitive Bias Modification Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Simon E; Woud, Marcella L; MacLeod, Colin

    2017-10-26

    While control conditions are vitally important in research, selecting the optimal control condition can be challenging. Problems are likely to arise when the choice of control condition is not tightly guided by the specific question that a given study aims to address. Such problems have become increasingly apparent in experimental psychopathology research investigating the experimental modification of cognitive biases, particularly as the focus of this research has shifted from theoretical questions concerning mechanistic aspects of the association between cognitive bias and emotional vulnerability, to questions that instead concern the clinical efficacy of 'cognitive bias modification' (CBM) procedures. We discuss the kinds of control conditions that have typically been employed in CBM research, illustrating how difficulties can arise when changes in the types of research questions asked are not accompanied by changes in the control conditions employed. Crucially, claims made on the basis of comparing active and control conditions within CBM studies should be restricted to those conclusions allowed by the specific control condition employed. CBM studies aiming to establish clinical utility are likely to require quite different control conditions from CBM studies aiming to illuminate mechanisms. Further, conclusions concerning the clinical utility of CBM interventions cannot necessarily be drawn from studies in which the control condition has been chosen to answer questions concerning mechanisms. Appreciating the need to appropriately alter control conditions in the transition from basic mechanisms-focussed investigations to applied clinical research could greatly facilitate the translational process.

  8. Faecal loading in the cecum as a new radiological sign of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroianu, Andy

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Although the radiological features of acute appendicitis have been well documented, the value of the plain radiography has not been fully appreciated. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the association of acute appendicitis and images of faecal loading in the cecum. Methods: Plain abdominal radiographs of 100 consecutive adult patients operated on acute appendicitis were assessed. The presence of faecal loading was registered. Results: The presence of faecal loading in the cecum occurred in 97 of the cases of acute appendicitis. Conclusion: This study seems to demonstrate that the presence of radiological images of faecal loading in the cecum may be a useful sign of acute appendicitis

  9. Omental infarction in children misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Omental infarction (OI) is a rare cause of acute abdomen in children. It is found in 0.1–0.5% of pediatric patients undergoing abdominal exploration for the suspect of acute appendicitis. OI is considered a self-limited entity, and conservative management should be considered. This approach implicates computer tomography ...

  10. Mean Platelet volume in diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA) in children is still problematic in status. Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic value of mean platelet volume (MPV) in acute AA at childhood. Methods: One hundred patients diagnosed as AA patients and 100 healthy individuals. Laboratory tests were studied ...

  11. Endometriosis of the appendix presenting as acute appendicitis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endometriosis is a common disease generally, but appendiceal endometriosis causing acute appendicitis is a very uncommon clinical phenomenon and a few cases have been reported. The authors aim to highlight the rarity of such clinical entity in Nigeria. A 29 year old nulliparous woman presented with severe right iliac ...

  12. Acute appendicitis in Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hospital is a tertiary care facility in competition with a large number of private hospitals with different levels of competence. Objective: The objective of the study is to review the outcome of the surgical management of acute appendicitis in our hospital. Method: A retrospective study of subjects who had appendectomy for ...

  13. Case Report - Missed appendicitis after self-induced abortion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She was eventually referred to a rural District Hospital, where a laparotomy demonstrated acute appendicitis. After treating herself for a self-diagnosed pregnancy with illegally provided misoprostol, this patient presented with persistent lower abdominal pain. The differential diagnosis included ectopic pregnancy and all ...

  14. Uncommon mimics of appendicitis: Giant mucocele | Zahid | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appendiceal mucocele is an infrequent but well recognized entity that can present with a variety of clinical syndromes or can be asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. A 55 years old patient was admitted in the emergency department for acute right lower quadrant pain. A diagnosis of appendicitis was made.

  15. Trans-umbilical Laparoscopic Appendectomy for Acute Appendicitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trans-umbilical Laparoscopic Appendectomy for Acute Appendicitis without Raising Skin-flaps: An Easy-to-use Modification Applied to the Series of 164 Patients from a Rural Institute of Central India. Priyadarshan Anand Jategaonkar, Sudeep Pradeep Yadav1. INTRODUCTION. Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is widely ...

  16. Acute appendicitis: An overview | Saidi | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To provide an overview of the changing epidemiology of acute appendicitis in the developed and developing countries and the presumptive reasons. Data source: Major published series of the last two decades were reviewed using Medline Search and Index Medicus. The myriad of diagnostic approaches ...

  17. A paratubal cyst associated with flegmonous appendicitis: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appendicitis: a case report and review of literature. Volkan S. Erikci a. , Demet Payza a. , Malik Ergin b and Mu¨nevver Ho ¸sgo¨ r a. Paratubal cysts (PTCs) are rare clinical entities and are believed to originate from the mesothelium or to be a remnant of Mullerian duct and Wolffian duct. These masses have been reported in ...

  18. Acute Appendicitis: Incidence and Management in Nigeria | Alatise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appendicitis is the leading cause of surgical emergency admission in most hospital in Nigeria. It accounts for about 15-40% of all emergency surgery done in most centers in the country. All age groups can develop the disease including the fetus in utero, but the incidence is higher in the second and third decade of life.

  19. Endometriosis of the meso-appendix mimicking appendicitis: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    urine examination were both negative. A diagnosis of appendicitis was entertained; however, in light of her gynaecological history, a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed. The CT scan revealed a mildly enlarged appendix (measuring 8.2 mm in cross- section), with rim enhancement and minimal surrounding fat.

  20. Torsion of an Epiploic Appendix Pretending as Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Ahmad Malik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Torsion of an epiploic appendix is a rare surgical entity. Its unusual symptomatology, wide variation in physical findings and the absence of helpful laboratory and radiological studies makes it very difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. This is a report of this rare entity found in a patient upon diagnostic laparoscopy performed for suspected acute appendicitis

  1. Analysis on misdiagnosed cases of right colon cancer as appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case report is to investigate the causes of misdiagnosing right colon cancer as appendicitis, in order to reduce the misdiagnosis rate. The process of diagnosing and treating 44 misdiagnosed right colon cancer cases was analyzed. It was found that the right colonic lumen in these patients was thick, and their cancer consisted mostly of the ulcerative type or of a cauliflower-like tumor that protruded into the intestinal cavity. Moreover, ring-shaped and structured cancer was rarely observed, which suggested a decreased likelihood of obstruction. The patients showed limited peritoneal irritation signs in their right lower abdomen, which was also a potential cause for misdiagnosis. Right colon cancer associated with appendicitis is easily misdiagnosed as simple appendicitis, chronic appendicitis, or appendiceal abscess. Therefore, it is necessary to raise general awareness on the manifestations of the disease in order to exclude other common complications during diagnosis and to reduce the misdiagnosis rate. An accurate early diagnosis and treatment will improve patient prognosis.

  2. Venstresidig appendicitis forårsaget af intestinal malrotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilangkovan, Nivethitha; Rindom, Alesia; Mogensen, Christian Backer

    2013-01-01

    Left-sided appendicitis due to malrotation is a rare condition with an atypical presentation. We report a history of a 31-year-old man who had four days of right-sided abdominal pain, moving across lower abdomen and tenderness in both right and left side on examination. A computed tomography...

  3. Richtlijn voor diagnostiek en behandeling van acute appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O. J.; Go, P. M. N. Y. H.; Puylaert, J. B. C. M.; Kazemier, G.; Heij, H. A.

    2010-01-01

    - Every year, over 2500 unnecessary appendectomies are carried out in the Netherlands. - At the initiative of the Dutch College of Surgeons, the evidence-based guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis was developed. - This guideline recommends that appendectomy should not be

  4. CT diagnosis of appendicitis. Usefulness for staging of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Tadafumi; Sugimura, Kazurou

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine signs and indexes useful for differentiating grades of appendicitis (catarrhal, phlegmonous, gangrenous). We assessed CT findings of 98 cases of appendicitis retrospectively. Nonenhanced CT scans were obtained in 83 cases and enhanced scans in 15 cases. No patients were given oral or colon contrast media. Each examination was performed from the level of the diaphragm to the pubic symphysis with 10 mm or 7 mm slice thickness and intervals. All images were examined for CT signs of appendicitis and the diameter and appearance of the appendix. We statistically analyzed the results and white blood cell count. We detected an abnormal appendix in 88 cases. Two CT signs identified and their sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, included fat stranding around the appendix (92.2%, 81.8%, 90.9%) and indistinct wall of the appendix (63.9%, 94.2%, 81.8%). The diameter of the appendix differed significantly among the three grades (p=0.0008). The appearance of the appendix could be divided into 5 types, which exhibited correlation with the grades, although white blood cell count did not (p=0.1988). Fat stranding and indistinct wall, and appendix diameter and CT appearances provided useful signs and indexes for staging of appendicitis. (author)

  5. Systematic review of nonoperative versus operative treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Ramon R; The, Sarah-May M L; Gorter-Stam, Marguerite A W; Eker, Hasan H; Bakx, Roel; van der Lee, Johanna H; Heij, Hugo A

    2017-08-01

    To compare the risk of complications between initial nonoperative treatment and appendectomy of uncomplicated (simple) appendicitis in children. Systematic literature search. Eligible for inclusion were both and randomized controlled trials and cohort studies including children in which the outcome of nonoperative treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis was reported with a minimum follow-up period of one year. Two authors extracted data independently and assessed quality. Primary outcome parameter was the percentage of children experiencing complications. Secondary outcomes were early failures, recurrent appendicitis and appendectomies, for all indications and on request. Five of the 2051 articles screened were eligible for inclusion, including 147 children (nonoperative treatment) and 173 children (appendectomy) with one year follow-up. Percentage of children experiencing complications ranged from 0 to 13% versus 0-17% for nonoperative and appendectomy, respectively. Nonoperative treatment avoided an appendectomy in 62-81% of the children after one year follow-up. The evidence base for initial nonoperative treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis in children is by far insufficient. It suggests that the percentage of patients experiencing complications in the initial nonoperative treatment group is comparable to the appendectomy group, and it may avoid an appendectomy in the large majority of children after one year follow-up. Systematic review. 1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ileocecocolic Intussusception Induced by Acute Appendicitis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Bang Sil; Kim, Min Jeong; Jang, Kyung Mi; Lee, Hyun; Jeon, Eui Yong; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Intussusception is a rare disease in adults. Moreover, appendiceal disease is very rarely the leading cause of adult intussusception. We report a case in which ileocecocolic intussusception is secondary to an acute appendicitis in an adult, and describe the radiologic, clinical, and pathologic findings.

  7. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Achiam, Michael

    2011-01-01

    patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate (kappa=0.51) and fair (kappa=0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute...

  8. Elderly versus young patients with appendicitis 3 years experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elderly group of patients had perforated appendix in 16 cases (69.5%) while in group II patients eight cases (20%) had perforated appendix. Conclusion: Acute appendicitis in the elderly remains a challenge for practicing surgeons and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Results might improve with ...

  9. Perforated appendicitis: Risk factors and outcomes of management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case files of patients with perforated appendicitis were analysed in relation to age, sex, clinical presentation, management and outcome of management. The aim was to detect the main factors that contributed to the perforation of the appendix in these patients and assess the effectiveness of the treatment offered.

  10. On the Science of Embodied Cognition in the 2010s: Research Questions, Appropriate Reductionism, and Testable Explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    "The Journal of the Learning Sciences" has devoted this special issue to the study of embodied cognition (as it applies to mathematics), a topic that for several decades has gained attention in the cognitive sciences and in mathematics education, in particular. In this commentary, the author aims to address crucial questions in embodied…

  11. Will the Real Author Come Forward? Questions of Ethics, Plagiarism, Theft and Collusion in Academic Research Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Pat

    2009-01-01

    This paper raises some questions about academic authorial honesty under the headings of Plagiarism (including self-plagiarism), Theft, and Collusion. Compared with the medical sciences, the social sciences in general and education specifically, lag behind in terms of critical attention being paid to the problem of plagiarism, the peer review…

  12. Research perspectives on the public and fire management: a synthesis of current social science on eight essential questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah M. McCaffrey; Christine S. Olsen

    2012-01-01

    As part of a Joint Fire Science Program project, a team of social scientists reviewed existing fire social science literature to develop a targeted synthesis of scientific knowledge on the following questions: 1. What is the public's understanding of fire's role in the ecosystem? 2. Who are trusted sources of information about fire? 3. What are the public...

  13. Randomized clinical trial of antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H C; Kim, M J; Lee, B H

    2017-12-01

    Uncomplicated appendicitis may resolve spontaneously or require treatment with antibiotics or appendicectomy. The aim of this randomized trial was to compare the outcome of a non-antibiotic management strategy with that of antibiotic therapy in uncomplicated appendicitis. Patients presenting to a university teaching hospital with CT-verified uncomplicated simple appendicitis (appendiceal diameter no larger than 11 mm and without any signs of perforation) were randomized to management with a no-antibiotic regimen with supportive care (intravenous fluids, analgesia and antipyretics as necessary) or a 4-day course of antibiotics with supportive care. The primary endpoint was rate of total treatment failure, defined as initial treatment failure within 1 month and recurrence of appendicitis during the follow-up period. Some 245 patients were randomized within the trial, and followed up for a median of 19 months. The duration of hospital stay was shorter (mean 3·1 versus 3·7 days; P antibiotics. There was no difference in total treatment failure rate between the groups: 29 of 124 (23·4 per cent) in the no-antibiotic group and 25 of 121 (20·7 per cent) in the antibiotic group (P = 0·609). Eighteen patients (9 in each group) had initial treatment failure, 15 of whom underwent appendicectomy and three received additional antibiotics. Thirty-six patients (20 in the no-antibiotic group, 16 in the antibiotic group) experienced recurrence, of whom 30 underwent appendicectomy and six received further antibiotics. Treatment failure rates in patients presenting with CT-confirmed uncomplicated appendicitis appeared similar among those receiving supportive care with either a no-antibiotic regimen or a 4-day course of antibiotics. Registration number: KCT0000124 ( http://cris.nih.go.kr). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Association between climatic elements and acute appendicitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasuto; Kojimahara, Noriko; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Endo, Motoki; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2017-05-01

    In Japan, it has been reported that an increase in atmospheric pressure is associated with a higher incidence of acute appendicitis. The aim of this epidemiologic study was to investigate the association between climatic elements and the incidence of acute appendicitis. A case-crossover design was used in the present study. Two wk before diagnosis was used for the target period. The same 2-wk period, but 1, 2, and 3 y before diagnosis, was used for the control period. The study participants were patients with acute appendicitis (10-29 y) from 14 facilities in the Greater Tokyo Area. Mean of the observed values for atmospheric pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and hours of sunshine calculated for each target and control period were used as climatic elements to investigate trends 1 and 2 wk before diagnosis. The year of diagnosis, a statistically significant moderate upward trend in atmospheric pressure was observed during the 2-wk period before diagnosis of acute appendicitis (tau = 0.47; P = 0.0213), whereas a weak nonsignificant downward trend was observed 1 y before diagnosis (tau = -0.29; P = 0.1596), and weak nonsignificant upward trends were observed 2 (tau = 0.24; P = 0.2505) and 3 y (tau = 0.28; P = 0.1634) before diagnosis. An association was found between atmospheric pressure and the incidence of acute appendicitis. However, no significant differences were found in relation to sex or age. These findings suggest that changes in atmospheric pressure are associated with the likelihood of patients visiting the hospital. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elcha@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Balslev, Ingegerd, E-mail: inbal@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Achiam, Michael, E-mail: micach01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Nielsen, Yousef W., E-mail: yujwni01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Adamsen, Sven, E-mail: svad@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Gocht-Jensen, Peter, E-mail: petgoc01@heh.reginh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Brisling, Steffen K., E-mail: stkibr01@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke B., E-mail: viloe@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S., E-mail: heth@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. Materials and methods: The prospective study included 48 consecutive patients (29 female, 19 male, 18-70 years old, mean age = 37.1 years). MRI examination was designed to be comfortable and fast; no contrast was administered. The sequences were performed during quiet respiration. The MRI findings were reviewed by two radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. Results: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14 patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate ({kappa} = 0.51) and fair ({kappa} = 0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute appendicitis were found between the reviewers. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values for overall performance of MRI in detecting pelvic abnormalities were 100%, 75% (3 of 4 healthy patients were identified by MRI) and 98%, respectively. Conclusion: Unenhanced fast MRI is feasible as an additional fast screening before the appendectomy. It may prevent unnecessary surgeries. The fast MRI examination can be adequately performed on an MRI unit of broad range of field strengths.

  16. Thousand Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    (perhaps as an expanded Turing test) on its listeners. These questions are extracted in real-time from Twitter with the keyword search of the ‘?’ symbol to create a spatio-temporal experience. The computerized voice the audience hears is a collective one, an entanglement of humans and non-humans......In this work the network asks “If I wrote you a love letter would you write back?” Like the love letters which appeared mysteriously on the noticeboards of Manchester University’s Computer Department in the 1950s, thousands of texts circulate as computational processes perform the questions......, that circulates across networks. If I wrote you a love letter would you write back? (and thousands of other questions’ ) (封不回的情書?千言萬語無人回 was commissioned by the Microwave International New Media Festival 2012....

  17. Asking the Right Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Line

    Based on fieldwork in Mali this paper discusses the role of anthropology (and the anthropologist) in a large public health research project on children's health. In the uncertainty and disquiet that comes with the battle to combat and avoid diseases in a setting where poverty and abysmal diseases......, is the ability to move beyond even the best hidden assumptions and question our own questions, thereby enabling us to ask the right questions....

  18. Translating Answers to Open-Ended Survey Questions in Cross-Cultural Research: A Case Study on the Interplay between Translation, Coding, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Dorothée

    2015-01-01

    Open-ended probing questions in cross-cultural surveys help uncover equivalence problems in cross-cultural survey research. For languages that a project team does not understand, probe answers need to be translated into a common project language. This article presents a case study on translating open-ended, that is, narrative answers. It describes…

  19. Internet Research: The Question of Method - A Keynote Address from the YouTube and the 2008 Election Cycle in the United States Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, R.

    2010-01-01

    Digital studies on culture may be distinguished from cultural studies of the digital, at least in terms of method. This lecture takes up the question of the distinctiveness of "digital methods" for researching Internet cultures. It asks, initially, should the methods of study change, however

  20. Mimicry of Appendicitis Symptomatology in Congenital Anomalies and Diseases of the Genitourinary System and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpiaz, Amanda; Gandhi, Jason; Smith, Noel L.; Dagur, Gautam; Schwamb, Richard; Weissbart, Steven J.; Khan, Sardar Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Appendicitis is a prevailing cause of acute abdomen, but is often difficult to diagnose due to its wide range of symptoms, anatomical variations, and developmental abnormalities. Urological disorders of the genitourinary tract may be closely related to appendicitis due to the close proximity of the appendix to the genitourinary tract. This review provides a summary of the urological complications and simulations of appendicitis. Both typical and urological symptoms of appendicitis are discussed, as well as recommended diagnostic and treatment methods. Methods Medline searches were conducted via PubMed in order to incorporate data from the recent and early literature. Results Urological manifestations of appendicitis affect the adrenal glands, kidney, retroperitoneum, ureter, bladder, prostate, scrotum, and penis. Appendicitis in pregnancy is difficult to diagnose due to variations in appendiceal position and trimester-specific symptoms. Ultrasound, CT, and MRI are used in diagnosis of appendicitis and its complications. Treatment of appendicitis may be done via open appendectomy or laparoscopic appendectomy. In some cases, other surgeries are required to treat urological complications, though surgery may be avoided completely in other cases. Conclusion Clinical presentation and complications of appendicitis vary among patients, especially when the genitourinary tract is involved. Appendicitis may mimic urological disorders and vice versa. Awareness of differential diagnosis and proper diagnostic techniques is important in preventing delayed diagnosis and possible complications. MRI is recommended for diagnosis of pregnant patients. Ultrasound is preferred in patients exhibiting typical symptoms. PMID:28413377

  1. Comparison of helical computed tomography and ultrasonography in diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafees, M.; Abbas, G.; Sarwar, S.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of helical computed tomography and ultrasonography in acute appendicitis using histopathology as gold standard. Thirty cases of clinically suspected acute appendicitis were included in the study selected on non probability convenience sampling technique. Computed tomography and graded compression ultrasonography of right lower quadrant of abdomen were conducted and results compared with histopathological findings. Amongst 30 patients who underwent computed tomography and graded compression ultrasonography examinations of right lower quadrant for diagnosis of acute appendicitis, on computed tomography 19 were diagnosed with acute appendicitis, 10 were diagnosed as not having the disease and 01 patient diagnosed as not having appendicitis on computed tomography did not improve clinically, was operated upon and histopathology proved it as acute appendicitis. While on graded compression ultrasonography 15 were diagnosed with acute appendicitis, 11 were diagnosed as not having the disease and 04 patients diagnosed as not having appendicitis on ultrasonography, did not improve clinically, were operated upon and histopathology proved it as acute appendicitis. This showed that CT scan has sensitivity of 95%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 90.91% and overall accuracy of 96.67% while ultrasonography has sensitivity of 78.9%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 73.33% and overall accuracy of 86.67%. We concluded that Helical computed tomography is highly accurate in diagnosing acute appendicitis as compared to ultrasonography and it helps to reduce negative appendectomy rate. (author)

  2. Report on achievements of research and development of a technology to apply human senses to measurements in fiscal 1994. 3. Appended data; 1994 nendo ningen kankaku keisoku oyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu. 3. Fuzoku shiryohen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    From among the achievements of research and development of a technology to apply human senses to measurements in fiscal 1994, candidates considered to fall under the know-how were picked up. Those enumerated in composite measurement of physiological functions to measure stresses are the skin impedance and continuous blood pressure measuring device, and in contact-free skin temperature measurement, the procedure for data communication and image processing inside the devices. The method for making thermopile elements for tympanum temperature sensor proto-model, element output amplification circuit, and thermister output conversion circuit were enumerated in the living organism activity and living organism rhythm measurements. Development of a nonrestraint accelerated pulse meter was also described. The method for recording parameter file names in impulse response measurement by using audio signals was enumerated in the composite acoustic environment presenting, evaluating and improving methods. The warm heat comfort evaluating method by using a human body thermal model, and the sense volume estimating method by using skin temperatures were also enumerated. The stress measurement and the stress relaxing technology using scent were also described. The space-type human interface adapted to human senses, and comfort meter development were also enumerated. (NEDO)

  3. Improving ultrasound for appendicitis through standardized reporting of secondary signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partain, Kristin N; Patel, Adarsh U; Travers, Curtis; Short, Heather L; Braithwaite, Kiery; Loewen, Jonathan; Heiss, Kurt F; Raval, Mehul V

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to implement a standardized US report that included secondary signs of appendicitis (SS) to facilitate accurate diagnosis of appendicitis and decrease the use of computed tomography (CT) and admissions for observation. A multidisciplinary team implemented a quality improvement (QI) intervention in the form of a standardized US report and provided stakeholders with monthly feedback. Outcomes including report compliance, CT use, and observation admissions were compared pretemplate and posttemplate. We identified 387 patients in the pretemplate period and 483 patients in the posttemplate period. In the posttemplate period, the reporting of SS increased from 5.4% to 79.5% (pappendicitis also improved in the posttemplate period. A focused QI initiative led to high compliance rates of utilizing the standardized US report and resulted in lower CT use and fewer admissions for observation. Study of a Diagnostic Test Level of Evidence: 1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. IMAGING AS AN AID TO THE DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel I Wijesuriya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis has been known as a disease entity for well over a century but a confident diagnosis before surgeryin all patients suspected of the condition is still not possible. Timely diagnosis is essential to minimise morbidity due topossible perforation of the inflamed organ in the event treatment is delayed; so much so that surgeons often preferredto operate at the slightest suspicion of the diagnosis in the past. This resulted in the removal of many normal appendixes.When the diagnosis of appendicitis is clear from the history and clinical examination, then no further investigation isnecessary and prompt surgical treatment is appropriate. Where there is doubt about the diagnosis however it is advisableto resort to imaging studies such as abdominal ultrasound or computed tomography to clear such suspicions beforesubjecting the patient to an appendicectomy. These studies would also help avoid delays in surgery in deservingpatients.

  5. Regional variation in rates of pediatric perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Samir; Short, Heather L; Hockenberry, Jason M; McCarthy, Ian; Raval, Mehul V

    2017-09-01

    While trends in perforated appendicitis (PA) rates have been studied, regional variability in pediatric admissions for PA remains unknown. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the 2006-2012 Kids' Inpatient Database was conducted to examine variation in PA admission rates by region of the United States and insurance status. PA rates were calculated and reported as per 1000 admissions in accordance with national quality measure specifications. National PA rates per 1000 admissions for 2006, 2009, and 2012 were 313.9, 279.2, and 309.1, respectively. Similarly, all regions demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in PA rates between 2006 and 2009 (pappendicitis, geographic region and insurance status appear to be associated with perforation upon presentation. Understanding regional variation in pediatric PA rates may inform health policymakers in the constantly evolving insurance coverage landscape. Level III Treatment Study - Retrospective comparative study of appendicitis presentation in children by region of the country. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Better Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis by Using Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Mir Mekaeal Hosseini; Reza Safdari; Lila Shahmoradi; Mojtaba Javaherzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute appendicitis is the most common cause for referral of patients with abdominal pains to emergency department of hospitals and appendectomy is the most common emergency operation. Despite of introduction of the various diagnostic methods unnecessary appendectomy rate is significant. Therefore, the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning methods as a tool to aid in the diagnosis can be timely and more accurate diagnosis, reduce length of stay in hospital and improve...

  7. Perforated appendicitis: an underappreciated mimic of intussusception on ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Schmitz, Matthew; Gawande, Rakhee; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Barth, Richard [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We encountered multiple cases in which the US appearance of ruptured appendicitis mimicked intussusception, resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic delay and multiple additional imaging studies. To explore the clinical and imaging discriminatory features between the conditions. Initial US images in six children (age 16 months to 8 years; 4 boys, 2 girls) were reviewed independently and by consensus by three pediatric radiologists. These findings were compared and correlated with the original reports and subsequent US, fluoroscopic, and CT images and reports. All initial US studies demonstrated a multiple-ring-like appearance (target sign, most apparent on transverse views) with diagnostic consensus supportive of intussusception. In three cases, US findings were somewhat discrepant with clinical concerns. Subsequently, four of the six children had contrast enemas; two were thought to have partial or complete intussusception reduction. Three had a repeat US examination, with recognition of the correct diagnosis. None of the US examinations demonstrated definite intralesional lymph nodes or mesenteric fat, but central echogenicity caused by debris/appendicolith was misinterpreted as fat. All showed perilesional hyperechogenicity that, in retrospect, represented inflamed fat ''walling off'' of the perforated appendix. There were four CTs, all of which demonstrated a double-ring appearance that correlated with the US target appearance, with inner and outer rings representing the dilated appendix and walled-off appendiceal rupture, respectively. All six children had surgical confirmation of perforated appendicitis. Contained perforated appendicitis can produce US findings closely mimicking intussusception. Clinical correlation and careful multiplanar evaluation should allow for sonographic suspicion of perforated appendicitis, which can be confirmed on CT if necessary. (orig.)

  8. Perforated appendicitis: an underappreciated mimic of intussusception on ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Schmitz, Matthew; Gawande, Rakhee; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Barth, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We encountered multiple cases in which the US appearance of ruptured appendicitis mimicked intussusception, resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic delay and multiple additional imaging studies. To explore the clinical and imaging discriminatory features between the conditions. Initial US images in six children (age 16 months to 8 years; 4 boys, 2 girls) were reviewed independently and by consensus by three pediatric radiologists. These findings were compared and correlated with the original reports and subsequent US, fluoroscopic, and CT images and reports. All initial US studies demonstrated a multiple-ring-like appearance (target sign, most apparent on transverse views) with diagnostic consensus supportive of intussusception. In three cases, US findings were somewhat discrepant with clinical concerns. Subsequently, four of the six children had contrast enemas; two were thought to have partial or complete intussusception reduction. Three had a repeat US examination, with recognition of the correct diagnosis. None of the US examinations demonstrated definite intralesional lymph nodes or mesenteric fat, but central echogenicity caused by debris/appendicolith was misinterpreted as fat. All showed perilesional hyperechogenicity that, in retrospect, represented inflamed fat ''walling off'' of the perforated appendix. There were four CTs, all of which demonstrated a double-ring appearance that correlated with the US target appearance, with inner and outer rings representing the dilated appendix and walled-off appendiceal rupture, respectively. All six children had surgical confirmation of perforated appendicitis. Contained perforated appendicitis can produce US findings closely mimicking intussusception. Clinical correlation and careful multiplanar evaluation should allow for sonographic suspicion of perforated appendicitis, which can be confirmed on CT if necessary. (orig.)

  9. Standardized ultrasound templates for diagnosing appendicitis reduce annual imaging costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Andrew B; Sales, Stephen; Nielsen, Jason W; Adler, Brent; Bates, David Gregory; Kenney, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound is preferred over computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing appendicitis in children to avoid undue radiation exposure. We previously reported our experience in instituting a standardized appendicitis ultrasound template, which decreased CT rates by 67.3%. In this analysis, we demonstrate the ongoing cost savings associated with using this template. Retrospective chart review for the time period preceding template implementation (June 2012-September 2012) was combined with prospective review through December 2015 for all patients in the emergency department receiving diagnostic imaging for appendicitis. The type of imaging was recorded, and imaging rates and ultrasound test statistics were calculated. Estimated annual imaging costs based on pretemplate ultrasound and CT utilization rates were compared with post-template annual costs to calculate annual and cumulative savings. In the pretemplate period, ultrasound and CT rates were 80.2% and 44.3%, respectively, resulting in a combined annual cost of $300,527.70. Similar calculations were performed for each succeeding year, accounting for changes in patient volume. Using pretemplate rates, our projected 2015 imaging cost was $371,402.86; however, our ultrasound rate had increased to 98.3%, whereas the CT rate declined to 9.6%, yielding an annual estimated cost of $224,853.00 and a savings of $146,549.86. Since implementation, annual savings have steadily increased for a cumulative cost savings of $336,683.83. Standardizing ultrasound reports for appendicitis not only reduces the use of CT scans and the associated radiation exposure but also decreases annual imaging costs despite increased numbers of imaging studies. Continued cost reduction may be possible by using diagnostic algorithms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Raoultella Planticola associated necrotizing appendicitis: A novel case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Naganathan

    Full Text Available Introduction: Raoultella Planticola is a gram negative, aerobic, rod bacteria found in water and soil and is rarely reported to cause infections in humans. This case study is the first of its kind in reporting R. planticola appendicitis. Presentation of case: We report a case of a woman presenting with a two-day history of increased weakness, fatigue and anorexia, localized pain to the right lower quadrant, and elevated white blood cell count. CT results demonstrated acute uncomplicated appendicitis which was managed via laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient became febrile on the day of the procedure and was found to have R. planticola bacteremia which was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate. She was discharged on postoperative day two and reported an unremarkable recovery at her five-week follow-up appointment. Discussion: R. planticola is a common organism that is rarely, though increasingly, associated with human infection. Interestingly, prior to hospitalization, this patient did not have any risk factors commonly associated with R. planticola infection, such as seafood consumption. However, she may have had gastrointestinal tract colonization with R. planticola prior to onset of appendicitis and appendectomy. Bacteremia likely resulted from micro-perforation of the appendix. Conclusion: Although infection with R. planticola is typically benign when treated appropriately, this pathogen has homology with Klebsiella species, and has the potential to acquire antimicrobial resistance. The case presented here suggests that R. planticola should be considered as a potential source of bacteremia in inflammatory/infectious gastrointestinal tract diseases even in the absence of typical risk factors. Keywords: Raoultella planticola, Appendicitis, Case report

  11. An unusual presentation of perforated appendicitis in epigastric region☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Mehmet; Arslan, Cem; Abuoglu, Hasan; Gunay, Emre; Yildiz, Mehmet Kamil; Eris, Cengiz; Ozkan, Erkan; Aktekin, Ali; Muftuoglu, M.A. Tolga

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Atypical presentations of appendix have been reported including backache, left lower quadrant pain and groin pain from a strangulated femoral hernia containing the appendix. We report a case presenting an epigastric pain that was diagnosed after computed tomography as a perforated appendicitis on intestinal malrotation. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 27-year-old man was admitted with a three-day history of epigastric pain. Physical examination revealed tenderness and defense on palpation of epigastric region. There was a left subcostal incision with the history of diaphragmatic hernia repair when the patient was 3 days old. He had an intestinal malrotation with the cecum fixed at the epigastric region and the inflamed appendix extending beside the left lobe of liver. DISCUSSION While appendicitis is the most common abdominal disease requiring surgical intervention seen in the emergency room setting, intestinal malrotation is relatively uncommon. When patients with asymptomatic undiagnosed gastrointestinal malrotation clinically present with abdominal pain, accurate diagnosis and definitive therapy may be delayed, possibly increasing the risk of morbidity and mortality. CONCLUSION Atypical presentations of acute appendicitis should be kept in mind in patients with abdominal pain in emergency room especially in patients with previous childhood operation for diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:24441442

  12. Prospective Observational Study on acute Appendicitis Worldwide (POSAW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartelli, Massimo; Baiocchi, Gian L; Di Saverio, Salomone; Ferrara, Francesco; Labricciosa, Francesco M; Ansaloni, Luca; Coccolini, Federico; Vijayan, Deepak; Abbas, Ashraf; Abongwa, Hariscine K; Agboola, John; Ahmed, Adamu; Akhmeteli, Lali; Akkapulu, Nezih; Akkucuk, Seckin; Altintoprak, Fatih; Andreiev, Aurelia L; Anyfantakis, Dimitrios; Atanasov, Boiko; Bala, Miklosh; Balalis, Dimitrios; Baraket, Oussama; Bellanova, Giovanni; Beltran, Marcelo; Melo, Renato Bessa; Bini, Roberto; Bouliaris, Konstantinos; Brunelli, Daniele; Castillo, Adrian; Catani, Marco; Che Jusoh, Asri; Chichom-Mefire, Alain; Cocorullo, Gianfranco; Coimbra, Raul; Colak, Elif; Costa, Silvia; Das, Koray; Delibegovic, Samir; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Kiseleva, Nadezda; El Zalabany, Tamer; Faro, Mario; Ferreira, Margarida; Fraga, Gustavo P; Gachabayov, Mahir; Ghnnam, Wagih M; Giménez Maurel, Teresa; Gkiokas, Georgios; Gomes, Carlos A; Griffiths, Ewen; Guner, Ali; Gupta, Sanjay; Hecker, Andreas; Hirano, Elcio S; Hodonou, Adrien; Hutan, Martin; Ioannidis, Orestis; Isik, Arda; Ivakhov, Georgy; Jain, Sumita; Jokubauskas, Mantas; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Kauhanen, Saila; Kaushik, Robin; Kavalakat, Alfie; Kenig, Jakub; Khokha, Vladimir; Khor, Desmond; Kim, Dennis; Kim, Jae I; Kong, Victor; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Leão, Pedro; Leon, Miguel; Litvin, Andrey; Lohsiriwat, Varut; López-Tomassetti Fernandez, Eudaldo; Lostoridis, Eftychios; Maciel, James; Major, Piotr; Dimova, Ana; Manatakis, Dimitrios; Marinis, Athanasio; Martinez-Perez, Aleix; Marwah, Sanjay; McFarlane, Michael; Mesina, Cristian; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Michalopoulos, Nickos; Misiakos, Evangelos; Mohamedahmed, Ali; Moldovanu, Radu; Montori, Giulia; Mysore Narayana, Raghuveer; Negoi, Ionut; Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Novelli, Giuseppe; Novikovs, Viktors; Olaoye, Iyiade; Omari, Abdelkarim; Ordoñez, Carlos A; Ouadii, Mouaqit; Ozkan, Zeynep; Pal, Ajay; Palini, Gian M; Partecke, Lars I; Pata, Francesco; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Pereira Júnior, Gerson A; Pintar, Tadeja; Pisarska, Magdalena; Ploneda-Valencia, Cesar F; Pouggouras, Konstantinos; Prabhu, Vinod; Ramakrishnapillai, Padmakumar; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Reitz, Marianne; Rios-Cruz, Daniel; Saar, Sten; Sakakushev, Boris; Seretis, Charalampos; Sazhin, Alexander; Shelat, Vishal; Skrovina, Matej; Smirnov, Dmitry; Spyropoulos, Charalampos; Strzałka, Marcin; Talving, Peep; Teixeira Gonsaga, Ricardo A; Theobald, George; Tomadze, Gia; Torba, Myftar; Tranà, Cristian; Ulrych, Jan; Uzunoğlu, Mustafa Y; Vasilescu, Alin; Occhionorelli, Savino; Venara, Aurélien; Vereczkei, Andras; Vettoretto, Nereo; Vlad, Nutu; Walędziak, Maciej; Yilmaz, Tonguç U; Yuan, Kuo-Ching; Yunfeng, Cui; Zilinskas, Justas; Grelpois, Gérard; Catena, Fausto

    2018-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common surgical disease, and appendectomy is the treatment of choice in the majority of cases. A correct diagnosis is key for decreasing the negative appendectomy rate. The management can become difficult in case of complicated appendicitis. The aim of this study is to describe the worldwide clinical and diagnostic work-up and management of AA in surgical departments. This prospective multicenter observational study was performed in 116 worldwide surgical departments from 44 countries over a 6-month period (April 1, 2016-September 30, 2016). All consecutive patients admitted to surgical departments with a clinical diagnosis of AA were included in the study. A total of 4282 patients were enrolled in the POSAW study, 1928 (45%) women and 2354 (55%) men, with a median age of 29 years. Nine hundred and seven (21.2%) patients underwent an abdominal CT scan, 1856 (43.3%) patients an US, and 285 (6.7%) patients both CT scan and US. A total of 4097 (95.7%) patients underwent surgery; 1809 (42.2%) underwent open appendectomy and 2215 (51.7%) had laparoscopic appendectomy. One hundred eighty-five (4.3%) patients were managed conservatively. Major complications occurred in 199 patients (4.6%). The overall mortality rate was 0.28%. The results of the present study confirm the clinical value of imaging techniques and prognostic scores. Appendectomy remains the most effective treatment of acute appendicitis. Mortality rate is low.

  13. Gangrenous Appendicitis in a Boy with Mobile Caecum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Suat; Keskin, Zeynep; Gunduz, Metin; Sekmenli, Taner; Kivrak, Hatice Yazar

    2015-01-01

    A mobile caecum and ascending colon is an uncommon congenital disorder, and it is even rarer as the cause of an acute abdomen during childhood. This report presents the case of a 6-year-old boy with acute gangrenous appendicitis with a mobile caecum and ascending colon. Data from the surgical course, as well as laboratory and imaging studies, were acquired and carefully examined. Emergency ultrasound (US) was performed and revealed no signs of appendicitis in the right lower quadrant. Serial imaging study, including non-enhanced computed tomography (CT), was performed. An imaging study identified epigastric appendicitis with mobile caecum. Surgery was executed under general anesthesia with a median incision extending from the epigastrium to the suprapubic region. The caecum was mobile and placed in the right epigastric area, next to the left lobe of the liver and gallbladder. The gangrenous appendix was discovered posterior to the caecum and transverse colon, enlarging to the left upper quadrant. Appendectomy was executed, the gangrenous appendix was confirmed pathologically, and the patient was released 4 days later. In the US, if there are unusual clinical findings or no findings in patients with abdominal pain, CT is beneficial in determining the location of the caecum and appendix and preventing misdiagnosis in children. PMID:26060548

  14. [Acute appendicitis: clinico-diagnostic and therapeutic considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carditello, A; Bartolotta, M; Bonavita, G; Lentini, B; Sturniolo, G

    1985-04-01

    Since january 1970-december 1982, 58 patients underwent emergently appendectomy for acute appendicitis. 31 (53,4 percent) where males; the average age was 21 +/- 2,3 years (M +/- SEM). The duration of symptoms ranged from 1-6 hours (10,3 percent of cases) to over 48 hours, before the hospital admission (15,4 percent of cases). 27 patients (46,5 percent) had a clinical examination at home by a physician. 21 patients (36,4 percent) came to hospital emergency unit without previous physical examination; 10 (17,2 percent) were transferred from other departments. In 6,9 percent of cases was present a perforated appendicitis with peritonitis. During operation, in 50 percent of patients was performed a therapeutic peritoneal lavage. In 63,7 percent of cases multiple drains were placed in peritoneal cavity. In all patients was effected postoperative antibiotic profilaxis. The mortality rate was 3,4 percent. General complications were observed more in patients with perforated appendicitis. This review suggests the following remarcable data: morbidity of this disease is still high; the physical examination is more important than laboratory work (especially in the elderly patients, which are often immunodepressed and in children, with leucocitosis-lack at hospital admission); early surgery is the most important factor to the improvement of prognosis in these cases and the results of surgical treatment are improved by large vertical incisions, peritoneal lavage and application of multiple intracavitary drains.

  15. The US findings of acute nonperforated and perforated appendicitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jun Gi; Lee, Young Seok; Jung, Yoon Ho; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Woon Ki; Lee, Tae Hoon

    1996-01-01

    To analyse and interpret different sonographic findings in acute nonperforated and appendicitis. In 46 cases of acute appendicitis in children(26 girls, 20 boys) proven by surgery, sonographic findings were reviewed retrospectively. The findings of nonperforated and perforated appendicitis were analysed, focusing on the size, shape and echogenicity of the appendix, echo patterns of periappendiceal abscesses, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, and the prevalence of appendicolith. A noncompressible distended appendix was present in 18 of 21 patients with nonperforated appendicitis and in 13 of 25 patients with perforation. In 18 patients with nonperforated appendicitis, the average diameter of distended appendix was 8.6 mm ; target appearance was noted in 16 patients and loss of echogenic submucosa in two. In 13 patients with perforated appendicitis, the average diameter of appendix was 9.1 mm ; target appearance was noted in four patients and loss of echogenic submucosa in nine. Periappendiceal abscesses were present in 21 of 25 cases of perforated appendicitis, and the echogenicity of abscesses was mixed in 12 patients, hypoechogenic in eight, and hyperechogenic in one. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was present in two of 21 patients with nonperforated appendicitis and in four of 25 with perforation. Appendicolith was detected on sonography in three of 25 patients with perforated appendicitis, but was found in seven patients during surgery. One patients with perforated appendicitis also had right side hydronephrosis. Sonographically false-negative results were obtained in six cases. A sonographic examination was useful to differenciate perforated and nonperforated appendicitis in children. Loss of echogenic submucosa in the distended appendix and periappendiceal abscess formation were important findings in diagnosis of perforated appendicitis

  16. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Samuel H.F.; Grippo, Anthony; Kerwin, Chistopher; Konicki, P. John; Goodwine, Diana; Lambert, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED). Increasingly emergency physicians (EP) are using bedside ultrasound (BUS) as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspect...

  17. Fostering the exchange of real world data across different countries to answer primary care research questions: an UNLOCK study from the IPCRG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragg, Liza; Williams, Siân; van der Molen, Thys; Thomas, Mike; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Chavannes, Niels H

    2018-03-08

    There is growing awareness amongst healthcare planners, providers and researchers of the need to make better use of routinely collected health data by translating it into actionable information that improves efficiency of healthcare and patient outcomes. There is also increased acceptance of the importance of real world research that recruits patients representative of primary care populations and evaluates interventions realistically delivered by primary care professionals. The UNLOCK Group is an international collaboration of primary care researchers and practitioners from 15 countries. It has coordinated and shared datasets of diagnostic and prognostic variables for COPD and asthma to answer research questions meaningful to professionals working in primary care over a 6-year period. Over this time the UNLOCK Group has undertaken several studies using data from unselected primary care populations from diverse contexts to evaluate the burden of disease, multiple morbidities, treatment and follow-up. However, practical and structural constraints have hampered the UNLOCK Group's ability to translate research ideas into studies. This study explored the constraints, challenges and successes experienced by the UNLOCK Group and its participants' learning as researchers and primary care practitioners collaborating to answer primary care research questions. The study identified lessons for future studies and collaborations that require data sharing across borders. It also explored specific challenges to fostering the exchange of primary care data in comparison to other datasets such as public health, prescribing or hospital data and mechanisms that may be used to overcome these.

  18. A Rare Case: Appendectomy After Connected Stump Appendicitis Perforation of the Cecum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berke Manoglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stump appendicitis is a rare complication after appendectomy . Stump appendicitis made of incomplete appendectomy after a rest appendix tissue develops as a result of the inflammation. Admitted to the emergency department with acute abdomen and a history of appendectomy in patients with a history of current pain in the right lower quadrant , especially that of the patient must be evaluated in terms of stump appendicitis. The fact that the earlier story appendectomy patients , causing a delay in diagnosis and increasing the morbidity Cecal perforation was offered an advanced case of delayed depending on the stump appendicitis in this article.

  19. Differentiation of Acute Perforated from Non-Perforated Appendicitis: Usefulness of High-Resolution Ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Gyu Chang [Dept. of Radiology, Gumi Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) for the differentiation of acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis. The high-resolution US features in 96 patients (49 males, 47 females; mean age, 33.8 years; age range, 4-80 years) with pathologically proven acute appendicitis were evaluated. The following US findings were evaluated for differentiation of acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis: circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, periappendiceal fluid collection, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, maximum overall diameter > 10.5 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths. The sensitivity and specificity of the US features in the diagnosis of acute perforated appendicitis were calculated. All of the US findings, except for appendicoliths, were significantly more common in the acute perforated appendicitis group (p < 0.001). The sensitivity of circumferential loss of the echogenic submucosal layer, periappendiceal fluid collection, disruption of the serosal layer, asymmetrical wall thickening, maximum overall diameter > 10.5 mm, and the presence of appendicoliths was 85.4, 73.2, 68.3, 70.7, 80.5, and 36.6%, respectively, while the specificity was 65.5, 89.1, 96.4, 98.2, 81.8, and 80.0%, respectively. High-resolution US was found to be useful for differentiating acute perforated appendicitis from non-perforated appendicitis.

  20. Profiles of US and CT imaging features with a high probability of appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randen, A. van; Lameris, W.; Es, H.W. van; Hove, W. ten; Bouma, W.H.; Leeuwen, M.S. van; Keulen, E.M. van; Hulst, V.P.M. van der; Henneman, O.D.; Bossuyt, P.M.; Boermeester, M.A.; Stoker, J.

    2010-01-01

    To identify and evaluate profiles of US and CT features associated with acute appendicitis. Consecutive patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the emergency department were invited to participate in this study. All patients underwent US and CT. Imaging features known to be associated with appendicitis, and an imaging diagnosis were prospectively recorded by two independent radiologists. A final diagnosis was assigned after 6 months. Associations between appendiceal imaging features and a final diagnosis of appendicitis were evaluated with logistic regression analysis. Appendicitis was assigned to 284 of 942 evaluated patients (30%). All evaluated features were associated with appendicitis. Imaging profiles were created after multivariable logistic regression analysis. Of 147 patients with a thickened appendix, local transducer tenderness and peri-appendiceal fat infiltration on US, 139 (95%) had appendicitis. On CT, 119 patients in whom the appendix was completely visualised, thickened, with peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and appendiceal enhancement, 114 had a final diagnosis of appendicitis (96%). When at least two of these essential features were present on US or CT, sensitivity was 92% (95% CI 89-96%) and 96% (95% CI 93-98%), respectively. Most patients with appendicitis can be categorised within a few imaging profiles on US and CT. When two of the essential features are present the diagnosis of appendicitis can be made accurately. (orig.)

  1. MRI for appendicitis in pregnancy: is seeing believing? clinical outcomes in cases of appendix nonvisualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Katib, Sayf; Sokhandon, Farnoosh; Farah, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the clinical outcomes in cases of appendix nonvisualization with MRI in pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis and the implications of appendix nonvisualization for excluding appendicitis. Fifty-eight pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis evaluated with MRI at three centers from a single institution were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists with varying levels of abdominal imaging experience. All scans were performed on a 1.5-Tesla Siemens unit. Cases were evaluated for diagnostic quality, visualization of the appendix, presence of appendicitis, and alternate diagnoses. Clinical outcomes were gathered from the electronic medical record. Of the 58 patients who underwent MRI for suspected appendicitis, 50 cases were considered adequate diagnostic quality by all three radiologists. The rate of appendix visualization among the three radiologists ranged from 60 to 76% (p = 0.44). The appendix was nonvisualized by at least one of the three radiologists in 25 cases (50%). Of these, none had a final diagnosis of appendicitis including one patient who underwent appendectomy. MRI suggested an alternate diagnosis in 6 (24%) patients with appendix nonvisualization. For the three reviewers, the agreement level on whether or not the appendix was visualized on the MRI had a Light's kappa value of 0.526, indicating a "moderate" level of agreement (p value appendicitis confers a significant reduction in the risk of appendicitis compared to all comers as long as the study is adequate diagnostic quality and there are no secondary signs of appendicitis present.

  2. Profiles of US and CT imaging features with a high probability of appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, A. van; Lameris, W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Es, H.W. van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Hove, W. ten; Bouma, W.H. [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Leeuwen, M.S. van [University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keulen, E.M. van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Hilversum (Netherlands); Hulst, V.P.M. van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Henneman, O.D. [Bronovo Hospital, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Bossuyt, P.M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, M.A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-07-15

    To identify and evaluate profiles of US and CT features associated with acute appendicitis. Consecutive patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the emergency department were invited to participate in this study. All patients underwent US and CT. Imaging features known to be associated with appendicitis, and an imaging diagnosis were prospectively recorded by two independent radiologists. A final diagnosis was assigned after 6 months. Associations between appendiceal imaging features and a final diagnosis of appendicitis were evaluated with logistic regression analysis. Appendicitis was assigned to 284 of 942 evaluated patients (30%). All evaluated features were associated with appendicitis. Imaging profiles were created after multivariable logistic regression analysis. Of 147 patients with a thickened appendix, local transducer tenderness and peri-appendiceal fat infiltration on US, 139 (95%) had appendicitis. On CT, 119 patients in whom the appendix was completely visualised, thickened, with peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and appendiceal enhancement, 114 had a final diagnosis of appendicitis (96%). When at least two of these essential features were present on US or CT, sensitivity was 92% (95% CI 89-96%) and 96% (95% CI 93-98%), respectively. Most patients with appendicitis can be categorised within a few imaging profiles on US and CT. When two of the essential features are present the diagnosis of appendicitis can be made accurately. (orig.)

  3. Assessing the Impact of De Novo Social Ties within Health Intervention Settings: New Questions for Health Behavior Intervention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesdahl, Eric; Gesell, Sabina B

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in the study of health and social networks have focused on linkages between health outcomes and naturally occurring social relations, such as friendship or kinship. Based on findings in this area, a new generation of health behavior intervention programs have been implemented that rely on the formation of new social relations among program participants. However, little is known about the qualities of these de novo social relations. We examined the social networks of 59 participants within a randomized controlled trial of an intervention designed to prevent excessive gestational weight gain. We employed exponential random graph modeling techniques to analyze supportive relationships formed between participants in the intervention arm, to detect unique effects of program participation on the likelihood of forming ties. Program participation had a positive effect on the likelihood of forming supportive social relations, however, in this particular timeframe we did not detect any additional effect of such relations on the health behaviors or outcomes of interest. Our findings raise two critical questions: do short-term group-level programs reliably lead to the formation of new social relations among participants; and do these relations have a unique effect on health outcomes relative to standard methods of health behavior intervention? © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Imaging trends in suspected appendicitis-a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Victoria F; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess trends in the imaging of suspected appendicitis in adult patients in emergency departments of academic centers in Canada. A questionnaire was sent to all 17 academic centers in Canada to be completed by a radiologist who works in emergency radiology. The questionnaires were sent and collected over a period of 4 months from October 2015 to February 2016. Sixteen centers (94%) responded to the questionnaire. Eleven respondents (73%) use IV contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) as the imaging modality of choice for all patients with suspected appendicitis. Thirteen respondents (81%) use ultrasound as the first modality of choice in imaging pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis. Eleven respondents (69%) use ultrasound (US) as the first modality of choice in patients younger than 40 years of age. Ten respondents (67%) use ultrasound as the first imaging modality in female patients younger than 40 years of age. When CT is used, 81% use non-focused CT of the abdomen and pelvis, and 44% of centers use oral contrast. Thirteen centers (81%) have ultrasound available 24 h a day/7 days a week. At 12 centers (75%), ultrasound is performed by ultrasound technologists. Four centers (40%) perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in suspected appendicitis in adult patients at the discretion of the attending radiologist. Eleven centers (69%) have MRI available 24/7. All 16 centers (100%) use unenhanced MRI. Various imaging modalities are available for the work-up of suspected appendicitis. Although there are North American societal guidelines and recommendations regarding the appropriateness of the multiple imaging modalities, significant heterogeneity in the first-line modalities exist, which vary depending on the patient demographics and resource availability. Imaging trends in the use of the first-line modalities should be considered in order to plan for the availability of the imaging examinations and to consider plans for

  5. Retrospective evaluation of acute appendicitis incorrectly diagnosed on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Hyun Cheol

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the CT images of patients suffering with surgically proven appendicitis to determine the causes of missed diagnoses. We reviewed the pathology reports of the patients with surgically proven appendicitis from two hospitals during a 3-year period. Thirty-seven such cases with a misdiagnosis were identified and they served as our misdiagnosed group (17 females and 20 males, mean age: 58 years, age range 15-68 years). These were cases that were misdiagnosed on preoperative abdominal CT. All 57 patients in the control group (30 females and 27 males, mean age: 44 years, age range: 21-78 years) had undergone laparotomy for acute appendicitis and they had been correctly diagnosed preoperatively on CT. Two abdominal radiologists evaluated the following items from all 94 CT examinations: 1) an abnormal appendix, 2) periappendiceal fat inflammation, 3) pericecal extraluminal fluid, 4) pericecal extraluminal air, 5) appendicolith, 6) cecal wall thickening, 7) small bowel dilatation, and 8) the pericecal fat content. Statistical analysis was performed using a Chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test. Any abnormal appendix was not visualized, even retrospectively, in 27 (73%) of the 37 patients from the misdiagnosed group, whereas it was not visualized in 13 (23%) of the 57 patients in the control group (ρ = 0.001). Of the patients who had been misdiagnosed, inflammation of the pericecal fat was observed in 21 patients (57%) as compared to 50 (88%) patients in the control group (ρ =0.001). Pericecal fluid and air were noted in 15 (41%) and 9 (24%) patients, respectively, in the misdiagnosed group and in 19 (33%) and 14 (25%) patients, respectively, in the control group, (ρ = 0.477 and ρ =0.901, respectively). Appendicolith was found in 3 (8%) misdiagnosed subjects and in 10 (18%) of the controls (ρ = 0.001). Focal cecal wall thickening was noted in 14 (38%) misdiagnosed patients and in 28 (49%) control patients (

  6. Two decades of research on euthanasia from the Netherlands. What have we learnt and what questions remain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); P.J. van der Maas (Paul); B.D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (Bregje); J.J.M. van Delden (Hans); A. van der Heide (Agnes)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTwo decades of research on euthanasia in the Netherlands have resulted into clear insights in the frequency and characteristics of euthanasia and other medical end-of-life decisions in the Netherlands. These empirical studies have contributed to the quality of the public debate, and to

  7. Twenty years of research on fungal-plant interactions on Lyman Glacier forefront—lessons learned and questions yet unanswered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari Jumpponen; Shawn P. Brown; James M. Trappe; Efrén Cázares; Rauni. Strömmer

    2012-01-01

    Retreating glaciers and the periglacial areas that they vacate produce a harsh environment of extreme radiation, nutrient limitations and temperature oscillations. They provide a model system for studying mechanisms that drive the establishment and early assembly of communities. Here, we synthesize more than 20 years of research at the Lyman Glacier forefront in the...

  8. The Question of the Objective Basis of Whitehead's Theory of the Rhythm of Education: Homeostasis Research and Chronobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Alfred North Whitehead's (1861-1947) theory of the rhythm of education has enjoyed much popularity and success in terms of providing a general model for conceptualizing learning, teaching, and research processes. However, in respect to the Whiteheadian notion that there is a rhythm belonging to such processes, of which educators ought to be aware,…

  9. Big Questions, Small Works, Lots of Layers: Documentary Video Production and the Teaching of Academic Research and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbritter, Bump; Blon, Noah; Creighton, Caron

    2011-01-01

    Documentary movie making is not academic writing. Nor is it traditional academic research. However, I have found it to be a remarkable vehicle for teaching both of these things...each semester I am amazed and humbled by the creativity and sincerity that my students bring to their work.

  10. Top 10 research questions to promote physical activity in bipolar disorders: A consensus statement from the International Organization of Physical Therapists in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Rosenbaum, Simon; Probst, Michel; Connaughton, Joanne; du Plessis, Christy; Yamamoto, Taisei; Stubbs, Brendon

    2016-05-01

    Research has only recently started to consider the importance and applicability of physical activity (PA) for people with bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of the current study is to highlight 10 pertinent PA research questions in people with BD. The International Organization of Physical Therapy in Mental Health executed a consultation with all National organizations (n=13) to identify the most salient questions to guide future research on PA in BD. We identified the following 10 questions: (1) What are the benefits of PA for people with BD? (2) What are the most prominent safety issues for PA prescription in BD? (3) What is the optimal PA prescription for people with BD? (4) What are the key barriers to PA among people with BD? (5) What are the most effective motivational strategies for ensuring PA adoption and maintenance in BD? (6) How do we translate PA research into community practice? (7) If one treatment goal is increased physical activity, what type of professionals are needed as part of a multidisciplinary team? (8) How do we incorporate PA as a vital sign in clinical practice? (9) How can we prevent sedentary behavior in BD? (10) What is the most appropriate PA assessment method? We did not consult people with BD. Addressing these questions is critical for developing evidence-based approaches for promoting and sustaining an active lifestyle in BD. Ultimately, achieving this will reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease and improve the quality of life of this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Association between pluviometric index and the occurrence of acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djalma Ribeiro Costa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological studies demonstrate, for unknown reasons, the prevalence of appendicitis in the summer and in young male adults, and there are controversies about its association with the rainy season. There are no studies in the State of Piauí about such association. Objective: To establish an association between the occurrence of appendicitis and the pluviometric precipitation index. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study that was carried out using the database of the pathology service at a public emergency hospital in Piauí, and the pluviometric precipitation index in the State of Piauí from January 2009 to April 2014, with data from the National Institute of Meteorology. Descriptive statistics and association measures were applied using the Pearson correlation coefficient and the χ2 test. Results: We found a predominance of appendicitis cases in male subjects, from 11 to 20 years of age, with a predominance of the monthly mean of appendicitis cases in the second semester, which conforms to the dry season in the State of Piauí. Pearson's correlation coefficient was −0.260. Conclusion: There is an association between the occurrence of appendicitis and the months of the year; however, this is a weak negative correlation between the monthly mean of cases of appendicitis and monthly pluviometric precipitation average in the State of Piauí. Resumo: Contexto: Estudos epidemiológicos demonstram, por razões desconhecidas, o predomínio dos casos de apendicite no verão e em adultos jovens do sexo masculino, havendo controvérsias sobre sua associação com o período chuvoso. Não há estudos realizados no Piauí sobre esta associação. Objetivo: Estabelecer uma associação entre a ocorrência de apendicite e o índice de precipitação pluviométrica. Metodologia: Realizou-se um estudo transversal através do banco de dados do serviço de patologia de um hospital de emergência público do Piauí e do índice de

  12. Hyperactivity in anorexia nervosa: to warm or not to warm. That is the question (a translational research one).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Olaia; Gutiérrez, Emilio

    2018-01-01

    In the Editorial 'Is the neglect of exercise in anorexia nervosa research a case of "running out" of ideas or do we need to take a "LEAP" of faith into the future?' these authors express their doubts concerning the suitability of keeping patients warm as a beneficial treatment option in managing excessive activity in anorexia nervosa (AN) patients. The case for warming as an adjunctive treatment for AN patients is based on strong experimental evidence gathered from research on animals with Activity-Based Anorexia (ABA). We posit that the beneficial effect of heat results, at least in part, from heat blocking the vicious cycle that hyperactivity plays on AN. Hyperactivity decreases caloric intake by interfering with feeding and increases energy expenditure through excess motor activity which in turn increases emaciation that further strengthens anorexic thinking.

  13. Two decades of research on euthanasia from the Netherlands. What have we learnt and what questions remain?

    OpenAIRE

    Rietjens, Judith; Maas, Paul; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje; Delden, Hans; Heide, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTwo decades of research on euthanasia in the Netherlands have resulted into clear insights in the frequency and characteristics of euthanasia and other medical end-of-life decisions in the Netherlands. These empirical studies have contributed to the quality of the public debate, and to the regulating and public control of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. No slippery slope seems to have occurred. Physicians seem to adhere to the criteria for due care in the large majority...

  14. Climate experts. The IPCC in Four Questions. Behind-the-scene of Climate Research. Climate Change: evidences and Uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beriot, Nicolas; Jouzel, Jean; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Braconnot, Pascale; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Le Treut, Herve; Pachauri, Rajendra; Cazenave, Anny; Planton, Serge; Feral, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Scientists and government delegations from around the world gathered in Stockholm (Sweden) in September 2013 to approve the first volume of the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). This document reviews existing scientific knowledge on the Earth's climate. How was it prepared? How do scientists conduct research on climate change? What do they know for certain? What remains to be discovered?

  15. Tracking climate change. The IPCC in Four Questions. The Hidden Face of Climate Research. Climate Change: Facts and Uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beriot, Nicolas; Jouzel, Jean; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Braconnot, Pascale; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Le Treut, Herve; Pachauri, Rajendra; Cazenave, Anny; Planton, Serge; Feral, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Scientists and government delegations from around the world gathered in Stockholm (Sweden) in September 2013 to approve the first volume of the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). This document reviews existing scientific knowledge on the Earth's climate. How was it prepared? How do scientists conduct research on climate change? What do they know for certain? What remains to be discovered?

  16. Using routinely collected health data for surveillance, quality improvement and research: Framework and key questions to assess ethics, privacy and data access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lusignan, Simon; Liyanage, Harshana; Di Iorio, Concetta Tania; Chan, Tom; Liaw, Siaw-Teng

    2016-01-19

    The use of health data for public health, surveillance, quality improvement and research is crucial to improve health systems and health care. However, bodies responsible for privacy and ethics often limit access to routinely collected health data. Ethical approvals, issues around protecting privacy and data access are often dealt with by different layers of regulations, making approval processes appear disjointed. To create a comprehensive framework for defining the ethical and privacy status of a project and for providing guidance on data access. The framework comprises principles and related questions. The core of the framework will be built using standard terminology definitions such as ethics-related controlled vocabularies and regional directives. It is built in this way to reduce ambiguity between different definitions. The framework is extensible: principles can be retired or added to, as can their related questions. Responses to these questions should allow data processors to define ethical issues, privacy risk and other unintended consequences. The framework contains three steps: (1) identifying possible ethical and privacy principles relevant to the project; (2) providing ethics and privacy guidance questions that inform the type of approval needed; and (3) assessing case-specific ethics and privacy issues. The outputs from this process should inform whether the balance between public interests and privacy breach and any ethical considerations are tipped in favour of societal benefits. If they are then this should be the basis on which data access is permitted. Tightly linking ethical principles to governance and data access may help maintain public trust.

  17. The validity and reliability of iridology in the diagnosis of previous acute appendicitis as evi-denced by appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Frank

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iridology is defined as a photographic science that identifies pathological and functional changes within organs via biomicroscopic iris assessment for aberrant lines, spots, and discolourations. According to iridology, the iris does not reflect changes  during  anaesthesia,  due  to  the  drugs inhibitory  effects  on  nerves  impulses,  and  in cases of organ removal, it reflects the pre-surgical condition.The profession of Homoeopathy is frequently associated with iridology and in a recent survey (2009  investigating  the  perceptions  of  Masters of  Technology  graduates  in  Homoeopathy  of University of Johannesburg, iridology was highly regarded as a potential additional skill requirement for assessing the health status of the patient.This  study  investigated  the  reliability  of iridology  in  the  diagnosis  of  previous  acute appendicitis, as evidenced by appendectomy. A total of 60 participants took part in the study. Thirty of the 60 participants had an appendectomy due to acute appendicitis, and 30 had had no prior history  of  appendicitis.  Each  participant’s  right iris  was  documented  by  photography  with  the use  of  a  non-mydriatic  retinal  camera  that  was reset for photographing the iris. The photographs were then randomized by an external person and no identifying data made available to the three raters.  The  raters  included  the  researcher,  who had little experience in iridology and two highly experienced  practising  iridologists.  Data  was obtained  from  the  analyses  of  the  photographs wherein  the  presence  or  absence  of  lesions (implying acute appendicitis was indicated by the raters. None of the three raters was able to show a significant  success  rate  in  identifying  correctly the  people  with  a  previous  history  of  acute appendicitis and resultant appendectomies

  18. Questions of trust in health research on social capital: what aspects of personal network social capital do they measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpiano, Richard M; Fitterer, Lisa M

    2014-09-01

    Health research on personal social capital has often utilized measures of respondents' perceived trust of others as either a proxy for one's social capital in the absence of more focused measures or as a subjective component of social capital. Little empirical work has evaluated the validity of such practices. We test the construct validity of two trust measures used commonly in health research on social capital-generalized trust and trust of neighbors-with respect to measures of people's general network-, organization-, family-, friend-, and neighborhood-based social capital and the extent to which these two trust measures are associated with self-rated general health and mental health when social capital measures are included in the same models. Analyses of 2008 Canadian General Social Survey data (response rate 57.3%) indicate that generalized trust and trust of neighbors are both positively-yet modestly-associated with measures of several domains of network-based social capital. Both trust measures are positively associated with general and mental health, but these associations remain robust after adjusting for social capital measures. Our findings suggest that (a) trust is conceptually distinct from social capital, (b) trust measures are inadequate proxies for actual personal social networks, and (c) trust measures may only be capturing psychological aspects relevant to-but not indicative of-social capital. Though links between perceived trust and health deserve study, health research on social capital needs to utilize measures of respondents' actual social networks and their inherent resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Global Incidence of Appendicitis: A Systematic Review of Population-based Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mollie; Quan, Samuel; Kaplan, Belle S; Molodecky, Natalie; Ball, Chad G; Chernoff, Greg W; Bhala, Nij; Ghosh, Subrata; Dixon, Elijah; Ng, Siew; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2017-08-01

    We compared the incidence of appendicitis or appendectomy across the world and evaluated temporal trends. Population-based studies reported the incidence of appendicitis. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for population-based studies reporting the incidence of appendicitis or appendectomy. Time trends were explored using Poisson regression and reported as annual percent change (APC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). APC were stratified by time periods and pooled using random effects models. Incidence since 2000 was pooled for regions in the Western world. The search retrieved 10,247 citations with 120 studies reporting on the incidence of appendicitis or appendectomy. During the 21st century the pooled incidence of appendicitis or appendectomy (in per 100,000 person-years) was 100 (95% CI: 91, 110) in Northern America, and the estimated number of cases in 2015 was 378,614. The pooled incidence ranged from 105 in Eastern Europe to 151 in Western Europe. In Western countries, the incidence of appendectomy steadily decreased since 1990 (APC after 1989=-1.54; 95% CI: -2.22, -0.86), whereas the incidence of appendicitis stabilized (APC=-0.36; 95% CI: -0.97, 0.26) for both perforated (APC=0.95; 95% CI: -0.25, 2.17) and nonperforated appendicitis (APC=0.44; 95% CI: -0.84, 1.73). In the 21st century, the incidence of appendicitis or appendectomy is high in newly industrialized countries in Asia (South Korea pooled: 206), the Middle East (Turkey pooled: 160), and Southern America (Chile: 202). Appendicitis is a global disease. The incidence of appendicitis is stable in most Western countries. Data from newly industrialized countries is sparse, but suggests that appendicitis is rising rapidly.

  20. Can platelet indices be used as predictors of complication in subjects with appendicitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Bahadır; Aslan, Turan; Çınar, Ahmet; Ruhkar Kurt, Ayşe; Akkoyunlu, Yasemin

    2016-12-01

    We examined the changes of mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) in subjects with appendicitis and whether MPV and PDW could be used to predict the development of complication due to appendicitis. The healthy control group, the cases of appendicitis with perforation, and the cases of appendicitis without perforation were compared with regard to MPV and PDW. We determined whether MPV and PDW were independent variables predictive of the development of complication in subjects with appendicitis. This retrospective case-control study included a total of 362 patients (249 of which were male (68.8 %) and 113 were female (31.2 %); median age, 30 [range, 18-84 years]). One hundred and ninety-two subjects (53 %) presented with appendicitis and 170 (47 %) comprised the healthy control group. Sixty-six (18.2 %) of the subjects with appendicitis developed complication. MPVs were lower in subjects of appendicitis without complication compared to the subjects of appendicitis with complication and the control group (MPV, 9.78 ± 0.99 vs. 10.20 ± 1.21 and 10.14 ± 1.03, respectively [p = 0.005]). The PDW levels were not different between the three groups. Independent variables predictive of the presence of complication included increased MPV and time from onset of symptoms to hospital presentation (odds ratio[confidence interval], p-value: 1.507[1.064-2.133], 0.021 and 18.887[5.139-69.410], 0.0001, respectively). Our findings suggested these, MPV values in cases of appendicitis without complication were lower than the cases with complication and healthy control and MPV is a predictor of the development of complication in subjects with appendicitis.

  1. Abdominal 64-MDCT for suspected appendicitis: the use of oral and IV contrast material versus IV contrast material only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stephan W; Soto, Jorge A; Lucey, Brian C; Ozonoff, Al; Jordan, Jacqueline D; Ratevosian, Jirair; Ulrich, Andrew S; Rathlev, Niels K; Mitchell, Patricia M; Rebholz, Casey; Feldman, James A; Rhea, James T

    2009-11-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of IV contrast-enhanced 64-MDCT with and without the use of oral contrast material in diagnosing appendicitis in patients with abdominal pain. We conducted a randomized trial of a convenience sample of adult patients presenting to an urban academic emergency department with acute nontraumatic abdominal pain and clinical suspicion of appendicitis, diverticulitis, or small-bowel obstruction. Patients were enrolled between 8 am and 11 pm when research assistants were present. Consenting subjects were randomized into one of two groups: Group 1 subjects underwent 64-MDCT performed with oral and IV contrast media and group 2 subjects underwent 64-MDCT performed solely with IV contrast material. Three expert radiologists independently reviewed the CT examinations, evaluating for the presence of appendicitis. Each radiologist interpreted 202 examinations, ensuring that each examination was interpreted by two radiologists. Individual reader performance and a combined interpretation performance of the two readers assigned to each case were calculated. In cases of disagreement, the third reader was asked to deliver a tiebreaker interpretation to be used to calculate the combined reader performance. Final outcome was based on operative, clinical, and follow-up data. We compared radiologic diagnoses with clinical outcomes to calculate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in both groups. Of the 303 patients enrolled, 151 patients (50%) were randomized to group 1 and the remaining 152 (50%) were randomized to group 2. The combined reader performance for the diagnosis of appendicitis in group 1 was a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 76.8-100%) and specificity of 97.1% (95% CI, 92.7-99.2%). The performance in group 2 was a sensitivity of 100% (73.5-100%) and specificity of 97.1% (92.9-99.2%). Patients presenting with nontraumatic abdominal pain imaged using 64-MDCT with isotropic reformations had similar characteristics for the

  2. Two versus five days of antibiotics after appendectomy for complex acute appendicitis (APPIC): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. van den Boom (Anne Loes); E.M.L. de Wijkerslooth (Elisabeth); J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost); Beverdam, F.H. (Frédérique H.); Boerma, E.-J.G. (Evert-Jan G.); M.A. Boermeester (Marja); Bosmans, J.W.A.M. (Joanna W.A.M.); Burghgraef, T.A. (Thijs A.); E.C. Consten (Esther); I. Dawson (Imro); J.W.T. Dekker (Jan Willem); Emous, M. (Marloes); A.A. van Geloven (Anna); P.M.N.Y.H. Go (Peter); Heijnen, L.A. (Luc A.); S. Huisman; Jean Pierre, D. (Dayanara); de Jonge, J. (Joske); Kloeze, J.H. (Jurian H.); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); H.R. Langeveld-Benders (Hester); M. Luyer (Misha); D.C. Melles (Damian); J.W. Mouton (Johan); A.P.T. van der Ploeg (Augustinus); Poelmann, F.B. (Floris B.); Ponten, J.E.H. (Jeroen E.H.); van Rossem, C.C. (Charles C.); W.H. Schreurs; Shapiro, J. (Joël); Steenvoorde, P. (Pascal); B.R. Toorenvliet (B.); J. Verhelst (Joost); Versteegh, H.P. (Hendt P.); R.M.H. Wijnen (René); B.P.L. Wijnhoven (Bas)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Acute appendicitis is one of the most common indications for emergency surgery. In patients with a complex appendicitis, prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended after appendectomy. There is no consensus regarding the optimum duration of antibiotics. Guidelines propose

  3. The second answers and questions on the licence of the fabrication project for the nuclear fuel of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Dae; Kim, C. K.; Kim, K. H.

    2002-07-01

    KINS has examined the application for licensing of research reactor fuel fabrication for seven months, from May to Dec. 2000. The most hot issues during examination, in order to understand whether the design and facilities are fitted to the regulation criteria or not, were the availability of basic ground, design criteria on safety, availability and methodology of design, seismic criteria, availability of nuclear fuel fabrication, safety related criticality, safety related the process, availability of nuclear waste management, validity of organization and procedure for radioactivity management, and the validity of both selection and analysis about predicted accident. Moreover, another issues such as the radioactivity inspection plan for waste treatment, effect on both radioactive material and accidant, method of decrease of damage on environment, and environmental inspection plan of radioactivity, were severely examined

  4. Two Decades of Research on Euthanasia from the Netherlands. What Have We Learnt and What Questions Remain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, Judith A C; van der Maas, Paul J; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; van Delden, Johannes J M; van der Heide, Agnes

    2009-09-01

    Two decades of research on euthanasia in the Netherlands have resulted into clear insights in the frequency and characteristics of euthanasia and other medical end-of-life decisions in the Netherlands. These empirical studies have contributed to the quality of the public debate, and to the regulating and public control of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. No slippery slope seems to have occurred. Physicians seem to adhere to the criteria for due care in the large majority of cases. Further, it has been shown that the majority of physicians think that the euthanasia Act has improved their legal certainty and contributes to the carefulness of life-terminating acts. In 2005, eighty percent of the euthanasia cases were reported to the review committees. Thus, the transparency envisaged by the Act still does not extend to all cases. Unreported cases almost all involve the use of opioids, and are not considered to be euthanasia by physicians. More education and debate is needed to disentangle in these situations which acts should be regarded as euthanasia and which should not. Medical end-of-life decision-making is a crucial part of end-of-life care. It should therefore be given continuous attention in health care policy and medical training. Systematic periodic research is crucial for enhancing our understanding of end-of-life care in modern medicine, in which the pursuit of a good quality of dying is nowadays widely recognized as an important goal, in addition to the traditional goals such as curing diseases and prolonging life.

  5. The research questions and methodological adequacy of clinical studies of the voice and larynx published in Brazilian and international journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Vanessa Pedrosa; De Biase, Noemi; Peccin, Maria Stella; Atallah, Alvaro Nagib

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the methodological adequacy of voice and laryngeal study designs published in speech-language pathology and otorhinolaryngology journals indexed for the ISI Web of Knowledge (ISI Web) and the MEDLINE database. A cross-sectional study conducted at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Federal University of São Paulo). Two Brazilian speech-language pathology and otorhinolaryngology journals (Pró-Fono and Revista Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia) and two international speech-language pathology and otorhinolaryngology journals (Journal of Voice, Laryngoscope), all dated between 2000 and 2004, were hand-searched by specialists. Subsequently, voice and larynx publications were separated, and a speech-language pathologist and otorhinolaryngologist classified 374 articles from the four journals according to objective and study design. The predominant objective contained in the articles was that of primary diagnostic evaluation (27%), and the most frequent study design was case series (33.7%). A mere 7.8% of the studies were designed adequately with respect to the stated objectives. There was no statistical difference in the methodological quality of studies indexed for the ISI Web and the MEDLINE database. The studies published in both national journals, indexed for the MEDLINE database, and international journals, indexed for the ISI Web, demonstrate weak methodology, with research poorly designed to meet the proposed objectives. There is much scientific work to be done in order to decrease uncertainty in the field analysed.

  6. Optimisation of the MR protocol in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilah; Chung, Yong Eun; An, Chansik; Kim, Honsoul; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Sun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Research Affairs, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    To investigate the optimal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in pregnant women suspected of having acute appendicitis. One hundred and forty-six pregnant women with suspected appendicitis were included. MR images were reviewed by two radiologists in three separate sessions. In session 1, only axial single-shot turbo spin echo (SSH-TSE) T2-weighted images (WI) were included with other routine sequences. In sessions 2 and 3, coronal and sagittal T2WI were sequentially added. The visibility of the appendix and diagnostic confidence of appendicitis were evaluated in each session using a 5-point grading scale. If diseases other than appendicitis were suspected, specific diagnosis with a 5-point confidence scale was recorded. Diagnostic performance for appendicitis and other diseases were evaluated. Twenty-five patients (17.1%) were diagnosed with appendicitis. Among the patients with normal appendix, 28 were diagnosed with other disease. Diagnostic performance including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the curve values for diagnosing appendicitis and other diseases showed no significant difference among sets for both reviewers (p>0.05). Diagnostic performance of MR in pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis can be preserved with omission of sagittal or both coronal and sagittal SSH-T2WI. (orig.)

  7. Optimisation of the MR protocol in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ilah; Chung, Yong Eun; An, Chansik; Kim, Honsoul; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Lee, Hye Sun

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the optimal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in pregnant women suspected of having acute appendicitis. One hundred and forty-six pregnant women with suspected appendicitis were included. MR images were reviewed by two radiologists in three separate sessions. In session 1, only axial single-shot turbo spin echo (SSH-TSE) T2-weighted images (WI) were included with other routine sequences. In sessions 2 and 3, coronal and sagittal T2WI were sequentially added. The visibility of the appendix and diagnostic confidence of appendicitis were evaluated in each session using a 5-point grading scale. If diseases other than appendicitis were suspected, specific diagnosis with a 5-point confidence scale was recorded. Diagnostic performance for appendicitis and other diseases were evaluated. Twenty-five patients (17.1%) were diagnosed with appendicitis. Among the patients with normal appendix, 28 were diagnosed with other disease. Diagnostic performance including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the curve values for diagnosing appendicitis and other diseases showed no significant difference among sets for both reviewers (p>0.05). Diagnostic performance of MR in pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis can be preserved with omission of sagittal or both coronal and sagittal SSH-T2WI. (orig.)

  8. Composition of the cellular infiltrate in patients with simple and complex appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, Ramon R.; Wassenaar, Emma C. E.; de Boer, Onno J.; Bakx, Roel; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Bunders, Madeleine J.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernst; Heij, Hugo A.

    2017-01-01

    It is now well established that there are two types of appendicitis: simple (nonperforating) and complex (perforating). This study evaluates differences in the composition of the immune cellular infiltrate in children with simple and complex appendicitis. A total of 47 consecutive children

  9. Appendicitis and alternate diagnoses in children: findings on unenhanced limited helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, L.H.; Perez, R. Jr.; Scheker, L.E.; Stein, S.M.; Heller, R.M.; Hernanz-Schulman, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to review and illustrate the findings of appendicitis, and of alternate diagnoses that may clinically or radiographically simulate appendicitis, on unenhanced limited CT in children. Potential pitfalls in unenhanced limited CT interpretation of pediatric patients will also be discussed. (orig.)

  10. Acute appendicitis in children: ultrasound and CT findings in negative appendectomy cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Ho; Choi, Young Hun; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To decrease the negative appendectomy rate in children, knowledge of the misleading imaging findings on US and CT in negative appendicitis cases is important. To evaluate the negative appendectomy rate and describe the imaging findings of US and CT that lead radiologists to misdiagnose acute appendicitis in children. From 2007 to 2013, 374 children operated for suspected appendicitis were proved to either have acute appendicitis (n = 348) or to be negative for appendicitis (n = 26) on pathological reports. Negative appendectomy rates were compared among imaging modalities, age groups and genders. We retrospectively reviewed US and CT findings from negative appendectomy cases. The overall negative appendectomy rate was 7.0% (26/374). There were no statistically significant differences among the subgroups. The most common misleading presentations on US were sonographic tenderness (9/16, 56%) and non-compressibility (9/16, 56%). The most common misleading finding on CT were the presence of an appendicolith or hyperdense feces (5/12, 42%). Periappendiceal fat inflammation was observed in only one case of negative appendicitis on US and on CT. Radiologists can misdiagnose children with equivocal diameters of appendices as having acute appendicitis when sonographic tenderness or non-compressibility is present on US and when an appendicolith or hyperdense feces is noted on CT. The possibility of negative appendicitis should be borne in mind when periappendiceal fat inflammation is absent or minimal in indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  11. Diabetes increases the risk of an appendectomy in patients with antibiotic treatment of noncomplicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2017-07-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined whether diabetic patients have a higher risk for recurrent appendicitis during a 1-year follow-up period after successful antibiotic treatment for patients with acute uncomplicated appendicitis than nondiabetic patients using a population-based database. We included 541 appendicitis patients who received antibiotic treatment for acute appendicitis. We individually tracked each patient for a 1-year period to identify those who subsequently underwent an appendectomy during the follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard regressions suggested that the adjusted hazard ratio of an appendectomy during the 1-year follow-up period was 1.75 for appendicitis patients with diabetes than appendicitis patients without diabetes. We found that among females, the adjusted hazard ratio of an appendectomy was 2.18 for acute appendicitis patients with diabetes than their counterparts without diabetes. However, we failed to observe this relationship in males. We demonstrated a relationship between diabetes and a subsequent appendectomy in females who underwent antibiotic treatment for noncomplicated appendicitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of appendicitis during pregnancy : No delay in accurate diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aggenbach, L.; Zeeman, G. G.; Cantineau, A. E. P.; Gordijn, S. J.; Hofker, H. S.

    Background: Acute appendicitis during pregnancy may be associated with serious maternal and/or fetal complications. To date, the optimal clinical approach to the management of pregnant women suspected of having acute appendicitis is subject to debate. The purpose of this retrospective study was to

  13. [Coexistence of acute appendicitis and dengue fever: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna-Ramos, Juan Fidel; Silva-Gracia, Carlos; Maya-Vacio, Gerardo Joel; Romero-Utrilla, Alejandra; Ríos-Burgueño, Efrén Rafael; Velarde-Félix, Jesús Salvador

    2017-12-01

    Dengue is the most important human viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It can be asymptomatic or it can present in any of its 3clinical forms: Dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. However, some atypical manifestations have been reported in surgical emergencies caused by acute appendicitis in patients with dengue fever. We report the case of an 18-year-old Mexican male who presented to the emergency department of the General Hospital of Culiacan, Sinaloa, with symptoms of dengue fever, accompanied by crampy abdominal pain with positive Rovsing and Dunphy signs. Dengue infection was confirmed by a positive NS1 antigen test performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An abdominal ultrasound revealed an appendicular process; as the abdominal pain in the right side kept increasing, an open appendectomy was performed. Abundant inflammatory liquid was observed during the surgery, and the pathology laboratory reported an oedematous appendix with fibrinopurulent plaques, which agreed with acute ulcerative appendicitis. The patient was discharged fully recovered without complications during the follow-up period. Acute abdominal pain can be caused in some cases by dengue infection. This can be confusing, which can lead to unnecessary surgical interventions, creating additional morbidities and costs for the patient. This unusual and coincident acute appendicitis with dengue highlights the importance of performing careful clinical studies for appropriate decision making, especially in dengue endemic regions during an outbreak of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of routine imaging of suspected appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N; Marsden, M; Bottomley, S; Nagarajah, N; Scutt, F; Toh, S

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The misdiagnosis of appendicitis and consequent removal of a normal appendix occurs in one in five patients in the UK. On the contrary, in healthcare systems with routine cross-sectional imaging of suspected appendicitis, the negative appendicectomy rate is around 5%. If we could reduce the rate in the UK to similar numbers, would this be cost effective? This study aimed to calculate the financial impact of negative appendicectomy at the Queen Alexandra Hospital and to explore whether a policy of routine imaging of such patients could reduce hospital costs. Materials and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of all appendicectomies over a 1-year period at our institution. Data were extracted on outcomes including appendix histology, operative time and length of stay to calculate the negative appendicectomy rate and to analyse costs. Results A total of 531 patients over 5 years of age had an appendicectomy. The negative appendicectomy rate was 22% (115/531). The additional financial costs of negative appendicectomy to the hospital during this period were £270,861. Universal imaging of all patients with right iliac fossa pain that could result in a 5% negative appendicectomy rate would cost between £67,200 and £165,600 per year but could save £33,896 (magnetic resonance imaging), £105,896 (computed tomography) or £132,296 (ultrasound) depending on imaging modality used. Conclusions Negative appendicectomy is still too frequent and results in additional financial burden to the health service. Routine imaging of patients with suspected appendicitis would not only reduce the negative appendicectomy rate but could lead to cost savings and a better service for our patients.

  15. Xanthogranulomatous appendicitis with a fulminant course: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Gaurav; Saha, Sudipta; Andley, Manoj; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Ajay

    2014-12-01

    Xanthogranulomatous inflammation is a well-described entity with involvement of various body organs. But the involvement of vermiform appendix in the disease process is quite rare with only few cases are reported in literature. This case report describes a 50-year-old man, who was diagnosed as a case of acute appendicitis with appendicular lump on the basis of clinical history, physical examination, and hematological and radiological investigations. Patient underwent surgical interventions twice. But, he succumbed to the disease. We are reporting this case in view of rarity of the disease and the fulminant course, which has not been described in any other reports.

  16. Correlation between the season, temperature and atmospheric pressure with incidence and pathogenesis of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikolić, Aleksandar; Karanikolić, Vesna; Djordjević, Lidija; Pešić, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    There is very little literature data on the correlation between the seasons, temperature and atmospheric pressure, and pathogenesis of acute appendicitis (AA). The aim of this research is to investigate the association between the seasons, changes in atmospheric temperature and pressure, and patients’ age and severity of the clinical form of AA in the city of Niš This study included 395 patients diagnosed with AA, who, during the two-year period, from July 1st 2011 to June 30th 2013, were hospitalized and operated on at the Department of General Surgery, Clinical Center in Niš, Serbia. The increased average daily values of barometric pressure by 1 millibar on the day when the event took place was associated (p atmospheric temperature and pressure.

  17. The ectopic appendicolith from perforated appendicitis as a cause of tubo-ovarian abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, Rajashree C.; Sides, Corey; Klein, Deborah J.; Reddy, Sireesha Y.; Santos, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical cause of abdominal pain in the pediatric population. History and physical examination are atypical in up to a third of patients. Known potential complications of untreated or delayed management of acute appendicitis include appendiceal perforation, periappendiceal abscess formation, peritonitis, bowel obstruction and rarely septic thrombosis of mesenteric vessels. We report an unusual complication of perforated appendicitis. A tubo-ovarian abscess developed secondary to appendicolith migration into the right fallopian tube in a patient who had undergone interval laparoscopic appendectomy for perforated appendicitis. The retained appendicolith was visualized within the obstructed and dilated fallopian tube on contrast-enhanced CT. We discuss the CT imaging features of this unusual complication of perforated appendicitis. (orig.)

  18. The ectopic appendicolith from perforated appendicitis as a cause of tubo-ovarian abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, Rajashree C.; Sides, Corey; Klein, Deborah J. [University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Reddy, Sireesha Y. [University of Rochester, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rochester, NY (United States); Santos, Mary C. [University of Rochester, Pediatric Surgery, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical cause of abdominal pain in the pediatric population. History and physical examination are atypical in up to a third of patients. Known potential complications of untreated or delayed management of acute appendicitis include appendiceal perforation, periappendiceal abscess formation, peritonitis, bowel obstruction and rarely septic thrombosis of mesenteric vessels. We report an unusual complication of perforated appendicitis. A tubo-ovarian abscess developed secondary to appendicolith migration into the right fallopian tube in a patient who had undergone interval laparoscopic appendectomy for perforated appendicitis. The retained appendicolith was visualized within the obstructed and dilated fallopian tube on contrast-enhanced CT. We discuss the CT imaging features of this unusual complication of perforated appendicitis. (orig.)

  19. The diagnostic value of a panel of serological markers in acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooqui, W; Pommergaard, H-C; Burcharth, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appendicitis is a frequent reason for hospital admissions. Elevated C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, and serum bilirubin have been suggested as individual markers for appendicitis and appendiceal perforation. The aim of this study was to analyze if a combination of serologic...... markers could increase the prognostic accuracy of diagnosing non-perforated and perforated appendicitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Demographic data, histological findings, blood tests, and clinical symptoms were collected on all patients who underwent a diagnostic laparoscopy, a laparoscopic appendectomy......, or conventional (open) appendectomy between May 2009 and May 2012 from a surgical department. The patients were grouped into those with either perforated appendicitis, non-perforated appendicitis, or differential diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate models were used to identify which markers were useful...

  20. Field-Based Teacher Research: How Teachers and Scientists Working Together Answers Questions about Turtle Nesting Ecology while Enhancing Teachers' Inquiry Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, J. M.; Jungblut, D.; Catena, A. N.; Rubenstein, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    Providing rigorous academic supplement to a professional development program for teachers, QUEST is a fusion of Drexel University's environmental science research department with Princeton University's Program in Teacher Preparation. Completed in the summers of 2012 (in partnership with Earthwatch) and 2013 in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey, QUEST's terrapin field research program enhances K-12 teachers' ecological knowledge, develops inquiry-based thinking in the classroom, and builds citizen science engagement. With a focus on quality question development and data analysis to answer questions, teachers are coached in developing, implementing, and presenting independent research projects on diamondback terrapin nesting ecology. As a result, teachers participating in QUEST's week long program bring a realistic example of science in action into their classrooms, helping to develop their own students' critical thinking skills. For teachers, this program provides training towards educating students on how to do real and imaginative science - subsequently sending students to university better prepared to engage in their own independent research. An essential component of the collaboration through QUEST, in addition to the teacher's experience during and after the summer institute, is the research data collected which supplements that of the Principal Investigator. In 2012, by documenting terrapin nest site predators, teachers gained valuable scientific experience, while Drexel acquired important ecological data which would have not been able to be collected otherwise. In 2013, teachers helped answer important questions about terrapin nesting success post Superstorm Sandy. In fact, the 2013 QUEST teachers are the first to visualize the frighteningly increased erosion of a primary terrapin nesting site due to Sandy; showing how most terrapin nests now lie in the bay, instead of safe on shore. Teachers comment that interacting with scientists in the field, and contributing to

  1. Characteristic clinical features of Aspergillus appendicitis: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Amin, Mitual B; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-11-28

    This work aims to facilitate diagnosing Aspergillus appendicitis, which can be missed clinically due to its rarity, by proposing a clinical pentad for Aspergillus appendicitis based on literature review and one new case. The currently reported case of pathologically-proven Aspergillus appendicitis was identified by computerized search of pathology database at William Beaumont Hospital, 1999-2014. Prior cases were identified by computerized literature search. Among 10980 pathology reports of pathologically-proven appendicitis, one case of Aspergillus appendicitis was identified (rate = 0.01%). A young boy with profound neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute myelogenous leukemia presented with right lower quadrant pain, pyrexia, and generalized malaise. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed a thickened appendiceal wall and periappendiceal inflammation, suggesting appendicitis. Emergent laparotomy showed an inflamed, thickened appendix, which was resected. The patient did poorly postoperatively with low-grade-fevers while receiving antibacterial therapy, but rapidly improved after initiating amphotericin therapy. Microscopic examination of a silver stain of the appendectomy specimen revealed fungi with characteristic Aspergillus morphology, findings confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Primary Aspergillus appendicitis is exceptionally rare, with only 3 previously reported cases. All three cases presented with (1)-neutropenia, (2)-recent chemotherapy, (3)-acute leukemia, and (4)-suspected appendicitis; (5)-the two prior cases initially treated with antibacterial therapy, fared poorly before instituting anti-Aspergillus therapy. The current patient satisfied all these five criteria. Based on these four cases, a clinical pentad is proposed for Aspergillus appendicitis: clinically-suspected appendicitis, neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, acute leukemia, and poor clinical response if treated solely by antibacterial/anti-candidial therapy. Patients presenting with

  2. Diagnosing Appendicitis: Evidence-Based Review of the Diagnostic Approach in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogilev, Daniel J.; Duus, Nicolaj; Odom, Stephen R.; Shapiro, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery. However, the diagnosis is often challenging and the decision to operate, observe or further work-up a patient is often unclear. The utility of clinical scoring systems (namely the Alvarado score), laboratory markers, and the development of novel markers in the diagnosis of appendicitis remains controversial. This article presents an update on the diagnostic approach to appendicitis through an evidence-based review. Methods We performed a broad Medline search of radiological imaging, the Alvarado score, common laboratory markers, and novel markers in patients with suspected appendicitis. Results Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate mode of imaging for suspected cases of appendicitis, but the associated increase in radiation exposure is problematic. The Alvarado score is a clinical scoring system that is used to predict the likelihood of appendicitis based on signs, symptoms and laboratory data. It can help risk stratify patients with suspected appendicitis and potentially decrease the use of CT imaging in patients with certain Alvarado scores. White blood cell (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), granulocyte count and proportion of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells are frequently elevated in patients with appendicitis, but are insufficient on their own as a diagnostic modality. When multiple markers are used in combination their diagnostic utility is greatly increased. Several novel markers have been proposed to aid in the diagnosis of appendicitis; however, while promising, most are only in the preliminary stages of being studied. Conclusion While CT is the most accurate mode of imaging in suspected appendicitis, the accompanying radiation is a concern. Ultrasound may help in the diagnosis while decreasing the need for CT in certain circumstances. The Alvarado Score has good diagnostic utility at specific cutoff points. Laboratory markers have very limited

  3. VQABQ: Visual Question Answering by Basic Questions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jia-Hong

    2017-03-19

    Taking an image and question as the input of our method, it can output the text-based answer of the query question about the given image, so called Visual Question Answering (VQA). There are two main modules in our algorithm. Given a natural language question about an image, the first module takes the question as input and then outputs the basic questions of the main given question. The second module takes the main question, image and these basic questions as input and then outputs the text-based answer of the main question. We formulate the basic questions generation problem as a LASSO optimization problem, and also propose a criterion about how to exploit these basic questions to help answer main question. Our method is evaluated on the challenging VQA dataset and yields state-of-the-art accuracy, 60.34% in open-ended task.

  4. VQABQ: Visual Question Answering by Basic Questions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jia-Hong; Alfadly, Modar; Ghanem, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Taking an image and question as the input of our method, it can output the text-based answer of the query question about the given image, so called Visual Question Answering (VQA). There are two main modules in our algorithm. Given a natural language question about an image, the first module takes the question as input and then outputs the basic questions of the main given question. The second module takes the main question, image and these basic questions as input and then outputs the text-based answer of the main question. We formulate the basic questions generation problem as a LASSO optimization problem, and also propose a criterion about how to exploit these basic questions to help answer main question. Our method is evaluated on the challenging VQA dataset and yields state-of-the-art accuracy, 60.34% in open-ended task.

  5. Measuring Anatomic Severity in Pediatric Appendicitis: Validation of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Appendicitis Severity Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Matthew C; Polites, Stephanie F; Aho, Johnathon M; Haddad, Nadeem N; Kong, Victor Y; Saleem, Humza; Bruce, John L; Laing, Grant L; Clarke, Damian L; Zielinski, Martin D

    2018-01-01

    To assess whether the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grading system accurately corresponds with appendicitis outcomes in a US pediatric population. This single-institution retrospective review included patients appendicitis from 2008 to 2012. Demographic, clinical, procedural, and follow-up data (primary outcome was measured as Clavien-Dindo grade of complication severity) were abstracted. AAST grades were generated based on intraoperative findings. Summary, univariate, and multivariable regression analyses were performed to compare AAST grade and outcomes. Overall, 331 patients (46% female) were identified with a median age of 12 (IQR, 8-15) years. Appendectomy was laparoscopic in 90% and open in 10%. AAST grades included: Normal (n = 13, 4%), I (n = 152, 46%), II (n = 90, 27%), III (n = 43, 13%), IV (n = 24 7.3%), and V (n = 9 2.7%). Increased AAST grade was associated with increased Clavien-Dindo severity, P =.001. The overall complication rate was 13.6% and was comprised by superficial surgical site infection (n = 13, 3.9%), organ space infection (n = 15, 4.5%), and readmission (n = 17, 5.1%). Median duration of stay increased with AAST grade (P appendicitis grading system is valid in a single-institution pediatric population. Increasing AAST grade incrementally corresponds with patient outcomes including increased risk of complications and severity of complications. Determination of the generalizability of this grading system is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. To research (or not) that is the question: ethical issues in research when medical care is disrupted by political action: a case study from Eldoret, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Darlene R; Marete, Irene; Meslin, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    While considerable attention has been focused on understanding the myriad of ethical analysis in international research in low and middle income countries, new issues always arise that have not been anticipated in guidelines or studied extensively. The disruption of medical care arising as a direct result of political actions, including strikes, postelection violence and related activities, is one such issue that leaves physician-researchers struggling to manage often conflicting professional responsibilities. This paper discusses the ethical conflicts that arise for physician-researchers, particularly when disruption threatens the completion of a study or completion is possible but at the expense of not addressing unmet medical needs of patients. We review three pragmatic strategies and the ethical issues arising from each: not starting research, stopping research that has already started, and continuing research already initiated. We argue that during episodes of medical care disruption, research that has been started can be continued only if the ethical standards imposed at the beginning of the study can continue to be met; however, studies that have been approved but not yet started should not begin until the disruption has ended and ethical standards can again be assured. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Using routinely collected health data for surveillance, quality improvement and research: Framework and key questions to assess ethics, privacy and data access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The use of health data for public health, surveillance, quality improvement and research is crucial to improve health systems and health care. However, bodies responsible for privacy and ethics often limit access to routinely collected health data. Ethical approvals, issues around protecting privacy and data access are often dealt with by different layers of regulations, making approval processes appear disjointed.Objective To create a comprehensive framework for defining the ethical and privacy status of a project and for providing guidance on data access.Method The framework comprises principles and related questions. The core of the framework will be built using standard terminology definitions such as ethics-related controlled vocabularies and regional directives. It is built in this way to reduce ambiguity between different definitions. The framework is extensible: principles can be retired or added to, as can their related questions. Responses to these questions should allow data processors to define ethical issues, privacy risk and other unintended consequences.Results The framework contains three steps: (1 identifying possible ethical and privacy principles relevant to the project; (2 providing ethics and privacy guidance questions that inform the type of approval needed; and (3 assessing case-specific ethics and privacy issues. The outputs from this process should inform whether the balance between public interests and privacy breach and any ethical considerations are tipped in favour of societal benefits. If they are then this should be the basis on which data access is permitted. Tightly linking ethical principles to governance and data access may help maintain public trust.

  8. "We Don't See Things as They Are, We See Things as We Are": Questioning the "Outsider" in Polish Migration Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Botterill

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a reflexive account of conducting research on Polish migration to Scotland from the perspective of the "outsider." The contribution argues for a revision to the insider/outsider dichotomy viewing it as inadequately nuanced in relation to the multiple intersectionalities performed through the research encounter. It is based on data collected from biographical-narrative interviews with Polish young people living in Edinburgh, Scotland. The article explores the interview encounter between an English researcher and Polish young people about the experience of EU mobility and argues that as migration narratives unfold the distinctions between the "researcher" and the "researched" blur. In particular, I focus on the intersections of gender, class and nationality to show how different positionalities are negotiated and confronted through reflexivity. The interview is a creative process involving co-construction of narratives through dialogue, embodied performances and non-cognitive associations that draw out the multiple intersectionalities of both parties. Through this process the binary of insider/outsider is called into question and this article examines the usefulness of this dichotomy as a framework for understanding the research relationship. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs150249

  9. Teacher's Questions in Reading Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuliati Rohmah

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The present paper discusses an English teacher's questions in Reading classes at MAN Malang III. Types of questions, functions of teacher's questions, question levels and the strategies applied by the teacher were put as the research problems. Non-participant observa­tion was applied to collect the data with the researcher as the main in­strument aided by field-notes and a tape recorder. It was found that the distribution of the questions did not allow the students to talk longer and to think more analytically. Meanwhile, the strategies applied by the teacher helped the students to respond to the questions previously unanswered. The teacher is suggested to produce more open and refer­ential question as well as inference and evaluation questions as to give more chances for the students to think aloud more.

  10. Virtualization of Research Universities: Raising the Right Questions to Address Key Functions of the Institution. Research & Occasional Paper Series. CSHE.6.03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the variety of information and communication technology (ICT) applications at traditional universities and to integrate them into a holistic picture of the institution. Using the distinction of three key elements of scholarly activity (research, publication, education), it suggests a functional…

  11. Effectiveness of conservative management of uncomplicated acute appendicitis: A single hospital based prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz KH. Alnaser

    Full Text Available Background: Acute appendicitis is one of the commonest causes of acute abdomen. There is a wide discussion and controversy on the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and outcomes of the conservative management of selected cases of acute appendicitis with an antibiotic first plan. Patients and methods: This was a single hospital-based prospective study with a duration of 25 months. Patients with clinical and radiological features of acute appendicitis presenting within 72 h of the beginning of abdominal pain with Alvarado score ≥5 were included. The patients received a therapeutic dose of broad-spectrum antibiotics and symptomatic treatment. The follow-up period was 6 months. Results: 90 patients were evaluated, 54 (60% patients were female and 36 (40% patients were male with mean age 34.4 years. Conservative treatment was successful in 68 (75.6% patients and failed in 22 (24.4% patients. No mortality recorded in this study. The main complications which occurred in those patients who failed to respond to conservative treatment were perforated appendicitis (3 patients, appendicular abscess (3 patients and appendicular mass (4 patients. Conclusion: Majority of cases of the first attack of uncomplicated acute appendicitis can be treated successfully by conservative treatment. However, conservative treatment demands precise communication, close monitoring and follow-up to recognize failure which needs to be treated immediately by surgery. Keywords: Acute appendicitis, Conservative treatment, Surgery, Antibiotics

  12. A study of preoperative diagnosis using abdominal computed tomography in acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takehiro

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in differential diagnosis and decisions for operative indications in patients with acute appendicitis, CT was done in 45 patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. CT was retrospectively analyzed for the following findings: enlarged appendix, hazy periappendiceal density, increased enhancement of the appendiceal wall, deficiency of the appendiceal wall, appendiceal stones, abscess, and ascites. Surgery was conducted 28 patients, of whom 25 were pathologically diagnosed with gangrenous or phlegmonous appendicitis. Seventeen improved without surgery, i.e., 9 with acute appendicitis, 7 with diverticulitis of the colon, and 1 with pelvic peritonitis. Except for 3 with severe abscess, enlarged appendix, hazy periappendiceal density, and increased enhancement of the appendiceal wall were observed in 22 with phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis. In 25 with phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis, appendiceal stones were observed in 32% and abscess or ascites in 60%. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CT diagnosis images were 100%, 80%, and 96%. CT findings thus provide useful information in differential diagnosis and decisions on operative indication in patients with acute appendicitis. (author)

  13. Changes in the epidemiology of acute appendicitis and appendectomy in Danish children 1996-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S B; Paerregaard, A; Larsen, K

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aim of the study was to describe changes in the epidemiology of acute appendicitis in Danish children between 0-19 years of age for the period 1996-2004. METHODS: The study was based on discharge diagnoses taken from the Danish National Patient Registry of all 28 274 patients with a diag......PURPOSE: Aim of the study was to describe changes in the epidemiology of acute appendicitis in Danish children between 0-19 years of age for the period 1996-2004. METHODS: The study was based on discharge diagnoses taken from the Danish National Patient Registry of all 28 274 patients...... with a diagnosis of acute uncomplicated or complicated appendicitis, and/or a registered procedure code of appendectomy. These data were computed together with data on the background population, and incidences were calculated. RESULTS: A significant decrease in the incidence of acute uncomplicated appendicitis...... was found for all age groups (range, 13-36%). The decrease was present for both sexes, but most prominent in girls. The incidence of complicated acute appendicitis decreased by 10%. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute appendicitis is declining. The incidence of uncomplicated appendicitis appears...

  14. Studies on CT findings and operation findings for acute appendicitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakibara, Kenichi; Andoh, Shigemitsu; Karamatsu, Syouji; Urakami, Toshihiko; Tsuji, Hideki; Kobayashi, Tohru; Okahira, Kihiro

    1995-01-01

    Pediatric CT findings of acute appendicitis were reviewed retrospectively. The subjects were 29 patients (15 boys and 14 girls with an average age of 8.2 years), consisting of 17 with necrotic, 8 with phlegmonous inflammatory, and 4 with catarrhal appendicitis. CT findings were compared with the degree of inflammation. CT revealed abscess in 64.7%, 12.5%, and 0% for necrotic, phlegmonous inflammatory, and catarrhal types, respectively, and 41.4% for all types. An enlarged appendicitis was shown on CT in 86.2% (25/29). Fecalithes were shown on CT in 67.7% (19/29), which was associated with necrotic and phlegmonous inflammatory types, but not with catarrhal type. The other CT findings included thickened paramesocolon of the right lower abdomen, undefined wall of the inner side of the cecum. Inflammation was relatively slight in cases of catarrhal appendicitis, Nine patients less than 5 years of age had phlegmonous inflammatory or necrotic appendicitis. CT allowed definitive diagnosis of appendicitis in 2 of 3 patients with necrotic type. Ct was considered to be very useful in the diagnosis of appendicitis. (N.K.)

  15. Sonography of acute appendicitis in pregnant women: diagnostic accuracy by the stage of gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Sang Wook; Rho, Myung Ho

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women according to the trimester. A retrospective review was performed on 103 pregnant women who underwent sonography with clinically suspected acute appendicitis. The sonographic technique used involved either the graded compression or a non-compression method. All the sonograms were obtained after changing the patient's position and identifying the diseased appendix. The criterion for a sonographic diagnosis of acute appendicitis was the visualization of a non-compressible appendix with a maximal diameter ≥ 6 mm. The sonographic findings were correlated with the surgical findings and clinical follow-up. Acute appendicitis was confirmed by both the surgical and pathological findings in 48 out of 103 pregnant women. Ultrasound established the diagnosis in 34 of the 48 patients with proven appendicitis. There were false-positives in 2 patients and false-negatives in 14 patients. Among the 55 patients who had a normal appendix, 30 patients improved at the clinical follow-up and 25 patients had other intra-abdominal disorders. The diagnostic accuracy of the ultrasound was 94% in the first trimester, 81% in the second trimester, and 76% in the third trimester. The overall accuracy was found to be 84%, with a 71% sensitivity and a 96% specificity. No significant difference was found in the diagnostic accuracy of the ultrasound according to the trimester in which the acute appendicitis occurred. Therefore, regardless of the stage of gestation, sonography is a valuable procedure for diagnosing acute appendicitis

  16. Clinical use of MRI for the evaluation of acute appendicitis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darshan; Fingard, Jordan; Winters, Sean; Low, Gavin

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MRI for detecting acute appendicitis in pregnancy in a multi-institution study involving general body MR readers with no specific expertise in MR imaging of the pregnant patient. Retrospective review of MRI examinations on PACS in 42 pregnant patients was evaluated for acute right lower quadrant pain. Three fellowship-trained general body radiologists analyzed the MRI examinations in consensus and attempted to localize the appendix, assess for features of appendicitis, and exclude alternative etiologies for the right lower quadrant pain. Of the 42 MRI examinations, the readers noted 6 cases of acute appendicitis, 16 cases of a normal appendix, and 20 cases involving non-visualization of the appendix but where there were no secondary features of acute appendicitis. Based on the surgical data and clinical follow-up, there were 3 true-positive cases, 3 false-positive cases, 34 true-negative cases, and 2 false-negative cases of acute appendicitis on MRI. This yielded an accuracy of 88.1%, sensitivity of 60%, specificity of 91.9%, positive predictive value of 50%, and negative predictive value of 94.4% for the detection of acute appendicitis in the pregnant patient on MRI. Alternative etiologies for the right lower quadrant pain on MRI included torsion of an ovarian dermoid in 1 case and pyelonephritis in 1 case. MRI is an excellent modality for excluding acute appendicitis in pregnant patients presenting with right lower quadrant pain.

  17. Increased incidence of bowel cancer after non-surgical treatment of appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enblad, Malin; Birgisson, Helgi; Ekbom, Anders; Sandin, Fredrik; Graf, Wilhelm

    2017-11-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the use of antibiotics instead of appendectomy for treating appendicitis but diagnostic difficulties and longstanding inflammation might lead to increased incidence of bowel cancer in these patients. The aim of this population-based study was to investigate the incidence of bowel cancer after non-surgical treatment of appendicitis. Patients diagnosed with appendicitis but lacking the surgical procedure code for appendix removal were retrieved from the Swedish National Inpatient Register 1987-2013. The cohort was matched with the Swedish Cancer Registry and the standardised incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for appendiceal, colorectal and small bowel cancers were calculated. Of 13 595 patients with non-surgical treatment of appendicitis, 352 (2.6%) were diagnosed with appendiceal, colorectal or small bowel cancer (SIR 4.1, 95% CI 3.7-4.6). The largest incidence increase was found for appendiceal (SIR 35, 95% CI 26-46) and right-sided colon cancer (SIR 7.5, 95% CI 6.6-8.6). SIR was still elevated when excluding patients with less than 12 months since appendicitis and the incidence of right-sided colon cancer was elevated five years after appendicitis (SIR 3.5, 95% CI 2.1-5.4). An increased incidence of bowel cancer was found after appendicitis with abscess (SIR 4.6, 95% CI 4.0-5.2), and without abscess (SIR 3.5, 95% CI 2.9-4.1). Patients with non-surgical treatment of appendicitis have an increased short and long-term incidence of bowel cancer. This should be considered in the discussion about optimal management of patients with appendicitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and its severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Tesshou; Ogata, Seiji; Uto, Mitsunobu; Nakazono, Toshihiro; Urata, Miyuki; Ishibe, Ryouhei; Shinyama, Shin; Nakajo, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in diagnosing acute appendicitis and its severity. Contrast-enhanced MD-CT 3.5 mm thick images of 23 control patients (A), and 64 patients with surgically proven acute appendicitis including 8 catarrhal (B), 28 phiegmonous (C), and 28 gangrenous (D) appendicitis patients were respectively analyzed. The number of observed major computed tomography (CT) findings for each patient group were as follows: enlarged (≥6 mm in maximum diameter) appendix (A: 5, B: 8, C: 28, D: 28), enhancement of the appendiceal wall; hyper (A: 3, B: 8, C: 27, D: 20), iso (A: 15, B: 0, C: 1, D: 2), hypo (A-C: 0, D: 4), and patched (A-C: 0, D: 2) enhancement, appendicolith (A, B: 0, C: 7, D: 13), dirty fat sign (A: 3, B: 1, C: 21, D: 28), localized ascites (A: 2, B: 0, C: 2, D: 11), and abscess formation (A-C: 0, D: 5). From the combinations of these findings, we could differentiate acute appendicitis from the control normal appendix with an accuracy of 99% and could diagnose the severity of acute appendicitis with accuracies of 92% for catarrhal appendicitis, 84% for phlegmonous appendicitis, and 92% for gangrenous appendicitis. We could also visually reconstruct the entire forms and positions of the appendices from the successive CT findings because of the high-resolution thin-slice MDCT images. MDCT is highly accurate in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and its severity. (author)

  19. A STUDY ON OPEN VS. LAPAROSCOPIC APPROACH IN ACUTE APPENDICITIS

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    Savalam Bujjitha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reginald Fitz in 1986, first described acute appendicitis. Since the acute appendicitis was first described, the pathology remains the most common intra-abdominal condition requiring emergency surgery. The life time risk of having acute appendicitis is about 8%. Traditionally, the treatment of choice has been surgery. Before the only option was the open laparotomical meaning opening the abdominal cavity was the mode of operation. Laparoscopic appendectomy was described by Semm in 1983. This method was new and had its own benefits but this particular procedure has struggled to prove its superiority over the open technique. This is contrast to laparoscopic cholecystectomy which has promptly become the gold standard for gallstone disease despite little scientific challenge. This peculiarity might be because of the fact that the Open Appendectomy was used for centuries with good effect. The particular procedure withstood the test of time for more than a century since its introduction by McBurney unlike cholecystectomy. Open surgery is typically completed using a small right lower quadrant incision between the point joining the lateral one-third and medial two-third of a line drawn from anterior-superior iliac spine and the umbilicus. The postoperative recovery is usually uneventful. The overall mortality of OA is around 0.3% and morbidity about 11%. Despite numerous randomised trials, several meta-analysis and systematic critical reviews, the clear cut winner is unannounced. A sincere effort has been put to understand the different pros and cons of the two methods so that the patient can be benefited. METHODS One Hundred cases were studied in the Department of Surgery, King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh from 01-09-2015 to 29-02-2016. Out of these, fifty cases underwent open surgery and the rest through laparoscopic surgery. The first group (Open Surgery thus consisted of 50 cases and the second group (laparoscopic consisted of fifty

  20. Typhoid Fever and Acute Appendicitis: A Rare Association Not Yet Fully Formed

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    Daniel J. Sartori

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by foodborne enteric pathogens including typhoidal and non-typhoidal Salmonella species can mimic symptoms of acute appendicitis. The association between such bacterial pathogens and pathology-proven acute appendicitis has been described, but this link is poorly understood. Here we describe a case of a young man with typhoid fever presenting with histology-proven acute appendicitis requiring urgent appendectomy, and provide a brief review of relevant literature to prompt more widespread recognition of this rare cause of a common surgical emergency.

  1. Acute Appendicitis as the Initial Clinical Presentation of Primary HIV-1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleimann, Mariane H; Leth, Steffen; Krarup, Astrid R

    2018-01-01

    We report a case of an adolescent who presented at our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. While the initial diagnosis was acute appendicitis, a secondary and coincidental diagnosis of primary HIV-1 infection was made. Concurrent and subsequent clinical and molecular biology findings ...... form the basis of our argument that primary HIV-1 infection was the cause of acute appendicitis in this individual.......We report a case of an adolescent who presented at our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. While the initial diagnosis was acute appendicitis, a secondary and coincidental diagnosis of primary HIV-1 infection was made. Concurrent and subsequent clinical and molecular biology findings...

  2. Acute scrotal swelling caused by scrotal suppurative appendicitis in a young infant: A case report

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    Ramaswamy Rajendran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A 70d old infant who had reducible bilateral inguinal hernia was found to have acute bilateral scrotal swelling, erythema and tenderness without intestinal obstruction. Radiography and ultrasonography studies detected right side inguinoscrotal hernia. With a diagnosis of strangulated inguinal hernia on right side, exploration was done. Amyand's hernia and acute scrotal appendicitis were found. Appendectomy, bilateral inguinal herniotomy and scrotal fixation of testes were done. Scrotal appendicitis is an exceptionally rare cause of acute scrotum in young infants. Scrotal manifestations and scrotal complications of acute appendicitis in children are reviewed. This case stresses the need for emergency exploration of acute scrotum in which there is diagnostic dilemma

  3. Midgut malrotation presenting with left-sided acute appendicitis and CT inversion sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çağlar, Emrah; Arıbaş, Bilgin; Tiken, Ramazan; Keskin, Suat

    2014-01-01

    In patients presenting with abdominal pain, appendicitis is the most common surgical disorder. Appendicitis causing pain in the left lower quadrant is extremely rare and can occur with congenital abnormalities that include true left-sided appendix or as an atypical presentation of right-sided long appendix, which projects into the left lower quadrant. We report a case of a 69-year-old man showing midgut malrotation with acute appendicitis presenting as left lower quadrant abdominal pain. PMID:24682135

  4. Laparoscopic appendicectomy for suspected mesh-induced appendicitis after laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal polypropylene mesh inguinal herniorraphy

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    Jennings Jason

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic inguinal herniorraphy via a transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP approach using Polypropylene Mesh (Mesh and staples is an accepted technique. Mesh induces a localised inflammatory response that may extend to, and involve, adjacent abdominal and pelvic viscera such as the appendix. We present an interesting case of suspected Mesh-induced appendicitis treated successfully with laparoscopic appendicectomy, without Mesh removal, in an elderly gentleman who presented with symptoms and signs of acute appendicitis 18 months after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Possible mechanisms for Mesh-induced appendicitis are briefly discussed.

  5. MODIFIED ALVARADO SCORING AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN ACUTE APPENDICITIS- A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    V. K. Arun Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute Appendicitis commonest community-acquired intra-abdominal infections. Acute appendicitis and its associated complications are significant source of morbidity and sometimes mortality. The Modified Alvarado Scoring System (MASS has been reported to be a cheap and quick diagnostic tool in patients with acute appendicitis. Diagnostic accuracy have been observed if the scores were applied to various populations and clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of Modified Alvarado Scoring System in patients with acute appendicitis in our setting. The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the modified Alvarado score as a diagnostic tool in Acute Appendicitis, as the diagnosis of appendicitis depends on the onset of symptoms and the subjective interpretation of the physical examination. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective study carried out in Pondicherry Institute of Medical Science during the period of November 2013 to May 2015. This study was done on 50 patients diagnosed with Acute Appendicitis and admitted in General Surgery. RESULTS In this study, there were a total of 50 patients who were taken up for surgery based on clinical and radiological diagnosis. Our study demonstrates that modified Alvarado score applied to all adult patients of acute appendicitis in adults with a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 40% only. Showing it wasn’t efficient in diagnosing acute appendicitis. The positive predictive value shown by our study was 80% which is marginally lower than that explained in literature which reports 87.5%. Negative appendicectomy rate in this study is 12%. CONCLUSION Alvarado score is a non-invasive, safe diagnostic procedure, which is simple, fast reliable and repeatable; it can be used in all conditions, without expensive and complicated supportive diagnostic methods. Alvarado score increases the diagnostic certainty of clinical examination in diagnosis of

  6. Acute Appendagitis Presenting with Features of Appendicitis: Value of Abdominal CT Evaluation

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    Sukhpreet Dubb

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute appendagitis in a patient who presented initially with typical features of acute appendicitis. The diagnosis of acute appendagitis was made on pathognomonic signs on computed tomography (CT scan. Abdominal pain is a common surgical emergency. CT is not always done if there are clear features of acute appendicitis. The rare but important differential diagnosis of acute appendagitis must be borne in mind when dealing with patients with suspected acute appendicitis. A CT scan of the abdomen may avoid unnecessary surgery in these patients.

  7. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel H.F. Lam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED. Increasingly emergency physicians (EP are using bedside ultrasound (BUS as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspected appendicitis were eligible for enrollment. After informed consent was obtained, BUS was performed on the subjects by trained EPs who had undergone a minimum of one-hour didactic training on the use of BUS to diagnose appendicitis.They then recorded elements of clinical history, physical examination, white blood cell count (WBC with polymophonuclear percentage (PMN, and BUS findings on a data form. We ascertained subject outcomes by a combination of medical record review and telephone follow-up. Results: A total of 125 subjects consented for the study, and 116 had adequate image data for final analysis. Prevalence of appendicitis was 40%. Mean age of the subjects was 20.2 years, and 51% were male. BUS was 100% sensitive (95% CI 87-100% and 32% specific (95% CI 14-57% for detection of appendicitis, with a positive predictive value of 72% (95% CI 56-84%, and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI 52-100%. Assuming all non-diagnostic studies were negative would yield a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 81%. Subjects with appendicitis had a significantly higher occurrence of anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and a higher WBC and PMN count when compared to those without appendicitis. Their BUS studies were significantly more likely to result in visualization of the appendix, appendix diameter >6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid, visualization of the appendix tip, and sonographic Mcburney’s sign (p6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid were

  8. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Samuel H.F.; Grippo, Anthony; Kerwin, Chistopher; Konicki, P. John; Goodwine, Diana; Lambert, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED). Increasingly emergency physicians (EP) are using bedside ultrasound (BUS) as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspected appendicitis were eligible for enrollment. After informed consent was obtained, BUS was performed on the subjects by trained EPs who had undergone a minimum of one-hour didactic training on the use of BUS to diagnose appendicitis. They then recorded elements of clinical history, physical examination, white blood cell count (WBC) with polymophonuclear percentage (PMN), and BUS findings on a data form. We ascertained subject outcomes by a combination of medical record review and telephone follow-up. Results A total of 125 subjects consented for the study, and 116 had adequate image data for final analysis. Prevalence of appendicitis was 40%. Mean age of the subjects was 20.2 years, and 51% were male. BUS was 100% sensitive (95% CI 87–100%) and 32% specific (95% CI 14–57%) for detection of appendicitis, with a positive predictive value of 72% (95% CI 56–84%), and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI 52–100%). Assuming all non-diagnostic studies were negative would yield a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 81%. Subjects with appendicitis had a significantly higher occurrence of anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and a higher WBC and PMN count when compared to those without appendicitis. Their BUS studies were significantly more likely to result in visualization of the appendix, appendix diameter >6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid, visualization of the appendix tip, and sonographic Mcburney’s sign (p6mm, appendix wall thickness >2mm, periappendiceal fluid were found

  9. Future trials of endovascular mechanical recanalisation therapy in acute ischemic stroke patients: a position paper endorsed by ESMINT and ESNR. Pt. 1. Current situation and major research questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiehler, Jens [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Soederman, Michael [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Turjman, Francis [Hopital Neurologique, Centre de Neurosciences Cognitives, Department of Neuroradiology, Lyon (France); White, Philip M. [Western General Hospital, University of Edinburgh, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bakke, Soeren Jacob [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Neuroradiology, Oslo (Norway); Mangiafico, Salvatore [University Hospital Careggi, Interventional Neuroradiology Unit, Florence (Italy); Kummer, Ruediger von [University of Dresden, Department of Neuroradiology, Dresden (Germany); Muto, Mario [University of Naples, Department of Neuroradiology, Naples (Italy); Cognard, Christophe [Hopital Purpan, Service de Neuroradiologie, Toulouse (France); Gralla, Jan [Inselspital Bern, Department of Neuroradiology, Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    A new era of stroke treatment may have begun with mechanical thrombectomy (MT) by fully deployed closed-cell self-expanding stents (stent-triever). Multiple case series and the first randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have now been published. More studies are under way involving large numbers of patients, which in turn has resulted in less strict ''pragmatic'' study protocols. Problems with current trials include a lack of standardisation in the conduct of the recanalisation procedure, the definition of primary endpoints such as the grade of arterial recanalisation and tissue reperfusion, and the post-surgical care provided. In Part 1 of this two part series, we outline the current situation and the major research questions. (orig.)

  10. Appendicitis caused by ingestion of metal foreign body

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    José Inácio de Almeida Neto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ingestion of foreign bodies is a frequent occurrence, especially among children. The majority of these objects travel safely through the gastrointestinal tract, without causing symptoms or leaving sequelae. Acute appendicitis is the emergency surgical pathology of greater prevalence. However, the impaction of a foreign body into the appendicular lumen as an etiologic agent of appendicitis is a very rare event. Case report: We describe the case of a 21-year-old male patient with lower abdominal pain over approximately six days, in association with vomiting, fever and abdominal distension. After imaging studies, a radiopaque foreign body was identified in a pelvic topography, with distention and air-fluid levels in intestinal loops. Our patient was submitted to an open appendectomy, evidencing acute perforated appendicitis and the presence of two foreign bodies in its lumen. The patient progressed satisfactorily in the post-operative period, with use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Discussion: Foreign bodies impacted in the gastrointestinal tract are usually removed by endoscopic techniques. When these bodies cause infections, there should be a resolution, preferably by surgical laparoscopy, which will serve both for diagnostic as therapeutic purposes. Resumo: Introdução: A ingesta de corpos estranhos é um acontecimento frequente, principalmente entre crianças. A maioria destes passa de forma inócua pelo trato gastrointestinal, sem causar sintomas ou deixar sequelas. Apendicite aguda é a patologia cirúrgica emergencial de maior prevalência. Contudo: a impactação de um corpo estranho no lúmen apendicular como agente etiológico de apendicite é um evento muito raro. Relato de caso: Descrevemos o caso de um paciente masculino de 21 anos com quadro de dor abdominal baixa há aproximadamente 6 dias, associando-se a vômitos, febre e distensão abdominal. Após exames de imagem, identificou-se corpo estranho radiopaco em

  11. Amyand's hernia with appendicitis in the children: A delayed diagnosis

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    Asma Jabloun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac is known as Amyand's hernia. It is an uncommon and rare condition estimated to be found in approximately 1 % of hernia. However, in just 0.08 %, the condition is complicated by an acute appendicitis. The clinical presentation varies, depending on the extent of inflammation of the appendix, and is most often misdiagnosed as an incarcerated inguinal hernia. As such, it is rarely recognized prior to surgical exploration. We report a case of Amyand’s hernia in a 2-month-old male, who presented as a right-sided congenital hernia with pain in the right groin. He underwent herniotomy, which revealed that the hernia sac containing elongated inflamed appendix appeared with some adhesions to sac, lying in the inguinal canal.

  12. [Synchronous acute cholecystolithiasis and perforated acute appendicitis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón-Arredondo, Guillermo; de Atocha Rosado-Montero, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis and acute cholecystitis are among the most common diagnoses that general surgeons operate on. However, it is rarely described in its synchronous form. A 43 year-old woman attending the clinic for right upper quadrant pain of 11 days duration. The patient refers to intermittent radiating pain in the right side, with positive Murphy, tachycardia, and fever. The laboratory results showed white cells 16,200/mm(3), glucose 345 mg/dl, abnormal liver function tests. Acute cholecystitis was reported with ultrasound. A Masson-type incision was made, noting an enlarged pyogenic gallbladder with thickened walls, sub-hepatic abscess of approximately 300 ml, greenish-yellow colour, and foetid. An anterograde subtotal cholecystectomy is performed due to difficulty in identifying elements of Calot triangle due to the inflammatory process, opening it and extracting stones. The right iliac fossa is reviewed, finding a plastron and a sub-serous retrocaecal appendix perforated in its middle third with free fecalith and an abscess in the pelvic cavity. An anterograde appendectomy was performed and the patient progressed satisfactorily, later being discharged due to improvement. In this patient, with a history of recurrent episodes of gallbladder pain and disseminated acute abdominal pain without peritoneal irritation, clinical suspicion was exacerbated cholecystitis with probable empyema of the gallbladder. Open surgery approach for this patient allowed access to both the appendix and gallbladder in order to perform a complete exploration of the abdominal cavity. The synchronous presentation of cholecystolithiasis and complicated appendicitis has not been reported in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. The appendicolith in acute appendicitis: a radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyo Seok; Lee, Myung Hee; Lee, Sun Kyu; Ro, In Woo; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1981-01-01

    The diagnostic importance of finding an appendicolith in the plain x-ray of the abdomen has been well documented. However, most of the papers so far published have stressed x-ray findings of the preoperative abdomen in acute appendicitis. In the present study we have attempted to correlate incidences of appendicoliths in surgical specimen and plain x-ray of the abdomen. The materials were 37 surgical specimens of the appendix removed for acute appendicitis at St. Mary's Hospital, St. Paul's Hospital, Kang Nam Hospital, Holy Family Hospital and Our Lady of Mercy Hospital of Catholic Medical College during the period of 6 months from August 1980. Each surgical specimen was subjected to soft tissue radiography to detect calcified appendicolith. Then the preoperative x-rays of abdomen were retrospectroscopically analysed for the presence of radiographically demonstrable appendicoliths. Our study revealed that in as many as 32% of 37 surgical specimens one or more calcified appendicoliths were demonstrated radiographically whereas only one of these was identified as such in the preoperative x-ray film of the abdomen. Such a great discrepancy between the incidences of appendicoliths in the surgical specimen and preoperative x-ray films of the abdomen are ascribed to (1) relative smallness of appendicoliths (87% of the stones measured less than 1 cm in diameter in radiographs of surgical specimen in our series), (2) overlapping of these small stones on the right iliac bone and (3) underpenetrating of the iliac bone area in x-ray films of the abdomen. For improving detectability of appendicoliths therefore it is recommended that the technique of radiography of plain abdomen should be such that a small appendicolith overlying the iliac bone can be brought out of trabecular shadows

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric appendicitis: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Michael M.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Kulaylat, Afif N.; Engbrecht, Brett W.; Hollenbeak, Christopher S.; Dillman, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of appendicitis in children has rapidly increased recently. This change has been primarily driven by the desire to avoid CT radiation dose. This meta-analysis reviews the diagnostic performance of MRI for pediatric appendicitis and discusses current knowledge of cost-effectiveness. We used a conservative Haldane correction statistical method and found pooled diagnostic parameters including a sensitivity of 96.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.3-97.8%), specificity of 96.1% (95% CI: 93.5-97.7%), positive predictive value of 92.0% (95% CI: 89.3-94.0%) and negative predictive value of 98.3% (95% CI: 97.3-99.0%), based on 11 studies. Assessment of patient outcomes associated with MRI use at two institutions indicates that time to antibiotics was 4.7 h and 8.2 h, time to appendectomy was 9.1 h and 13.9 h, and negative appendectomy rate was 3.1% and 1.4%, respectively. Alternative diagnoses were present in ∝20% of cases, most commonly adnexal cysts and enteritis/colitis. Regarding technique, half-acquisition single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) pulse sequences are crucial. While gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequences might be helpful, any benefit beyond non-contrast MRI has not been confirmed. Balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences are generally noncontributory. Protocols do not need to exceed five sequences; four-sequence protocols are commonly utilized. Sedation generally is not indicated; patients younger than 5 years might be attempted based on the child's ability to cooperate. A comprehensive pediatric cost-effectiveness analysis that includes both direct and indirect costs is needed. (orig.)

  15. Double sampling with multiple imputation to answer large sample meta-research questions: Introduction and illustration by evaluating adherence to two simple CONSORT guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice L. Capers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Meta-research can involve manual retrieval and evaluation of research, which is resource intensive. Creation of high throughput methods (e.g., search heuristics, crowdsourcing has improved feasibility of large meta-research questions, but possibly at the cost of accuracy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of double sampling combined with multiple imputation (DS+MI to address meta-research questions, using as an example adherence of PubMed entries to two simple Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT guidelines for titles and abstracts. METHODS: For the DS large sample, we retrieved all PubMed entries satisfying the filters: RCT; human; abstract available; and English language (n=322,107. For the DS subsample, we randomly sampled 500 entries from the large sample. The large sample was evaluated with a lower rigor, higher throughput (RLOTHI method using search heuristics, while the subsample was evaluated using a higher rigor, lower throughput (RHITLO human rating method. Multiple imputation of the missing-completely-at-random RHITLO data for the large sample was informed by: RHITLO data from the subsample; RLOTHI data from the large sample; whether a study was an RCT; and country and year of publication. RESULTS: The RHITLO and RLOTHI methods in the subsample largely agreed (phi coefficients: title=1.00, abstract=0.92. Compliance with abstract and title criteria has increased over time, with non-US countries improving more rapidly. DS+MI logistic regression estimates were more precise than subsample estimates (e.g., 95% CI for change in title and abstract compliance by Year: subsample RHITLO 1.050-1.174 vs. DS+MI 1.082-1.151. As evidence of improved accuracy, DS+MI coefficient estimates were closer to RHITLO than the large sample RLOTHI. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support our hypothesis that DS+MI would result in improved precision and accuracy. This method is flexible and may provide a practical way to examine large corpora of

  16. Questioning ORACLE: An Assessment of ORACLE's Analysis of Teachers' Questions and [A Comment on "Questioning ORACLE"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarth, John; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of teachers' questions, part of the ORACLE (Observation Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation) project research, is examined in detail. Scarth and Hammersley argue that the rules ORACLE uses for identifying different types of questions involve levels of ambiguity and inference that threaten reliability and validity of the study's…

  17. Intra-Appendiceal Air at CT: Is It a Useful or a Confusing Sign for the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Lee, Yul; Yang, Ik; Hwang, Ji-Young; Kim, Han Myun; Kim, Jeong Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the significance of intra-appendiceal air at CT for the evaluation of appendicitis. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 458 patients (216 men, 242 women; age range, 18-91 years) who underwent CT for suspected appendicitis. Two independent readers reviewed the CT. Prevalence, amount, and appearance of intra-appendiceal air were assessed and compared between the patients with and without appendicitis. Performance of CT diagnosis was evaluated in two reading strategies: once ignoring appendiceal air (strategy 1), and the other time considering presence of appendiceal air as indicative of no appendicitis in otherwise indeterminate cases (strategy 2), using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Of the 458 patients, 102 had confirmed appendicitis. The prevalence of intra-appendiceal air was significantly different between patients with (13.2%) and without (79.8%) appendicitis (p appendicitis as compared with the normal group, for both reader 1 (p = 0.011) and reader 2 (p = 0.002). Stool-like appearance and air-fluid levels were more common in the appendicitis group than in the normal appendix for both readers (p appendicitis, it has a limited incremental value for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:26798214

  18. May Ingestion of Leachate from Decomposed Corpses Cause Appendicitis? A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Domingues-Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The general consensus is that appendicitis is basically provoked by fecaliths or lymphoid hyperplasic obstruction. Several studies based on histological diagnosis have not confirmed this hypothesis. On the contrary, obstruction has been proved in only a minority of cases. Diverse infections by parasites, bacteria, fungus, and noninfective agents have been associated with appendicitis in the medical literature. We describe a firefighter, who ingested a small quantity of leachate from decomposing corpses while working and developed enteritis a few hours later, which lasted several days and evolved to appendicitis. This case raises the possibility that the high quantity of bacteria concentration present in the leachate could have provoked enteritis and the subsequent appendicitis due to a direct effect of the bacteria on the appendix.

  19. Epiploic appendicitis and omental infarction. Findings in the ultrasonography and computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migule, A.; Ripolles, T.; Martinez, M. J.; Morote, V.; Ruiz, A.

    2001-01-01

    Describe the findings in the ultrasonography and computerized tomography (CT) of the omental infarction and epiploic appendicitis. The clinical and radiological findings of the patients diagnosed in our hospital with epiploic appendicitis or omental infarctions between August 1994 and March 2001 were assessed retrospectively. We found a high incidence (42 cases) of these two diseases: 30 patients with diagnosis of epiploic appendicitis and 12 with the diagnosis of omental infarction. Four patients were treated surgically, while the remaining 38 were conservatively, without posterior complications. The ultrasonography and CT images is characteristics. making it possible to make a diagnosis of epiploic appendicitis or omental infarction with certainty. It is not necessary to make a differential diagnosis between the two entities because their prognosis and treatment are similar. Their incidence is much more frequent than that previously published. (Author) 19 refs

  20. Appendicitis complicated by appendiceal metastasis via peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Naoki; Furonaka, Makoto; Kikutani, Kazuya; Haji, Keiko; Fujisaki, Seiji; Nishida, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Peritoneal disseminations from lung cancer are difficult to detect during the patient's clinical course. Therefore, complications of this condition are unclear. We report a case in which peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer complicated appendicitis. A 74-year-old man with lung cancer who was receiving maintenance therapy presented at our hospital because of abdominal pain. It was the seventh day after the 14th cycle of maintenance therapy with bevacizumab. He was diagnosed with acute appendicitis. The resected appendix showed acute appendicitis complicated by appendiceal metastasis from lung cancer. Adenocarcinoma was observed predominantly in the serous membrane from the neck to the tail of the appendix. The distribution of the adenocarcinoma was diffuse. Peritoneal dissemination was considered the route of metastasis. He was admitted to the palliative care unit 10 months after appendectomy. Appendiceal metastasis via peritoneal dissemination from lung cancer complicated appendicitis in our patient who had been receiving bevacizumab.

  1. Appendicitis-like clinical image elicited by Enterobius vermicularis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleeschouwers, W; Hofman, Ph; Gillardin, J P; Meert, V; Van Slycke, S

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient presented with the clinical features of an acute appendicitis. During laparoscopic exploration a macroscopically normal appendix was found. Since there were no intra-abdominal abnormalities found, the appendix was resected. Anatomopathology demonstrated Enterobius vermicularis, a pinworm infecting only humans, and mostly living in the caecum. This parasite is responsible for possibly the most common helminthic infection in the developed world. Its role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis is controversial, but more recent studies indicate a stronger association between enterobiasis and appendicitis. Often, enterobius mimics appendicitis by obstructing the lumen of the appendix, thereby causing appendiceal colic. This case report stresses the importance of microscopic examination of all appendectomy resection specimens. In case of enterobius infestation, systemic therapy of patient and family is necessary.

  2. A rare complication of acute appendicitis: complete bilateral distal ureteral obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronson, D. C.; Moorman-Voestermans, C. G.; Tiel-van Buul, M. M.; Vos, A.

    1994-01-01

    Three children treated for appendicitis developed anuria and acute renal insufficiency several days after appendicectomy. Associated hydronephrosis or hydroureters were present in two. At cystoscopy, marked swelling of the trigonum and ureteric orifices was seen. One patient developed unilateral

  3. Imaging the child with right lower quadrant pain and suspected appendicitis: current concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivit, Carlos J. [Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital of the University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Euclid Avenue, 11100, 44106-5056, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common condition presenting with right lower quadrant pain requiring acute surgical intervention in childhood. The clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis is often not straightforward and can be challenging. Approximately one-third of children with the condition have atypical clinical findings and are initially managed non-operatively. Complications usually result from perforation and include abscess formation, peritonitis, sepsis, bowel obstruction and death. Cross-sectional imaging with sonography and computed tomography (CT) have proven useful for the evaluation of suspected acute appendicitis in children. The principal advantages of sonography are its lower cost, lack of ionizing radiation, and ability to precisely delineate gynecologic disease. The principal advantages of CT are its operator independency with resultant higher diagnostic accuracy, enhanced delineation of disease extent in perforated appendicitis, and improved patient outcomes including decreased negative laparotomy and perforation rates. (orig.)

  4. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis: Report of a case and review of Japanese literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ito

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: We report a case of acute amebic appendicitis in a 31-year-old woman and review the ages at presentation, causative factors, treatments, and outcomes of 11 cases reported in Japan between 1995 and 2013.

  5. A comparison between modified Alvarado score and RIPASA score in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Anand; Singla, Satpaul; Singh, Mohinder; Singla, Deeksha

    2016-12-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common but elusive surgical condition and remains a diagnostic dilemma. It has many clinical mimickers and diagnosis is primarily made on clinical grounds, leading to the evolution of clinical scoring systems for pin pointing the right diagnosis. The modified Alvarado and RIPASA scoring systems are two important scoring systems, for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We prospectively compared the two scoring systems for diagnosing acute appendicitis in 50 patients presenting with right iliac fossa pain. The RIPASA score correctly classified 88 % of patients with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis compared with 48.0 % with modified Alvarado score, indicating that RIPASA score is more superior to Modified Alvarado score in our clinical settings.

  6. Focused abdominal CT scan for acute appendicitis in children: can it help in need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, W.; Ali, S.; Arshad, M.; Nadeem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the focused abdominal CT scan [FACT] in clinically equivocal cases of acute appendicitis in paediatric population. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Radiology Department of Aga Khan Hospital, from August 2007 to November 2008. A total of 84 patients (42 males and 42 females) with clinically equivocal signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis referred to radiology department for CT evaluation were studied. CT findings were compared with histopathology and clinical follow-up. Results: The sensitivity of focused CT for acute appendicitis was 91%; specificity was 69% and accuracy of 76% while PPV and NPV were 58%, 94% respectively. Conclusion: Focused unenhanced CT is a quick, accurate and non invasive modality for the assessment of clinically equivocal cases of acute appendicitis for ruling out patients and reducing negative appendectomies. (author)

  7. Correlation between the serum and tissue levels of oxidative stress markers and the extent of inflammation in acute appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumlu, Ersin Gürkan; Tokaç, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Birkan; Yildirim, Murat Baki; Ergin, Merve; Yalçin, Abdussamed; Kiliç, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the serum and tissue levels of markers of impaired oxidative metabolism and correlate these levels with the histopathology and Alvarado score of acute appendicitis patients. METHOD: Sixty-five acute appendicitis patients (mean age, 31.4±12.06 years; male/female, 30/35) and 30 healthy control subjects were studied. The Alvarado score was recorded. Serum samples were obtained before surgery and 12 hours postoperatively to examine the total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, paraoxonase, stimulated paraoxonase, arylesterase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, ceruloplasmin, oxidative stress markers (advanced oxidized protein products and total thiol level) and ischemia-modified albumin. Surgical specimens were also evaluated. RESULTS: The diagnoses were acute appendicitis (n = 37), perforated appendicitis (n = 8), phlegmonous appendicitis (n = 12), perforated+phlegmonous appendicitis (n = 4), or no appendicitis (n = 4). The Alvarado score of the acute appendicitis group was significantly lower than that of the perforated+phlegmonous appendicitis group (p = 0.004). The serum total antioxidant status, total thiol level, advanced oxidized protein products, total oxidant status, catalase, arylesterase, and ischemia-modified albumin levels were significantly different between the acute appendicitis and control groups. There was no correlation between the pathological extent of acute appendicitis and the tissue levels of the markers; additionally, there was no correlation between the tissue and serum levels of any of the parameters. CONCLUSIONS: The imbalance of oxidant/antioxidant systems plays a role in the pathogenesis acute appendicitis. The Alvarado score can successfully predict the presence and extent of acute appendicitis. PMID:25518019

  8. Diagnostic performance and useful findings of ultrasound re-evaluation for patients with equivocal CT features of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Sung; Kwon, Heon-Ju; Kang, Kyung A; Do, In-Gu; Park, Hee-Jin; Kim, Eun Young; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Young Hwan

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of ultrasound and to determine which ultrasound findings are useful to differentiate appendicitis from non-appendicitis in patients who underwent ultrasound re-evaluation owing to equivocal CT features of acute appendicitis. 62 patients who underwent CT examinations for suspected appendicitis followed by ultrasound re-evaluation owing to equivocal CT findings were included. Equivocal CT findings were considered based on the presence of only one or two findings among the CT criteria, and ultrasound re-evaluation was done based on a predefined structured report form. The diagnostic performance of ultrasound and independent variables to discriminate appendicitis from non-appendicitis were assessed. There were 27 patients in the appendicitis group. The overall diagnostic performance of ultrasound re-evaluation was sensitivity of 96.3%, specificity of 91.2% and accuracy of 91.9%. In terms of the performance of individual ultrasound findings, probe-induced tenderness showed the highest accuracy (86.7%) with sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 97%, followed by non-compressibility (accuracy 71.7%, sensitivity 85.2% and specificity 60.6%). The independent ultrasound findings for discriminating appendicitis were non-compressibility (p = 0.002) and increased flow on the appendiceal wall (p = 0.001). Ultrasound re-evaluation can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy in cases with equivocal CT features for diagnosing appendicitis. The presence of non-compressibility and increased vascular flow on the appendix wall are useful ultrasound findings to discriminate appendicitis from non-appendicitis. Advances in knowledge: Ultrasound re-evaluation is useful to discriminate appendicitis from non-appendicitis when CT features are inconclusive.

  9. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle I. Miano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US or computed tomography (CT studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results: 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4] compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]. Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7] and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]. The proportion of

  10. Can multiple-choice questions simulate free-response questions?

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a study to evaluate the extent to which free-response questions could be approximated by multiple-choice equivalents. Two carefully designed research-based multiple-choice questions were transformed into a free-response format and administered on the final exam in a calculus-based introductory physics course. The original multiple-choice questions were administered in another similar introductory physics course on final exam. Findings suggest that carefully designed multiple-choice...

  11. Establishing and prioritizing research questions for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of hair loss (excluding alopecia areata): the Hair Loss Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeth, A; Tomlinson, J; Messenger, A; Moore-Millar, K; Michaelides, C; Shipman, A; Kassim, J; Brockley, J; Szczecinska, W; Farrant, P; Robinson, R; Rodgers, J; Chambers, J; Upadhyaya, S; Harries, M

    2018-02-01

    Hair and scalp problems are common. Unfortunately, many uncertainties exist around the most effective management and treatment strategies for these disorders. To identify uncertainties in hair-loss management, prevention, diagnosis and treatment that are important to both people with hair loss and healthcare professionals. A Hair Loss Priority Setting Partnership was established between patients, their carers and relatives, and healthcare professionals to identify the most important uncertainties in hair loss. The methodology of the James Lind Alliance was followed to ensure a balanced, inclusive and transparent process. In total, 2747 treatment uncertainties were submitted by 912 participants; following exclusions 884 uncertainties relating to hair loss (excluding alopecia areata) were analysed. Questions were combined into 'indicative uncertainties' following a structured format. A series of ranking exercises further reduced this list to a top 25 that was taken to a final prioritization workshop where the top 10 priorities were agreed. We present the top 10 research priorities for hair loss (excluding alopecia areata) to guide researchers and funding bodies to support studies important to both patients and clinicians. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Computed tomography findings mimicking appendicitis as a manifestation of colorectal cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchorn, Richard E.; Poder, Liina; Wang, Zhen J.; Yeh, Benjamin M.; Webb, Emily M.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    The primary computed tomography (CT) signs of appendicitis can also be seen with other inflammatory or neoplastic processes. We report on two cases in which appendiceal dilatation and peri-appendiceal fluid or stranding were the dominant imaging manifestations of colorectal carcinoma in the ascending colon. This study highlights the need to closely examine the ascending colon in patients with a suspected CT diagnosis of acute appendicitis, since these findings may be secondary to an inconspicuous colorectal carcinoma. PMID:19857802

  13. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis in a Child: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rawabdeh, Sura M.; Prasad, Vinay; King, Denis R.; Kahwash, Samir B.

    2013-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous inflammation is a well-described inflammatory process, which may involve any organ but is most frequently encountered in the gall bladder and the kidney. There are rare reports of xanthogranulomatous appendicitis (XA) in the adult population, but only one brief mention of such a diagnosis in a child. In this report, we describe the case of an 11-year-old boy who presented with clinical signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis necessitating appendectomy. Upon microscopic ex...

  14. Isolated submucosal lipomatosis of appendix mimicking acute appendicitis: computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Şanlı

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is one of the more common surgical emergencies, and it is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain. Intestinal lipomatosis is a rare condition particularly the isolated form of lipomatosis of the appendix which may mimic or present as an acute appendicitis, that frequently requires the surgical exploration.In this paper, we report computed tomography findings of a case wıth isolated form of submucosal lipomatosis of appendix.

  15. Onset of Crohn’s Disease by Symptoms of Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya.I. Lomei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of current views on Crohn’s disease (CD has been carried out. A case report of the sudden onset of CD by symptoms of acute appendicitis in young patient is described. The events took place as follows: cumulative negative impact of risk factors — acute CD with primary lesion of vermiform appendix — clinical manifestations of acute appendicitis — appendectomy — recovery, possibly deceptive.

  16. Effectiveness of a Staged US and Unenhanced MR Imaging Algorithm in the Diagnosis of Pediatric Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibble, Elizabeth H; Swenson, David W; Cartagena, Claudia; Baird, Grayson L; Herliczek, Thaddeus W

    2018-03-01

    Purpose To establish, in a large cohort, the diagnostic performance of a staged algorithm involving ultrasonography (US) followed by conditional unenhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the imaging work-up of pediatric appendicitis. Materials and Methods A staged imaging algorithm in which US and unenhanced MR imaging were performed in pediatric patients suspected of having appendicitis was implemented at the authors' institution on January 1, 2011, with US as the initial modality followed by unenhanced MR imaging when US findings were equivocal. A search of the radiology database revealed 2180 pediatric patients who had undergone imaging for suspected appendicitis from January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2012. Of the 2180 patients, 1982 (90.9%) were evaluated according to the algorithm. The authors reviewed the electronic medical records and imaging reports for all patients. Imaging reports were reviewed and classified as positive, negative, or equivocal for appendicitis and correlated with surgical and pathology reports. Results The frequency of appendicitis was 20.5% (407 of 1982 patients). US alone was performed in 1905 of the 1982 patients (96.1%), yielding a sensitivity of 98.7% (386 of 391 patients) and specificity of 97.1% (1470 of 1514 patients) for appendicitis. Seventy-seven patients underwent unenhanced MR imaging after equivocal US findings, yielding an overall algorithm sensitivity of 98.2% (400 of 407 patients) and specificity of 97.1% (1530 of 1575 patients). Seven of the 1982 patients (0.4%) had false-negative results with the staged algorithm. The negative predictive value of the staged algorithm was 99.5% (1530 of 1537 patients). Conclusion A staged algorithm of US and unenhanced MR imaging for pediatric appendicitis appears to be effective. The results of this study demonstrate that this staged algorithm is 98.2% sensitive and 97.1% specific for the diagnosis of appendicitis in pediatric patients. © RSNA, 2017.

  17. Randomized clinical trial of preoperative dexamethasone on postoperative nausea and vomiting after laparoscopy for suspected appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleif, J.; Kirkegaard, A.; Vilandt, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Few studies have investigated the effects of preoperative dexamethasone in acute surgical patients. This study examined the effects of 8 mg dexamethasone administered intravenously 30 min before surgery for suspected acute appendicitis. Methods: A multicentre, parallel-group, double......-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted at two university hospitals in Denmark. Adults undergoing laparoscopic surgery for suspected appendicitis were eligible for inclusion. Participants, healthcare staff and investigators were blinded until all data analysis had been done. The primary outcome...

  18. Perforated Appendicitis After Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy in a Term Neonate with Haemolytic Jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atikan, B. Y.; Koroglu, O. A.; Yalaz, M.; Ergun, O.; Dokumcu, Z.; Doganavasrgil, B.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal appendicitis is a rare clinical condition that may cause high morbidity and mortality if diagnosis is delayed. There is usually an underlying disease; it can also be a localized form of necrotizing enterocolitis. Here, we present a term neonate who was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin because of severe isoimmune hemolytic jaundice. The patient developed abdominal symptoms within 10 hours of therapy, was diagnosed with acute perforated appendicitis and completely recovered after surgery. (author)

  19. Robustness Analysis of Visual Question Answering Models by Basic Questions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jia-Hong

    2017-11-01

    Visual Question Answering (VQA) models should have both high robustness and accuracy. Unfortunately, most of the current VQA research only focuses on accuracy because there is a lack of proper methods to measure the robustness of VQA models. There are two main modules in our algorithm. Given a natural language question about an image, the first module takes the question as input and then outputs the ranked basic questions, with similarity scores, of the main given question. The second module takes the main question, image and these basic questions as input and then outputs the text-based answer of the main question about the given image. We claim that a robust VQA model is one, whose performance is not changed much when related basic questions as also made available to it as input. We formulate the basic questions generation problem as a LASSO optimization, and also propose a large scale Basic Question Dataset (BQD) and Rscore (novel robustness measure), for analyzing the robustness of VQA models. We hope our BQD will be used as a benchmark for to evaluate the robustness of VQA models, so as to help the community build more robust and accurate VQA models.

  20. Robustness Analysis of Visual Question Answering Models by Basic Questions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Visual Question Answering (VQA) models should have both high robustness and accuracy. Unfortunately, most of the current VQA research only focuses on accuracy because there is a lack of proper methods to measure the robustness of VQA models. There are two main modules in our algorithm. Given a natural language question about an image, the first module takes the question as input and then outputs the ranked basic questions, with similarity scores, of the main given question. The second module takes the main question, image and these basic questions as input and then outputs the text-based answer of the main question about the given image. We claim that a robust VQA model is one, whose performance is not changed much when related basic questions as also made available to it as input. We formulate the basic questions generation problem as a LASSO optimization, and also propose a large scale Basic Question Dataset (BQD) and Rscore (novel robustness measure), for analyzing the robustness of VQA models. We hope our BQD will be used as a benchmark for to evaluate the robustness of VQA models, so as to help the community build more robust and accurate VQA models.

  1. Pediatric patients transferred for operative management of appendicitis: are they at a disadvantage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farach, Sandra M; Danielson, Paul D; Walford, N Elizabeth; Harmel, Richard P; Chandler, Nicole M

    2015-09-01

    Many pediatric patients are initially diagnosed with appendicitis at referring hospitals and are subsequently transferred to pediatric facilities. We aimed to compare outcomes of patients transferred to a pediatric referral center to those who present primarily for operative management of appendicitis. A retrospective review of 326 patients with operative appendicitis from July 2012 to July 2013 was performed. Demographic data, clinical parameters, and outcomes were analyzed. Transferred (n=222, 68%) and primary patients (n=104, 32%) were similar except for mean age (primary 12.4 vs. transferred 11.2 years, pprimary patients. Primary patients were more likely to present between the hours of 09:00 and 17:59 (52%), while transferred arrived equally across all hours. Both groups were more likely to present with acute appendicitis (primary 56% vs. transfer 61%, p=NS). There was no difference in time of diagnosis to time of appendectomy, length of hospital stay, or 30 day complications (primary 8.6% vs. transfer 5.8%, p=NS). Patients transferred for definitive care of appendicitis are not found to have more advanced disease or have increased complications; however, they are exposed to significantly more ionizing radiation during evaluation for appendicitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound Findings of Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Appendix in Children: Differentiation from Acute Appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Jae; Seo, Jung Wook; Lee, Byung Hoon

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the ultrasound (US) findings that can help differentiate lymphoid hyperplasia in the appendix from acute appendicitis. A total of 1230 patients (below 20 years old) suspected of having appendicitis received an appendectomy between November, 1999, and March, 2008, with US findings in 27 patients with pathologically proven lymphoid hyperplasia of the appendix. Of 167 patients that received an appendectomy from January, 2007, to December, 2007, 52 patients with acute appendicitis were retrospectively reviewed as a control group. Retrospective review of US images was performed by two radiologists who were blinded to the pathologic results. The review was based on 12 ultrasonographic criteria derived from reports on the diagnostic findings of the appendicitis. Compared with acute appendicitis, lymphoid hyperplasia in appendix had a smaller diameter (7.14±1.22 mm vs 9.37±1.80 mm, p < 0.001) and less wall thickening(1.38±0.36 mm vs 1.74 ± 0.56 mm, p =0.001). Periappendicular inflammation (p < 0.001), intraluminal air (p = 0.006), round shape in transverse scan (p = 0.002),increased blood flow on color Doppler US (p = 0.03) were also different. US is a useful modality to differentiate lymphoid hyperplasia in the appendix from acute appendicitis

  3. Management of Pediatric Perforated Appendicitis: Comparing Outcomes Using Early Appendectomy Versus Solely Medical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadio, William; Rebillot, Katie; Ukwuoma, Onyinyechi; Saracino, Christine; Iskhakov, Arthur

    2017-10-01

    There is controversy regarding whether children with perforated appendicitis should receive early appendectomy (EA) versus medical management (MM) with antibiotics and delayed interval appendectomy. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes of children with perforated appendicitis who receive EA versus MM. Case review of consecutive children appendicitis who received either EA or MM during an 8-year period. Criteria for hospital discharge included patient being afebrile for at least 24 hours, pain-free and able to tolerate oral intake. Of 203 patients diagnosed with perforated appendicitis, 122 received EA and 81 received MM. All received parenteral antibiotic therapy initiated in the emergency department and continued during hospitalization. There were no significant differences between groups in mean patient age, mean complete blood count total white blood cells count, gender distribution, rates of emergency department fever or rates of intra-abdominal infection (abscess or phlegmon) identified on admission. Compared with patients receiving MM, those receiving EA experienced significantly fewer (1) days of hospitalization, parenteral antibiotic therapy and in-hospital fever; (2) radiographic studies, percutaneous drainage procedures and placement of central venous catheters performed; (3) post admission intra-abdominal complications and (4) unscheduled repeat hospitalizations after hospital discharge. Only 1 EA-managed patient developed a postoperative wound infection. Children with perforated appendicitis who receive EA experience significantly less morbidity and complications versus those receiving MM. The theoretical concern for enhanced morbidity associated with EA management of perforated appendicitis is not supported by our analysis.

  4. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. A study of 226 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.M.; Sandoval, E.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the clinical value of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Graded-compression ultrasound was performed in 226 patients with atypical or unclear clinical signs of appendicitis. Twenty-three patients were excluded from study because of an inconclusive examination due to inadequate compression. Appendicitis was considered to be present when the appendix was non compressible and measured over 6 mn in anteroposterior diameter or the patient presented an abscess in right iliac fossa. The findings were confirmed by pathological study of surgically resected tissue or by clinical follow-up. The operative features and the predictive capacity of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis were calculated. In 98 cases, acute appendicitis was confirmed intraoperatively. In 103, this diagnosis was ruled out by the clinical course or intraoperative findings. Ninety-four patients presented ultrasonographic signs compatible with appendiceal inflammation. The sensitivity of ultrasound in the diagnosis of these doubtful cases of appendicitis was, 93.9%; the specificity, 98.1%; reliability, 96%; positive value, 9%; negative predictive value, 94.5%, and the positive probability rate, 49.3%. Our results indicate that high-resolution ultrasonography is indicated in all cases in which the clinical diagnosis of appendiceal inflammation id doubtful. (Author) 64 refs

  5. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Becker, Christoph D.; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Emergency Center, Geneva (Switzerland); Verdun, Francis R. [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gervaz, Pascal [University Hospital of Geneva, Clinic of Digestive Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) {>=} 18.5. In slim patients (BMI < 18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI {>=} 18.5. (orig.)

  6. Secondary Signs May Improve the Diagnostic Accuracy of Equivocal Ultrasounds for Suspected Appendicitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partain, Kristin N.; Patel, Adarsh; Travers, Curtis; McCracken, Courtney; Loewen, Jonathan; Braithwaite, Kiery; Heiss, Kurt F.; Raval, Mehul V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound (US) is the preferred imaging modality for evaluating appendicitis. Our purpose was to determine if including secondary signs (SS) improves diagnostic accuracy in equivocal US studies. Methods Retrospective review identified 825 children presenting with concern for appendicitis and with a right lower quadrant (RLQ) US. Regression models identified which SS were associated with appendicitis. Test characteristics were demonstrated. Results 530 patients (64%) had equivocal US reports. Of 114 (22%) patients with equivocal US undergoing CT, those with SS were more likely to have appendicitis (48.6% vs 14.6%, pappendicitis (61.0% vs 33.6%, pappendicitis included fluid collection (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 13.3, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 2.1–82.8), hyperemia (OR=2.0, 95%CI 1.5–95.5), free fluid (OR=9.8, 95%CI 3.8–25.4), and appendicolith (OR=7.9, 95%CI 1.7–37.2). Wall thickness, bowel peristalsis, and echogenic fat were not associated with appendicitis. Equivocal US that included hyperemia, a fluid collection, or an appendicolith had 96% specificity and 88% accuracy. Conclusion Use of SS in RLQ US assists in the diagnostic accuracy of appendicitis. SS may guide clinicians and reduce unnecessary CT and admissions. PMID:27039121

  7. T1 bright appendix sign to exclude acute appendicitis in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ilah; An, Chansik; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the T1 bright appendix sign for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women. This retrospective study included 125 pregnant women with suspected appendicitis who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 bright appendix sign was defined as a high intensity signal filling more than half length of the appendix on T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix identification were calculated in all patients and in those with borderline-sized appendices (6-7 mm). The T1 bright appendix sign was seen in 51% of patients with normal appendices, but only in 4.5% of patients with acute appendicitis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix diagnosis were 44.9%, 95.5%, 97.6%, and 30.0%, respectively. All four patients with borderline sized appendix with appendicitis showed negative T1 bright appendix sign. The T1 bright appendix sign is a specific finding for the diagnosis of a normal appendix in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis. • Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used in emergency settings. • Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. • Magnetic resonance imaging is widely used in pregnant population. • T1 bright appendix sign can be a specific sign representing normal appendix.

  8. Ultrasonography with a hand-held device for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Toru; Takahashi, Isao

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonography (US) with a hand-held device for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the emergency room. US with a hand-held device was performed by the first author in 33 patients suspected of having appendicitis in the emergency room. From these 33 patients, 24 who subsequently underwent computed tomography (CT) or surgery were included in this study. The accuracy of US with the hand-held device for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was evaluated based on the findings of CT or surgery. CT and surgery were performed in 22 and 12 patients, respectively. Final diagnoses were acute appendicitis (n=18), terminal ileitis (n=2), pelvic inflammatory disease (n=2), diverticulitis (n=1), and ureterolithiasis (n=1). The US yielded a sensitivity of 78% and a positive predictive value of 100%. The shortest distance between the abdominal wall and the appendix measured on CT was less than 40 mm in 11 patients. In ten (91%) of the 11 patients US with the hand-held device showed the swollen appendix. US with a hand-held device is potentially useful in the positive identification of acute appendicitis, but further investigation is needed to prove its utility in the routine diagnosis of acute appendicitis. (author)

  9. Ultrasound Findings of Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Appendix in Children: Differentiation from Acute Appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Jae; Seo, Jung Wook; Lee, Byung Hoon [Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Koyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the ultrasound (US) findings that can help differentiate lymphoid hyperplasia in the appendix from acute appendicitis. A total of 1230 patients (below 20 years old) suspected of having appendicitis received an appendectomy between November, 1999, and March, 2008, with US findings in 27 patients with pathologically proven lymphoid hyperplasia of the appendix. Of 167 patients that received an appendectomy from January, 2007, to December, 2007, 52 patients with acute appendicitis were retrospectively reviewed as a control group. Retrospective review of US images was performed by two radiologists who were blinded to the pathologic results. The review was based on 12 ultrasonographic criteria derived from reports on the diagnostic findings of the appendicitis. Compared with acute appendicitis, lymphoid hyperplasia in appendix had a smaller diameter (7.14{+-}1.22 mm vs 9.37{+-}1.80 mm, p < 0.001) and less wall thickening(1.38{+-}0.36 mm vs 1.74 {+-} 0.56 mm, p =0.001). Periappendicular inflammation (p < 0.001), intraluminal air (p = 0.006), round shape in transverse scan (p = 0.002),increased blood flow on color Doppler US (p = 0.03) were also different. US is a useful modality to differentiate lymphoid hyperplasia in the appendix from acute appendicitis

  10. Early appendectomy shortens antibiotic course and hospital stay in children with early perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu; Chao, Hsun-Chin; Yu, Wan-Ju

    2017-10-01

    The optimal management of perforated appendicitis in the pediatric population has been controversial. This study aimed to compare the therapeutic efficacy between conservative treatment (CS) and early appendectomy (EA) in pediatric perforated appendicitis, and to determine whether surgical intervention is an optimal treatment modality for early perforated appendicitis in children. Patients treated between January 2012 and April 2014, aged 0-18 years, with an imaging-based diagnosis of perforated appendicitis were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified into nonabscess and abscess groups by image findings, and were further categorized into CS and EA groups by treatment modality. Early perforated appendicitis was defined as having duration of symptoms≤7 days, C-reactive protein level≤200 mg/L, maximum abscess diameter≤5 cm, and absence of general peritonitis, and unstable vital signs. The clinical features and therapeutic outcomes were compared between CS and EA in each group. A total of 326 patients had confirmed appendicitis, including 116 patients with an image diagnosis of perforation. The CS group had a significantly longer duration of symptoms, larger abscesses, and higher serum C-reactive protein levels at presentation (all pappendicitis, the CS and EA groups showed no difference in baseline disease severity. Patients in the EA group also had a shorter antibiotic course and length of hospitalization than those in the CS group (pappendicitis, even in the presence of small abscesses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Becker, Christoph D.; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Rutschmann, Olivier T.; Verdun, Francis R.; Gervaz, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5. In slim patients (BMI < 18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI ≥ 18.5. (orig.)

  12. Second date appendectomy: Operating for failure of nonoperative treatment in perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Nonoperative treatment of acute appendicitis is embraced by many surgical teams, driven by low to moderate quality randomized studies that support noninferiority of antibiotics versus appendectomy for treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis. Several flaws of these studies have emerged, especially in the recruitment strategy and in the diagnostic criteria that were used. The growing confidence given to antibiotics, together with the lack of reliable criteria to distinguish between uncomplicated and perforated appendicitis, exposes patients with perforated appendicitis to the likelihood to be treated with antibiotics instead of surgery. Among them, those patients who experience a temporary relief of symptoms due to antibiotics, followed by early recurrence of disease when antibiotics are discontinued, are likely to undergo appendectomy at their second date. Second date appendectomy, i.e. the removal of the appendix when acute inflammation relapses within the scar of a previously unhealed perforated appendicitis, is the unwanted child of the nonoperative treatment and a new challenge for both the surgeon and the patient. Between June and July 2016, two patients were readmitted and operated for failure of nonoperative treatment with antibiotics. A video is presented, which focuses on the different anatomic presentation and technical challenges between prompt and second date laparoscopic appendectomy. When proposing nonoperative treatment for acute appendicitis, surgeons should be aware and inform their patients that if the appendix is perforated and an incomplete healing and early recurrence occur, a second date appendectomy could be a more challenging operation compared to a prompt appendectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Utility of diffusion-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Ercan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Aydin, Sibel; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Cimilli, Tan [Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Kilickesmez, Ozgur [Yeditepe University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-04-15

    To evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. 119 patients with acute appendicitis and 50 controls were enrolled in this prospective study. DWI was obtained with b factors 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} and were assessed with a visual scoring system by two radiologists followed by quantitative evaluation of the DW images and ADC maps. Histopathology revealed appendicitis in 79/92 patients (78%) who had undergone surgery. On visual evaluation, except for one patient with histopathologically proven appendicitis all inflamed appendixes were hyperintense on DWI (98.7%). Quantitative evaluation with DW signal intensities and ADC values revealed a significant difference with normal and inflamed appendixes (p < 0.001). The best discriminative parameter was signal intensity (b 500). With a cut-off value of 56 for the signal intensity the ratio had a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 97%. The cut-off ADC value at 1.66 mm{sup 2}/s had a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 99%. DWI is a valuable technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with both qualitative and quantitative evaluation. DWI increases the conspicuity of the inflamed appendix. We recommend using DWI to diagnose acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  14. Utility of diffusion-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inci, Ercan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Aydin, Sibel; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Cimilli, Tan; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. 119 patients with acute appendicitis and 50 controls were enrolled in this prospective study. DWI was obtained with b factors 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm 2 and were assessed with a visual scoring system by two radiologists followed by quantitative evaluation of the DW images and ADC maps. Histopathology revealed appendicitis in 79/92 patients (78%) who had undergone surgery. On visual evaluation, except for one patient with histopathologically proven appendicitis all inflamed appendixes were hyperintense on DWI (98.7%). Quantitative evaluation with DW signal intensities and ADC values revealed a significant difference with normal and inflamed appendixes (p 2 /s had a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 99%. DWI is a valuable technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with both qualitative and quantitative evaluation. DWI increases the conspicuity of the inflamed appendix. We recommend using DWI to diagnose acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  15. Parasitic infestation in appendicitis. A retrospective analysis of 660 patients and brief literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Altun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the incidence of parasitic infestations and inflammation accompanying parasitosis in a series of appendectomy cases. Methods: Six-hundred-sixty patients who had undergone appendectomy in Bingöl State Hospital, Bingol, Turkey with the preliminary diagnosis of appendicitis between January 2012 and February 2015 were included in this retrospective study. They were retrospectively evaluated in terms of age, gender and pathological findings. Cases diagnosed with parasitic infestations were re-evaluated histopathologically for inflammatory response. Results: The mean age was 19.6 years, and the male/female ratio was 1.8. When evaluated in terms of histopathological diagnoses, 573 (86.8% were diagnosed as acute appendicitis, and parasitic infestation was identified in 12 (1.8%. Among cases with parasitic infestation, Enterobius vermicularis was identified in 9 (75% and Taenia in 3 (25% cases. Of cases with Enterobius vermicularis, 4 (44.4% had lymphoid hyperplasia, 1 (11.1% had normal-structured appendix vermiformis, and 4 (44.4% had findings of acute appendicitis. All cases with taeniasis had an inflammatory response: acute appendicitis was identified in 2 (66% and acute gangrenous appendicitis in 1 (33% of them. Conclusion: Parasitic infestations are among the probable causes in appendicitis etiology and should be kept in mind during differential diagnosis. However, whether every parasitic infestation leads to appendiceal inflammatory response is controversial.

  16. A rare case of perforated "sub-hepatic appendicitis" - a challenging differential diagnosis of acute abdomen based on the combination of appendicitis and maldescent of the caecum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Costanza; Jannasch, Olof; Petersen, Manuela; Lessel, Wiebke; Bruns, Christiane; Meyer, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Unusual locations of the appendix vermiformis can result in delay in appropriate diagnosis and treatment of appendicitis. So an inflamed appendix in a sub-hepatic caecum caused by caecal maldescent for example can mimic cholecystitis, the pain being localized in the right upper quadrant. Here, we present a case of perforated sub-hepatic appendicitis with peritonitis, requiring open ileocaecal resection. Review of the existing literature has demonstrated that this pathology is uncommon, yet not so rare as one might presume. In conclusion, surgeons should be aware of this possibility in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of acute abdomen. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. Teaching Students about Research: Classroom Poster Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley-Long, Kathleen; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Finds that undergraduate students in an introductory psychology class acquired more favorable attitudes toward research as a result of their active participation in the creation and presentation of a poster that illustrates their independent work. Appends poster session instructions. (RS)

  18. Alfa-2-glicoproteína rica en leucina urinaria en pacientes con apendicitis aguda (Urinary leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein in patients with acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heberto Machado-Montero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of research was to determine diagnostic efficacy of urinary concentrations of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (A2GRL in patients with acute appendicitis. There were included patients with high suspicion of acute appendicitis (group A; cases, n = 30. In group B (controls, n = 30 were included patients with non-surgical abdominal pain who attended to Hospital Central “Dr. Urquinaona”, Maracaibo, Zulia. General characteristics, urinary concentrations of A2GRL and diagnostic efficacy of assay were evaluated. Mean age of patients in group A was 36.3 +/- 8.8 years-old and in group B was 35.8 +/- 9.6 years-old (p = ns. There were not found significant differences in sex distribution, weight and height between groups (p = ns. Urinary concentrations of A2GRL were significantly higher in group A (1543.8 +/- 762.7 ng/mL compared with mean value in patients of group B (774.1 +/- 356.1 ng/mL; p < 0.0001. A2GRL presented a value below curve 0.81. A cut-off value of 1000 ng/mL, showed sensivity 73.3%, specificity 70.9%, positive predictive value 72.4% and negative predictive value 72.4%. It is concluded that urinary concentrations of A2GRL have a high diagnostic efficacy in patients with acute appendicitis

  19. Different Clinical Features and Lower Scores in Clinical Scoring Systems for Appendicitis in Preschool Children: Comparison with School Age Onset

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Chun Woo; Kang, Joon Won; Kim, Jae Young

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To clarify the clinical features of appendicitis in preschool children and to explore clinical appendicitis scoring systems in this age group. Methods We retrospectively collected data on 142 children, aged 10 years or younger, with confirmed diagnosis of appendicitis based on surgical and pathologic findings. Enrolled subjects were divided into two groups: Group 1 (preschool children aged ≤5 years, n=41) and Group 2 (school children aged >5 to ≤10 years, n=101). Data analyzed include...

  20. Efficiency of unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Comparison with Alvarado scoring system and histopathological results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inci, Ercan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Aydin, Sibel; Palabiyik, Figen; Cimilli, Tan; Turhan, Ahmet Nuray; Ayguen, Ersan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare with Alvarado scores and histopathological results. Materials and methods: The study included 85 consecutive patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 11.3 years) who were clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis. Each patients Alvarado scores were recorded and unenhanced MRI was performed, consisting of T1-weighted, T2-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. The MR images were prospectively reviewed in consensus for the presence of acute appendicitis by two radiologists who were blinded to the results of the Alvarado scores. The study population were divided into three subgroups based on the MRI findings: Group I: definitely not appendicitis, Group II: probably appendicitis, Group III: definitely appendicitis. All patients were divided into two subgroups according to Alvarado scores as Group A (low: 1-6), and Group B (high: 7-10). MR findings were compared with Alvarado scores and histopathological findings. Results: Sixty-six (77.6%) of the 85 patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis, had undergone surgery. The diagnosis of appendicitis could be correctly achieved with MRI in 55 (83.3%) of 57 (86.4%) patients with histopathologically proven acute appendicitis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of MRI examination and Alvarado scoring system in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis were 96.49%, 66.67%, 94.83%, 75.0% and 84.21%, 66.67%, 94.12%, 40.0%, respectively. Conclusions: MRI is a valuable technique for detecting acute appendicitis even in the cases with low Alvarado scores. To increase the diagnostic accuracy and preventing unnecessary laparotomies for suspected appendicitis, shorter and cheaper unenhanced basic MRI may be performed.