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Sample records for research history philosophy

  1. Introducing History (and Philosophy) of Science in the Classroom: A Field Research Experience in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibattista, Liborio; Morgese, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    For quite some time, many EU and Italian Ministry of Education official documents have warmly suggested the introduction of the history and the philosophy of science in the teaching of science disciplines at school. Accordingly, there is a shared agreement between pedagogists and science historians about the efficacy of this approach towards an…

  2. The History and Philosophy of Science in Physics Teaching: A Research Synthesis of Didactic Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Elder Sales; Greca, Ileana Maria; Freire, Olival, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This work is a systematic review of studies that investigate teaching experiences applying History and Philosophy of Science (HPS) in physics classrooms, with the aim of obtaining critical and reliable information on this subject. After a careful process of selection and exclusion of studies compiled from a variety of databases, an in-depth review…

  3. The architecture of modern mathematics essays in history and philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreiros, J

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at both students and researchers in philosophy, mathematics and the history of science, this edited volume, authored by leading scholars, highlights foremost developments in both the philosophy and history of modern mathematics.

  4. The Role of History and Philosophy of in University Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Tinne Hoff; Carter, Jessica M H Grund

    2014-01-01

    uses of history and the research direction in philosophy of mathematics denoted ‘Philosophy of Mathematical Practice’. We link history and philosophy of mathematical practices to recent ideas in mathematics education in order to identify different roles history and philosophy can play in the learning...... of mathematics at university level. We present, analyse and discuss different examples of inclusions of history and philosophy in university programmes in mathematics. These presentations are divided into courses in history and philosophy, respectively, since this is the main way they are organised...... at the universities. We shall see, however, that the history courses address philosophical questions and that the philosophy courses employ historical material. The chapter ends with comments on how mathematics educations at university level can benefit from history and philosophy of mathematics...

  5. A history of erotic philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soble, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This essay historically explores philosophical views about the nature and significance of human sexuality, starting with the Ancient Greeks and ending with late 20th-century Western philosophy. Important figures from the history of philosophy (and theology) discussed include Sappho, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Jerome, the Pelagians, St. Thomas Aquinas, Michel de Montaigne, Rene Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Søren Kierkegaard, Arthur Schopenhauer, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Wilhelm Reich, and Herbert Marcuse. Contemporary philosophers whose recent work is discussed include Michel Foucault, Thomas Nagel, Roger Scruton, Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II), Catharine MacKinnon, Richard Posner, and John Finnis. To show the unity of the humanities, the writings of various literary figures are incorporated into this history, including Mark Twain, Arthur Miller, James Thurber, E. B. White, Iris Murdoch, and Philip Roth.

  6. Psychical research in the history and philosophy of science. An introduction and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    As a prelude to articles published in this special issue, I sketch changing historiographical conventions regarding the 'occult' in recent history of science and medicine scholarship. Next, a review of standard claims regarding psychical research and parapsychology in philosophical discussions of the demarcation problem reveals that these have tended to disregard basic primary sources and instead rely heavily on problematic popular accounts, simplistic notions of scientific practice, and outdated teleological historiographies of progress. I conclude by suggesting that rigorous and sensitively contextualized case studies of past elite heterodox scientists may be potentially useful to enrich historical and philosophical scholarship by highlighting epistemologies that have fallen through the crude meshes of triumphalist and postmodernist historiographical generalizations alike. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Teaching the History and Philosophy of Science in Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kenneth L.

    1980-01-01

    Lists educational objectives, course syllabus, audiovisual materials, and bibliography for a secondary school course on the history and philosophy of science. The class consists of discussions, lectures, use of film and filmstrips, and student research papers. (KC)

  8. History, philosophy and science teaching new perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This anthology opens new perspectives in the domain of history, philosophy, and science teaching research. Its four sections are: first, science, culture and education; second, the teaching and learning of science; third, curriculum development and justification; and fourth, indoctrination. The first group of essays deal with the neglected topic of science education and the Enlightenment tradition. These essays show that many core commitments of modern science education have their roots in this tradition, and consequently all can benefit from a more informed awareness of its strengths and weaknesses. Other essays address research on leaning and teaching from the perspectives of social epistemology and educational psychology. Included here is the first ever English translation of Ernst Mach’s most influential 1890 paper on ‘The Psychological and Logical Moment in Natural Science Teaching’. This paper launched the influential Machian tradition in education. Other essays address concrete cases of the ...

  9. History, applications, and philosophy in mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankvist, Uffe Thomas

    2013-01-01

    on the observation that a use of history, applications, and philosophy as a 'goal' is best realized through a modules approach, the article goes on to discuss how to actually design such teaching modules. It is argued that a use of primary original sources through a so-called guided reading along with a use......The article first investigates the basis for designing teaching activities dealing with aspects of history, applications, and philosophy of mathematics in unison by discussing and analyzing the different 'whys' and 'hows' of including these three dimensions in mathematics education. Based...... of student essay assignments, which are suitable for bringing out relevant meta-issues of mathematics, is a sensible way of realizing a design encompassing the three dimensions. Two concrete teaching modules on aspects of the history, applications, and philosophy of mathematics-HAPh-modules-are outlined...

  10. Research philosophy: towards an understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossan, Frank

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, Frank Crossan argues that the distinction between quantitative and qualitative philosophies and research methods is sometimes overstated, and that triangulation of methods in contemporary research is common. It is, therefore, important to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and this paper aims to provide the novice researcher with a basis for developing that understanding. A descriptive analysis of the philosophies of positivism and post-positivist thinking in relation to research methodology is presented both as an introduction to the philosophical basis of research, and as a sound basis from which to discuss the 'quantitative-qualitative' debate.

  11. Philosophy of phenomenology: how understanding aids research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Mary

    2012-01-01

    To assist the researcher in understanding the similarities and differences between the Husserlian and Heideggerian philosophies of phenomenology, and how that philosophy can inform nursing research as a useful methodology. Nurse researchers using phenomenology as a methodology need to understand the philosophy of phenomenology to produce a research design that is philosophically congruent. However, phenomenology has a long and complex history of development, and may be difficult to understand and apply. The author draws from Heidegger (1962), Gadamer (2004), and nurse scholars and methodologists. To give the reader a sense of the development of the philosophy of phenomenology, the author briefly recounts its historical origins and interpretations, specifically related to Husserl, Heidegger and Gadamer. The author outlines the ontological and epistemological assumptions of Husserlian and Heideggerian phenomenology and guidance for methodology inspired by these philosophers. Difficulties with engaging in phenomenological research are addressed, especially the processes of phenomenological reduction and bracketing, and the lack of clarity about the methods of interpretation. Despite its complexity, phenomenology can provide the nurse researcher with indepth insight into nursing practice. An understanding of phenomenology can guide nurse researchers to produce results that have meaning in nursing patient care.

  12. All about science philosophy, history, sociology & communication

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Liu

    2014-01-01

    There is a lot of confusion and misconception concerning science. The nature and contents of science is an unsettled problem. For example, Thales of 2,600 years ago is recognized as the father of science but the word science was introduced only in the 14th century; the definition of science is often avoided in books about philosophy of science. This book aims to clear up all these confusions and present new developments in the philosophy, history, sociology and communication of science. It also aims to showcase the achievement of China's top scholars in these areas. The 18 chapters, divided into five parts, are written by prominent scholars including the Nobel laureate Robin Warren, sociologist Harry Collins, and physicist-turned-historian Dietrich Stauffer.

  13. History, Philosophy and Science Teaching: Some Answers to ``How?''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa de Carvalho, Anna Maria; Infantosi Vannucchi, Andréa

    The study of the history and philosophy of science in school science courses is highly recommended. This paper deals with the methodological aspects derived from research in science education and how they have to be taken into account in order to generate effective classroom activities, so that history and philosophy are not relegated to the status of additional rhetoric of conclusions in an extensive curricula. This is illustrated with the analysis of episodes ___ transcribed from videotape records ___ which took place when such activity was introduced into high school physics classes. This analysis has shown that students, when working in cooperative groups over problematic historical episodes, may come to discuss essential features of science. This not only provides a more realistic view of science, but also enhances cognitive and argumentation skills, besides emphasizing the importance of teachers' guidance.

  14. The Beginnings of the History of Philosophy in Ancient Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacija J. Fridl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Like many contemporary researchers into the ancient history of philosophy and into encyclopedic Hellenistic works (Mejer, Schoefield, Runia, Maasfeld ..., the author observes that a great deal of research into ancient doxography and Diogenes Laertius has focused on evaluation. Her own paper, on the other hand, turns to the question: What can Laertius’ attention to philosophers’ biographies in his Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers tell us about the Ancient Greek view of the philosophical thought from the past?  As noted by the author, the term ‘doxography’ itself, which bears the connotation of a less reliable source and is applied today to almost every ancient explanation of any philosophical doctrine, was established by Hermann Diels as late as the 19th century. Yet this view of earlier thought was in fact already developed by Aristotle. His treatise On the Soul defines the philosophical tenets of his precursors as ‘opinions’, which are then critically examined and rejected. This attitude to earlier philosophy informs all Aristotle’s writings and his methodology of philosophy in general, for his prima philosophia as a ‘science which considers the truth’ is founded precisely on the critique of earlier thought. He critically evaluates even the tenets of his teacher Plato, in order to surpass him with his own philosophy. Thus he lays the foundations of evolutionary historiography, which perceives history as a spiritual progress and has lasted through Hegel, Marx, and – with a negative historical connotation – Heidegger – to this day. Plato, by contrast, envisages, through the very form of the dialogue, the relation to earlier philosophy as a conversation, a constant interweaving and fertilisation of one’s own thought with the wisdom of one’s precursors. This perception is further reinforced by his doctrine of knowledge as a process of remembering, that is, of philosophy as a road to wisdom leading back

  15. Critical issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of astrobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    Fifty years after serious scientific research began in the field of exobiology, and forty years after serious historical research began on the subject of extraterrestrial life, this paper identifies and examines some of the most important issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of what is today known as astrobiology. As in the philosophy of science in general, and in the philosophies of particular sciences, critical issues in the philosophy and sociology of astrobiology are both stimulated and illuminated by history. Among those issues are (1) epistemological issues such as the status of astrobiology as a science, the problematic nature of evidence and inference, and the limits of science; (2) metaphysical/scientific issues, including the question of defining the fundamental concepts of life, mind, intelligence, and culture in a universal context; the role of contingency and necessity in the origin of these fundamental phenomena; and whether or not the universe is in some sense fine-tuned for life and perhaps biocentric; (3) societal issues such as the theological, ethical, and worldview impacts of the discovery of microbial or intelligent life; and the question of whether the search for extraterrestrial life should be pursued at all, and with what precautions; and (4) issues related to the sociology of scientific knowledge, including the diverse attitudes and assumptions of different scientific communities and different cultures to the problem of life beyond Earth, the public "will to believe," and the formation of the discipline of astrobiology. All these overlapping issues are framed by the concept of cosmic evolution-the 13.7 billion year Master Narrative of the Universe-which may result in a physical, biological, or postbiological universe and determine the long-term destiny of humanity.

  16. The history of the philosophy of management and corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, the history of philosophy of management is discussed with a focus on the search for legitimacy in the Judeo-Christian tradition. This is the basis for evaluating modern concepts of the economics of the philosophy of management and corporations. The chapter also presents the neoli...... the neoliberal paradigm of the philosophy of management and the attempt to search for another economy beyond rational individual utility maximization. Here we move toward business ethics, CSR, and corporate citizenship....

  17. At the Interface: Academic History, School History and the Philosophy of History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retz, Tyson

    2016-01-01

    How history is learnt and taught must to some extent be shaped by conceptions of what history is. Historians tend to conceptualize what something is by investigating what it has been and what it has meant in different contexts. This article explains how a debate in the philosophy of history between positivism and intentionalism provided the…

  18. [The function of philosophy of science in the teaching of medical history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaming

    2014-05-01

    The philosophy of science yields 3 important functions in the teaching of medical history. Firstly, by analyzing the development of medicine from the perspective of philosophy, we can integrate medical history into the history of human thought and clearly show the close connection between the development of humanity and the development of medical science. Secondly, philosophical analysis on the general rules of scientific discoveries involved in medical history can help medical students to understand the methodology in the research of sciences in history. Thirdly, philosophy of science offers new dimensions for understanding the relationship between medicine and the society. By making use of the relevant theory in scientific philosophy to explore the relationship between medicine and the society, the nature of medicine and the social nature and function of science can be further understood by medical students so as to exert an active role in the research and clinical work in the future.

  19. A brief history of the philosophy of time

    CERN Document Server

    Bardon, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Adrian Bardon's A Brief History of the Philosophy of Time is a short introduction to the history, philosophy, and science of the study of time-from the pre-Socratic philosophers through Einstein and beyond. A Brief History of the Philosophy of Time covers subjects such as time and change, the experience of time, physical and metaphysical approaches to the nature of time, the direction of time, time travel, time and freedom of the will, and scientific and philosophical approaches to eternity and the beginning of time. Bardon employs helpful illustrations and keeps technical language to a minimum in bringing the resources of over 2500 years of philosophy and science to bear on some of humanity's most fundamental and enduring questions.

  20. Is There a Future for History?: On the Need for a Philosophy of History and Historiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Jansen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the philosophy of history the main focus has been on problems regarding the ideal typical division between the sciences and the humanities. However speculation on ideal forms risks neglecting the epistemic problems regarding historical research, writing history and education. Therefore the philosophy of history needs a new dimension by supplementing it with a line of thinking Harry Jansen would like to call the philosophy of history and historiography, in short phh. Very much like the painter Velazquez, who in his Las Meninas invites people to look into the mirror and see themselves as rulers, Harry Jansen wants to invite historians to look into the mirror of historiography and see themselves as users of epistemic tools. This requires the historian to view historical interpretations from a comparative perspective. Historical texts not only inform us about the past, they can also be seen as providing insights into the intellectual operation of historical production. These insights show not only the richness of historiography but above all they provide the historian with the theoretical tools with which that richness can be acquired.   

  1. History, philosophy, and science teaching: The present rapprochement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    1992-03-01

    This paper traces the use of, and arguments for, the history and philosophy of science in school science courses. Specific attention is paid to the British National Curriculum proposals and to the recommendations of the US Project 2061 curriculum guidelines. Some objections to the inclusion of historical material in science courses are outlined and answered. Mention is made of the Piagetian thesis that individual psychological development mirrors the development of concepts in the history of science. This introduces the topic of idealisation in science. Some significant instances are itemised where science education has, at its considerable cost, ignored work in philosophy of science. Arguments for the inclusion of the history and philosophy of science in science teacher education programmes are given. The paper finishes with a list of topical issues in present science education where collaboration between science teachers, historians, philosophers, and sociologists would be of considerable benefit.

  2. 'True Love' and Rousseau's Philosophy of History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armenteros, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Rousseau, a philosopher of history? The suggestion may startle those who know him as an enemy of history, the founder of Counter-Enlightenment who rejected his century's hope in progress and conjured quasi-utopias devoid of time. Alone, the political texts seem to justify this interpretation. Side

  3. The Actuality of Gentile's Philosophy of History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This essay reconstructs Gentile's conception of history as the product of the eternal act of thinking. Peters charts the development of this distinctive position, presenting it as a sustained attempt to unite past and present, fact and value, thought and action within a single theory. He argues,

  4. The Actuality of Gentile's Philosophy of History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Richard; Haddock, Bruce; Wakefield, James

    2015-01-01

    This essay reconstructs Gentile's conception of history as the product of the eternal act of thinking. Peters charts the development of this distinctive position, presenting it as a sustained attempt to unite past and present, fact and value, thought and action within a single theory. He argues,

  5. Eric Davidson, his philosophy, and the history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichmann, Ute

    2017-10-16

    Eric Davidson, a passionate molecular developmental biologist and intellectual, believed that conceptual advances in the sciences should be based on knowledge of conceptual history. Convinced of the superiority of a causal-analytical approach over other methods, he succeeded in successfully applying this approach to the complex feature of organismal development by introducing the far-reaching concept of developmental Gene Regulatory Networks. This essay reviews Davidson's philosophy, his support for the history of science, and some aspects of his scientific personality.

  6. The unborn child: history, philosophy and religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucan Maria Casandra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available All throughout history the unborn, and implicitly its protection, have been subject for academics and practitioners of various areas. The problem of the origin of the soul and the exact determination of the moment when it is united with the body was crucial in enabling us to define the exact moment when the human life begins, and, consequently, for providing proper protection for the unborn child. In this context visions of the Greek philosophers like Plato, Aristotle, Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas, and of the Latin writer Tertullian, as well as Christian perspectives were analysed in order to identify the starting point of the human being to help determine the level of protection provided for the unborn in history. Finally, considering the fact that not even today has consensus been achieved concerning the beginning of human life, it was and still is difficult to provide proper legal protection for the unborn child, but in our opinion this is by far not impossible.

  7. Philosophy of Research in Applied Linguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Torabi

    2011-01-01

    The term  “ philosophy of research in applied linguistics” may be considered to cover a wide range of academically and philosophically important issues that have recently begun to capture the attention of scholars in research programs in their efforts, on the one hand, to reflect upon how they have traditionally approached their scientific practices and, on the other, to reconsider and redefine their research priorities in the light of new findings and revise their methodologies and designs i...

  8. Recasting particle physics by entangling physics, history and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertozzi, Eugenio; Levrini, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the design process we followed to recast particle physics so as to make it conceptually relevant for secondary school students. In this design process, the concept of symmetry was assumed as core-idea because of its structural and foundational role in particle physics, its crosscutting character and its epistemological and philosophical value. The first draft of the materials was tested in a pilot-study which involved 19 students of a regular class (grade 13) of an Italian school. The data analysis showed that the students were in their 'regime of competence' for grasping subtle nuances of the materials and for providing important hints for revising them. In particular, students’ reactions brought into light the need of clarifying the 'foundational' character that symmetry attained in twentieth-century physics. The delicate step of re-thinking the materials required the researchers to articulate the complex relationship between researches on physics teaching, history and philosophy of physics. This analytic phase resulted in a version of the materials which implies the students to be guided to grasp the meaning of symmetry as normative principle in twentieth-century physics, throughout the exploration of the different meanings assumed by symmetry over time. The whole process led also to the production of an essential, on-line version, of the materials targeted to a wider audience.

  9. Shaping biomedical objects across history and philosophy:a conversation with Hans-Jörg Rheinberger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sancho, Miguel; González-Silva, Matiana; Jesús Santesmases, María; Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Historical epistemology, according to the historian of science Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, is a space through which "to take experimental laboratory work into the realm of philosophy". This key concept, together with the crucial events and challenges of his career, were discussed in a public conversation which took place on the occasion of Rheinberger's retirement. By making sense of natural phenomena in the laboratory, the act of experimenting shapes the object; it is this shaping which became the core of Rheinberger's own research across biology and philosophy into history. For his intellectual agenda, a history of the life sciences so constructed became "epistemologically demanding".

  10. Interacting with History: Reflections on Philosophy and the Pedagogy of Dance History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Dance history is studied at all levels of the curriculum, whether as a named course or part of other domains of enquiry. Debates drawn from the philosophy of history and historiographic practice can impact on the teaching and learning of dance history in order to produce a more imaginative and personal engagement with the field. These debates are…

  11. ‘Doxographical or Philosophical History of Philosophy: On Michael Frede’s Precepts for Writing the History of Philosophy’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catana, Leo

    2016-01-01

    In a series of articles from the 1980s and 1990s, Michael Frede analysed the history of histories of philosophy written over the last three hundred years. According to Frede, modern scholars have degenerated into what he calls a “doxographical” mode of writing the history of philosophy. Instead, he...... argued, these scholars should write what he called “philosophical” history of philosophy, first established in the last decades of the seventeenth century but since abandoned. In the present article it is argued that Frede’s reconstruction of the history of histories of philosophy is historically...

  12. DA Masolo A Short History of African Philosophy, a Review pp165-171

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DA Masolo

    Review of Barry Hallen's A Short History of African Philosophy, Second ... 2006, by African Philosophy: The Analytic Approach (Africa World Press). .... handling of culpability in witchcraft accusations as overlooking the obvious logical inference.

  13. Biohumanities: rethinking the relationship between biosciences, philosophy and history of science, and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Karola; Griffiths, Paul E

    2008-03-01

    We argue that philosophical and historical research can constitute a "Biohumanities" that deepens our understanding of biology itself engages in constructive "science criticism," helps formulate new "visions of biology," and facilitates "critical science communication." We illustrate these ideas with two recent "experimental philosophy" studies of the concept of the gene and of the concept of innateness conducted by ourselves and collaborators. We conclude that the complex and often troubled relations between science and society are critical to both parties, and argue that the philosophy and history of science can help to make this relationship work.

  14. A PHENOMENOLOGICAL RESEARCH ON MORAL PHILOSOPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CIPRIAN IULIAN ŞOPTICĂ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this article concerns the what, the how and the whyof moral phenomenology. The first question we take into consideration is „What is moral phenomenology”? The second question which arises is „How to pursue moral phenomenology”? The third question is „Why pursue moral phenomenology”? We will analyze the study Moral phenomenology:foundation issues1, by which the American phenomenologist Uriah Kriegel aims three lines of research: the definition of moral phenomenology and the description of field research within the phenomenological tradition; the establishment of a method of moral phenomenology research; the emphasis of the purpose of such research and its importance for moral philosophy in general.

  15. Chinese Traditional Philosophy and Indigenous Management Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three key notions of Chinese traditional philosophy, i.e., Zhongyong, Yin Yang, and Wu, pointing out the possible mistakes in Prof. Peter Ping Li's arguments as well as some questions that are often neglected and taken for granted. The author posits, Chinese traditional...... philosophy is a system of thought distinct from the Western philosophy; while the Western philosophy is mainly concerned about the True, i.e., the objective knowledge of the world, the aim of Chinese traditional philosophy is the pursuit of the Good, i.e., the unification of heaven and human....

  16. The Nature of Philosophy of History | Eresia-Eke | AFRREV IJAH: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    articulated argument ensures concerning what philosophy of history is, and its ability to direct the course of history in the areas of historical evidence and the extent to which objectivity is possible. The paper argues that philosophy of history is a ...

  17. Notes toward a Philosophy of Action Learning Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, David; Coughlan, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The philosophical foundations of action learning research have not received a great deal of attention. In the context of action learning postgraduate and professional programmes in universities, articulation of a philosophy of action learning research seems timely and appropriate. This article explores a philosophy of action learning research,…

  18. From Philosophy of History to Philosophy of Historicities: Some Ideas on a Potential Future of Historical Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berber Bevernage

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Berber Bevernage does not share the pessimistic view that the philosophy of history is in crisis or coming to an end: it can have a bright and fascinating future. However in order to remain relevant, he argues, philosophy of history should look beyond academic historiography and transform into a broad ‘philosophy of historicities’ that also pays attention to the wide variety of extra-academic ways of dealing with the past. In order to do this current philosophy of history has to overcome a number challenges. First, it has to recognise that academic historiography did not develop in an intellectual vacuum but is closely related to particular social, cultural and political presuppositions about time and historicity on which it is partly dependent but which it can also reinforce or contradict. Second, it should recognise that different approaches to time and historicity have different social, cultural and political functions and not restrict its focus to philosophy of science or epistemological/cognitive issues. Third, it should focus on the ethics of history.

  19. Research philosophy in pharmacy practice: necessity and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winit-Watjana, Win

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacy practice has gradually evolved with the paradigm shifted towards patient-focused practice or medicines optimisation. The advancement of pharmacy-related research has contributed to this progression, but the philosophy of research remained unexplored. This review was thus aimed to outline the succinct concept of research philosophy and its application in pharmacy practice research. Research philosophy has been introduced to offer an alternative way to think about problem-driven research that is normally conducted. To clarify the research philosophy, four research paradigms, i.e. positivism (or empiricism), postpositivism (or realism), interpretivism (or constructivism) and pragmatism, are investigated according to philosophical realms, i.e. ontology, epistemology, axiology and logic of inquiry. With the application of research philosophy, some examples of quantitative and qualitative research were elaborated along with the conventional research approach. Understanding research philosophy is crucial for pharmacy researchers and pharmacists, as it underpins the choice of methodology and data collection. The review provides the overview of research philosophy and its application in pharmacy practice research. Further discussion on this vital issue is warranted to help generate quality evidence for pharmacy practice. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. History of logic and ``university'' philosophy in Russia. The view from Kazan

    OpenAIRE

    Bazhanov, V. A.

    1994-01-01

    History of logic and "university" philosophy in Russia. The view from Kazan. On the basis of investigations of archival materials a picture is given of the conceptual and social history of "university" philosophy and logic in Russia (nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries). Emphasis is placed on those features of Russian philosophy and logic which were characteristic of the thinkers - philosophers and logicians — of Kazan

  1. Promotion of Cultural Content Knowledge through the Use of the History and Philosophy of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Igal

    2012-01-01

    Historical excurse was suggested as a beneficial form of using the history and philosophy of science in the modules of learning materials developed within the History and Philosophy in Science Teaching project. The paper briefly describes the theoretical framework of the produced modules, addressing ontological and epistemological aspects of…

  2. Cutting Edge Discoveries for the 2015: Capsule of a History and Philosophy of Andragogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschke, John A.

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 updated capsule on a History and Philosophy of Andragogy includes nine new items and is mainly limited [with a few exceptions] to a chronological history and the accompanying philosophy of andragogy, in line with when the English language documents were published and personal descriptions of events were recorded. Some of these documents,…

  3. Al-Attas’ Philosophy of History on the Arrival and Proliferation of Islam in the Malay World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZMUL FAHIMI KAMARUZAMAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the philosophy of history of Syed Muhammad Naquib al-Attas on the theory of the arrival and spread of Islam in the Malay world, particularly in his work ‘Historical Facts and Fictions’. This philosophy of history is consequent to al-Attas' critical research contained in his previous works such as ‘Preliminary Statement on a General Theory of The Islamization of the Malay-Indonesian Archipelago’ (1969, ‘Islam in the Malay History and Culture’ (1972 and ‘The Correct Date of the Terengganu Inscription’ (1972. This study analyses these works and his other works to look into the aspects of history and historiography contained in the philosophy of history of al-Attas on the arrival and spread of Islam in the Malay world in terms of their scope, sources and history methods. This study found that in terms of epistemology al-Attas has contributed in creating a theoretical framework and a novel approach to the philosophy of history of the history of Islam in the Malay world.

  4. Compendium of quantum physics. Concepts, experiments, history and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberger, Daniel; Hentschel, Klaus; Weinert, Friedel

    2009-01-01

    With contributions by many of today's leading quantum physicists, philosophers and historians, including three Nobel laureates, this comprehensive A to Z of quantum physics provides a lucid understanding of the key concepts of quantum theory and experiment. It covers technical and interpretational aspects alike, and includes both traditional topics and newer areas such as quantum information and its relatives. The central concepts that have shaped contemporary understanding of the quantum world are clearly defined, with illustrations where helpful, and discussed at a level suitable for undergraduate and graduate students of physics, history of science, and philosophy of physics. All articles share three main aims: (1) to provide a clear definition and understanding of the term concerned; (2) where possible, to trace the historical origins of the concept; and (3) to provide a small but optimal selection of references to the most relevant literature, including pertinent historical studies. Also discussed are the often contentious philosophical implications derived from quantum theory and its associated experimental findings. This compendium will be an indispensable resource for all those seeking concise up-to-date information about the many facets of quantum physics. (orig.)

  5. Nonlinearity: The History and Philosophy of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides for a concise history of nonlinearity from the context of the changing assumptions in science throughout the turn of the twentieth century. Concerned with the development of an ethics of technology in higher education, it establishes a background for ongoing research on quantitative methods in the social sciences. The history…

  6. The history and philosophy of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Many interesting statements about inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and also Crohn's disease have been made in recent years in journals and scientific meetings. They have influenced our thinking and the perception of the diseases. Among these statements is the notion that IBDs are 'relatively new diseases', that 'IBD is rather a syndrome than a disease' or that with the new insights into pathophysiology, 'we will be able to discriminate many different Crohn's diseases based on genetic risk factors'. A look into history and philosophy may help to clarify misconceptions and prove that many of these statements are either wrong or misleading. People suffered from symptoms that are suggestive of Crohn's disease centuries before the disease concept evolved in the early 19th century and before Burrill B. Crohn could describe a complex of symptoms he suggested to be a so far non-identified disease. Early concepts on the pathophysiology of CD were not so different to present-time theories as it may be assumed. 'Pre-ideas' and basic concepts were leading the search for a cause of Crohn's disease and IBD. With respect to pathophysiology, we have to accept that most likely we will never come up with one unifying concept ('the cause of IBD') as different scientific schools and think-collectives exist. Therefore, the 'classical adaptive immunologists' and the 'innate immunologist' as well as scientists focused on barrier function or the microbiome will never completely understand each other and each other's concepts. As for many other diseases, several different pathophysiological concepts existed in parallel and will do so in the future as it is impossible to prove the exclusive 'truth' of one of the concepts for reasons that will be further discussed below. This means on the other hand that none of the concepts on pathophysiology of IBD we have at present will ever unequivocally be proven to be wrong.

  7. A Philosophy Research Database to Share Data Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jili Cheng

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Philosophy research used to rely mainly on the traditional published journals and newspapers for collecting or communicating data. However, because of financial limits or lack of capability to collect data, required published materials and even restricted materials and developing information from research projects often could not be obtained. The rise of digital techniques and Internet opportunities has allowed data resource sharing of philosophy research. However, although there are several ICPs with large-scale comprehensive commercial databases in the field in China, no real non-profit professional database for philosophy researchers exists. Therefore, in 2002, the Philosophy Institute of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences began a project to build "The Database of Philosophy Research." Until Mar. 2006 the number of subsets had reached 30, with more than 30,000 records, retrieval services reached 6,000, and article-reading reached 30,000. Because of the concept of intellectual property, the service of the database is currently limited to the information held in CASS. Nevertheless, this is the first academic database for philosophy research, so its orientation is towards resource-sharing, leading users to data, and serving large number of demands from other provinces and departments.

  8. Kant on the history of nature: the ambiguous heritage of the critical philosophy for natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Phillip R

    2006-12-01

    This paper seeks to show Kant's importance for the formal distinction between descriptive natural history and a developmental history of nature that entered natural history discussions in the late eighteenth century. It is argued that he developed this distinction initially upon Buffon's distinctions of 'abstract' and 'physical' truths, and applied these initially in his distinction of 'varieties' from 'races' in anthropology. In the 1770s, Kant appears to have given theoretical preference to the 'history' of nature [Naturgeschichte] over 'description' of nature [Naturbeschreibung]. Following Kant's confrontations with Johann Herder and Georg Forster in the late 1780s, Kant weakened the epistemic status of the 'history of nature' and gave theoretical preference to 'description of nature'. As a result, Kant's successors, such as Goethe, could draw from Kant either a justification for a developmental history of nature, or, as this paper argues, a warrant from the critical philosophy for denying the validity of the developmental history of nature as anything more than a 'regulative' idea of reason.

  9. A Teaching-Learning Sequence of Colour Informed by History and Philosophy of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurício, Paulo; Valente, Bianor; Chagas, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a teaching-learning sequence on colour intended to a pre-service elementary teacher programme informed by History and Philosophy of Science. Working in a socio-constructivist framework, we made an excursion on the history of colour. Our excursion through history of colour, as well as the reported misconception on colour…

  10. O ensino e a pesquisa em história da educação brasileira na cadeira de Filosofia e História da Educação (1933-1962 - The teaching and the research on the history of the brazilian education in the subjects of Philosophy and History of Education (1933-1962

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bontempi Júnior

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Este artigo apresenta a trajetória da cadeira de Filosofia e História da Educação, desde a sua constituição em 1933 até 1962, quando, na Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras da Universidade de São Paulo, o professor Laerte Ramos de Carvalho deu início às primeiras pesquisas acadêmicas em história da educação. Explora fatores "internos" e "externos" da história das disciplinas, tais como os perfis institucionais, as prescrições curriculares, as disputas ocorridas no mundo acadêmico e as relações entre as "disciplinas vizinhas", a fim de tecer uma rede de personagens e acontecimentos que confira à disciplina a sua "identidade histórica". Palavras-chave: história das disciplinas, filosofia e história da educação, Roldão Lopes de Barros, Laerte Ramos de Carvalho.   THE TEACHING AND THE RESEARCH ON THE HISTORY OF THE BRAZILIAN EDUCATION IN THE SUBJECTS OF PHILOSOPHY AND HISTORY OF EDUACTION (1933-1962 Abstract This article presents the trajectory of the Cathedra of Philosophy and History of Education, since its constitution in 1933, until 1962, when, at the College of Philosophy, Sciences and Literature of the University of São Paulo, the professor Laerte Ramos de Carvalho commenced the very first academic researches on history of education. The article explores both "internal" and "external" factors in the history of disciplines, such as institutional profiles, prescriptions of the curriculum, struggles occurred in the academic world, and relationships between "neighbouring disciplines", in order to weave a net, made by characters and facts, that gives to the discipline its "historical identity". Keywords: history of disciplines, Philosophy and History of Education, Roldão Lopes de Barros, Laerte Ramos de Carvalho.   LA ENSEÑANZA Y LA INVESTIGACIÓN EN HISTORIA DE LA EDUCACIÓN BRASILEÑA EN LA CÁTEDRA DE FILOSOFÍA Y HISTORIA DE LA EDUCACIÓN (1933- 1962 Resumen Este artículo presenta el camino de la c

  11. A new world era in the history of philosophy

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    Enrique Dussel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper supports the following theses: 1. It is necessary to affirm that all humanity has always expressed certain “core universal problems” that are present in all cultures. 2. The rational responses to these “core problems” first acquire the form of mythical narratives. 3. The formulation of categorical philosophical discourses is a subsequent development in human rationality that does not negate all mythical narratives. These philosophical discourses have arisen in all the great urban Neolithic cultures (even if only on a very beginning level. 4. Modern European philosophy confused its economic and political domination of culture and the crises derived from other regional philosophies with a Eurocentric pretention to universality, which must be questioned. 5. In any case, there are formal, universal aspects on which all regional philosophies can coincide and which respond to the “core problems” on an abstract level. 6. All of this impels us to enter a new age of inter-philosophical dialogue, respectful of differences and open to learning from the useful discoveries of other traditions. 7. A new philosophical project must be developed that, going beyond Eurocentric philosophical modernity, tries to shape a global, trans-modern pluriverse, drawing upon the development of its own resources of peripheral, subaltern, post-colonial philosophies that have been “discarded” by modernity.

  12. Why philosophy and history matter : A conversation with Ann Taves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Stuckrad, C.K.M.

    2010-01-01

    The article picks up some ideas that Ann Taves presents in her book Religious Experience Reconsidered, and looks at possible conversations that are not fleshed out in detail in Taves' book. In particular, it is argued that the disciplinary confrontation with philosophy and with historiography is of

  13. Philosophy, history and sociology of science: interdisciplinary relations and complex social identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, Hauke

    2014-12-01

    Sociology and philosophy of science have an uneasy relationship, while the marriage of history and philosophy of science has--on the surface at least--been more successful I will take a sociological look at the history of the relationships between philosophy and history as well as philosophy and sociology of science. Interdisciplinary relations between these disciplines will be analysed through social identity complexity theory in oider to draw out some conclusions on how the disciplines interact and how they might develop. I will use the relationships between the disciplines as a pointer for a more general social theory of interdisciplinarity which will then be used to sound a caution on how interdisciplinary relations between the three disciplines might be managed.

  14. Community science, philosophy of science, and the practice of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2005-06-01

    Embedded in community science are implicit theories on the nature of reality (ontology), the justification of knowledge claims (epistemology), and how knowledge is constructed (methodology). These implicit theories influence the conceptualization and practice of research, and open up or constrain its possibilities. The purpose of this paper is to make some of these theories explicit, trace their intellectual history, and propose a shift in the way research in the social and behavioral sciences, and community science in particular, is conceptualized and practiced. After describing the influence and decline of logical empiricism, the underlying philosophical framework for science for the past century, I summarize contemporary views in the philosophy of science that are alternatives to logical empiricism. These include contextualism, normative naturalism, and scientific realism, and propose that a modified version of contextualism, known as perspectivism, affords the philosophical framework for an emerging community science. I then discuss the implications of perspectivism for community science in the form of four propositions to guide the practice of research.

  15. The principle of holism in post-neoclassical philosophy of history

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    Y. A. Dobrolyubska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The principle of holism restores historical science tendency to grasp the past as a «whole matter» and raises the questions about the global synthesis, based on the integration of micro­ and makrohistory, narrative and metatheory. Post­neoclassical subsystem in the philosophy of history operates of the corresponding concept of truth. Scientific truth is always contextual. She stated subject to the methodological postulates, which designed a specific research situation. Historical studies of scientific search for truth is always associated with the study of specific historical events or historical building theories. Both approaches solve the problem of objectivity: a theoretical history try to discover the truth, liberated from specific features and history of events wishes to discover the truth, given in the particular nuances of the entire event. Based on the corresponding concept of truth post­neoclassical subsystem aims to reconstruct the historical reality in all its fullness, complexity and specificity. This subsystem comes to the fundamental principle of post­neoclassical philosophy of history – to the principle of holism. On the one hand this principle orients the historian to the need for a holistic study of the subject of research, on the other hand he directs the historian to the study of historical reality as a hierarchy of «integrality», which can not be reduced to the parts that make up. Also it is emphasized that the meaning of these parts must necessarily be present as a sense of the whole context.

  16. Bochenski and Balance: System and History in Analytic Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    SIMONS, PETER

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED First published in Studies in East European Thought 55 (2003), 281-297. Sankt Augustin, Germany This paper praises, upholds and justifies the balance found in Bochenski's philosophical writings between a systematic interest in theoretical questions and a purely historical approach to philosophy. The drawbacks of the unbalanced positions are pointed out and the benefits of due balance illustrated from Bochenski's own work and from my own.

  17. Empiricism and rationalism in nineteenth-century histories of philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Vanzo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    This paper traces the ancestry of a familiar historiographical narrative, according to which early modern philosophy was marked by the development of empiricism, rationalism, and their synthesis by Immanuel Kant. It is often claimed that this narrative became standard in the nineteenth century, due to the influence of Thomas Reid, Kant and his disciples, or German Hegelians and British Idealists. The paper argues that the narrative became standard only at the turn of the twentieth century. Th...

  18. Nursing history as philosophy-towards a critical history of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foth, Thomas; Lange, Jette; Smith, Kylie

    2018-07-01

    Mainstream nursing history often positions itself in opposition to philosophy and many nursing historians are reticent of theorizing. In the quest to illuminate the lives of nurses and women current historical approaches are driven by reformist aspirations but are based on the conception that nursing or caring is basically good and the timelessness of universal values. This has the effect of essentialising political categories of identity such as class, race and gender. This kind of history is about affirmation rather than friction and about the conservation of memory and musealization. In contrast, we will focus on how we imagine nursing history could be used as a philosophical, critical perspective to challenge the ongoing transformations of our societies. Existing reality must be confronted with strangeness and the historically different can assume the function of this counterpart, meaning present and past must continuously be set in relation to each other. Thus, critical history is always the history of the present but not merely the pre-history of the present - critique must rather present different realities and different certainties. In this paper, we use this approach to discuss the implementation of the nursing process (NP) in Germany. The nursing process appears to be a technology that helped to set up an infrastructure - or assemblage - to transform nursing interventions into a commodity exchangable between consumers and nurses in a free market. In our theoretical perspective, we argue that NP was a step in the realization of the German ordoliberal program, a specific variety of neoliberalism. In order to implement market-orientation in the healthcare system it was necessary to transform hospitals into calculable spaces and to make all performances in the hospital calculable. This radically transformed not just the systems, but the ways in which nurses and patients conveived of themselves. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The main features of the enlightened philosophy of history by A. R. Turgot

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    H. Hussein

    2014-03-01

    The most important historical achievement A. R. Turgot in the development of philosophy of history was that he related a story of mental activity of man with a history of his employment, economic activity and the development of forms of social organization.

  20. History, Applications, and Philosophy in Mathematics Education: HAPh--A Use of Primary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankvist, Uffe Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The article first investigates the basis for designing teaching activities dealing with aspects of history, applications, and philosophy of mathematics in unison by discussing and analyzing the different "whys" and "hows" of including these three dimensions in mathematics education. Based on the observation that a use of history, applications, and…

  1. Empiricism and Rationalism in Nineteenth-Century Histories of Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    This paper traces the ancestry of a familiar historiographical narrative, according to which early modern philosophy was marked by the development of empiricism, rationalism, and their synthesis by Kant. It is often claimed that this narrative became standard in the nineteenth century because of the influence of Thomas Reid, Kant and his disciples, or German and British idealists. I argue that the narrative became standard at the turn of the twentieth century. Among the factors that allowed it to become standard are its aptness to be adopted by philosophers of the most diverse persuasions, its simplicity and suitability for teaching.

  2. Choosing phenomenology as a guiding philosophy for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matua, Gerald Amandu

    2015-03-01

    To provide an overview of important methodological considerations that nurse researchers need to adhere to when choosing phenomenology as a guiding philosophy and research method. Phenomenology is a major philosophy and research method in the humanities, human sciences and arts disciplines with a central goal of describing people's experiences. However, many nurse researchers continue to grapple with methodological issues related to their choice of phenomenological method. The author conducted online and manual searches of relevant research books and electronic databases. Using an integrative method, peer-reviewed research and discussion papers published between January 1990 and December 2011 and listed in the CINAHL, Science Direct, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were reviewed. In addition, textbooks that addressed research methodologies such as phenomenology were used. Although phenomenology is widely used today to broaden understanding of human phenomena relevant to nursing practice, nurse researchers often fail to adhere to acceptable scientific and phenomenological standards. Cognisant of these challenges, researchers are expected to indicate in their work the focus of their investigations, designs, and approaches to collecting and analysing data. They are also expected to present their findings in an evocative and expressive manner. Choosing phenomenology requires researchers to understand it as a philosophy, including basic assumptions and tenets of phenomenology as a research method. This awareness enables researchers, especially novices, to make important methodological decisions, particularly those necessary to indicate the study's scientific rigour and phenomenological validity. This paper adds to the discussion of phenomenology as a guiding philosophy for nursing research. It aims to guide new researchers on important methodological decisions they need to make to safeguard their study's scientific rigour and phenomenological validity.

  3. In the Shadow of the Decay. The Philosophy of History of Mencius and Xunzi

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    Dawid ROGACZ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of my paper is to analyze the debate between Mencius and Xunzi from the perspective of their views on the nature of the historical process. The Mencian approach embraces not only elaboration on the doctrine of the Mandate of Heaven, resulting in a cyclical vision of history, but also strong idealization of the past. I will show that ren (benevolence, treated as a historical principle, could link two dimensions of his historical thinking: the moral and ontological. Xunzi rejected the possibility of the intervention of Heaven in history, however, his theory of rituals and belief in moral use of history made his philosophy of history much more conservative, embalming the idealization of the past. In short, I will look for the main common points and differences between these two major figures of Confucianism regarding their views on history, attempting to answer which beliefs could constitute a unique Confucian philosophy of history.

  4. History of plastic surgery: Art, philosophy, and rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macionis, Valdas

    2018-03-23

    The 200th anniversary of K. F. Graefe's "Rhinoplasty," E. Zeis' naming of the specialty of plastic surgery in 1838, and the continuing discussion on what is plastic surgery have prompted this historical-conceptual review with a semantic insight into the meaning of the word "plastic." A literature search has revealed that this term contains dual aspects: artistic and philosophical. The progressive development of these two connotations can be traced from their origin in the ceramics and the myths of ancient Greeks to their metamorphoses in fine arts, science, and philosophy of plasticity of the modern day. Although the names of plastic procedures and the title of the specialty carry both the artistic and philosophical features, the philosophical notion is less evident. This article underlines the importance of etymology in the interpretation of the concept of plastic surgery. Copyright © 2018 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clearing Away Assumptions through Philosophy and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Stanton

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates one way in which philosophical inquiry and empirical research can be combined to illuminate processes like learning and social identification. Over the past 20 years, my empirical work in classrooms and communities has drawn on philosophical discussions about how knowledge is interconnected with social relationships and…

  6. A PHENOMENOLOGICAL RESEARCH ON MORAL PHILOSOPHY

    OpenAIRE

    CIPRIAN IULIAN ŞOPTICĂ

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this article concerns the what, the how and the whyof moral phenomenology. The first question we take into consideration is „What is moral phenomenology”? The second question which arises is „How to pursue moral phenomenology”? The third question is „Why pursue moral phenomenology”? We will analyze the study Moral phenomenology:foundation issues1, by which the American phenomenologist Uriah Kriegel aims three lines of research: the definition of moral phenomenology and the desc...

  7. Dynamics of the concept “Man” in the history of philosophy

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    Karpina Olena Serhiyivna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the development of the category “man” in the history of philosophy. The author focuses on such periods of the philosophical thought development as the Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Modern history, the Age of the Enlightenment, German classical philosophy, and non-classical philosophy. The article analyses and compare philosophical views of such outstanding thinkers as Socrates, Aristotle, Epicurus, Titus Lucretius Carus, Thomas Aquinas, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, Coluccio Salutati, Michel de Montaigne, Francis Bacon, John Locke, Benedict Spinoza, Blaise Pascal, Charles-Louis de Montesquieu, Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Ludwig Feuerbach, Arthur Schopenhauer, Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche.

  8. Historical thinking in clinical medicine: lessons from R.G. Collingwood's philosophy of history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Yee, Benjamin H; Upshur, Ross E G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this article is to create a space for historical thinking in medical practice. To this end, we draw on the ideas of R.G. Collingwood (1889-1943), the renowned British philosopher of history, and explore the implications of his philosophy for clinical medicine. We show how Collingwood's philosophy provides a compelling argument for the re-centring of medical practice around the patient history as a means of restoring to the clinical encounter the human meaning that is too often lost in modern medicine. Furthermore, we examine how Collingwood's historical thinking offers a patient-centred epistemology and a more pluralistic concept of evidence that includes the qualitative, narrative evidence necessary for human understanding. We suggest that clinical medicine can benefit from Collingwood's historical thinking, and, more generally, illustrates how a philosophy of medicine that draws on diverse sources from the humanities offers a richer, more empathetic clinical practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Tannery and Duhem on the concept of a system in the history of philosophy and history of science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catana, Leo

    2011-01-01

    historical disciplines, creating the impression that they were mutually independent. Modern commentators have tended to take these declarations at face value. This article argues that Tannery and Duhem, some of the first historians of science, transferred historiographical concepts from history of philosophy...

  10. Qualitative Research in Counseling Psychology: A Primer on Research Paradigms and Philosophy of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an overview of philosophy of science and research paradigms. The philosophy of science parameters of ontology, epistemology, axiology, rhetorical structure, and methodology are discussed across the research paradigms of positivism, postpositivism, constructivism-interpretivism, and the critical-ideological perspective.…

  11. Early Musical Training in Bel Canto Vocal Technique: A Brief History and Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstein, Christine Wondolowski

    This paper offers a brief history and philosophy of the origins of bel canto vocal style and describes the pedagogical methods used to achieve bel canto ideals in singing. The document discusses the adoption and development of this technique and how it developed over long periods of preparation in the foregoing centuries before the Baroque era.…

  12. Physics Teachers' Challenges in Using History and Philosophy of Science in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Andreas; Höttecke, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of the history and philosophy of science (HPS) in science teaching is widely accepted, but the actual state of implementation in schools is still poor. This article investigates possible reasons for this discrepancy. The demands science teachers associate with HPS-based teaching play an important role, since these determine teachers'…

  13. Innovating Science Teacher Education: A History and Philosophy of Science Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2010-01-01

    How teachers view the nature of scientific knowledge is crucial to their understanding of science content and how it can be taught. This book presents an overview of the dynamics of scientific progress and its relationship to the history and philosophy of science, and then explores their methodological and educational implications and develops…

  14. Why Implementing History and Philosophy in School Science Education Is a Challenge: An Analysis of Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottecke, Dietmar; Silva, Cibelle Celestino

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and learning with history and philosophy of science (HPS) has been, and continues to be, supported by science educators. While science education standards documents in many countries also stress the importance of teaching and learning with HPS, the approach still suffers from ineffective implementation in school science teaching. In order…

  15. Is There a Future for Teacher Ed Curriculum? An Answer from History and Moral Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Null, J. Wesley

    2008-01-01

    Is there a future for teacher ed "curriculum"? The author contends that he is not sure if there is a future for teacher ed curriculum, but if such a future is to exist, the answer will come only from history and moral philosophy. In this article, the author opines that individuals cannot make good decisions about the future of teacher ed…

  16. History, Philosophy, and Science in a Social Perspective: A Pedagogical Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Andreia; Braga, Marco; Reis, Jose Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Various studies have promoted instruction in the history and philosophy of science (HPS) in science classes, but the best way of putting this perspective into practice remains undetermined. To contribute to this issue, we developed a pedagogical project in some high schools in Brazil that aimed to present science content using an…

  17. History and Philosophy of Science through Models: The Case of Chemical Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justi, Rosaria; Gilbert, John K.

    1999-01-01

    A greater role for the history and philosophy of science in science education can only be realized if it is based on both a credible analytical approach--such as that of Lakatos--and if the evolution of a sufficient number of major themes in science is known in suitable detail. Considers chemical kinetics as an example topic. Contains 62…

  18. [Philosophy of care, care and nursing care: a literature review for a research at the intersection of philosophy and care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy-Largeau, Isabelle

    2011-12-01

    Very recently the concept of care has burst on the French philosophical scene. What are the contours of this developing "philosophy of care"? How does it place itself in relation to what are today called the ethics of care? And how does it take account of nursing care, as a discipline understood in its triple dimension: social, pedagogical and epistemological? The research presented in this paper examines some of the founding texts of this philosophy of care through the prism of these questions. It is the partial presentation of a reflection developed from a literature review that will include two other sections. The second section will focus on studying the way in which the ethics of care allow for nursing care and enter into dialogue with the nascent philosophy of care. The third will focus, conversely, on the way nurses integrate reflections derived from ethics of care and the philosophy of care into the evolution of their own discipline and contribute back to the development of a philosophy of care. These three questions are in turn part of more extensive research carried out in preparation for a philosophy thesis. They are meant as an invitation and a contribution towards what we hope will be a successful encounter between philosophy and nursing care.

  19. 2016 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics

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    Schlimm, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    This volume contains fourteen papers that were presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics/La Société Canadienne d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Mathématiques, held at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada. In addition to showcasing rigorously reviewed modern scholarship on an interesting variety of topics in the history and philosophy of mathematics, this meeting also honored the life and work of the logician and philosopher of mathematics Aldo Antonelli (1962-2015). The first four papers in this book are part of that remembrance and have a philosophical focus. Included in these are a discussion of Bolzano’s objections to Kant’s philosophy of mathematics and an examination of the influence of rhetorical and poetic aesthetics on the development of symbols in the 16th and 17thCenturies. The remaining papers deal with the history of mathematics and cover such subjects as Early schemes for polar ordinates in the work of L’Hôpital, bas...

  20. Alchemy & algorithms: perspectives on the philosophy and history of open science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Lahti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the reader a chance to experience, or revisit, PHOS16: a conference on the History and Philosophy of Open Science. In the winter of 2016, we invited a varied international group to engage with these topics at the University of Helsinki, Finland. Our aim was a critical assessment of the defining features, underlying narratives, and overall objectives of the contemporary open science movement. The event brought together contemporary open science scholars, publishers, and advocates to discuss the philosophical foundations and historical roots of openness in academic research. The eight sessions combined historical views with more contemporary perspectives on topics such as transparency, reproducibility, collaboration, publishing, peer review, research ethics, as well as societal impact and engagement. We gathered together expert panelists and 15 invited speakers who have published extensively on these topics, which allowed us to engage in a thorough and multifaceted discussion. Together with our involved audience we charted the role and foundations of openness of research in our time, considered the accumulation and dissemination of scientific knowledge, and debated the various technical, legal, and ethical challenges of the past and present. In this article, we provide an overview of the topics covered at the conference as well as individual video interviews with each speaker. In addition to this, all the talks were recorded and they are offered here as an openly licensed community resource in both video and audio form.

  1. Socratic Questioning: A Teaching Philosophy for the Student Research Consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Marie Robinson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Brief Socratic questioning, the act of asking questions in order to prompt critical thinking and reflection, expands the boundaries of librarianship by borrowing from the fields of philosophy, pedagogy, and psychology. When employed during the research consultation, Socratic questioning establishes a cooperative relationship between librarian and student that empowers the student to take agency over the interaction. Engaging learners not only academically but emotionally encourages them to become more deliberate and cognizant as they articulate their research need. This paper demonstrates how reference librarians can adjust interactions with students in order to encourage, empathize, and engage with these learners.

  2. History of Philosophy in John Dewey’s discourse on morals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernando Aleixo da Cruz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article follows Chaïm Perelman and Stephen Toulmin’s theoretical and methodological guidelines which foundations are found in the contemporary revision movement of Aristotle’s philosophy. It aims at performing the rhetorical analysis of the essay “Intelligence and Morals” by John Dewey, published in 1908, in which the author advances the thesis that since Renaissance moral has become unrelated of  transcendental ends, being hence based on intelligence. The exam of the essay reveals the use of the discursive strategy called “recourse to origin”, which consists of elaborating a genealogical narrative about the history of philosophy in order to sustain the author’s thesis. This article suggests that this form of reasoning is frequently found in Dewey’s work: it can also be observed in the book Democracy and education, in which the philosopher discourses about history of philosophy to show that philosophical reflection on education emerges from social problems. Keywords: John Dewey. Rhetoric. Philosophy and Education.

  3. History of acupuncture research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yi; Xing, Jing-jing; Li, Juan; Zeng, Bai-Yun; Liang, Fan-rong

    2013-01-01

    The acupuncture has been practiced in China for more than 3000 years and was spread to Europe and American from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. The history of acupuncture research was initiated in the eighteenth century and developed rapidly since then. In the past, physicians tried hard to apply acupuncture into clinical practice, while scientists were focused on the possible characteristics of acupoints and meridians. In the modern time, scientists have strived hard to evaluate the real effectiveness of acupuncture and the underlying physiological and biological mechanisms of acupuncture. Reviewing research history from past to present, we are delighted to witness this wonderful development. Accumulated evidences that acupuncture is beneficial in various conditions significantly enhanced our understanding the mechanisms of acupuncture treatment. However, there is still no conclusive evidence in acupuncture clinical studies. The clinical research still needs great improving, while the basic research results need to be appropriately transformed into clinical outcomes. Based on current achievements, we believe that although the challenges and difficulties exist, a more collaborative, innovative, and integrated approach will help us to achieve further progress in future acupuncture research. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Features of formation of philosophy of Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Baranov G. V.

    2016-01-01

    in article the main content of problems and achievements of philosophy of Russia on initial stage of its history is researched; urgent achievements of the Russian philosophy in their value for modern humanitarian culture are characterized.

  5. 2015 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains seventeen papers that were presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics/La Société Canadienne d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Mathématiques, held in Washington, D.C. In addition to showcasing rigorously reviewed modern scholarship on an interesting variety of general topics in the history and philosophy of mathematics, this meeting also honored the memories of Jacqueline (Jackie) Stedall and Ivor Grattan-Guinness; celebrated the Centennial of the Mathematical Association of America; and considered the importance of mathematical communities in a special session. These themes and many others are explored in these collected papers, which cover subjects such as New evidence that the Latin translation of Euclid’s Elements was based on the Arabic version attributed to al-Ḥajjāj Work done on the arc rampant in the seventeenth century The history of numerical methods for finding roots of nonlinear equations An original play feat...

  6. Lonergan's philosophy as grounding for cross-disciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Increasingly, nurses conduct scientific inquiry into complex health-care problems by collaborating on teams with researchers from other highly specialized fields. As cross-disciplinary research proliferates and becomes institutionalized globally, researchers will increasingly encounter the need to integrate their particular research perspectives within inquiries without sacrificing the potential contributions of their discipline-specific expertise. The work of the philosopher Bernard Lonergan (1904–1984) offers the necessary philosophical grounding. Here, I defend a role for philosophy in cross-disciplinary research and present selected ideas in Lonergan's work. These include: (1) a dynamic, normative pattern that each inquirer operates uniquely also forms the common core, or unity, in knowing; (2) the possibility of cross-disciplinary knowledge development is dependent on each researcher's consciousness of her or his attentiveness, intelligence, reasonableness, and responsibleness; and (3) shifts in researchers' viewpoints, or horizons, facilitate their collaborative inquiry and their grasp of the unity in knowing. The desire to know, shared by team members, drives their inquiry. Lonergan's stance is consistent with nursing values because it respects, but does not unconditionally privilege, any researcher or discipline. Arguments support a claim that Lonergan's perspective is well suited to guide nurse researchers participating on cross-disciplinary health research teams.

  7. 2014 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains thirteen papers that were presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics/La Société Canadienne d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Mathématiques, held on the campus of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. It contains rigorously reviewed modern scholarship on general topics in the history and philosophy of mathematics, as well as on the meeting’s special topic, Early Scientific Computation. These papers cover subjects such as •Physical tools used by mathematicians in the seventeenth century •The first historical appearance of the game-theoretical concept of mixed-strategy equilibrium •George Washington’s mathematical cyphering books •The development of the Venn diagram •The role of Euler and other mathematicians in the development of algebraic analysis •Arthur Cayley and Alfred Kempe’s influence on Charles Peirce's diagrammatic logic •The influence publishers had on the development of mathematical...

  8. Understanding the Key Tenets of Heidegger’s Philosophy for Interpretive Phenomenological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Horrigan-Kelly

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Martin Heidegger’s phenomenology provides methodological guidance for qualitative researchers seeking to explicate the lived experience of study participants. However, most phenomenological researchers apply his philosophy loosely. This is not surprising because Heidegger’s phenomenological philosophy is challenging and the influence of his philosophy in shaping the conduct of interpretive phenomenological research is broadly debated. This article presents an exploration of Dasein, a key tenet of Martin Heidegger’s interpretive phenomenology and explicates its usefulness for phenomenological research. From this perspective, we present guidance for researchers planning to utilize Heidegger’s philosophy underpinning their research.

  9. Understanding the Key Tenets of Heidegger’s Philosophy for Interpretive Phenomenological Research

    OpenAIRE

    Marcella Horrigan-Kelly; Michelle Millar; Maura Dowling

    2016-01-01

    Martin Heidegger’s phenomenology provides methodological guidance for qualitative researchers seeking to explicate the lived experience of study participants. However, most phenomenological researchers apply his philosophy loosely. This is not surprising because Heidegger’s phenomenological philosophy is challenging and the influence of his philosophy in shaping the conduct of interpretive phenomenological research is broadly debated. This article presents an exploration of Dasein, a key tene...

  10. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  11. Feminisms and Educational Research. Philosophy, Theory, and Educational Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Wendy R.; Burbules, Nicholas C.

    2011-01-01

    Feminist theory has come a long way from its nascent beginnings--no longer can it be classified as "liberal," "socialist," or "radical." It has shaped and evolved to take on multiple meanings and forms, each distinct in its own perspective and theory. In "Feminisms and Educational Research," the authors explore the various forms of feminisms,…

  12. The changing role of continuity and discontinuity in the history of philosophy and mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danie F.M. Strauss

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to highlight the inevitability of employing discreteness and continuity as primitive (indefinable modes of explanation in the history of philosophy and mathematics. It embodies the general challenge to account for the coherence of what is unique. Gödel emphasises the coherence of ‘primitive concepts’. Greek philosophy already discovered the spatial whole and/or parts relation with its infinite divisibility. During and after the medieval era philosophers toggled between an atomistic appreciation of the continuum and its opposite, for example found in the thought of Leibniz who postulated his law of continuity (lex continui. The discovery of incommensurability (irrational numbers by the Greeks caused the first foundational crisis of mathematics, as well as its geometrisation. Leibniz and Newton did not resolve the problems surrounding the limit concept and soon it induced the third foundational crisis of mathematics. It caused Frege and the ‘continuum theoreticians’ to assign priority to the continuum – discreteness is a catastrophe. Recently Smooth Infinitesimal Analysis appreciated what is ‘continuous’ as constituting ‘an unbroken or uninterrupted whole’. Intuitionistic mathematics once more proceeded from an emphasis on the whole and/or parts relation. In spite of alternating attempts to understand continuity exclusively, either in arithmetical or in spatial terms, the history of philosophy and mathematics undeniably confirms that the co-conditioning role of these two modes of explanation remains a constant element in reflections on continuity and discontinuity. (The role of continuity and discontinuity within the disciplines of physics and biology will be discussed in a separate article.

  13. History and Philosophy of Science as a Guide to Understanding Nature of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Niaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nature of science (NOS is considered to be a controversial topic by historians, philosophers of science and science educators. It is paradoxical that we all teach science and still have difficulties in understanding what science is and how it develops and progresses. A major obstacle in understanding NOS is that science is primarily ‘unnatural’, that is it cannot be learned by a simple observation of phenomena. In most parts of the world history and philosophy of science are ‘inside’ science content and as such can guide our understanding of NOS. However, some science educators consider the ‘historical turn’ as dated and hence neglect the historical approach and instead emphasize the model based naturalist view of science. The objective of this presentation is to show that the historical approach is very much a part of teaching science and actually complements naturalism. Understanding NOS generally requires two aspects of science: Domain general and domain specific. In the classroom this can be illustrated by discussing the atomic models developed in the early 20th century which constitute the domain specific aspect of NOS. This can then lead to an understanding of the tentative nature of science that is a domain general aspect of NOS. A review of the literature in science education reveals three views (among others of understanding NOS: a Consensus view: It attempts to include only those domain-general NOS aspects that are the least controversial (Lederman, Abd-El-Khalick; b Family resemblance view: Based on the ideas of Wittgenstein, this view promotes science as a cognitive system (Irzik, Nola; c Integrated view: this view postulates that both domain general and domain specific aspects of NOS are not dichotomous but rather need to be integrated and are essential if we want students to understand ‘science in the making’ (Niaz. The following framework helps to facilitate integration: i Elaboration of a theoretical framework

  14. "Plays Well with Others": The Engagement of Philosophy of Education with Other Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenberg, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This essay takes up John White's argument for an engagement and collaboration of philosophy of education with other disciplines, and in particular with other forms of educational research. It examines the benefits and risks of "situated" or "embedded" philosophy as well as Hannah Arendt's claims about the separation of…

  15. Measuring philosophy: a philosophy index

    OpenAIRE

    Biggs, Lesley; Mierau, Dale; Hay, David

    2002-01-01

    Chiropractic philosophy which has been debated since the founding of chiropractic in 1895 has taken on new vigour over the past ten years. Despite a growing body of literature examining chiropractic philosophy, the chiropractic profession continues to be divided over this issue. To date, there has been little research examining the meaning of chiropractic philosophy to rank-and-file practitioners.

  16. Why Implementing History and Philosophy in School Science Education is a Challenge: An Analysis of Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höttecke, Dietmar; Silva, Cibelle Celestino

    2011-03-01

    Teaching and learning with history and philosophy of science (HPS) has been, and continues to be, supported by science educators. While science education standards documents in many countries also stress the importance of teaching and learning with HPS, the approach still suffers from ineffective implementation in school science teaching. In order to better understand this problem, an analysis of the obstacles of implementing HPS into classrooms was undertaken. The obstacles taken into account were structured in four groups: 1. culture of teaching physics, 2. teachers' skills, epistemological and didactical attitudes and beliefs, 3. institutional framework of science teaching, and 4. textbooks as fundamental didactical support. Implications for more effective implementation of HPS are presented, taking the social nature of educational systems into account.

  17. Teaching the gravitational redshift: lessons from the history and philosophy of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    The equivalence principle and the notion of an ideal clock running independently of acceleration suggest that clocks are unaffected by gravity. The apparent contradiction with the gravitational redshift points to a subtlety in general relativity theory. Indeed, early attempts for a clear derivation of the gravitational redshift were fraught with errors and ambiguities, and much confusion endured for the next two decades. This suggests that the subject should be treated carefully in introductory textbooks on relativity theory. I analyze the weaknesses of the presentation in five otherwise excellent modern introductory general relativity books (by Rindler, Schutz, Hobson et al., Weinberg, and Carroll). I also present some analysis from an history and philosophy of physics article, which proves to be a great resource to learn about, anticipate, and clarify problems in teaching the redshift. (paper)

  18. Johns Hopkins's first professorship in philosophy: a critical pivot point in the history of American psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher D

    2007-01-01

    The first professorship in philosophy at Johns Hopkins University was contested in the early 1880s by two of the most prominent and influential scholars in America: Charles Sanders Peirce and George Sylvester Morris. A third figure also vied for the position, although he was much less well known at the time: Granville Stanley Hall. Through a series of unexpected circumstances, Hall ultimately won the professorship and then used it to leverage an extraordinary career that included his opening the first American research laboratory in psychology, establishing the American Journal of Psychology, becoming president of Clark University, founding the American Psychological Association, and profoundly affecting the character of developmental psychology in America.

  19. The re-emergence of hyphenated history-and-philosophy-of-science and the testing of theories of scientific change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudan, Larry; Laudan, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    A basic premise of hyphenated history-and-philosophy-of-science is that theories of scientific change have to be based on empirical evidence derived from carefully constructed historical case studies. This paper analyses one such systematic attempt to test philosophical claims, describing its historical context, rationale, execution, and limited impact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on "How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: "How Can the History and Philosophy of…

  1. A filosofia da história no Doutor Fausto The philosophy of history in Doctor Faust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Miskolci

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Há uma "filosofia da história" implícita na obra de Thomas Mann. Este artigo pretende fornecer elementos para compreender esta filosofia que tem raízes em Schopenhauer e Nietzsche, mas que também deve muito às descobertas da psicanálise e ao aprofundado conhecimento de mitologia do escritor alemão.There is a "philosophy of history" in Thomas Mann's works. This article intends to give elements to the comprehension of this philosophy linked, since the beggining, to Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, but also related to psychoanalysis' discoveries and to Mann's profound knowledge of mythology.

  2. Quantum mechanics at the crossroads. New perspectives from history, philosophy and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.; Thorndike, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum mechanics is a beautiful, strange and successful theory that originated in the 1920s. The theory, which Niels Bohr regarded as finished and complete, has in the last few decades rapidly developed in unexpected directions. An intense new focus on the stranger aspects of the theory, including entanglement and nonlocality, has resulted in new perceptions of the foundations of quantum mechanics, as well as surprising new exploitations of quantum phenomena. Historians and philosophers of science have also renewed their attention to quantum mechanics, opening up its human dimensions and asking searching questions about its meaning. This volume brings together new insights from different vantage points: Historians of physics, such as J. L. Heilbron; philosophers of science, such as Abner Shimony and Michel Bitbol; and quantum physicists, such as Wolfgang Ketterle and Roland Omncs, join forces to tackle essential questions in quantum mechanics and its interpretation. All the authors have written for a broad readership, and the resulting volume will appeal to everyone wishing to keep abreast of new developments in quantum mechanics, as well as its history and philosophy. (orig.)

  3. Safety philosophies in the history of the West German nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radkau, J.

    1989-01-01

    The article discusses the term 'philosophy' within the framework of the safety debate, examines the philosophy of 'inherent safety' and that of 'power plant siting away from agglomerations', as well as other concepts and approaches in safety engineering, as e.g. the maximum credible accident, the MCA and probabilistic approach, the practice-oriented safety philosophy, and human factors. Participation of the public as a legal requirement is discussed as a means of balancing the interests of various groups of the society, taking into account the possibility of abandoning a technology altogether as an ultimate consequence of the principle of participation of the public. (HSCH) [de

  4. The Wilhelm Wundt Center and the first graduate program for the history and philosophy of psychology in Brazil: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Saulo de Freitas; Caropreso, Fátima Siqueira; Simanke, Richard Theisen; Castañon, Gustavo Arja

    2013-08-01

    The expansion of Brazilian universities since 2009 has promoted a general growth and incentive of scientific activities throughout the country, not only in the so-called hard sciences, but also in the human sciences. In this brief report, we announce the creation of two new institutional spaces dedicated to the history and philosophy of psychology at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF) in Brazil: the Wilhelm Wundt Center for the History and Philosophy of Psychology (NUHFIP) and the Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. ON THE USE AND ABUSE OF PHILOSOPHY FOR PSYCHIATRY (AND ON THE USE OF HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoma, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It looks very much like philosophy is going to save psychiatry or at least to rescue it from the quick sands of biological reductionism, in which it has been muddling for decades. Through a series of historical cases (Roland Kuhn, Viktor Frankl, Hemmo Müller‐ Suur this paper aims at showing that this situation is not new and that it would be naïve to take the salvific value of philosophy for granted. 

  6. Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Filosofia Theoretica Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions, a publication of the Calabar School of Philosophy (CSP) is dedicated to the publication of astute academic research in African Philosophy, Culture, History, Art, Literature, Science, Education and Religions, etc. The articles submitted to Filosofia ...

  7. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  8. Parallels between a Collaborative Research Process and the Middle Level Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Robin; Ross, Diane; Miller, Jennifer; White, Paula; Jones, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of the middle level philosophy as described in This We Believe closely parallel the collaborative research process. The journey of one research team is described in relationship to these characteristics. The collaborative process includes strengths such as professional relationships, professional development, courageous…

  9. A brief history of the Quality of Life: its use in medicine and in philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchini, M; Bertolaso, M; Elvira, M M; De Marinis, M G

    2011-01-01

    The term Quality of Life (QoL) has been increasingly used in medical and philosophical literatures for the past four decades. The purpose of this article is to analyze how QoL is being used in medicine and in philosophy to understand its current status. In the 1960s and 1970s new technologies raised new questions for clinicians, so they used QoL as a parameter for making decisions in health issues. Consequently, researchers focused their interest on the construction and testing of instruments designed to measure health and QoL. However, all these instruments showed some conceptual and methodological problems that made the use of QoL in medicine difficult. While some researchers considered QoL an "idiosyncratic mystery", others believed that QoL was useful in implementing the patient's point of view into clinical practice and they suggested improving QoL's definition and methodology. In the 1980s, some consequentialist philosophers used QoL to formulate moral judgment, in particular they justified infanticide for some severely handicapped infants, and both euthanasia and suspension of life-sustaining treatment using QoL. In the 1990s, welfarist philosophers opened a new debate about QoL and they associated it with health and happiness. These philosophers developed QoL and those other concepts as subjectivist notions; consequently their definition and their measurements pose challenges. Afterwards researchers' interest in theoretical issues regarding QoL has fallen; nevertheless, physicians have continued to use QoL in clinical practice.

  10. Men's Sheds function and philosophy: towards a framework for future research and men's health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie; Doma, Kenji; Misan, Gary; Vaz, Sharmila

    2015-08-01

    The Men's Shed movement supports a range of men's health promotion initiatives. This paper examines whether a Men's Shed typology could inform future research and enable more efficient and targeted health promotion activities through Men's Sheds. The International Men's Shed Survey consisted of a cross-sectional exploration of sheds, their members, and health and social activities. Survey data about shed 'function' and 'philosophy' were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. A framework of Men's Sheds based on function and philosophy demonstrated that most sheds serve a primary utility function, a secondary social function, but most importantly a primary social opportunity philosophy. Sheds with a primary health philosophy participated in fewer health promotion activities when compared with sheds without a primary health philosophy. In addition to the uniform health promotion resources distributed by the Men's Shed associations, specific health promotion activities, such as prostate education, are being initiated from an individual shed level. This framework can potentially be used to enable future research and health promotion activities to be more efficiently and effectively targeted. SO WHAT? Men experience poorer health and well being outcomes than women. This framework offers a novel approach to providing targeted health promotion activities to men in an environment where it is okay to talk about men's health.

  11. Community Service and University Roles: An Action Research Based on the Philosophy of Sufficiency Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart; Chansirisira, Pacharawit

    2012-01-01

    This study employs action research to develop community service through university roles by applying the philosophy of sufficiency economy of His Majesty the King Bhumibol Adulyadej to fulfill villagers' way of life. Participatory learning, seminar, field trip and supervision were employed for strategic plan. Data were collected by participatory…

  12. What Is Indigenous Research in Philosophy of Education? And What Is PESA, from an Indigenous Perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Carl; Stewart, Georgina; Watson, Ka'imi; Silva, Keola; Martin, Brian; Matapo, Jacoba; Galuvao, Akata

    2018-01-01

    In this commentary, various expert authors offer their ideas on indigenous research in the philosophy of education and PESA's role from an indigenous perspective. Georgiana Stewart is the first author to step forward and explain that education is based on knowledge, and so education is centrally concerned with literacy and identity. Stewart goes…

  13. iPod therefore I am: Using PC Videos to Aid the Teaching of the History of Political Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Woodcock, Pete; Duckworth, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines our experiences at the University of Huddersfield of\\ud (a) producing and using mini-lectures on the history of political philosophy\\ud that were available to students as MP4 and progressive download PC video\\ud files (and MP3 audio files), and (b) the student feedback on these files\\ud which will help future development. This article largely avoids pedagogical\\ud issues regarding the use of technology in teaching and focuses more on\\ud student feedback and use of these ...

  14. Just truth? Carefully applying history, philosophy and sociology of science to the forensic use of CCTV images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Gary

    2013-03-01

    Using as a case study the forensic comparison of images for purposes of identification, this essay considers how the history, philosophy and sociology of science might help courts to improve their responses to scientific and technical forms of expert opinion evidence in ways that are more consistent with legal system goals and values. It places an emphasis on the need for more sophisticated models of science and expertise that are capable of helping judges to identify sufficiently reliable types of expert evidence and to reflexively incorporate the weakness of trial safeguards and personnel into their admissibility decision making. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Experimental philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  16. Empirical Philosophy of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansnerus, Erika; Wagenknecht, Susann

    2015-01-01

    knowledge takes place through the integration of the empirical or historical research into the philosophical studies, as Chang, Nersessian, Thagard and Schickore argue in their work. Building upon their contributions we will develop a blueprint for an Empirical Philosophy of Science that draws upon...... qualitative methods from the social sciences in order to advance our philosophical understanding of science in practice. We will regard the relationship between philosophical conceptualization and empirical data as an iterative dialogue between theory and data, which is guided by a particular ‘feeling with......Empirical insights are proven fruitful for the advancement of Philosophy of Science, but the integration of philosophical concepts and empirical data poses considerable methodological challenges. Debates in Integrated History and Philosophy of Science suggest that the advancement of philosophical...

  17. Ethical muscle and scientific interests: a role for philosophy in scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposy, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Ethics, a branch of philosophy, has a place in the regulatory framework of human subjects research. Sometimes, however, ethical concepts and arguments play a more central role in scientific activity. This can happen, for example, when violations of research norms are also ethical violations. In such a situation, ethical arguments can be marshaled to improve the quality of the scientific research. I explore two different examples in which philosophers and scientists have used ethical arguments to plead for epistemological improvements in the conduct of research. The first example deals with research dishonesty in pharmaceutical development. The second example is concerned with neuropsychological research using fMRI technology.

  18. Understanding the creative processes of phenomenological research: The life philosophy of Løgstrup

    OpenAIRE

    Annelise Norlyk; Pia Dreyer; Anita Haahr; Bente Martinsen

    2011-01-01

    The creative processes of understanding patients’ experiences in phenomenological research are difficult to articulate. Drawing on life philosophy as represented by the Danish philosopher K.E. Løgstrup (1905-1981), this article aims to illustrate Løgstrup’s thinking as a way to elaborate the creation of cognition and understanding of patients’ experiences. We suggest that Løgstrup’s thoughts on sensation can add new dimensions to an increased understanding of the creative process of phenomeno...

  19. An Alternative Periodization of Romanian History. A Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poenaru Florin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I suggest an alternative form of periodization of Romanian history. My aim is not to move around historical posts; rather I propose a different way of understanding Romanian history as such. This is the research agenda. I seek to write a world history from the perspective of a peripheral place like Romania has been. Therefore, this is not simply an attempt to insert a local, neglected, silenced or distorted history into a wider, European, global story (that is, to discover the history of “people without history”, just as it is not another attempt to “provincialize Europe” in favour of a view from its repressed margins. Instead, following Coronil (2004, I believe it is indispensable to globalize the periphery, to understand its worldwide formation. My investigation draws upon the conceptual toolkit of world-system theory and its underlining philosophy of history (Wallerstein, 2011. In the same vein, the guiding principles of my periodization elaborate on Andre Gunder Frank’s insight that the exchange (or rather direct transfer of surplus between societies is what links regions and societies as whole (Frank, 1978. The focus then shifts from a given society/state and its internal relations to the wider world-system, or world-economy, in which it is embedded. The unit of analysis is not a geographical location, but relations and networks and their historical development.

  20. The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory Philosophy: Mentoring Students in a Scientific Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Betty M; Liu, Ann; Sankey, Eric W; Mangraviti, Antonella; Barone, Michael A; Brem, Henry

    2016-06-01

    After over 50 years of scientific contribution under the leadership of Harvey Cushing and later Walter Dandy, the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory entered a period of dormancy between the 1960s and early 1980s. In 1984, Henry Brem reinstituted the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory, with a new focus on localized delivery of therapies for brain tumors, leading to several discoveries such as new antiangiogenic agents and Gliadel chemotherapy wafers for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Since that time, it has been the training ground for 310 trainees who have dedicated their time to scientific exploration in the lab, resulting in numerous discoveries in the area of neurosurgical research. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory has been a unique example of successful mentoring in a translational research environment. The laboratory's philosophy emphasizes mentorship, independence, self-directed learning, creativity, and people-centered collaboration, while maintaining productivity with a focus on improving clinical outcomes. This focus has been served by the diverse backgrounds of its trainees, both in regard to educational status as well as culturally. Through this philosophy and strong legacy of scientific contribution, the Hunterian Laboratory has maintained a positive and productive research environment that supports highly motivated students and trainees. In this article, the authors discuss the laboratory's training philosophy, linked to the principles of adult learning (andragogy), as well as the successes and the limitations of including a wide educational range of students in a neurosurgical translational laboratory and the phenomenon of combining clinical expertise with rigorous scientific training.

  1. Philosophy and Sociology Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kravchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Philosophy and Social science school of MGIMO has received both nationwide and international recognition. The traditions of the school were laid by two highly respected scientists and science managers, George P. Frantsev, who was the rector MGIMO during the crucial period of its early years, and Alexander F. Shishkin, who was the founder and head of the Department of Philosophy. The former belonged to one of the best schools of antic history studies of the Petersburg (Leningrad University. Frantsev made a great contribution to the restoration of Russian social and political science after World War II. After graduating from MGIMO, he worked at the Foreign Ministry of USSR, and then served as a rector of the Academy of Social Sciences and chief-editor of the journal "Problems of Peace and Socialism" in Prague. He consistently supported MGIMO scientists and recommended them as participants for international congresses and conferences. Shishkin was born in Vologda, and studied in Petrograd during 1920s. His research interests included history of education and morality. He was the author of the first textbook on ethics in the postwar USSR. Other works Shishkin, including monograph "XX century and the moral values of humanity", played a in reorienting national philosophy from class interests to universal moral principles. During thirty years of his leadership of the Department of Philosophy, Shishkin managed to prepare several generations of researchers and university professors. Scientists educated by Shishkin students consider themselves to be his "scientific grandchildren". The majority of MGIMO post-graduate students followed the footsteps of Frantsev in their research, but they also were guided by Shishkin's ideas on morality in human relations. Philosophy and Social science school of MGIMO played an important role in the revival of Soviet social and political science. Soviet Social Science Association (SSSA, established in 1958, elected Frantsev

  2. Applications of interpretive and constructionist research methods in adolescent research: philosophy, principles and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Shek, Daniel T L; Bu, Fei-Fei

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to give a brief introduction to interpretivism, constructionism and constructivism. Similarities and differences between interpretivism and constructionism in terms of their histories and branches, ontological and epistemological stances, as well as research applications are highlighted. This review shows that whereas interpretivism can be viewed as a relatively mature orientation that contains various traditions, constructionism is a looser trend in adolescent research, and in the narrow sense denotes the "pure" relativist position, which refers to a discursive approach of theory and research. Both positions call for the importance of clearly identifying what type of knowledge and knowledge process the researcher is going to create, and correctly choosing methodology matching with the epistemological stance. Examples of adolescent research adopting interpretivist and constructionist orientations are presented.

  3. Researching the History of Women in Chanoyu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Corbett

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available At the time of writing I am living in Kyoto, conducting research for my PhD thesis on the History of Women in chanoyu (tea-ceremony, supported by a Japan Foundation Fellowship. This research combines my academic and personal interests in Japanese history and chanoyu. In this paper I would like to discuss how I came to choose this subject for my doctoral research, before going on to describe this research and how I believe it will contribute to the fields of Tea history and Japanese women’s history.

  4. History and conceptual developments in vascular biology and angiogenesis research: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Vascular biology is an important scientific domain that has gradually penetrated many medical and scientific fields. Scientists are most often focused on present problems in their daily scientific work and lack awareness regarding the evolution of their domain throughout history and of how philosophical issues are related to their research field. In this article, I provide a personal view with an attempt to conceptualize vascular development research that articulates lessons taken from history, philosophy, biology and medicine. I discuss selected aspects related to the history and the philosophy of sciences that can be extracted from the study of vascular development and how conceptual progress in this research field has been made. I will analyze paradigm shifts, cross-fertilization of different fields, technological advances and its impact on angiogenesis and discuss issues related to evolutionary biology, proximity of different molecular systems and scientific methodologies. Finally, I discuss briefly my views where the field is heading in the future.

  5. L'etat, c'est moi. Fifty years of history and philosophy of evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Michael

    2016-01-01

    I reflect on my fifty-year history as a philosopher of biology, showing how it has taken me from rather narrow analytic studies, through the history of ideas, and now on to issues to do with science and religion. I argue that moral concerns were and still are a major motivation behind what I do and write. Copyright: © 2016 by Fabrizio Serra editore, Pisa · Roma.

  6. Didactics prodution of history: trajectories of researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Circe Maria Fernandes Bittencourt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the history of research on the history textbook from 1980 through the first decade of this century on the basis of theses, dissertations and publications of the period. Displays the rate of growth of research on the subject, indicates the institutional places where they are produced and analyzes the concepts of textbooks and methodological foundations of different approaches

  7. Philosophy for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Rob; Onstenk, Jeroen; Veugelers, Wiel

    2016-01-01

    Philosophy for Democracy is a research project that aims to examine whether and how Philosophy with Children contributes to the development of democratic skills and attitudes. In the Netherlands, as in almost all Western countries, Philosophy with Children is linked with the movement for citizenship education. This article reports the research on…

  8. Where History, Philosophy, and Psychology Meet: An Interview with Wayne Viney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Wayne Viney is Professor of Psychology and University Distinguished Teaching Scholar at Colorado State University where he teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the history of psychology. He is also inaugurating a new course, The Development of Scientific Thought, for the College of Natural Sciences at Colorado State. Earlier in his…

  9. The Use of History and Philosophy of Science as a Core for a Socioconstructivist Teaching Approach of the Concept of Energy in Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizaki, Aikaterini; Kokkotas, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    The present study should be thought as a socioconstructivist teaching approach (a teaching model) for the concept of energy in primary education. It contains important and crucial aspects of the History and Philosophy of Natural Sciences, introduces the concept of energy using the macroscopic framework of thermodynamics, takes into consideration…

  10. Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's "Historia Insectorum Generalis" and the Case of the Water Flea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendig, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Hasok Chang ("Sci Educ" 20:317-341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science…

  11. A Reconstruction of Development of the Periodic Table Based on History and Philosophy of Science and Its Implications for General Chemistry Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Angmary; Rodriguez, Maria A.; Niaz, Mansoor

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (a) elaboration of a history and philosophy of science (HPS) framework based on a reconstruction of the development of the periodic table; (b) formulation of seven criteria based on the framework; and (c) evaluation of 57 freshman college-level general chemistry textbooks with respect to the presentation of the…

  12. Thought and Research on Chinese Sports from the Perspective of Confucian Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchang Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article conducts a research on Chinese sports under Confucian philosophy from the perspective of social value that ancient sports sought, development limitation for ancient physical morality and legal system, and development direction of Chinese sports. It also makes an analysis of the promotion and restraint of traditional Confusion culture on Chinese sports, and seeks many valuable factors such as the integration of social and class nature deeply contained in Chinese sports, improvement of physical supervision mechanism and legal system, as well as personal humanistic quality. This article will provide available ideology resources for sustainable development of modern sports, aiming at settling the current problems therein.

  13. History of Geoscience Research Matters to You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    The geosciences have a long, distinguished, and very useful history Today's science is tomorrow's history of science. If we don't study the past, then every decision we face will seem unprecedented. If we don't study the history of science and apply its lessons, then I don't think we can say we really understand science. Actual research results and ongoing programs will be highlighted, with a focus on public understanding and support for atmospheric science and global change.

  14. Understanding the creative processes of phenomenological research: The life philosophy of Løgstrup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Pia; Haahr, Anita; Martinsen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    The creative processes of understanding patients’ experiences in phenomenological research are difficult to articulate. Drawing on life philosophy as represented by the Danish philosopher K.E. Løgstrup (1905–1981), this article aims to illustrate Løgstrup's thinking as a way to elaborate the creation of cognition and understanding of patients’ experiences. We suggest that Løgstrup's thoughts on sensation can add new dimensions to an increased understanding of the creative process of phenomenological research, and that his thinking can be seen as an epistemological ground for these processes. We argue with Løgstrup that sense-based impressions can facilitate an flash of insight, i.e., the spontaneous, intuitive flash of an idea. Løgstrup stresses that an “flash of insight” is an important source in the creation of cognition and understanding. Relating to three empirical phenomenological studies of patients’ experiences, we illustrate how the notions of impression and flash of insight can add new dimensions to increased understanding of the creative processes in phenomenological research that have previously not been discussed. We illustrate that sense-based impressions can facilitate creative flash of insights that open for understanding of patients’ experiences in the research process as well as in the communication of the findings. The nature of impression and flash of insight and their relevance in the creation of cognition and understanding contributes to the sparse descriptions in the methodological phenomenological research literature of the creative processes of this research. An elaboration of the creative processes in phenomenological research can help researchers to articulate these processes. Thus, Løgstrup's life philosophy has proven to be valuable in adding new dimensions to phenomenological empirical research as well as embracing lived experience. PMID:22076123

  15. Understanding the creative processes of phenomenological research: The life philosophy of Løgstrup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelise Norlyk

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The creative processes of understanding patients’ experiences in phenomenological research are difficult to articulate. Drawing on life philosophy as represented by the Danish philosopher K.E. Løgstrup (1905–1981, this article aims to illustrate Løgstrup's thinking as a way to elaborate the creation of cognition and understanding of patients’ experiences. We suggest that Løgstrup's thoughts on sensation can add new dimensions to an increased understanding of the creative process of phenomenological research, and that his thinking can be seen as an epistemological ground for these processes. We argue with Løgstrup that sense-based impressions can facilitate an flash of insight, i.e., the spontaneous, intuitive flash of an idea. Løgstrup stresses that an “flash of insight” is an important source in the creation of cognition and understanding. Relating to three empirical phenomenological studies of patients’ experiences, we illustrate how the notions of impression and flash of insight can add new dimensions to increased understanding of the creative processes in phenomenological research that have previously not been discussed. We illustrate that sense-based impressions can facilitate creative flash of insights that open for understanding of patients’ experiences in the research process as well as in the communication of the findings. The nature of impression and flash of insight and their relevance in the creation of cognition and understanding contributes to the sparse descriptions in the methodological phenomenological research literature of the creative processes of this research. An elaboration of the creative processes in phenomenological research can help researchers to articulate these processes. Thus, Løgstrup's life philosophy has proven to be valuable in adding new dimensions to phenomenological empirical research as well as embracing lived experience.

  16. Understanding the creative processes of phenomenological research: The life philosophy of Løgstrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlyk, Annelise; Dreyer, Pia; Haahr, Anita; Martinsen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    The creative processes of understanding patients' experiences in phenomenological research are difficult to articulate. Drawing on life philosophy as represented by the Danish philosopher K.E. Løgstrup (1905-1981), this article aims to illustrate Løgstrup's thinking as a way to elaborate the creation of cognition and understanding of patients' experiences. We suggest that Løgstrup's thoughts on sensation can add new dimensions to an increased understanding of the creative process of phenomenological research, and that his thinking can be seen as an epistemological ground for these processes. We argue with Løgstrup that sense-based impressions can facilitate an flash of insight, i.e., the spontaneous, intuitive flash of an idea. Løgstrup stresses that an "flash of insight" is an important source in the creation of cognition and understanding. Relating to three empirical phenomenological studies of patients' experiences, we illustrate how the notions of impression and flash of insight can add new dimensions to increased understanding of the creative processes in phenomenological research that have previously not been discussed. We illustrate that sense-based impressions can facilitate creative flash of insights that open for understanding of patients' experiences in the research process as well as in the communication of the findings. The nature of impression and flash of insight and their relevance in the creation of cognition and understanding contributes to the sparse descriptions in the methodological phenomenological research literature of the creative processes of this research. An elaboration of the creative processes in phenomenological research can help researchers to articulate these processes. Thus, Løgstrup's life philosophy has proven to be valuable in adding new dimensions to phenomenological empirical research as well as embracing lived experience.

  17. Oral History as Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rebecca P.

    2008-01-01

    Oral history is a significant type of historical research. Its use in retaining records of the early days of educational technology provides another way to look at the history of this field. The remembrances of its founders inform everyone today of, not only of what went on before, but also of how current and future technologies evolve. There are…

  18. History of research on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the number of Medline publications dealing with angiogenesis has increased in a nonlinear fashion, reflecting the interest among basic scientists and clinicians in this field. Under physiological conditions, angiogenesis is regulated by the local balance between endogenous stimulators and inhibitors of this process. In tumor growth, there is an imbalance between endogenous stimulator and inhibitor levels, leading to an 'angiogenic switch'. Starting with the hypothesis formulated by Judah Folkman that tumor growth is angiogenesis-dependent, this area of research has a solid scientific foundation and inhibition of angiogenesis is a major area of therapeutic development for the treatment of cancer. This paper offers an account of the most relevant discoveries in this field of biomedical research. Copyright © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Discourse analysis and the impact of the philosophy of Enlightenment in nursing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    analysis in nursing research reflect a dominant pattern of thought in the discourse of the nursing profession that have held sway throughout the last century. We argue that this pattern of thought stems from the Western philosophy of consciousness and the conception of the sovereign subject. By applying......Discourse analysis has been introduced into nursing research as an approach which has the potential to offer new perspectives and to pose new questions to taken-for-granted assumptions. However, critique has arisen that when applied to nursing studies, the epistemological foundation...... a discourse analytical perspective to the discourse of the nursing profession itself, this paper elucidates the challenges of applying discourse analysis in nursing research....

  20. An Analysis of the Relationship between Scientific Epistemological Beliefs and Educational Philosophies: A Research on Formation Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Ali Riza; Uyangör, Nihat

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the relationship between scientific epistemological beliefs and educational philosophies of formation teacher candidates. The research was conducted in the summer pedagogical formation program at Balikesir University of Necatibey Education Faculty during the 2016-17 academic years. The research, conducted with 379 candidate…

  1. Color consilience: color through the lens of art practice, history, philosophy, and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Bevil R

    2012-03-01

    Paintings can be interpreted as the product of the complex neural machinery that translates physical light signals into behavior, experience, and emotion. The brain mechanisms responsible for vision and perception have been sculpted during evolution and further modified by cultural exposure and development. By closely examining artists' paintings and practices, we can discover hints to how the brain works, and achieve insight into the discoveries and inventions of artists and their impact on culture. Here, I focus on an integral aspect of color, color contrast, which poses a challenge for artists: a mark situated on an otherwise blank canvas will appear a different color in the context of the finished painting. How do artists account for this change in color during the production of a painting? In the broader context of neural and philosophical considerations of color, I discuss the practices of three modern masters, Henri Matisse, Paul Cézanne, and Claude Monet, and suggest that the strategies they developed not only capitalized on the neural mechanisms of color, but also influenced the trajectory of western art history. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Importance of philosophy of science to the history of medical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Z

    1999-03-01

    Popular approach to the history of medicine rests on naive assumptions that: 1) only the present state of medical knowledge can be counted as scientific and only those elements of the former knowledge and practice which fitted the body of contemporary science should be regarded by the historians of medicine (presentism); 2) medical sciences, like the other natural sciences, portray natural phenomena as they really are (naturalism); 3) progress in sciences consists of cumulative growth of information and explanation. The twentieth century philosophical critique of science revealed that none of these assumptions were true. Empirical facts, which are taken as a basis for any true knowledge, are dependent on the presumed theories; theories are intertwined into a broader socio-cultural context; theory-changing processes are caused by social factors rather than by the theoretical content. Therefore, it is a common task of historians of medicine and philosophers of science to reveal all theoretical and cultural premises on which our comprehension of the contemporary medicine is founded.

  3. Empirical philosophy of science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann; Nersessian, Nancy J.; Andersen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of philosophers of science make use of qualitative empirical data, a development that may reconfigure the relations between philosophy and sociology of science and that is reminiscent of efforts to integrate history and philosophy of science. Therefore, the first part...... of this introduction to the volume Empirical Philosophy of Science outlines the history of relations between philosophy and sociology of science on the one hand, and philosophy and history of science on the other. The second part of this introduction offers an overview of the papers in the volume, each of which...... is giving its own answer to questions such as: Why does the use of qualitative empirical methods benefit philosophical accounts of science? And how should these methods be used by the philosopher?...

  4. A BRIEF HISTORY OF HUMAN POWERED FLIGHT: FROM PHYSIOLOGY TO PHILOSOPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Enrico di Prampero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a scientific theory (T can be separated into successive phases: i Fantasy, to conceive T ii Analysis to couch T into formal language iii Action, to apply in practice the predictions of T. The history of human powered flight, in which case the three phases are stretched over several thousand years, allow us to better appreciate their intrinsic characteristics. Fantasy, dating back to the myth of Ikarus, must be experimentally testable, as indeed were Daedalus’ wings. Analysis must state in quantitative terms the laws governing the matter at stake. Action, from Leonardo’s unsuccessful attempts to the crossings of the British Channel in 1979 and of the arm of the sea separating Crete from mainland Greece in 1988, has the aim of shaping the world according to our will. The kernel of any “proper” T is a formal system wherein a set of operational rules allows us to manipulate a set of symbols, representing the objects of T, on the bases of a limited number of axioms. In such formal systems, “theorem” is a string of symbols that can be arrived at in a finite number of steps from the axioms, applying the canonical operational rules. However, as Kurt Gödel showed in 1931, it is possible to demonstrate that, within a sufficiently powerful formal system, there exists demonstrably true strings of symbols that are not theorems. Thus, even in an ultra-powerful theory of everything, there will still be truths that can not be arrived at within the theory.

  5. Particle physics and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Shoichi.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy of dialectical materialism is applied to the history of the discovery of building blocks of matter. Engels' theory was adapted by Taketani to describe the cognizance of different levels of material structures. This philosophy was used to construct the composite Sakata model of hadrons in the early sixties. (D.Gy.)

  6. Particle physics and philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, S.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy of dialectical materialism is applied to the history of the discovery of building blocks of matter. Engels' theory was adapted by Taketani to describe the cognizance of different levels of material structures. This philosophy was used to construct the composite Sakata model of hadrons in the early sixties.

  7. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-09-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 education from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science. Key ones were that: students need to understand that central to science is argumentation, criticism, and analysis; students should be educated to appreciate science as part of our culture; students should be educated to be science literate; what is meant by the nature of science as discussed in much of the science education literature must be broadened to accommodate a science literacy that includes preparation for socioscientific issues; teaching for science literacy requires the development of new assessment tools; and, it is difficult to change what science teachers do in their classrooms. The principal conclusions drawn by the editors are that: to prepare students to be citizens in a participatory democracy, science education must be embedded in a liberal arts education; science teachers alone cannot be expected to prepare students to be scientifically literate; and, to educate students for scientific literacy will require a new curriculum that is coordinated across the humanities, history/social studies, and science classrooms.

  8. [Existence, Absence and Power of Madness: A Critical Review of Michel Foucault's Writings on the History and Philosophy of Madness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Burkhart; Iwer, Lukas; Thoma, Samuel

    2017-03-01

    This article discusses Michel Foucault's main writings on "madness and psychiatry" from his early works up to the 1970s. On the one hand, we reconstruct the overall theoretical and methodological development of his positions over the course of the different periods in his oeuvre. On the other hand, we also take a closer look at Foucault's philosophical considerations regarding the subjects of his investigations. After an initial introduction of our conceptual approach, we draw on the most recent research on Foucault to show to what extent the phenomenological description of the topic at hand and the historical-critical perspective that are reflected in his early writings of 1954 (the Introduction to Binswanger's Dream and Existence and Mental Illness and Personality) laid the ground for his later work. Moving on to Foucault's work during the 1960s, we look at the core features and methodological bases of his 1961 classic Folie et déraison (History of Madness). His propositions regarding the "absence of madness" in modernity are conceptualized as an inherently contradictory attempt to liberate the topic under study from the common assumptions at that time. We then situate his 1973/74 lectures on Psychiatric Power in the context of his shift towards analyzing the dynamics of power and highlight the renewed shift of focus in his statements on the "productivity" of madness as an effect of power. Finally, we sum up our critique by taking into account the history of the reception of Foucault's writings and ask about their potential significance for the contemporary philosophy and history of psychiatry.

  9. Was Feyerabend a Popperian? Methodological issues in the History of the Philosophy of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collodel, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    For more than three decades, there has been significant debate about the relation between Feyerabend and Popper. The discussion has been nurtured and complicated by the rift that opened up between the two and by the later Feyerabend's controversial portrayal of his earlier self. The first part of the paper provides an overview of the accounts of the relation that have been proposed over the years, disentangles the problems they deal with, and analyses the evidence supporting their conclusions as well as the methodological approaches used to process that evidence. Rather than advancing a further speculative account of the relation based on Feyerabend's philosophical work or autobiographical recollections, the second part of the paper strives to clarify the problems at issue by making use of a wider range of evidence. It outlines a historical reconstruction of the social context within which Feyerabend's intellectual trajectory developed, putting a special emphasis on the interplay between the perceived intellectual identity of Feyerabend, Feyerabend's own intellectual self-concept, and the peculiar features of the evolving Popperian research group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Educational philosophy in China:a centennial retrospect and prospect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Youquan; CHI Yanjie

    2007-01-01

    Educational philosophy in China during the 20th century started with the introduction of John Dewey's educational philosophy thoughts,followed by the dissemination of Marxism thoughts of education,and initially established the framework of educational philosophy as an academic discipline.After the foundation of the People's Republic of China in 1949,especially during the 1980s,under the guidance of Marxism,the discipline of educational philosophy has been maturing.While exploring China's history of educational philosophy,this article also covers contemporary Western development.Future trends of this discipline include extending specific fields of research,increasing internationalization of research,enhancing the functions of both critique and guiding ideals of educational philosophy.

  11. "Publish or Perish" as citation metrics used to analyze scientific output in the humanities: International case studies in economics, geography, social sciences, philosophy, and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneyx, Audrey

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, the most commonly used source of bibliometric data is the Thomson ISI Web of Knowledge, in particular the (Social) Science Citation Index and the Journal Citation Reports, which provide the yearly Journal Impact Factors. This database used for the evaluation of researchers is not advantageous in the humanities, mainly because books, conference papers, and non-English journals, which are an important part of scientific activity, are not (well) covered. This paper presents the use of an alternative source of data, Google Scholar, and its benefits in calculating citation metrics in the humanities. Because of its broader range of data sources, the use of Google Scholar generally results in more comprehensive citation coverage in the humanities. This presentation compares and analyzes some international case studies with ISI Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar. The fields of economics, geography, social sciences, philosophy, and history are focused on to illustrate the differences of results between these two databases. To search for relevant publications in the Google Scholar database, the use of "Publish or Perish" and of CleanPoP, which the author developed to clean the results, are compared.

  12. The History of Rock Art Research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The History of Rock Art Research. Rock art in South India was discovered as early as 1891.The earliest discovery of petroglyphs on the Koppagallu hill in Bellary district was made by Fred Fawcett (1892) who with the assistance of H.T.Knox and Robert Sewell ...

  13. Discourse analysis and the impact of the philosophy of Enlightenment in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-06-01

    Discourse analysis has been introduced into nursing research as an approach which has the potential to offer new perspectives and to pose new questions to taken-for-granted assumptions. However, critique has arisen that when applied to nursing studies, the epistemological foundation of the discourse analysis is often overlooked. It is furthermore claimed that the methodological inspiration does not lead to any new insights and that these studies can hardly be differentiated from more traditional studies. This study supports this critique, arguing that the challenges of implementing discourse analysis in nursing research reflect a dominant pattern of thought in the discourse of the nursing profession that have held sway throughout the last century. We argue that this pattern of thought stems from the Western philosophy of consciousness and the conception of the sovereign subject. By applying a discourse analytical perspective to the discourse of the nursing profession itself, this study elucidates the challenges of applying discourse analysis in nursing research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Status and some safety philosophies of the China advanced research reactor CARR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzheng Yuan

    2001-01-01

    The existing two research reactors, HWRR (heavy water research reactor) and SPR (swimming pool reactor), have been operated by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) since, respectively, 1958 and 1964, and are both in extending service and facing the aging problem. It is expected that they will be out of service successively in the beginning decade of the 21 st century. A new, high performance and multipurpose research reactor called China advanced research reactor (CARR) will replace these two reactors. This new reactor adopts the concept of inverse neutron trap compact core structure with light water as coolant and heavy water as the outer reflector. Its design goal is as follows: under the nuclear power of 60MW, the maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux in peripheral D 2 O reflector not less than 8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 . s while in central experimental channel, if the central cell to be replaced by an experimental channel, the corresponding value not less than 1 x 10 15 n/cm 2 . s. The main applications for this research reactor will cover RI production, neutron scattering experiments, NAA and its applications, neutron photography, NTD for monocrystaline silicon and applications on reactor engineering technology. By the end of 1999, the preliminary design of CARR was completed, then the draft of preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) was submitted to the relevant authority at the end of 2000 for being reviewed. Now, the CARR project has entered the detail design phase and safety reviewing procedure for obtaining the construction permit from the relevant licensing authority. This paper will only briefly introduce some aspects of safety philosophy of CARR design and PSAR. (orig.)

  15. Joined-up history : new directions in history education research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, Arthur; Wilschut, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Debates about the identity of school history and about the nature and purpose of the learning that does, can and should take place in history classrooms continue in many countries around the world. At issue, in many of these debates, beyond the concerns about history and national identity, are often

  16. Reginald M.J. Oduor Research Methodology in Philosophy within an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reginald M.J. Oduor

    While this approach encourages a considerable amount of objectivity .... philosophy or African rationality is to engage in perverse and unnecessary dialogues. Reflection ..... to function as emotional expressions rather than statements of facts.

  17. Would Virchow be a systems biologist? A discourse on the philosophy of science with implications for pathological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzinger, Albrecht; Klauschen, Frederick; Wittschieber, Daniel; Weichert, Wilko; Denkert, Carsten; Dietel, Manfred; Roller, Claudio

    2010-06-01

    Research in pathology spans from merely descriptive work to functional studies, "-omics" approaches and, more recently, systems biology. The work presented here aims at placing pathological research into an epistemological context. Aided by Rudolf Virchow, we give an overview on the philosophy of science including the Wiener Kreis, Popper, Kuhn, Fleck and Rheinberger and demonstrate their implications for routine diagnostics and science in pathology. A focus is on the fields of "-omics" and systems pathology.

  18. Rorty, Pragmatism, and Analytic Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Misak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One of Richard Rorty's legacies is to have put a Jamesian version of pragmatism on the contemporary philosophical map. Part of his argument has been that pragmatism and analytic philosophy are set against each other, with pragmatism almost having been killed off by the reigning analytic philosophy. The argument of this paper is that there is a better and more interesting reading of both the history of pragmatism and the history of analytic philosophy.

  19. The human being : when philosophy meets history. Miki Kiyoshi, Watsuji Tetsuro and their quest for a New Ningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brivio, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    This thesis analyses the concept of the 'human being' (ningen) in the philosophies of the two modern Japanese intellectuals Miki Kiyoshi and Watsuji Tetsuro. I demonstrate that their philosophical systems, based on the idea that the creation of a new Japanese human being should have coincided with

  20. History and Philosophy of Science: a Phylogenetic approach História e filosofia da ciência: uma abordagem filogenética

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Lennox

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In the aftermath of Thomas Kuhn's The structure of scientific revolutions, there was a great deal of discussion about the relationship between the History of Science and the Philosophy of Science. A wider issue was at stake in these discussions: 'normativism' versus 'naturalism' in Epistemology. If the History of Science, at best, gives us reliable information about what actually occurred historically, how can it inform debates about such things as confirmation or explanation in Philosophy of Science? This essay makes a case for the centrality of historical investigation in the Philosophy of Science. I will defend what I term the 'Phylogenetic' approach to the Philosophy of Science. I will argue that since the foundations and dominant methods of a particular scientific field are shaped by its history, studying that History can give us considerable insight into conceptual and methodological problems in a particular Science. The case will be made both on general, philosophical grounds, and by compelling instantiation.A publicação de A estrutura das revoluções científicas de Thomas Khun resultou em uma grande discussão sobre a relação entre a história da ciência e a filosofia da ciência. Nessa discussão, o que estava em jogo era algo bem mais abrangente, isto é, o 'normativismo' versus o 'naturalismo' em epistemologia. Se a história da ciência, na melhor das hipóteses, nos dá informações confiáveis quanto ao que realmente ocorreu historicamente, como é que ela pode auxiliar os debates da filosofia da ciência sobre aspectos tais como confirmação e explicação? O presente artigo defende a centralização da investigação histórica para a filosofia da ciência. O autor defende o que ele chama de abordagem 'filogenética' à filosofia da ciência, argumentando que, uma vez que a as bases e métodos que prevalecem em uma área científica são moldados pela sua história, estudar esta história pode esclarecer

  1. History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science in Science Education: Results from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsingchi A.; Sshmidt, William H.

    Throughout the history of enhancing the public scientific literacy, researchers have postulated that since every citizen is expected to have informal opinions on the relationships among government, education, and issues of scientific research and development, it is imperative that appreciation of the past complexities of science and society and the nature of scientific knowledge be a part of the education of both scientists and non-scientists. HPSS inclusion has been found to be an effective way to reach the goal of enhancing science literacy for all citizens. Although reports stated that HPSS inclusion is not a new educational practice in other part of the world, nevertheless, no large scale study has ever been attempted to report the HPSS educational conditions around the world. This study utilizes the rich data collected by TIMSS to unveil the current conditions of HPSS in the science education of about forty TIMSS countries. Based on the analysis results, recommendations to science educators of the world are provided.

  2. Philosophy of Design: An Introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per

    2007-01-01

    The relatively young field of research known as ‘the philosophy of design’ is briefly presented, by asking on behalf of the reader what the philosophy of design is about, and what its use may be.......The relatively young field of research known as ‘the philosophy of design’ is briefly presented, by asking on behalf of the reader what the philosophy of design is about, and what its use may be....

  3. Utilizing a logic model to identify clinical research problems: a lesson from philosophy of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins CR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cynthia R Collins School of Nursing, College of Social Sciences, Loyola University, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Communication and decision making in the health care workplace often involve finding solutions to ill-structured problems in uncertain, dynamic environments influenced by the competing interests of multiple stakeholders. In this environment, doctoral-prepared nurses who practice as administrators, policy makers, or advanced practice practitioners are often compelled to make important decisions based upon evaluating the merit of colleagues’ proposals against some desired organizational or population outcome. Of equal importance is the nurse leader’s own capacity to construct a compelling argument or proposal that will drive the organization forward to meet the evolving needs for quality health care. Where do we learn the skills necessary to foster this kind of critical thinking in our professional communications? The author suggests that one teaching–learning approach can be found through the thoughtful application of the work of British philosopher Steven Toulmin. Toulmin defined a model for both the analysis and derivation of logical arguments or proposals that can be readily learned and applied for use in health care systems. This model posits that a substantive argument or claim can be evaluated based on the assumptions it presumes (warrants and the strength of the evidence base (backing. Several of the social science professions have adapted Toulmin’s model to generate analysis and creative solutions to complex or emergent problems. The author proposes that an application of this model be included in the pedagogy of doctoral level Philosophy of Science or Nursing Theory courses. The Toulmin process often provides the doctoral student or novice researcher with their first real learning experience in defining the scope and inherent challenges of framing a clinical issue to be the focus of their scholarly translational

  4. Putting Research into Practice: Pedagogy Development Workshops Change the Teaching Philosophy of Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter J. T.; Syncox, David; Heppleston, Audrey; Isaac, Siara; Alters, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Teaching competence is an important skill for graduate students to acquire and is often considered a precursor to an academic career. In this study, we evaluated the effects of a multi-day teaching workshop on graduate teaching philosophies by surveying 200 graduate students, 79 of whom had taken the workshops and 121 who had not. We found no…

  5. Why research into the history of geosciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    Study of the history of various sciences is rather heterogeneous. Some disciplines, such as medicine, mathematics, and astronomy, have numerous noteworthy compendia and even specialized journals where papers on the history of these sciences can be published.The situation in geophysics, meteorology, and other subdivisions of the geosciences is far less favorable. This neglect is an outcome of a dogma of autonomy that is essentially oriented toward progress in understanding, without much reference to historical developments. But even the geoscientists cannot ignore that the phenomenon ‘science’ must be viewed in the context of sociological processes. In the initial stages, sociologists and some philosophers, in the context of the general theory of perception, began research into the development of scientific thought, but the geoscientists and other natural scientists contributed very little. It has since become clear that research on these topics requires historical assessment and more insight. The development of the ‘science of science’ is directed toward understanding and explanation of the complex human involvement in science, not only in the sense of theorizing about the scientific processes but also in sociological, political, and historical context [Kuhn, 1973; Burrichter, 1979; Sandkühler and Plath, 1979.

  6. STORY AND HISTORY IN FETAL BEHAVIOR RESEARCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakke, Karen

    2015-09-01

    In their monograph, DiPietro, Costigan, and Voegtline present an important and thoughtful portrait of low-risk fetal development during the last trimester of gestation, and they also pay tribute to the Fels Longitudinal Study investigators' early work in this area. In this commentary, the history and legacy of the Fels Institute is further explored within the broader context of fetal research, and DiPietro et al.'s findings are placed in alignment with contemporary dynamic systems' theoretical approaches that emphasize longitudinal analysis of emergent behavior and process during early development. The commentary puts forth the assertion that the work reported by DiPietro and her colleagues tells a story that sets the stage for a new generation of technology-enhanced and culturally expanded investigations of fetal behavior. © 2015 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  7. History Through Biography? A Conceptual Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Robert W.

    Social studies classroom teachers can enliven high school history courses and motivate students to learn about history by using dramatic or heroic biographies in teaching history. The biographical approach centers on study of the lives, beliefs, and surroundings of historical actors. This approach differs from the "great man" theory of history in…

  8. The Concept "System of Philosophy"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catana, Leo

    2005-01-01

    of philosophy’ as a methodological tool in the history of philosophy. I shall argue that the interdisciplinary nature of much pre-modern philosophy makes Brucker’s methodological concept ‘system of philosophy’ inadequate, and that we may be better off leaving it behind in our future exploration of pre-modern......In this article I shall examine and discuss the concept ‘system of philosophy’ as a methodological tool in the history of philosophy. I shall do so in two moves. First I shall analyze the historical origin of the concept in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Thereafter I shall undertake...... a discussion of its methodological weaknesses — a discussion, which is not only relevant to the writing of history of philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, but also to the writing of history of philosophy in our times, where the concept remains an important methodological tool. My first move...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY AND ECOLOGICAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalimat M. Alilova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the research is to study environmental problems related to the decline of culture, the importance of philosophy in overcoming private and personal interests as well as the unilateral approach of man in his relationship to nature. The study shows how philosophy can participate in the formation of ecological culture, a new ecological consciousness in man, while ecological culture is called upon to resist technocratic stereotypes and the course of history was aimed at preventing the biosphere from becoming deserted. Discussion. On the basis of the analysis of literary sources, we used the method of socio-cultural and socio-natural approaches based on the possibility of philosophy to introduce a new life into culture, new ecological values and new ecological principles. To solve these problems, environmental philosophy develops new theories. Representatives of different cultures, ethnic groups, nations, religions must learn to coexist with each other. We consider philosophy as a means of teaching rapprochement between peoples and creating new opportunities for understanding and improving the environmental situation. Cultural development makes it possible to assess the level of a man’s knowledge of nature, himself and the world around him. Ecological culture is a way of connecting man with nature on the basis of deeper knowledge and understanding. Philosophy says that you cannot move away from nature and be lauded over it since this will destroy culture. Rational doctrines tend to put a person above other living beings so the synthesis of philosophy with culture can have a positive ecological meaning. Conclusion. The findings obtained can be recommended for practical use in schools, starting from primary school, as well as in secondary special educational institutions and universities. It is necessary to work on the motivation and values of people, develop a common and ecological culture. Only a cultured person can move from

  10. Problem-oriented approach to Ancient philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berstov, Igor

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Igor Berestov and Marina Wolf of the Institute of philosophy and law, Novosibirsk, discuss various methodological difficulties typical of studies in the history of Ancient Greek philosophy and try to develop their own problem-oriented approach.

  11. Postmodernism: Philosophy of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Bazaluk

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the research is the philosophy of education and its reflection on the educational process. Based on the analysis of predecessors’ works the author presented the new structure of the philosophy of education which enriches the understanding of its subject, targets and methods of research. The author presented the philosophy of education as a pyramid, the base of which are generalizing the situation of man as a subject andobject of research accumulated in the philosophical anthropology. The first level of the pyramid takes psychology as a science which studies the origin, development and functioning of the psyche. Pedagogy crowns the “pyramid”. The author used the dialectical, system-structural, structural-functional method, as well as methods of comparison, analysis and synthesis. The main conclusion of the study is to prove that the philosophy of education in their new understanding is not only a theoretical understanding of basics and demonstrations of the educational process, but also a practice, the direct embodiment of the theoretical developments in the education in the everyday life. Using historical and philosophical analysis, the author shows that the philosophy of education does not just depend on the state of social philosophy (and philosophy in general, but also through its methodological apparatus it realizes the established philosophical (ideological paradigm in the different pedagogical practices.

  12. History of Research on Pharmacopuncture in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study introduces the history and types of Korean pharmacopuncture and reports trends of research on Korean pharmacopuncture. Methods: Pharmacopuncture studies were searched from the first year of each search engine to 2014 by using seven domestic and foreign search databases. Selected studies were divided into the history of pharmacopuncture, kinds and features of pharmacopuncture, research types, and experimental and clinic studies and were then classified by year of publication, type of pharmacopuncture, disease, and topic. Results: Pharmacopuncture can be classified into four large groups: meridian field pharmacopuncture (MFP, eight-principles pharmacopuncture (EPP, animal-based pharmacopuncture (ABP and mountain- ginseng pharmacopuncture, which is a single-co mpound pharmacopuncture (SCP. The largest numbers of studies were reported from 1997 to 2006, after which the numbers decreased until 2014. Of experimental studies, 51.9%, 18.7%. 14.3%, 9% and 3.4% were on SCP, ABP, MFP, formula pharmacopuncture (FP, and EPP, respectively. Of clinical studies, 54.7%, 15.3%. 14.9% 10.0% and 1.5% were on ABP, MFP, EPP, SCP, and FP (1.5%, respectively. Among clinical studies, case reports and case series accounted for 76.5%, followed by randomized controlled trials (RCTs, 16.4% and non-RCT (13.9%. Musculoskeletal diseases, toxicity and safety tests, anti-cancer effects, and nervous system diseases were mainly treated in experimental studies while musculoskeletal diseases, nervous system diseases, toxicity and safety tests, and autonomic nerve function tests were addressed in clinical studies. Bee venom (BV was the most frequently-used pharmacopuncture in mechanism studies. Pharmacopuncture was mainly used to treat musculoskeletal diseases. Conclusion: Pharmacopuncture and studies of it have made great progress in Korea. Studies on BV pharmacopuncture and musculoskeletal diseases accounted for most of the studies reported during the review

  13. Views about scientists and scientific work in the novel Deception Point by Dan Brown: possibilities to insert History and Philosophy of Science elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmo Ernesto Francisco Junior

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the influence of literature on people lives, this study investigates elements concerning views about scientists and scientific work presented in Deception Point, a novel by Dan Brown. Multiple aspects to represent the scientist figure, life and work, emerge from the novel and problematize characteristics that can be considered as a common sense view, or others perspectives based on more contemporaneous philosophical thoughts on science. Reading and analyzing this novel could be an interesting opportunity to insert elements of history and philosophy of science under different focus. This study discusses some elements, from excerpts of the novel, which may become possibilities for debates in Science classes at schools, and in teacher education.

  14. Exploring the use of feminist philosophy within nursing research to enhance post-positivist methodologies in the study of cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Faye S

    2007-10-01

    Nursing has historically relied heavily on scientific knowledge. It is not surprising that the cardiovascular health literature has been highly influenced by the post-positivist philosophy. The nursing discipline, as well as the cardiovascular nursing specialty, continues to benefit from research grounded within this philosophical tradition. At the same time, there are limitations associated with post-positivism. Therefore, it is beneficial for researchers and clinicians to examine the potential contributions various philosophical traditions can have for their research and practice. This paper is an exploration of the compatibilities of feminist and post-positivist philosophies in the study of cardiovascular nursing research. The ensuing discussion entails an examination of my clinical and research interests, the grounding of my research within the post-positivist perspective and the significant contribution feminist philosophy can make to my research.

  15. History of Orbivirus research in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Verwoerd

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the early colonial history of South Africa, horses played an important role, both in general transportation and in military operations. Frequent epidemics of African horsesickness (AHS in the 18th century therefore severely affected the economy. The first scientific research on the disease was carried out by Alexander Edington (1892, the first government bacteriologist of the Cape Colony, who resolved the existing confusion that reigned and established its identity as a separate disease. Bluetongue (BT was described for the first time by Duncan Hutcheon in 1880, although it was probably always endemic in wild ruminants and only became a problem when highly susceptible Merino sheep were introduced to the Cape in the late 18th century. The filterability of the AHS virus (AHSV was demonstrated in 1900 by M’Fadyean in London, and that of the BT virus (BTV in 1905 by Theiler at Onderstepoort, thus proving the viral nature of both agents. Theiler developed the first vaccines for both diseases at Onderstepoort. Both vaccines consisted of infective blood followed by hyper-immune serum, and were used for many years. Subsequent breakthroughs include the adaptation to propagation and attenuation in embryonated eggs in the case of BTV and in mouse brains for AHSV. This was followed by the discovery of multiple serotypes of both viruses, the transmission of both by Culicoides midges and their eventual replication in cell cultures. Molecular studies led to the discovery of the segmented double-stranded RNA genomes, thus proving their genetic relationship and leading to their classification in a genus called Orbivirus. Further work included the molecular cloning of the genes of all the serotypes of both viruses and clarification of their relationship to the viral proteins, which led to much improved diagnostic techniques and eventually to the development of a recombinant vaccine, which unfortunately has so far been unsuitable for mass production.

  16. Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Jesseph, Douglas M

    1993-01-01

    In this first modern, critical assessment of the place of mathematics in Berkeley's philosophy and Berkeley's place in the history of mathematics, Douglas M. Jesseph provides a bold reinterpretation of Berkeley's work. Jesseph challenges the prevailing view that Berkeley's mathematical writings are peripheral to his philosophy and argues that mathematics is in fact central to his thought, developing out of his critique of abstraction. Jesseph's argument situates Berkeley's ideas within the larger historical and intellectual context of the Scientific Revolution. Jesseph begins with Berkeley's r

  17. New Perspectives from a Quasi-English Translation of Dusan Savicevic's 2000 Work on Roots in the Development of Andragogy: The 2016 Update of History and Philosophy of Andragogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschke, John A.

    2016-01-01

    This 2016 updated capsule on a History and Philosophy of Andragogy includes 196 concepts and 268 names from a quasi-English translation of Dusan Savicevic's 2000 work on roots in the world-wide development of Andragogy from ancient times. Ten new items were discovered and added to the list. Some of these documents, however, present aspects of the…

  18. Introduction: philosophy in and philosophy of cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Despite being there from the beginning, philosophical approaches have never had a settled place in cognitive research and few cognitive researchers not trained in philosophy have a clear sense of what its role has been or should be. We distinguish philosophy in cognitive research and philosophy of cognitive research. Concerning philosophy in cognitive research, after exploring some standard reactions to this work by nonphilosophers, we will pay particular attention to the methods that philosophers use. Being neither experimental nor computational, they can leave others bewildered. Thought experiments are the most striking example but not the only one. Concerning philosophy of cognitive research, we will pay particular attention to its power to generate and test normative claims, claims about what should and should not be done. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Conceiving "personality": Psychologist's challenges and basic fundamentals of the Transdisciplinary Philosophy-of-Science Paradigm for Research on Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Jana

    2015-09-01

    Scientists exploring individuals, as such scientists are individuals themselves and thus not independent from their objects of research, encounter profound challenges; in particular, high risks for anthropo-, ethno- and ego-centric biases and various fallacies in reasoning. The Transdisciplinary Philosophy-of-Science Paradigm for Research on Individuals (TPS-Paradigm) aims to tackle these challenges by exploring and making explicit the philosophical presuppositions that are being made and the metatheories and methodologies that are used in the field. This article introduces basic fundamentals of the TPS-Paradigm including the epistemological principle of complementarity and metatheoretical concepts for exploring individuals as living organisms. Centrally, the TPS-Paradigm considers three metatheoretical properties (spatial location in relation to individuals' bodies, temporal extension, and physicality versus "non-physicality") that can be conceived in different forms for various kinds of phenomena explored in individuals (morphology, physiology, behaviour, the psyche, semiotic representations, artificially modified outer appearances and contexts). These properties, as they determine the phenomena's accessibility in everyday life and research, are used to elaborate philosophy-of-science foundations and to derive general methodological implications for the elementary problem of phenomenon-methodology matching and for scientific quantification of the various kinds of phenomena studied. On the basis of these foundations, the article explores the metatheories and methodologies that are used or needed to empirically study each given kind of phenomenon in individuals in general. Building on these general implications, the article derives special implications for exploring individuals' "personality", which the TPS-Paradigm conceives of as individual-specificity in all of the various kinds of phenomena studied in individuals.

  20. History of Elevators and Related Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shigeru; Watanabe, Eiki

    The history of traction drive elevators in Japan is described. The electrical technologies such as the microprocessor car control and the VVVF motor control made remarkable progress leading to higher reliability and energy savings. Then, the various machine-room-less elevators have been developed and the space saving technology, such as the shuttle and the double-deck elevators become important, too. The elevators used for evacuation in case of emergencies are also discussed.

  1. Philosophy, Philosophy of Education, and Economic Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 Harvey Siegel edited "The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education." This article develops a theme, prompted by reflection on several essays in that volume, about the nature of philosophy of education and its relation to philosophy. Siegel's view that philosophy of education is a "branch" of philosophy is put to…

  2. Philosophy of Education in the World of Twenty-First Century Capitalism: A Response to My "Theory and Research in Education" Critics

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John

    2015-01-01

    This is a reply to six "Theory and Research in Education" commentators on views I expressed in a 2013 "Theory and Research in Education" piece about priorities in philosophy of education today. The first section is about a concession to my critics; the second, about various misconceptions in their views. The third section…

  3. Anthropology & Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The present book is no ordinary anthology, but rather a workroom in which anthropologists and philosophers initiate a dialogue on trust and hope, two important topics for both fields of study. The book combines work between scholars from different universities in the U.S. and Denmark. Thus, besid......, therefore, also inspire others to work in the productive intersection between anthropology and philosophy....

  4. History of the Tinnitus Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, James B

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the creation and accomplishments of the Tinnitus Research Consortium (TRC), founded and supported through philanthropy and intended to enrich the field of tinnitus research. Bringing together a group of distinguished auditory researchers, most of whom were not involved in tinnitus research, over the fifteen years of its life it developed novel research approaches and recruited a number of new investigators into the field. The purpose of this special issue is to highlight some of the significant accomplishments of the investigators supported by the TRC. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Tinnitus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From 2018, the journal will begin to publish a third issue which will be a bi-lingual edition in both French and English languages. Filosofia Theoretica provides outlet for well researched and original papers in the following areas of African studies: philosophy, culture, religions, history and arts. It also publishes book reviews.

  6. The Philosophy of Mathematics Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    mathematics education, and the most relevant modern movements in the philosophy of mathematics. A case study is provided of an emerging research tradition in one country. This is the Hermeneutic strand of research in the philosophy of mathematics education in Brazil. This illustrates one orientation towards......This survey provides a brief and selective overview of research in the philosophy of mathematics education. It asks what makes up the philosophy of mathematics education, what it means, what questions it asks and answers, and what is its overall importance and use? It provides overviews of critical...... research inquiry in the philosophy of mathematics education. It is part of a broader practice of ‘philosophical archaeology’: the uncovering of hidden assumptions and buried ideologies within the concepts and methods of research and practice in mathematics education. An extensive bibliography is also...

  7. Philosophical Questions about Teaching Philosophy: What's at Stake in High School Philosophy Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    What is at stake in high school philosophy education, and why? Why is it a good idea to teach philosophy at this level? This essay seeks to address some issues that arose in revising the Ontario grade 12 philosophy curriculum documents, significant insights from philosophy teacher education, and some early results of recent research funded by the…

  8. Redrawing the Boundaries on Theory, Research, and Practice Concerning Language Teachers' Philosophies and Language Teacher Cognition: Toward a Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Graham V.

    2015-01-01

    Two areas of investigation and professional practice--language teachers' philosophies and language teacher cognition--can be considered as related, perhaps overlapping, insofar as they are both the result of thought. The concept of a philosophy of teaching may hold together sets of language teacher cognitions, or guide specific investigations of…

  9. The influence of underlying philosophies on talent management : Theory, implications for practice, and research agenda.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyers, M.C.; van Woerkom, M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to explain how and why talent management can contribute to a firm's sustained competitive advantage, we need to gain insights into the philosophies about talent that underpin talent management. This article introduces four talent philosophies that vary in their perception of talent as (a)

  10. At the Crossroads. Management and Business History in Entrepreneurship Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Águeda Gil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent calls for a historic turn in organization studies offer the opportunity to relaunch dialogue between management and business history research. Focusing on the specific domain of entrepreneurship research, this article illustrates the potential of mutual contributions from management and business history. In doing so, it demonstrates how historical approaches strongly influenced the early theoretical developments within entrepreneurship and demonstrates the potential to contribute to future scholarly debates. In sum, this article brings closer together business history and management studies stressing that their different perspectives and approaches are very valuable to enriching entrepreneurship research.

  11. Inductive reasoning in the context of discovery: Analogy as an experimental stratagem in the history and philosophy of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Amy A

    2018-06-01

    Building on Norton's "material theory of induction," this paper shows through careful historical analysis that analogy can act as a methodological principle or stratagem, providing experimentalists with a useful framework to assess data and devise novel experiments. Although this particular case study focuses on late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century experiments on the properties and composition of acids, the results of this investigation may be extended and applied to other research programs. A stage in-between what Steinle calls "exploratory experimentation" and robust theory, I argue that analogy encouraged research to substantiate why the likenesses should outweigh the differences (or vice versa) when evaluating results and designing experiments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Home Economics Archive: Research, Tradition and History (HEARTH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click here to go to the Mann Library Home Page Click here to return to the HEARTH Home Page Click , Tradition and History HEARTH is a core electronic collection of books and journals in Home Economics and Archive: Research, Tradition and History (HEARTH). Ithaca, NY: Albert R. Mann Library, Cornell University

  13. Interrupting Life History: The Evolution of Relationship within Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Ronald E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the author explores how relationships are defined within the context of constructing a life history. The life history of Benjamin, a homeless young man transitioning to adulthood, is used to illustrate how difficult it is to define the parameters of the research environment. During an "ethically important moment" in the…

  14. Ready for a paradigm shift? Part 1: introducing the philosophy of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Nicola J; Thomson, Oliver P; Stew, Graham

    2012-08-01

    The manual therapy professions have almost exclusively focused on the use of quantitative research to help inform their practices. This paper argues that a greater use of qualitative research will help develop a more robust and comprehensive knowledge base in manual therapy. The types of knowledge used in practice and generated from the two research paradigms are explored. It is hoped that an understanding of the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of qualitative research may encourage more manual therapists to value and use this approach to help further inform their practice; for some, this may involve a paradigm shift in thinking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. History of enrichment research at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarcat, N.

    1996-01-01

    French researches about uranium enrichment have been carried out at the CEA for about 40 years. In the beginning, these researches were considered as marginal and were carried out by a small team from the Powders Central Laboratory. They became intensive since 1955 and culminated in 1967 with the conception of Pierrelatte's factory. Several processes were studied: the gaseous diffusion, the chemical treatments, the centrifugation, the laser and electromagnetic separation processes on atomic and molecular vapors. Only a few of them were fully developed. This paper summarizes the development of these different processes in their historical context. (J.S.). 1 fig

  16. Transforming "Ecosystem" from a Scientific Concept into a Teachable Topic: Philosophy and History of Ecology Informs Science Textbook Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schizas, Dimitrios; Papatheodorou, Efimia; Stamou, George

    2017-04-01

    This study conducts a textbook analysis in the frame of the following working hypothesis: The transformation of scientific knowledge into school knowledge is expected to reproduce the problems encountered with the scientific knowledge itself or generate additional problems, which may both induce misconceptions in textbook users. Specifically, we describe four epistemological problems associated with how the concept of "ecosystem" is elaborated within ecological science and we examine how each problem is reproduced in the biology textbook utilized by Greek students in the 12th grade and the resulting teacher and student misunderstandings that may occur. Our research demonstrates that the authors of the textbook address these problems by appealing simultaneously to holistic and reductionist ideas. This results in a meaningless and confused depiction of "ecosystem" and may provoke many serious misconceptions on the part of textbook users, for example, that an ecosystem is a system that can be applied to every set of interrelated ecological objects irrespective of the organizational level to which these entities belong or how these entities are related to each other. The implications of these phenomena for science education research are discussed from a perspective that stresses the role of background assumptions in the understanding of declarative knowledge.

  17. The Stories We Need: Anthropology, Philosophy, Narrative and Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Cecily; Hobson, Julia

    2013-01-01

    As higher education research is largely practised by those immersed within the university, the questions we ask, and the stories we tell, over time co-create the university itself. Using Bruner's concept of the "narrative mode," we argue for a revaluing of narrative and storytelling within higher education research. We ground our…

  18. Scaffolding Learning for Practitioner-Scholars: The Philosophy and Design of a Qualitative Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Julie; Samkian, Artineh

    2017-01-01

    We present our approach to a qualitative research methods course to prepare practitioner-scholars for their dissertation and independent research. We explain how an instructor's guide provides consistency and rigor, and in-class activities to scaffold learning, and helps faculty connect the content to students' out-of-school lives. We explain how…

  19. A comparison of 17 author-level bibliometric indicators for researchers in Astronomy, Environmental Science, Philosophy and Public Health in Web of Science and Google Scholar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    were calculated for 512 researchers in Astronomy, Environmental Science, Philosophy and Public Health. Indicator scores and scholar rankings calculated in Web of Science (WoS) and Google Scholar (GS) were analyzed. The indexing policies of WoS and GS were found to have a direct effect on the amount...

  20. Re-Imagining "Bildung Zur Humanität": How I Developed the Dialogos Approach to Practical Philosophy through Action Inquiry Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helskog, Guro Hansen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an account of how I developed the Dialogos approach to practical philosophy through action inquiry research. The process of development is understood as a contribution to the reconstruction of the notion "Bildung zur Humanität" as an ideal in education. Core perspectives, traditions and purposes involved in the action…

  1. Safety philosophy and research program of the LWR development in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1978-11-01

    In this paper the framework of the reactor safety concept in the Federal Republic of Germany will be described. It is grounded on several cornerstones the most important of which are a closed fuel cycle concept, a statutory licensing and supervision procedure, a set of compulsory safety-engineering requirements and comprehensive research in the field of reactor-safety. The main part of this last area is the Reactor Safety Research Program sponsored by the Federal Minister for Research and Technology. Furthermore, in this paper emphasis is laid on safety requirements particularly with regard to the quality of the reactor pressure vessel. (orig.) [de

  2. The history of controlled fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1980-01-01

    The idea of using nuclear reaction between light elements to produce energy for peaceful objectives originated towards the mid-forties. In this work, the author traces the various stages of reserach undertaken in this field from the first fusion experiments to the projects now in course of production. Research scientists have travelled a long, hard road to reach a new development phase during which technological problems will play a prominent part [fr

  3. Taking history seriously in comparative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmenegger, Patrick; Petersen, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    parties, social movements or governments. Qualitative research has repeatedly documented that important political decisions are rarely taken in isolation and that collective actors are typically characterized by internal factions, personal and ideological rivalry, and charismatic leaders. Hence......, the political behavior of such collectivities actors is highly context-dependent, volatile and subject to strategic consierations. As a result, methodological approaches that treat these collective actors as unitary actors are prone to create non-robust and assumptions-dependent findings. As the debate...

  4. Current thinking in qualitative research: evidence-based practice, moral philosophies, and political struggle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Christina; Magasi, Susan; Frank, Gelya

    2012-01-01

    In this introduction to the special issue on current thinking in qualitative research and occupational therapy and science, the authors focus on the importance of rigorous qualitative research to inform occupational therapy practice. The authors chosen for this special issue reflect a "second generation of qualitative researchers" who are critical, theoretically sophisticated, methodologically productive, and politically relevant to show that working with disabled clients is political work. Three themes emerged across the articles included in this special issue: (1) recognizing and addressing social justice issues; (2) learning from clients' experiences; and (3) critically reframing occupational therapy's role. These themes can inform occupational therapy practice, research, and education to reflect a more client-centered and politically engaging approach. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Philosophy of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2017-10-01

    There are some physics controversies that no amount of physics research can answer. Why is doing string theory scientific despite its lack of empirical predictions? How should we interpret quantum mechanics? What is the nature of time and space? What constitutes fundamental physics? One can answer these questions dogmatically by appealing to textbooks or by making rough and ready pronouncements, but the issues behind them can often be significantly clarified by the sort of systematic, critical reflection that philosophy practices. Philosophy comes in several traditions. Three of these-known as 'analytic,' 'pragmatic' and 'continental'-have paid particular attention to physics. This ebook illustrates philosophy of physics in action, and how it can help physics, by using four examples from physics to exhibit the aims and value of these philosophical approaches.

  6. Can teaching philosophy in schools count towards the Research Excellence Framework (UK?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fisher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though critical thinking is carried out in schools across the country, there is no attempt to take high-level published philosophical research into schools. This paper reports on a pilot where this was attempted. The findings suggest that this can be done successfully and moreover that the results can be contextualised so as to count towards “impact” in the Research Excellence Framework (UK. The paper suggests that this means philosophers have not only a way of developing children’s confidence and reasoning, but also a way of meeting the requirements on Higher Education Institutions within the UK.

  7. A Concise History of Mycotoxin Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, John I; Miller, J David

    2017-08-23

    Toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins entered human food supplies about the time when mankind first began to cultivate crops and to store them from one season to the next, perhaps 10,000 years ago. The storage of cereals probably initiated the transition by mankind from hunter-gatherer to cultivator, at the same time providing a vast new ecological niche for fungi pathogenic on grain crops or saprophytic on harvested grain, many of which produced mycotoxins. Grains have always been the major source of mycotoxins in the diet of man and his domestic animals. In the historical context, ergotism from Claviceps purpurea in rye has been known probably for more than 2000 years and caused the deaths of many thousands of people in Europe in the last millennium. Known in Japan since the 17th century, acute cardiac beriberi associated with the consumption of moldy rice was found to be due to citreoviridin produced by Penicillium citreonigrum. This toxin was believed to be only of historic importance until its reemergence in Brazil a few years ago. Other Penicillium toxins, including ochratoxin A, once considered to be a possible cause of Balkan endemic nephropathy, are treated in a historical context. The role of Fusarium toxins in human and animal health, especially T-2 toxin in alimentary toxic aleukia in Russia in the 1940s and fumonisins in equine leucoencephalomalasia, is set out in some detail. Finally, this paper documents the story of the research that led to our current understanding of the formation of aflatoxins in grains and nuts, due to the growth of Aspergillus flavus and its role, in synergy with the hepatitis B virus, in human liver cancer. During a period of climate change and greatly reduced crop diversity on a global basis, researchers tasked with monitoring the food system need to be aware of fungal toxins that might have been rare in their working careers that can reappear.

  8. A Role for Philosophy of Education in Intercultural Research: A Reexamination of the Relativism-Absolutism Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Walter

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the author's attempt to understand some aspects of Japanese society and his reflections on the role that philosophy of education, anthropology, and other disciplines can play in grappling with issues of intercultural understanding. (IAH)

  9. Philosophy of Science and Philosophy of Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Jaap van Brakel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I assess the relation between philosophy of chemistry and (general) philosophy of science, focusing on those themes in the philosophy of chemistry that may bring about major revisions or extensions of current philosophy of science. Three themes can claim to make a unique contribution to philosophy of science: first, the variety of materials in the (natural and artificial) world; second, extending the world by making new stuff; and, third, specific features of the relations betwe...

  10. Immanent philosophy of X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Robin Findlay

    2016-02-01

    In this paper I examine the relationship between historians, philosophers and sociologists of science, and indeed scientists themselves. I argue that (i) they co-habit a shared intellectual territory (science and its past); and (ii) they should be able to do so peacefully, and with mutual respect, even if they disagree radically about how to describe the methods and results of science. I then go on to explore some of the challenges to mutually respectful cohabitation between history, philosophy and sociology of science. I conclude by identifying a familiar kind of project in the philosophy of science which seeks to explore the worldview of a particular scientific discipline, and argue that it too has a right to explore the shared territory even though some historians and sociologists may find it methodologically suspect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 110 Theory and Practice in Philosophy and Education: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... philosophy of education in its content and method is theoretical but must ... Philosophy, like psychology, sociology and history is an abstract, .... tested through the use and application of dialectics, logic and statistics among.

  12. COGNITIVE ASPECTS OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartak Sh. Aytov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this work is the intelligent reconstruction and the analysis of the various methodological approaches to cognitive areas of modern philosophy of history and determines their cognitive and academic relationships with conceptual terms of such branches of historical knowledge as historical anthropology. Methodology. Methodological tools of this work are such scientific approaches as methods of philosophy of science, interdisciplinary approach, methods of source and system analysis. Scientific novelty. Reproduced and analyzed was a number of methodological approaches inherent in the natural sciences and the social - the humanities. The latter, in accordance with the principles of interdisciplinary paradigm, is very widely applied by the modern philosophy of historical knowledge, in particular in the analysis of the historical process and its main elements: the mentality, attitudes and norms of socially significant and personal behavior of individuals and societies of the past. The influence of research on various historical and historical anthropological problems such concepts implanted in the methodology of modern philosophy of history scientific disciplines as chaos theory, synergetics, mathematical biology, ethnology, social psychology, etc. Focuses on intellectual connections are used in the philosophy of history, historical knowledge interdisciplinary methodology, theory and concepts of natural science and social - humanities. They are used to analyze and understand the complex and multifaceted historical events and processes. Conclusions. The result of the analysis of the cognitive dynamics applications in the philosophy of history of conceptual approaches of a very wide range of scientific disciplines has been the allocation of a number of phases of the mining process. Each of them has special logic - methodological and socio cultural characteristics ("Data". Internal, cognitive science dynamics of this unity was not the

  13. Cognitive Aspects of Modern Philosophy of Historical Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartak Sh. Aytov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this work is the intelligent reconstruction and the analysis of the various methodological approaches to cognitive areas of modern philosophy of history and determines their cognitive and academic relationships with conceptual terms of such branches of historical knowledge as historical anthropology. Methodology. Methodological tools of this work are such scientific approaches as methods of philosophy of science, interdisciplinary approach, methods of source and system analysis. Scientific novelty. Reproduced and analyzed was a number of methodological approaches inherent in the natural sciences and the social - the humanities. The latter, in accordance with the principles of interdisciplinary paradigm, is very widely applied by the modern philosophy of historical knowledge, in particular in the analysis of the historical process and its main elements: the mentality, attitudes and norms of socially significant and personal behavior of individuals and societies of the past. The influence of research on various historical and historical anthropological problems such concepts implanted in the methodology of modern philosophy of history scientific disciplines as chaos theory, synergetics, mathematical biology, ethnology, social psychology, etc. Focuses on intellectual connections are used in the philosophy of history, historical knowledge interdisciplinary methodology, theory and concepts of natural science and social - humanities. They are used to analyze and understand the complex and multifaceted historical events and processes. Conclusions. The result of the analysis of the cognitive dynamics applications in the philosophy of history of conceptual approaches of a very wide range of scientific disciplines has been the allocation of a number of phases of the mining process. Each of them has special logic - methodological and socio cultural characteristics ("Data". Internal, cognitive science dynamics of this unity was not the

  14. Research Network on Regional Economic and Policy History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, A.M.; van der Zwet, Arno

    2017-01-01

    In the spring of 2017, the Research Network on Regional Economic and Policy History organised its inaugural workshop in London. The network aims to stimulate research in relation to regional economic development and planning challenges, by exploring the importance of historical approaches and

  15. An introductory course in philosophy of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, A

    2004-06-01

    Philosophy of medicine, narrowly defined as ontology and epistemology of medicine, is a well developed research field, yet education in this field is less well developed. The aim of this paper is to present an educational development in philosophy of medicine-an introductory course in philosophy of medicine. Central features of the course are described. Participants (medical undergraduate students) scored high on average. The conclusion is that further such educational ventures in philosophy of medicine should be developed and implemented.

  16. The history of Patuxent: America’s wildlife research story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Matthew C.

    2017-01-18

    This report, based on a symposium held on October 13, 2011, at the National Wildlife Visitor Center at the Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, MD, documents the history of the Patuxent Research Refuge and the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, collectively known as Patuxent. The symposium was one of the many activities occurring at that time to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the creation of the Patuxent Research Refuge in 1936. The Patuxent Wildlife Research Center is located at the refuge, and the research center director, Dr. Gregory J. Smith, with great enthusiasm, personally supervised all aspects of the celebration. The symposium was coordinated by Dr. Matthew C. Perry, the editor of this report, with Dr. Smith’s strong support. The refuge and the research center have been essentially synonymous for the almost 80 years of their history.

  17. On the way to a philosophy of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    This Thesis argues the case that a philosophy of science education is required for improving science education as a research field as well as curriculum and teacher pedagogy. It seeks to re-think science education as an educational endeavor by examining why past reform efforts have been only partially successful, including why the fundamental goal of achieving scientific literacy after several "reform waves" has proven to be so elusive. The identity of such a philosophy is first defined in relation to the fields of philosophy, philosophy of science, and philosophy of education. Considering science education as a research discipline it is emphasized a new field should be broached with the express purpose of developing a discipline-specific "philosophy of science education" (largely neglected since Dewey). A conceptual shift towards the philosophy of education. is needed, thereto, on developing and demarcating true educational theories which could in addition serve to reinforce science education's growing sense of academic autonomy and independence from socio-economic demands. Two educational metatheories are contrasted, those of Kieran Egan and the Northern European Bildung tradition, to illustrate the task of such a philosophy. Egan's cultural-linguistic metatheory is presented for two primary purposes: it is offered as a possible solution to the deadlock of the science literacy conceptions within the discipline; regarding practice, examples are provided how it can better guide the instructional practice of teachers, specifically how it reinforces the work of other researchers in the History and Philosophy of Science (HPS) reform movement who value narrative in learning science. Considering curriculum and instruction, a philosophy of science education is conceptualized as a "second order" reflective capacity of the teacher. This notion is aligned with Shulman's idea of Pedagogical Content Knowledge. It is argued that for educators the nature of science learning

  18. Investigating Talent Management Philosophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbancova Hana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study, motivated by the recognition that organizational performance and success always hinges on employee competencies and management’s skill in utilizing their potentials, focuses on one of the key factors in organizational efficiency: the possibilities of development of talented employees within Czech organizations. The data was collected via two quantitative studies. The first study involved 100 organizations from every economic sector with a main focus on the topic from the organization’s perspective. The second study explored the approach from employees’ perspective. Our analysis shows that different talent management philosophies are used in practice. Almost half of the sample use inclusive and stable philosophy, 11% inclusive and developable philosophy and almost 10% exclusive and developable philosophy. Employees are mostly developed in generally recommended areas without any consideration for the specific individual’s characteristics or related opportunities. It is a stable approach. Limitations of this study may be found in the focus on analysis outcomes - on practitioners in particular. The present findings provide a basis for future hypotheses and research in this area.

  19. Urban History in 4 Dimensions - Supporting Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster, S.; Friedrichs, K.; Kröber, C.; Bruschke, J.; Henze, F.; Maiwald, F.; Niebling, F.

    2017-08-01

    The new research group on the four-dimensional research and communication of urban history (Urban History 4D) aims to investigate and develop methods and technologies to access extensive repositories of historical media and their contextual information in a spatial model, with an additional temporal component. This will make content accessible to different target groups, researchers and the public, via a 4D browser. A location-dependent augmented-reality representation can be used as an information base, research tool, and means of communicating historical knowledge. The data resources for this research include extensive holdings of historical photographs of Dresden, which have documented the city over the decades, and digitized map collections from the Deutsche Fotothek (German photographic collection) platform. These will lay the foundation for a prototype model which will give users a virtual experience of historic parts of Dresden.

  20. URBAN HISTORY IN 4 DIMENSIONS – SUPPORTING RESEARCH AND EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Münster

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The new research group on the four-dimensional research and communication of urban history (Urban History 4D aims to investigate and develop methods and technologies to access extensive repositories of historical media and their contextual information in a spatial model, with an additional temporal component. This will make content accessible to different target groups, researchers and the public, via a 4D browser. A location-dependent augmented-reality representation can be used as an information base, research tool, and means of communicating historical knowledge. The data resources for this research include extensive holdings of historical photographs of Dresden, which have documented the city over the decades, and digitized map collections from the Deutsche Fotothek (German photographic collection platform. These will lay the foundation for a prototype model which will give users a virtual experience of historic parts of Dresden.

  1. CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY, IDENTITY AND THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mycl

    histories of African philosophy taking full consideration of Ancient. Egyptian philosophy ... philosophers there were thinkers who made deep philosophical reflections. ... for his conviction that independent critical sages existed in Africa who were .... against the African cannot but leave a strong negative impact on his psyche.

  2. History of Research Reactor Fuel Fabrication at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freim, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    1982 was a year of tremendous growth for Babcock and Wilcox and its Research Reactor Fuel Facility. The Division has progressed from essentially being a non-competitor to a position where we are growing in strength. This paper describes some of the general aspects of past history and where B and W is now

  3. Short history of natural product research in the CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Walwyn, D

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural product research has been a major component of the CSIR's bioscience activities for its entire history, and particularly in the 1960s and 1970s. This type of work is also strongly aligned with one of the objectives of the CSIR, namely...

  4. Index of Oral Histories Relating to Naval Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Navy research and development that are available in major U. S. repositories. In a sense, it is a companion to the broader U. S. Naval History Sources...Director, his work with the FAA, and his hobbies, including old cars and a penchant for Shakespeare . Repositories: NWC, DTNSRDC, NHC Individuals

  5. Early Chinese History: The Hundred Schools Period. China's Golden Age of Philosophy. A Unit of Study for Grades 9-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Lehn; Dube, Clayton

    In this unit students examine the four most influential Chinese philosophical traditions developed during the Zhou period (roughly 6th-3rd centuries B.C.E.). The four philosophies students study include: (1) Confucianism; (2) Mohism; (3) Daoism (Taoism); and (4) Legalism. In three lessons, students compare the ideas of these schools and explore…

  6. AN EXPLORATORY RESEARCH ON HISTORY OF CLUJ HOTELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius BOTA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cluj-Napoca has a long and interesting history. The City of Cluj is considered the “capital of Transylvania” because it is an important academic, cultural and business center, an interesting tourist destination for various types of tourists. The present study makes an analysis regarding the hotels from Cluj during the 19th and 20th centuries. The analysis is focusing on history of the hotels, their market evolution and the stories related to those hotels. This period was chosen for this research because represent the beginnings of the Cluj hotels market. For the investigations it was used exploratory research, obtaining secondary data through different types of sources: history books, published studies, web sites and old pictures. The present research has two main objectives: the first one is to explore the Cluj history in order to identify the hotels present on the market during the 19th and 20th centuries; the second one is to revile some stories related to the hotels, owners and buildings. There were identified 11 hotels from Cluj during the 19th and 20th centuries. There were not included here the hotels build in the last part of the communist period. At present, the buildings in which were functioned the most important hotels, are on the list of historical monuments from Cluj County. It can be proposed some old pictures and interesting stories about the hotels, the buildings, the guests, in order to attract the tourists.

  7. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION AS AN ACCIDENTAL TRICKLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terryl Cyber

    lecturer at of Philosophy of Education and History of Education at CUEA and. Spanish lecturer at .... linguistic analysis as their foundation, and yet we thought all along that ...... refer to the world of production and marketing goods and services.

  8. The philosophy of cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph; Barrow, John D; Saunders, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Following a long-term international collaboration between leaders in cosmology and the philosophy of science, this volume addresses foundational questions at the limit of science across these disciplines, questions raised by observational and theoretical progress in modern cosmology. Space missions have mapped the Universe up to its early instants, opening up questions on what came before the Big Bang, the nature of space and time, and the quantum origin of the Universe. As the foundational volume of an emerging academic discipline, experts from relevant fields lay out the fundamental problems of contemporary cosmology and explore the routes toward finding possible solutions. Written for graduates and researchers in physics and philosophy, particular efforts are made to inform academics from other fields, as well as the educated public, who wish to understand our modern vision of the Universe, related philosophical questions, and the significant impacts on scientific methodology.

  9. Educational Non-Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The final lines of Deleuze and Guattari's What is Philosophy? call for a non-philosophy to balance and act as a counterweight to the task of philosophy that had been described by them in terms of concept creation. In a footnote, Deleuze and Guattari mention François Laruelle's project of non-philosophy, but dispute its efficacy in terms of the…

  10. Philosophy Rediscovered: Exploring the Connections between Teaching Philosophies, Educational Philosophies, and Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Joy E.; Leigh, Jennifer S. A.; Dean, Kathy Lund

    2009-01-01

    Teaching philosophy statements reflect our personal values, connect us to those with shared values in the larger teaching community, and inform our classroom practices. In this article, we explore the often-overlooked foundations of teaching philosophies, specifically philosophy and historical educational philosophies. We review three elements of…

  11. The Birth of Philosophy and the Contempt for Food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals, M.J.J.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    The history of philosophy of food is an unhappy one. It seems that only by denying the relevance of food for a happy life, philosophy could establish itself as a serious branch of knowledge: this is what I call the philosopher's incoherence. First with the Greeks, philosophy want to get rid of the

  12. The anatomic location of the soul from the heart, through the brain, to the whole body, and beyond: a journey through Western history, science, and philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Wood, Mark D; Merlo, Lucia; Anastasi, Giuseppe Pio; Tomasello, Francesco; Germanò, Antonino

    2009-10-01

    To describe representative Western philosophical, theological, and scientific ideas regarding the nature and location of the soul from the Egyptians to the contemporary period; and to determine the principal themes that have structured the history of the development of the concept of the soul and the implications of the concept of the soul for medical theory and practice. We surveyed the ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman periods, the early, Medieval, and late Christian eras, as well as the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Modern periods to determine the most salient ideas regarding the nature and location of the soul. In the history of Western theological, philosophical, and scientific/medical thought, there exist 2 dominant and, in many respects, incompatible concepts of the soul: one that understands the soul to be spiritual and immortal, and another that understands the soul to be material and mortal. In both cases, the soul has been described as being located in a specific organ or anatomic structure or as pan-corporeal, pervading the entire body, and, in some instances, trans-human and even pan-cosmological. Moreover, efforts to discern the nature and location of the soul have, throughout Western history, stimulated physiological exploration as well as theoretical understanding of human anatomy. The search for the soul has, in other words, led to a deepening of our scientific knowledge regarding the physiological and, in particular, cardiovascular and neurological nature of human beings. In addition, in virtually every period, the concept of the soul has shaped how societies thought about, evaluated, and understood the moral legitimacy of scientific and medical procedures: from performing abortions and autopsies to engaging in stem cell research and genetic engineering. Our work enriches our shared understanding of the soul by describing some of the key formulations regarding the nature and location of the soul by philosophers, theologians, and physicians. In

  13. History of the Energy Research and Development Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, A.L.

    1982-03-01

    Congress created the Energy Research and Development Administration on October 11, 1974 in response to the Nation's growing need for additional sources of energy. The new agency would coordinate energy programs formerly scattered among many federal agencies, and serve as the focus point for a major effort by the Federal Government to expand energy research and development efforts. New ways to conserve existing supplies as well as the commercial demonstration of new technologies would hopefully be the fruit of the Government's first significant effort to amalgamate energy resource development programs. This history briefly summarizes the accomplishments of the agency.

  14. Philosophy and Post-Totalitarian Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhii Yosypenko

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This writing aims to outline the principles of researches on philosophy in Central and Eastern European countries, preferably USSR, in the latest soviet and post-soviet periods. In author’s opinion, the crucial points for such kind of research are: a to discover a correlation between philosophy and the phenomenon of totalitarianism; b to correlate a soviet philosophy with totalitarian experience. The article considers methodological and axiological problems in research of post-totalitarian practices in general as such as in philosophy. In author’s opinion the main problem in development of the post-soviet philosophy is interiorisation of intellectual, cultural and social practices, which were formed concerning to totalitarian experience. This became a reason of “cynicism” and “nihilism” of post-soviet philosophy. It’s impossible to cast mentioned phenomena off without consideration of totalitarian phenomenon and critical reconsideration of the own totalitarian experience.

  15. Issues Using the Life History Calendar in Disability Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tiffany N.; Harrison, Tracie

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall, there is a dearth of research reporting mixed-method data collection procedures using the LHC within disability research. Objective This report provides practical knowledge on use of the life history calendar (LHC) from the perspective of a mixed-method life history study of mobility impairment situated within a qualitative paradigm. Methods In this paper the method related literature referring to the LHC was reviewed along with its epistemological underpinnings. Further, the uses of the LHC in disability research were illustrated using preliminary data from reports of disablement in Mexican American and Non-Hispanic White women with permanent mobility impairment. Results From our perspective, the LHC was most useful when approached from an interpretive paradigm when gathering data from women of varied ethnic and socioeconomic strata. While we found the LHC the most useful tool currently available for studying disablement over the life course, there were challenges associated with its use. The LHC required extensive interviewer training. In addition, large segments of time were needed for completion depending on the type of participant responses. Conclusions Researchers planning to conduct a disability study may find our experience using the LHC valuable for anticipating issues that may arise when the LHC is used in mixed-method research. PMID:22014674

  16. Atom and life - History of a research issued from nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griset, Pascal; Picard, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    As many examples illustrate the commitment of the French CEA in biology (development of medical imagery technologies, of the first prion test for the detection of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease), this book proposes an insight into those specific researches in life sciences performed within this institution initially devoted to nuclear sciences. This history comprises researches performed in Fontenay aux Roses at the initiative of Frederic Joliot on basic physiological processes, the development of a scientific library in Saclay where physicists, chemists and biologists worked together, the building of a medical department within the Saclay hospital, research activities in Grenoble, the regrouping of biology laboratories, the increasingly important mission of the Life Sciences Directorate within the CEA in four domains (radiobiology and radio-pathology, protein engineering and structural biology, medical imagery and pharmacology, eco-physiology and vegetal ecosystems). This research field is now characterized by its international dimension

  17. Masses of Formal Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masses of Formal Philosophy is an outgrowth of Formal Philosophy. That book gathered the responses of some of the most prominent formal philosophers to five relatively open and broad questions initiating a discussion of metaphilosophical themes and problems surrounding the use of formal methods i...... in philosophy. Including contributions from a wide range of philosophers, Masses of Formal Philosophy contains important new responses to the original five questions.......Masses of Formal Philosophy is an outgrowth of Formal Philosophy. That book gathered the responses of some of the most prominent formal philosophers to five relatively open and broad questions initiating a discussion of metaphilosophical themes and problems surrounding the use of formal methods...

  18. Responsibility and the physical body. Paul Ricoeur on analytical philosophy of language, cognitive science, and the task of phenomenological hermeneutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dierckxsens, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 573-593 ISSN 0031-8256 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : analytical philosophy * body * cognitive science * hermeneutics * phenomenology * philosophy of language * Ricoeur Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion OBOR OECD: Philosophy, History and Philosophy of science and technology

  19. An introduction to the philosophy of science

    CERN Document Server

    Staley, Kent W

    2014-01-01

    This book guides readers by gradual steps through the central concepts and debates in the philosophy of science. Using concrete examples from the history of science, Kent W. Staley shows how seemingly abstract philosophical issues are relevant to important aspects of scientific practice. Structured in two parts, the book first tackles the central concepts of the philosophy of science, such as the problem of induction, falsificationism, and underdetermination, and important figures and movements, such as the logical empiricists, Thomas Kuhn, and Paul Feyerabend. The second part turns to contemporary debates in the philosophy of science, such as scientific realism, explanation, the role of values in science, the different views of scientific inference, and probability. This broad yet detailed overview will give readers a strong grounding whilst also providing opportunities for further exploration. It will be of particular interest to students of philosophy, the philosophy of science, and science. Read more at h...

  20. Philosophy, Neuroscience and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, John

    2015-01-01

    This short note takes two quotations from Snooks' recent editorial on neuroeducation and teases out some further details on the philosophy of neuroscience and neurophilosophy along with consideration of the implications of both for philosophy of education.

  1. Shakespeare's Philosophy of Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Sulka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Shakespeare is one of the most widely read figures in literature, but his use of music is not usually touched on in literary discussions of his works. In this paper, I discuss how Shakespeare portrays music within the context of his plays, through both dialogue and songs performed within each work. In Shakespeare’s time, Boethius’s philosophy of the Music of the Spheres was still highly popular. This was the idea that the arrangement of the cosmos mirrored musical proportions. As a result, every aspect of the universe was believed to be highly ordered, and this idea is prominent throughout Shakespeare’s works, from "Hamlet" to "A Midsummer Night’s Dream." To make this clear to the reader, I discuss dialogue symmetry weaved throughout "The Merchant of Venice," clear allusions to the music of the spheres in "Pericles," and the use of music as a signifier of the strange and mysterious – from madness to love – in numerous works, always relating these topics back to the philosophy of the music of the spheres. In order to compile this information and make it clear, I researched the philosophy of music during Shakespeare’s era. I also researched how he uses music thematically to emphasize different characters’ struggles as well as plot details. After examining his plays as well as the other sources available on the subject, it is clear that Shakespeare was highly influenced by the philosophical and practical ideas regarding music of his time, specifically the theory of the music of the spheres.

  2. Teaching Philosophy Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryadi, Qais

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the rationale for my teaching philosophy. Using a personal perspective, I explain my objectives, mission, and vision in writing my philosophy of teaching statements. This article also creates a road map and reference points for educators who want to write their own teaching philosophy statements to help them make informed…

  3. Philosophy of Education Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    In this review essay J.J. Chambliss assesses the current state of the field of philosophy of education through analysis of four recent edited compilations: Randall Curren's "A Companion to Philosophy of Education"; Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith, and Paul Standish's "The Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Education"; Wilfred Carr's "The…

  4. Cockroaches (Blattaria) of Ecuador-checklist and history of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidlička, Lubomír

    2013-01-09

    Cockroaches are an understudied group and the total number of described taxa increases every year. The last checklist of Ecuador species was published in 1926. The main aim of this study was to complete a new checklist of cockroach species recorded in Ecuador supplemented with a research history of cockroaches (Blattaria) on the territory of continental Ecuador. In addition, the checklist contains comments on Ecuadorian faunistic records, including the Galápagos Islands. A total of 114 species (105 in continental Ecuador and 18 in Galápagos Islands) belonging to 6 families and 44 genera are listed. Forty species (38.1 %) occur solely in continental Ecuador and five (27.8 %) are endemic on Galápagos Islands. The results indicate that further research on the cockroach fauna of Ecuador as well as determination of museum collections from this territory is needed.

  5. Helical system. History and current state of helical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper described the following: (1) history of nuclear fusion research of Japan's original heliotron method, (2) worldwide development of nuclear fusion research based on helical system such as stellarator, and (3) worldwide meaning of large helical device (LHD) aiming to demonstrate the steady-state performance of heliotron type in the parameter area extrapolable to the core plasma, and research results of LHD. LHD demonstrated that the helical system is excellent in steady operation performance at the world's most advanced level. In an experiment using deuterium gas in 2017, LHD achieved to reach 120 million degrees of ion temperature, which is one index of nuclear fusion condition, demonstrated the realization of high-performance plasma capable of extrapolating to future nuclear fusion reactors, and established the foundation for full-scale research toward the realization of nuclear fusion reactor. Besides experimental research, this paper also described the helical-type stationary nuclear fusion prototype reactor, FFHR-d1, which was based on progress of large-scale simulation at the world's most advanced level. A large-scale superconducting stellarator experimental device, W7-X, with the same scale as LHD, started experiment in December 2015, whose current state is also touched on here. (A.O.)

  6. My Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Oliver

    2012-08-01

    Foreword; Part I. An Elementary Survey of Physical Existence: 1. The constitution of things around us; 2. The progress of physical science; 3. Design and purpose in the universe; 4. Religion and science; 5. The organism and the control; 6. The property of inertia; 7. Summary of new knowledge; 8. Machinery of guidance; Part II. Evidence for and Controversies Concerning the Ether: 9. Matter, energy and the ether; 10. The ether and the forms of energy; 11. Faraday's conception of the ether; 12. Modern gibes at the ether; 13. The physical aspect of the universe; 14. Views of Thomas Young, Newton and Fresnel; 15. The ether and relativity; 16. Magnetism and the ether, with suggestions for experiment; 17. Summary of our present knowledge about the ether; Part III. Introduction of Life and Mind: 18. The interaction of the psychical with the physical; 19. Life and mechanism; 20. A psychical function suggested for the ether of space; 21. Ether and the soul; Part IV. The Evidence for Survival and its Mechanism: 22. Evidence for and mechanism of survival; 23. On the difficulty of proving individual survival; 24. On the reasons for the non-recognition of psychical research by the majority of the scientific world; 25. On the apparent element of caprice introduced by the spiritistic hypothesis; 26. The whole organically considered; 27. The spiritistic hypothesis; 28. The bearing of the theory upon religions; Index.

  7. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring History and Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, W. L.; Zucca, J. J.

    2008-12-01

    Within a year after the nuclear detonations over Hiroshima and Nagasaki the Baruch Plan was presented to the newly formed United Nations Atomic Energy Commission (June 14, 1946) to establish nuclear disarmament and international control over all nuclear activities. These controls would allow only the peaceful use of atomic energy. The plan was rejected through a Security Council veto primarily because of the resistance to unlimited inspections. Since that time there have been many multilateral, and bilateral agreements, and unilateral declarations to limit or eliminate nuclear detonations. Almost all of theses agreements (i.e. treaties) call for some type of monitoring. We will review a timeline showing the history of nuclear testing and the more important treaties. We will also describe testing operations, containment, phenomenology, and observations. The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) which has been signed by 179 countries (ratified by 144) established the International Monitoring System global verification regime which employs seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide monitoring techniques. The CTBT also includes on-site inspection to clarify whether a nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the Treaty. The US Department of Energy (DOE) through its National Nuclear Security Agency's Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring R&D Program supports research by US National Laboratories, and universities and industry internationally to detect, locate, and identify nuclear detonations. This research program builds on the broad base of monitoring expertise developed over several decades. Annually the DOE and the US Department of Defense jointly solicit monitoring research proposals. Areas of research include: seismic regional characterization and wave propagation, seismic event detection and location, seismic identification and source characterization, hydroacoustic monitoring, radionuclide monitoring, infrasound monitoring, and

  8. Advanced Neutron Source operating philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houser, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    An operating philosophy and operations cost estimate were prepared to support the Conceptual Design Report for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a new research reactor planned for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The operating philosophy was part of the initial effort of the ANS Human Factors Program, was integrated into the conceptual design, and addressed operational issues such as remote vs local operation; control room layout and responsibility issues; role of the operator; simulation and training; staffing levels; and plant computer systems. This paper will report on the overall plans and purpose for the operations work, the results of the work done for conceptual design, and plans for future effort

  9. Philosophy and Politics: The anti-political character of Socrates’ philosophy and Plato ’s project of making philosophy political

    OpenAIRE

    Hrvoje Cvijanović

    2016-01-01

    The intention of this research is to elaborate on Socrates’ philosophy and its serious consequences for the relationship between philosophy and politics, hence making them hostile to each other, and Socrates an enemy of the people. The author explores the tension between philosophy and public life by comparing and contrasting two opposing philosophical projects – Socrates and Plato’s – while illuminating different methods and paths they follow in their understanding of philosophy and politics...

  10. Recent progress in structural biology: lessons from our research history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Ryo; Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Eriko

    2018-05-16

    The recent 'resolution revolution' in structural analyses of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has drastically changed the research strategy for structural biology. In addition to X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, cryo-EM has achieved the structural analysis of biological molecules at near-atomic resolution, resulting in the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017. The effect of this revolution has spread within the biology and medical science fields affecting everything from basic research to pharmaceutical development by visualizing atomic structure. As we have used cryo-EM as well as X-ray crystallography since 2000 to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the fundamental phenomena in the cell, here we review our research history and summarize our findings. In the first half of the review, we describe the structural mechanisms of microtubule-based motility of molecular motor kinesin by using a joint cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography method. In the latter half, we summarize our structural studies on transcriptional regulation by X-ray crystallography of in vitro reconstitution of a multi-protein complex.

  11. The borderlands between science and philosophy: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2008-03-01

    Science and philosophy have a very long history, dating back at least to the 16th and 17th centuries, when the first scientist-philosophers, such as Bacon, Galilei, and Newton, were beginning the process of turning natural philosophy into science. Contemporary relationships between the two fields are still to some extent marked by the distrust that maintains the divide between the so-called "two cultures." An increasing number of philosophers, however, are making conceptual contributions to sciences ranging from quantum mechanics to evolutionary biology, and a few scientists are conducting research relevant to classically philosophical fields of inquiry, such as consciousness and moral decision-making. This article will introduce readers to the borderlands between science and philosophy, beginning with a brief description of what philosophy of science is about, and including a discussion of how the two disciplines can fruitfully interact not only at the level of scholarship, but also when it comes to controversies surrounding public understanding of science.

  12. History, research and practice of forensic anthropology in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traithepchanapai, Pongpon; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Kranioti, Elena F

    2016-04-01

    Forensic anthropology is an increasingly developing discipline born about a century ago in the United States with the objective to contribute the knowledge of bone biology and physical anthropology to the emerging needs of the court of law. The development of research in biological and forensic anthropology has made rapid progress worldwide in the past few years, however, in most countries--with the exception of the United States--forensic anthropology work is still considered within the duties of the forensic pathologist. This paper attempts to summarise the history and development of forensic anthropology in Thailand by providing information on past and current research and practice that can help forensic practitioners to apply existing methods in forensic cases and mass disasters. It is hoped that the lessons learned from the tsunami catastrophe and the emerging need for positive identification in medicolegal settings will lead to rapid advances in education, training and professional engagement of anthropologists from the forensic departments and the law enforcement agencies in Thailand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Philosophy of physics quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Maudlin, Tim

    2019-01-01

    In this book, Tim Maudlin, one of the world’s leading philosophers of physics, offers a sophisticated, original introduction to the philosophy of quantum mechanics. The briefest, clearest, and most refined account of his influential approach to the subject, the book will be invaluable to all students of philosophy and physics. Quantum mechanics holds a unique place in the history of physics. It has produced the most accurate predictions of any scientific theory, but, more astonishing, there has never been any agreement about what the theory implies about physical reality. Maudlin argues that the very term “quantum theory” is a misnomer. A proper physical theory should clearly describe what is there and what it does—yet standard textbooks present quantum mechanics as a predictive recipe in search of a physical theory. In contrast, Maudlin explores three proper theories that recover the quantum predictions: the indeterministic wavefunction collapse theory of Ghirardi, Rimini, and Weber; the deterministic ...

  14. Does a Course on the History and Philosophy of Chemistry Have Any Effect on Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Perceptions? The Case of Chemistry and the Chemist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendur, G.; Polat, M.; Kazanci, C.

    2017-01-01

    The creative comparisons prospective chemistry teachers make about "chemistry" and the "chemist" may reflect how they perceive these concepts. In this sense, it seems important to determine which creative comparisons prospective teachers make with respect to these and how these can change after the history of chemistry is…

  15. Philosophy as Estrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffnsøe, Sverre

    interested in philosophy as a privileged object of investigation and investment ‐ an aim in itself. There are, however, moments and situations in my life where an interest in philosophy has appeared or is necessarily forced upon me; these are times when philosophy appears as a seemingly unavoidable...... and essential questioning of fundamentals,– as a ‘basic’ need. This being said, it can be annoying as well as cumbersome. Philosophy as a ‘basic’ need makes itself felt as an estrangement that has always already taken place. It takes the form of a “Schritt zurück” in which one pulls away from, problematizes...

  16. Philosophy of statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Forster, Malcolm R

    2011-01-01

    Statisticians and philosophers of science have many common interests but restricted communication with each other. This volume aims to remedy these shortcomings. It provides state-of-the-art research in the area of philosophy of statistics by encouraging numerous experts to communicate with one another without feeling "restricted” by their disciplines or thinking "piecemeal” in their treatment of issues. A second goal of this book is to present work in the field without bias toward any particular statistical paradigm. Broadly speaking, the essays in this Handbook are concerned with problems of induction, statistics and probability. For centuries, foundational problems like induction have been among philosophers' favorite topics; recently, however, non-philosophers have increasingly taken a keen interest in these issues. This volume accordingly contains papers by both philosophers and non-philosophers, including scholars from nine academic disciplines.

  17. GREEN CHEMISTRY: NEW CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Tykhomirova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the principles and guidelines of “Green chemistry” in comparison with the philosophy of nanotechnology. Modern philosophy and methodology of science research focus is on the process of the growth of scientific knowledge. Modern chemistry is complex, hierarchical, multilevel and multidimensional system. Philosophy of nanotechnology relies heavily on the value of scientism and the idea of domination of man over nature , there is an apology of human intervention in nature. “Green chemistry” is called “new thinking”of chemistry, philosophy of modern chemical research. The chemicals and processes in accordance with the principles of “Green chemistry” are considered not only in terms of production of substances and materials with desired properties, but also taking into account the consequences for the environment. In the “Green chemistry” created image of the “ideal customer” – he uses a minimum number of products understands the need to preserve the environment. Ideological landmark “Green chemistry” – co-evolution of man and nature, preservation of the biosphere. It emphasized the need to implement the ideology of “Green chemistry” in the training of future specialists.

  18. Cluster randomization and political philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwang, Eric

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, I will argue that, while the ethical issues raised by cluster randomization can be challenging, they are not new. My thesis divides neatly into two parts. In the first, easier part I argue that many of the ethical challenges posed by cluster randomized human subjects research are clearly present in other types of human subjects research, and so are not novel. In the second, more difficult part I discuss the thorniest ethical challenge for cluster randomized research--cases where consent is genuinely impractical to obtain. I argue that once again these cases require no new analytic insight; instead, we should look to political philosophy for guidance. In other words, the most serious ethical problem that arises in cluster randomized research also arises in political philosophy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Life lines: An art history of biological research around 1800.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Around 1800, the scientific "illustrator" emerged as a new artistic profession in Europe. Artists were increasingly sought after in order to picture anatomical dissections and microscopic observations and to translate drawings into artworks for books and journals. By training and technical expertise, they introduced a particular kind of knowledge into scientific perception that also shaped the common image of nature. Illustrations of scientific publications, often undervalued as a biased interpretation of facts and subordinate to logic and description, thus convey an 'art history' of science in its own right, relevant both for the understanding of biological thought around 1800 as well as for the development of the arts and their historiography. The article is based on an analysis of botanical treatises produced for the Göttingen Society of Sciences in 1803, during an early phase of microscopic cell research, in order to determine the constitutive role of artistic knowledge and the media employed for the visualization and conceptualization of biological issues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Development of a Regional Nursing History Collection: Its Relevance to Practice, Education, and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezel, Linda F.; Linebach, Laura M.

    1991-01-01

    The Nursing History Collection at the University of Missouri-Kansas City preserves artifacts and memorabilia of regional nursing history. Such collections are essential to practice, education, and research in nursing. (SK)

  1. [Jena philosophies of nature around 1800].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidbach, O

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the situation and the outline of positions in philosophy of nature in Jena about 1800, in focusing on research other than the key figures Schelling and Hegel. In 1789, Schelling introduced philosophy of nature into the course program of Jena University. Already in 1800, two young scientists--a mathematician (Fischer) and a physiologist--reacted, announcing lectures on Schellingian topics. But only in late 1802, younger philosophers offered courses on those topics. From 1802 onwards, lectures were announced by Schad, Krause, Henrici, Hegel, Oken and the botanist Schelver. Apart from the Fisher lecture from 1800, the program of these presentations was based on Schellingian principles. Analyses of the ideas of Schad, Krause and Schelver show that, about 1800, philosophy of nature in Jena conserved basic ideas of the early philosophy of nature of Schelling. Thus, philosophy of nature in this period of Jena University seemed to follow just one line of reasoning.

  2. [The discourse of psychosis in contemporary philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stompe, Thomas; Ritter, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    The preoccupation of philosophy with madness can be traced back till the Greek antiquity. For many philosophers like Descartes psychotic phenomena were symbols for the fragility of human mental powers, while others like Plato or Nietzsche saw madness as a way to escape the constraints of rationality. After 1960 three direction of contemporary philosophy dealt with the topics madness--schizophrenia--psychosis: Following Nietzsche and Bataille, Foucault as well as Deleuze and Guattari considered schizophrenia as the societal oppressed reverse of modern rationality, a notion which had a strong influence on the anti-psychiatric movement. Philosophical phenomenology primarily focussed on ontological problems of the psychotic existence. Finally Philosophy of Mind, the modern Anglo-American version of analytical philosophy, analyzed the logical coherence of psychotic inferences and experiences. Especially the insights of analytical philosophy may be important for a more sophisticated interpretation of psychopathological research as well as of the new findings of neuroscience.

  3. Globalization and Life History Research: Fragments of a Life Foretold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William G.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to understand, by way of a life history of one low-income working-class youth, how globalization impacts the working class in a developing nation. The concept of globalization and the method of life history seem diametrically opposed. Globalization is an idea about large social forces that impact the economic and material…

  4. Crisis and Environmental Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wolsing

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental ethics began in the 1960s with a growing awareness of coming environmental problems such as pollution and the projected shortage of resources caused by an acceleration in human’s technically based exploitation of nature. In addition to becoming an issue in public debate and in politics since the 1970s, the environmental crisis, which can be laid at the door of industrialization, calls for a more basic consideration of man’s attitude to nature. In this paper I give a short presentation of the concept of crisis in a selection of the principal classical critical philosophies of history and suggest that they all connect crisis to the oppression of man’s inner nature. I go on to sketch the idea of environmental crisis as an oppression of outer nature (the natural environment suggesting that a new, more nuanced organic concept of nature is needed as a condition for ascribing value to life on earth as a whole, which is what most non-anthropocentric ethical theories to some extent do.

  5. Physics Needs Philosophy. Philosophy Needs Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2018-05-01

    Contrary to claims about the irrelevance of philosophy for science, I argue that philosophy has had, and still has, far more influence on physics than is commonly assumed. I maintain that the current anti-philosophical ideology has had damaging effects on the fertility of science. I also suggest that recent important empirical results, such as the detection of the Higgs particle and gravitational waves, and the failure to detect supersymmetry where many expected to find it, question the validity of certain philosophical assumptions common among theoretical physicists, inviting us to engage in a clearer philosophical reflection on scientific method.

  6. John White on Philosophy of Education and Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    John White offers a provocative characterization of philosophy of education. In this brief reaction, I evaluate the characterization and urge the maintenance of a strong connection between philosophy of education and philosophy.

  7. Truth in Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor R. Machan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Can there be truth in philosophy? A problem: it is philosophy, its various schools, that advances what counts as true versus false, how to go about making the distinction. This is what I wish to focus on here and see if some coherent, sensible position could be reached on the topic.

  8. Philosophy of Data: Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furner, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Philosophy of data should not be dismissed as a cluster of scholastic puzzles whose solutions are of limited practical value. On the contrary, philosophy of data should be recognized as constituting the core of a field of data studies that is informed by, but far from equivalent to, statistics, computer science, and library and information studies.

  9. Philosophy with Guts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Western philosophy, from Plato on, has had the tendency to separate feeling and thought, affect and cognition. This article argues that a strong philosophy (metaphorically, with "guts") utilizes both in its work. In fact, a "complete act of thought" also will include action. Feeling motivates thought, which formulates ideas,…

  10. Why Philosophy Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The motives of philosophers tend to be personal. Philosophy has mattered politically as part of continuing political debates. Its effects on politics, religion and the development of the sciences have been evident. Philosophy has been supposed to have special educational value, from its contents or from the benefits of its methods and arguments.…

  11. Conversations in African Philosophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    Conversational philosophy is articulated by Jonathan O. Chimakonam as the new wave of philosophical practice both in “place” and in “space”. This journal adopts and promotes this approach to philosophizing for African philosophy. Readers are encouraged to submit their conversational piece (maximum of 2000 words) ...

  12. Trends in African philosophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    In the contention of Oladipo (2006), the debate on the idea of. African philosophy which has been divided into trends or schools, dates back to the 1960's and 70's, which constitute the modern epoch of African philosophy, when some African thinkers began to question the perspective that traditional African beliefs and.

  13. Counseling and Transcendental Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donceel, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    An acquaintance with the different philosophies of human nature is an invaluable asset for counseling. The author presents a modern Christian concept of man with emphasis on contributions of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas and elements from modern philosophy. Its two main concerns are man's spirit and man's knowledge and will. (Author/CG)

  14. Legal Philosophy - Five Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This collection gathers together a host of the most eminent contemporary legal philosophers, who writes about their take on legal philosophy, its fundamental questions and potential.......This collection gathers together a host of the most eminent contemporary legal philosophers, who writes about their take on legal philosophy, its fundamental questions and potential....

  15. Medical Genetics at McGill: The History of a Pioneering Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Christopher; Weisz, George; Tone, Andrea; Cambrosio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The McGill Group in Medical Genetics was formed in 1972, supported by the Medical Research Council and successor Canadian Institutes for Health Research until September 2009, making it the longest active biomedical research group in the history of Canada. We document the history of the McGill Group and situate its research within a broader history of medical genetics. Drawing on original oral histories with the Group's members, surviving documents, and archival materials, we explore how the Group's development was structured around epistemological trends in medical genetics, policy choices made by research agencies, and the development of genetics at McGill University and its hospitals.

  16. Sustainable geothermal utilization - Case histories; definitions; research issues and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Gudni

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable development by definition meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The Earth's enormous geothermal resources have the potential to contribute significantly to sustainable energy use worldwide as well as to help mitigate climate change. Experience from the use of numerous geothermal systems worldwide lasting several decades demonstrates that by maintaining production below a certain limit the systems reach a balance between net energy discharge and recharge that may be maintained for a long time (100-300 years). Modelling studies indicate that the effect of heavy utilization is often reversible on a time-scale comparable to the period of utilization. Thus, geothermal resources can be used in a sustainable manner either through (1) constant production below the sustainable limit, (2) step-wise increase in production, (3) intermittent excessive production with breaks, and (4) reduced production after a shorter period of heavy production. The long production histories that are available for low-temperature as well as high-temperature geothermal systems distributed throughout the world, provide the most valuable data available for studying sustainable management of geothermal resources, and reservoir modelling is the most powerful tool available for this purpose. The paper presents sustainability modelling studies for the Hamar and Nesjavellir geothermal systems in Iceland, the Beijing Urban system in China and the Olkaria system in Kenya as examples. Several relevant research issues have also been identified, such as the relevance of system boundary conditions during long-term utilization, how far reaching interference from utilization is, how effectively geothermal systems recover after heavy utilization and the reliability of long-term (more than 100 years) model predictions. (author)

  17. 1. Editorial: Philosophy and Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Albertone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After “Erasmian Science” and “Gastronomy and Revolution”, the Journal of Interdisciplinary History of Ideas has again issued a Call for Paper, for a special issue dedicated to the historical relations of Philosophy and Geography. It will be guest-edited by Ernesto Sferrazza Papa and Simone Mammola, and appear end 2017. In the Editorial we present the contents of the Call, that can also be found, together with practical information for submission, in the News of the JIHI.

  18. Elusive Rivalry? Conceptions of the Philosophy of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John

    2010-01-01

    What is analytical philosophy of education (APE)? And what has been its place in the history of the subject over the past 50 years? In a recent essay in "Ethics and Education" (Vol. 2, No. 2, October 2007) on 'Rival conceptions of the philosophy of education', Paul Standish described a number of features of APE. Relying on both historical and…

  19. Philosophy as Pharmakon : Towards the hermeneutics of healing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of philosophy gives us an insight into what good life portends. Plato, Aristotle and other ancient classics developed guiding principles on the ethical basis for behavioural cognition and existential logic. Hence, the interest of philosophy in other disciplines such as medicine and psychology is well known.

  20. Making History Relevant to Students by Connecting Past, Present and Future: A Framework for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Straaten, Dick; Wilschut, Arie; Oostdam, Ron

    2016-01-01

    History teaching usually focuses on understanding the past as an aim in itself. Research shows that many students do not see the point of this and perceive history as not very useful. Yet history plays a major role in the orientation on present and future. If students fail to see this, the question arises whether this is due to a lack of explicit…

  1. Aligning Literacy Practices in Secondary History Classes with Research on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Jeffery D.

    2008-01-01

    Literacy is a basic element of the discipline of history and of traditional secondary history instruction. However neither the growing body of research on learning with texts nor modern learning theories support the traditional literacy practices that are taking place in many secondary history classrooms. Nor are classroom literacy practices a…

  2. Guide to Sources: American History, Anthropology, Folklore, Business Administration, Education, English, Food Science, French, German, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine Univ., Orono. Raymond H. Fogler Library.

    This group of 13 library guides, designed to introduce the student to some of the bibliographical tools available in various subject areas at Fogler Library, is not intended to be a complete listing, but rather a selective introduction to the many sources of information available to the beginning researcher. Information is provided on the use of…

  3. A History of Research on Business and the Natural Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffman, Andrew J.; Georg, Susse

    Every field of inquiry goes through a life cycle; a new idea emerges, it develops into a growing body of literature and either continues to grow or enters a decline. A sure sign of the successful growth of a field is an effort to institutionalize its history, categorize its accomplishments...

  4. The Digital Life History Project: Intergenerational Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loe, Meika

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the Digital Life History Project, a 10-week "lab" linked to a course on aging, in which students and community-dwelling elders work together to create a short digital story honoring the elder's life. After two interview sessions, the pair works together to produce a 3- to 5-minute digital life story narrated by the elder.…

  5. Opening Philosophy to the World: Derrida and Education in Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burik, Steven

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Steven Burik discusses Jacques Derrida's position with regard to the place of education in philosophy within the university system, and then relates these thoughts to comparative philosophy. Philosophers find themselves constantly having to defend philosophy and the importance of teaching philosophy against pressure from the powers…

  6. Philosophy of Money

    CERN Document Server

    Simmel, Georg; Frisby, David; Bottomore, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In The Philosophy of Money, Georg Simmel provides us with a now classic discussion of the social, psychological and philosophical aspects of the money economy, full of brilliant insights into the forms that social relationships take.

  7. The Humanist Bias in Western Philosophy and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues that the bias in Western philosophy is tied to its humanist ideology that pictures itself as central to the natural history of humanity and is historically linked to the emergence of humanism as pedagogy.

  8. The future of philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, J R

    1999-12-29

    There is no sharp dividing line between science and philosophy, but philosophical problems tend to have three special features. First, they tend to concern large frameworks rather than specific questions within the framework. Second, they are questions for which there is no generally accepted method of solution. And third they tend to involve conceptual issues. For these reasons a philosophical problem such as the nature of life can become a scientific problem if it is put into a shape where it admits of scientific resolution. Philosophy in the 20th century was characterized by a concern with logic and language, which is markedly different from the concerns of earlier centuries of philosophy. However, it shared with the European philosophical tradition since the 17th century an excessive concern with issues in the theory of knowledge and with scepticism. As the century ends, we can see that scepticism no longer occupies centre stage, and this enables us to have a more constructive approach to philosophical problems than was possible for earlier generations. This situation is somewhat analogous to the shift from the sceptical concerns of Socrates and Plato to the constructive philosophical enterprise of Aristotle. With that in mind, we can discuss the prospects for the following six philosophical areas: (1) the traditional mind-body problem; (ii) the philosophy of mind and cognitive science; (iii) the philosophy of language; (iv) the philosophy of society; (v) ethics and practical reasons; (vi) the philosophy of science. The general theme of these investigations, I believe, is that the appraisal of the true significance of issues in the philosophy of knowledge enables us to have a more constructive account of various other philosophical problems than has typically been possible for the past three centuries.

  9. The future of philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, J R

    1999-01-01

    There is no sharp dividing line between science and philosophy, but philosophical problems tend to have three special features. First, they tend to concern large frameworks rather than specific questions within the framework. Second, they are questions for which there is no generally accepted method of solution. And third they tend to involve conceptual issues. For these reasons a philosophical problem such as the nature of life can become a scientific problem if it is put into a shape where it admits of scientific resolution. Philosophy in the 20th century was characterized by a concern with logic and language, which is markedly different from the concerns of earlier centuries of philosophy. However, it shared with the European philosophical tradition since the 17th century an excessive concern with issues in the theory of knowledge and with scepticism. As the century ends, we can see that scepticism no longer occupies centre stage, and this enables us to have a more constructive approach to philosophical problems than was possible for earlier generations. This situation is somewhat analogous to the shift from the sceptical concerns of Socrates and Plato to the constructive philosophical enterprise of Aristotle. With that in mind, we can discuss the prospects for the following six philosophical areas: (1) the traditional mind-body problem; (ii) the philosophy of mind and cognitive science; (iii) the philosophy of language; (iv) the philosophy of society; (v) ethics and practical reasons; (vi) the philosophy of science. The general theme of these investigations, I believe, is that the appraisal of the true significance of issues in the philosophy of knowledge enables us to have a more constructive account of various other philosophical problems than has typically been possible for the past three centuries. PMID:10670025

  10. What can philosophy do for psychiatry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Kenneth WM; Stanghellini, Giovanni; Broome, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    This article illustrates the practical impact of recent developments in the philosophy of psychiatry in five key areas: patient-centred practice, new models of service delivery, neuroscience research, psychiatric education, and the organisation of psychiatry as an international science-led discipline focused on patient care. We conclude with a note on the role of philosophy in countering the stigmatisation of mental disorder. PMID:16633476

  11. Jazz-Philosophy Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Tartaglia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I describe and provide a justification for the fusion of jazz music and philosophy which I have developed; the justification is provided from the perspectives of both jazz and philosophy. I discuss two of my compositions, based on philosophical ideas presented by Schopenhauer and Derek Parfit respectively; links to sound files are provided. The justification emerging from this discussion is that philosophy produces ‘non-argumentative effects’ which provide suitable material for artistic expression and exploration. These effects – which are often emotional – are under-recognised in philosophy, but they do important philosophical work in demarcating the kinds of truths we want to discover, and in sustaining our search for them. Jazz-Philosophy Fusion can help to increase metaphilosophical self-consciousness about these effects, while also helping to counteract any undue persuasive force they may achieve. Jazz is a particularly suitable medium because it has independently developed a concern with philosophical ideas; because of strong parallels between jazz and philosophy which explain their mutual openness to fusions, and because improvisation very effectively facilitates the direct audience engagement essential to inducing these effects.

  12. What is philosophy of medicine? : (Che cos’è la filosofia della medicina?)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Philosophy of Medicine is considered a new and emerging discipline. This paper presents an overview of philosophy of medicine, discusses its relation to bioethics and to other areas of philosophy, and introduces three potential topics for research in the philosophy of medicine: concepts of health

  13. Early History of Heavy Isotope Research at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn T. Seaborg

    1976-06-01

    I have had the idea for some time that it would be interesting and worthwhile to put together an account of the early work on heavy isotopes at Berkeley. Of a special interest is the discovery of plutonium (atomic number 94) and the isotope U{sup 233}, and the demonstration of their fission with slow neutrons. This work served as a prelude to the subsequent Plutonium Project (Metallurgical Project) centered at the University of Chicago, in connection with which I have also had the idea of putting together a history of the work of my chemistry group. I have decided that it would be an interesting challenge to write this account on a day-to-day basis in a style that would be consistent with the entries having been written at the end of each day. The aim would be to make this history as accurate as possible by going back to the original records and using them with meticulous care.

  14. The Concept "System of Philosophy":The Case of Jacob Brucker's Historiography of Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Catana, Leo

    2005-01-01

    In this article I shall examine and discuss the concept ‘system of philosophy’ as a methodological tool in the history of philosophy. I shall do so in two moves. First I shall analyze the historical origin of the concept in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Thereafter I shall undertake a discussion of its methodological weaknesses — a discussion, which is not only relevant to the writing of history of philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, but also to the writing of h...

  15. The NCTM Research Presession: A Brief History and Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The NCTM Research Committee invited Richard Lesh, instrumental in the founding of the NCTM Research Presession, to join the members of the current Research Committee in reflecting on its formation, the hopes he and others had in mind when they started it, and the current state and future of research in the field.

  16. Scientific methods of research in archaeology, prehistory, and ancient history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentner, W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-12-01

    This contribution deals with some fields of archaeometry, i.e. the application of physical methods in archaeology: Age determination in glasses and potsherds with the aid of fission tracks and thermoluminescence, determination of the origin of coins and pottery by chemical analyses with the aid of neutron activation ('fingerprinting'), obtaining information on metal winning in ancient history with the aid of the C-14-method.

  17. Philosophy of the social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Kimelyev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Philosophy of social science is a branch of philosophy where relations between philosophy and social sciences are traced and investigated. The main functions of philosophy of social science are: to work out social ontology, methodology and metatheory of social science.

  18. Collaborations between Multicultural Educators and Archivists: Engaging Students with Multicultural History through Archival Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    When multicultural educators and archivists collaborate to design projects that engage students with multicultural history through archival research, students can learn in-depth research skills with primary source documents, creatively share their knowledge, and, on a broader level, engage with their local community history. The projects shared in…

  19. Collaboratively Teaching and Doing History: Promoting Historical Research in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elaine; Pun, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative course introduced history students to a variety of digital tools and printed materials for historical research. The authors explore the development of this program by a historian and a librarian as a case study to address the value of teaching history outside of the classroom and allowing students to conduct research on-site. This…

  20. Stowaways in the history of science: the case of simian virus 40 and clinical research on federal prisoners at the US National Institutes of Health, 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Laura; Campbell, Nancy D

    2014-12-01

    In 1960, J. Anthony Morris, a molecular biologist at the US National Institutes of Health conducted one of the only non-therapeutic clinical studies of the cancer virus SV40. Morris and his research team aimed to determine whether SV40 was a serious harm to human health, since many scientists at the time suspected that SV40 caused cancer in humans based on evidence from in vivo animal studies and experiments with human tissue. Morris found that SV40 had no significant effect but his claim has remained controversial among scientists and policymakers through the present day--both on scientific and ethical grounds. Why did Morris only conduct one clinical study on the cancer-causing potential of SV40 in healthy humans? We use the case to explain how empirical evidence and ethical imperatives are, paradoxically, often dependent on each other and mutually exclusive in clinical research, which leaves answers to scientific and ethical questions unsettled. This paper serves two goals: first, it documents a unique--and uniquely important--study of clinical research on SV40. Second, it introduces the concept of "the stowaway," which is a special type of contaminant that changes the past in the present moment. In the history of science, stowaways are misfortunes that nonetheless afford research that otherwise would have been impossible specifically by creating new pasts. This case (Morris' study) and concept (the stowaway) bring together history of science and philosophy of history for productive dialog. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Philosophy of biology. Is there still a need for philosophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we now focus on critically examining the theoretical and methodological conceptual foundations in the particular field of science of the living, namely the philosophy of biology. The latter seems to draw attention to two disparate disciplines in methods and scope of interest. On the one hand there seems to be a point of view that considers the cognitive phenomenon in question in a way so as to say "abstract", i.e. as something that seeks to determine the nature or essence, to use a term dear to many philosophers. On the other hand, there is a point of view that considers these phenomena in the actual place, the result of a process caused by the cognitive system of the subject, if the latter, of course, does not mean that they are human beings. We will argue that the two approaches do not represent two distinct planes of research: in fact philosophy takes on a main task, namely helping to lay the foundations for a philosophy of nature capable of meeting first a completeness, that is, to describe and explain what is special in all the different layers of the different natural systems.

  2. Philosophy vs the common sense

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Chernyshov

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with the antinomy of philosophy and the common sense. Philosophy emerges as a way of specifically human knowledge, which purposes analytics of the reality of subjective experience. The study reveals that in order to alienate philosophy from the common sense it was essential to revise the understanding of wisdom. The new, philosophical interpretation of wisdom – offered by Pythagoras – has laid the foundation of any future philosophy. Thus, philosophy emerges, alienating itself...

  3. Stock Prices and Earnings: A History of Research

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia M. Dechow; Richard G. Sloan; Jenny Zha

    2014-01-01

    Copyright © 2014 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved. Accounting earnings summarize periodic corporate financial performance and are key determinants of stock prices. We review research on the usefulness of accounting earnings, including research on the link between accounting earnings and firm value and research on the usefulness of accounting earnings relative to other accounting and nonaccounting information. We also review research on the features of accounting earnings that make them ...

  4. Has Richard Rorty a moral philosophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asghari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available I try to show that Richard Rorty, although is not a moral philosopher like Kant, nerveless, has moral philosophy that must be taken seriously. Rorty was not engaged with moral philosophy in the systematic manner common among leading modern and contemporary moral philosophers. This paper has two parts: first part, in brief, is concerned with principles of his philosophy such as anti-essentialism, Darwinism, Freudism, and historicism. Second part which be long and detailed, considers many moral themes in Rorty's thought such as critique of Kantian morality, solidarity, moral progress, cruelty and concept of other, etc. Subsequently, I will try to answer the research question of the article namely, has Rorty a moral philosophy?

  5. History of research reactor fuel fabrication at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freim, James B.

    1983-01-01

    B and W Research Reactor Fuel Element facility at Lynchburg, Virginia now produces national laboratory and university fuel assemblies. The Company's 201000 square foot facility is devoted entirely to supplying research fuel and related products. B and W re-entered the research reactor fuel market in 1981

  6. A Brief History of Publishing Papers on Astronomy Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    While some research had been done on K-12 and planetarium astronomy teaching from the 1930's to the 1980's, the growth of research on college physics education offered astronomy education researchers a model for examining techniques for teaching introductory college astronomy survey "Astronomy 101" courses as well. This early research…

  7. Neither logical empiricism nor vitalism, but organicism: what the philosophy of biology was.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Daniel J; Gawne, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Philosophy of biology is often said to have emerged in the last third of the twentieth century. Prior to this time, it has been alleged that the only authors who engaged philosophically with the life sciences were either logical empiricists who sought to impose the explanatory ideals of the physical sciences onto biology, or vitalists who invoked mystical agencies in an attempt to ward off the threat of physicochemical reduction. These schools paid little attention to actual biological science, and as a result philosophy of biology languished in a state of futility for much of the twentieth century. The situation, we are told, only began to change in the late 1960s and early 1970s, when a new generation of researchers began to focus on problems internal to biology, leading to the consolidation of the discipline. In this paper we challenge this widely accepted narrative of the history of philosophy of biology. We do so by arguing that the most important tradition within early twentieth-century philosophy of biology was neither logical empiricism nor vitalism, but the organicist movement that flourished between the First and Second World Wars. We show that the organicist corpus is thematically and methodologically continuous with the contemporary literature in order to discredit the view that early work in the philosophy of biology was unproductive, and we emphasize the desirability of integrating the historical and contemporary conversations into a single, unified discourse.

  8. The Donner Institute for Research in Religious and Cultural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmer Ringgren

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the history of the Donner Institute. The Donner Institute is an institution for the study of the history of religion and culture at the university of Åbo Akademi (Åbo, Finland. It was founded in 1957 following a stipulation in the last will of Mr. and Mrs. Uno Donner of Helsingfors, who died in 1958 and 1956 respectively. Uno Donner had shown an early interest in philosophical questions. During a visit to Egypt at the beginning of this century both he and his wife were impressed by ancient Egyptian culture and certain mysterious aspects of religion. They both seem to have had a firm conviction that intuition is an important way to true knowledge. When, in 1913, an artist friend of theirs, Henry Collison, introduced them to the thinking of Dr. Rudolf Steiner, their interest was easily kindled, and they became eager students of anthroposophy. They visited Dornach near Basel, the center of the anthroposophic movement, several times and made the personal acquaintance of Dr. Steiner. When an Anthroposophic Society was established in Finland in 1922, Uno Donner became its president. The library of the institute possesses an almost complete collection of Dr. Steiner's works and all available works of various anthroposophic authors.

  9. History, Development and Future of TRIGA Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Due to its particular fuel design and resulting enhanced inherent safety features, TRIGA reactors (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) constitute a ‘class of their own’ among the large variety of research reactors built world-wide. This publication summarizes in a single document the information on the past and present of TRIGA research reactors and presents an outlook in view of potential issues to be solved by TRIGA operating organizations in the near future. It covers the historical development and basic TRIGA characteristics, followed by utilization, fuel conversion and ageing management of TRIGA research reactors. It continues with issues and challenges, introduction to the global TRIGA research reactor network and concludes with future perspectives. The publication is complemented with a CD-ROM to illustrate the historical developments of TRIGA research reactors through individual facility examples and experiences

  10. The history of ethics in research with human subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Kottow, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    This article contextualizes the emergence of the field of research ethics in historical, social, and political events over the last 60 years. It draws a distinction between professional ethics and bioethics, focusing on the historical and philosophical precedents of the latter field. It also presents the appearance of research ethics as a result of the disclosure of cases of scientific misconduct, discussing the first regulations on research ethics, the guidelines contained in the Belmont Rep...

  11. Yugonostalgia as Research Concept of Communication History: The Possible Research Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Simeunović Bajić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Yugoslavia no longer exists. There is only yugonostalgia i.e. nostalgia for all those things which are no longer in common state boundaries. There remains common corpus of historical memory which is imposed to researchers as a good basis for affirmation. After the tragic decomposition of Yugoslavia, nationalist tendencies, interruption of communication channels and national reawakening in all former republics, the period of transition has arrived. But in the minds of ordinary people, political, economical and social changes have not brought long-expected "better life". Therefore more and more collective memory of everyday life, culture and social relations in the former Yugoslavia was revitalized. Yugonostalgia for a Yugoslav Union that no longer exists as a concept of studying the history of communication, can contribute to better understanding of the past and the future. For this reason, this paper attempts to explore the role of the concept of yugonostalgia as an important factor in studying the history of communication in the Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav context.

  12. The Historical-Conceptual Language of Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Mié

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In an essay devoted to the method of philosophy, Ernst Tugendhat (1989 warned about the scarcity of general methodological clarifications that this discipline offers for its own labor. Beyond the many ways there currently exist to make philosophy, and along its vast history, such lack of clarifications about the procedures can signal a lasting fault in the concept and scope of philosophy. Although Tugendhat is certainly right in his diagnosis, his proposal is quite incomplete and its formulation in the classical terms of the analytic tradition −according to which doing philosophy is a form of clarification in the use of linguistic expressions− must be completed with the historical feature which is peculiar to the discipline. However, in this paper I will not discuss this author’s thesis, but I will examine the methodological problem mapped out by him. The strategy is to start from what I consider a necessary previous step: to clarify the conceptual and historical dimensions of the philosophical vocabulary whereby this discipline handles its own topics. As a result, I will be able to derive some consequences vis-à-vis the method and goals of philosophy.

  13. From Mentoring to Collaborating: Fostering Undergraduate Research in History

    Science.gov (United States)

    History Teacher, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The author of this essay argues that historians should join their colleagues in the sciences in creating supportive environments for undergraduate research. Despite the apparent hurdles to overcome, historians can devise effective undergraduate research experiences that mimic those occurring in the chemistry, biology, and psychology labs across…

  14. Critical Issues in the Philosophy of Astronomy and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Although the philosophy of science and of specific sciences such as physics, chemistry, and biology are well-developed fields with their own books and journals, the philosophy of astronomy and cosmology have received little systematic attention. At least six categories of problems may be identified in the astronomical context: 1) the nature of reasoning, including the roles of observation, theory, simulation, and analogy, as well as the limits of reasoning, starkly evident in the anthropic principle, fine-tuning, and multiverse controversies; 2) the often problematic nature of evidence and inference, especially since the objects of astronomical interest are for the most part beyond experiment and experience;3) the influence of metaphysical preconceptions and non-scientific worldviews on astronomy, evidenced, for example in the work of Arthur S. Eddington and many other astronomers; 4) the epistemological status of astronomy and its central concepts, including the process of discovery, the problems of classification, and the pitfalls of definition (as in planets); 5) the role of technology in shaping the discipline of astronomy and our view of the universe; and 6) the mutual interactions of astronomy and cosmology with society over time. Discussion of these issues should draw heavily on the history of astronomy as well as current research, and may reveal an evolution in approaches, techniques, and goals, perhaps with policy relevance. This endeavor should also utilize and synergize approaches and results from philosophy of science and of related sciences such as physics (e.g. discussions on the nature of space and time). Philosophers, historians and scientists should join this new endeavor. A Journal of the Philosophy of Astronomy and Cosmology (JPAC) could help focus attention on their studies.

  15. Segregation, Jim Crow, Racism, Embodied History & the People’s Health: Implications for Cancer Registries, Research & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Nancy Krieger is Professor of Social Epidemiology, in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Director of the HSPH Interdisciplinary Concentration on Women, Gender, and Health.  She is an internationally recognized social epidemiologist, with a background in biochemistry, philosophy of science, and the history of public health, combined with over 30 years of activism linking issues involving social justice, science, and health.  In 2004, she became an ISI highly cited scientist (reaffirmed: 2015 ISI update), a group comprising “less than one-half of one percent of all publishing researchers,” and in 2013 was the recipient of the Wade Hampton Frost Award from the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association; in 2015, she was awarded the American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professorship. Dr. Krieger’s work addresses three topics: (1) conceptual frameworks to understand, analyze, and improve the people’s health, including the ecosocial theory of disease distribution she has been developing since 1994 and its focus on embodiment and equity; (2) etiologic research on societal determinants of population health and health inequities; and (3) methodologic research on improving monitoring of health inequities.  She is author of Epidemiology and The People’s Health: Theory and Context (Oxford University Press, 2011), editor of Embodying Inequality: Epidemiologic Perspectives (Baywood Press, 2004) and co-editor, with Glen Margo, of AIDS: The Politics of Survival (Baywood Publishers, 1994), and, with Elizabeth Fee, of Women’s Health, Politics, and Power:  Essays on Sex/Gender, Medicine, and Public Health (Baywood Publishers, 1994).  In 1994, she co-founded, and still chairs, the Spirit of 1848 Caucus of the American Public Health Association, which is concerned with the links between social justice and public health.  Dr. Krieger received her PhD in Epidemiology from the

  16. Geoscience Education Research: A Brief History, Context and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.; Manduca, C. A.; Kastens, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    DBER combines knowledge of teaching and learning with deep knowledge of discipline-specific science content. It describes the discipline-specific difficulties learners face and the specialized intellectual and instructional resources that can facilitate student understanding (NRC, 2011). In the geosciences, content knowledge derives from all the "spheres, the complex interactions of components of the Earth system, applications of first principles from allied sciences, an understanding of "deep time", and approaches that emphasize the interpretive and historical nature of geoscience. Insights gained from the theory and practice of the cognitive and learning sciences that demonstrate how people learn, as well as research on learning from other STEM disciplines, have helped inform the development of geoscience curricular initiatives. The Earth Science Curriculum Project (1963) was strongly influenced by Piaget and emphasized hands-on, experiential learning. Recognizing that education research was thriving in related STEM disciplines a NSF report (NSF 97-171) recommended "... that GEO and EHR both support research in geoscience education, helping geoscientists to work with colleagues in fields such as educational and cognitive psychology, in order to facilitate development of a new generation of geoscience educators." An NSF sponsored workshop, Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences (2002) brought together geoscience educators and cognitive scientists to explore areas of mutual interest, and identified a research agenda that included study of spatial learning, temporal learning, learning about complex systems, use of visualizations in geoscience learning, characterization of expert learning, and learning environments. Subsequent events have focused on building new communities of scholars, such as the On the Cutting Edge faculty professional development workshops, extensive collections of online resources, and networks of scholars that have addressed teaching

  17. History and philosophy of modern epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of chronic diseases began around the mid-20th century. Contrary to the infectious disease epidemiology which had prevailed at the beginning of the 20th century and which had focused on single agents causing individual diseases, the chronic disease epidemiology which emerge...

  18. A History of Coastal Research in the Arctic (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, H. J.; McGraw, M.

    2009-12-01

    The arctic shoreline is, according to the CIA World Factbook, 45,389 km long. However, a more realistic length from the standpoint of detailed research is the 200,000 km proposed at the 1999 Arctic Coastal Dynamics Workshop. Highly varied in form and material it is dominated by a variety of processes, is relatively remote, is ice-bound much of the year, and has generally been neglected by the scientific community. Before the 20th century, most of the information about its geology, hydrology, geomorphology, and biology was recorded in ship's logs or in explorer's books and was for the most part incidental to the narrative being related. The paucity of specific research is indicated by the relatively few relevant papers included in the more than 100,000 annotated entries published in the 15 volumes of the Arctic Bibliography (1953-1971) and in the nearly as extensive 27 volume bibliography prepared by the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) between 1952 and 1973. Nonetheless, there were some distinctive research endeavors during the early part of the 20th century; e.g., Leffingwell's 1919 Alaskan Arctic Coast observations, Nansen's 1921 strandflat studies, and Zenkovich's 1937 Murmansk research. During that period some organizations devoted to polar research, especially the USSR's Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute and the Scott Polar Research Institute (both in 1920) were established, although the amount of their research that could be considered coastal and arctic was limited. Specific research of the arctic's shoreline was mainly academic until after World War II when military, economic, industrial, and archaeological interests began demanding reliable, contemporary data. At the time numerous organizations with a primary focus on the Arctic were formed. Included are the Arctic Institute of North America (1945), the Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment (latter to become CRREL) and the Office of Naval Research's Arctic Research

  19. The Philosophy of Forestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn W. Erickson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstrac: In an extended discussion, within the context of a"philosophy offorestry", of the relationships of the concepts of truth and of tree some fundamental aspects of occidental metaphysics are examined from a Heideggerian perspective. But the paper tries to go beyond Heidegger's thematization of metaphysics in the context of pre-Socratic philosophy by establishing Indo-European etymology as a more inclusive horizon. In this manner, the transition from anti-metaphysics to post-metaphysics is anticipated.

  20. Safety philosophy in Plowshare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalgott, R.H.

    1969-01-01

    A nuclear device can be detonated safely when it can ascertained that the detonation can be accomplished without injury to people, either directly or indirectly, and without unacceptable damage to the ecological system and natural or man made structures. This philosophy has its origin in the nuclear weapons testing program dating back to the first detonation in 1945 and applies without reservation to PIowshare projects. This paper therefore will outline the mechanics employed by government in implementing this safety philosophy. The talk will describe those type of actions taken by safety oriented organizations and committees to assure that necessary and desirable safety reviews are conducted. (author)

  1. Pragmatism and Existential Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Lipps

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hans Lipps compares pragmatism (William James and John Dewey existentialism (Friedrich Nietzsche, Soren Kierkegaard, and Martin Heidegger in this 1936 article translated from French.  He claims that they aim at the same goals, e.g., a return to lived experience and a rejection of the Cartesian legacy in philosophy.  While summarizing the commonalities of each, he engages in a polemic against philosophy then that remains relevant now into the next century.

  2. Safety philosophy in Plowshare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalgott, R H [Nevada Operations Office, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (United States)

    1969-07-01

    A nuclear device can be detonated safely when it can ascertained that the detonation can be accomplished without injury to people, either directly or indirectly, and without unacceptable damage to the ecological system and natural or man made structures. This philosophy has its origin in the nuclear weapons testing program dating back to the first detonation in 1945 and applies without reservation to PIowshare projects. This paper therefore will outline the mechanics employed by government in implementing this safety philosophy. The talk will describe those type of actions taken by safety oriented organizations and committees to assure that necessary and desirable safety reviews are conducted. (author)

  3. Philosophy and mathematics: interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Roshdi

    From Plato to the beginnings of the last century, mathematics provided philosophers with methods of exposition, procedures of demonstration, and instruments of analysis. The unprecedented development of mathematics on the one hand, and the mathematicians' appropriation of Logic from the philosophers on the other hand, have given rise to two problems with which the philosophers have to contend: (1) Is there still a place for the philosophy of mathematics? and (2) To what extent is a philosophy of mathematics still possible? This article offers some reflections on these questions, which have preoccupied a good many philosophers and continue to do so.

  4. Philosophy of Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanæs, Dag

    2011-01-01

    This is an encyclopedia entry for the Interaction-Design.org free IxD encyclopedia. The topic of the entry is the application of the philosophy of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty to a theory of interactivity. Comments by Don Norman and Eva Hornecker.......This is an encyclopedia entry for the Interaction-Design.org free IxD encyclopedia. The topic of the entry is the application of the philosophy of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty to a theory of interactivity. Comments by Don Norman and Eva Hornecker....

  5. Dreaming as inspiration evidence from religion, philosophy, literature, and film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkeley, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents evidence from the history of religion, philosophy, literature, and film to suggest that dreaming is a primal wellspring of creative inspiration. Powerful, reality-bending dreams have motivated the cultural creativity of people all over the world and throughout history. Examples include the dream revelations of Egyptian Pharaohs, the philosophical insights of Socrates, the dark literary themes of Fyodor Dostoevsky, and the cinematic artistry of Akira Kurusawa. Although the conclusions that can be drawn from these sources are limited by several methodological factors, the evidence gives contemporary researchers good reasons to explore the creative potentials of dreaming and the impact on waking life behavior of certain types of extraordinary dream experience. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modern Western Concepts of Philosophy of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Ivanova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The philosophy of education is represented by a wide range of concepts and approaches. The basic concepts of the philosophy of education can be divided into 4 groups according to the «pure» philosophical systems: realism, idealism, pragmatism, existentialism. Among the goals of the philosophy of education as an independent science are: stimulation, analysis, ordering, research. The delineation of the concept of education and the notion of school education are an important aspect in formulating the goals of the philosophy of education. A significant place in the process of finding and setting the goals of the philosophy of education is occupied by an alternative: discipline of mind or discipline of knowledge? It is worth paying attention to the goals of the modern Western philosophy of education: training for the formation of character, training for personal growth and success, training for the development and refinement of aesthetic predispositions, etc. Within the frameworks of the American philosophy of education, three main directions were formed: empiricism, rationalism, naturalism. According to the approach of the empiricists, education is the main factor, influencing human existence, which stimulates human activity, forms the person’s abilities and character. Rationalists introduced the idea of «self-alienation» as the most important for the philosophy of education. «Self-alienation» is a transition of a student from one stage of training to another one under the supervision of a teacher, when human mind becomes an object of his own attention. At the last stage of the student’s intellectual development, discovery of universals, laws and principles takes place. According to naturalists’ concept, the conclusions of scientific study of nature should be understood not as a testimony of truth, but as working hypotheses for further investigation. Scientific discoveries should be discoveries for education. Modern educational systems

  7. The Relationship between Popper's Philosophy and the Acceptance of the Vitamin Theory: A Case Study of the Methodology of Scientific Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeroyd, F. Michael

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship between Karl Popper's philosophy and a 1912 paper by F. G. Hopkins which was instrumental in convincing scientists about merits of the vitamin theory. Concludes that Hopkins' work was convincing because it subjected a theory (which was the center of attention) to the severest possible tests, supporting Popper's position.…

  8. Time: The Biggest Pattern in Natural History Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontier, Nathalie

    2016-10-01

    We distinguish between four cosmological transitions in the history of Western intellectual thought, and focus on how these cosmologies differentially define matter, space and time. We demonstrate that how time is conceptualized significantly impacts a cosmology's notion on causality, and hone in on how time is conceptualized differentially in modern physics and evolutionary biology. The former conflates time with space into a single space-time continuum and focuses instead on the movement of matter, while the evolutionary sciences have a tradition to understand time as a given when they cartography how organisms change across generations over or in time, thereby proving the phenomenon of evolution. The gap becomes more fundamental when we take into account that phenomena studied by chrono-biologists demonstrate that numerous organisms, including humans, have evolved a "sense" of time. And micro-evolutionary/genetic, meso-evolutionary/developmental and macro-evolutionary phenomena including speciation and extinction not only occur by different evolutionary modes and at different rates, they are also timely phenomena that follow different periodicities. This article focusses on delineating the problem by finding its historical roots. We conclude that though time might be an obsolete concept for the physical sciences, it is crucial for the evolutionary sciences where evolution is defined as the change that biological individuals undergo in/over or through time.

  9. Redefining ecological ethics: science, policy, and philosophy at Cape Horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodeman, Robert

    2008-12-01

    In the twentieth century, philosophy (especially within the United States) embraced the notion of disciplinary expertise: philosophical research consists of working with and writing for other philosophers. Projects that involve non-philosophers earn the deprecating title of "applied" philosophy. The University of North Texas (UNT) doctoral program in philosophy exemplifies the possibility of a new model for philosophy, where graduate students are trained in academic philosophy and in how to work with scientists, engineers, and policy makers. This "field" (rather than "applied") approach emphasizes the inter- and transdisciplinary nature of the philosophical enterprise where theory and practice dialectically inform one another. UNT's field station in philosophy at Cape Horn, Patagonia, Chile is one site for developing this ongoing experiment in the theory and practice of interdisciplinary philosophic research and education.

  10. History for fifty years of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-15

    This introduces establishment, foundation, technical independent, puberty and preview of KAERI. It is divided six chapters, which deals with research and development on nuclear fission and nuclear fusion, cycle of nuclear fuel and research of nuclear safety, nuclear business and technical development, activity on nuclear safe regulation like establishment and role module for nuclear safety center and check of the safety of nuclear power plant, study of radio therapeutics and cancer treatment, development of human resources for nuclear power and training, general management about regulations, organization, person, contract, facility and building, welfare and establishment and activity of labor union.

  11. A short history of radiopharmaceutical research in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.

    1989-01-01

    A brief summary is given of radiopharmaceuticals research carried out in Australia. Historically, a number of the larger hospital radiopharmacies have been, and still are, involved with 99m Tc-cold kit production. Originally, this scenario evolved because the nuclear medicine community was denied access to state-of-the-art products available overseas. Although the situation has improved in recent times, most such departments continue kit production, having made a large capital investment in sterile facilities, equipment and staff. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization has a leading role in radiopharmaceutical research and some of the topics which have occupied its scientists over the last few years are outlined

  12. History of Discharge of Radionuclide from Nuclear Malaysia Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Nahar Othman; Ismail Sulaiman

    2013-01-01

    After more than 40 years the operation of Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor, this is the first time, the discharge emission radionuclide to environment is recorded and analyzed in detail. Starting from 1984, radionuclide Ar-41 had been analyzed manually by Research Officers but their finding is not recorded in any Journal. That is responsible of Safety and Health Division to make sure the safety of the workers and public living around Malaysian Nuclear Agency receive safe dose. This paper will report dose that had been discharge to the environment starting from 1984 to 2012 and it detail calculations.After more than 40 years the operation of Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor, this is the first time, the discharge emission radionuclide to environment is recorded and analyzed in detail. Starting from 1984, radionuclide Ar-41 had been analyzed manually by Research Officers but their finding is not recorded in any Journal. That is responsible of Safety and Health Division to make sure the safety of the workers and public living around Malaysian Nuclear Agency receive safe dose. This paper will report dose that had been discharge to the environment starting from 1984 to 2012 and it detail calculations. (author)

  13. 100 Years of Curriculum History, Theory, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews a collection of papers written by the American Educational Research Association's first 50 presidents that deal specifically with curricular issues. It characterizes the ways in which curricula were conceptualized, implemented, and assessed, with an eye toward the epistemological and methodological framings that the authors…

  14. Some Lessons from Art History for Art-Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Edmund Burke

    1980-01-01

    At present, art-educational research seems locked into a number of unexamined assumptions--largely derived from European Romantic ideology--about artistic productiveness as a desirable psychological trait. We need to know more about other cultural patterns of artistic behavior and the historic and social factors that influence them. (Author/SJL)

  15. Livestock in biomedical research: history, current status and future prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polejaeva, Irina A; Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Wells, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Livestock models have contributed significantly to biomedical and surgical advances. Their contribution is particularly prominent in the areas of physiology and assisted reproductive technologies, including understanding developmental processes and disorders, from ancient to modern times. Over the past 25 years, biomedical research that traditionally embraced a diverse species approach shifted to a small number of model species (e.g. mice and rats). The initial reasons for focusing the main efforts on the mouse were the availability of murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and genome sequence data. This powerful combination allowed for precise manipulation of the mouse genome (knockouts, knockins, transcriptional switches etc.) leading to ground-breaking discoveries on gene functions and regulation, and their role in health and disease. Despite the enormous contribution to biomedical research, mouse models have some major limitations. Their substantial differences compared with humans in body and organ size, lifespan and inbreeding result in pronounced metabolic, physiological and behavioural differences. Comparative studies of strategically chosen domestic species can complement mouse research and yield more rigorous findings. Because genome sequence and gene manipulation tools are now available for farm animals (cattle, pigs, sheep and goats), a larger number of livestock genetically engineered (GE) models will be accessible for biomedical research. This paper discusses the use of cattle, goats, sheep and pigs in biomedical research, provides an overview of transgenic technology in farm animals and highlights some of the beneficial characteristics of large animal models of human disease compared with the mouse. In addition, status and origin of current regulation of GE biomedical models is also reviewed.

  16. My Teaching Learning Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjani, Neelam Saleem

    2014-01-01

    The heart of teaching learning philosophy is the concept of nurturing students and teaching them in a way that creates passion and enthusiasm in them for a lifelong learning. According to Duke (1990) education is a practice of artful action where teaching learning process is considered as design and knowledge is considered as colours. Teaching…

  17. Technology and Teaching Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges faced when integrating new technologies into the classroom. Viewing the experiences of teaching a first year learning community through the lens of the principles of the Reflective Teaching Portfolio, the author looks to answer the question: "How should Technology relate to our Teaching Philosophy?"…

  18. Operations and maintenance philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUNCAN, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    This Operations and Maintenance (O and M) Philosophy document is intended to establish a future O and M vision, with an increased focus on minimizing worker exposure, ensuring uninterrupted retrieval operations, and minimizing operation life-cycle cost. It is intended that this document would incorporate O and M lessons learned into on-going and future project upgrades

  19. Retooling Peace Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk; Hersh, Jacques; Petersen-Overton, Kristofer

    2010-01-01

    This book documents recent and historical events in the theoretically-based practice of peace development. Its diverse collection of essays describes different aspects of applied philosophy in peace action, commonly involving the contributors’ continual engagement in the field, while offering sup...

  20. Game theory in philosophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, B.P.

    2005-01-01

    Game theory is the mathematical study of strategy and conflict. It has wide applications in economics, political science, sociology, and, to some extent, in philosophy. Where rational choice theory or decision theory is concerned with individual agents facing games against nature, game theory deals

  1. Humor, Philosophy and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreall, John

    2014-01-01

    This article begins by examining the bad reputation humor traditionally had in philosophy and education. Two of the main charges against humor--that it is hostile and irresponsible--are linked to the Superiority Theory. That theory is critiqued and two other theories of laughter are presented--the Relief Theory and the Incongruity Theory. In the…

  2. Performance and Philosophy Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasoula Kallenou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Was Plato the first philosophical dramatist to explore philosophical ideas through dramatic content, introducing dramatic structures currently in line with contemporary theatre? If Plato was an influential figure for philosophers as well as theatre-makers, it can arguably be said that he was a silent pioneer in creating the newly defined discipline of Performance Philosophy. There is an obvious polarity between performance and philosophy since both disciplines are on the quest of exploring and presenting what life is. At least this can be said of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. Conceived as “biou techne” the art of living, Greek and Roman philosophers, especially the Epicureans, Stoics and Skeptics, saw philosophy as a way of conceiving what a good life is (a life worth living and pursuing its practical realization for the attainment of eudemonia. Plato was arguably the first significant philosopher to explore philosophical ideas through dramatic content, introducing dramatic structures currently in line with contemporary theatre views. As such, he can be seen as an influential figure for theatre makers as well as for philosophers. Plato’s artistic intention was to uncover the artist that lacked substance and support the knowledgeable creative philosophical mind that besides instant emotional pleasure has to contribute in social development.

  3. 87 Philosophy and African Philosophy: A Conceptual Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    concepts of philosophy and then African philosophy. This is because the ... philosophy inter alia, as one's moral guide is only but the informal meaning ... reasons for all the assumptions entertained by any disciplines. .... quite unfortunate to state here that the earliest studies and .... functionality, rigour and coherence. And as ...

  4. History of the use of system method in research of properties of criminality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Ф. Оболенцев

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted history of system method in criminology. Maintenance of criminology theories, offered the Ukrainian scientists is exposed. Perspective of the use of system method in criminology researches is grounded.

  5. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network: a history of multicenter collaboration in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzimenatos, Leah; Kim, Emily; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we review the history and progress of a large multicenter research network pertaining to emergency medical services for children. We describe the history, organization, infrastructure, and research agenda of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network and highlight some of the important accomplishments since its inception. We also describe the network's strategy to grow its research portfolio, train new investigators, and study how to translate new evidence into practice. This strategy ensures not only the sustainability of the network in the future but the growth of research in emergency medical services for children in general.

  6. 論戴震 (1723–1777 之考證哲學及其反思/On Dai Zhen’s (1723–1777 Philosophy of Evidential Research and Its Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jer-shiarn LEE

    2012-09-01

    Dai Zhen was known as a leading proponent of the evidential research (kaozheng school during the Qian Jia Era. However, he regarded kaozheng as primarily a means of revealing the truth. Moreover, he was regarded as a philosopher rather than as merely a kaozheng, or textual, scholar. In this respect, his philosophical writings reflect an attempt to substitute his own philosophy for the Song Philosophy of Principle (lixue. Dai Zhen’s philosophical writings indicate the impact philology had on philosophical issues. The methodology Dai Zhen adopted was essentially linguistic, that is, xungu (etymology, lit., “glossing”. The merit of this methodology was that it would trace back the original meanings of key terms in the Classics, and this in turn, would benefit the understanding of the Confucian tradition. The aim of this paper is to explore Dai Zhen’s attempt to reconstruct the Confucian tradition, and to assess his philosophy of evidential research in order to manifest its value and limitation.

  7. Kierkegaard's Philosophy: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopson, Lorraine; Gade, Eldon

    1981-01-01

    Discusses how the philosophy of Soren Kierkegaard can provide useful guidelines for the study of the counseling process. Compares Kierkegaard's philosophy with selected contributions of Freud, Skinner, Rogers, and May and with four common themes of counseling and psychotherapy. (Author)

  8. Operations research at CSIR - a brief history in cases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ittmann, HW

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available to Field Marshal Montgomery [1]. At the end of the war, the then Prime Minister, General ∗Logistics and Quantitative Methods, CSIR Built Environment, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001 †Corresponding author: Logistics and Quantitative Methods, CSIR Built... there were efforts to formalise theoretical OR research work [28] and to conduct non-military work. For example, as a result of the oil crisis in 1973, the CSIR group got very involved in energy-related work [42]. It is impossible to list and cover all...

  9. Revisiting the nuclear age : state of the art research in nuclear history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmbach, K.

    This article provides an overview of recent research developments in the field of nuclear history, focusing on Western European and Northern American research perspectives and topics. The analysis of these developments reveals under-researched areas which merit more focus from humanities and social

  10. The emancipatory character of action research, its history and the present state of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boog, B.

    2003-01-01

    Right from the start. action research was intended to be emancipatory research, and it still is. This article will underpin this by outlining its history and the present state of the art. Though a variety of action research approaches have developed along divergent theoretical pathways, it will be

  11. The Journal of Stored-Products Research: The living history of stored product protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    This year, the Journal of Stored Products Research (JSPR) completes 52 years of history with publications of research papers. With approx. one hundred articles annually, the JSPR is an important scientific forum for stored product researchers throughout the globe. The aims and scope of JSPR are focu...

  12. The Philosophy of University Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, James A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines a stated philosophy of university housing and the philosophy's effect on the facilitation of the personal and intellectual growth of students residing in the residence halls and the development of a sense of community. This particular philosophy governs the housing operations at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.…

  13. TRIGA International - History of Training Research Isotope production General Atomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    TRIGA conceived at GA in 1956 by a distinguished group of scientists including Edward Teller and Freeman Dyson. First TRIGA reactor Mk-1 was commissioned on 3 may 1958 at G.A. Characteristic feature of TRIGA reactors is inherent safety: Sitting can be confinement or conventional building. TRIGA reactors are the most prevalent in the world: 67 reactors in 24 countries. Steady state powers up to 14 MWt, pulsing up to 22,000 MWt. To enlarge the scope of its manufactured products, CERCA engaged in a Joint Venture with General Atomics, and in July 1995 a new Company was founded: TRIGA INTERNATIONAL SAS (50% GA, 50% CERCA; Head Office: Paris (France); Sales offices: GA San Diego (Ca, USA) and CERCA Lyon (France); Manufacturing plant: CERCA Romans. General Atomics ID: founded in 1955 at San Diego, California, by General Dynamics; status: Privately held corporation; owners: Neal and Linden Blue; business: High technology research, design, manufacturing, and production for industry and Government in the U.S. and overseas; locations: U.S., Germany, Japan, Australia, Thailand, Morocco; employees: 5,000. TRIGA's ID: CERCA is a subsidiary of AREVA, born in November 05, 1957. Activities: fuel manufacture for research reactor, equipment and components for high-energy physics, radioactive sources and reference sources; plants locations: Romans and Pierrelatte (France); total strength: 180. Since the last five years TRIGA has manufactured and delivered more than 800 fuel elements with a door to door service. TRIGA International has the experience to manufacture all types of TRIGA fuel: standard fuel elements, instrumented fuel elements, fuel followed control rods, geometry: 37.3 mm (1.47 in.), 35.8 mm (1.4 in), 13 mm (0.5 in), chemical Composition: U w% 8.5, 12, 20, 30 and 45 w/o, erbium and no erbium. TRIGA International is on INL's approved vendor list (ISO 9000/NQA) and is ready to meet any TRIGA fuel needs either in the US or worldwide

  14. The Landscape Of Philosophy Of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nistrup Madsen, Bodil; Hjørland, Birger; Brier, Søren

    2016-01-01

    In Denmark, all higher education programs must include a course on philosophy of science. Therefore, a group of researchers at Copenhagen Business School (CBS) are developing a smartphone application where information about central theoretical paradigms and concepts from philosophy of science can...... be visualized and disseminated in an easily accessible and systematic manner. This will be achieved by entering structured knowledge about concepts from philosophy of science in both Danish and English into a terminology and knowledge base which will provide the opportunity to “navigate in conceptual landscapes......” (here used metaphorically for terminological ontologies) in the same way as we navigate in maps. The result of the project will be a tool that can help students in their studies and support their information retrieval. The project is based on existing technologies and research in knowledge organization...

  15. A Brief History of Research on Mitotic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Richard McIntosh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes in summary form some of the most important research on chromosome segregation, from the discovery and naming of mitosis in the nineteenth century until around 1990. It gives both historical and scientific background for the nine chapters that follow, each of which provides an up-to-date review of a specific aspect of mitotic mechanism. Here, we trace the fruits of each new technology that allowed a deeper understanding of mitosis and its underlying mechanisms. We describe how light microscopy, including phase, polarization, and fluorescence optics, provided descriptive information about mitotic events and also enabled important experimentation on mitotic functions, such as the dynamics of spindle fibers and the forces generated for chromosome movement. We describe studies by electron microscopy, including quantitative work with serial section reconstructions. We review early results from spindle biochemistry and genetics, coupled to molecular biology, as these methods allowed scholars to identify key molecular components of mitotic mechanisms. We also review hypotheses about mitotic mechanisms whose testing led to a deeper understanding of this fundamental biological event. Our goal is to provide modern scientists with an appreciation of the work that has laid the foundations for their current work and interests.

  16. PHILOSOPHY IN CONTEMPORARY TIME: RELEVANCE VS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    This proper training of the human mind with the tool of philosophy translates ... students of philosophy do not understand what philosophy students do in their philosophy classes. ..... communication as well as the analysis and synthesis thereof.

  17. Psicoanálisis y filosofía: el problema del a priori de la investigación en Heidegger y Winnicott Psychoanalysis and philosophy: the problem of a priori research in Heidegger and Winnicott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Bareiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo intenta presentar la relación entre saber psicoanalítico y filosofía a partir de un diálogo entre Winnicott y Heidegger. Para ello se llevará a cabo dos reconstrucciones argumentativas. En primer lugar, se expondrá el modo en que Heidegger determina el carácter a priori de su investigación. En segundo lugar, se hará un recorrido por la obra de Winnicott a fin de determinar cómo concibe el vínculo entre psicoanálisis y filosofía y, fundamentalmente, para establecer si hay lugar en su pensamiento para un a priori que permita trazar un vínculo con la filosofía.This paper aims to present the relationship between psychoanalytic knowledge and philosophy through to dialogue between Winnicott and Heidegger. This will take place two reconstructions argumentative. First, it exposed the way in which Heidegger determines the a priori character of their research. Secondly, it will go through to Winnicott´s work to determine how he conceives the relationship between psychoanalysis and philosophy and, crucially, to establish if a form in their thinking to a priori that allows a link with philosophy.

  18. History of Pain Research and Management in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Merskey

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Scattered accounts of the treatment of pain by aboriginal Canadians are found in the journals of the early explorers and missionaries. French and English settlers brought with them the remedies of their home countries. The growth of medicine through the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in Europe, was mirrored in the practice and treatment methods of Canadians and Americans. In the 19th century, while Americans learned about causalgia and the pain of wounds, Canadian insurrections were much less devastating than the United States Civil War. By the end of that century, a Canadian professor working in the United States, Sir William Osler, was responsible for a standard textbook of medicine with a variety of treatments for painful illnesses. Yet pain did not figure in the index of that book. The modern period in pain research and management can probably be dated to the 20 years before the founding of the International Association for the Study of Pain. Pride of place belongs to The management of pain by John Bonica, published in Philadelphia in 1953 and based upon his work in Tacoma and Seattle. Ideas about pain were evolving in Canada in the 1950s with Donald Hebb, Professor of Psychology at McGill University in Montreal, corresponding with the leading American neurophysiologist, George H Bishop. Hebb's pupil Ronald Melzack engaged in studies of early experiences in relation to pain and, joining with Patrick Wall at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, published the 1965 paper in Science that revolutionized thinking. Partly because of this early start with prominent figures and partly because of its social system in the organization of medicine, Canada became a centre for a number of aspects of pain research and management, ranging from pain clinics in Halifax, Kingston and Saskatoon - which were among the earliest to advance treatment of pain - to studying the effects of implanted electrodes for neurosurgery. Work in Toronto by Moldofsky

  19. Danto, history, and the tragedy of human existence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankersmit, FR

    2003-01-01

    Philosophy of history is the Cinderella of contemporary philosophy. Philosophers rarely believe that the issues dealt with by philosophers of history are matters of any great theoretical interest or urgency. In their view philosophy of history rarely goes beyond the question of how results that have

  20. R.G. Collingwood, Analytical Philosophy And Logical Positivism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Connelly

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available R.G. Collingwood is not normally associated with analytic philosophy, neither negatively nor positively. He neither regarded himself, nor was regarded by his contemporaries and their successors, as an analytical philosopher. However, the story is more interestingly complex than this, both because Collingwood is one of the few pre-analytics in the UK who continues to be of interest to current analytical philosophers, especially in relation to the philosophy of art and history and his conception of metaphysics, and because he mounted a critique of analytical philosophy in the years of its emergence.

  1. HTGR safety philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joksimovic, V.; Fisher, C. R. [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)

    1981-01-15

    The accident at the Three Mile Island has focused public attention on reactor safety. Many public figures advocate a safer method of generating nuclear electricity for the second nuclear era in the U.S. The paper discusses the safety philosophy of a concept deemed suitable for this second nuclear era. The HTGR, in the course of its evolution, included safety as a significant determinant in design philosophy. This is particularly evident in the design features which provide inherent safety. Inherent features cause releases from a wide spectrum of accident conditions to be low. Engineered features supplement inherent features. The significance of HTGR safety features is quantified and order-of-magnitude type of comparisons are made with alternative ways of generating electricity.

  2. A Philosophy of Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Horne

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The survival of the homo sapiens sapiens species depends upon learning and passing on to future generations quality knowledge. Yet, we find to an increasing extent a corruption of the process, resulting in ignorance, environmental destruction, and breakdown of community. A fundamental shift in priorities is required to avert disaster. Articulating a solution depends upon a language, which, in turn, depends upon clarifying concepts. This paper identifies the dialectical (something existing because of what it is not interrelationship of episteme (theory and techné (practice within the framework of ethos, pathos, and logos. This structure and process as learning provides coherence in developing knowledge and can then be what in a generic sense is religion (to cohere, or bind. In a monk-like devotion to learning to generate quality knowledge humanity can appreciate its own meaning and make this world a better place in which to live. In this way religion becomes philosophy, and philosophy religion.

  3. A Philosophy of Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Horne

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The survival of the homo sapiens sapiens species depends upon learning and passing on to future generations quality knowledge. Yet, we find to an increasing extent a corruption of the process, resulting in ignorance, environmental destruction, and breakdown of community. A fundamental shift in priorities is required to avert disaster. Articulating a solution depends upon a language, which, in turn, depends upon clarifying concepts. This paper identifies the dialectical (something existing because of what it is not interrelationship of episteme (theory and techné (practice within the framework of ethos, pathos, and logos. This structure and process as learning provides coherence in developing knowledge and can then be what in a generic sense is religion (to cohere, or bind. In a monk-like devotion to learning to generate quality knowledge humanity can appreciate its own meaning and make this world a better place in which to live. In this way religion becomes philosophy, and philosophy religion.

  4. HTGR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.; Fisher, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island has focused public attention on reactor safety. Many public figures advocate a safer method of generating nuclear electricity for the second nuclear era in the U.S. The paper discusses the safety philosophy of a concept deemed suitable for this second nuclear era. The HTGR, in the course of its evolution, included safety as a significant determinant in design philosophy. This is particularly evident in the design features which provide inherent safety. Inherent features cause releases from a wide spectrum of accident conditions to be low. Engineered features supplement inherent features. The significance of HTGR safety features is quantified and order-of-magnitude type of comparisons are made with alternative ways of generating electricity. (author)

  5. HTGR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joskimovic, V.; Fisher, C.R.

    1980-08-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island has focused public attention on reactor safety. Many public figures advocate a safer method of generating nuclear electricity for the second nuclear era in the US. The paper discusses the safety philosophy of a concept deemed suitable for this second nuclear era. The HTGR, in the course of its evolution, included safety as a significant determinant in design philosophy. This is particularly evident in the design features which provide inherent safety. Inherent features cause releases from a wide spectrum of accident conditions to be low. Engineered features supplement inherent features. The significance of HTGR safety features is quantified and order-of-magnitude type of comparisons are made with alternative ways of generating electricity

  6. Information Philosophy in China: Professor Wu Kun’s 30 Years of Academic Thinking in Information Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowu Li

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Professor Wu Kun, from Xi'an Jiaotong University of China, has been studying information philosophy for 30 years. He thinks information conception is one of the most fundamental areas in philosophy and has founded information philosophy. He has done original and pioneering research in information ontology, epistemology, social information theory, information production theory, information evolution theory, information value, and information thinking directions. He is the first scholar to develop a completely new view of theories, systems, and methods about information philosophy.

  7. Microbiology, philosophy and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Maureen A

    2016-09-01

    There are not only many links between microbiological and philosophical topics, but good educational reasons for microbiologists to explore the philosophical issues in their fields. I examine three broad issues of classification, causality and model systems, showing how these philosophical dimensions have practical implications. I conclude with a discussion of the educational benefits for recognising the philosophy in microbiology. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Radiation protection philosophy alters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmin, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two significant events that have taken place this year in the field of radiation protection are reported. New SI units have been proposed (and effectively adopted), and the ICRP has revised its recommendations. Changes of emphasis in the latest recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) imply an altered radiation protection philosophy, in particular the relation of dose limits to estimates of average risk, an altered view of the critical organ approach and a new attitude to genetic dose to the population. (author)

  9. Philosophy in Seminaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Tarasiewicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The author attempts to answer the question concerning whether or not philosophy is needed in seminaries. In light of his analysis, it can be concluded that philosophical studies for future priests are a serious alternative to the fideistic positions often adopted by Catholics. The presence of philosophy in the seminary curriculum is supported by: (1 the need for building intellectual foundations of the religious faith professed by a cleric; the faith which cannot do without reason and abstain from justifying the rationale of its content; (2 the need for introducing the alumnus to the mysteries of the classical philosophy of being which can equip him with a better understanding of human nature and the surrounding reality. In this way, the seminarian: (1 acquires a reasonable belief that the human mind is able to know the objective and universal truth, including the truth about God as the Ultimate Cause of all that exists; (2 is able to enter into an intelligent dialogue about the truth with an increasingly globalized world.

  10. Physics, philosophy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel Maya, Augusto

    2001-01-01

    Physics and philosophy has join developments since the Jonios. The present article tries to analyze some of the philosophical problems that arise of the classic and contemporary physics and that affect the environmental vision. In general, it can be said that the discoveries of the physics has meant a progressive desplatonization of the western world, including the remaining of Platon that is included in Aristoteles philosophy. From the analysis some problems arise that is worthwhile to emphasize. Above all the relationship between determinism and random theory, from the environmental perspective it is necessary to wonder if it is licit to apply these concepts to man. With it the problem of freedom arise, attacked by Spinoza, but carefully protected by Kant's philosophy. Their acceptance supposes, however, the division between man and the cultural schizophrenia. Is it possible to explain freedom from the physics, such as was pretended by Epicuro or Prigonine? Has nature a wide field of freedom as it is assumed in some of the currents of contemporary physics? All of them are questions that the environmental thought has to confront, although it cannot solve them

  11. Newton and scholastic philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, Dmitri

    2016-03-01

    This article examines Isaac Newton's engagement with scholastic natural philosophy. In doing so, it makes two major historiographical interventions. First of all, the recent claim that Newton's use of the concepts of analysis and synthesis was derived from the Aristotelian regressus tradition is challenged on the basis of bibliographical, palaeographical and intellectual evidence. Consequently, a new, contextual explanation is offered for Newton's use of these concepts. Second, it will be shown that some of Newton's most famous pronouncements - from the General Scholium appended to the second edition of the Principia (1713) and from elsewhere - are simply incomprehensible without an understanding of specific scholastic terminology and its later reception, and that this impacts in quite significant ways on how we understand Newton's natural philosophy more generally. Contrary to the recent historiographical near-consensus, Newton did not hold an elaborate metaphysics, and his seemingly 'metaphysical' statements were in fact anti-scholastic polemical salvoes. The whole investigation will permit us a brief reconsideration of the relationship between the self-proclaimed 'new' natural philosophy and its scholastic predecessors.

  12. Safety philosophy of ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuaki

    1995-01-01

    Measures are important as the means to realize philosophy. Accordingly, it is meaningful to take measures as the object when the philosophy of ICRP is considered. As to controllable risk factors, restraint shall be done so as to make the risk being brought about as small as possible. When it is not necessary to limit restraining means, risk-free is ideal. Ionizing radiation is one of risk factors. The risk that ICRP speaks is the loss of the probability of maintaining life. The object of radiation protection is limited to the exposure to controllable radiation, and the aim of protection is to minimize risk under the condition of as low as reasonably achievable. The philosophy of ICRP and the problems in the measures are discussed. ICRP and ICRU must reconfirm the allotment of roles. Radiation protection system is composed of system of radiation dosimetry and system of dose limitation. The mission of ICRP is to recommend political decision, and it may make the political declaration 'The radiation below a certain amount may be regarded as safe'. It is better only to recommend the conversion relation of radiation dose and risk. The desire and demand to ICRP are mentioned. (K.I.)

  13. Reticence in Silence. An Examination of Heidegger's Phenomenology of Language in Contributions to Philosophy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nitsche, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 765, č. 1 (2011), s. 74-79 ISSN 1407-2157 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : Heidegger * contributions to philosophy * phenomenology * language * reticence in silence Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  14. Philosophy of science and the emerging paradigm: implications for hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osowiec, Darlene A

    2014-01-01

    Within the hypnosis field, there is a disparity between clinical and research worldviews. Clinical practitioners work with patients who are dealing with serious, often unique, real-world problems-lived experience. Researchers adhere to objective measurements, standardization, data, and statistics. Although there is overlap, an ongoing divergence can be counterproductive to the hypnosis field and to the larger professional and social contexts. The purpose of this article is: (1) to examine some of the major assumptions, the history, and the philosophy that undergird the definition of science, which was constructed in the mid-17th century; (2) to discover how science is a product of prevailing social forces and is undergoing a paradigm shift; and (3) to understand the more encompassing, holistic paradigm with implications for the hypnosis field.

  15. The problem of language in contemporary African philosophy: some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A critical discussion of the contentious problem of language in contemporary African philosophy is attempted in this paper. The problem centres on whether or not African languages can be used in 'doing' contemporary African philosophy, where 'doing' means teaching, writing and researching. It also revolves around the ...

  16. The Current Status of the Philosophy of Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Peter; Ruse, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The philosophy of biology today is one of the most exciting areas of philosophy. It looks critically across the life sciences, teasing out conceptual issues and difficulties bringing to bear the tools of philosophical analysis to achieve clarification and understanding. This essay surveys work in all of the major directions of research:…

  17. The optimal rating philosophy for the rating of SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikkers, F.; Thibeault, A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the optimal rating philosophy for the rating of SMEs, and to describe the consequences of the chosen philosophy on several related aspects. As to our knowledge, this is the first paper that studies the considerations of financial institutions on what

  18. Theory and History, Questions and Methodology: Current and Future Issues in Research into ICT in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Anne; Jones, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Serious criticisms of research in information and communications technology (ICT) in education have been published recently in both the UK and the USA. This paper addresses several issues raised in these commentaries: a lack of sound theoretical underpinnings to our research, persistent neglect of the history of our sub-discipline, the choice of…

  19. Talking With Scholars: Developing a Research Environment for Oral History Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemman, Max; Scagliola, Stef; de Jong, Franciska M.G.; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.

    Scholars are yet to make optimal use of Oral History collections. For the uptake of digital research tools in the daily working practice of researchers, practices and conventions commonly adhered to in the subfields of the humanities should be taken into account during development, in order to

  20. Lifetime radiation effects research in animals: An overview of the status and philosophy of studies at University of California-Davis Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Book, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the life-shortening and carcinogenic effects of internal emitters and external irradiation have been conducted at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research for over three decades. Our principal animal model has been the beagle dog. The beagle's tissue sensitivity, metabolic and dosimetric characteristics, pathologic responses, and aging changes give it relevance for the assessment of radiation risks in humans. Although our results confirm the existence of an amelioration of effects at low doses and low dose rates (the dose-rate effectiveness factor), the manifestation of the amelioration may vary. For example, with x-irradiation higher exposures appeared to decrease latency but did not alter the incidence of mammary cancer, whereas with the bone-seeking radionuclides, 90 Sr and 226 Ra, higher doses decreased the latency and increased the incidence of osteosarcomas. Radiation-induced leukemias were seen only with high doses at high dose rates but only from 90 Sr and from chronic exposures to 60 Co, mainly in dogs exposed beginning in utero. Most of the radiation-induced life shortening in dogs exposed to internal emitters appears attributable to an increased cancer risk, but this is not necessarily the case for x-irradiated dogs

  1. Modern Basics Philosophy of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Bazaluk

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In thisarticle the authors examine the current understanding ofthe foundations ofthe philosophy of education. Lately when it is spoken about human development and education and concretized that it is the perfection of its mind. And if at the end of the twentieth century the subject of educational impact was human being, consisting of social and biological entities, at the beginning of the XXI century the situation has changed. Advances in neuroscience (Risto Nааtаnеn, James Olds, Donald Hebb, Elkhonon Goldberg and others allowed specifying the subject of the educational impact and identifying in a person the material organization that really makes him standing out from the world of living organisms. We are talking about the neural structures that are formed and developed in the human brain and which are not observed (and if they are observed, then in a different format and with different functional manifestations in the brain of higher animals. We are talking about consistently evolving neural networks and subconscious consciousness which perform the corresponding functions: subliminal (unconscious and conscious. If the consistent development of the structure of the human brain sees neuroscience, the development of the functions of this structure, considering psychology. Methods, ways and means of transmission of socio-cultural heritage from one generation to another explores pedagogy. Therefore, the philosophy of education that considers the impact of educational technology, global educational model should be based on the integration of research in neuroscience, psychology and pedagogy.

  2. Kazakh Philosophy: From Abai to Shakarim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydykov, Yerlan B.; Nysanbayev, Abdumalik N.; Kurmanbaev, Erbol A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the influence of Shakarim--a follower of Abai--on Kazakh philosophy, his worldview and opinion of existential issues. The specifics of the problem under consideration required taking a synthetic approach to the use of various methods in this research. A synthesis of dialectical, metaphysical, rational,…

  3. New waves in philosophy of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, O

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen promising young researchers write on what they take to be the right philosophical account of mathematics and discuss where the philosophy of mathematics ought to be going. New trends are revealed, such as an increasing attention to mathematical practice, a reassessment of the canon, and inspiration from philosophical logic.

  4. Introduction to the special issue Hermann Weyl and the philosophy of the 'New Physics'

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bianchi, Silvia; Catren, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    This Special Issue Hermann Weyl and the Philosophy of the 'New Physics' has two main objectives: first, to shed fresh light on the relevance of Weyl's work for modern physics and, second, to evaluate the importance of Weyl's work and ideas for contemporary philosophy of physics. Regarding the first objective, this Special Issue emphasizes aspects of Weyl's work (e.g. his work on spinors in n dimensions) whose importance has recently been emerging in research fields across both mathematical and experimental physics, as well as in the history and philosophy of physics. Regarding the second objective, this Special Issue addresses the relevance of Weyl's ideas regarding important open problems in the philosophy of physics, such as the problem of characterizing scientific objectivity and the problem of providing a satisfactory interpretation of fundamental symmetries in gauge theories and quantum mechanics. In this Introduction, we sketch the state of the art in Weyl studies and we summarize the content of the contributions to the present volume.

  5. Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lecky-Thompson, Jenni

    2009-01-01

    Philosophy Newsletter. Articles by: Edward Craig - From the Chairman. Onora O'Neill - "It's the newspapers I can't stand. Serena Olsaretti - The 2004 Annual Royal Institute of Philosophy Conference. Mary Leng - Mathematical Knowledge Conference. Postgraduate Conference. Jane Heal - Facts, Fables and Funds. Hugh Mellor - Uses and Abuses of Probability. Amanda Boyle - Nobody Knows Anything: Philosophy, Film and Me. Jaime Whyte - Seven Years at Cambridge Alex Oliver...

  6. Telling the history of self-advocacy: a challenge for inclusive research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This paper tells the story of Central England People First's (CEPF) History Project. This was an inclusive research project, owned and controlled by members of CEPF which sought to chart its 21-year history, 1990-2012. It illustrates both the strengths of such a project and some of the challenges. It concludes that using inclusive research methods enabled the story to be told, but that it was less successful in addressing questions about why the organization grew and prospered in the 1990s, only to struggle in its later years, and what this tells us about the conditions which enable self-advocacy to flourish. The paper was collaboratively written by the CEPF History Project team and an academic ally. Different fonts differentiate the contributions, although it is acknowledged that lots of the ideas were shared. This paper explores issues in telling the history of self advocacy using inclusive research methods. It explains how and why CEPF recorded its history, what we found out, and some of the questions we have had to think about: whose voices we hear what to include, what to leave out what parts of the research people with learning difficulties can do what self advocacy means to different people how to make use of research other people have done. It raises some new questions about directions for inclusive research. The Paper was written by the CEPF History team - Craig Hart, Ian Davies, Angela Still and Catherine O'Byrne - working with Jan Walmsley. We wanted to make it clear what were Jan Walmsley's ideas and what were our ideas. We have done this by writing our ideas in a different font. BUT lots of the ideas belong to all of us. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Towards a critical dialogue between the history of sport, management history, and sport management/organisation studies in research and teaching

    OpenAIRE

    McDowell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses possibilities for a critical dialogue between the history of sport, management history, and sport management/organization studies. Many historians of sport will find themselves employed in sport management programmes, and these programmes allow the potential to interpret historical perspectives on sport, as well as historical research methods in sport management. This offers possibilities in terms of research as well. However, if historians are to engage in a research a...

  8. The Philosophy of Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcham, Khalil; Silk, Joseph; Barrow, John D.; Saunders, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Part I. Issues in the Philosophy of Cosmology: 1. Cosmology, cosmologia and the testing of cosmological theories George F. R. Ellis; 2. Black holes, cosmology and the passage of time: three problems at the limits of science Bernard Carr; 3. Moving boundaries? - comments on the relationship between philosophy and cosmology Claus Beisbart; 4. On the question why there exists something rather than nothing Roderich Tumulka; Part II. Structures in the Universe and the Structure of Modern Cosmology: 5. Some generalities about generality John D. Barrow; 6. Emergent structures of effective field theories Jean-Philippe Uzan; 7. Cosmological structure formation Joel R. Primack; 8. Formation of galaxies Joseph Silk; Part III. Foundations of Cosmology: Gravity and the Quantum: 9. The observer strikes back James Hartle and Thomas Hertog; 10. Testing inflation Chris Smeenk; 11. Why Boltzmann brains do not fluctuate into existence from the de Sitter vacuum Kimberly K. Boddy, Sean M. Carroll and Jason Pollack; 12. Holographic inflation revised Tom Banks; 13. Progress and gravity: overcoming divisions between general relativity and particle physics and between physics and HPS J. Brian Pitts; Part IV. Quantum Foundations and Quantum Gravity: 14. Is time's arrow perspectival? Carlo Rovelli; 15. Relational quantum cosmology Francesca Vidotto; 16. Cosmological ontology and epistemology Don N. Page; 17. Quantum origin of cosmological structure and dynamical reduction theories Daniel Sudarsky; 18. Towards a novel approach to semi-classical gravity Ward Struyve; Part V. Methodological and Philosophical Issues: 19. Limits of time in cosmology Svend E. Rugh and Henrik Zinkernagel; 20. Self-locating priors and cosmological measures Cian Dorr and Frank Arntzenius; 21. On probability and cosmology: inference beyond data? Martin Sahlén; 22. Testing the multiverse: Bayes, fine-tuning and typicality Luke A. Barnes; 23. A new perspective on Einstein's philosophy of cosmology Cormac O

  9. William Whewell's philosophy of architecture and the historicization of biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Aleta

    2016-10-01

    William Whewell's work on historical science has received some attention from historians and philosophers of science. Whewell's own work on the history of German Gothic church architecture has been touched on within the context of the history of architecture. To a large extent these discussions have been conducted separately. I argue that Whewell intended his work on Gothic architecture as an attempt to (help) found a science of historical architecture, as an exemplar of historical science. I proceed by analyzing the key features of Whewell's philosophy of historical science. I then show how his architectural history exemplifies this philosophy. Finally, I show how Whewell's philosophy of historical science matches some developments in a science (biological systematics) that, in the mid-to late-nineteenth century, came to be reinterpreted as a historical science. I comment briefly on Whewell as a potential influence on nineteenth century biology and in particular on Darwin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. French PWR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.

    1986-05-01

    Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach, each of them having possibilities and limits. As a consequence of the global risk objective set in 1977 for nuclear reactors, safety analysis was extended to the evaluation of events more complex than the conventional ones, and later to the evaluation of the feasibility of the offsite emergency plans in case of severe accidents

  11. A TQC philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sandrock

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent upsurge in the quest for world class manufacturing. Tremendous amounts of effort are being exerted to attain Total quality Control (TQC - so as to be able to produce "the best". The EEC has stated categorically that it will only support accredited suppliers, and this has been partly responsible for the recent fixation on techniques for excellence. These techniques often fail to produce results. This paper presents a systems based philosophy for working towards world class levels of manufacturing.

  12. Modern philosophy of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirillov N. P

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors suggest the concept of philosophy of education, which implies that education is focused on building the concept of a creative professional. The paper actualizes problems of methodology of scientific knowledge, ontological and gnoseological thinking alongside with their role in education. It is claimed that understanding of gnoseological thinking that captures the cognitive process as a whole, including methods, resources, procedures, approaches and ability to apply this method within the scope of science in any educational process, is a necessary condition in developing a creatively thinking professional. Thus, in order to implement this objective the paper covers the use of interdisciplinary and abovedisciplinary approaches in education.

  13. Poetry, philosophy, political

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pucheu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering how persistently a certain amount of specialized critics work to diminish contemporary Brazilian poetry, this essay seeks to conceive an articulation among poetry, philosophy and politics. We atempt to do that, on the one hand, through the philosophical concepts of aporia and wonder (thaumazein, and, on the another hand, by considering what Giorgio Agamben refers to as “an insurmontable disjunction between whatever singularity and the State organization”. Among the many poets that could be approached in this context, we chose to close the text with an interpretation some of Tarso de Melo's remarkably and explicitly political poems.

  14. Introducing philosophy of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Friend, Michele

    2014-01-01

    What is mathematics about? Does the subject-matter of mathematics exist independently of the mind or are they mental constructions? How do we know mathematics? Is mathematical knowledge logical knowledge? And how is mathematics applied to the material world? In this introduction to the philosophy of mathematics, Michele Friend examines these and other ontological and epistemological problems raised by the content and practice of mathematics. Aimed at a readership with limited proficiency in mathematics but with some experience of formal logic it seeks to strike a balance between conceptual acc

  15. Philosophy of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M; Woods, John

    2009-01-01

    One of the most striking features of mathematics is the fact that we are much more certain about the mathematical knowledge we have than about what mathematical knowledge is knowledge of. Are numbers, sets, functions and groups physical entities of some kind? Are they objectively existing objects in some non-physical, mathematical realm? Are they ideas that are present only in the mind? Or do mathematical truths not involve referents of any kind? It is these kinds of questions that have encouraged philosophers and mathematicians alike to focus their attention on issues in the philosophy of mat

  16. Philosophy of power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amein, H.; Joyia, Y.; Qureshi, M.N.; Asif, M.

    1995-01-01

    In view of the huge power demand in future, the capital investment requirements for the development of power projects to meet the future energy requirements are so alarming that public sector alone cannot manage to raise funds and participation of the private sector in power generation development has become imperative. This paper discusses a power generation philosophy based on preference to the exploitation of indigenous resources and participation of private sector. In order to have diversification in generation resources, due consideration has been given to the development of nuclear power and even non-conventional but promising technologies of solar, wind, biomass and geothermal etc. (author)

  17. A Citation Analysis of Western Journals Cited in Taiwan's Library and Information Science and History Research Journals: From a Research Evaluation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Hsuan; Lin, Chi-Shiou

    2011-01-01

    This article examines citations of Western journals in eight LIS journals and six history journals published in Taiwan. The findings show that both the Western journals' impact factor values and whether they are included in JCR may not necessarily indicate their real use in Taiwan's LIS and history research--especially in history research.…

  18. Philosophy as Inquiry Aimed at the Absolute Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Snarskaya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Philosophy as the absolute knowledge has been studied from two different but closely related approaches: historical and logical. The first approach exposes four main stages in the history of European metaphysics that marked out types of “philosophical absolutism”: the evolution of philosophy brought to light metaphysics of being, method, morals and logic. All of them are associated with the names of Aristotle, Bacon/Descartes, Kant and Hegel. Then these forms are considered in the second approach that defined them as subject-matter of philosophy as such. Due to their overall, comprehensive character, the focus of philosophy on them justifies its claim on absoluteness as far as philosophy is aimed at comprehension of the world’s unity regardless of the philosopher’s background, values and other preferences. And that is its prerogative since no other form of consciousness lays down this kind of aim. Thus, philosophy is defined as an everlasting attempt to succeed in conceiving the world in all its multifold manifestations. This article is to try to clarify the claim of philosophy on the absolute knowledge.

  19. French PWR Safety Philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    The first 900 MWe units, built under the American Westinghouse licence and with reference to the U. S. regulation, were followed by 28 standardized units, C P1 and C P2 series. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. As early as 1976, this experience was taken into account by French Safety organisms to discuss, with Electricite de France, the safety options for the planned 1300 MWe units, P4 and P4 series. In 1983, the new reactor scheduled, Ni4 series 1400 MWe, is a totally French design which satisfies the French regulations and other French standards and codes. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach each of them having possibilities and limits. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from operating experience have contributed to the French safety philosophy improvement. The methodology now applied to safety evaluation develops a new facet of the in depth defense concept by taking highly unlikely events into consideration, by developing the search of safety consistency of the design, and by completing the deterministic approach by the probabilistic one

  20. The philosophy of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rickles, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Does the future exist already? What is space? Are time machines physically possible? What is quantum mechanical reality like? Are there many universes? Is there a 'true' geometry of the universe? Why does there appear to be an arrow of time? Do humans play a special role in the world? In this unique introductory book, Dean Rickles guides the reader through these and other core questions that keep philosophers of physics up at night. He discusses the three pillars of modern physics (quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, and the theories of relativity), in addition to more cutting-edge themes such as econophysics, quantum gravity, quantum computers, and gauge theories. The book's approach is based on the idea that philosophy of physics is a kind of 'interpretation game' in which we try to map physical theories onto our world. But the rules of this game often lead to a multiplicity of possible victors: rarely do we encounter a simple answer. The Philosophy of Physics offers a highly accessible introduction...

  1. [The endeavours by Wincentego Lutosławskiego (1863-1954) to obtain a chair of philosophy at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mróz, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    When applying for a chair of philosophy at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow in 1891, Wincentego Lutosławskiego had already published a number of important articles as well as a doctoral dissertation, which he defended at Dorpat University. While working at the University of Kazan, Lutosławskiego had been engaged in several research sojourns abroad, including one in London. He had also made contact with another Polish specialist on Plato's philosophy, Stanisław Pawlicki, who gave a positive referral on the publication of Lutosławskiego's work On Plato's logic, part I by Akademia Umiejtno [ci (Academy of Science) in Cracow (1891); the subsequent conflict between the two scholars stemmed from differences in world-view and differences in scholarly views relating to methodology and interpretation. The application by Lutosławskiego, despite being supported by the dean of Faculty of Philosophy, Maurycy Staszewski, the only philosophy sitting on the faculty council, was rejected, and the majority of faculty council opted for Pawlicki, a renowned professor of the Faculty of Theology. Lutosławskiego continued to pursue his scholarly career abroad, publishing in several European languages, until the publication in 1897 of his famous work on Plato (The Origin and Growth of Plato's Logic). Meanwhile Pawlicki, burdened both by his teaching responsibilities and the results of the research by Lutosławskiego, was not able to complete (before his death in 1916) his History of ancient philosophy, the intention of doing which he had declared in the first volume, published in 1890. While Lutosławskiego was prevented from working in Crackow, he became - thanks to his works - a historian of ancient philosophy whose world renown has persisted until the present day. Pawlicki obtained the Chair, but his works on the history of philosophy are rarely cited today.

  2. [Helminthology according to the philosophy of science of Imre Lakatos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orensanz, Martín; Denegri, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Lakatos's philosophy of science has been used for different branches of biology, however this has not been true for helminthology. Therefore, this article examines the possibility of using his methodology of scientific research programmes (SRP) for reconstructing the history of the discipline of helminthology. It is upheld that the first SRP in biology was inaugurated by Aristotle, and its protective belt included a small group of auxiliary hypotheses referring to helminths. This programme continued up until the 17th century, when two rival programmes in helminthology arose: the internalist and the externalist. After the second half of the 19th century the internalist SRP was abandoned, while the externalist considerably broadened its protective belt during the 20th century. The internalist programme was abandoned due to the crucial experiments of Küchenmeister, which permitted the consolidation of the externalist SRP.

  3. History and Nature of Science in High School: Building up Parameters to Guide Educational Materials and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forato, Thais Cyrino de Mello; Martins, Roberto de Andrade; Pietrocola, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the main results of a research examining the didactic transposition of history and philosophy of science in high school level. The adaptation of history of science to this particular level, addressing some aspects of the nature of science aiming at the students' critical engagement, was analyzed by examining both the…

  4. International public management network symposium on administrative philosophies and management practice

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    Do administrative philosophies, however defined, lead or trail change in public sector organizations? How may we define administrative philosophy and is useful to distinguish between philosophy, doctrine and justification? To what extent does academic research and theory influence administrative practice? Do academics learn most of what they theorize about from practitioners? These and other questions are addressed in this first IPMN electronic symposium.

  5. Analysing Theoretical Frameworks of Moral Education through Lakatos's Philosophy of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin

    2014-01-01

    The structure of studies of moral education is basically interdisciplinary; it includes moral philosophy, psychology, and educational research. This article systematically analyses the structure of studies of moral educational from the vantage points of philosophy of science. Among the various theoretical frameworks in the field of philosophy of…

  6. Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, and Counseling Ethics: Not an Abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urofsky, Robert I.; Engels, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several decades, increased attention has been given to ethics in the preparation of counselors and psychologists. With that increase comes a number of voices calling for exposure to and integration of not only moral philosophy but other areas of philosophy to enhance understanding and provide a foundation for counseling practice. The…

  7. The History of Women in Botany and Science at the Herbarium Library: Evaluation for Historical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Sandra J.

    Evaluating library collections by comparing them to bibliographies has a long history in research libraries. This evaluative study examined all 107 titles within the "Women in Botany" section of the Herbarium Library at The Ohio State University (OSU). The Herbarium is not part of the OSU Library system, but functions as a satellite to…

  8. Classical Natural History: the importance of volunteers in collection management and research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reumer, J.W.F.; Post, K.

    2010-01-01

    As a result of increasing budget constraints and decreasing interest in classical natural history, the work effort of volunteer researchers and the need for private funding are of growing importance. A brief historical background is provided, showing the decreasing interest in the subject shown by

  9. History matters...through partnerships that advance research, education, and public service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Reznick

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the ongoing strategic partnership between the History of Medicine Division at the National Library of Medicine and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech to allow researchers, educators, and students access to new forms of cooperative work through a growing network of resources.

  10. A brief history of HIV vaccine research: stepping back to the drawing board?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, Frank

    2008-09-12

    In September 2007, it was announced that the most promising HIV vaccine trial had to be stopped because it had failed to show the protection that was hoped for. Here, the history of HIV vaccine development from the discovery of HIV-1 in 1983 until 2008, the underlying ideas on protective immunity to HIV and potential avenues for vaccine research are discussed.

  11. A short history of research on immunity to infectious diseases in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muiswinkel, van W.B.; Nakao, M.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the history of research on immunity to infectious diseases of fish in the period between 1965 and today. Special attention is paid to those studies, which are dealing with the interaction between immune system and invading pathogens in bony fish. Moreover, additional biographic

  12. [From literature to academic history:the position and pathway of acupuncture theory research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujian

    2017-03-12

    There are two clues in academic inheritance of acupuncture, including theoretical inheritance and empirical inheritance. Up to now, the mainstream of acupuncture theory has not been in conformity with empirical clinic, and could not explain new clinical techniques. The existing acupuncture theories are in need of strict re-examination, and new academic achievements shall be carefully absorbed. The literature review, concepts research and academic history study are considered as key pathways of acupuncture theory research.

  13. Constructive philosophy of technology and responsible innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, Philip A.E.; Franssen, M.; Vermaas, P.E.; Kroes, P.; Meijers, A.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    This essay argues for a new turn after the empirical turn in the philosophy of technology: the societal turn, which is the turn from reflective philosophy of technology (academic philosophy concerned with analysis and understanding) to constructive philosophy of technology (philosophy that is

  14. Enlarging the bounds of moral philosophy: Why did Isaac Newton conclude the Opticks the way he did?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, John

    2017-01-01

    This paper draws attention to the remarkable closing words of Isaac Newton's Optice (1706) and subsequent editions of the Opticks (1718, 1721), and tries to suggest why Newton chose to conclude his book with a puzzling allusion to his own unpublished conclusions about the history of religion. Newton suggests in this concluding passage that the bounds of moral philosophy will be enlarged as natural philosophy is ‘perfected’. Asking what Newton might have had in mind, the paper first considers the idea that he was foreshadowing the ‘moral Newtonianism’ developed later in the eighteenth century; then it considers the idea that he was perhaps pointing to developments in natural theology. Finally, the paper suggests that Newton wanted to at least signal the importance of attempting to recover the true original religion, and perhaps was hinting at his intention to publish his own extensive research on the history of the Church.

  15. Physics and philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Feyerabend, P K; Agassi, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This collection of the writings of Paul Feyerabend is focused on his philosophy of quantum physics, the hotbed of the key issues of his most debated ideas. Written between 1948 and 1970, these writings come from his first and most productive period. These early works are important for two main reasons. First, they document Feyerabend's deep concern with the philosophical implications of quantum physics and its interpretations. These ideas were paid less attention in the following two decades. Second, the writings provide the crucial background for Feyerabend's critiques of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn. Although rarely considered by scholars, Feyerabend's early work culminated in the first version of Against Method. These writings guided him on all the key issues of his most well-known and debated theses, such as the incommensurability thesis, the principles of proliferation and tenacity, and his particular version of relativism, and more specifically on quantum mechanics.

  16. Philosophy of ecology

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Bryson; Peacock, Kent A

    2011-01-01

    The most pressing problems facing humanity today - over-population, energy shortages, climate change, soil erosion, species extinctions, the risk of epidemic disease, the threat of warfare that could destroy all the hard-won gains of civilization, and even the recent fibrillations of the stock market - are all ecological or have a large ecological component. in this volume philosophers turn their attention to understanding the science of ecology and its huge implications for the human project. To get the application of ecology to policy or other practical concerns right, humanity needs a clear and disinterested philosophical understanding of ecology which can help identify the practical lessons of science. Conversely, the urgent practical demands humanity faces today cannot help but direct scientific and philosophical investigation toward the basis of those ecological challenges that threaten human survival. This book will help to fuel the timely renaissance of interest in philosophy of ecology that is now oc...

  17. Philosophie en islam

    OpenAIRE

    Jambet, Christian

    2013-01-01

    I. L’héritage d’Avicenne au xviie siècle : le Commentaire de la Métaphysique du Shifā’ par Mullā Ṣadrā Les philosophes de l’Iran safavide ont une dette envers l’œuvre d’Avicenne, Abū ʽAlī ibn Sīnā (m. 428/1037). L’ouvrage synthétique et allusif d’Avicenne, al-Ishārāt wa l-tanbīhāt fut méthodiquement étudié par les savants imamites quand Naṣīr al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī en eut achevé son commentaire vers 664/1246. Les philosophes instruits de la théologie rationnelle imamite et de la philosophie « illumin...

  18. Legitimizing Blacks in Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameliah Shorter-Bourhanou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In its efforts toward improving diversity, the discipline of philosophy has tended to focus on increasing the number of black philosophers. One crucial issue that has received less attention is the extent to which black philosophers are delegitimized in the discipline because their philosophical contributions challenge the status quo. A systematic problem that bars black philosophers from equal and full participation, this delegitimization precludes the emergence of genuine diversity and reveals the importance of interrogating broader attitudes toward black philosophical contributions. In this essay, I argue for radical systematic changes to disciplinary hallmarks of professionalization such as pedagogy, mentoring, publishing, and hiring practices with the aim of legitimizing black philosophers and their contributions.

  19. Reflections concerning radiation protection philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seelentag, W.

    1981-01-01

    Critical philosophy also includes observations of the technical amplified senses make, i.e. the application of accessory instruments, measuring instruments and statistic methods. The application of this philosophy is, among other things, referred to when taking the linear dose response relationship for stochastic radiation effects as an example. (DG) [de

  20. Kaupapa Maori, Philosophy and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Georgina

    2014-01-01

    Goals for adding philosophy to the school curriculum centre on the perceived need to improve the general quality of critical thinking found in society. School philosophy also provides a means for asking questions of value and purpose about curriculum content across and between subjects, and, furthermore, it affirms the capability of children to…

  1. Odera Oruka's Contribution to Philosophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commentators on the four trends in contemporary African philosophy as enunciated by H. Odera Oruka frequently focus on the merits and demerits of each trend. However, many of them are obblivious to the way in which sagacity emancipates African philosophy by putting reason in its rightful pivotal position. This article ...

  2. Present Day Philosophies of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2006-01-01

    Presently, there are competing philosophies of education which need comparison. Two philosophies will be compared which are at opposite ends of the continuum. They are distinctly different. And yet, both schools of thought have their disciples. Each of the two will be discussed in terms of its essential features and then there will be selected…

  3. Elementary School Philosophy: A Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartenberg, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    This article is a response to criticism of my book "Big Ideas for Little Kids." The main topics addressed are: Who is the audience for the book? Can people without formal philosophical training can be good facilitators of elementary school philosophy discussions? Is it important to assess attempts to teach philosophy in elementary school? Should…

  4. Do People with Intellectual Disability Require Special Human Subjects Research Protections? The Interplay of History, Ethics, and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, Chris; Brosco, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    People with intellectual disability (ID) have a long history of discrimination and stigmatization, and a more recent history of pride and self-advocacy. The early history suggests that people with ID are a vulnerable population and deserve special research protections as do some other groups; the disability rights movement of the late 20th century…

  5. Modern Questions Of The Legal Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy A. Torgashev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author considers fundamental problems of law connected with equality, justice and freedom. Author proves that philosophy and law as forms of public consciousness carry out the important closely interconnected among themselves functions of the social life judgment. In the article author noted that among other forms of public consciousness law is one of difficult objects of knowledge, because law is connected with such forms of consciousness as philosophy, morals, religion, policy. The legal philosophy is the philosophical discipline having the subject the general regularities of law functioning, taken in their historical and sociocultural development, definition and the sense of legal judgment and its fundamental concepts. Law represents a set of obligatory rules of conduct (norms established by the authorized or the state. Diverse spiritual life of the society assumes a variety in the nature of law. The typology of philosophical concepts of the law and how the legal philosophy interprets legal reality is researched, various philosophical and legal concepts which are caused by two main types of rights – natural and positive are allocated. Author gives opinions of scientists, and explains own views of the author.

  6. [Where is going philosophy of psychiatry ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Elisabetta

    2016-12-01

    This contribution provides a critical outline of the current trends in the field of "philosophy of psychiatry" by following their developments in the last decade. The first part of the paper focuses on the evolution of this field from a strictly conceptual approach to a perspective more attentive to the social, practical, and clinical dimension of psychiatry. The second part of the paper points out that the need of a mutual commitment of philosophy and psychiatry is perceived according to different ways by the countries involved in this research area. The paper deals especially with the case of France, where the enthusiasm for the "new philosophy of psychiatry" has not had the same impact on the philosophical scene as in the English speaking countries. In conclusion, the paper shows that the field of philosophy of psychiatry stands as a fertile ground for new forms of interaction between the analytic, and the continental philosophical traditions. This interaction takes place, more particularly, as regards such topics as normativity, language, and interpretation.

  7. [Treatment goals in FACE philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Domingo; Maté, Amaia; Zabalegui, Paula; Valenzuela, Jaime

    2017-03-01

    The FACE philosophy is characterized by clearly defined treatment goals: facial esthetics, dental esthetics, periodontal health, functional occlusion, neuromuscular mechanism and joint function. The purpose is to establish ideal occlusion with good facial esthetics and an orthopedic stable joint position. The authors present all the concepts of FACE philosophy and illustrate them through one case report. Taking into account all the FACE philosophy concepts increases diagnostic ability and improves the quality and stability of treatment outcomes. The goal of this philosophy is to harmonize the facial profile, tooth alignment, periodontium, functional occlusion, neuromuscular mechanism and joint function. The evaluation and treatment approach to vertical problems are unique to the philosophy. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  8. Frauen in Philosophie und Wissenschaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Harzer

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Der von Brigitte Doetsch herausgegebene Band präsentiert die aktuelle Feministische Philosophie und sammelt Beiträge, die Einblick geben in den gegenwärtigen Forschungsstand, wie ihn „Philosophinnen im dritten Jahrtausend“ erreicht haben. Insgesamt neun, zum Teil interdisziplinär ausgerichtete Arbeiten werden vorgestellt. Das Themenspektrum ist weit: Geschichte der Philosophie; Politische Philosophie und Naturphilosophie; Epistemologie; Biopolitik und Bioethik als Bereiche praktischer Philosophie; Forschung über Geschlechterverhältnisse. Alle Beiträge gehen zurück auf eine Vortragsreihe des Braunschweiger Zentrums für Gender Studies (www.genderzentrum.de. Leser/-innen erhalten einen guten Überblick über die aktuelle Frauenforschung aus der Sicht theoretischer und praktischer Philosophie.

  9. Innovation was not enough a history of the Midwestern Universities Research Association (MURA)

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Lawrence; Sessler, Andrew; Symon, Keith; Young, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a history of the Midwestern Universities Research Association (MURA) during its lifetime from the early 1950s to the late 1960s. MURA was responsible for a number of important contributions to the science of particle accelerators, including the invention of fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAG), as well as contributions to accelerator orbit theory, radio frequency acceleration techniques, colliding beams technology, orbit instabilities, computation methods, and designs of accelerator magnets and linear accelerator cavities. A number of students were trained by MURA in accelerator techniques, and went on to important posts where they made further contributions to the field. The authors were all members of the MURA staff and themselves made many contributions to the field. No other such history exists, and there are relatively few publications devoted to the history of particle accelerators.

  10. Quantum philosophy understanding and interpreting contemporary science

    CERN Document Server

    Omnès, Roland

    2002-01-01

    In this magisterial work, Roland Omnès takes us from the academies of ancient Greece to the laboratories of modern science as he seeks to do no less than rebuild the foundations of the philosophy of knowledge. One of the world's leading quantum physicists, Omnès reviews the history and recent development of mathematics, logic, and the physical sciences to show that current work in quantum theory offers new answers to questions that have puzzled philosophers for centuries: Is the world ultimately intelligible? Are all events caused? Do objects have definitive locations? Omnès addresses these p

  11. A historical introduction to the philosophy of science

    CERN Document Server

    Losee, John

    1993-01-01

    This new edition brings up to date this accessible study of the philosophy of science. Since the time of Plato and Aristotle, scientists and philosophers have raised questions about the proper evaluation of scientific interpretations. A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science is an exposition of differing viewpoints on issues such as the distinction between scientific inquiry and other types of interpretation, the relationship between theories and observation reports; the evaluation of competing theories; and the nature of progress in science. The author makes accessible the philosophy of science to readers who may not have extensive knowledge of formal logic or the history of the several sciences. The third edition incorporates an extended discussion of recent developments. Historicist critics of Logical Empiricism have established that evaluative standards and cognitive aims have changed within the history of science. This edition examines these changes, the recent controversies over scientific...

  12. The early history of research funding in South Africa: From the Research Grant Board to the FRD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndivhuwo M. Luruli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The South African government has a long tradition of supporting research at public higher education institutions. Such support commenced in the early 20th century, although the exact nature of the support at that time is poorly documented. The oldest research funding model in the country was agency funding, which started as early as 1911 through the Royal Society of South Africa. A few years later, in 1918, a more coordinated funding body called the Research Grant Board (RGB was established in the Union of South Africa. The RGB offered competitive funding to individual academics in the natural and physical sciences. The human sciences were only supported much later with the establishment of the Council for Educational and Social Research in 1929. Here we review the history of research funding in South Africa, with a special focus on the work of the RGB between 1918 and 1938.

  13. Post-Empiricism and Philosophy of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marsonet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide some sketchy remarks on the post-empiricist phenomenon in philosophy of science, taking into account the themes of the relationships between language on the one side and reality on the other, and the parallel problem of the alleged elimination of metaphysics. Unlike the logical empiricists, Popper believes that a clear separation between (i analytic and synthetic sentences, and (ii between theory and observation, is an impossible task. According to his view, theory and observation are intimately linked to each other, and no pure observation is ever possible. A position very similar to Popper’s was endorsed by the American pragmatists in the last two centuries with Charles S. Peirce, William James and John Dewey. There also are important similarities between what Popper says and William James’ theses. It is clear that if we recognize that the theoretical dimension precedes observation, and if we claim furthermore that scientific theories have a creative character, then we may explain the “jumps” that often take place in the history of science. Later on Feyerabend and his followers have turned philosophy of science into something mysterious and not easily classifiable in philosophical or scientific terms. The anything goes undermines the meaning itself of the discipline. If science is equated to any other dimension of spirit - art, religion, or even witchcraft - the specific and cognitive character of scientific rationality is eliminated. It follows that philosophy of science loses any meaningful role within the field of human knowledge, while even philosophy as such becomes more similar to a joke than to a serious endeavor.

  14. A spectacularity concept in modern philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolodii Nataliia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the interpretation problem of the concept of spectacularity in modern philosophy. The particularities of different conceptions of spectacularity are analyzed and the special attention is paid to its role in the development of the modern society. The main objective of the article is the critical analysis of different theories of philosophers and cultural experts in the context of the spectacularity phenomenon. The research applies the methods of the systematic approach and contextual analysis. The novelty of the paper lies in the formation of the strengths and weaknesses of the spectacularity concepts and in the development of certain principles of the interdisciplinary study of the phenomenon. This research could be of interest for professionals working in the field of sociology of culture and philosophy of culture.

  15. History of Physics Education Research as a Model for Geoscience Education Research Community Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.

    2011-12-01

    Discipline-based Education Research (DBER) is a research field richly combining a deep understanding of how to teach a particular discipline with an evolving understanding how people learn that discipline. At its center, DBER has an overarching goal of improving the teaching and learning of a discipline by focusing on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms learners use as they develop expertise. Geoscience Education Research, or GER, is a young but rapidly advancing field which is poised to make important contributions to the teaching and learning of earth and space science. Nascent geoscience education researchers could accelerate their community's progress by learning some of the lessons from the more mature field of Physics Education Research, PER. For the past three decades, the PER community has been on the cutting edge of DBER. PER started purely as an effort among traditionally trained physicists to overcome students' tenaciously held misconceptions about force, motion, and electricity. Over the years, PER has wrestled with the extent to which they included the faculty from the College of Education, the value placed on interpretive and qualitative research methods, the most appropriate involvement of professional societies, the nature of its PhD programs in the College of Science, and how to best disseminate the results of PER to the wider physics teaching community. Decades later, as a more fully mature field, PER still struggles with some of these aspects, but has learned important lessons in how its community progresses and evolves to be successful, valuable, and pertinent.

  16. Philosophy and data in astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mix, Lucas John

    2018-04-01

    Creating a unified model of life in the universe - history, extent and future - requires both scientific and humanities research. One way that humanities can contribute is by investigating the relationship between philosophical commitments and data. Making those commitments transparent allows scientists to use the data more fully. Insights in four areas - history, ethics, religion and probability - demonstrate the value of careful, astrobiology-specific humanities research for improving how we talk and think about astrobiology as a whole. First, astrobiology has a long and influential history. Second, astrobiology does not decentre humanity, either physically or ethically. Third, astrobiology is broadly compatible with major world religions. Finally, claims about the probability of life arising or existing elsewhere rest heavily on philosophical priors. In all four cases, identifying philosophical commitments clarifies the ways in which data can tell us about life.

  17. Common sense in moral philosophy of the age of Enlightenment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sokurenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Age of Enlightenment had a special meaning for the history of moral philosophy, because in this period the morality becomes a special subject of philosophic interest, philosophic concept of morality is formed. The problem of rational grounding of morality becomes a central one. The important role in this problem solving was the idea of common sense – one of the fundamental ideas of Scottish and French Enlightenment. In the Scottish philosophy concept of «common sense» was developed by representatives of ethical sentimentalism (A. Shaftesbury, F. Hutcheson and by the founder of the rationalist understanding of morality Th. Reid. In France, the idea of common sense was widely developed in the works of Enlightenment philosophers. Scottish enlighteners understood common sense as a kind of inherent, intuitive principle, put by God into human being. This paper analyzes the significance of the concept «common sense» and its features of interpretations by Scottish philosophers. The quintessence of philosophy of the Age of Enlightenment was practical philosophy of I. Kant, in formation of which the idea of common sense played the key role. German classic clearly defined field of application of common sense. He considered an appeal to common sense in matters of science and philosophy unacceptable, but claimed that it was common sense people must rely in everyday practice. Such an understanding of this idea has allowed Kant to justify main concept of his moral philosophy ­ concept of the autonomous subject.

  18. The concept of God in Christian philosophy | Anthony | Sophia: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The different stages of the evolution of human history have made enormous attempts at understanding the concept of God. Tracing this study through the historical evolution of philosophy: from the Ancient to the Contemporary era, one would say that it remained distorted during the Ancient era, beautifully synthesized during ...

  19. Gifted Sixth-Graders and Primary Source Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David A.; Schlaggar, Sheila

    1993-01-01

    A sixth-grade gifted class studied the history of philosophy, including selections from such philosophers as Plato, Confucius, Buddha, Marcus Aurelius, and Moses Maimonides. Readings drew on fundamental features of child experience, such as their sense of justice, concern for moral values, and questions about reality. The paper describes classroom…

  20. Kant's Philosophy of Education: Between Relational and Systemic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ana Marta

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to view Kant's approach to education in the broader context of Kant's philosophy of culture and history as a process whose direction should be reflectively assumed by human freedom, in the light of man's moral vocation. In this context, some characteristic tensions of his enlightened approach to education appear. Thus,…

  1. Qualitative tools and experimental philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andow, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Experimental philosophy brings empirical methods to philosophy. These methods are used to probe how people think about philosophically interesting things such as knowledge, morality, and freedom. This paper explores the contribution that qualitative methods have to make in this enterprise. I argue that qualitative methods have the potential to make a much greater contribution than they have so far. Along the way, I acknowledge a few types of resistance that proponents of qualitative methods in experimental philosophy might encounter, and provide reasons to think they are ill-founded. PMID:28392629

  2. Neuroaesthetics and Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Holt

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some philosophers even recently have been skeptical about whether science can reveal anything significant about art. Although some scientists’ ventures into art theory have seemed to warrant such suspicions, including early speculative forays into neuroaesthetics, against such skepticism, the argument here is that neuroaesthetics is crucial for understanding aesthetic experience and ultimately art itself. Because certain core proposals of early versions of neuroaesthetics (e.g., the art-as-caricature thesis seem to justify this skepticism and yet, at the same time, prove more defensible than they might initially seem, they are ideal illustrations of how neuroaesthetics at a more abstract level dovetails with the philosophy of art, and so provides a complementary, not competing perspective that can help complete, verify, and defend such philosophical theories. In particular, it is proposed that aesthetic experience involves a distinctive corticolimbic response, that such experience is therefore testable and may be found even with so-called anti-art, and that its value consists in resolution of conflict between the higher cortex and limbic system generated by the evolution of the former.

  3. Cosmology and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of establishing boundaries between cosmology and philosophy is discussed. It is stated that the theoretic knowledge and observation data do not contradict the selection of one of non-stationary homogenous and isotropic relativistic models, which are also called the Friedmann models. In this model (with a zero Λ - member) there is a critical value of the substance density which is 10 -29 g/cm 2 . The determination of the average density of the Universe substance relatively to this value enables to choose between a closed and an open Universe model. Nowadays, this problem is not yet solved. But some philosophic theses reject the closed cosmological model without any naturally scientific argumentation. Critical remarks about such an approach to the problem studied are presented. The conclusion is made that the problems of the Universe volume infinity of finity, laws of its evolution in time or the like are not philosophic and should be considered taking into account the data of astronomic observations and modern physics

  4. Philosophy vs the common sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Chernyshov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the antinomy of philosophy and the common sense. Philosophy emerges as a way of specifically human knowledge, which purposes analytics of the reality of subjective experience. The study reveals that in order to alienate philosophy from the common sense it was essential to revise the understanding of wisdom. The new, philosophical interpretation of wisdom – offered by Pythagoras – has laid the foundation of any future philosophy. Thus, philosophy emerges, alienating itself from the common sense, which refers to the common or collective experience. Moreover, the study examines the role of emotions, conformity and conventionality which they play with respect to the common sense. Next the author focuses on the role of philosophical intuition, guided with principles of rationality, nonconformity and scepticism, which the author professes the foundation stones of any sound philosophy. The common sense, described as deeply routed in the world of human emotions, aims at empathy, as the purpose of philosophy is to provide the rational means of knowledge. Therefore, philosophy uses thinking, keeping the permanent efforts to check and recheck data of its own experience. Thus, the first task of philosophical thinking appears to overcome the suggestion of the common sense, which purposes the social empathy, as philosophical intuition aims at independent thinking, the analytics of subjective experience. The study describes the fundamental principles of the common sense, on the one hand, and those of philosophy, on the other. The author arrives to conclusion that the common sense is unable to exceed the limits of sensual experience. Even there, where it apparently rises to a form of any «spiritual unity», even there it cannot avoid referring to the data of commonly shared sensual experience; though, philosophy, meanwhile, goes beyond sensuality, creating a discourse that would be able to alienate from it, and to make its rational

  5. Historical an insight into the teaching of philosophy in Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Lidia Beltrán-Marín; Greten Lauren Blanco-Montesino; Lesly León-Montesino

    2018-01-01

    The teaching of philosophy in Cuba has been related to events in economic and political life, which leads to the boundaries between the various stages of its teaching are linked to the transformations of its general historical evolution. This work aims to contribute to the training of educational professional’s specialties of history and marxism, and to expand cuban philosophical historiography. Among other methods, analysis and synthesis and logical history were used, complemented by an in-d...

  6. Dance Education Action Research: A Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author compares the practices, philosophy, and history of action research, also known as participatory action research, to the purposes and practices of dance education. The comparison yields connections in four categories, enhancing self-reflective teaching and curriculum design, taking responsibility for teaching outcomes,…

  7. Discourse on the incomprehensible in philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Aleksandar M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Philosophy has its roots in history as a thought and consideration about things of heaven and earth, about their interplay and sense, as their logos. The meaning of life still concerns human kind. Archaic thinking has been sharpened and perfected through time, while the development brought about deep rooted terminology, as well as the key concepts that reflect a specific and marked approach to thinking. Concepts that are expressed by words also belong to the realm of things; therefore, their correlation sets the history of the deliberation on the content of thinking. The expression of a mature thought implies that the obstacles have been removed from the path to wisdom which can often lead sideways. Hegel describes a sharpened critical thought, but also expresses the need for further development of philosophical thought. Misologic statements that are common even today use those sideways to show that philosophy is barren and unnecessary. However, can expression of things that concern us all ever be boring and superfluous? This can only be answered by a philosopher.

  8. Three concepts of history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Campillo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is twofold. On the one hand, I will outline the diverse usages that the concept of history has taken on throughout Western history. These different usages may be grouped together in three semantic fields (history as a way of knowing, as a way of being and as a way of doing, which correspond to three ways of understanding the Philosophy of History: as Epistemology of History, as Ontology of historicity and as ethical-political Critique of the present. On the other hand, I will show that these three concepts of history (and, accordingly, the three ways of understanding the Philosophy of History refer mutually to each other and, thus, are inseparable from each other.

  9. The Christian voice in philosophy

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    Stuart Fowler

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the Rev. Stuart Fowler outlines a Christian voice in Philosophy and urges the Christian philosopher to investigate his position and his stance with integrity and honesty.

  10. Why still philosophy?: Once again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Predrag

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this paper is to revisit, once again the question asked by Adorno and Habermas and other contemporary thinkers under different headings few decades ago. The author is suggesting that nowadays philosophy requires a final departure from the idea of having single and perennial face, and that this would not only allow, but also enable philosophy to test its various faces freely, that is, without norm or limit set in advance. At the same time, by creating such ′liberal′ climate philosophy would no longer be frightened by the possible answer, and hence would no longer dramatize the very question of ′why still?′. Even if philosophy turns out to be far less than the mission it once bestowed upon itself.

  11. [Neurosciences and philosophy of mind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, Aarón

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the interaction between neurosciences and philosophy of the mind is on the way to understand consciousness, and to solve the mind-body or mind-brain problem. Naturalism is the view that mental processes are just brain processes and that consciousness is a natural phenomenon. It is possible to construct a theory about its nature by blending insights from neuroscience, philosophy of the mind, phenomenology, psychology and evolutionary biology.

  12. The Current Status of the Philosophy of Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Peter; Ruse, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The philosophy of biology today is one of the most exciting areas of philosophy. It looks critically across the life sciences, teasing out conceptual issues and difficulties bringing to bear the tools of philosophical analysis to achieve clarification and understanding. This essay surveys work in all of the major directions of research: evolutionary theory and the units/levels of selection; evolutionary developmental biology; reductionism; ecology; the species problem; teleology; evolutionary epistemology; evolutionary ethics; and progress. There is a comprehensive bibliography.

  13. History of bystander effects research 1905-present; what is in a name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Rusin, Andrej; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; Seymour, Colin

    2017-11-29

    This review, which arose from a Radiation Research Society History symposium, traces the history of 'bystander effects' or 'indirect effects'(also known as 'abscopal effects', 'clastogenic effects' and more recently 'the secretosome'). In 1905, Murphy first drew attention to effects caused by the injection of irradiated cells into animals. In the present day, bystander effects are seen as part of the secretosome, where they coordinate responses to stressors at the tissue, organism, and population level. The review considers the history and also the reasons why this process of information exchange/communication appears to have been discovered and forgotten several times. The review then considers the evolution of our understanding of the mechanisms and what relevance these effects may have in radiation protection and radiotherapy. The authors conclude that the phenomenon currently described as a 'bystander effect' has been described under a variety of different names since 1905. However recent advances in biology have made it possible to investigate mechanisms and potential impacts more fully. This has led to the current upsurge in research into this effect of radiation.

  14. HOBBES’ POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

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    MHAI NOVAC

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This is basically an attempt at an original conceptual reconstruction of Hobbes’ philosophy as set in Lehiathan, namely one in the view of which Hobbes was neither an atheist nor an absolutist, as the standard interpretation holds, but rather what we could call an agnostical pragmatist (fact which, quite surprisingly, places Hobbes in the company of Burke. More to the point, my basic claim within this paper is that Hobbes was not such an ‘enemy of individual freedom’ as we traditionally hold him to be and that his thought was just as attached to the notion of individual freedom as the later contractualist views. The difference however, arises from the fact that Hobbes, unlike Locke, Rousseau or Kant, was what we could call a voluntaristic determinist and consequently viewed human freedom not so much as ‘unhindered action derived from reflective choice’, but rather as what we could call ‘reasonable fulfillment of the basic human inclinations’ (self-interest. As such, I will analyze the three main focal points of Hobbes’ thought, namely (i human nature, (ii the principle of association and (iii the principle of authority. More specifically I will try to offer a perspective on the link between his voluntaristic determinism, his notion of legitimate absolute coercion (sovereignity and his political theology (the view that any form of political authority rests on a religious legitimacy in trying to demonstrate how all these were Hobbes’ specific way of seeking to find individual freedom a place under the sun.

  15. Science and philosophy in Deleuze

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    Krtolica Igor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deleuze will not wait until he had completed his works to frame and formulate a theory on the relation between philosophy and science. The first articulations of this question are already present as early as the 1950s and 1960s in the studies on Bergson and Nietzsche, and then in Difference and repetition as well as in The Logic of Sense. It is also true that this question will be specifically developed in 1991 in What Is Philosophy? But throughout his work, the main thrust would proceed. This issue, it seems, comprises three main aspects: in the first place, in a polemic against the neo-Kantian epistemological legacy, it primarily consists in denying the critical definition of philosophy as being a ‘reflection on scientific knowledge’ to replace it by a conception drawn from Bergson’s expressionist ontology that places science and philosophy on both sides of the being; secondly, in an attempt to restore the concept of dialectics, it consists in making the dialectics of ideas the communal sphere of both science and philosophy; thirdly, aiming to specify every form of thinking, it consists in shaping how each expresses its ideas or its problems with its own signs. These three aspects, it seems, can frame the overall conception Deleuze formed of the link between science and philosophy. We shall successively analyze them, exclusively considering the first period of Deleuze’s work, which is to say the pre-guattarian publications.

  16. Bioethics: why philosophy is essential for progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    It is the JME's 40th anniversary and my 20th anniversary working in the field. I reflect on the nature of bioethics and medical ethics. I argue that both bioethics and medical ethics together have, in many ways, failed as fields. My diagnosis is that better philosophy is needed. I give some examples of the importance of philosophy to bioethics. I focus mostly on the failure of ethics in research and organ transplantation, although I also consider genetic selection, enhancement, cloning, futility, disability and other topics. I do not consider any topic comprehensively or systematically or address the many reasonable objections to my arguments. Rather, I seek to illustrate why philosophical analysis and argument remain as important as ever to progress in bioethics and medical ethics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. [Philosophy against psychiatry, right up against it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demazeux, Steeves

    2016-12-01

    Since the early 1990s, there has been a tremendous new interest at the international level for researches at the crossroad between philosophy and psychiatry. This interest has been supported and quite stimulated by the foundation of a dedicated association, as well as by the establishment of a journal and the promotion of a new collection. My aim in this paper is to trace the origins of the so-called "new philosophy of psychiatry" field and to reconstruct its global intellectual dynamics during the past two decades. I try to identify, through the big diversity of the individual contributions, its dominant theoretical orientations but also what may appear as some of its philosophical blind spots.

  18. Can there be science without philosophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Marco J; Brancaccio, Diego; Zoccali, Carmine

    2016-12-01

    Over the last few decades, philosophy has gained an increasingly bad reputation among working scientists. Prominent researchers have suggested, in various forms and degrees of mockery, that philosophy has little or nothing positive to contribute to science. This essay provides a response to these allegations. We begin by examining, and ultimately questioning, an influential argument purporting to undermine the significance of a philosophical approach to science. Next, we offer some biomedical examples where philosophical speculation plays a prominent role. We conclude by arguing that, when understood in the appropriate context, philosophical reflection is an important-indeed, integral-ingredient of healthy scientific inquiry. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  19. UTILITARIANISM AS A PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena N. Yarkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The article is devoted to the representation of utilitarianism as the philosophy of education. The main problem is the relevance of utilitarian strategies for the present stage of development of education in Russia. Methods, results and scientific novelty. Utilitarianism is presented as an educational strategy, nominating at the forefront the principle of usefulness of education, positioning education as a means of achieving social and individual wellbeing. The author represents the basic principles of utilitarian philosophy, and also reveals how these principles have been refracted in the philosophy of education using the methods of value-semantic reduction and qualitative content analysis. The first part of the article is devoted to the history of utilitarianism as the philosophy of education in the Euro-American pedagogical culture, as well as the analysis of modern utilitarianism as widely existent in this culture of philosophy of education. In the second part of the article the author explicates the role of utilitarianism in the education strategies of the Russian pedagogical culture, past and present. The main idea of the article is the idea that we have two value-semantic forms of utilitarianism: narrowly understood (tactical utilitarianism and widespread (strategic utilitarianism. Within the tactical utilitarianism as socially and/or individually useful education is considered to be vocationalism, claimed the currently market education. This kind of education is characterized by its focus on learning/teaching applied science and recognition of the futility of Sciences fundamental and philosophical. Under the strategic utilitarianism individually and/or socially beneficial is considered: first, the versatile education characterized by its focus on learning/teaching not only applications, but also fundamental and philosophical disciplines, secondly, eclectic education aimed at obtaining different professional competences. Versatile

  20. Statistical reporting inconsistencies in experimental philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Matteo; Duev, Georgi; Nuijten, Michèle B; Sprenger, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Experimental philosophy (x-phi) is a young field of research in the intersection of philosophy and psychology. It aims to make progress on philosophical questions by using experimental methods traditionally associated with the psychological and behavioral sciences, such as null hypothesis significance testing (NHST). Motivated by recent discussions about a methodological crisis in the behavioral sciences, questions have been raised about the methodological standards of x-phi. Here, we focus on one aspect of this question, namely the rate of inconsistencies in statistical reporting. Previous research has examined the extent to which published articles in psychology and other behavioral sciences present statistical inconsistencies in reporting the results of NHST. In this study, we used the R package statcheck to detect statistical inconsistencies in x-phi, and compared rates of inconsistencies in psychology and philosophy. We found that rates of inconsistencies in x-phi are lower than in the psychological and behavioral sciences. From the point of view of statistical reporting consistency, x-phi seems to do no worse, and perhaps even better, than psychological science.

  1. Statistical reporting inconsistencies in experimental philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Matteo; Duev, Georgi; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Sprenger, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Experimental philosophy (x-phi) is a young field of research in the intersection of philosophy and psychology. It aims to make progress on philosophical questions by using experimental methods traditionally associated with the psychological and behavioral sciences, such as null hypothesis significance testing (NHST). Motivated by recent discussions about a methodological crisis in the behavioral sciences, questions have been raised about the methodological standards of x-phi. Here, we focus on one aspect of this question, namely the rate of inconsistencies in statistical reporting. Previous research has examined the extent to which published articles in psychology and other behavioral sciences present statistical inconsistencies in reporting the results of NHST. In this study, we used the R package statcheck to detect statistical inconsistencies in x-phi, and compared rates of inconsistencies in psychology and philosophy. We found that rates of inconsistencies in x-phi are lower than in the psychological and behavioral sciences. From the point of view of statistical reporting consistency, x-phi seems to do no worse, and perhaps even better, than psychological science. PMID:29649220

  2. Do people with intellectual disability require special human subjects research protections? The interplay of history, ethics, and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, Chris; Brosco, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    People with intellectual disability (ID) have a long history of discrimination and stigmatization, and a more recent history of pride and self-advocacy. The early history suggests that people with ID are a vulnerable population and deserve special research protections as do some other groups; the disability rights movement of the late 20th century aligns people with ID more closely with the principle of autonomy that has guided clinical and research ethics for the last 40 years. In examining the history of people with ID and the prevailing framework of human subjects research protections in the United States, we conclude that people with ID do not require special protection in human subjects research. The protections that have already been put in place for all individuals, if conscientiously and effectively implemented, achieve the right balance between safeguarding the interest of human research subjects and empowering individuals who choose to do so to participate in research. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A History of the Western Institute of Nursing and Its Communicating Nursing Research Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Paula A; Lindeman, Carol A

    The Western Institute of Nursing (WIN) celebrated its 60th anniversary and the 50th Annual Communicating Nursing Research Conference in April 2017. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief history of the origin, development, and accomplishments of WIN and its Communicating Nursing Research conferences. Historical documents and conference proceedings were reviewed. WIN was created in 1957 as the Western Council on Higher Education for Nursing under the auspices of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. The bedrock and enduring value system of the organization is the interrelated nature of nursing education, practice, and research. There was a conviction that people in the Western region of the United States needed nursing services of excellent quality and that nursing education must prepare nurses capable of providing that care. Shared goals were to increase the science of nursing through research and to produce nurses who could design, conduct, and supervise research-all to the end of improving quality nursing care. These goals were only achieved by collaboration and resource sharing among the Western region states and organizations. Consistent with the goals, the first research conferences were held between 1957 and 1962. Conference content focused on seminars for faculty teaching research, on the design and conduct of research in patient care settings, and on identification of priority areas for research. The annual Communicating Nursing Research conferences began in 1968 and grew over the years to a total 465 podium and poster presentations on a wide array of research topics-and an attendance of 926-in 2016. As WIN and its Communicating Nursing Research conferences face the next 50 years, the enduring values on which the organization was created will stand in good stead as adaptability, adjustments, and collaborative effort are applied to inevitable change for the nursing profession. It is the Western way.

  4. [From oral history to the research film: the audiovisual as a tool of the historian].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Hebe; Abreu, Martha; Castro, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    An analytical essay of the process of image production, audiovisual archive formation, analysis of sources, and creation of the filmic narrative of the four historiographic films that form the DVD set Passados presentes (Present pasts) from the Oral History and Image Laboratory of Universidade Federal Fluminense (Labhoi/UFF). From excerpts from the audiovisual archive of Labhoi and the films made, the article analyzes: how the problem of research (the memory of slavery, and the legacy of the slave song in the agrofluminense region) led us to the production of images in a research situation; the analytical shift in relation to the cinematographic documentary and the ethnographic film; the specificities of revisiting the audiovisual collection constituted by the formulation of new research problems.

  5. Back by Popular Demand: A Narrative Review on the History of Food Addiction Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meule, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of food addiction has gained more and more popularity. This approach acknowledges the apparent parallels between substance use disorders and overeating of highly palatable, high-caloric foods. Part of this discussion includes that “hyperpalatable” foods may have an addictive potential because of increased potency due to certain nutrients or additives. Although this idea seems to be relatively new, research on food addiction actually encompasses several decades, a fact that often remains unrecognized. Scientific use of the term addiction in reference to chocolate even dates back to the 19th century. In the 20th century, food addiction research underwent several paradigm shifts, which include changing foci on anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, obesity, or binge eating disorder. Thus, the purpose of this review is to describe the history and state of the art of food addiction research and to demonstrate its development and refinement of definitions and methodologies. PMID:26339213

  6. Second International Research Conference on the History of Arms and Armor in Kyiv, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Toichkin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present report provides a short description of a conference titled “Second International Research Conference on the History of Arms and Armor in Kyiv, Ukraine”. It was the second scientific conference dedicated to the study of historical weapons in Ukraine. A number of international experts in the field of historical arms and armor were invited to the conference. Each researcher had been asked to provide a short and a long article on a specific research subject. The short articles had already been published in a peer-review booklet that was handed out before the start of the conference. The long articles will be published together as a large collection of paper in future.

  7. Back by Popular Demand: A Narrative Review on the History of Food Addiction Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meule, Adrian

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the concept of food addiction has gained more and more popularity. This approach acknowledges the apparent parallels between substance use disorders and overeating of highly palatable, high-caloric foods. Part of this discussion includes that "hyperpalatable" foods may have an addictive potential because of increased potency due to certain nutrients or additives. Although this idea seems to be relatively new, research on food addiction actually encompasses several decades, a fact that often remains unrecognized. Scientific use of the term addiction in reference to chocolate even dates back to the 19th century. In the 20th century, food addiction research underwent several paradigm shifts, which include changing foci on anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, obesity, or binge eating disorder. Thus, the purpose of this review is to describe the history and state of the art of food addiction research and to demonstrate its development and refinement of definitions and methodologies.

  8. Philosophy and conceptual framework: collectively structuring nursing care systematization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Eudinéia Luz; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; Bruggmann, Mario Sérgio; Luz, Susian Cássia Liz

    2017-03-30

    To build the Nursing Philosophy and Conceptual Framework that will support the Nursing Care Systematization in a hospital in southern Brazil with the active participation of the institution's nurses. Convergent Care Research Data collection took place from July to October 2014, through two workshops and four meetings, with 42 nurses. As a result, the nursing philosophy and conceptual framework were created and the theory was chosen. Data analysis was performed based on Morse and Field. The philosophy involves the following beliefs: team nursing; team work; holistic care; service excellence; leadership/coordination; interdisciplinary team commitment. The conceptual framework brings concepts such as: human being; nursing; nursing care, safe care. The nursing theory defined was that of Wanda de Aguiar Horta. As a contribution, it brought the construction of the institutions' nursing philosophy and conceptual framework, and the definition of a nursing theory.

  9. Towards real persons: Clinical judgement and philosophy of psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Thornton

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the motivations for the new philosophy of psychiatry is the need to understand changing ideas in mental health care. In the last century, changes in both physical and biological theory prompted work in philosophy of physics and philosophy of biology to understand those fields better, attempts which were continuous with empirical work. At the start of this century, changes in psychiatry promise increased interest in the philosophy of psychiatry as an attempt, alongside empirical research, to understand the conceptual underpinnings of mental heath care. While philosophical methods are distinct from empirical methods, the work is truly interdisciplinary, growing organically from the complexities of demand on psychiatric care and, although philosophical, carried out by philosophers and psychiatrists alike. One focus is the nature of clinical judgement in psychiatric diagnosis. In this short note I will briefly sketch some issues that arise from a current idea: that psychiatric diagnosis should include idiographic elements.

  10. The History of Research and Development Islands Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr B. Kosolapov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the history of the discovery, research and development of the islands of Russian pioneers in Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan from the middle of the XIX century. The paper used in scientific papers and journalistic materials researchers Islands Peter the Great Bay, unpublished sources: Russian State Historical Archive of the Far East, Primorsky Region State Archives, Archives of Primorsky regional department of the All-Russian public organization "Russian Geographical Society" Society for the Study of the Amur region. The methodological basis of the work was the principle of historicism and objectivity, allowed to consider the issue of research and development of the islands of the Gulf of Peter the Great on a broad documentary basis in the process of development in the specific historical conditions. The history of hydrographic discoveries of natural and geographical studies. It touches upon the issues concerning the construction of Vladivostok fortress. In the periodical press materials recreated pages agricultural and industrial development of the islands. Examples of business entrepreneurs first edge (A.D. Startsev, M.I. Jankowski, O.V. Lindgolm. The Toponymic notes link the island territories with the names of their discoverers, explorers, industrialists. The authors conclude that the historical conditionality of development of the islands is linked mainly with the military interests of Russia on its southeastern edge, using the resources of the sea and the unique natural conditions suitable for the development of agricultural, industrial, recreation and tourism.

  11. Historical an insight into the teaching of philosophy in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lidia Beltrán-Marín

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of philosophy in Cuba has been related to events in economic and political life, which leads to the boundaries between the various stages of its teaching are linked to the transformations of its general historical evolution. This work aims to contribute to the training of educational professional’s specialties of history and marxism, and to expand cuban philosophical historiography. Among other methods, analysis and synthesis and logical history were used, complemented by an in-depth document analysis. We present the results of a project of the University of Sancti Spiritus which has led to the present approach to the history of the teaching of philosophy in Cuba which runs through the synthesis stages of colonial, republic and revolution; As well as the predominant philosophical currents at each stage: scholasticism, reformism, modernity, positivism, electivism, existentialism, marxism.

  12. Peculiarities of the Research of the History of Western European Countries, Case of Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Vorobiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Researcing of history of small advanced countries of Western Europe has a number of specific features, which are connected to its socio-economic level and dynamic development and the dependence on the external economic factor. So the article is devoted to the analysis of regularity of the development of the industry of Norwegian economic specialization (energy sector in the international division of labour as an important element of its historical development. The author of the article analyzes the influence of the energy sector on the political life of the country, the balance of political forces, legislation, foreign policy priorities, and the history of the development of society. At the same time he uses the interdisciplinary approach to determine the relationship of cause and effect between historical events to compile a complete historical picture. The author concludes that the regularities in history are universal and concern all small highly developed countries of Western Europe including Norway. The complex of economic, social, political, financial, legal, tax, environmental and other measures of state support to specialized branches of the national economy is the main semantic rod of historical events in many of the small countries of Western Europe. Analysis of individual industries of the economy in the international division of labor should be an integral part of researches of the historical development of small countries which have a narrow structure of economy, because it helps to understand the peculiarities of the historical development of nations.

  13. The history for thirty years of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This book gives description of history for thirty years of KAERI. It contains five chapters, which reports the process and development of KAERI, embryonic stage with nuclear energy for peace, the process of establishment of KAERI and building of the KAERI in 1960s, period of growth with change of international situation and measurement of KAERI and launching for KAERI in 1970s, period of technical independence for safe regulation and establishment nuclear safe center in 1980s and prospect on technical development of nuclear energy research like basic R and D.

  14. The Best Time of their Lives: Researching the History of Prahran Technical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Buckrich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The history of Prahran Technical School is a remarkable story. Created by the Prahran Mechanics’ Institute, the ‘Tech’ opened in High Street in 1915. With both junior and senior sections, a boys’ school and later a girls’ school, it survived for fifty years with barely sufficient funding. Art had always featured as a major stream of study, however, and in the 1960s it became Melbourne’s most innovative art school. In this paper the author shares her experiences of gathering her material and shaping her research.

  15. Critique and cure: a dream of uniting psychoanalysis and philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jamieson

    2013-06-01

    Critical theory, whose aim was to historicize philosophy through integrating it with the social sciences, turned to psychoanalysis to find its way through an accounting of philosophy after the Second World War. Over 50 years after this initial project, the rift between philosophy and psychoanalysis has never been greater. If Jacques Lacan could be considered one of the few psychoanalysts to maintain and foster links to philosophical thought in the latter half of the 20th century, his work has sadly remained marginal in the clinical field throughout America and Europe. Both critical theory and Lacan remain skeptical of the direction taken by psychoanalysis after Freud. Reflecting on the history of these two disciplines, as well as through an examination of Theodor Adorno's posthumously published dream journal, critique and cure emerge as two dialectically intertwined themes that gain momentum in the dream of the unification of the philosophical and psychoanalytic projects.

  16. Back to business: a next step in the field of oral history: the usefulness of oral history for leadership and organizational research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, S.; Kroeze, R.

    2012-01-01

    Business organizations and elites are often neglected in oral history as a result of the dominant assumption that elites have ample opportunity to be heard. We argue, however, that researching corporations and elites is very interesting for oral historians. This contention is supported by the four

  17. Philosophy and the practice of Bayesian statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Andrew; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla

    2013-02-01

    A substantial school in the philosophy of science identifies Bayesian inference with inductive inference and even rationality as such, and seems to be strengthened by the rise and practical success of Bayesian statistics. We argue that the most successful forms of Bayesian statistics do not actually support that particular philosophy but rather accord much better with sophisticated forms of hypothetico-deductivism. We examine the actual role played by prior distributions in Bayesian models, and the crucial aspects of model checking and model revision, which fall outside the scope of Bayesian confirmation theory. We draw on the literature on the consistency of Bayesian updating and also on our experience of applied work in social science. Clarity about these matters should benefit not just philosophy of science, but also statistical practice. At best, the inductivist view has encouraged researchers to fit and compare models without checking them; at worst, theorists have actively discouraged practitioners from performing model checking because it does not fit into their framework. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Distributed Access to Oral History collections: Fitting Access Technology to the needs of Collection Owners and Researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast with the large amounts of potential interesting research material in digital multimedia repositories, the opportunities to unveil the gems therein are still very limited. The Oral History project ‘Verteld Verleden’ (Dutch literal translation of Oral History) that is currently running in

  19. Using the History of Research on Sickle Cell Anemia to Affect Preservice Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Eric M.

    This paper examines how using a series of lessons developed from the history of research on sickle cell anemia affects preservice teacher conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The importance of a pedagogy that has students do science through an integral use of the history of science is effective at enriching students' NOS views is presented.…

  20. Kant’s Studies in Ukrainian Philosophy of Soviet Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadym Tytarenko

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This writing is devoted to the brief review of Immanuel Kant’s philosophy studies and receptions of his philosophical concepts within the Ukrainian philosophy of Soviet period. Such attempt is actually pertinent because nowadays we definitely need to reconsider the soviet philosophical heritage for better understanding the real value of any philosophical conclusions and worldview-concerning statements which were made in the times of soviet ideology hegemony. Additionally, mentioned reconsidering is presently urgent because Ukrainian intellectual culture is now looking for its identity and is trying to identify the stillremaining ideological totalitarian elements which spoil the originality and objectiveness of its products. The present review attempts to identify which totalitarian intentions and prejudices were used to interpret and evaluate the Immanuel Kant’s heritage in the texts written by several selected Ukrainian philosophers of the Soviet period. Nevertheless, it’s obvious that absolutely impossible to avoid talking about Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s philosophical position interpretation by the same authors. Kant’s and Hegel’s soviet-Ukrainian interpretations were often connected, because there was a general trend of soviet Marxist history of philosophy to interpret Kant as the “worse” version of Hegel. To fulfill the general image of Kant’s philosophy interpretation in Ukrainian philosophy and its future perspectives, this paper also delivers some common information about the whole historical path of Kant’s interpretations and receptions

  1. Some little-known facts and events from the history of gravitational wave research in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatskiv, Ya. S.,; Vavilova, I. B.; Romanets, O. A.; Savchuk, V. S.

    2017-10-01

    The paper deals with the history of gravitational wave research in Ukraine and describes two little-known facts and events. The first one is concerning with a short period of Dr. Nathan Rosen's life in Kyiv and his scientific activity at the Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the UkrSSR in 1936-1938 years. At that time, he has published several papers, which promoted the first steps in the creation of modern theories in the fields of gravity and quantum physics. These papers, including "Plane-polarized waves in the General Theory of Relativity", have been issued in the "Ukrainian Physical Notes" ("Ukrainski Fizychni Zapysky"), which was not widely accessed. We quote also some parts from correspondence of N. Rosen and A. Einstein in this period. The second comment is related to the history of gravitational wave experimental research in Kyiv, which were initiated in 1970s by Prof. Aleksey Z. Petrov at the Institute of Theoretical Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the UkrSSR. We describe briefly the development of the detector of high-frequency gravitational waves (the Weber type antenna) as well as results obtained by K.A. Piragas's group.

  2. Listmania. How lists can open up fresh possibilities for research in the history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbourgo, James; Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2012-12-01

    Anthropologists, linguists, cultural historians, and literary scholars have long emphasized the value of examining writing as a material practice and have often invoked the list as a paradigmatic example thereof. This Focus section explores how lists can open up fresh possibilities for research in the history of science. Drawing on examples from the early modern period, the contributors argue that attention to practices of list making reveals important relations between mercantile, administrative, and scientific attempts to organize the contents of the world. Early modern lists projected both spatial and temporal visions of nature: they inventoried objects in the process of exchange and collection; they projected possible trajectories for future endeavor; they publicized the social identities of scientific practitioners; and they became research tools that transformed understandings of the natural order.

  3. Transcendental Philosophy and its Transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihara, Yuko

    There is an interesting overlap between Heidegger and Nishida that has not gained attention in the literature. During the late 1920s, both philosophers looked to transcendental philosophy as a way to overcome the Western metaphysical tradition. Neither philosopher, however,simply accepted...... traditional forms of transcendental philosophy. Rather, both attempted to transform it from within. In this work, I aim to articulate the extent to which Heidegger and Nishidastill worked within a traditional transcendental framework and also the ways in which they attempt to transform transcendental...... philosophy. I argue that while Heidegger’s “hermeneutic” and Nishida’s “chorological” (I employ this term from Plato’s chōra) transformations have much in common, the latter is more radical than the former. Specifically, Nishida reveals the pre-reflective origin of transcendental reflection not in the pre...

  4. African Journals Online: Philosophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 7 of 7 ... ... publish their research works on all aspects of religions. It seeks to promote critical research and original scholarship on issues related to all aspects of religion generally – theoretical, empirical or comparative. Other websites related to this journal: http://www.unilorin.edu.ng/ejournals/index.php/ijourel/index.

  5. Beyond Identity: the Dynamic Self at the Intersection of Performance Philosophy and the Philosophy of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Petlevski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we advocate the methodological feedback loop in the study of the dynamical self at the crossroads of performance philosophy, (artistic performance, and the philosophy of science. We point to the importance of the dynamics of methodology transfer between arts and sciences and the “interactive continuum” proposed by Newman & Benz in 1998. In the first part of this paper we give a comparative review of the research context relevant for our field of study, and we explain our research hubs in approaching the concept of “performance”. We suggest the possibility to define our filed of research in three equally legitimate ways: as philosophy-of-performance, philosophy-as-performance and performance-as-philosophy. In our recent work we are primarily interested in artistic performances that incorporate elements of artistic practice in the methodology of research output (Frayling 1993, as well as in the potentials of performative aspects of scientific praxis and methodology. However, the conceptual background relevant for this paper is in the field of process philosophy and its relation to science (Birkhard’s “interactivist model” 2009; Campbell’s “process-based model for an interactive ontology” 2009. We attribute particular importance to the notion of “autopoietic feedback” (Maturana and Varela 1974; Luhmann 1990. The second part addresses the issue of transcending identity in the representations of the self and the other; the relationship between Theory-Theory (TT and Simulation Theory (ST, as well as some recent attempts at combining different theories of mind (e.g. Barlassina 2013. We also deal with the notion of “embodied praxis” (Gallagher and Meltzoff 1996; we mention some neuroscientific insights into the similar phenomena, and – commenting on the importance of the dialogue between neuroscientists and philosophers (Changeux and Ricour – we give an example of an enactive approach to understanding

  6. Parenting dimensions and styles: a brief history and recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Thomas G

    2013-08-01

    Over the last decade, researchers have uncovered relationships between general parenting styles and children's obesity. This is an emerging area of research, and there currently is a great deal of interest in the parent's role. This review was written to provide researchers entering this area with a historical introduction to parenting research and to point to some directions for future inquiry. Over the last 75 years, considerable insight has been gained into individual differences in parenting behavior, especially regarding the dimensions underlying individual differences in general parenting approach, and parenting styles resulting from individual differences on these dimensions. The history of empirical attempts to identify parenting dimensions and styles is reviewed briefly, followed by a review of more recent studies of parenting styles. Next is a discussion of data analytic approaches to measuring parenting, with a particular emphasis on variable-centered versus person-centered approaches. Because investigators have often disagreed about which of these approaches is the most appropriate, the advantages and disadvantages of each are considered, along with recommendations for future research.

  7. How student teachers understand African philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsephe M. Letseka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The question ‘What constitutes African philosophy?’ was first raised with the publication of Placide Tempels’s seminal work Bantu philosophy in 1959. Tempels’s book inevitably elicited considerable critical response from African philosophers, which culminated in a wide range of publications such as Wiredu’s (1980 Philosophy and an African culture, Hountondji’s (1983 African philosophy: Myth and reality, Oruka’s (1990 Sage philosophy: Indigenous thinkers and modern debate on African philosophy, Shutte’s (1993 Philosophy for Africa, Masolo’s (1994 African philosophy in search of identity and Gyekye’s (1995 An essay of African philosophical thought: The Akan conceptual scheme. It has been over 60 years since the publication of Temples’s book and there continues to be serious debate about African philosophy. This article sought to contribute to the debate on the various conceptions of African philosophy, but with a focus on the challenges of teaching African philosophy to Philosophy of Education students at an open distance learning institution in South Africa. This article discussed the tendency amongst undergraduate Philosophy of Education students to conflate and reduce African philosophy to African cultures and traditions, and to the notion of ubuntu, and sought to understand the reasons for students’ inclination to treat African philosophy in this way. It examined students’ background knowledge of African philosophy, their critical thinking skills and whether their official study materials are selected and packaged in a manner that, in fact, adds to the challenges they face. Finally, the article explored the ways in which Philosophy of Education lecturers can adapt their pedagogy to provide students with a better understanding of African philosophy.

  8. Mario Bunge, Systematic Philosophy and Science Education: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2012-10-01

    Mario Bunge was born in Argentina in 1919 and is now in his mid-90s. He studied atomic physics and quantum mechanics with Guido Beck (1903-1988), an Austrian refugee and student of Heisenberg. Additionally he studied modern philosophy in an environment that was a philosophical backwater becoming the first South American philosopher of science to be trained in science. His publications in physics, philosophy, psychology, sociology and the foundations of biology, are staggering in number, and include a massive 8-volume Treatise on Philosophy. The unifying thread of his scholarship is the constant and vigorous advancement of the Enlightenment Project, and criticism of cultural and academic movements that deny or devalue the core planks of the project: namely its naturalism, the search for truth, the universality of science, the value of rationality, and respect for individuals. At a time when specialisation is widely decried, and its deleterious effects on science, philosophy of science, educational research and science teaching are recognised, and at a time when `grand narratives' are thought both undesirable and impossible—it is salutary to appraise the fruits of one person's pursuit of the `Big' scientific and philosophical picture or grand narrative. In doing so this special issue brings together philosophers, physicists, biologists, sociologists, logicians, cognitive scientists, economists and mathematicians to examine facets of Mario Bunge's systematic philosophy and to appraise its contribution to important issues in current philosophy and, by implication, education.

  9. Caring to Care: Applying Noddings' Philosophy to Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F; Hirsh, David A; Monie, Daphne; Weil, Henry; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-12-01

    The authors argue that Nel Noddings' philosophy, "an ethic of caring," may illuminate how students learn to be caring physicians from their experience of being in a caring, reciprocal relationship with teaching faculty. In her philosophy, Noddings acknowledges two important contextual continuities: duration and space, which the authors speculate exist within longitudinal integrated clerkships. In this Perspective, the authors highlight core features of Noddings' philosophy and explore its applicability to medical education. They apply Noddings' philosophy to a subset of data from a previously published longitudinal case study to explore its "goodness of fit" with the experience of eight students in the 2012 cohort of the Columbia-Bassett longitudinal integrated clerkship. In line with Noddings' philosophy, the authors' supplementary analysis suggests that students (1) recognized caring when they talked about "being known" by teaching faculty who "cared for" and "trusted" them; (2) responded to caring by demonstrating enthusiasm, action, and responsibility toward patients; and (3) acknowledged that duration and space facilitated caring relations with teaching faculty. The authors discuss how Noddings' philosophy provides a useful conceptual framework to apply to medical education design and to future research on caring-oriented clinical training, such as longitudinal integrated clerkships.

  10. Logic and Philosophy of Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A.N. Prior (1914-69) in the course of the 1950s and 1960s founded a new and revolutionary paradigm in philosophy and logic. Its most central feature is the preoccupation with time and the development of the logic of time. However, this was inseparably interwoven with fundamental questions about h...... human freedom, ethics, and existence. This remarkable integration of themes also embodies an original and in fact revolutionary conception of logic. The book series, Logic and Philosophy of Time, is dedicated to a deep investigation and also the further development of Prior’s paradigm. ...

  11. Epidemiology and moral philosophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Westrin, C G; Nilstun, T; Smedby, B; Haglund, B

    1992-01-01

    To an increasing extent ethical controversies affect and sometimes obstruct public health work and epidemiological research. In order to improve communication between the concerned parties a model for identification and analysis of ethical conflicts in individual-based research has been worked out in co-operation between epidemiologists and moral philosophers. The model has two dimensions. One dimension specifies relevant ethical principles (as beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justi...

  12. From biomedicine to natural history research: EST resources for ambystomatid salamanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Susan V

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing genomic resources for closely related species will provide comparative insights that are crucial for understanding diversity and variability at multiple levels of biological organization. We developed ESTs for Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum and Eastern tiger salamander (A. tigrinum tigrinum, species with deep and diverse research histories. Results Approximately 40,000 quality cDNA sequences were isolated for these species from various tissues, including regenerating limb and tail. These sequences and an existing set of 16,030 cDNA sequences for A. mexicanum were processed to yield 35,413 and 20,599 high quality ESTs for A. mexicanum and A. t. tigrinum, respectively. Because the A. t. tigrinum ESTs were obtained primarily from a normalized library, an approximately equal number of contigs were obtained for each species, with 21,091 unique contigs identified overall. The 10,592 contigs that showed significant similarity to sequences from the human RefSeq database reflected a diverse array of molecular functions and biological processes, with many corresponding to genes expressed during spinal cord injury in rat and fin regeneration in zebrafish. To demonstrate the utility of these EST resources, we searched databases to identify probes for regeneration research, characterized intra- and interspecific nucleotide polymorphism, saturated a human – Ambystoma synteny group with marker loci, and extended PCR primer sets designed for A. mexicanum / A. t. tigrinum orthologues to a related tiger salamander species. Conclusions Our study highlights the value of developing resources in traditional model systems where the likelihood of information transfer to multiple, closely related taxa is high, thus simultaneously enabling both laboratory and natural history research.

  13. From biomedicine to natural history research: EST resources for ambystomatid salamanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putta, Srikrishna; Smith, Jeramiah J; Walker, John A; Rondet, Mathieu; Weisrock, David W; Monaghan, James; Samuels, Amy K; Kump, Kevin; King, David C; Maness, Nicholas J; Habermann, Bianca; Tanaka, Elly; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M; Parichy, David M; Voss, S Randal

    2004-01-01

    Background Establishing genomic resources for closely related species will provide comparative insights that are crucial for understanding diversity and variability at multiple levels of biological organization. We developed ESTs for Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) and Eastern tiger salamander (A. tigrinum tigrinum), species with deep and diverse research histories. Results Approximately 40,000 quality cDNA sequences were isolated for these species from various tissues, including regenerating limb and tail. These sequences and an existing set of 16,030 cDNA sequences for A. mexicanum were processed to yield 35,413 and 20,599 high quality ESTs for A. mexicanum and A. t. tigrinum, respectively. Because the A. t. tigrinum ESTs were obtained primarily from a normalized library, an approximately equal number of contigs were obtained for each species, with 21,091 unique contigs identified overall. The 10,592 contigs that showed significant similarity to sequences from the human RefSeq database reflected a diverse array of molecular functions and biological processes, with many corresponding to genes expressed during spinal cord injury in rat and fin regeneration in zebrafish. To demonstrate the utility of these EST resources, we searched databases to identify probes for regeneration research, characterized intra- and interspecific nucleotide polymorphism, saturated a human – Ambystoma synteny group with marker loci, and extended PCR primer sets designed for A. mexicanum / A. t. tigrinum orthologues to a related tiger salamander species. Conclusions Our study highlights the value of developing resources in traditional model systems where the likelihood of information transfer to multiple, closely related taxa is high, thus simultaneously enabling both laboratory and natural history research. PMID:15310388

  14. [Protoplasm, coagulation and colloids : Forgotten chapter in the research history of anesthesia between Zeitgeist and paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perouansky, M

    2015-05-01

    The historically most important mechanistic theories attributed the fundamental cause of anesthesia to interactions betweeen anesthetics and proteins as early as the 1870s. According to the underlying thought, the resulting changes in the consistency of cellular protoplasm were the cause of the anesthetized state of the whole organism.These protoplasm coagulation theories, as they were collectively referred to, brought the contemporary enthusiasm for protoplasm, the rapid advances in colloid chemistry and the unified theory of narcosis proclamed by Claude Bernard under a unified mechanistic theory that reflected the Zeitgeist of the epoch.This research effort, on the intersection of the developing disciplines of cellular biology and colloid chemistry, lasted for almost a century. It involved scientists of worldwide reputation and resulted in a number of elegant theories. Contrary to widespread opinion, proteins and not lipids were recognized and investigated first as the critical molecular target of anesthetics more than a century prior to their much publicized rediscovery in 1984.The protoplasm coagulation theories of anesthesia were pursued after the First World War across ideological trenches by scientists in Europe, the Soviet Union and the United States. They united research in anesthesia with research of fundamental cell biology.In contrast to the much less fruitful lipid theories, protoplasm coagulation theories are largely forgotten without leaving a trace in contemporary discussions of the history of anesthesia. For many tyears, however, they constituted an essential part of fundamental anesthetic research and must therefore be mentioned in any historical review.

  15. Francis Bacon and the classification of natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the place of natural history within Bacon's divisions of the sciences in The Advancement of Learning (1605) and the later De dignitate et augmentis scientiarum (1623). It is shown that at various points in Bacon's divisions, natural history converges or overlaps with natural philosophy, and that, for Bacon, natural history and natural philosophy are not discrete disciplines. Furthermore, it is argued that Bacon's distinction between operative and speculative natural philosophy and the place of natural history within this distinction, are discontinuous with the later distinction between experimental and speculative philosophy that emerged in the methodology of the Fellows of the early Royal Society.

  16. From Boxing to Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosiewicz Jerzy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article begins the cycle of portraits of the members of the Editorial Board and Editorial Advisory Board of the journal Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research, who are eminent social scientists researching the issue of sport. Among them, there are many world-class professors, rectors and deans of excellent universities, founders, presidents and secretaries-general of continental and international scientific societies and editors of high-scoring journals related to social sciences focusing on sport. The journal Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research started its activities in 2008 and gathered many readers, distinguished authors and outstanding reviewers. It is worth taking a moment to present the profiles of the individual editors, thanks to whom the journal keeps getting better and better. The journal is increasingly appreciated internationally particular among the scientists from the humanist and social areas of investigations. The rapidly increasing number of its readers and its surprisingly wide reception, indicated by the number of visits and downloads in English-speaking countries, including hundreds of universities (up to 791 were interested in the content of issue 62 of our magazine, research institutes and related libraries, as well as academics, researchers and students, should be celebrated. These data are derived only from one bibliographic data base (EBSCO. It must be noted that the journal is indexed in 43 bases.

  17. Zagreb during World War I: Historic newspapers as source for social history research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Jurić

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to reconstruct the social image of Zagreb during World War I by focusing on the influence of war circumstances on urban life, the living conditions and the position of children as the most vulnerable group of inhabitants, by using primarily newspapers as historical sources. In order to achieve as complete an image as possible, various publications were used (‘Narodne novine’, ‘Jutarnji list’, ‘Obzor’, ‘Novine’, ‘Hrvatska’, ‘Ilustrovani list’, ‘Katolički list’ and ‘Narodna zaštita’ which proved to be an inexhaustible source of information and contemporary observations on the above-mentioned issues. The paper tells about the general sense of insecurity in the city during wartime, the usual war motives (the wounded in the streets, life under war regulations, forced charity events and the consequences of the war situation (shortage of living supplies and poverty, begging and vagrancy, neglected children and war orphans. The paper has proven that historic newspapers are a first-class historical source. The essential scientific contribution of the paper is the reconstruction of part of Zagreb social history during World War I, highlighting that this part of Croatian history has still been poorly and incompletely researched.

  18. Working with language learner histories from three perspectives: Teachers, learners and researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mercer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in SLA, such as learner-centredness, social constructivism, the postmethod era, and complexity perspectives, have highlighted the need for more localized, situated understandings of teaching and learning and greater recognition of learner individuality and diversity. In this article, I suggest an effective way of meeting these needs is to employ learner histories. This powerful form of writing allows learners to use their L2 to engage in authentic, personally meaningful communication with others about their identities, experiences, perceptions and emotions related to their language learning histories. As a text type, they are able to facilitate a more holistic perspective of the learner’s life and reveal the unique interconnections that an individual makes across various domains. They also enable the situated, contextualised and dynamic nature of their learning experiences to become apparent and provide learners with a genuine, motivating purpose for writing. Exploring data generated in Austria with tertiary-level EFL learners, I seek to illustrate some of the rich potential of these text types from three perspectives, namely, those of the teacher, learner and researcher.

  19. Discourses on Philosophies of Science in International Business Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael; Worm, Verner

    or her capable of developing a pertinent explanatory framework for how to engage a foreign market. Before starting to look for appropriate research methodologies and tools for data collection, however, a pertinent philosophy of science point of departure has to be selected. This article has chosen...... to discuss three different philosophies of science. Each one of them is capable of providing the analyst with a specific take on how to ‘think’ data that are being extracted. Arguably, whatever approach one selects, the choice will have a crucial impact on the outcome of the research process. After settling...... company to their own benefit as well as to the company’ per se. The article closes with a critical discussion of the ramification of selecting one philosophy of science over another when engaging in either qualitative or quantitative research in an IB context....

  20. Phenomenology and adapted physical activity: philosophy and professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standal, Øyvind F

    2014-01-01

    Through the increased use of qualitative research methods, the term phenomenology has become a quite familiar notion for researchers in adapted physical activity (APA). In contrast to this increasing interest in phenomenology as methodology, relatively little work has focused on phenomenology as philosophy or as an approach to professional practice. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine the relevance of phenomenology as philosophy and as pedagogy to the field of APA. First, phenomenology as philosophy is introduced through three key notions, namely the first-person perspective, embodiment, and life-world. The relevance of these terms to APA is then outlined. Second, the concept of phenomenological pedagogy is introduced, and its application and potential for APA are discussed. In conclusion, it is argued that phenomenology can help theorize ways of understanding human difference in movement contexts and form a basis of action-oriented research aiming at developing professional practice.