WorldWideScience

Sample records for require doe development

  1. US DOE Pipeline Unplugging Requirements Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, J.; McDaniel, D.

    2009-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites around the country have an ongoing effort to transport and process several tons of radioactive waste in the form of slurry (liquids and solids) from storage tanks to processing facilities. The system of pipes used for the transportation of this waste needs technology for maintenance and for the prevention (and correction) of pipeline plugging. The unplugging technologies that have been tested and evaluated at Florida International University include ones from NuVision Engineering, AIMM and AquaMiser. NuVision's technology acts as an ocean wave does on beach erosion. It can operate on a long pipeline that has drained down below a blockage. AIMM Technology's Hydrokinetic TM process uses a sonic resonance with a cleaning water stream. This sonic resonance travels through the water stream and transfers vibration to both the pipe and the blockage. The AquaMiser line of water blasting equipment combines 15,000- to 40,000-psi water injection technology to unplug pipelines. Some sites cannot allow this level of pressure in their pipes. After reviewing the results of every test, including the benefits, advantages and disadvantages of each technology, requirements were developed for pressure, personnel training, environmental concerns, safety, and compatibility with current systems, operability, reliability, maintainability and cost. (authors)

  2. NERSC Cyber Security Challenges That Require DOE Development andSupport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draney, Brent; Campbell, Scott; Walter, Howard

    2007-01-16

    Traditional security approaches do not adequately addressall the requirements of open, scientific computing facilities. Many ofthe methods used for more restricted environments, including almost allcorporate/commercial systems, do not meet the needs of today's science.Use of only the available "state of the practice" commercial methods willhave adverse impact on the ability of DOE to accomplish its sciencegoals, and impacts the productivity of the DOE Science community. Inparticular, NERSC and other high performance computing (HPC) centers havespecial security challenges that are unlikely to be met unless DOE fundsdevelopment and support of reliable and effective tools designed to meetthe cyber security needs of High Performance Science. The securitychallenges facing NERSC can be collected into three basic problem sets:network performance and dynamics, application complexity and diversity,and a complex user community that can have transient affiliations withactual institutions. To address these problems, NERSC proposes thefollowing four general solutions: auditing user and system activityacross sites; firewall port configuration in real time;cross-site/virtual organization identity management and access control;and detecting security issues in application middleware. Solutions arealsoproposed for three general long term issues: data volume,application complexity, and information integration.

  3. Aspergillus fumigatus Does Not Require Fatty Acid Metabolism via Isocitrate Lyase for Development of Invasive Aspergillosis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schöbel, Felicitas; Ibrahim-Granet, Oumaïma; Avé, Patrick; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Brakhage, Axel A.; Brock, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne filamentous fungus causing invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals. Only a limited number of determinants directly associated with virulence are known, and the metabolic requirements of the fungus to grow inside a host have not yet been investigated. Previous studies on pathogenic microorganisms, i.e., the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the yeast Candida albicans, have revealed an essential role for isocitrate lyas...

  4. Applicability of federal and state environmental requirements to selected DOE field installations and recommendations for development of generic compliance guidance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This final report identifies and describes federal and state environmental requirements applicable to selected Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear field installations, establishes priorities for the requirements, determines the need for development of additional compliance guidance, and recommends development of compliance guidance for specific priority requirements. Compliance guidance developed as part of the study is summarized. The applicability of environmental requirements to 12 DOE field installations was reviewed. Five installations were examined under Task 4. They are: Nevada Test Site; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Seven other installations were reviewed under Task 2 and included: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Hanford; Savannah River Plant; Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Pantex Plant; Rocky Flats Plant; and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This report combines results of the two tasks. The objective of the study was to identify the set of environmental requirements which are applicable to DOE field installations, track changes in the requirements, and prepare compliance guidance for important requirements and important regulatory developments as necessary. A cumulative calendar update for July 1982 represents the current status of applicable requirements. Environmental profiles of each facility, along with ambient monitoring results, are presented. Applicable federal requirements are identified. The specific applicability of federal and state requirements is detailed for each installation. Compliance guidance available from various agencies is described. Each requirement described is ranked by priority, and recommendations are made for development of additional guidance

  5. Does Sustainability Require Transparency? The UN Divide Over Freedom of Information & Media in the Post-2015 Development Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Orme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2015 the United Nations General Assembly will adopt a new set of global development objectives to succeed the Millennium Development Goals, which expire at the end of the year. A General Assembly working group has proposed 17 “Sustainable Development Goals” with 169 associated “targets,” including one committing all UN member states to “ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms, in accordance with national legislation and international agreements.” The UN Secretary-General and his many prominent “post-2015” advisors also advocate guarantees for freedom of information in the new global goals. The inclusion of a clear commitment to access to information in the SDGs – including factual “indicators” to monitor compliance – could have a profound impact on freedom of expression and media globally, advocates contend. Yet it remains uncertain whether any provision on access to information will survive the remaining months of negotiations before the final set of SDGs is agreed at the UN’s Sustainable Development Summit in September 2015. Some developing countries oppose an access to information target, along with other proposed commitments to human rights and democratic governance in the SDGs. But others are strongly supportive, and UN debates on the new goals are likely to continue until the September deadline.

  6. When does food refusal require professional intervention?

    OpenAIRE

    Dovey, Terence M.; Farrow, Claire V.; Martin, Clarissa I.; Isherwood, Elaine; Halford, Jason C.G.

    2009-01-01

    Food refusal can have the potential to lead to nutritional deficiencies, which increases the risk of a variety of communicable and non-communicable diseases. Deciding when food refusal requires professional intervention is complicated by the fact that there is a natural and appropriate stage in a child's development that is characterised by increased levels of rejection of both previously accepted and novel food items. Therefore, choosing to intervene is difficult, which if handled badly can ...

  7. Background and planning requirements for spent fuel shipments to DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravenscroft, Norman [Edlow International Company, 1666 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 201, Washington, DC 20009 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Information is provided on the planning required and the factors that must be included in the planning process for spent fuel shipments to DOE. A summary is also provided on the background concerning renewal of the DOE spent fuel acceptance policy in May 1996. (author)

  8. Does Saudi school furniture meet ergonomics requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Mohamed Zaki

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to study the effect of adjustable imported desk and chair combinations available in the market on student performance. Six sets of chairs and tables within three different activities (reading, writing, and looking to the blackboard) were the independent variables. Evaluation of back force at 5th lumbar vertebrae and the 1st sacrum (L5/S1), subjective measures of discomfort, and the mismatch between student body dimension and classroom furniture analysis were measured. A total of 124 young male students (first through sixth-grade) participated in this experiment. The results revealed too low or too high chair and table heights relative to the students' body dimensions increased the stresses acting at L5/S1 as well as discomfort ratings. This study indicated there was a high level of body mismatch in desk-chair combinations even with the adjustable imported furniture available in the local market. Anthropometric data of Saudi students should be collected from different regions in the Kingdom and then design and development of desk-chair combinations could follow the development of a standard procedure to adapt to the needs of Saudi school children.

  9. Does perceptual learning require consciousness or attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwese, Julia D I; Post, Ruben A G; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-10-01

    , suggesting that the memory trace that is formed during inattention is latent until accessed. The results suggest that learning requires consciousness, and not attention, and further strengthen the idea that consciousness is separate from attention.

  10. 40 CFR 33.301 - What does this subpart require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY PROGRAMS Good Faith Efforts § 33.301 What does this subpart require? A recipient, including one... good faith efforts whenever procuring construction, equipment, services and supplies under an EPA...

  11. Developing a model lifeline protection program for DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowing, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    A National Lifeline Standard Development Program is currently being conducted by FEMA and NIST. The Department of Energy is following these developments and supplementing them to meet Life-Safety and mission requirements for all DOE facilities as part of the Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Plan. The task will be overseen by a DOE management team with technical guidance provided by a Steering Group of management and operating contractor representatives. The DOE will participate in the federal program by conducting a workshop on lifeline protection issues, developing an overall plan, organizing a Steering Group, and conducting a pilot study at a DOE facility

  12. Codes, standards, and requirements for DOE facilities: natural phenomena design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    The basic requirements for codes, standards, and requirements are found in DOE Orders 5480.1A, 5480.4, and 6430.1. The type of DOE facility to be built and the hazards which it presents will determine the criteria to be applied for natural phenomena design. Mandatory criteria are established in the DOE orders for certain designs but more often recommended guidance is given. National codes and standards form a great body of experience from which the project engineer may draw. Examples of three kinds of facilities and the applicable codes and standards are discussed. The safety program planning approach to project management used at Westinghouse Hanford is outlined. 5 figures, 2 tables

  13. Developing innovative environmental technologies for DOE needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.; Sewell, I.O.; DeGregory, J.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental restoration and waste management activities at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are diverse and complex. Contamination at DOE sites and facilities includes radionuclides, chlorinated hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, non-aqueous phase liquids, and heavy metals, among others. Soil and groundwater contamination are major areas of concern and DOE has focused very significant efforts in these areas. Relevant technology development activities are being conducted at DOE's own national laboratories, as well as through collaborative efforts with other federal agencies and the private sector. These activities span research and development (R ampersand D) of new concepts and techniques to demonstration and commercialization of mature technologies. Since 1990, DOE has also supported R ampersand D of innovative technologies through interagency agreements with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and others

  14. Technology development for DOE SNF management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, D.L.; Einziger, R.E.; Murphy, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the process used to identify technology development needs for the same management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the US Department of Energy (DOE) inventory. Needs were assessed for each of the over 250 fuel types stores at DOE sites around the country for each stage of SNF management--existing storage, transportation, interim storage, and disposal. The needs were then placed into functional groupings to facilitate integration and collaboration among the sites

  15. PFP requirements development planning guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The PFP Requirements Development Planning Guide presents the strategy and process used for the identification, allocation, and maintenance of requirements within the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) integrated project baseline. Future revisions to this document will be included as attachments (e.g., results of the PFP Requirements Analysis attributable to this approach). This document is intended be a Project-owned management tool. As such, this document will periodically require revisions resulting from improvements of the information, processes, and techniques as now described. Future updates may be made to this document by PFP management and final approval of the content will be accomplished in a Baseline Change Request as it impacts the Multi-Year Work Plan, or baseline information managed in the Hanford Site Systems Engineering Baseline

  16. Developing integrated benchmarks for DOE performance measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, Jr. H.C.

    1992-09-30

    The objectives of this task were to describe and evaluate selected existing sources of information on occupational safety and health with emphasis on hazard and exposure assessment, abatement, training, reporting, and control identifying for exposure and outcome in preparation for developing DOE performance benchmarks. Existing resources and methodologies were assessed for their potential use as practical performance benchmarks. Strengths and limitations of current data resources were identified. Guidelines were outlined for developing new or improved performance factors, which then could become the basis for selecting performance benchmarks. Data bases for non-DOE comparison populations were identified so that DOE performance could be assessed relative to non-DOE occupational and industrial groups. Systems approaches were described which can be used to link hazards and exposure, event occurrence, and adverse outcome factors, as needed to generate valid, reliable, and predictive performance benchmarks. Data bases were identified which contain information relevant to one or more performance assessment categories . A list of 72 potential performance benchmarks was prepared to illustrate the kinds of information that can be produced through a benchmark development program. Current information resources which may be used to develop potential performance benchmarks are limited. There is need to develop an occupational safety and health information and data system in DOE, which is capable of incorporating demonstrated and documented performance benchmarks prior to, or concurrent with the development of hardware and software. A key to the success of this systems approach is rigorous development and demonstration of performance benchmark equivalents to users of such data before system hardware and software commitments are institutionalized.

  17. Comparison of selected DOE and non-DOE requirements, standards, and practices for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, L.; Kudera, D.; Newberry, W.

    1995-12-01

    This document results from the Secretary of Energy's response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94--2. The Secretary stated that the US Department of Energy (DOE) would ''address such issues as...the need for additional requirements, standards, and guidance on low-level radioactive waste management. '' The authors gathered information and compared DOE requirements and standards for the safety aspects Of low-level disposal with similar requirements and standards of non-DOE entities

  18. International inspection activity impacts upon DOE safeguards requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zack, N.R.

    1995-01-01

    The US has placed certain special nuclear materials declared excess to their strategic needs under international safeguards through the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This Presidential initiative has obligated materials at several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for these safeguards activities to demonstrate the willingness of the US to ban production or use of nuclear materials outside of international safeguards. However, IAEA inspection activities generally tend to be intrusive in nature and are not consistent with several domestic safeguards procedures implemented to reduce worker radiation exposures and increase the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of accounting for and storing of special nuclear materials. To help identify and provide workable solutions to these concerns, the Office of Safeguards and Security has conducted a program to determine possible changes to the DOE safeguards and security requirements designed to help facilities under international safeguards inspections more easily comply with domestic safeguards goals during international inspection activities. This paper will discuss the impact of international inspection activities on facility safeguards operations and departmental safeguards procedures and policies

  19. Status of cask procurement strategy to satisfy DOE/OCRWM requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teer, B.R.; Nolan, D.J.; Lake, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act requires the development of a safe and efficient system to transport spent nuclear fuel to and within the Federal Waste Management System. This paper describes the DOE/OCRWM strategy to develop and procure a major component of the Transportation System-the transport cask systems. The original initiative to develop high-capacity innovative designs and its current status is described. The follow-on phase to design and procure proven technology cask systems is also discussed

  20. The development of safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorel, M.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the safety approach followed in France for the design of nuclear reactors. This safety approach is based on safety principles from which stem safety requirements that set limiting values for specific parameters. The improvements in computerized simulation, the use of more adequate new materials, a better knowledge of the concerned physical processes, the changes in the reactor operations (higher discharge burnups for instance) have to be taken into account for the definition of safety criteria and the setting of limiting values. The developments of the safety criteria linked to the risks of cladding failure and loss of primary coolant are presented. (A.C.)

  1. ORNL implementation of new health and safety requirements (DOE Order 5480.11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    New mandates in radiological protection outlined in DOE Order 5480. 11, include changes in the methodology for determining total radiation dose, ALARA program accountability, monitoring requirements, and standards for public entrance into controlled areas. The new order places distinct requirements concerning training at all DOE facilities. Radiation protection training requirements are addressed, including the effective communication of operations changes to all employees. This paper details the endeavors underway at ORNL in designing, developing, and delivering the training required by the new mandates. Strategies taken to reach the intended goals are explained. Efforts involve the design and implementation of the above mentioned radiation protection programs, a job-specific ALARA instructional package, and a Risk-Based Philosophy program matched to operational changes. 4 refs., 5 tabs

  2. Does unbelted safety requirement affect protection for belted occupants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingwen; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Flannagan, Carol A C; Narayanaswamy, Prabha; Reed, Matthew P; Andreen, Margaret; Neal, Mark; Lin, Chin-Hsu

    2017-05-29

    Federal regulations in the United States require vehicles to meet occupant performance requirements with unbelted test dummies. Removing the test requirements with unbelted occupants might encourage the deployment of seat belt interlocks and allow restraint optimization to focus on belted occupants. The objective of this study is to compare the performance of restraint systems optimized for belted-only occupants with those optimized for both belted and unbelted occupants using computer simulations and field crash data analyses. In this study, 2 validated finite element (FE) vehicle/occupant models (a midsize sedan and a midsize SUV) were selected. Restraint design optimizations under standardized crash conditions (U.S.-NCAP and FMVSS 208) with and without unbelted requirements were conducted using Hybrid III (HIII) small female and midsize male anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) in both vehicles on both driver and right front passenger positions. A total of 10 to 12 design parameters were varied in each optimization using a combination of response surface method (RSM) and genetic algorithm. To evaluate the field performance of restraints optimized with and without unbelted requirements, 55 frontal crash conditions covering a greater variety of crash types than those in the standardized crashes were selected. A total of 1,760 FE simulations were conducted for the field performance evaluation. Frontal crashes in the NASS-CDS database from 2002 to 2012 were used to develop injury risk curves and to provide the baseline performance of current restraint system and estimate the injury risk change by removing the unbelted requirement. Unbelted requirements do not affect the optimal seat belt and airbag design parameters in 3 out of 4 vehicle/occupant position conditions, except for the SUV passenger side. Overall, compared to the optimal designs with unbelted requirements, optimal designs without unbelted requirements generated the same or lower total injury risks for

  3. Meeting the requirements for a DOE environmental restoration project. The Fernald strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanoss, R.L.; Risenhoover, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental Restoration (ER) of five Operable Units (OU) at Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) includes compliance with the requirements of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA), National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and DOE Orders. Each regulatory driver has differing procedural requirements for documenting calculations, decisions, and actions involved in site cleanup. Integration of documentation and avoidance of duplication can save time and money. Such savings are being achieved by OU specific application of supporting studies, revised procedures, and guidance documents. Each OU is seeking appropriate opportunities to produce single documents that simultaneously fulfill the important requirements of the other regulations and DOE orders. These opportunities are evaluated at all phases of decision making, remedial design, and remedial action. Three essential processes precede environmental restoration/remedial action at a DOE site/project: 1. Completion of decision-making documents required by governing or applicable statutes. 2. Completion of important scientific and engineering analyses of remedial alternatives, and design and implementation of the remedial solution established in the CERCLA Record of Decision (ROD). 3. Preparation of DOE-mandated documentation to record engineering evaluations and cost estimates required for budgeting, decision making, and project management. Methodology and requirements for each process have developed from long, successful practice, but independently of each other. FERMCO, as new DOE contractor at Fernald and first Environmental Restoration Management Contractor (ERMC), is committed to a process of Continuous Performance Improvement (CPI). A major reevaluation of documentation and processes for support of environmental decision-making and design of cleanup activities to remediate the five OUs at the FEMP is being undertaken

  4. DOE EM industry programs robotics development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staubly, R.; Kothari, V.

    1998-01-01

    The Office of Science and Technology (OST) manages an aggressive program for RD and D, as well as testing and evaluation for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) organization. The goal is to develop new and improved environmental restoration and waste management technologies to clean up the inventory of the DOE weapons complex faster, safer, and cheaper than is possible with currently available technologies. Robotic systems reduce worker exposure to the absolute minimum, while providing proven, cost-effective, and, for some applications, the only acceptable technique for addressing challenging problems. Development of robotic systems for remote operations occurs in three main categories: tank waste characterization and retrieval; decontamination and dismantlement; and characterization, mapping, and inspection systems. In addition, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has some other projects which fall under the heading of supporting R and D. The central objective of all FETC robotic projects is to make robotic systems more attractive by reducing costs and health risks associated with the deployment of robotic technologies in the cleanup of the nuclear weapons complex. This will be accomplished through development of robots that are cheaper, faster, safer, and more reliable, as well as more straightforward to modify/adapt and more intuitive to operate with autonomous capabilities and intelligent controls that prevent accidents and optimize task execution

  5. Research requirements for alternative reactor development strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate and compare resource requirements and other fuel cycle quantities for alternative reactor deployment strategies. The paper examines from global and national perspectives the interaction of various fuel cycle alternatives described in the previous U.S. submissions to Working Groups 4, 5, 8 and Subgroup 1A/2A. Nuclear energy forecasts of Subgroup 1A/2A are used in the calculation of uranium demand for each strategy. These uranium demands are then compared to U.S. estimates of annual uranium producibility. Annual rather than cumulative producibility was selected because it does not assume preplanned stockpiling, and is therefore more conservative. The strategies attempt to span a range of nuclear power mixes which could evolve if appropriate commercial and governmental climates develop

  6. Development and testing of the methodology for performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of implementing a set of materials control and accountability (MC ampersand A) performance requirements. These graded requirements set a uniform level of performance for similar materials at various facilities against the threat of an insider adversary stealing special nuclear material (SNM). These requirements are phrased in terms of detecting the theft of a goal quantity of SNM within a specified time period and with a probability greater than or equal to a special value and include defense-in-depth requirements. The DOE has conducted an extensive effort over the last 2 1/2 yr to develop a practical methodology to be used in evaluating facility performance against the performance requirements specified in DOE order 5633.3. The major participants in the development process have been the Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The process has included careful reviews of related evaluation systems, a review of the intent of the requirements in the order, and site visits to most of the major facilities in the DOE complex. As a result of this extensive effort to develop guidance for the MC ampersand A performance requirements, OSS was able to provide a practical method that will allow facilities to evaluate the performance of their safeguards systems against the performance requirements. In addition, the evaluations can be validated by the cognizant operations offices in a systematic manner

  7. Development of transportation operations requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, S.T.; Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L.; Peterson, R.W.; Pope, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Transport conditions at various utility sties vary dramatically in terms of characteristics at and near the site, requirements, administrative procedures, and other factors. Continuation of design efforts for the OCRWM transportation operations system requires that the operating requirements for the transportation system -- quantity of fuel per unit time per site -- be identified so that the effect the variations have on the system can be accommodated. The approach outlined in this paper provides for an identification of specific sites, evaluation of shipment capabilities at each site, and integration of the sites into multi-site shipping campaigns to scope the logistics management problem for the transportation operations system. 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Spent fuel storage requirements. An update of DOE/RL-83-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    Spent fuel storage capacities at some commercial light water reactors (LWRs) are inadequate to handle projected spent fuel discharges. This report presents estimates of potential near-term requirements for additional LWR spent fuel storage capacity, based on information voluntarily supplied by utilities operating commercial nuclear power plants. These estimates provide information needed for planning the Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Interim Storage (FIS) Program and the spent fuel research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities to be carried out under the DOE's Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program, in conjunction with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. This report is the latest in a series published by the DOE on LWR spent fuel storage requirements. Since the planning needs of the CSFM program focus on the near-term management of spent fuel inventories from commercial nuclear power reactors, the estimates in this report cover the ten-year period from the present through 1983. The report also assesses the possible impacts of using various concepts to reduce the requirements for additional storage capacity

  9. 25 CFR 42.6 - When does due process require a formal disciplinary hearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When does due process require a formal disciplinary... RIGHTS § 42.6 When does due process require a formal disciplinary hearing? Unless local school policies and procedures provide for less, a formal disciplinary hearing is required before a suspension in...

  10. Enforcement handbook: Enforcement of DOE nuclear safety requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This Handbook provides detailed guidance and procedures to implement the General Statement of DOE Enforcement Policy (Enforcement Policy or Policy). A copy of this Enforcement Policy is included for ready reference in Appendix D. The guidance provided in this Handbook is qualified, however, by the admonishment to exercise discretion in determining the proper disposition of each potential enforcement action. As discussed in subsequent chapters, the Enforcement and Investigation Staff will apply a number of factors in assessing each potential enforcement situation. Enforcement sanctions are imposed in accordance with the Enforcement Policy for the purpose of promoting public and worker health and safety in the performance of activities at DOE facilities by DOE contractors (and their subcontractors and suppliers) who are indemnified under the Price-Anderson Amendments Act. These indemnified contractors, and their suppliers and subcontractors, will be referred to in this Handbook collectively as DOE contractors. It should be remembered that the purpose of the Department`s enforcement policy is to improve nuclear safety for the workers and the public, and this goal should be the prime consideration in exercising enforcement discretion.

  11. Enforcement handbook: Enforcement of DOE nuclear safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This Handbook provides detailed guidance and procedures to implement the General Statement of DOE Enforcement Policy (Enforcement Policy or Policy). A copy of this Enforcement Policy is included for ready reference in Appendix D. The guidance provided in this Handbook is qualified, however, by the admonishment to exercise discretion in determining the proper disposition of each potential enforcement action. As discussed in subsequent chapters, the Enforcement and Investigation Staff will apply a number of factors in assessing each potential enforcement situation. Enforcement sanctions are imposed in accordance with the Enforcement Policy for the purpose of promoting public and worker health and safety in the performance of activities at DOE facilities by DOE contractors (and their subcontractors and suppliers) who are indemnified under the Price-Anderson Amendments Act. These indemnified contractors, and their suppliers and subcontractors, will be referred to in this Handbook collectively as DOE contractors. It should be remembered that the purpose of the Department's enforcement policy is to improve nuclear safety for the workers and the public, and this goal should be the prime consideration in exercising enforcement discretion

  12. Extinction of relapsed fear does not require the basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingawi, Nura W; Westbrook, R Frederick; Laurent, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    It is well established that extinguished fears are restored with the passage of time or a change in physical context. These fear restoration phenomena are believed to mimic the conditions under which relapse occurs in patients that have been treated for anxiety disorders by means of cue-exposure therapy. Here, we used a rodent model to extinguish relapsed fear and assess whether this new extinction prevents further relapse. We found that activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) is required to initially extinguish conditioned fear, but this activity was not necessary to subsequently extinguish relapsed fear. That is, extinction of spontaneously recovered or renewed fear was spared by BLA inactivation. Yet, this BLA-independent learning of extinction did not protect against further relapse: extinction of relapsed fear conducted without BLA activity was still likely to return after the passage of time or a shift in physical context. These findings have important clinical implications. They indicate that pharmacological agents with anxiolytic properties may disrupt initial cue-exposure therapy but may be useful when therapy is again needed due to relapse. However, they also suggest that these agents will not protect against further relapse, implying the need for developing drugs that target other brain regions involved in fear inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fundamental requirements for petrochemical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, G. B.

    1999-01-01

    The development of NOVA Chemicals over the past 20 years is described as an illustration of how the petrochemical industry provides markets for natural gas, natural gas liquids and the products of crude oil distillation, and functions as a conduit for upgrading products which would otherwise be sold into the fuel market. Some fundamental characteristics of the business which are foundations for competitiveness are reviewed in the process. These fundamentals help to understand why the industry locates in certain geographic regions of the world, which are often remote from end-use markets. Chief among these fundamentals is access to an adequate supply of appropriately priced feedstock; this is the single most important reason why chemical companies continue to emphasize developments in areas of the world where feedstock are advantageously priced. The cost of operations is equally significant. Cost depends not so much on location but on the scale of operations, hence the tendency towards large scale plants. Plant and product rationalization, technology and product development synergies and leverage with suppliers are all opportunities for cost reduction throughout the product supply chain. The combination of lower natural gas cost in Alberta, the lower fixed cost of extraction and the economies of scale achieved by large scale operation (five billion pounds per year of polyethylene production capacity) are the crucial factors that will enable NOVA Chemicals to maintain its competitive position and to weather the highs and lows in industry price fluctuations

  14. Development and use of consolidated criteria for evaluation of emergency preparedness plans for DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, K.; Kier, P.H.; Baldwin, T.E.

    1995-01-01

    Emergency preparedness at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is promoted by development and quality control of response plans. To promote quality control efforts, DOE has developed a review document that consolidates requirements and guidance pertaining to emergency response planning from various DOE and regulatory sources. The Criteria for Evaluation of Operational Emergency Plans (herein referred to as the Criteria document) has been constructed and arranged to maximize ease of use in reviewing DOE response plans. Although developed as a review instrument, the document also serves as a de facto guide for plan development, and could potentially be useful outside the scope of its original intended DOE clientele. As regulatory and DOE requirements are revised and added in the future, the document will be updated to stay current

  15. 12 CFR 617.7630 - Does this Federal requirement affect any state property laws?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does this Federal requirement affect any state property laws? 617.7630 Section 617.7630 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM BORROWER RIGHTS Right of First Refusal § 617.7630 Does this Federal requirement affect any state property...

  16. The DOE safeguards and security technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, R.C.; Wheelock, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that strategic planning for safeguards and security within the Department of Energy emphasizes the contributions of advanced technologies to the achievement of Departmental protection program goals. The Safeguards and Security Technology Development Program provides state-of-the-art technologies, systems and technical services in support of the policies and programmatic requirements for the protection of Departmental assets. The Program encompasses research and development in physical security, nuclear material control and accountability, information security and personnel security, and the integration of these disciplines in advanced applications. Technology development tasks serve goals that range from the maintenance of an effective technology base to the development, testing and evaluation of applications to meet field needs. A variety of factors, from the evolving threat to reconfiguration of the DOE complex and the technical requirements of new facilities, are expected to influence safeguards and security technology requirements and development efforts. Implementation of the Program is based on the systematic identification, prioritization and alignment of technology development tasks and needs. Initiatives currently underway are aimed at enhancing technology development project management. Increased management attention is also being placed on efforts to promote the benefits of the Program through technology transfer and interagency liaison

  17. Cytochrome oxidase assembly does not require catalytically active cytochrome C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Antoni; Pierre, Danielle; Lee, Johnson; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2003-03-14

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, catalyzes the transfer of electrons from reduced cytochrome c to molecular oxygen. COX assembly requires the coming together of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits and the assistance of a large number of nuclear gene products acting at different stages of maturation of the enzyme. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of cytochrome c, encoded by CYC1 and CYC7, is required not only for electron transfer but also for COX assembly through a still unknown mechanism. We have attempted to distinguish between a functional and structural requirement of cytochrome c in COX assembly. A cyc1/cyc7 double null mutant strain was transformed with the cyc1-166 mutant gene (Schweingruber, M. E., Stewart, J. W., and Sherman, F. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 4132-4143) that expresses stable but catalytically inactive iso-1-cytochrome c. The COX content of the cyc1/cyc7 double mutant strain harboring non-functional iso-1-cytochrome c has been characterized spectrally, functionally, and immunochemically. The results of these studies demonstrate that cytochrome c plays a structural rather than functional role in assembly of cytochrome c oxidase. In addition to its requirement for COX assembly, cytochrome c also affects turnover of the enzyme. Mutants containing wild type apocytochrome c in mitochondria lack COX, suggesting that only the folded and mature protein is able to promote COX assembly.

  18. Does this adult patient with suspected bacteremia require blood cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Bryan; Morris, Andrew M; Tomlinson, George; Detsky, Allan S

    2012-08-01

    Clinicians order blood cultures liberally among patients in whom bacteremia is suspected, though a small proportion of blood cultures yield true-positive results. Ordering blood cultures inappropriately may be both wasteful and harmful. To review the accuracy of easily obtained clinical and laboratory findings to inform the decision to obtain blood cultures in suspected bacteremia. A MEDLINE and EMBASE search (inception to April 2012) yielded 35 studies that met inclusion criteria for evaluating the accuracy of clinical variables for bacteremia in adult immunocompetent patients, representing 4566 bacteremia and 25,946 negative blood culture episodes. Data were extracted to determine the prevalence and likelihood ratios (LRs) of findings for bacteremia. The pretest probability of bacteremia varies depending on the clinical context, from low (eg, cellulitis: 2%) to high (eg, septic shock: 69%). Elevated temperatures alone do not accurately predict bacteremia (for ≥38°C [>100.3°F], LR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.4-2.4]; for ≥38.5°C [>101.2°F], LR, 1.4 [95% CI, 1.1-2.0]), nor does isolated leukocytosis (LR, cultures should not be ordered for adult patients with isolated fever or leukocytosis without considering the pretest probability. SIRS and the decision rule may be helpful in identifying patients who do not need blood cultures. These conclusions do not apply to immunocompromised patients or when endocarditis is suspected.

  19. What does it require to open a franchising clothing business?

    OpenAIRE

    Ranta, Heidi-Helena; Pikarinen, Helmi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out how to open a franchising clothing business in Finland and what is required from the new franchisee. The goal of this thesis work was to make preparation work for a potential future business. This thesis was to find out the possibility if a franchising business could be a possible future career for the authors. The information for this thesis was gathered from literature, the Internet and by interviewing the franchisees and franchisors from differe...

  20. Criteria development methodology for DOE decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Radiological Guide for DOE Decommissioning Operations provides a uniform basis for assessing hazard inventories, making risk analyses, performing site characterizations, and certifying decommissioning operations. While initially addressed to radioactive contaminants, in all likelihood it will be extended to include other contaminants

  1. Assessing DOE`s success in implementing the FFC Act: A federal and state partnership to develop treatment plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, M.J.; Bubar, P.M. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Implementation of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) required total cooperation among the Department of Energy (DOE), the involved States and interested stakeholders. Although the effort was time consuming, tedious and (at times) trying, the results obtained [Site Treatment Plans (STP)] were an unprecedented success. Through long-range planning, attention to details and organization of effort, a coordinated, cohesive, focused team was developed that included the DOE Headquarters, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 40 DOE sites, 20 states and multiple interested stakeholders. The efforts of the FFCAct team resulted in the preparation of 37 STPs which outline the methods, locations and schedules for the treatment and disposal of DOE`s mixed wastes. The Plans provided a strong foundation upon which consent orders were prepared and approved. The FFCAct approach also resulted in the development of working relationships that will prove not only useful but vital to the planning and implementation necessary to the successful clean-up and disposal DOE`s mixed wastes.

  2. Requirements for shipment of DOE radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gablin, K.; No, Hyo; Herman, J.

    1993-01-01

    There are several sources of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) at Argonne National Laboratory which, in the past, were collected at waste tanks and/or sludge tanks. They were eventually pumped out by special pumps and processed in an evaporator located in the waste operations area in Building No. 306. Some of this radioactive mixed waste represents pure elementary mercury. These cleaning tanks must be manually cleaned up because the RMW material was too dense to pump with the equipment in use. The four tanks being discussed in this report are located in Building No. 306. They are the Acid Waste Tank, IMOX/FLOC Tanks, Evaporation Feed Tanks, and Waste Storage Tanks. All of these tanks are characterized and handled separately. This paper discusses the process and the requirements for characterization and the associated paperwork for Argonne Waste to be shipped to Westinghouse Hanford Company for storage

  3. Core Problem: Does the CV Parent Body Magnetization require differentiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T.; Tarduno, J. A.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Evidence for the presence of past dynamos from magnetic studies of meteorites can provide key information on the nature and evolution of parent bodies. However, the suggestion of a past core dynamo for the CV parent body based on the study of the Allende meteorite has led to a paradox: a core dynamo requires differentiation, evidence for which is missing in the meteorite record. The key parameter used to distinguish core dynamo versus external field mechanisms is absolute field paleointensity, with high values (>>1 μT) favoring the former. Here we explore the fundamental requirements for absolute field intensity measurement in the Allende meteorite: single domain grains that are non-interacting. Magnetic hysteresis and directional data define strong magnetic interactions, negating a standard interpretation of paleointensity measurements in terms of absolute paleofield values. The Allende low field magnetic susceptibility is dominated by magnetite and FeNi grains, whereas the magnetic remanence is carried by an iron sulfide whose remanence-carrying capacity increases with laboratory cycling at constant field values, indicating reordering. The iron sulfide and FeNi grains are in close proximity, providing mineralogical context for interactions. We interpret the magnetization of Allende to record the intense early solar wind with metal-sulfide interactions amplifying the field, giving the false impression of a higher field value in some prior studies. An undifferentiated CV parent body is thus compatible with Allende's magnetization. Early solar wind magnetization should be the null hypothesis for evaluating the source of magnetization for chondrites and other meteorites.

  4. Does multifocal papillary micro-carcinoma require radioiodine ablation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punda, A.; Markovic, V.; Eterovic, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Background: the thyroid carcinomas smaller than 1 cm (micro-carcinomas) comprise a significant fraction of papillary carcinomas. Excluding clinical micro-carcinomas, which present as metastatic disease, the micro-carcinomas diagnosed by ultrasound/FNAC or incidentally have very good prognosis. However, whether or not these papillary micro-carcinomas require post-surgical radioiodine ablation remains a matter of debate. Hypothesis: multi-focality is present in majority of clinical papillary micro-carcinomas and this characteristic can be used to identify the subset of non-clinical micro-carcinomas with greater malignant potential. Methods: the data on types of differentiated thyroid carcinomas diagnosed in the period 2008-2011 in the University Hospital Split were collected. Results: there were 359 patients with thyroid carcinoma, 329 (92%) of which had papillary carcinoma. About 61% (202/329) of papillary carcinomas were micro-carcinomas; most of them were diagnosed by ultrasound/FNAC (134/202= 66%), the rest were incidentalomas (48/202=24%) and clinical micro carcinomas (20/202=10%). Sixty percent (12/20) of patients with clinical micro-carcinoma and 23 patients with non-clinical micro-carcinoma (23/182=13%) had multifocal disease. Conclusion: multifocal disease is a frequent characteristic of clinical papillary thyroid micro-carcinomas, suggesting that multi-focality presents an early stage of non-clinical micro-carcinomas with more aggressive behaviour. Thus multifocal, but not uni-focal papillary micro-carcinomas may require radioiodine ablation. (authors)

  5. What does respect for the patient's autonomy require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kam-Yuen

    2013-11-01

    Personal autonomy presupposes the notion of rationality. What is not so clear is whether, and how, a compromise of rationality to various degrees will diminish a person's autonomy. In bioethical literature, three major types of threat to the rationality of a patient's medical decision are identified: insufficient information, irrational beliefs/desires, and influence of different framing effects. To overcome the first problem, it is suggested that patients be provided with information about their diseases and treatment choices according to the objective standard. I shall explain how this should be finessed. Regarding the negative impact of irrational beliefs/desires, some philosophers have argued that holding irrational beliefs can still be an expression of autonomy. I reject this argument because the degree of autonomy of a decision depends on the degree of rationality of the beliefs or desires on which the decision is based. Hence, to promote patient autonomy, we need to eliminate irrational beliefs by the provision of evidence and good arguments. Finally, I argue that the way to smooth out the framing effects is to present the same information in different perspectives: it is too often assumed that medical information can always be given in a complete and unadorned manner. This article concludes with a cautionary note that the protection of patient autonomy requires much more time and effort than the current practice usually allows. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. 45 CFR 261.16 - Does the imposition of a penalty affect an individual's work requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Provisions Addressing Individual Responsibility? § 261.16 Does the imposition of a penalty affect an individual's work requirement... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Does the imposition of a penalty affect an...

  7. Analysis of waste treatment requirements for DOE mixed wastes: Technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The risks and costs of managing DOE wastes are a direct function of the total quantities of 3wastes that are handled at each step of the management process. As part of the analysis of the management of DOE low-level mixed wastes (LLMW), a reference scheme has been developed for the treatment of these wastes to meet EPA criteria. The treatment analysis in a limited form was also applied to one option for treatment of transuranic wastes. The treatment requirements in all cases analyzed are based on a reference flowsheet which provides high level treatment trains for all LLMW. This report explains the background and basis for that treatment scheme. Reference waste stream chemical compositions and physical properties including densities were established for each stream in the data base. These compositions are used to define the expected behavior for wastes as they pass through the treatment train. Each EPA RCRA waste code was reviewed, the properties, chemical composition, or characteristics which are of importance to waste behavior in treatment were designated. Properties that dictate treatment requirements were then used to develop the treatment trains and identify the unit operations that would be included in these trains. A table was prepared showing a correlation of the waste physical matrix and the waste treatment requirements as a guide to the treatment analysis. The analysis of waste treatment loads is done by assigning wastes to treatment steps which would achieve RCRA compliant treatment. These correlation's allow one to examine the treatment requirements in a condensed manner and to see that all wastes and contaminant sets are fully considered

  8. [Does clinical risk management require a structured conflict management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A key element of clinical risk management is the analysis of errors causing near misses or patient damage. After analyzing the causes and circumstances, measures for process improvement have to be taken. Process management, human resource development and other established methods are used. If an interpersonal conflict is a contributory factor to the error, there is usually no structured conflict management available which includes selection criteria for various methods of conflict processing. The European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder) has created a process model for introducing a structured conflict management system which is suitable for hospitals and could fill the gap in the methodological spectrum of clinical risk management. There is initial evidence that a structured conflict management reduces staff fluctuation and hidden conflict costs. This article should be understood as an impulse for discussion on to what extent the range of methods of clinical risk management should be complemented by conflict management.

  9. DOE research and development and field facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This report describes the roles of DOE's headquarters, field offices, major multiprogram laboratories, Energy Technology and Mining Operations Centers, and other government-owned, contractor-operated facilities which are located in all regions of the United States. It gives brief descriptions of resources, activities, and capabilities of each field facility (sections III through V). These represent a cumulative capital investment of $12 billion and involve a work force of approximately 12,000 government (field) employees and approximately 100,000 contractor employees.

  10. 40 CFR 141.571 - What records does subpart T require my system to keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... records does subpart T require my system to keep? Your system must keep several types of records based on... Benchmarking(§§ 141.540-141.544) Benchmark (including raw data and analysis) Indefinitely. ...

  11. [The Mexican health system: does it require a transformation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertorivski Woldenberg, Salomón; Fajardo Dolci, German

    2012-01-01

    National health systems represent an organized social response that enables countries to improve, maintain and enhance the health status of their citizens. These evolve and are transformed according to changes in the biological, economic, political and social components of health. In Mexico there is currently a segmented health system, consisting of a bismarckian model of social security and a social protection in health model. The latter developed to comply with the fourth constitutional article by which health is no longer described as a right linked to the employment status of the individual. Given this reality at least three alternatives seem to emerge for the future: the permanence of a mixed health system with social security and social protection institutions with a similar weight within the national health system, or its opposite, the extension of social protection as a mechanism for widespread access. Given the challenges we face, it is desirable to establish a unified health system, the aim should be that health care is universally protected, as currently happens, but is guaranteed through a much more efficient and based in primary care health care system.

  12. Quality Assurance Grading Guidelines for Research and Development at DOE Facilities (DOE Order 5700.6C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, T.B.

    1992-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are established in DOE Order 5700.6C. This order is applicable for all DOE departmental elements, management, and maintenance and operating contractors and requires that documented Quality Assurance Programs (QAPs) are prepared at all levels; it has one attachment. The DOE Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER) has issued a standard to ensure implementation of the full intent of this order in the ER community.

  13. Assessment of the requirements for DOE's annual report to congress on low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (PL99-240; LLRWPAA) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to ''submit to Congress on an annual basis a report which: (1) summarizes the progress of low-level waste disposal siting and licensing activities within each compact region, (2) reviews the available volume reduction technologies, their applications, effectiveness, and costs on a per unit volume basis, (3) reviews interim storage facility requirements, costs, and usage, (4) summarizes transportation requirements for such wastes on an inter- and intra-regional basis, (5) summarizes the data on the total amount of low-level waste shipped for disposal on a yearly basis, the proportion of such wastes subjected to volume reduction, the average volume reduction attained,, and the proportion of wastes stored on an interim basis, and (6) projects the interim storage and final disposal volume requirements anticipated for the following year, on a regional basis (Sec. 7(b)).'' This report reviews and assesses what is required for development of the annual report specified in the LLRWPAA. This report addresses each of the subject areas set out in the LLRWPAA

  14. When does treatment plan optimization require inverse planning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherouse, George W.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing maturity of image-based computer-aided design of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy has recently sparked a great deal of work in the area of treatment plan optimization. Optimization of a conformal photon beam treatment plan is that exercise through which a set of intensity-modulated static beams or arcs is specified such that, when the plan is executed, 1) a region of homogeneous dose is produced in the patient with a shape which geometrically conforms (within a specified tolerance) to the three-dimensional shape of a designated target volume and 2) acceptably low incidental dose is delivered to non-target tissues. Interest in conformal radiotherapy arise from a fundamental assumption that there is significant value to be gained from aggressive customization of the treatment for each individual patient In our efforts to design optimal treatments, however, it is important to remember that, given the biological and economic realities of clinical radiotherapy, mathematical optimization of dose distribution metrics with respect to some minimal constraint set is not a necessary or even sufficient condition for design of a clinically optimal treatment. There is wide variation in the complexity of the clinical situations encountered in practice and there are a number of non-physical criteria to be considered in planning. There is also a complementary variety of computational and engineering means for achieving optimization. To date, the scientific dialogue regarding these techniques has concentrated on development of solutions to worst-case scenarios, largely in the absence of consideration of appropriate matching of solution complexity to problem complexity. It is the aim of this presentation to propose a provisional stratification of treatment planning problems, stratified by relative complexity, and to identify a corresponding stratification of necessary treatment planning techniques. It is asserted that the subset of clinical radiotherapy cases for

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF DOE'S POST-CLOSURE MONITORING NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    The 2006 plan sets an ambitious agenda for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the remediation of sites contaminated by decades of nuclear weapons production activities. The plan's primary objective is to reduce overall clean up costs by first eliminating the environmental problems that are most expensive to control and safely maintain. In the context of the 2006 Plan, closure refers to the completion of area or facility specific cleanup projects. The cleanup levels are determined by the planned future use of the site or facility. Use restrictions are still undecided for most sites but are highly probable to exclude residential or agricultural activities. Most of the land will be remediated to ''industrial use'' levels with access restrictions and some areas will be closed-off through containment. Portions of the site will be reserved for waste disposal, either as a waste repository or the in-situ immobilization of contaminated soil and groundwater, and land use will be restricted to waste disposal only. The land used for waste disposal will require monitoring and maintenance activities after closure. Most of the land used for industrial use may also require such postclosure activities. The required postclosure monitoring and maintenance activities will be imposed by regulators and stakeholders. Regulators will not approve closure plans without clearly defined monitoring methods using approved technologies. Therefore, among all other more costly and labor-intensive closure-related activities, inadequate planning for monitoring and lack of appropriate monitoring technologies can prevent closure. The purpose of this project is to determine, document, and track the current and evolving postclosure monitoring requirements at DOE-EM sites. This information will aid CMST-CP in guiding its postclosure technology development and deployment efforts.

  16. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the by what method the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun, in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of ongoing efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  17. 30 CFR 250.195 - What notification does MMS require on the production status of wells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the well in a production status. You must confirm oral notification by telefax or e-mail within those... production status of wells? 250.195 Section 250.195 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Information and Reporting Requirements § 250.195 What notification does MMS require on the production status...

  18. 13 CFR 123.11 - Does SBA require collateral for any of its disaster loans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does SBA require collateral for any of its disaster loans? 123.11 Section 123.11 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS...? Generally, SBA will not require that you pledge collateral to secure a disaster home loan or a physical...

  19. Progress in developing new commercial LLRW disposal facilities and DOE assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, T.D.; Hinschberger, S.T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports state and regional progress in developing new commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Specifically the paper addresses DOE determination of state and regional compliance with the 1988 milestone requirements of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). In addition, the paper summarizes the assistance provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) to the states and regions in their efforts to develop new disposal facilities as mandated in the LLRWPAA

  20. Youth development in India: does poverty matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Bijaya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the differentials in youth development patterns determined by the economic condition of the household in India. The wealth index is used to glean youth development differentials in the different economic categories of the household. The findings suggest that youth from the bottom 20 per cent (poorest) of households are deprived in education, employment, labour force and are not working currently compared to youth from the middle and rich households. The states differ in yo...

  1. Projected uranium requirements of developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the uranium requirements of developing countries both in aggregate and individually. Although the cumulative uranium requirements of these countries are expected to account for less than eight percent of total requirements, the fact that many of these countries are expressing renewed interest in nuclear is, in itself, encouraging. The countries analyzed in this paper are Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, India, Israel, Mexico, Pakistan, South Africa, South Korea and Taiwan. For each country, the existing and planned nuclear capacity levels have been identified and capacity factors have been projected. For countries with no previous nuclear power, the world weighted average capacity factor for the specific reactor type is utilized. Other factors influencing nuclear power demand and operations of these developing countries will be discussed, and finally, uranium requirements based on a calculated optimal tails assay of .30 will be provided

  2. Does Bilingualism Delay the Development of Dementia?

    OpenAIRE

    Amy L Atkinson

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that bilingualism (where individuals speak two languages) may delay the development of dementia. However, much of the research is inconclusive. Some researchers have reported that bilingualism delays the onset and diagnosis of dementia, whilst other studies have found weak or even detrimental effects. This paper reviews a series of nine empirical studies, published up until March 2016, which investigated whether bilingualism significantly delays the onset of dementia. Th...

  3. Quality assurance grading guidelines for research and development at DOE facilities. DOE Order 5700.6C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, T.B.; Morris, R.N.

    1992-10-01

    The quality assurance (QA) requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) are established in DOE Order 5700.6C. This order is applicable for all DOE departmental elements, management, and maintenance and operating contractors and requires that documented Quality Assurance Programs (QAPS) are prepared at all levels; it has one attachment. The DOE Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER) has issued a standard to ensure implementation of the full intent of this order in the ER community. This report discusses order 5700.6C in relation to research with DOE.

  4. Does Tumor Development Follow a Programmed Path?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert

    2011-03-01

    The initiation and progression of a tumor is a complex process, resembling the growth of a embryo in terms of the stages of development and increasing differentiation and somatic evolution of constituent cells in the community of cells that constitute the tumor. Typically we view cancer cells as rogue individuals violating the rules of the games played within an organism, but I would suggest that what we see is a programmed and algorithmic process. I will then question If tumor progression is dominated by the random acquisition of successive survival traits, or by a systematic and sequential unpacking of ``weapons'' from a pre-adapted ``toolkit'' of genetic and epigenetic potentialities? Can we then address this hypothesis by data mining solid tumors layer by layer? Support of the NSF and the NCI is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Does Bilingualism Delay the Development of Dementia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Atkinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that bilingualism (where individuals speak two languages may delay the development of dementia. However, much of the research is inconclusive. Some researchers have reported that bilingualism delays the onset and diagnosis of dementia, whilst other studies have found weak or even detrimental effects. This paper reviews a series of nine empirical studies, published up until March 2016, which investigated whether bilingualism significantly delays the onset of dementia. The article also explores whether the inconsistent findings can be attributed to differences in study designs or the definitions of bilingualism used between studies. Based on current evidence, it appears that lifelong bilingualism, where individuals frequently use both languages, may be protective against dementia. However, becoming bilingual in adulthood or using the second language infrequently is unlikely to substantially delay onset of the disease.

  6. Implementation guide for use with suspect/counterfeit items: Requirements of DOE O 440.1, worker protection management; 10 CFR 830.120; and DOE 5700.6C, quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 440.1, Worker Protection Management For DOE Federal and Contractors Employees, [7] sets forth requirements for DOE and its contractors to implement suspect and counterfeit items (S/CI) controls as part of the quality assurance (QA) programs required by 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830.120 [8] or DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance [9]. DOE G-830.120, Implementation Guide for Use with 10 CFR Part 830.120, Quality Assurance, [10] provides additional guidance on establishing and implementing effective QA processes to control S/CIs. DOE O 232.1, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations, [11] specifies requirements for reporting S/CIs under the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS). DOE promulgated the requirements and guidance to control or eliminate the hazards posed by S/CIs, which can lead to unexpected equipment failures and undue risks to the DOE mission, the environment, and personnel. This Guide is a compendium of information contained in the referenced DOE directives and other documents concerning S/CI controls. It incorporates, updates, and supersedes earlier guidance issued in Plan for the Suspect/Counterfeit Products Issue in the Department of Energy, dated October 1993, [4] and in memoranda issued by Defense Programs (DP) [12-16] and other DOE program offices. This guidance was developed to strengthen the procurement process, identify and eliminate S/CIs, and improve the reporting of S/CIs. The information in this Guide, when implemented by DOE and its contractors, will satisfy the S/CI requirements contained in the referenced DOE directives.

  7. Implementation guide for use with suspect/counterfeit items: Requirements of DOE O 440.1, worker protection management; 10 CFR 830.120; and DOE 5700.6C, quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 440.1, Worker Protection Management For DOE Federal and Contractors Employees, [7] sets forth requirements for DOE and its contractors to implement suspect and counterfeit items (S/CI) controls as part of the quality assurance (QA) programs required by 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830.120 [8] or DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance [9]. DOE G-830.120, Implementation Guide for Use with 10 CFR Part 830.120, Quality Assurance, [10] provides additional guidance on establishing and implementing effective QA processes to control S/CIs. DOE O 232.1, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations, [11] specifies requirements for reporting S/CIs under the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS). DOE promulgated the requirements and guidance to control or eliminate the hazards posed by S/CIs, which can lead to unexpected equipment failures and undue risks to the DOE mission, the environment, and personnel. This Guide is a compendium of information contained in the referenced DOE directives and other documents concerning S/CI controls. It incorporates, updates, and supersedes earlier guidance issued in Plan for the Suspect/Counterfeit Products Issue in the Department of Energy, dated October 1993, [4] and in memoranda issued by Defense Programs (DP) [12-16] and other DOE program offices. This guidance was developed to strengthen the procurement process, identify and eliminate S/CIs, and improve the reporting of S/CIs. The information in this Guide, when implemented by DOE and its contractors, will satisfy the S/CI requirements contained in the referenced DOE directives

  8. Development of Nuclear Analysis Capabilities for DOE Waste Management Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Rearden, B.T.; Broadhead, B.L.; Petrie, L.M.; DeHart, M.D.; Hopper, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypical analysis capabilities that can be used by nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, this project has been investigating the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses. It is also investigating the use of a new deterministic code that allows for specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model geometric details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored. RESEARCH PROGRESS AND IMPLICATIONS

  9. Integrating total quality management principles with the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedges, D. [Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy has recently required its field offices, contractors, and subcontractors to implement DOE Order 5700.6C, ``Quality Assurance,`` for all work on waste management contracts. The order restructures the 18 criteria of NQA-1 and focuses on the role of management in achieving and assuring quality, performance of activities to achieve and assure quality, and management`s assessment of its performance for the purpose of identifying improvements to be made. The DOE order also introduces elements of the total quality management (TQM) philosophy, which were not present in DOE Order 5700.6B. The research community within DOE has recently issued a document entitled DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide, which is more explicit about the integration of TQM principles with the implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C in research facilities. The Environmental Protection Agency is sponsoring a quality assurance standard (ANSI/ASQC E-4) to replace EPA`s QAMS 005/80. The new standard is consistent with DOE Order 5700.6C, and it also stresses the integration of TQM principles within the quality assurance process. This paper discusses the intent and philosophy of the 10 criteria of the new DOE order, the status of ANSI/ASQC E-4, and how to effectively integrate TQM principles into the quality assurance process as the conversion is made from NQA-1 to DOE Order 5700.6C. The purpose and value of DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide for research will also be discussed.

  10. Comparative analysis of DOE Order 5820.2A, NRC, and EPA radioactive and mixed waste management requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    As directed by DOE-Headquarters and DOE-Idaho, the Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program (TSP) drafted an analysis of DOE Order 5820. 2A on ''Radioactive Waste Management'' to develop guidelines and criteria for revising the Order. This comparative matrix is a follow up to the earlier analysis. This matrix comparing the requirements of DOE Order 5820.2A with Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations was prepared at the request of EM-30. The matrix compares DOE Order 5820.2A with the following: NRC regulations in 10 CFR Part 61 on ''Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste''; NRC regulations in 10 CFR Part 60 on ''Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste in Geologic Repositories''; EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 191 on ''Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Waste''; EPA regulations in 40 FR Part 192 on ''Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailing''; and EPA regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

  11. Research and development for DOE environmental restoration and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, M.D.; Borys, S.S.; Bugielski, D.; Lien, S.C.T.; Hain, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently consolidated its environmental restoration and waste management activities. Within that new organization, DOE has committed to support Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) activities with the following objectives: rapidly advance beyond currently available technologies; provide solutions to key technical issues that will improve effectiveness, efficiency, and safety; and enhance DOE's ability to meet its 30-year compliance and cleanup goals. DOE has already supported a number of R ampersand D activities in this area and plans to continue that support in the future. DOE's Office of Technology Development is interested in eliciting broad participation from qualified organizations who can contribute to RDDT ampersand E activities. This presentation addresses the on-going and future R ampersand D, with an emphasis on the private sector activities. To focus private sector capabilities on the high-priority needs of DOE, a series of competitive solicitations was started in FY 1990. On May 1, 1990, on behalf of DOE's Office of Technology Development, Argonne National Laboratory issued a Request for Proposals that solicited proposals for research and development in the areas of (1) groundwater remediation, (2) soil remediation, (3) characterization of contamination and geological and hydrological features, and (4) containment of contaminated sites. In response to this solicitation, Argonne National Laboratory received 147 proposals. Fifteen of the proposals totaling $5.7 million were funded in FY 1990. The scope of work and evaluation criteria used in the procurement and the workscope of the resultant contracts are reviewed in this paper. The FY 1991 plans for competitive private sector research and development activities will also be presented at the conference. Funding levels, technical workscope, evaluation criteria, and schedule for the FY 1991 Request for Proposals will be detailed. 2

  12. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated Resource Planning § 905.14 Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? Yes, customers must submit IRP progress... projected goals and implementation schedules, and energy and capacity benefits and renewable energy...

  13. 13 CFR 123.513 - Does SBA require collateral on its Military Reservist EIDL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., or both. SBA will not decline a loan if you do not have a particular amount of collateral so long as SBA is reasonably sure that you can repay the loan. If you refuse to pledge the available collateral... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does SBA require collateral on its...

  14. 32 CFR 555.9 - Reporting requirements for work in support of DOE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reporting requirements for work in support of DOE. 555.9 Section 555.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY.... This notification shall include: (1) A brief statement of the problem. (2) Nature of corrective action...

  15. Spent fuel storage requirements. An update of DOE/RL-85-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    Utility projections of spent fuel storage capacities indicate that some commercial light water reactors (LWRs) have inadequate capacity to handle projected spent fuel discharges. This report presents estimates of potential near-term requirements for additional LWR spent fuel storage capacity, based on information supplied by utilities operating commercial nuclear power plants. These estimates provide information needed for planning the Department of Energy's (DOE) activities to be carried out under the DOE's Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program, in conjunction with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. This report is the latest in a series published by the DOE on LWR spent fuel storage requirements. The estimates in this report cover the period from the present through the year 2000. Although the DOE objective is to begin accepting spent fuel for final disposal in 1998, types of fuel and the receipt rates to be shipped are not yet known. Hence, this report makes no assumption regarding such fuel shipments. The report also assesses the possible impacts of increased fuel exposure and spent fuel transshipment on the requirements for additional storage capacity

  16. EVALUATION OF STATE-OF-THE-ART MANIPULATORS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR DOE ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLACK, DEREK; GRUPINSKI, STEPHEN

    1998-10-08

    This report provides an overview of applications within the DOE complex which could benefit from the use of modular robotics technology during remediation operations. Each application area contains one or more specific tasks which are presently conducted by humans under hazardous conditions or which are deemed highly impractical, or are altogether impossible without automation. Five major areas were investigated for specific needs with respect to automation. Information was collected on Mixed Waste Operations, Contaminant Automated Analysis, Tanks, Decontamination and Dismantlement and Automated Plutonium Processing. During this investigation, information was gathered from available literature, telephone interviews with informed personnel and on-site visits. This data serves to provide design requirements and guidelines for the design of a family of modular actuators, which will be used to construct manipulators suited to each task. In addition, a survey of existing modular manipulator designs is presented. This survey addresses modular manipulators developed inside government labs and in universities for such applications as space exploration or controls research. It also addresses efforts at commercially viable industrial manipulators which have been built. This survey of robotic systems provides the reader with a glimpse into what technology currently exists in the way of modular manipulator automation and, to a degree, where this technology may be applicable or, more often, where these systems are unsuited to EM applications. From the information gathered during this study, it is possible to sufficiently define the requirements of one manipulator system which can be used to conduct automated transfer operations within Plutonium gloveboxes. This manipulator will be constructed from ARM Automation actuator modules and will provide this application with a viable option for automation within these gloveboxes. The design issues surrounding this manipulator and its

  17. Successful intraosseous infusion in the critically ill patient does not require a medullary cavity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Gerard

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate that successful intraosseous infusion in critically ill patients does not require bone that contains a medullary cavity. DESIGN: Infusion of methyl green dye via standard intraosseous needles into bones without medullary cavity-in this case calcaneus and radial styloid-in cadaveric specimens. SETTING: University department of anatomy. PARTICIPANTS: Two adult cadaveric specimens. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Observation of methyl green dye in peripheral veins of the limb in which the intraosseous infusion was performed. RESULTS: Methyl green dye was observed in peripheral veins of the chosen limb in five out of eight intraosseous infusions into bones without medullary cavity-calcaneus and radial styloid. CONCLUSIONS: Successful intraosseous infusion does not always require injection into a bone with a medullary cavity. Practitioners attempting intraosseous access on critically ill patients in the emergency department or prehospital setting need not restrict themselves to such bones. Calcaneus and radial styloid are both an acceptable alternative to traditional recommended sites.

  18. Overview of DOE's field screening technology development activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, C.W.; Anderson, T.D.; Cooley, C.R.; Hain, K.E.; Lien, S.C.T.; Erickson, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has recently created the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, into which it consolidated those activities. Within this new organization, the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is responsible for research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) activities aimed at meeting DOE cleanup goals, while minimizing cost and risk. Site characterization using traditional drilling, sampling, and analytical methods comprises a significant part of the environmental restoration efforts in terms of both cost and time to accomplish. It can also be invasive and create additional pathways for spread of contaminants. Consequently, DOE is focusing on site characterization as one of the areas in which significant technological advances are possible which will decrease cost, reduce risk, and shorten schedules for achieving restoration goals. DOE is investing considerably in R ampersand D and demonstration activities which will improve the abilities to screen chemical, radiological, and physical parameters in the field. This paper presents an overview of the program objectives and status and reviews some of the projects which are currently underway in the area. 1 ref

  19. Overcoming regulatory barriers: DOE environmental technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtyka, B.M.; Clodfelter-Schumack, K.; Evans, T.T.

    1995-01-01

    The potential to improve environmental conditions via compliance or restoration is directly related to the ability to produce and apply innovative technological solutions. However, numerous organizations, including the US General Accounting Office (GAO), the EPA National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology (NACEPT), the DOE Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB), and the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) have determined that significant regulatory barriers exist that inhibit the development and application of these technologies. They have noted the need for improved efforts in identifying and rectifying these barriers for the purpose of improving the technology development process, providing innovative alternatives, and enhancing the likelihood of technology acceptance by all. These barriers include, among others, regulator and user bias against ''unknown/unproven'' technologies; multi-level/multi-media permit disincentives; potential liability of developers and users for failed implementation; wrongly defined or inadequate data quality objectives: and lack of customer understanding and input. The ultimate goal of technology development is the utilization of technologies. This paper will present information on a number of regulatory barriers hindering DOE's environmental technology development program and describe DOE efforts to address these barriers

  20. Recent developments in the DOE Waste Minimization Pollution Prevention Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in a wide variety of research and development, remediation, and production activities at more than 100 sites throughout the United States. The wastes generated cover a diverse spectrum of sanitary, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams, including typical office environments, power generation facilities, laboratories, remediation sites, production facilities, and defense facilities. The DOE's initial waste minimization activities pre-date the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 and focused on the defense program. Little emphasis was placed on nonproduction activities. In 1991 the Office of Waste Management Operations developed the Waste Minimization Division with the intention of coordinating and expanding the waste minimization pollution prevention approach to the entire complex. The diverse nature of DOE activities has led to several unique problems in addressing the needs of waste minimization and pollution prevention. The first problem is developing a program that addresses the geographical and institutional hurdles that exist; the second is developing a monitoring and reporting mechanism that one can use to assess the overall performance of the program

  1. Quantitative methods for developing C2 system requirement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, K.K.

    1992-06-01

    The US Army established the Army Tactical Command and Control System (ATCCS) Experimentation Site (AES) to provide a place where material and combat developers could experiment with command and control systems. The AES conducts fundamental and applied research involving command and control issues using a number of research methods, ranging from large force-level experiments, to controlled laboratory experiments, to studies and analyses. The work summarized in this paper was done by Pacific Northwest Laboratory under task order from the Army Tactical Command and Control System Experimentation Site. The purpose of the task was to develop the functional requirements for army engineer automation and support software, including MCS-ENG. A client, such as an army engineer, has certain needs and requirements of his or her software; these needs must be presented in ways that are readily understandable to the software developer. A requirements analysis then, such as the one described in this paper, is simply the means of communication between those who would use a piece of software and those who would develop it. The analysis from which this paper was derived attempted to bridge the communications gap'' between army combat engineers and software engineers. It sought to derive and state the software needs of army engineers in ways that are meaningful to software engineers. In doing this, it followed a natural sequence of investigation: (1) what does an army engineer do, (2) with which tasks can software help, (3) how much will it cost, and (4) where is the highest payoff This paper demonstrates how each of these questions was addressed during an analysis of the functional requirements of engineer support software. Systems engineering methods are used in a task analysis and a quantitative scoring method was developed to score responses regarding the feasibility of task automation. The paper discusses the methods used to perform utility and cost-benefits estimates.

  2. Quantitative methods for developing C2 system requirement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, K.K.

    1992-06-01

    The US Army established the Army Tactical Command and Control System (ATCCS) Experimentation Site (AES) to provide a place where material and combat developers could experiment with command and control systems. The AES conducts fundamental and applied research involving command and control issues using a number of research methods, ranging from large force-level experiments, to controlled laboratory experiments, to studies and analyses. The work summarized in this paper was done by Pacific Northwest Laboratory under task order from the Army Tactical Command and Control System Experimentation Site. The purpose of the task was to develop the functional requirements for army engineer automation and support software, including MCS-ENG. A client, such as an army engineer, has certain needs and requirements of his or her software; these needs must be presented in ways that are readily understandable to the software developer. A requirements analysis then, such as the one described in this paper, is simply the means of communication between those who would use a piece of software and those who would develop it. The analysis from which this paper was derived attempted to bridge the ``communications gap`` between army combat engineers and software engineers. It sought to derive and state the software needs of army engineers in ways that are meaningful to software engineers. In doing this, it followed a natural sequence of investigation: (1) what does an army engineer do, (2) with which tasks can software help, (3) how much will it cost, and (4) where is the highest payoff? This paper demonstrates how each of these questions was addressed during an analysis of the functional requirements of engineer support software. Systems engineering methods are used in a task analysis and a quantitative scoring method was developed to score responses regarding the feasibility of task automation. The paper discusses the methods used to perform utility and cost-benefits estimates.

  3. Quality assurance grading guidelines for research and development at DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, T.B.; Morris, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) are established in DOE Order 5700.6C. This order is applicable for all DOE departmental elements, management, and maintenance and operating contractors and requires that documented Quality Assurance Programs (QAPs) are prepared at all levels; it has one attachment. The DOE Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER) has issued a standard to ensure implementation of the full intent of this order in the ER community.

  4. BASELINE DEVELOPMENT USING THE CRITICAL DECISION AND DOE ORDER 413.3 FRAMEWORKS: A CASE STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darnell, M.L.; Duffy, M.A.; Gantos, N.J.; Zadeh, B.

    2003-01-01

    From 1943 through 1986, Battelle Memorial Institute performed nuclear research and development on behalf of various Federal government agencies, primarily for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies. This work was performed in Battelle's privately owned facilities in Columbus, Ohio, and a research park located at an 11-acre facility 16 miles west of Columbus, in a rural area near the village of West Jefferson, Ohio. Under the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP), Battelle is now engaged in cleaning up the West Jefferson site on a cost-sharing basis with the DOE. The BCLDP mission is to decontaminate Battelle facilities in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost-effective manner, returning the facilities to a condition suitable for use without radiological restriction. The Columbus Environmental Management Project (CEMP), reporting to the DOE Ohio Field Office, is the DOE organization that is responsible for overseeing the BCLDP. CEMP requested preparation of a technical baseline, suitable for independent validation, establishing the scope, cost, and schedule for completing the project. Concurrent with this request, the DOE Office of Environmental Management issued DOE Order 413.3, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, for review and, shortly thereafter, published the first drafts of companion documents titled Program and Project Management Manual and Project Management Practices. These two documents suggest or require the use of a variety of techniques and tools for planning and executing DOE cleanup programs. Accordingly, Battelle successfully developed a project baseline for obtaining approval of Critical Decision 2/3 (CD-2/3) in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 413.3 and the technical approaches described in the companion documents. This paper addresses three fundamental questions:(1) What were the planned baseline development methodology and its implementation

  5. DOE Integrated Safeguards and Security (DISS) historical document archival and retrieval analysis, requirements and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guyer, H.B.; McChesney, C.A.

    1994-10-07

    The overall primary Objective of HDAR is to create a repository of historical personnel security documents and provide the functionality needed for archival and retrieval use by other software modules and application users of the DISS/ET system. The software product to be produced from this specification is the Historical Document Archival and Retrieval Subsystem The product will provide the functionality to capture, retrieve and manage documents currently contained in the personnel security folders in DOE Operations Offices vaults at various locations across the United States. The long-term plan for DISS/ET includes the requirement to allow for capture and storage of arbitrary, currently undefined, clearance-related documents that fall outside the scope of the ``cradle-to-grave`` electronic processing provided by DISS/ET. However, this requirement is not within the scope of the requirements specified in this document.

  6. DOE SNF technology development necessary for final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, D.L.; Fillmore, D.L.; Windes, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Existing technology is inadequate to allow safe disposal of the entire inventory of US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Needs for SNF technology development were identified for each individual fuel type in the diverse inventory of SNF generated by past, current, and future DOE materials production, as well as SNF returned from domestic and foreign research reactors. This inventory consists of 259 fuel types with different matrices, cladding materials, meat composition, actinide content, and burnup. Management options for disposal of SNF include direct repository disposal, possible including some physical or chemical preparation, or processing to produce a qualified waste form by using existing aqueous processes or new treatment processes. Technology development needed for direct disposal includes drying, mitigating radionuclide release, canning, stabilization, and characterization technologies. While existing aqueous processing technology is fairly mature, technology development may be needed to apply one of these processes to SNF different than for which the process was originally developed. New processes to treat SNF not suitable for disposal in its current form were identified. These processes have several advantages over existing aqueous processes

  7. Excellence in clinical teaching: knowledge transformation and development required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, David M

    2014-08-01

    Clinical teachers in medicine face the daunting task of mastering the many domains of knowledge needed for practice and teaching. The breadth and complexity of this knowledge continue to increase, as does the difficulty of transforming the knowledge into concepts that are understandable to learners. Properly targeted faculty development has the potential to expedite the knowledge transformation process for clinical teachers. Based on my own research in clinical teaching and faculty development, as well as the work of others, I describe the unique forms of clinical teacher knowledge, the transformation of that knowledge for teaching purposes and implications for faculty development. The following forms of knowledge for clinical teaching in medicine need to be mastered and transformed: (i) knowledge of medicine and patients; (ii) knowledge of context; (iii) knowledge of pedagogy and learners, and (iv) knowledge integrated into teaching scripts. This knowledge is employed and conveyed through the parallel processes of clinical reasoning and clinical instructional reasoning. Faculty development can facilitate this knowledge transformation process by: (i) examining, deconstructing and practising new teaching scripts; (ii) focusing on foundational concepts; (iii) demonstrating knowledge-in-use, and (iv) creating a supportive organisational climate for clinical teaching. To become an excellent clinical teacher in medicine requires the transformation of multiple forms of knowledge for teaching purposes. These domains of knowledge allow clinical teachers to provide tailored instruction to learners at varying levels in the context of fast-paced and demanding clinical practice. Faculty development can facilitate this knowledge transformation process. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Development of a treatability variance guidance document for US DOE mixed-waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, N.; Spikula, R.; Harms, T.

    1990-03-01

    In response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) anticipated need for variances from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs), a treatability variance guidance document was prepared. The guidance manual is for use by DOE facilities and operations offices. The manual was prepared as a part of an ongoing effort by DOE-EH to provide guidance for the operations offices and facilities to comply with the RCRA (LDRs). A treatability variance is an alternative treatment standard granted by EPA for a restricted waste. Such a variance is not an exemption from the requirements of the LDRs, but rather is an alternative treatment standard that must be met before land disposal. The manual, Guidance For Obtaining Variance From the Treatment Standards of the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions (1), leads the reader through the process of evaluating whether a variance from the treatment standard is a viable approach and through the data-gathering and data-evaluation processes required to develop a petition requesting a variance. The DOE review and coordination process is also described and model language for use in petitions for DOE radioactive mixed waste (RMW) is provided. The guidance manual focuses on RMW streams, however the manual also is applicable to nonmixed, hazardous waste streams. 4 refs

  9. U.S. DOE driver development for ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluyter, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) supported Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is to produce pure fusion ignition with fusion yields of 200 to 1000 millions of joules, which could find several applications in the defence and in the electric power generation. The National Ignition Facility will operate in both direct and indirect driver modes, with a glass laser driver. However two other options have been developed to increase the energy efficiency: the Light Ion Pulsed Power program and the NIKE KrF laser. Heavy ion drivers are also investigated -Abstract only-. (TEC)

  10. Does elite sport develop mass sport? : a Norwegian case study

    OpenAIRE

    Skille, Eivind Å.; Hanstad, Dag Vidar

    2010-01-01

    The original publication is available at: http://www.sportstudies.org/content/vol_1_2010/051-068_vol_1_2010_hanstad-skille.pdf The notion that elite sport generates mass sport,seems to be a social fact among many and influential members of the society. The issue is, however, under-researched, and the little research which actually exists does not confirm a causal link. In this article, we take as a point of departure the case of Norwegian biathlon, and its development, both as elite sp...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development, Downers Grove, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This single-family home built in a peat bog has underground storage tanks and drainage tanks, blown fiberglass insulation, coated rigid polyisocyanurate, and flashing. The 3,600-square-foot custom home built by Weiss Building & Development LLC is the first home in Illinois certified to the DOE Challenge Home criteria, which requires that homes meet the EPA Indoor airPlus guidelines.The builder won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  12. 25 CFR 39.219 - What happens if a residential program does not maintain residency levels required by this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What happens if a residential program does not maintain residency levels required by this subpart? 39.219 Section 39.219 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS..., Student Counts, and Verifications Residential Programs § 39.219 What happens if a residential program does...

  13. Does Islamic Banking Contribute to Economic Development? Evidence from Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafas Furqani

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Does Islamic banking contribute to the economic development of a country? In what way Islamic banking contribute to the economic development? Are the main question might be asked to examine the viability of Islamic banking to the economic development. This paper attempts to answer those questions by examining the dynamic interactions between Islamic banking and economic development of Malaysia by employing the Cointegration test and Vector Error Model (VECM to see whether the Islamic financial system contributes to the economic development and economic development that contribute to the transformation of the operation of the Islamic financial system in the longrun. We use time series data of total Islamic bank financing (IB financing and real GDP per capita (RGDP, fixed investment (GFCF, and trade activities (TRADE to represent real economic sectors. We found that in the short-run only fixed investment that granger cause Islamic bank to develop for 1997:1-2005:4. Where as in the long-run, there is evidence of a bidirectional relationship between Islamic bank and fixed investment and there is evidence to support ‘demand following’ hypothesis of GDP and Islamic bank, where increase in GDP causes Islamic banking to develop and not vice versa. Islamic banking is also found to have less contribution to the international trade in the form of export and import of goods and services.Keywords: Islamic banking, economic growth, Malaysia, VECM

  14. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  15. Hazardous Substance Release Reporting Under CERCLA, EPCR {section}304 and DOE Emergency Management System (EMS) and DOE Occurrence Reporting Requirements. Environmental Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traceski, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    Releases of various substances from DOE facilities may be subject to reporting requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), as well as DOE`s internal ``Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information`` and the ``Emergency Management System`` (EMS). CERCLA and EPCPA are Federal laws that require immediate reporting of a release of a Hazardous Substance (HS) and an Extremely Hazardous Substance (EHS), respectively, in a Reportable Quantity (RQ) or more within a 24-hour period. This guidance uses a flowchart, supplemental information, and tables to provide an overview of the process to be followed, and more detailed explanations of the actions that must be performed, when chemical releases of HSs, EHSs, pollutants, or contaminants occur at DOE facilities. This guidance should be used in conjunction with, rather than in lieu of, applicable laws, regulations, and DOE Orders. Relevant laws, regulations, and DOE Orders are referenced throughout this guidance.

  16. ICF ETF and its engineering development requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blink, J.A.; Allen, W.O.; Billman, K.

    1980-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion driver development and ICF target physics are being intensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. However, engineering considerations of harnessing the fusion energy pulses that are an ultimate product and goal of the ICF physics program are only being addressed on a small scale. Experience with development of other new technologies indicates that engineering development time will be substantial for ICF energy converters. The authors met at Livermore in July 1980 to form an ICF Reactor Technology Working Group to address this issue. This paper outlines the current state of planning for an ICF Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and the engineering development that must precede it

  17. The DOE technology development programme on severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhold, R.J.; Moore, R.A.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a programme in technology development aimed at resolving the technical issues in severe accident management strategies for advanced and evolutionary light water reactors (LWRs). The key objective of this effort is to achieve a robust defense-in-depth at the interface between prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. The approach taken towards this goal is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). Applications of ROAAM to the severe accident management strategy for the US AP600 advanced LWR have been effective both in enhancing the design and in achieving acceptance of the conclusions and base technology developed in the course of the work. This paper presents an overview of that effort and its key technical elements

  18. An in fiber experimental approach to photonic quantum digital signatures that does not require quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Robert J.; Donaldon, Ross J.; Dunjko, Vedran; Wallden, Petros; Clarke, Patrick J.; Andersson, Erika; Jeffers, John; Buller, Gerald S.

    2014-10-01

    Classical digital signatures are commonly used in e-mail, electronic financial transactions and other forms of electronic communications to ensure that messages have not been tampered with in transit, and that messages are transferrable. The security of commonly used classical digital signature schemes relies on the computational difficulty of inverting certain mathematical functions. However, at present, there are no such one-way functions which have been proven to be hard to invert. With enough computational resources certain implementations of classical public key cryptosystems can be, and have been, broken with current technology. It is nevertheless possible to construct information-theoretically secure signature schemes, including quantum digital signature schemes. Quantum signature schemes can be made information theoretically secure based on the laws of quantum mechanics, while classical comparable protocols require additional resources such as secret communication and a trusted authority. Early demonstrations of quantum digital signatures required quantum memory, rendering them impractical at present. Our present implementation is based on a protocol that does not require quantum memory. It also uses the new technique of unambiguous quantum state elimination, Here we report experimental results for a test-bed system, recorded with a variety of different operating parameters, along with a discussion of aspects of the system security.

  19. Design of experiments (DoE) in pharmaceutical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Politis, Stavros; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; M Rekkas, Dimitrios

    2017-06-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, Sir Ronald Fisher introduced the concept of applying statistical analysis during the planning stages of research rather than at the end of experimentation. When statistical thinking is applied from the design phase, it enables to build quality into the product, by adopting Deming's profound knowledge approach, comprising system thinking, variation understanding, theory of knowledge, and psychology. The pharmaceutical industry was late in adopting these paradigms, compared to other sectors. It heavily focused on blockbuster drugs, while formulation development was mainly performed by One Factor At a Time (OFAT) studies, rather than implementing Quality by Design (QbD) and modern engineering-based manufacturing methodologies. Among various mathematical modeling approaches, Design of Experiments (DoE) is extensively used for the implementation of QbD in both research and industrial settings. In QbD, product and process understanding is the key enabler of assuring quality in the final product. Knowledge is achieved by establishing models correlating the inputs with the outputs of the process. The mathematical relationships of the Critical Process Parameters (CPPs) and Material Attributes (CMAs) with the Critical Quality Attributes (CQAs) define the design space. Consequently, process understanding is well assured and rationally leads to a final product meeting the Quality Target Product Profile (QTPP). This review illustrates the principles of quality theory through the work of major contributors, the evolution of the QbD approach and the statistical toolset for its implementation. As such, DoE is presented in detail since it represents the first choice for rational pharmaceutical development.

  20. Assessing DOE's success in implementing the FFC Act: A federal and state partnership to develop treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, M.J.; Bubar, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Implementation of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) required total cooperation among the Department of Energy (DOE), the involved States and interested stakeholders. Although the effort was time consuming, tedious and (at times) trying, the results obtained [Site Treatment Plans (STP)] were an unprecedented success. Through long-range planning, attention to details and organization of effort, a coordinated, cohesive, focused team was developed that included the DOE Headquarters, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 40 DOE sites, 20 states and multiple interested stakeholders. The efforts of the FFCAct team resulted in the preparation of 37 STPs which outline the methods, locations and schedules for the treatment and disposal of DOE's mixed wastes. The Plans provided a strong foundation upon which consent orders were prepared and approved. The FFCAct approach also resulted in the development of working relationships that will prove not only useful but vital to the planning and implementation necessary to the successful clean-up and disposal DOE's mixed wastes

  1. Broadband laser ranging development at the DOE Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Corey V.; La Lone, Brandon M.; Younk, Patrick W.; Daykin, Ed P.; Rhodes, Michelle A.

    2017-02-01

    Broadband Laser Ranging (BLR) is a new diagnostic being developed in collaboration across multiple USA Dept. of Energy (DOE) facilities. Its purpose is to measure the precise position of surfaces and particle clouds moving at speeds of a few kilometers per second. The diagnostic uses spectral interferometry to encode distance into a modulation in the spectrum of pulses from a mode-locked fiber laser and uses a dispersive Fourier transformation to map the spectral modulation into time. This combination enables recording of range information in the time domain on a fast oscilloscope every 25-80 ns. Discussed here are some of the hardware design issues, system tradeoffs, calibration issues, and experimental results. BLR is being developed as an add-on to conventional Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) systems because PDV often yields incomplete information when lateral velocity components are present, or when there are drop-outs in the signal amplitude. In these cases, integration of the velocity from PDV can give incorrect displacement results. Experiments are now regularly fielded with over 100 channels of PDV, and BLR is being developed in a modular way to enable high channel counts of BLR and PDV recorded from the same probes pointed at the same target location. In this way instruments, will independently record surface velocity and distance information along the exact same path.

  2. 24 CFR 1000.242 - When does the requirement for exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities? 1000.242 Section 1000.242 Housing and Urban... ACTIVITIES Indian Housing Plan (IHP) § 1000.242 When does the requirement for exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities? The requirement for exemption from taxation applies only to rental...

  3. Development and implementation of information systems for the DOE's National Analytical Management Program (NAMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streets, W. E.

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) faces a challenging environmental management effort, including environmental protection, environmental restoration, waste management, and decommissioning. This effort requires extensive sampling and analysis to determine the type and level of contamination and the appropriate technology for cleanup, and to verify compliance with environmental regulations. Data obtained from these sampling and analysis activities are used to support environmental management decisions. Confidence in the data is critical, having legal, regulatory, and therefore, economic impact. To promote quality in the planning, management, and performance of these sampling and analysis operations, DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has established the National Analytical Management Program (NAMP). With a focus on reducing the estimated costs of over $200M per year for EM's analytical services, NAMP has been charged with developing products that will decrease the costs for DOE complex-wide environmental management while maintaining quality in all aspects of the analytical data generation. As part of this thrust to streamline operations, NAMP is developing centralized information systems that will allow DOE complex personnel to share information about EM contacts at the various sites, pertinent methodologies for environmental restoration and waste management, costs of analyses, and performance of contracted laboratories

  4. Does national expenditure on research and development influence stroke outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Dae; Jung, Yo Han; Norrving, Bo; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2017-10-01

    Background Expenditure on research and development is a macroeconomic indicator representative of national investment. International organizations use this indicator to compare international research and development activities. Aim We investigated whether differences in expenditures on research and development at the country level may influence the incidence of stroke and stroke mortality. Methods We compared stroke metrics with absolute amount of gross domestic expenditure on R&D (GERD) per-capita adjusted for purchasing power parity (aGERD) and relative amount of GERD as percent of gross domestic product (rGERD). Sources included official data from the UNESCO, the World Health Organization, the World Bank, and population-based studies. We used correlation analysis and multivariable linear regression modeling. Results Overall, data on stroke mortality rate and GERD were available from 66 countries for two periods (2002 and 2008). Age-standardized stroke mortality rate was associated with aGERD (r = -0.708 in 2002 and r = -0.730 in 2008) or rGERD (r = -0.545 in 2002 and r = -0.657 in 2008) (all p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis showed a lower aGERD and rGERD were independently and inversely associated with higher stroke mortality (all p < 0.05). The estimated prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, or obesity was higher in countries with lower aGERD. The analysis of 27 population-based studies showed consistent inverse associations between aGERD or rGERD and incident risk of stroke and 30-day case fatality. Conclusions There is higher stroke mortality among countries with lower expenditures in research and development. While this study does not prove causality, it suggests a potential area to focus efforts to improve global stroke outcomes.

  5. Does Gender Influence Electroconvulsive Therapy Sessions Required across Psychiatric Diagnoses? A 5-Year Experience from a Single Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Harshini; Subramanian, Karthick; Menon, Vikas; Kattimani, Shivanand

    2017-01-01

    Context: There is a paucity of systematic data reflecting the practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) from developing countries. Aim: We aimed to identify the number of ECT sessions required to yield response and gender diffeferences in the number of sessions across various diagnostic categories. Setting and Design: A record-based study from a teaching cum tertiary care hospital in South India. Subjects and Methods: Case records of patients who received modified ECT from January 2011 to January 2016 were reviewed. The sociodemographic details and ECT-related data were collected. Psychiatric diagnoses were ascertained as per the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision criteria. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Among 148 patients, 82 (55.4%) had mood disorder (bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorder), 43 (29.1%) had schizophrenia, and 22 (14.9%) had other acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPDs). Patients with mood disorders, schizophrenia, and other ATPD received 7.3 (± 3.8), 9.7 (± 6.1), and 5.4 (± 2.0) ECT sessions, respectively, to achieve response. There was no gender difference in the number of sessions received. Conclusion: Our findings show that number of ECT sessions required to yield response may be disorder-specific. Gender does not influence the ECT dose requirement. Variations in ECT parameters across settings may limit the generalizability of results. PMID:28694625

  6. TYLCV-Is movement in planta does not require V2 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hak, Hagit [Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel); Department of Biological Chemistry, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Levy, Yael; Chandran, Sam A.; Belausov, Eduard [Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel); Loyter, Abraham [Department of Biological Chemistry, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Lapidot, Moshe [Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel); Gafni, Yedidya, E-mail: ygafni@volcani.agri.gov.il [Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel)

    2015-03-15

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen causing extensive crop losses, is a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus. V2 mutants of TYLCV-Is and related viruses tend to induce symptomless infection with attenuated viral DNA levels, while accumulating close to wild-type DNA levels in protoplasts, suggesting V2 as a movement protein. The discovery of plant-silencing mechanisms and viral silencing suppressors, V2 included, led us to reconsider V2's involvement in viral movement. We studied two mutant versions of the virus, one impaired in V2 silencing-suppression activity, and another carrying a non-translatable V2. While both mutant viruses spread in the infected plant to newly emerged leaves at the same rate as the wild-type virus, their DNA-accumulation levels were tenfold lower than in the wild-type virus. Thus, we suggest that the setback in virus proliferation, previously ascribed to a movement impediment, is due to lack of silencing-suppression activity. - Highlights: • TYLCV-Is V2 protein is localized in distinct microbodies throughout the cell cytoplasm, around the nucleus and in association with cytoplasmic strands but is not associated with the plasmodesmata. • Disruption of RNA-silencing suppression activity of TYLCV-Is V2 protein causes low titer of the virus in the infected plants. • The movement of TYLCV-Is in planta does not require a functional V2 protein.

  7. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. F. [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  8. Clubfoot Does Not Impair Gross Motor Development in 5-Year-Olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Karina A; Karol, Lori A; Jeans, Kelly A; Jo, Chan-Hee

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the gross motor development of 5-year-olds using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, 2nd Edition (PDMS-2), test after initial nonoperative management of clubfoot as infants. The PDMS-2 Stationary, Locomotion, and Object Manipulation subtests were assessed on 128 children with idiopathic clubfeet at the age of 5 years. Children were categorized by their initial clubfoot severity as greater than 13, unilateral or bilateral involvement, and required surgery. Children with treated clubfeet had average gross motor scores (99 Gross Motor Quotient) compared with age-matched normative scores. Children with more severe clubfeet required surgery significantly more than children with less severe scores (P < .01). Peabody scores were not significantly different according to initial clubfoot severity, unilateral versus bilateral involvement, and surgical versus nonsurgical outcomes. Clubfoot does not significantly impair gross motor development in 5-year-olds.

  9. Spent-fuel-storage requirements: an update of DOE/RL-82-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Spent fuel storage requirements as projected through the year 2000 for US light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants were calculated using information supplied by the utilities reflecting plant status as of September 30, 1982. Projections through the year 2000 combined fuel discharge projections of the utilities with the assumed discharges of typical reactors required to meet the nuclear capacity of 132 gigawatts electrical (GWe) projected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the year 2000. Three cases were developed and are summarized. A reference case, or maximum at-reactor (AR) capacity case, assumes that all reactor storage pools are increased to their maximum capacities, as estimated by the utilities, for spent fuel storage utilizing currently licensed technologies. Rod consolidation and dry storage technologies were not considered. The reference case assumes no transshipments between pools except as currently licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This case identifies an initial requirement for 13 metric tons uranium (MTU) of additional storage in 1984, and a cumulative requirement for 13,090 MTU additional storage in the year 2000. The reference case is bounded by two alternative cases. One, a current capacity case, assumes that only those pool storage capacity increases currently planned by the operating utilities will occur. The second, or maximum capacity with transshipment case, assumes maximum development of pool storage capacity as described above and also assumes no constraints on transshipment of spent fuel among pools of reactors of like type (BWR) within a given utility. In all cases, a full core discharge capability is assumed to be maintained for each reactor, except that only one FCR is maintained when two reactors share a common pool. 1 figure, 12 tables

  10. Does a new steam meal catering system meet patient requirements in hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, M; Fearnley, L; Thomas, J; Evans, S

    2007-10-01

    It has been consistently observed that a significant proportion of hospital inpatients are malnourished and many actually develop malnutrition in hospital. The NHS provides over 300 million meals each year at a cost of pound 500 million, yet there is relatively little research evaluating how well different catering systems provide for the needs of hospital inpatients. The aim of the study was to: (i) evaluate whether a new steam meal catering system (Steamplicity) enables patients in theory to meet their energy requirements in hospital and (ii) compare energy and protein intake using Steamplicity with a traditional bulk cook-chill system. Patients not at nutritional risk had their food intake at one lunchtime assessed. Energy intake was compared with the patients' energy requirements and energy and protein intake were compared with previous data from a bulk system. Fifty-seven patients had a median daily energy requirement of 7648 kJ (1821 kcal) [inter-quartile range (IQR): 6854-9164 kJ]. Assuming 30% [2293 kJ (546 kcal)] should be supplied by the lunch meal the average intake of 1369 kJ (326 kcal) fell short by 40%. Patients served meals from Steamplicity ate less energy [1369 kJ versus 1562 kJ (326 kcal versus 372 kcal) P = 0.04] but similar protein (18 g versus 19 g P = 0.34) to the bulk system. The largest difference was the energy provided by the dessert since the bulk system served more hot high-calorie desserts. Patient intakes did not meet their estimated requirements. The patients in this study were eating well and not at nutritional risk, thus patients with a poor appetite will be even less likely to meet their nutritional requirements. Steamplicity meals result in a lower energy intake than meals from a bulk cook-chill system, but similar protein intakes.

  11. Perceived Requirements of MIS Curriculum Implementation in Bilingual Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeil, Magdy M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses additional requirements associated with implementing a standard curriculum of Management Information Systems (MIS) in bilingual developing countries where both students and workplace users speak English as a second language. In such countries, MIS graduates are required to develop bilingual computer applications and to…

  12. 14 CFR 382.97 - To which aircraft does the requirement to provide boarding and deplaning assistance through the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... provide boarding and deplaning assistance through the use of lifts apply? 382.97 Section 382.97... REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.97 To which aircraft does the requirement to provide boarding and deplaning assistance...

  13. 43 CFR 404.60 - Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)? 404.60 Section 404.60 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM...

  14. 49 CFR 40.208 - What problem requires corrective action but does not result in the cancellation of a test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What problem requires corrective action but does not result in the cancellation of a test? 40.208 Section 40.208 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems...

  15. 41 CFR 102-118.25 - Does GSA still require my agency to submit its overall transportation policies for approval?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT General Introduction... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does GSA still require...

  16. The GETE approach to facilitating the commercialization and use of DOE-developed environmental technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, T.N. [Global Environment & Technology Foundation, Annandale, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Global Environmental Technology Enterprise (GETE) was conceived to develop and implement strategies to facilitate the commercialization of innovative, cost-effective Department of Energy (DOE)-developed environmental technologies. These strategies are needed to aid DOE`s clean-up mission; to break down barriers to commercialization; and to build partnerships between the federal government and private industry in order to facilitate the development and use of innovative environmental technologies.

  17. Designing eHealth that Matters via a Multidisciplinary Requirements Development Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsen, Lex; Wentzel, Jobke; Van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia Ewc

    2013-06-24

    personas (fictitious end users, representative of a primary end user group). The requirements development approach presented in this article enables eHealth developers to apply a systematic and multi-disciplinary approach towards the creation of requirements. The cooperation between health, engineering, and social sciences creates a situation in which a mismatch between design, end users, and the organizational context can be avoided. Furthermore, we suggest to evaluate eHealth on a feature-specific level in order to learn exactly why such a technology does or does not live up to its expectations.

  18. How does one develop the right quality assurance program for waste management projects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, D.

    1988-01-01

    The quality assurance requirements in use today for radioactive waste facilities, geologic repositories and hazardous waste projects were developed initially for the nuclear power plant industry, and their intent is being applied to regulations and guidance documents to radioactive and hazardous waste programs. The wording of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) quality assurance (QA) requirements in Appendix B of 10CFR50, the related guidance documents and the industry's ANSI/ASME NQA-1 were developed over a period of several years to address quality assurance for the design and construction of the complex and interactive systems to produce electrical power using nuclear fuel. Now, those same documents are the basis for the quality assurance requirements and guidance for waste management facilities and repositories. The intent of Appendix B of 10CFR50 and NQA-1 can easily be applied to waste projects providing one understands and uses the intent of the requirements. This paper describes the intent of existing QA requirements as they apply to radioactive and hazardous waste programs. Methods of ensuring that the quality assurance program design will be acceptable to DOE and regulatory agencies are illustrated

  19. How does one develop the right quality assurance program for waste management projects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, D.

    1988-01-01

    The quality assurance requirements in use today for radioactive waste facilities, geologic repositories and hazardous waste projects were developed initially for the nuclear power plant industry, and their intent is being applied by regulations and guidance documents to radioactive and hazardous waste programs. The wording of the NRC quality assurance requirements in Appendix B of 10CFR50, the related guidance documents and the industry's ANSI/ASME NQA-1 were developed over a period of several years to address quality assurance for the design and construction of the complex and interactive systems to produce electrical power using nuclear fuel. Now, those same documents are the basis for the quality assurance requirements and guidance for waste management facilities and repositories. The intent of Appendix B of 10CFR50 and NQA-1 can easily be applied to waste projects, providing one understands and uses the intent of the requirements. This paper describes the intent of existing QA requirements as they apply to radioactive and hazardous waste programs. Methods of ensuring that the quality assurance program design will be acceptable to DOE and regulatory agencies are illustrated

  20. Development of physiotherapy inherent requirement statements - an Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Johnson, Amanda; Allan, Trevor; Phillips, Kirrilee

    2013-04-16

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities promotes equal rights of people with a disability in all aspects of their life including their education. In Australia, Disability Discrimination legislation underpins this Convention. It mandates that higher education providers must demonstrate that no discrimination has occurred and all reasonable accommodations have been considered and implemented, to facilitate access and inclusion for a student with a disability. The first step to meeting legislative requirements is to provide students with information on the inherent requirements of a course. This paper describes the steps which were taken to develop inherent requirement statements for a 4-year entry-level physiotherapy program at one Australian university. Inherent requirement statements were developed using an existing framework, which was endorsed and mandated by the University. Items which described inherencies were extracted from Australian physiotherapy professional standards and statutory regulatory requirements, and units contained in the physiotherapy program. Data were integrated into the 8 prescribed domains: ethical behaviour, behavioural stability, legal, communication, cognition, sensory abilities, strength and mobility, and sustainable performance. Statements for each domain were developed using a 5-level framework (introductory statement, description of the inherent requirement, justification for inherency, characteristics of reasonable adjustments and exemplars) and reviewed by a University Review Panel. Refinement of statements continued until no further changes were required. Fifteen physiotherapy inherent requirement statements were developed. The eight domains identified in the existing framework, developed for Nursing, were relevant to the study of physiotherapy. The inherent requirement statements developed in this study provide a transparent, defensible position on the current requirements of physiotherapy study at

  1. Development of physiotherapy inherent requirement statements – an Australian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities promotes equal rights of people with a disability in all aspects of their life including their education. In Australia, Disability Discrimination legislation underpins this Convention. It mandates that higher education providers must demonstrate that no discrimination has occurred and all reasonable accommodations have been considered and implemented, to facilitate access and inclusion for a student with a disability. The first step to meeting legislative requirements is to provide students with information on the inherent requirements of a course. This paper describes the steps which were taken to develop inherent requirement statements for a 4-year entry-level physiotherapy program at one Australian university. Case presentation Inherent requirement statements were developed using an existing framework, which was endorsed and mandated by the University. Items which described inherencies were extracted from Australian physiotherapy professional standards and statutory regulatory requirements, and units contained in the physiotherapy program. Data were integrated into the 8 prescribed domains: ethical behaviour, behavioural stability, legal, communication, cognition, sensory abilities, strength and mobility, and sustainable performance. Statements for each domain were developed using a 5-level framework (introductory statement, description of the inherent requirement, justification for inherency, characteristics of reasonable adjustments and exemplars) and reviewed by a University Review Panel. Refinement of statements continued until no further changes were required. Fifteen physiotherapy inherent requirement statements were developed. The eight domains identified in the existing framework, developed for Nursing, were relevant to the study of physiotherapy. Conclusions The inherent requirement statements developed in this study provide a transparent, defensible position on the

  2. Robust design requirements specification: a quantitative method for requirements development using quality loss functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Nygaard; Christensen, Martin Ebro; Howard, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Product requirements serve many purposes in the product development process. Most importantly, they are meant to capture and facilitate product goals and acceptance criteria, as defined by stakeholders. Accurately communicating stakeholder goals and acceptance criteria can be challenging and more...

  3. 1994 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, E.F.; Poligone, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Y-12 Plant serves as a key manufacturing technology center for the development and demonstration of unique materials, components, and services of importance to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. This is accomplished through the reclamation and storage of nuclear materials, manufacture of nuclear materials, manufacture of components for the nation's defense capabilities, support to national security programs, and services provided to other customers as approved by DOE. We are recognized by our people, the community, and our customers as innovative, responsive, and responsible. We are a leader in worker health and safety, environmental protection, and stewardship of our national resources. As a DOE facility, Y-12 also supports DOE's waste minimization mission. Data contained in this report represents waste generation in Tennessee

  4. DOE ZERH Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 30 without PV, with 2x8 24” on center walls with blown fiberglass and 4” polysio rigid foam; basement with 2” XPS interior, 4” under slab, 4” exterior of foundation wall; vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater.

  5. The detection of temporally defined objects does not require focused attention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, Y.; Olivers, C.N.L.; Theeuwes, J.

    2008-01-01

    Perceptual grouping is crucial to distinguish objects from their background. Recent studies have shown that observers can detect an object that does not have any unique qualities other than unique temporal properties. A crucial question is whether focused attention is needed for this type of

  6. Guidance on meeting DOE order requirements for traceable nondestructive assay measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    Purpose of this guide is to facilitate accuracy and precision of nondestructive assay measurements through improvement of the materials and process of traceability. This document provides DOE and its contractor facilities with guidance to establish traceability to the national measurement base for site-prepared NDA working reference materials

  7. 41 CFR 102-3.185 - What does this subpart require agencies to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... National Academy of Sciences or the National Academy of Public Administration? § 102-3.185 What does this... recommendation provided to an agency by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) or the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) under an agreement between the agency and an academy, if such advice or recommendation was...

  8. 49 CFR 23.77 - Does this part preempt local requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 23.77 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PARTICIPATION OF DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISE IN AIRPORT CONCESSIONS Other Provisions § 23.77 Does this part preempt local...) You must clearly identify any State or local law, regulation, or policy pertaining to minority, women...

  9. Knowledge-based requirements analysis for automating software development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    1988-01-01

    We present a new software development paradigm that automates the derivation of implementations from requirements. In this paradigm, informally-stated requirements are expressed in a domain-specific requirements specification language. This language is machine-understable and requirements expressed in it are captured in a knowledge base. Once the requirements are captured, more detailed specifications and eventually implementations are derived by the system using transformational synthesis. A key characteristic of the process is that the required human intervention is in the form of providing problem- and domain-specific engineering knowledge, not in writing detailed implementations. We describe a prototype system that applies the paradigm in the realm of communication engineering: the prototype automatically generates implementations of buffers following analysis of the requirements on each buffer.

  10. What does systems biology mean for drug development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrattenholz, André; Soskić, Vukić

    2008-01-01

    regard to a new focus on agents that modulate multiple targets simultaneously. Targeting cellular function as a system rather than on the level of the single protein molecule significantly increases the size of the drugable proteome and is expected to introduce novel classes of multi-target drugs with fewer adverse effects and toxicity. Multiple target approaches have recently been used to design medications against atherosclerosis, cancer, depression, psychosis and neurodegenerative diseases. A focussed approach towards "systemic" drugs will certainly require the development of novel computational and mathematical concepts for appropriate modelling of complex data and extraction of "screenable" information from biological systems essentially ruled by deterministic chaotic processes on a background of individual stochasticity.

  11. Advanced Extra-Vehicular Activity Pressure Garment Requirements Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy; Aitchison, Lindsay; Rhodes, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center advanced pressure garment technology development team is addressing requirements development for exploration missions. Lessons learned from the Z-2 high fidelity prototype development have reiterated that clear low-level requirements and verification methods reduce risk to the government, improve efficiency in pressure garment design efforts, and enable the government to be a smart buyer. The expectation is to provide requirements at the specification level that are validated so that their impact on pressure garment design is understood. Additionally, the team will provide defined verification protocols for the requirements. However, in reviewing exploration space suit high level requirements there are several gaps in the team's ability to define and verify related lower level requirements. This paper addresses the efforts in requirement areas such as mobility/fit/comfort and environmental protection (dust, radiation, plasma, secondary impacts) to determine the method by which the requirements can be defined and use of those methods for verification. Gaps exist at various stages. In some cases component level work is underway, but no system level effort has begun; in other cases no effort has been initiated to close the gap. Status of on-going efforts and potential approaches to open gaps are discussed.

  12. Section 508 Electronic Information Accessibility Requirements for Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Section 508 Subpart B 1194.21 outlines requirements for operating system and software development in order to create a product that is accessible to users with various disabilities. This portion of Section 508 contains a variety of standards to enable those using assistive technology and with visual, hearing, cognitive and motor difficulties to access all information provided in software. The focus on requirements was limited to the Microsoft Windows® operating system as it is the predominant operating system used at this center. Compliance with this portion of the requirements can be obtained by integrating the requirements into the software development cycle early and by remediating issues in legacy software if possible. There are certain circumstances with software that may arise necessitating an exemption from these requirements, such as design or engineering software using dynamically changing graphics or numbers to convey information. These exceptions can be discussed with the Section 508 Coordinator and another method of accommodation used.

  13. The Department of Defense's Civilian Human Capital Strategic Plan Does Not Meet Most Statutory Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrell, Brenda S

    2008-01-01

    To examine the extent to which DOD's civilian human capital strategic plan addresses congressional reporting requirements, we obtained and analyzed the "Department of Defense Civilian Human Capital...

  14. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, Leonel E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler St, EC2100, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  15. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, Leonel E.

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  16. Development of guidance for preparing treatability variance petitions from the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions for DOE [Department of Energy] mixed-waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, T.; Scheuer, N.; Martin, R.; Van Epp, T.; Triplett, M.

    1990-01-01

    In response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) anticipated need for variances from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) treatment requirements, a treatability variance guidance document is being prepared for use by DOE facilities and operations offices. The guidance document, although applicable to non-mixed hazardous waste streams, provides specific guidance regarding radioactive mixed-waste streams. Preparation of the guidance manual has involved developing an overview of the Land Disposal Restrictions, as well as an overview of the petition preparation process. The DOE internal review requirements are specifically addressed in the manual. Specific data requirements and engineering analyses are also described. A discussion of EPA's criteria for granting a treatability variance is also provided. A checklist for completeness of the petition is provided. Model language for use in DOE treatability variance petitions will be provided in a petition for a DOE waste stream as an appendix to the document

  17. Guide to good practices for developing learning objectives. DOE guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This guide to good practices provides information and guidance on the types of, and the development of learning objectives in performance-based training system at reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities. Contractors are encouraged to consider this guidance as a reference when developing new learning objectives or refining existing ones. Training managers, designers, developers, and instructors are the intended audiences.

  18. Method for developing cost estimates for generic regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The NRC has established a practice of performing regulatory analyses, reflecting costs as well as benefits, of proposed new or revised generic requirements. A method had been developed to assist the NRC in preparing the types of cost estimates required for this purpose and for assigning priorities in the resolution of generic safety issues. The cost of a generic requirement is defined as the net present value of total lifetime cost incurred by the public, industry, and government in implementing the requirement for all affected plants. The method described here is for commercial light-water-reactor power plants. Estimating the cost for a generic requirement involves several steps: (1) identifying the activities that must be carried out to fully implement the requirement, (2) defining the work packages associated with the major activities, (3) identifying the individual elements of cost for each work package, (4) estimating the magnitude of each cost element, (5) aggregating individual plant costs over the plant lifetime, and (6) aggregating all plant costs and generic costs to produce a total, national, present value of lifetime cost for the requirement. The method developed addresses all six steps. In this paper, we discuss on the first three

  19. 31 CFR 363.28 - Does Public Debt reserve the right to require that any TreasuryDirect ® transaction be conducted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does Public Debt reserve the right to... Provisions Governing Securities Held in TreasuryDirect § 363.28 Does Public Debt reserve the right to require that any TreasuryDirect ® transaction be conducted in paper form? We reserve the right to require any...

  20. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DOE - DECEMBER 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOX, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about$450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' March 5, 1997, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 4 13.2. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R and D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  1. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DOE - DECEMBER 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2001-12-01

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' March 5, 1997, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 4 13.2. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas

  2. Development of safety-related regulatory requirements for nuclear power in developing countries. Key issue paper no. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    2000-01-01

    In implementing a national nuclear power program, balanced regulatory requirements are necessary to ensure nuclear safety and cost competitive nuclear power, and to help gain public acceptance. However, this is difficult due to the technology-intensive nature of the nuclear regulatory requirements, the need to reflect evolving technology and the need for cooperation among multidisciplinary technical groups. This paper suggests approaches to development of balanced nuclear regulatory requirements in developing countries related to nuclear power plant safety, radiation protection and radioactive waste management along with key technical regulatory issues. It does not deal with economic or market regulation of electric utilities using nuclear power. It suggests that national regulatory requirements be developed using IAEA safety recommendations as guidelines and safety requirements of the supplier country as a main reference after careful planning, manpower buildup and thorough study of international and supplier country's regulations. Regulation making is not recommended before experienced manpower has been accumulated. With an option that the supplier country's regulations may be used in the interim, the lack of complete national regulatory requirements should not deter introduction of nuclear power in developing countries. (author)

  3. The GETE approach to facilitating the commercialization and use of DOE-developed environmental technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, T.N.

    1995-01-01

    The Global Environmental Technology Enterprise (GETE) was conceived to develop and implement strategies to facilitate the commercialization of innovative, cost-effective Department of Energy (DOE)-developed environmental technologies. These strategies are needed to aid DOE's clean-up mission; to break down barriers to commercialization; and to build partnerships between the federal government and private industry in order to facilitate the development and use of innovative environmental technologies

  4. Quality functions for requirements engineering in system development methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M; Timpka, T

    1996-01-01

    Based on a grounded theory framework, this paper analyses the quality characteristics for methods to be used for requirements engineering in the development of medical decision support systems (MDSS). The results from a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) used to rank functions connected to user value and a focus group study were presented to a validation focus group. The focus group studies take advantage of a group process to collect data for further analyses. The results describe factors considered by the participants as important in the development of methods for requirements engineering in health care. Based on the findings, the content which, according to the user a MDSS method should support is established.

  5. Base technology development enhances state-of-the-art in meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, J.M.; Allen, G.C. Jr.; Luna, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has responsibility to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for baseline technology to support the design of radioactive material transportation packages. To fulfill this responsibility, SNL works with industry, government agencies, and national laboratories to identify and develop state-of-the-art technology required to design and test safe, cost-effective radioactive materials packages. Principal elements of the base technology program include: 1) analysis techniques, 2) testing, 3) subsystem and component development, 4) packaging systems development support, and 5) technical support for policy development. These program elements support a systems approach for meeting performance requirements and assure that there is a sound underlying technical basis for both transportation packaging design and associated policy decisions. Highlights from the base technology program included in this paper are testing, design and analysis methods, advanced materials, risk assessment and logistics models, and transportation package support

  6. Africa's Quest for Long-Term Development: Does NEPAD Provide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The formulation of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) in 2001 and its adoption by the African Union (AU) as the continent's blueprint policy document for development engendered a lot of optimism. This optimism resulted partly from the willingness of African governments to voluntarily undertake what the ...

  7. Guide to good practices for developing learning objectives. DOE Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    This guide to good practices provides information and guidance on the types of and development of learning objectives in a systematic approach to training program. This document can serve as a reference during the development of new learning objectives or refinement of existing ones.

  8. Net foreign asset (com)position : Does financial development matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Robert; de Haan, Jakob

    We investigate the relationship between a country's domestic financial development and the (composition of its) net foreign asset position using a pooled mean group estimator and data for 50 countries for the 1970-2007 period. The results show that financial development reduces a country's long-run

  9. Detector Development for the European XFEL: Requirements and Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Andreas; Kuster, Markus; Sztuk-Dambietz, Jolanta; Turcato, Monica

    2013-01-01

    The variety of applications and especially the unique European XFEL time structure will require adequate instrumentation to be developed to exploit the full potential of the light source. Two-dimensional integrating X-ray detectors with ultra-fast read out up to 4.5 MHz for 1024 × 1024 pixel images are under development for a variety of imaging applications. The actual status of the European XFEL detector development projects is presented. Furthermore, an outlook will be given with respect to detector research and development, performance optimization, integration, and commissioning.

  10. Recent developments and trends in requirements management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ueda, Hiroyoshi; Fujisaki, Kiyoshi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Vomvoris, Stratis; Gaus, Irina

    2011-01-01

    In a recent international meeting, five radioactive waste disposal organizations (NUMO/Japan; NAGRA/Switzerland; ONDRAF/NIRAS/Belgium; POSIVA/Finland; SKB/Sweden) have discussed the status and developments of RMS in their respective programs. The majority have already implemented an IT-based system, or, are testing and developing such systems. The level of detail of requirements depends on the stage of the program. Those approaching the license application have integrated all components of the repository concept, including the processes for the operational phase. Requirements management is closely associated with the quality management system. Combining requirement and decision-tracking has been expressed as an explicit goal for some programs. Caution was expressed regarding the expectations for the RMS being developed. There is a risk that such systems are perceived as expert systems that can derive decisions, which then will be unquestionably accepted. It is nevertheless recognized that they can be of great help in communicating with the various stakeholders and with relative ease demonstrate how their requirements have been considered and satisfied with the proposed repository systems. Further efforts need to be undertaken to integrate the requirement management systems, and the processes that they represent, in the day-to-day operations of the organizations. First positive experiences of the latter are reported. (author)

  11. Manpower requirements for nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    It is recognized that each country has its individual unique characteristics and that there is no typical or average developing country. Common conditions represent exceptions, rather than the rule. Manpower requirements, however, are created by the tasks to be performed and activities to be carried out at each definite stage of a nuclear power project or programme. These tasks and activities, as well as the manpower requirements they create, are of a similar nature for any country, subject to the influence of prevailing local conditions. First, successive stages of the evolution of a nuclear power programme are defined. These are: pre-planning, planning, study and procurement, construction, operation of the first plant, confirmed and self-sufficient in implementing nuclear power projects. The developing countries are then classified according to the present stage of their evolution. Finally, the present and future manpower requirements of each country or group of countries are estimated. No attempt has been made to try to establish any precise data for any country in particular. The results obtained are global estimates, intended as indications of trends and of orders of magnitude. It is found that the developing world's present manpower requirements for nuclear power are of the order of 100,000 people, of which about 20,000 need specialized nuclear training. By the year 2000, for an installed nuclear capacity of 150 to 200 GW, overall manpower requirements should increase to more than 500,000 which would include 130,000 with specialized nuclear training. (author)

  12. Compatibility of DOE energy data bases with EEMIS data requirements. [Energy Emergency Management Information Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D& #x27; Acierno, J; Hermelee, A

    1979-12-01

    Object of this report is to present the data from EIA data bases which are compatible with the requirements of the data structure for the Energy Emergency Management Information System (EEMIS). An overview of data availability is briefly described and presented in the EEMIS petroleum and natural gas flow diagrams as well as in a more detailed review with each data element in the EEMIS data requirements. This information is presented with the intent that it be used as an overall system guide during the data transfer task as well as in future operation of EEMIS and in the interpretation of EEMIS data.

  13. Exciting fear in adolescence: Does pubertal development alter threat processing?

    OpenAIRE

    Spielberg, JM; Olino, TM; Forbes, EE; Dahl, RE

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent development encompasses an ostensible paradox in threat processing. Risk taking increases dramatically after the onset of puberty, contributing to a 200% increase in mortality. Yet, pubertal maturation is associated with increased reactivity in threat-avoidance systems. In the first part of this paper we propose a heuristic model of adolescent affective development that may help to reconcile aspects of this paradox, which focuses on hypothesized pubertal increases in the capacity t...

  14. Does increasing the minimum wage reduce poverty in developing countries?

    OpenAIRE

    Gindling, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    Do minimum wage policies reduce poverty in developing countries? It depends. Raising the minimum wage could increase or decrease poverty, depending on labor market characteristics. Minimum wages target formal sector workers—a minority of workers in most developing countries—many of whom do not live in poor households. Whether raising minimum wages reduces poverty depends not only on whether formal sector workers lose jobs as a result, but also on whether low-wage workers live in poor househol...

  15. Visual Literacy: Does It Enhance Leadership Abilities Required for the Twenty-First Century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintz, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The twenty-first century hosts a well-established global economy, where leaders are required to have increasingly complex skills that include creativity, innovation, vision, relatability, critical thinking and well-honed communications methods. The experience gained by learning to be visually literate includes the ability to see, observe, analyze,…

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF VISUALLY GUIDED BEHAVIOR REQUIRES ORIENTED CONTOURS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRENNER, E; CORNELISSEN, FW

    1992-01-01

    Kittens do not learn to use visual information to guide their behaviour if they are deprived of the optic flow that accompanies their own movements. We show that the optic flow that is required for developing visually guided behaviour is derived from changes in contour orientations, rather than from

  17. Strength development of concrete : balancing production requirements and ecological impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onghena, S.; Grunewald, S.; Schutter, G; Jaime C., Galvez; Aguado de Cea, Antonio; Fernandez-Ordonez, David; Sakai, Koji; Reye s, Encarnación; Casati, Maria J .; Enfedaque, Alejandro; Alberti, Marcos G.; de la Fuente, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The effective production of concrete structures requires adequate control of
    strength development in order to realise the scheduled production cycles. Demoulding of elements can take place only when sufficient strength is gained and the production cycle has to be maintained with seasonal changes

  18. Replication of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in fibroblasts does not require Atg5-dependent macroautophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Isabelle; Goffin, Emeline; De Bolle, Xavier; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Jadot, Michel

    2014-09-02

    -type cells. Moreover, our data show that the infection with B. abortus or with B. melitensis does not stimulate neither the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II nor the membrane recruitment of LC3 onto the BCV. Our study suggests that like Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis does not subvert the canonical macroautophagy to reach its replicative niche or to stimulate its replication.

  19. DOE seeks applicants to develop next-generation nuclear detectors. (Sensors)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "DOE's Division of High Energy Physics seeks grant applications for development of advanced detectors in the areas of high energy physics experiments, which includes accelerator-based and non-accelerator based experiments" (1/2 page).

  20. Does dental caries affect dental development in children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamo, Brunilda; Elezi, Besiana; Kragt, Lea; Wolvius, Eppo B; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M

    2018-01-01

    Although a link between dietary changes, caries, and dental development has been observed, the literature provides little insight about this relationship. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between dental caries and dental development in a clinical sample of Albanian children and adolescents. In total, 118 children and adolescents, born between 1995 and 2004 and aged 6–15 years, were included. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Filled Teeth (dft) index and dental caries in the permanent dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Dental development during the permanent dentition was determined using the Demirjian method. Linear and ordinal regression models were applied to analyze the associations of dental caries with dental age and developmental stages of each left mandibular tooth. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition, estimated as a median dft of 2.0 (90% range, 0.0–9.1), was significantly associated with lower dental age (β = -0.21; 90% CI: -0.29, -0.12) and with delayed development of the canine, both premolars, and the second molar. Untreated dental caries (dt) was associated with lower dental age (β = -0.19; 90% CI: -0.28, -0.10). Dental caries in the permanent dentition, estimated as a median DMFT of 1.0 (90% range, 0.0–8.0), was not significantly associated with dental age (β = 0.05; 90% CI: -0.04, 0.14). However, the DMFT was associated with the advanced stages of development of both premolars and the second molar. The untreated dental caries in the deciduous dentition delays the development of permanent teeth. PMID:29659350

  1. WHAT DOES THE GUSTATORY PREFERENCES DEVELOPMENT IN INFANTS DEPEND ON?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive development of the molecular biology, genetically engineered methods of examination and decoding of human genome rendered significant assistance to discoveries in the field of gustatory preferences and food behavior formation study in children. It was proved that gustatory preferences in children and, further, in adults are influenced by numerous factors. The main of such factors are genetic ones; peculiarities of pregnant woman and child nutrition; national food traditions. The afore-mentioned factors and possible ways of influence on them are considered in this article, which contributes to development of appropriate food behavior, playing a significant role in the formation of children’ and adults’ health. 

  2. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective

  3. Static magnetic therapy does not decrease pain or opioid requirements: a randomized double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Carr, Daniel B; Sarquis, Tony; Miranda, Nelcy; Garcia, Ricardo J; Zarate, Camilo

    2007-02-01

    A growing multibillion dollar industry markets magnetic necklaces, bracelets, bands, insoles, back braces, mattresses, etc., for pain relief, although there is little evidence for their efficacy. We sought to evaluate the effect of magnetic therapy on pain intensity and opioid requirements in patients with postoperative pain. We designed a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. One-hundred-sixty-five patients older than 12 yr of age were randomized to magnetic (n = 81) or sham therapy (n = 84) upon reporting moderate-to-severe pain in the postanesthesia care unit. Devices were placed over the surgical incision and left in place for 2 h. Patients rated their pain intensity on a 0-10 scale every 10 min and received incremental doses of morphine until pain intensity was Magnetic therapy lacks efficacy in controlling acute postoperative pain intensity levels or opioid requirements and should not be recommended for pain relief in this setting.

  4. DOE low-level waste long term technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barainca, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program is to provide a low-level waste management system by 1986. Areas of concentration are defined as: (1) Waste Generation Reduction Technology, (2) Process and Handling Technology, (3) Environmental Technology, (4) Low-Level Waste Disposal Technology. A program overview is provided with specific examples of technical development. 2 figures

  5. Does globalization contribute to economic growth in developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines empirically whether or not globalization contributes to economic growth in developing countries, drawing empirical lessons from Nigeria. The globalization – growth link, is anchored on Husain Schematic representation, Solow model, and the new growth (endogenous growth) theory. The paper adopts ...

  6. Corporal Punishment: Does It Hinder the Development of Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, T.; Just, H.

    Noting that parents' use of corporal punishment to discipline their children remains a strongly debated issue, this paper examines the impact of corporal punishment on children's development, focusing primarily on its long-term effectiveness. The paper presents the history of spanking in the United States, including public opinion on corporal…

  7. Green product development : What does the country product space imply?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraccascia, Luca; Giannoccaro, Ilaria; Albino, Vito

    This paper contributes to green product development by identifying the green products with the highest potential for growth in a country. To address our aim, we use the concept of product proximity and product space and, borrowing from the results of recent studies on complexity economics, we

  8. Does Maternal Employment Influence Poor Children's Social Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bruce; Caspary, Gretchen; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Gauthier, Christiane; Hnang, Danny Shih-Cheng; Carroll, Judith; McCarthy, Jan

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the relation between young children's social development and maternal employment among women who entered welfare-to-work programs. Structural equation models provided evidence that indicators of economic security, such as food security and job quality indicators, but not recent employment per se, operated through parenting…

  9. The Relationship between Memory and Inductive Reasoning: Does It Develop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brett K.; Fritz, Kristina; Heit, Evan

    2013-01-01

    In 2 studies, the authors examined the development of the relationship between inductive reasoning and visual recognition memory. In both studies, 5- to 6-year-old children and adults were shown instances of a basic-level category (dogs) followed by a test set containing old and new category members that varied in their similarity to study items.…

  10. How does technological regime affect performance of technology development projects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Michael; Hooshangi, Soheil; Zhao, Y. Lisa; Halman, Johannes I.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine how technological regime affects the performance of technology development projects (i.e., project quality, sales, and profit). Technological regime is defined as the set of attributes of a technological environment where the innovative activities of firms take place.

  11. Does Infrastructure Matter In Tourism Development? Seetanah B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kpo

    sound infrastructure in promoting tourism development in the island. The networks ... as an interesting case whereby the effect of infrastructure on tourist arrivals into .... Gearing et al (1974) study the case of Turkey as a tourist destination and find that ... et al (2000) in discussing the case of Sun Lost City, South Africa, and ...

  12. Economic Disparities in Middle Childhood Development: Does Income Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    A large literature has documented the influence of family economic resources on child development, yet income's effects in middle childhood have been understudied. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 3,551), the author examined the influence of family income in early and middle childhood on academic skills and…

  13. The development of children's inhibition: does parenting matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, Isabelle; Stievenart, Marie; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2014-06-01

    Whereas a large body of research has investigated the maturation of inhibition in relation to the prefrontal cortex, far less research has been devoted to environmental factors that could contribute to inhibition improvement. The aim of the current study was to test whether and to what extent parenting matters for inhibition development from 2 to 8years of age. Data were collected from 421 families, with 348 mother-child dyads and 342 father-child dyads participating. Children's inhibition capacities and parenting behaviors were assessed in a three-wave longitudinal data collection. The main analyses examined the impact of parenting on the development of children's inhibition capacities. They were conducted using a multilevel modeling (MLM) framework. The results lead to the conclusion that both mothers and fathers contribute through their child-rearing behavior to their children's executive functioning, even when controlling for age-related improvement (maturation) and important covariates such as gender, verbal IQ, and place of enrollment. More significant relations between children's inhibition development and parenting were displayed for mothers than for fathers. More precisely, parenting behaviors that involve higher monitoring, lower discipline, inconsistency and negative controlling, and a positive parenting style are associated with good development of inhibition capacities in children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epileptic seizure, as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children, does not require antiepileptic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Meng-Jia; Li, Jiu-Wei; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Hu, Lin-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with hypoparathyroidism exhibit metabolic disorders (hypocalcemia) and brain structural abnormalities (brain calcifications). Currently, studies have determined whether antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is required for epileptic seizures in children with hypoparathyroidism. Method This study aims to evaluate the data of two medical centers in Beijing based on the diagnosis of epileptic seizures as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children. Result A total of 42 pa...

  15. Does copepods influence dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus early development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Mateus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Good knowledge on the development of early life stages is essential for successful conservation programs of threatened fish species. Diet and rearing system affects early life survival and juvenile quality. Copepods are the natural food of fish larvae in the wild possessing high nutritional value, when compared with live feeds used in aquaculture (rotifers and artemia, and a wide range of size classes. Rearing systems with low water column disturbance and low larval densities enhanced the survival of fragile fish larvae. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of the introduction of copepods in the diet of early dusky grouper larvae reared in controlled mesocosm systems using larval development and juvenile quality as indicators. Two feeding protocols were tested, one composed only by rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis, brine shrimp (Artemia spp. and dry feed and the other supplemented with copepods (Paracartia grani from mouth opening (2 day after hatching - DAH to 8 DAH. Feeding behavior, growth, survival, skeletal malformations and digestive enzymes activity was assessed at different developmental stages. The addition of copepods to the early larvae diet of dusky grouper resulted in faster development and higher survival rates. Larvae fed with copepods improved their development. At 20 DAH all larvae reared at the mesocosm with copedods were already at the stage of post-flexion while in the system without copepods this stage was attained later. At 25 DAH only 64% of the larvae were in post flexion in the mesoscosm without copepods. At 30 DAH larvae supplemented with copepods attained an acidic digestion (high specific activity of pepsin earlier than at the system without copepods. In this last system alkaline digestion (trypsin specific activity, characteristic of early larval stages, was significantly higher reinforcing the faster development of larvae fed with copepods. In both systems the incidence of skeletal malformations was low.

  16. Generic Safety Requirements for Developing Safe Insulin Pump Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Jetley, Raoul; Jones, Paul L; Ray, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors previously introduced a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model that identified common features and hazards shared by most insulin pumps on the market. The aim of this article is to extend our previous work on the GIIP model by articulating safety requirements that address the identified GIIP hazards. These safety requirements can be validated by manufacturers, and may ultimately serve as a safety reference for insulin pump software. Together, these two publications can serve as a basis for discussing insulin pump safety in the diabetes community. Methods In our previous work, we established a generic insulin pump architecture that abstracts functions common to many insulin pumps currently on the market and near-future pump designs. We then carried out a preliminary hazard analysis based on this architecture that included consultations with many domain experts. Further consultation with domain experts resulted in the safety requirements used in the modeling work presented in this article. Results Generic safety requirements for the GIIP model are presented, as appropriate, in parameterized format to accommodate clinical practices or specific insulin pump criteria important to safe device performance. Conclusions We believe that there is considerable value in having the diabetes, academic, and manufacturing communities consider and discuss these generic safety requirements. We hope that the communities will extend and revise them, make them more representative and comprehensive, experiment with them, and use them as a means for assessing the safety of insulin pump software designs. One potential use of these requirements is to integrate them into model-based engineering (MBE) software development methods. We believe, based on our experiences, that implementing safety requirements using MBE methods holds promise in reducing design/implementation flaws in insulin pump development and evolutionary processes, therefore improving

  17. Cognitive Development of Toddlers: Does Parental Stimulation Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Prahbhjot; Menon, Jagadeesh; Bharti, Bhavneet; Sidhu, Manjit

    2018-02-01

    To examine the impact of quality of early stimulation on cognitive functioning of toddlers living in a developing country. The developmental functioning of 150 toddlers in the age range of 12-30 mo (53% boys; Mean = 1.76 y, SD = 0.48) was assessed by the mental developmental index of the Developmental Assessment Scale for Indian Infants (DASII). The StimQ questionnaire- toddler version was used to measure cognitive stimulation at home. The questionnaire consists of four subscales including availability of learning materials (ALM), reading activities (READ), parent involvement in developmental activities (PIDA), and parent verbal responsivity (PVR). Multivariate regression analysis was used to predict cognitive scores using demographic (age of child), socio-economic status (SES) (income, parental education), and home environment (subscale scores of StimQ) as independent variables. Mean Mental Development Index (MDI) score was 91.5 (SD = 13.41), nearly one-fifth (17.3%) of the toddlers had MDI scores less than 80 (cognitive delay). Children with cognitive delay, relative to typically developing (TD, MDI score ≥ 80) cohort of toddlers, had significantly lower scores on all the subscales of StimQ and the total StimQ score. Despite the overall paucity of learning materials available to toddlers, typical developing toddlers were significantly more likely to have access to symbolic toys (P = 0.004), art materials (P = 0.032), adaptive/fine motor toys (P = 0.018), and life size toys (P = 0.036). Multivariate regression analysis results indicated that controlling for confounding socio-economic status variables, higher parental involvement in developmental activities (PIDA score) and higher parental verbal responsivity (PVR score) emerged as significant predictors of higher MDI scores and explained 34% of variance in MDI scores (F = 23.66, P = 0.001). Disparities in child development emerge fairly early and these differences are not

  18. Does Electricity Drive the Development of Manufacturing Sector in Malaysia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husaini, Dzul Hadzwan [Faculty of Economics and Business, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Sarawak (Malaysia); Lean, Hooi Hooi, E-mail: hooilean@usm.my [Economics Program, School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-22

    This paper investigates the relationship between electricity consumption, output, and price in the manufacturing sector in Malaysia. We find that electricity consumption, output, and price are cointegrated in the long run. In addition, it has been found that the relationship between electricity consumption and output is positive. In the long run, we find a unidirectional causality from manufacturing output to electricity consumption. This result indicates that the development of manufacturing sector stimulates greater demand for electricity. Government needs to make sure that the planning of electricity supply in the future is in line with the economic development planning to avoid shortage in electricity supply. In the short run, a unidirectional relationship runs from electricity consumption to output is found. A decrease of energy usage in production might reduce the output growth in short run. Hence, we suggest improving the efficiency of electricity usage and some cost-effective sources of energy.

  19. Does Electricity Drive the Development of Manufacturing Sector in Malaysia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini, Dzul Hadzwan; Lean, Hooi Hooi

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between electricity consumption, output, and price in the manufacturing sector in Malaysia. We find that electricity consumption, output, and price are cointegrated in the long run. In addition, it has been found that the relationship between electricity consumption and output is positive. In the long run, we find a unidirectional causality from manufacturing output to electricity consumption. This result indicates that the development of manufacturing sector stimulates greater demand for electricity. Government needs to make sure that the planning of electricity supply in the future is in line with the economic development planning to avoid shortage in electricity supply. In the short run, a unidirectional relationship runs from electricity consumption to output is found. A decrease of energy usage in production might reduce the output growth in short run. Hence, we suggest improving the efficiency of electricity usage and some cost-effective sources of energy.

  20. Does malaria affect placental development? Evidence from in vitro models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Umbers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria in early pregnancy is difficult to study but has recently been associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying malarial FGR are poorly characterized, but may include impaired placental development. We used in vitro methods that model migration and invasion of placental trophoblast into the uterine wall to investigate whether soluble factors released into maternal blood in malaria infection might impair placental development. Because trophoblast invasion is enhanced by a number of hormones and chemokines, and is inhibited by pro-inflammatory cytokines, many of which are dysregulated in malaria in pregnancy, we further compared concentrations of these factors in blood between malaria-infected and uninfected pregnancies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured trophoblast invasion, migration and viability in response to treatment with serum or plasma from two independent cohorts of Papua New Guinean women infected with Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax in early pregnancy. Compared to uninfected women, serum and plasma from women with P. falciparum reduced trophoblast invasion (P = .06 and migration (P = .004. P. vivax infection did not alter trophoblast migration (P = .64. The P. falciparum-specific negative effect on placental development was independent of trophoblast viability, but associated with high-density infections. Serum from P. falciparum infected women tended to have lower levels of trophoblast invasion promoting hormones and factors and higher levels of invasion-inhibitory inflammatory factors. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that in vitro models of placental development can be adapted to indirectly study the impact of malaria in early pregnancy. These infections could result in impaired trophoblast invasion with reduced transformation of maternal spiral arteries due to maternal hormonal and inflammatory disturbances, which may contribute to FGR by

  1. What does the magnetic storm development depend on?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodnicka, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic drift model applied to the magnetic storm development simulation reveals the significance of initial energy, initial pitch angle and the site of ions injection for the intensity, growth time and growth rate of a storm produced by two ion species - H + and O + . The most severe storms are caused by the ring current intensified by low initial pitch angle ions injected at low radial distance in the postmidnight local time region. (author)

  2. The development of children's inhibition: Does parenting matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Roskam, I.; Stievenart, Marie; Meunier, J.-C.; Noël, M.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas a large body of research has investigated the maturation of inhibition in relation to the prefrontal cortex, far less research has been devoted to environmental factors that could contribute to inhibition improvement. The aim of the current study was to test whether and to what extent parenting matters for inhibition development from 2 to 8. years of age. Data were collected from 421 families, with 348 mother-child dyads and 342 father-child dyads participating. Children's inhibition ...

  3. Retail Sugar From One Zambian Community Does Not Meet Statutory Requirements for Vitamin A Fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Matthew D; Kabaghe, Gladys; Musonda, Mofu; Palmer, Amanda C

    2017-12-01

    Industrial food fortification is a major strategy to improve dietary micronutrient intakes and prevent deficiencies. Zambia introduced mandatory sugar fortification with vitamin A, at a target of 10 mg/kg, in 1998. Representative surveys conducted since that time do not support marked improvement in vitamin A status. To describe vitamin A concentrations in retail sugar, as well as vendor practices, perceptions of fortified foods, and sugar use practices. We conducted a census of sugar vendors in one Zambian community, capturing information on vendors, available brands and packaging options, and storage conditions. We purchased all brands and package types of sugar available at each vendor. In a 15% subsample, we conducted semi-structured interviews with vendor-consumer pairs. We tested 50% of sugar samples at random for vitamin A using an iCheck portable fluorimeter. The distribution of vitamin A in sugar in market samples was highly skewed, with a median of 3.1 mg/kg (25th-75th percentiles: 1.8-5.5) and a range from 0.2 to 29.9 mg/kg. Only 11.3% of samples met the 10 mg/kg statutory requirement. Sugar was primarily repackaged and sold in small quantities, with rapid turnover of stocks. Perceptions of fortification by vendors and consumers were generally positive. Vitamin A in fortified sugar fell well below statutory requirements. Our data point to challenges at regional depot and/or poor adherence to fortification standards at the factory level. A renewed commitment to monitoring and enforcement will be required for Zambia to benefit from a food fortification strategy.

  4. Does Intervening in Childcare Settings Impact Fundamental Movement Skill Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Kristi B; Wilson, Shanna; Harvey, Alysha L J; Grattan, Kimberly P; Naylor, Patti-Jean; Temple, Viviene A; Goldfield, Gary S

    2016-05-01

    Knowing that motor skills will not develop to their full potential without opportunities to practice in environments that are stimulating and supportive, we evaluated the effect of a physical activity (PA)-based intervention targeting childcare providers on fundamental movement skills (FMS) in preschoolers attending childcare centers. In this two-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial, six licensed childcare centers in Ottawa, Canada, were randomly allocated into one of two groups (three controls, n = 43; three interventions, n = 40). Participants were between the ages of 3 and 5 yr. Childcare providers in the experimental condition received two 3-h workshops and a training manual at program initiation aimed at increasing PA through active play and several in-center "booster" sessions throughout the 6-month intervention. Control childcare centers implemented their standard curriculum. FMS were measured at baseline and 6 months using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2. Groups did not differ on sociodemographic variables. Compared with control, children in the intervention group demonstrated significantly greater improvement in their standardized gross motor quotient (score, 5.70; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.74-10.67; P = 0.025 and gross motor quotient percentile, 13.33; 95% CI, 2.17-24.49; P = 0.020). Over the 6-month study period, the intervention group showed a significantly greater increase in locomotor skills score (1.20; 95% CI, 0.18-2.22; P = 0.022) than the control group. There was a significant decrease in the object control scores in the control group over the study period. A childcare provider-led PA-based intervention increased the FMS in preschoolers, driven by the change in locomotor skills. The childcare environment may represent a viable public health approach for promoting motor skill development to support future engagement in PA.

  5. How does the prosocial self-perception develop in childhood?

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 順子

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the development of the prosocial self-perception (sense of value, efficacy). Thirty 5-year-olds, one hundred one 6-year-olds, sixty three 7-yearolds, eighty seven 8-year-olds, and seventy eight 9-year-olds were administrated the Prosocial Self-Perception Scale which consisted of 10 prosocial items. Children were asked their sense of value and efficacy for each item : how they thought they had better be prosocial (sense of value) and could be prosocial ...

  6. Developing the skills required for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, B

    1998-01-01

    The current health care environment requires practitioners with the skills to find and apply the best currently available evidence for effective health care, to contribute to the development of evidence-based practice protocols, and to evaluate the impact of utilizing validated research findings in practice. Current approaches to teaching research are based mainly on gaining skills by participation in the research process. Emphasis on the requirement for rigour in the process of creating new knowledge is assumed to lead to skill in the process of using research information created by others. This article reflects upon the requirements for evidence-based practice, and the degree to which current approaches to teaching research prepare practitioners who are able to find, evaluate and best use currently available research information. The potential for using the principles of systematic review as a teaching and learning strategy for research is explored, and some of the possible strengths and weakness of this approach are highlighted.

  7. Exciting fear in adolescence: Does pubertal development alter threat processing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Spielberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent development encompasses an ostensible paradox in threat processing. Risk taking increases dramatically after the onset of puberty, contributing to a 200% increase in mortality. Yet, pubertal maturation is associated with increased reactivity in threat-avoidance systems. In the first part of this paper we propose a heuristic model of adolescent affective development that may help to reconcile aspects of this paradox, which focuses on hypothesized pubertal increases in the capacity to experience (some fear-evoking experiences as an exciting thrill. In the second part of this paper, we test key features of this model by examining brain activation to threat cues in a longitudinal study that disentangled pubertal and age effects. Pubertal increases in testosterone predicted increased activation to threat cues, not only in regions associated with threat avoidance (i.e., amygdala, but also regions associated with reward pursuit (i.e., nucleus accumbens. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that puberty is associated with a maturational shift toward more complex processing of threat cues—which may contribute to adolescent tendencies to explore and enjoy some types of risky experiences.

  8. Does petroleum development affect burrowing owl nocturnal space-use?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scobie, Corey; Wellicome, Troy; Bayne, Erin [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta (Canada)], email: cscobie@ualberta.ca, email: tiw@ualberta.ca, email: bayne@ualberta.ca

    2011-07-01

    Decline all over Canada in the population of burrowing owls, a federally listed endangered species, has raised concerns about the possible influence of petroleum infrastructure development on owl nocturnal space-use while foraging. Roads, wells, pipelines and sound-producing facilities related to petroleum development change the landscape and can influence the owls' mortality risk. For 3 years, 27 breeding adult male burrowing owls with nests close to different petroleum infrastructures were captured and fitted with a miniature GPS datalogger in order to track their nocturnal foraging. Data from these GPS devices were fed into a geographical information system and showed that pipelines and wells did not alter the foraging habits of the owls. Dirt and gravel roads, with little traffic, were preferentially selected by the owls, conceivably because of higher owl mortality risk along paved roads. Sound-producing facilities did not change owls' foraging behaviour, implying that sound may not affect their nocturnal space-use. Traffic data and sound power measurements will be used in further studies in an effort to better understand burrowing owls' nocturnal foraging habits.

  9. Exciting fear in adolescence: does pubertal development alter threat processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Olino, Thomas M; Forbes, Erika E; Dahl, Ronald E

    2014-04-01

    Adolescent development encompasses an ostensible paradox in threat processing. Risk taking increases dramatically after the onset of puberty, contributing to a 200% increase in mortality. Yet, pubertal maturation is associated with increased reactivity in threat-avoidance systems. In the first part of this paper we propose a heuristic model of adolescent affective development that may help to reconcile aspects of this paradox, which focuses on hypothesized pubertal increases in the capacity to experience (some) fear-evoking experiences as an exciting thrill. In the second part of this paper, we test key features of this model by examining brain activation to threat cues in a longitudinal study that disentangled pubertal and age effects. Pubertal increases in testosterone predicted increased activation to threat cues, not only in regions associated with threat avoidance (i.e., amygdala), but also regions associated with reward pursuit (i.e., nucleus accumbens). These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that puberty is associated with a maturational shift toward more complex processing of threat cues--which may contribute to adolescent tendencies to explore and enjoy some types of risky experiences. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. The actual development of European aviation safety requirements in aviation medicine: prospects of future EASA requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedenburg, J

    2009-04-01

    Common Rules for Aviation Safety had been developed under the aegis of the Joint Aviation Authorities in the 1990s. In 2002 the Basic Regulation 1592/2002 was the founding document of a new entity, the European Aviation Safety Agency. Areas of activity were Certification and Maintenance of aircraft. On 18 March the new Basic Regulation 216/2008, repealing the original Basic Regulation was published and applicable from 08 April on. The included Essential Requirements extended the competencies of EASA inter alia to Pilot Licensing and Flight Operations. The future aeromedical requirements will be included as Annex II in another Implementing Regulation on Personnel Licensing. The detailed provisions will be published as guidance material. The proposals for these provisions have been published on 05 June 2008 as NPA 2008- 17c. After public consultation, processing of comments and final adoption the new proposals may be applicable form the second half of 2009 on. A transition period of four year will apply. Whereas the provisions are based on Joint Aviation Requirement-Flight Crew Licensing (JAR-FCL) 3, a new Light Aircraft Pilot Licence (LAPL) project and the details of the associated medical certification regarding general practitioners will be something new in aviation medicine. This paper consists of 6 sections. The introduction outlines the idea of international aviation safety. The second section describes the development of the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA), the first step to common rules for aviation safety in Europe. The third section encompasses a major change as next step: the foundation of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the development of its rules. In the following section provides an outline of the new medical requirements. Section five emphasizes the new concept of a Leisure Pilot Licence. The last section gives an outlook on ongoing rulemaking activities and the opportunities of the public to participate in them.

  11. How does administrative law cope with scientific and technological developments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronellenfitsch, M.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution discusses the means available to administrative law in coping with scientific and technological developments. The potentials and chances of technology are reviewed in contrast to the immanent risks, and technology and law are discussed in their interactive relations. The role of the law is explained with regard to supervisory and controlling functions, referring to practical examples (licensing of installations, biological and genetic engineering, information and communication science and technology). The author discusses the efficiency of control (preventive prohibition subject to possible licensing, averting danger, preventing risks, strict liability regimes, planning laws), as well as the time problem (protection of existing rights, stepwise licensing procedures, subsequent instructions and supervision), and judical review. Finally, the author discusses the ways technology may win (improvement of acceptance procedures, judicial control) and the rather unsatisfactory conditions today. (RST) [de

  12. Does vitamin C deficiency affect cognitive development and function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(-/-) mice...... and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age......-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies....

  13. Support for DOE program in mineral waste-form development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmour, H. III; Hare, T.M.; Russ, J.C.; Batchelor, A.D.; Paisley, M.J.; Freed, L.E.

    1982-09-01

    This research investigation relates to sintered simulation ceramic waste forms of the generic SYNROC compositional type. Though they have been formulated with simulated wastes only, they serve as prototypes for potential hot, processed, crystalline waste forms whose combined thermodynamic stability and physical integrity are considered to render them capable of long-term imobilization of high-level radwastes under deep geologic disposal conditions. The problems involved are nontrivial, largely because of the very complex nature of the radwastes: a typical waste stream would contain more than 31 cation species. When the stabilizing matrix constituents are included, the final batch composition must successfully account (and find substitutional homes for some 35 different cation species. One of the important objectives of this study thus has been to develop a computer-based method for simulating these complex ion substitutions, and for calculating the resultant phase demands and batch formulations. Primary goals of the study have been (1) use of that computer simulation capability to incorporate rationally the radwaste ions from a specific waste stream (PW-7a) into the available SYNROC lattice sites and (2) utilization of existing ceramic processing and sintering methodologies to assure (and to understand) the attainment of high density, fine microstructure, full phase development and other features of the sintered product which are known to relate directly to its integrity and leach resistance. Though improved resistance to leaching has been a continuing goal, time and budget constraints have precluded initiation of any leachability studies of these new compositions during this contract period. 27 references, 15 figures, 6 tables

  14. New developments in containment in-service inspection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffiera, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Section 11 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code contains requirements for inservice inspection of nuclear power plant components. Development of ASME Code requirements for containment inservice inspection was begun in 1977, and in 1979 the first such requirements were published in the form of Code Case N-236. Formal inclusion of these requirements in Section 11 of the ASME Code occurred with publication of Subsection IWE, ''Rules for inservice Inspection of Class MC Components of Nuclear Power Plants,'' in the 1980 Edition, Winter 1981 Addenda. At that time, inspection emphasis on nuclear power construction and operation activities was placed on welds and welding processes associated with steel containments and metallic liners of concrete containments. The need for repair-welding requirements was necessitated by containment design modifications for conditions not considered in several original plant designs. Welds in steel containments and metallic liners of concrete containments have not required significant amounts of repair, however, degradation of base metal in containments has become a major concern. Various degradation mechanisms have been identified as potential causes of damage to containment surfaces, including fatigue, corrosion and material embrittlement due to long-term radiation exposure. As a result of these concerns, and in response to comments generated by the Committee to Review Generic Requirements (CRGR) of the NRC in its review of Subsection IWE, emphasis on weld-based inservice inspection was redirected toward a containment-surface inservice inspection program. Significant changes were made to accommodate this re-emphasis. The majority of these changes were published in the 1992 Edition, with the 1992 Addenda, of Subsection IWE. The NRC Proposed Rulemaking was issued for a 75-day public comment period in January, 1994. This period was extended at the request of nuclear industry organizations to allow for meaningful evaluation

  15. Development of quality assurance requirements - an international comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, M [Siemens AG, Bereich Energieerzeugung (KWU), Erlangen (Germany); Mertz, W [Siemens AG, Bereich Energieerzeugung (KWU), Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    1993-12-01

    Total quality management strategy and the worldwide introduction of the DIN/ISO 9000 (EN 29 000) series of standards have given new impetus to traditional quality assurance. The most important change must surely be seen in the holistic approach of total quality management and its strict orientation towards customer requirements and satisfaction. International codes and standards for the nuclear industry will also have to be brought into line as part of the process of harmonizing quality assurance system standards. One possible approach is simply to specify a supplementary 'delta' of nuclear-specific requirements to be appended to the broad range of conventional requirements. It is a particular feature of quality-assured procedures in Germany that product and/or component related quality requirements and quality verifications are defined in the specifications of the architect engineer so that full implementation of the requirements from the design phase through to the manufacturing phase is assured. Looking at the development of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and the elaboration of 'Common Rules', it is to be anticipated that a major step will be made toward international harmonization of safety criteria. (orig.)

  16. Development of quality assurance requirements - an international comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, M.; Mertz, W.

    1993-01-01

    Total quality management strategy and the worldwide introduction of the DIN/ISO 9000 (EN 29 000) series of standards have given new impetus to traditional quality assurance. The most important change must surely be seen in the holistic approach of total quality management and its strict orientation towards customer requirements and satisfaction. International codes and standards for the nuclear industry will also have to be brought into line as part of the process of harmonizing quality assurance system standards. One possible approach is simply to specify a supplementary 'delta' of nuclear-specific requirements to be appended to the broad range of conventional requirements. It is a particular feature of quality-assured procedures in Germany that product and/or component related quality requirements and quality verifications are defined in the specifications of the architect engineer so that full implementation of the requirements from the design phase through to the manufacturing phase is assured. Looking at the development of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and the elaboration of 'Common Rules', it is to be anticipated that a major step will be made toward international harmonization of safety criteria. (orig.) [de

  17. Does thermodynamics require a new expansion after the ''Big Crunch'' of our cosmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.; Tonin-Zanchin, V.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, a unifield geometrical approach to gravitational and strong interactions was proposed, based on the methods of General Relativity. According to it, hadrons can be regarded as ''black-hole type'' solutions of new field equations describing two tensorial metric-fields (the ordinary gravitational, and the 'strong' one). By extending the Bekenstein-Hawking thermodynamics to those 'strong black-holes' (SBH), it is shown: (i) that SBH thermodynamics seems to require a new expansion of our cosmos after its 'Big Crunch' (this thermodynamical indication being rather unique, up to now, in showing that a recontraction of our cosmos has to be followed by a new 'creation'); (ii) that a collapsing star with mass 2M sub(sun) [pt

  18. Off-Site Prefabrication: What Does it Require from the Trade Contractor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekdik, Baris; Hall, Daniel; Aslesen, Sigmund

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to show what is required to industrialize a building process from the standpoint of the trade contractor. Rationalization of building processes has, over the years, caught the attention of numerous IGLC papers. Although significant contributions have been made to further...... understand and improve existing construction processes, relatively few contributions have focused on the opportunities for industrialization from the trade contractor’s perspective. This paper uses an in-depth case study to address the deployment strategy for off-site fabrication techniques and processes...... at only one case study, the conclusions are limited in generalizability to other prefabrication operations. However, it represents an important in-depth case from the trade contractors’ perspective and will contribute to the growing body of research focused on industrialization and prefabrication in lean...

  19. Ego depletion and positive illusions: does the construction of positivity require regulatory resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Frey, Dieter

    2007-09-01

    Individuals frequently exhibit positive illusions about their own abilities, their possibilities to control their environment, and future expectations. The authors propose that positive illusions require resources of self-control, which is considered to be a limited resource similar to energy or strength. Five studies revealed that people with depleted self-regulatory resources indeed exhibited a less-optimistic sense of their own abilities (Study 1), a lower sense of subjective control (Study 2), and less-optimistic expectations about their future (Study 3). Two further studies shed light on the underlying psychological process: Ego-depleted (compared to nondepleted) individuals generated/retrieved less positive self-relevant attributes (Studies 4 and 5) and reported a lower sense of general self-efficacy (Study 5), which both partially mediated the impact of ego depletion on positive self-views (Study 5).

  20. The development of functional requirement for integrated test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, B.S.; Oh, I.S.; Cha, K.H.; Lee, H.C.

    1994-01-01

    An Integrated Test Facility (ITF) is a human factors experimental environment comprised of a nuclear power plant function simulator, man-machine interfaces (MMI), human performance recording systems, and signal control and data analysis systems. In this study, we are going to describe how the functional requirements are developed by identification of both the characteristics of generic advanced control rooms and the research topics of world-wide research interest in human factors community. The functional requirements of user interface developed in this paper together with those of the other elements will be used for the design and implementation of the ITF which will serve as the basis for experimental research on a line of human factors topics. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig

  1. How the Office of Safeguards and Security Technology development program facilitates safeguarding and securing the DOE complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoot, W.

    1995-01-01

    The technology development program's (TDP's) mission is to provide technologies or methodologies that address safeguards and security requirements throughout the U.S. DOE complex as well as to meet headquarters' policy needs. This includes developing state-of-the-art technologies or modifying existing technologies in physical security, material control and accountability, information security, and integrated safeguards systems. The TDP has an annual process during which it solicits user requirements from the field. These requirements are analyzed by DOE headquarters and laboratory personnel for technical merit. The requirements are then prioritized at headquarters, and the highest priorities are incorporated into our budget. Although this user-needs process occurs formally once a year, user requirements are accepted at any time. The status of funded technologies is communicated through briefings, programs reviews, and various documents that are available to all interested parties. Participants in several interagency groups allows our program to benefit from what others are doing and to prevent duplications of efforts throughout the federal community. Many technologies are transferred to private industry

  2. How does brain insulin resistance develop in Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Fernanda G; Lourenco, Mychael V; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2014-02-01

    Compelling preclinical and clinical evidence supports a pathophysiological connection between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and diabetes. Altered metabolism, inflammation, and insulin resistance are key pathological features of both diseases. For many years, it was generally considered that the brain was insensitive to insulin, but it is now accepted that this hormone has central neuromodulatory functions, including roles in learning and memory, that are impaired in AD. However, until recently, the molecular mechanisms accounting for brain insulin resistance in AD have remained elusive. Here, we review recent evidence that sheds light on how brain insulin dysfunction is initiated at a molecular level and why abnormal insulin signaling culminates in synaptic failure and memory decline. We also discuss the cellular basis underlying the beneficial effects of stimulation of brain insulin signaling on cognition. Discoveries summarized here provide pathophysiological background for identification of novel molecular targets and for development of alternative therapeutic approaches in AD. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Requirement of proline synthesis during Arabidopsis reproductive development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funck Dietmar

    2012-10-01

    CR is limiting for vegetative and reproductive development in Arabidopsis, whereas disruption of P5CS1 alone does not affect development of non-stressed plants.

  4. Creatine Supplementation Does Not Prevent the Development of Alcoholic Steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Murali; Feng, Dan; Barton, Ryan W; Thomes, Paul G; McVicker, Benita L; Tuma, Dean J; Osna, Natalia A; Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2016-11-01

    Alcohol-induced reduction in the hepatocellular S-adenosylmethionine (SAM):S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratio impairs the activities of many SAM-dependent methyltransferases. These impairments ultimately lead to the generation of several hallmark features of alcoholic liver injury including steatosis. Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) is an important enzyme that catalyzes the final reaction in the creatine biosynthetic process. The liver is a major site for creatine synthesis which places a substantial methylation burden on this organ as GAMT-mediated reactions consume as much as 40% of all the SAM-derived methyl groups. We hypothesized that dietary creatine supplementation could potentially spare SAM, preserve the hepatocellular SAM:SAH ratio, and thereby prevent the development of alcoholic steatosis and other consequences of impaired methylation reactions. For these studies, male Wistar rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol (EtOH) diet with or without 1% creatine supplementation. At the end of 4 to 5 weeks of feeding, relevant biochemical and histological analyses were performed. We observed that creatine supplementation neither prevented alcoholic steatosis nor attenuated the alcohol-induced impairments in proteasome activity. The lower hepatocellular SAM:SAH ratio seen in the EtOH-fed rats was also not normalized or SAM levels spared when these rats were fed the creatine-supplemented EtOH diet. However, a >10-fold increased level of creatine was observed in the liver, serum, and hearts of rats fed the creatine-supplemented diets. Overall, dietary creatine supplementation did not prevent alcoholic liver injury despite its known efficacy in preventing high-fat-diet-induced steatosis. Betaine, a promethylating agent that maintains the hepatocellular SAM:SAH, still remains our best option for treating alcoholic steatosis. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Early successful orchidopexy does not prevent from developing azoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Hadziselimovic

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The incidence of Ad spermatogonia (stem cells for fertility was assessed in 20 cryptorchid patients, all of whom had a successful orchidopexy in childhood but developed azoospermia following puberty. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From a cohort of 231 patients who had a semen analysis following successful orchidopexy 20 patients (9% had azoospermia. The patients were classified into 2 groups according to the time of surgery: A = < 21 months of age (n = 5, mean = 10.7 ± 8.6 months and B = during childhood (n = 15, mean = 10.1 ± 3 years. Nine of the 20 patients (45% had bilateral cryptorchidism: A = 1 and B = 8. Testicular biopsies were performed during orchidopexy and analyzed with semi-thin technique. The number of Ad spermatogonia and entire number of germ cells was determined. The patients' semen analyses were evaluated at least twice; FSH and testosterone plasma values were estimated. RESULTS: In group A, all patients had germ cells at the time of surgery (mean = 1.04 ± 1.4 germ cells per tubular cross section; only 6 patients in group B (40% had no germ cells (mean = 0.17 ± 0.4; A vs. B, p = 0.0133. Importantly, Ad spermatogonia were absent in the entire study population. The plasma FSH of 16 patients (80% was abnormal [median = 16.35 IU/L (Interquartile range of sample - IQR 9.075-27.85 95% CI, 3-53] while the plasma testosterone of all the patients was normal. CONCLUSIONS: The most severe cause of infertility in cryptorchid patients cannot be mitigated by an early successful surgery alone.

  6. How Does the Modular Organization of Entorhinal Grid Cells Develop?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eGrossberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal-hippocampal system plays a crucial role in spatial cognition and navigation. Since the discovery of grid cells in layer II of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC, several types of models have been proposed to explain their development and operation; namely, continuous attractor network models, oscillatory interference models, and self-organizing map (SOM models. Recent experiments revealing the in vivo intracellular signatures of grid cells (Domnisoru et al., 2013; Schmidt-Heiber & Hausser, 2013, the primarily inhibitory recurrent connectivity of grid cells (Couey et al., 2013; Pastoll et al., 2013, and the topographic organization of grid cells within anatomically overlapping modules of multiple spatial scales along the dorsoventral axis of MEC (Stensola et al., 2012 provide strong constraints and challenges to existing grid cell models. This article provides a computational explanation for how MEC cells can emerge through learning with grid cell properties in modular structures. Within this SOM model, grid cells with different rates of temporal integration learn modular properties with different spatial scales. Model grid cells learn in response to inputs from multiple scales of directionally-selective stripe cells (Krupic et al., 2012; Mhatre et al., 2012 that perform path integration of the linear velocities that are experienced during navigation. Slower rates of grid cell temporal integration support learned associations with stripe cells of larger scales. The explanatory and predictive capabilities of the three types of grid cell models are comparatively analyzed in light of recent data to illustrate how the SOM model overcomes problems that other types of models have not yet handled.

  7. Does Vitamin C Deficiency Promote Fatty Liver Disease Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Højland Ipsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the subsequent reprogramming of the white adipose tissue are linked to human disease-complexes including metabolic syndrome and concurrent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The dietary imposed dyslipidemia promotes redox imbalance by the generation of excess levels of reactive oxygen species and induces adipocyte dysfunction and reprogramming, leading to a low grade systemic inflammation and ectopic lipid deposition, e.g., in the liver, hereby promoting a vicious circle in which dietary factors initiate a metabolic change that further exacerbates the negative consequences of an adverse life-style. Large epidemiological studies and findings from controlled in vivo animal studies have provided evidence supporting an association between poor vitamin C (VitC status and propagation of life-style associated diseases. In addition, overweight per se has been shown to result in reduced plasma VitC, and the distribution of body fat in obesity has been shown to have an inverse relationship with VitC plasma levels. Recently, a number of epidemiological studies have indicated a VitC intake below the recommended daily allowance (RDA in NAFLD-patients, suggesting an association between dietary habits, disease and VitC deficiency. In the general population, VitC deficiency (defined as a plasma concentration below 23 μM affects around 10% of adults, however, this prevalence is increased by an adverse life-style, deficiency potentially playing a broader role in disease progression in specific subgroups. This review discusses the currently available data from human surveys and experimental models in search of a putative role of VitC deficiency in the development of NAFLD and NASH.

  8. Transgenic HFE-dependent induction of hepcidin in mice does not require transferrin receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Paul J; Fleming, Mark D

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary hemochomatosis (HH) is caused by mutations in several genes, including HFE and transferrin receptor-2 (TFR2). Loss of either protein decreases expression of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin by the liver, leading to inappropriately high iron uptake from the diet, and resulting in systemic iron overload. In tissue culture, overexpressed HFE and TFR2 physically interact. Hepatocellular overexpression of Hfe in vivo increases hepcidin expression, despite an associated decrease in Tfr2. On this basis, we hypothesized that Tfr2 would not be required for Hfe-dependent up-regulation of hepcidin. We show that hepatocellular overexpression of Hfe in Tfr2(Y245X/Y245X) mice leads to hepcidin induction eventuating in iron deficiency and a hypochromic, microcytic anemia. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation studies using liver lysates did not provide evidence for physical interaction between Hfe and Tfr2 in vivo. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Tfr2 is not essential for Hfe-mediated induction of hepcidin expression, supporting the possibility that TFR2 may regulate iron metabolism in an HFE-independent manner. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Dignity or integrity - does the genetic modification of animals require new concepts in animal ethics?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Animal genetic engineering seems to point at a normative gap beyond pathocentric welfare theories in animal ethics. Recently developed approaches aim to bridge this gap by means of new normative criteria such as animal dignity and animal integrity. The following comparison of dignity and integrity in the context of animal ethics shows that the dignity concept faces serious problems because of its necessarily anthroporelational character and the different functions of contingent and inherent dignity within ethical reasoning. Unlike animal dignity the concept of animal integrity could prove to be a useful enhancement for pathocentric approaches.

  10. 42 CFR 136.404 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.404 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and Indian Tribes or Tribal organizations receiving funds under...

  11. Sleep's influence on a reflexive form of memory that does not require voluntary attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Bhavin R; Serranzana, Andrew; Anjum, Syed F; Khan, Murtuza

    2012-05-01

    Studies to date have examined the influence of sleep on forms of memory that require voluntary attention. The authors examine the influence of sleep on a form of memory that is acquired by passive viewing. Induction of the McCollough effect, and measurement of perceptual color bias before and after induction, and before and after intervening sleep, wake, or visual deprivation. Sound-attenuated sleep research room. 13 healthy volunteers (mean age = 23 years; age range = 18-31 years) with normal or corrected-to-normal vision. N/A. ) ENCODING: sleep preceded adaptation. On separate nights, each participant slept for an average of 0 (wake), 1, 2, 4, or 7 hr (complete sleep). Upon awakening, the participant's baseline perceptual color bias was measured. Then, he or she viewed an adapter consisting of alternating red/horizontal and green/vertical gratings for 5 min. Color bias was remeasured. The strength of the aftereffect is the postadaptation color bias relative to baseline. A strong orientation contingent color aftereffect was observed in all participants, but total sleep duration (TSD) prior to the adaptation did not modulate aftereffect strength. Further, prior sleep provided no benefit over prior wake. Retention: sleep followed adaptation. The procedure was similar except that adaptation preceded sleep. Postadaptation sleep, irrespective of its duration (1, 3, 5, or 7 hr), arrested aftereffect decay. By contrast, aftereffect decay was arrested during subsequent wake only if the adapted eye was visually deprived. Sleep as well as passive sensory deprivation enables the retention of a color aftereffect. Sleep shelters this reflexive form of memory in a manner akin to preventing sensory interference.

  12. Does caries risk assessment predict the incidence of caries for special needs patients requiring general anesthesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juhea; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the caries-related variables of special needs patients to the incidence of new caries. Data for socio-demographic information and dental and general health status were obtained from 110 patients treated under general anesthesia because of their insufficient co-operation. The Cariogram program was used for risk assessment and other caries-related variables were also analyzed. Within a defined follow-up period (16.3 ± 9.5 months), 64 patients received dental examinations to assess newly developed caries. At baseline, the mean (SD) values of the DMFT (decayed, missing and filled teeth) and DT (decayed teeth) for the total patients were 9.2 (6.5) and 5.8 (5.3), respectively. During the follow-up period, new caries occurred in 48.4% of the patients and the mean value (SD) of the increased DMFT (iDMFT) was 2.1 (4.2). The patients with a higher increment of caries (iDMFT ≥3) showed significantly different caries risk profiles compared to the other patients (iDMFT dentistry. Past caries experience and inadequate oral hygiene maintenance were largely related to caries development in special needs patients.

  13. Instructor Time Requirements to Develop and Teach Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    How much time does it take to teach an online course? Does teaching online take more or less time than teaching face-to-face? Instructors, department chairs, deans, and program administrators have long believed that teaching online is more time-consuming than teaching face-to-face. Many research studies and practitioner articles indicate…

  14. Basic Requirements for Systems Software Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuszmaul, Chris; Nitzberg, Bill

    1996-01-01

    Our success over the past ten years evaluating and developing advanced computing technologies has been due to a simple research and development (R/D) model. Our model has three phases: (a) evaluating the state-of-the-art, (b) identifying problems and creating innovations, and (c) developing solutions, improving the state- of-the-art. This cycle has four basic requirements: a large production testbed with real users, a diverse collection of state-of-the-art hardware, facilities for evalua- tion of emerging technologies and development of innovations, and control over system management on these testbeds. Future research will be irrelevant and future products will not work if any of these requirements is eliminated. In order to retain our effectiveness, the numerical aerospace simulator (NAS) must replace out-of-date production testbeds in as timely a fashion as possible, and cannot afford to ignore innovative designs such as new distributed shared memory machines, clustered commodity-based computers, and multi-threaded architectures.

  15. Implementation of the Clean Air Act, Title III, Section 112(r) Prevention of Accidental Release Rule requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Title III, Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to promulgate regulations to prevent accidental releases of regulated substances and to reduce the severity of those releases that do occur. The final EPA rule for Risk Management Programs under Section 112(r)(7) of the CAA, promulgated June 20, 1996, applies to all stationary sources with processes that contain more than a threshold quantity of any of 139 regulated substances listed under 40 CFR 68.130. All affected sources will be required to prepare a risk management plan which must be submitted to EPA and be made available to state and local governments and to the public. This paper will provide details of initiatives underway at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of the Prevention of Accidental Release Rule. The ORR encompasses three DOE Facilities: the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the K-25 Site. The Y-12 Plant manufactures component parts for the national nuclear weapons program; the ORNL is responsible for research and development activities including nuclear engineering, engineering technologies, and the environmental sciences; and the K-25 Site conducts a variety of research and development activities and is the home of a mixed waste incinerator. ORR activities underway and soon to be undertaken toward implementation of the Prevention of Accidental Release Rule include: compilation of inventories of regulated substances at all processes at each of the three ORR Facilities for determination of affected processes and facilities; plans for inventory reduction to levels below threshold quantities, where necessary and feasible; determination of the overlap of processes subject to the OSHA PSM Standard and determination of parallel requirements; preparation of Risk Management Plans and Programs for affected processes and facilities including detailed requirements

  16. 20 CFR 652.207 - How does a State meet the requirement for universal access to services provided under the Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a State meet the requirement for universal access to services provided under the Act? 652.207 Section 652.207 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT... exercising this discretion, a State must meet the Act's requirements. (b) These requirements are: (1) Labor...

  17. The millennium development goals and household energy requirements in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, Francis I

    2013-01-01

    Access to clean and affordable energy is critical for the realization of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals, or MDGs. In many developing countries, a large proportion of household energy requirements is met by use of non-commercial fuels such as wood, animal dung, crop residues, etc., and the associated health and environmental hazards of these are well documented. In this work, a scenario analysis of energy requirements in Nigeria's households is carried out to compare estimates between 2005 and 2020 under a reference scenario, with estimates under the assumption that Nigeria will meet the millennium goals. Requirements for energy under the MDG scenario are measured by the impacts on energy use, of a reduction by half, in 2015, (a) the number of household without access to electricity for basic services, (b) the number of households without access to modern energy carriers for cooking, and (c) the number of families living in one-room households in Nigeria's overcrowded urban slums. For these to be achieved, household electricity consumption would increase by about 41% over the study period, while the use of modern fuels would more than double. This migration to the use of modern fuels for cooking results in a reduction in the overall fuelwood consumption, from 5 GJ/capita in 2005, to 2.9 GJ/capita in 2015.

  18. Development of the world energy requirement until 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, D.

    1977-01-01

    In its final report entitled 'Energy Global Prospects 1985 - 2000' and in three technical reports the Workshop on Alternative Energy Strategies (WAES), which was attended by 70 experts from 15 countries, in the summer of this year published the first worldwide forecast of the energy requirement up to the year 2000. The uncertainties affecting the long term development caused the WAES to employ a scenario in which the variables were economic growth, price levels of energy (and oil, respectively), and energy policy. Additional variables included to describe the long term problems arising in meeting the energy requirement are the coal vs. nuclear power alternative, the gross additions to the oil reserves, and assumptions about OPEC production limits. In view of the long lead times of technological developments and the extraordinarily high capital investments involved, rethinking is necessary right now, according to the WAES study, to find a possibility to change to other sources of fossil energy, nuclear power and, finally, renewable sources of energy, in view of the impending scarcity of the most important present source of energy, i.e., oil. Since the chances to meet a growing energy requirement by natural gas are viewed sceptically and a major contribution of new sources of energy is not expected to come forth before the next century, coal and nuclear power will be the main sources of energy supply for a foreseeable period of time to come. (orig.) [de

  19. PTBP1 is required for embryonic development before gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, Jakob; Wendling, Olivia; Masjkur, Jimmy; Jäger, Melanie; Münster, Carla; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Solimena, Michele

    2011-02-17

    Polypyrimidine-tract binding protein 1 (PTBP1) is an important cellular regulator of messenger RNAs influencing the alternative splicing profile of a cell as well as its mRNA stability, location and translation. In addition, it is diverted by some viruses to facilitate their replication. Here, we used a novel PTBP1 knockout mouse to analyse the tissue expression pattern of PTBP1 as well as the effect of its complete removal during development. We found evidence of strong PTBP1 expression in embryonic stem cells and throughout embryonic development, especially in the developing brain and spinal cord, the olfactory and auditory systems, the heart, the liver, the kidney, the brown fat and cartilage primordia. This widespread distribution points towards a role of PTBP1 during embryonic development. Homozygous offspring, identified by PCR and immunofluorescence, were able to implant but were arrested or retarded in growth. At day 7.5 of embryonic development (E7.5) the null mutants were about 5x smaller than the control littermates and the gap in body size widened with time. At mid-gestation, all homozygous embryos were resorbed/degraded. No homozygous mice were genotyped at E12 and the age of weaning. Embryos lacking PTBP1 did not display differentiation into the 3 germ layers and cavitation of the epiblast, which are hallmarks of gastrulation. In addition, homozygous mutants displayed malformed ectoplacental cones and yolk sacs, both early supportive structure of the embryo proper. We conclude that PTBP1 is not required for the earliest isovolumetric divisions and differentiation steps of the zygote up to the formation of the blastocyst. However, further post-implantation development requires PTBP1 and stalls in homozygous null animals with a phenotype of dramatically reduced size and aberration in embryonic and extra-embryonic structures.

  20. Requirement of mouse BCCIP for neural development and progenitor proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yuan Huang

    Full Text Available Multiple DNA repair pathways are involved in the orderly development of neural systems at distinct stages. The homologous recombination (HR pathway is required to resolve stalled replication forks and critical for the proliferation of progenitor cells during neural development. BCCIP is a BRCA2 and CDKN1A interacting protein implicated in HR and inhibition of DNA replication stress. In this study, we determined the role of BCCIP in neural development using a conditional BCCIP knock-down mouse model. BCCIP deficiency impaired embryonic and postnatal neural development, causing severe ataxia, cerebral and cerebellar defects, and microcephaly. These development defects are associated with spontaneous DNA damage and subsequent cell death in the proliferative cell populations of the neural system during embryogenesis. With in vitro neural spheroid cultures, BCCIP deficiency impaired neural progenitor's self-renewal capability, and spontaneously activated p53. These data suggest that BCCIP and its anti-replication stress functions are essential for normal neural development by maintaining an orderly proliferation of neural progenitors.

  1. DOE standard: Radiological control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  2. DOE standard: Radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ''Occupational Radiation Protection''. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835

  3. De novo centriole formation in human cells is error-prone and does not require SAS-6 self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Won-Jing; Acehan, Devrim; Kao, Chien-Han; Jane, Wann-Neng; Uryu, Kunihiro; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2015-11-26

    Vertebrate centrioles normally propagate through duplication, but in the absence of preexisting centrioles, de novo synthesis can occur. Consistently, centriole formation is thought to strictly rely on self-assembly, involving self-oligomerization of the centriolar protein SAS-6. Here, through reconstitution of de novo synthesis in human cells, we surprisingly found that normal looking centrioles capable of duplication and ciliation can arise in the absence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. Moreover, whereas canonically duplicated centrioles always form correctly, de novo centrioles are prone to structural errors, even in the presence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. These results indicate that centriole biogenesis does not strictly depend on SAS-6 self-assembly, and may require preexisting centrioles to ensure structural accuracy, fundamentally deviating from the current paradigm.

  4. Development and supply of the world energy requirement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, E.

    1981-01-01

    Recently published research reveals that the world energy requirement can and must grow more slowly than previously anticipated. In order to supply developing nations with the energy necessary for the expansion of their economies, energy saving and oil substitution assume greater significance in the industrialised countries such as the Federal Republic. Future fulfillment of the world energy requirement will be characterised by escalating costs for supply, especially for the current main energy carrier oil, on the one hand and by increased use of coal and nuclear energy as well unconventional fossils such as regenerative energies on the other. Nuclear energy and thus the electricity economy must play a key function in the future energy supply of industrial nations such as Federal Germany. Nuclear energy enables, both directly and indirectly, the substitution of oil in the heat market, supplies the process heat required for coal production and, due to the ease of storage or uranium, provides a hedge against fluctuations on the world energy market. (orig.) [de

  5. Development of photovoltaic array and module safety requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Safety requirements for photovoltaic module and panel designs and configurations likely to be used in residential, intermediate, and large-scale applications were identified and developed. The National Electrical Code and Building Codes were reviewed with respect to present provisions which may be considered to affect the design of photovoltaic modules. Limited testing, primarily in the roof fire resistance field was conducted. Additional studies and further investigations led to the development of a proposed standard for safety for flat-plate photovoltaic modules and panels. Additional work covered the initial investigation of conceptual approaches and temporary deployment, for concept verification purposes, of a differential dc ground-fault detection circuit suitable as a part of a photovoltaic array safety system.

  6. Evaluation Of Supplemental Pre-Treatment Development Requirements To Meet TRL 6: Rotary Microfiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    In spring 2011, the Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) for the Supplemental Treatment Project (RPP-PLAN-49827, Rev. 0), Technology Maturation Plan for the Treatment Project (T4S01) was developed. This plan contains all identified actions required to reach technical maturity for a field-deployable waste feed pretreatment system. The supplemental pretreatment system has a filtration and a Cs-removal component. Subsequent to issuance of the TMP, rotary microfiltration (RMF) has been identified as the prime filtration technology for this application. The prime Cs-removal technology is small column ion exchange (ScIX) using spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) as the exchange resin. During fiscal year 2011 (FY2011) some of the tasks identified in the TMP have been completed. As of September 2011, the conceptual design package has been submitted to DOE as part of the critical decision (CD-1) process. This document describes the remaining tasks identified in the TMP to reach technical maturity and evaluates the validity of the proposed tests to fill the gaps as previously identified in the TMP. The potential vulnerabilities are presented and the completed list of criteria for the DOE guide DOE G 413.3-4 different technology readiness levels are added in an attachment. This evaluation has been conducted from a technology development perspective - all programmatic and manufacturing aspects were excluded from this exercise. Compliance with the DOE G 413.3-4 programmatic and manufacturing requirements will be addressed directly by the Treatment Project during the course of engineering design. The results of this evaluation show that completion of the proposed development tasks in the TMP are sufficient to reach TRL 6 from a technological point of view. The tasks involve actual waste tests using the current baseline configuration (2nd generation disks, 40 psi differential pressure, 30 C feed temperature) and three different simulants - the PEP, an AP-Farm and an S

  7. Requirements for and development of trained manpower resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R. Nazare; Araujo, R. de; Pinto, C. Syllus M.; Dale, C. Marcio M.; Souza, Jair A.M.; Spitalnik, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Brazilian nuclear programme will require, by 1990, the installation of at least 10 000 MWe of nuclear power capacity, the implementation of the entire fuel cycle complex, and the creation of a reactor heavy components manufacturing industry and of a nuclear power plant engineering capability. It has been estimated that such a programme will have to employ until 1985, some 7000 to 8000 people at the engineering and technician levels. As a consequence, planning the manpower preparation and qualification, involving such large numbers, required not only thorough analyses of sectoral requirements but also careful consideration of depletion rates and losses during the training process. Taking this into account, the Universities and Technical Schools will need to graduate, in average, 450 - 550 additional engineers and technicians respectively per year during the next 10 years. For this purpose, the maximum possible use of the existing educational system in the country will refrain from excessive reliance upon external sources and strengthen the local infrastructure. Crash specialization courses have been developed, in conjunction with the Universities, to specifically comply with the requirements of the nuclear programme. Only in the case where no industrial experience can be provided in the country, on-the-job training in foreign firms is being considered. Training of nuclear power plant operators is also to be a local activity. An Operators Training Center, by using a plant simulator, is under implementation with a scheduled operational date in the early eighties. For the implementation of the nuclear manpower programme, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) has been given the task of promoting and coordinating the nuclear academic education, whereas Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. (NUCLEBRAS) has the responsibility for the specialization and training of personnel in the nuclear technological fields [es

  8. Nuclear design and technical development required for ISER plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Yamano, Naoki.

    1987-01-01

    The report outlines some results of a study carried out by the ISER (intrinsically safe and economical reactor) Investigation Group. In particular, nuclear design concepts are examined in relation to the fuel cycle. Discussion is also made on technical development efforts to be made for realizing an ISER. Calculation of some basic nuclear design parameters is performed and results are used to examine the reactor core and fuel for ISER. As a result, it is indicated that a high-burnup type reactor core should be used on a 4.5-batch replacement, 15 EFPM (effective full power month) scheme to optimize an ISER. For technical development, consideration is made on various tests to be performed with an experimental reactor, called ISER-E, as well as other tests to provide basic data required for demonstrating the inherent safety of ISER. The study also deals with the possibility of the application of currently available light water reactor techniques to experiments with a critical assembly, non-nuclear test loop, and the experimental reactor ISER-E. It is revealed that many of the required experiments can be carried out by using test facilities and light water reactor techniques which are currently, or will be readily, available. It is stressed that international cooperation is necessary to accomplish these tests. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Development of DOE complexwide authorized release protocols for radioactive scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from site cleanup or D and D activities, constitute non-real properties that warrant consideration for reuse or recycle, as permitted and practiced under the current DOE policy. The provisions for supporting this policy are contained in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE field offices for interim use and implementation. The authorized release of such property is intended to permit its beneficial use across the entire DOE complex. The objective of this study is to develop readily usable computer-based release protocols to facilitate implementation of the Handbook in evaluating the scrap metals for reuse and recycle. The protocols provide DOE with an effective oversight tool for managing release activities

  10. Development and thermal requirements of Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Simone Martins; Bueno, Vanda Helena Paes; Carvalho, Livia Mendes

    2005-01-01

    The temperature strongly influences the development time of insects and the understanding of this aspect for natural enemies is essential for its use as biocontrol agents and for mass rearing purpose. The objective of this work was evaluating the effect of different temperatures on the development time of Orius insidiosus (Say, 1832) as well as its thermal requirements. The trials were conducted in climatic chamber at 16, 19, 22, 25, 28 and 31 ± 1 deg C; RH 70 ± 10% and photo phase 12h. Eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller, 1879) were provided as food. The embryonic period was 14.0, 8.9, 6.6, 4.8, 3.9 and 3.3 days at 16, 19, 22, 25, 28 and 31 deg C, respectively. Nymphs of all instars (independent of originated sex) were affected by the temperature on their development time; there was a reduction of this period with the increase of the temperature. Males and females presented a development time about 12 days at 25 deg C. The developmental thresholds (To) for egg stage was estimated at 11.78 deg C, and for the nymphal phase were 12.27 deg C and 13.03 deg C for males and females, respectively. The thermal constants (K) for egg stage (63.75 day-degrees) and for nymphal stage were 161.97 and 157.24 day-degrees, for males and females, respectively. The temperature of 25 deg C was the most suitable for development time of O. insidiosus. (author)

  11. Nuclear science. U.S. electricity needs and DOE's civilian reactor development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England-Joseph, Judy; Allen, Robert E. Jr.; Fitzgerald, Duane; Young, Edward E. Jr.; Leavens, William P.; Bell, Jacqueline

    1990-05-01

    Electricity projections developed by the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) appear to be the best available estimates of future U.S. electricity needs. NERC, which represents all segments of the utility industry, forecasts that before 1998 certain regions of the country, particularly in the more heavily populated eastern half of the United States, may experience shortfalls during summer peak demand periods. These forecasts considered the utility companies' plans, as of 1989, to meet electricity needs during the period; these plans include such measures as constructing additional generators and conducting demand management programs. Working closely with the nuclear industry, DOE is supporting the development of several reactor technologies to ensure that nuclear power remains a viable electricity supply option. In fiscal year 1990, DOE's Civilian Reactor Development Program was funded at $253 million. DOE is using these funds to support industry-led efforts to develop light water reactors (LWR), advanced liquid-metal reactors (LMR), and modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGR) that are safe, environmentally acceptable, and economically competitive. The utility company officials we spoke with, all of whom were in the Southeast, generally supported DOE's efforts in developing these technologies. However, most of the officials do not plan to purchase nuclear reactors until after 2000 because of the high costs of constructing nuclear reactors and current public opposition to nuclear power

  12. Developing an operational rangeland water requirement satisfaction index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Verdin, James P.; Rowland, James

    2011-01-01

    Developing an operational water requirement satisfaction index (WRSI) for rangeland monitoring is an important goal of the famine early warning systems network. An operational WRSI has been developed for crop monitoring, but until recently a comparable WRSI for rangeland was not successful because of the extremely poor performance of the index when based on published crop coefficients (K c) for rangelands. To improve the rangeland WRSI, we developed a simple calibration technique that adjusts the K c values for rangeland monitoring using long-term rainfall distribution and reference evapotranspiration data. The premise for adjusting the K c values is based on the assumption that a viable rangeland should exhibit above-average WRSI (values >80%) during a normal year. The normal year was represented by a median dekadal rainfall distribution (satellite rainfall estimate from 1996 to 2006). Similarly, a long-term average for potential evapotranspiration was used as input to the famine early warning systems network WRSI model in combination with soil-water-holding capacity data. A dekadal rangeland WRSI has been operational for east and west Africa since 2005. User feedback has been encouraging, especially with regard to the end-of-season WRSI anomaly products that compare the index's performance to ‘normal’ years. Currently, rangeland WRSI products are generated on a dekadal basis and posted for free distribution on the US Geological Survey early warning website at http://earlywarning.usgs.gov/adds/

  13. Software requirements specification document for the AREST code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, D.W.; McGrail, B.P.; Whitney, P.D.; Gray, W.J.; Williford, R.E.; White, M.D.; Eslinger, P.W.; Altenhofen, M.K.

    1993-11-01

    The Analysis of the Repository Source Term (AREST) computer code was selected in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Energy. The AREST code will be used to analyze the performance of an underground high level nuclear waste repository. The AREST code is being modified by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in order to evaluate the engineered barrier and waste package designs, model regulatory compliance, analyze sensitivities, and support total systems performance assessment modeling. The current version of the AREST code was developed to be a very useful tool for analyzing model uncertainties and sensitivities to input parameters. The code has also been used successfully in supplying source-terms that were used in a total systems performance assessment. The current version, however, has been found to be inadequate for the comparison and selection of a design for the waste package. This is due to the assumptions and simplifications made in the selection of the process and system models. Thus, the new version of the AREST code will be designed to focus on the details of the individual processes and implementation of more realistic models. This document describes the requirements of the new models that will be implemented. Included in this document is a section describing the near-field environmental conditions for this waste package modeling, description of the new process models that will be implemented, and a description of the computer requirements for the new version of the AREST code

  14. Data Requirements for Developing Adaptations to Climate Variability and Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basher, Reid E.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive foundation of high quality data and information on the climate and on the biological, environmental and social systems affected by climate is required in order to understand the climate impact processes involved, to develop new adaptation practices, and to subsequently implement these practices. Experience of the impacts of current and past variability of climate and sea level is a prime source of information. Many practices are in use to reduce climate impacts, for example in engineering design, agricultural risk management and climate prediction services, though their roles as adaptations to climate change are not widely appreciated. While there are good data sets on some factors and in some regions, in many cases the databases are inadequate and there are few data sets on adaptation-specific quantities such as vulnerability, resilience and adaptation effectiveness. Current international action under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) pays little attention to adaptation and its information requirements. Furthermore there are trends toward reduced data gathering and to restrictions on access to data sets, especially arising from cost and commercialisation pressures. To effectively respond to the changes in climate that are now inevitable, governments will need to more clearly identify adaptation as a central feature of climate change policy and make a renewed shared commitment to collecting and freely exchanging the necessary data. 12 refs

  15. Mineral supply for sustainable development requires resource governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saleem H.; Giurco, Damien; Arndt, Nicholas; Nickless, Edmund; Brown, Graham; Demetriades, Alecos; Durrheim, Ray; Enriquez, Maria Amélia; Kinnaird, Judith; Littleboy, Anna; Meinert, Lawrence D.; Oberhänsli, Roland; Salem, Janet; Schodde, Richard; Schneider, Gabi; Vidal, Olivier; Yakovleva, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Successful delivery of the United Nations sustainable development goals and implementation of the Paris Agreement requires technologies that utilize a wide range of minerals in vast quantities. Metal recycling and technological change will contribute to sustaining supply, but mining must continue and grow for the foreseeable future to ensure that such minerals remain available to industry. New links are needed between existing institutional frameworks to oversee responsible sourcing of minerals, trajectories for mineral exploration, environmental practices, and consumer awareness of the effects of consumption. Here we present, through analysis of a comprehensive set of data and demand forecasts, an interdisciplinary perspective on how best to ensure ecologically viable continuity of global mineral supply over the coming decades.

  16. Development to requirements for a procedures software tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutake, J.Y.; Hachiro Isoda

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan initiated a joint research program to investigate various interventions to reduce personnel errors and inefficiencies in the maintenance of nuclear power plants. This program, consisting of several interrelated projects, was initiated because of the mutual recognition of the importance of the human element in the efficient and safe operation of utilities and the continuing need to enhance personnel performance to sustain plant safety and availability. This paper summarizes one of the projects, jointly funded by EPRI and CRIEPI, to analyze the requirements for, and prepare a functional description of, a procedures software tool (PST). The primary objective of this project was to develop a description of the features and functions of a software tool that would help procedure writers to improve the quality of maintenance and testing procedures, thereby enhancing the performance of both procedure writers and maintenance personnel

  17. Requirements Document for Development of a Livermore Tomography Tools Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetho, I. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-09

    In this document, we outline an exercise performed at LLNL to evaluate the user interface deficits of a LLNL-developed CT reconstruction software package, Livermore Tomography Tools (LTT). We observe that a difficult-to-use command line interface and the lack of support functions compound to generate a bottleneck in the CT reconstruction process when input parameters to key functions are not well known. Through the exercise of systems engineering best practices, we generate key performance parameters for a LTT interface refresh, and specify a combination of back-end (“test-mode” functions) and front-end (graphical user interface visualization and command scripting tools) solutions to LTT’s poor user interface that aim to mitigate issues and lower costs associated with CT reconstruction using LTT. Key functional and non-functional requirements and risk mitigation strategies for the solution are outlined and discussed.

  18. The development and significance of the DOE Safeguards and Security standards and criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, J.

    1987-01-01

    In October 1985, the DOE Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs created a task force to develop inspection standards and criteria for Safeguards and Security. These standards and criteria (S/C) would provide the DOE Inspection and Evaluation (I and E) teams with the guidance needed to assess the security posture of DOE's nuclear and other important facilities. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was designated the lead management organization for the structuring, administration, and execution of the overall task force effort and appointed the Executive Secretary. The Office of Security Evaluations (OSE) became the responsible DOE organization, and its Director assumed the role of Chairman of the Task Force Executive Committee. At its peak, the Task Force consisted of approximately 200 people who were considered to be experts in eight major topical areas. The composition of the experts was almost evenly divided between DOE and contractor employees. The collective wisdom of these experts was used in a consensus process to develop the S/C that are now published in draft form. These S/C have been used in more than ten inspections since May 1986 with much success. This paper discusses the process used to achieve the desired end result and the significance of the Task Force's accomplishments

  19. Health services management development: what formal knowledge should support the skills and experience required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, David J; Yen, Margaret L

    2013-05-01

    This study reports on an analysis of 17 postgraduate programs in health services management. Public information was collected from websites in February 2010. Data analysed included core subject abstracts, admission requirements and length and aims of each course. Findings indicate that only three out of 16 subjects identified as core are common to more than 50% of the programs, with the eight most common individual subjects appearing in only a third of programs. This suggests diversity in what is deemed core foundational knowledge in managing health services and the approach taken to management development. We believe there should be greater consensus on core subjects in a specialist health services management qualification. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? With changes in the organisational structure of health organisations in Australia over the past two decades, managerial positions and roles have also changed. The educational preparation for those managerial roles would also be expected to have changed but core foundational knowledge should remain similar between the various academic institutions.WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This paper indicates greater diversity in core knowledge areas in health services management education than expected despite a similar target audience.WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? There are differences in what are deemed to be core foundational areas of knowledge required in specialist management development between academic programs. Management development requires a balance between knowledge, skills and experience and intending st

  20. Critical overview of the development of the optimization requirement and its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a critical overview of the development of the optimization requirement of the system of dose limitation recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), as well as of its implementation. The concept of optimization began to evolve in the mid-1950s and was formally introduced as a requirement for radiation protection in 1978. Recommendations on its practical implementation have been available for five years. After such a long evolution, it seems reasonable to make a critical assessment of the development of the optimization concept, and this summary paper is intended to provide such an assessment. It does not include a description of the requirement or of any method for implementing it, since it is assumed that optimization is familiar by now. The paper concentrates rather on misunderstandings of and achievements owed to optimization and explores some of their underlying causes, the intention being to draw lessons from past experience and to apply them to future developments in this area. The paper presents an outlook on some remaining policy issues that still pending solution as well as some suggestions on prioritization of implementation of optimization and on standardizing the optimization protection

  1. Recognition and categorization considerations for information assurance requirements development and speficication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stytz, Martin R.; May, Michael; Banks, Sheila B.

    2009-04-01

    Department of Defense (DoD) Information Technology (IT) systems operate in an environment different from the commercial world, the differences arise from the differences in the types of attacks, the interdependencies between DoD software systems, and the reliance upon commercial software to provide basic capabilities. The challenge that we face is determining how to specify the information assurance requirements for a system without requiring changes to the commercial software and in light of the interdependencies between systems. As a result of the interdependencies and interconnections between systems introduced by the global information grid (GIG), an assessment of the IA requirements for a system must consider three facets of a system's IA capabilities: 1) the IA vulnerabilities of the system, 2) the ability of a system to repel IA attacks, and 3) the ability of a system to insure that any IA attack that penetrates the system is contained within the system and does not spread. Each facet should be assessed independently and the requirements should be derived independently from the assessments. In addition to the desired IA technology capabilities of the system, a complete assessment of the system's overall IA security technology readiness level cannot be accomplished without an assessment of the capabilities required of the system for its capability to recover from and remediate IA vulnerabilities and compromises. To allow us to accomplish these three formidable tasks, we propose a general system architecture designed to separate the system's IA capabilities from its other capability requirements; thereby allowing the IA capabilities to be developed and assessed separately from the other system capabilities. The architecture also enables independent requirements specification, implementation, assessment, measurement, and improvement of a system's IA capabilities without requiring modification of the underlying application software.

  2. Divergent Requirements for EZH1 in Heart Development Versus Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Shanshan; Yu, Xianhong; Li, Yumei; Peng, Yong; Li, Chen; Yue, Yanzhu; Tao, Ge; Li, Chuanyun; Pu, William T; He, Aibin

    2017-07-07

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 is a major epigenetic repressor that deposits methylation on histone H3 on lysine 27 (H3K27me) and controls differentiation and function of many cells, including cardiac myocytes. EZH1 and EZH2 are 2 alternative catalytic subunits with partial functional redundancy. The relative roles of EZH1 and EZH2 in heart development and regeneration are unknown. We compared the roles of EZH1 versus EZH2 in heart development and neonatal heart regeneration. Heart development was normal in Ezh1 -/- ( Ezh 1 knockout) and Ezh2 f/f ::cTNT -Cre ( Ezh 2 knockout) embryos. Ablation of both genes in Ezh1 -/- ::Ezh2 f/f ::cTNT -Cre embryos caused lethal heart malformations, including hypertrabeculation, compact myocardial hypoplasia, and ventricular septal defect. Epigenome and transcriptome profiling showed that derepressed genes were upregulated in a manner consistent with total EZH dose. In neonatal heart regeneration, Ezh1 was required, but Ezh2 was dispensable. This finding was further supported by rescue experiments: cardiac myocyte-restricted re-expression of EZH1 but not EZH2 restored neonatal heart regeneration in Ezh 1 knockout. In myocardial infarction performed outside of the neonatal regenerative window, EZH1 but not EZH2 likewise improved heart function and stimulated cardiac myocyte proliferation. Mechanistically, EZH1 occupied and activated genes related to cardiac growth. Our work unravels divergent mechanisms of EZH1 in heart development and regeneration, which will empower efforts to overcome epigenetic barriers to heart regeneration. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. 78 FR 23550 - Department of Energy's (DOE) Participation in Development of the International Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... building energy codes by periodically reviewing the technical and economic basis of the voluntary building... and modification of such codes. (42 U.S.C. 6836(b)) B. Background The IECC serves as a model building... building energy codes is through participation in the IECC development process. DOE participates in the ICC...

  4. Asterless is required for centriole length control and sperm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Brian J.; Jacobs, Katherine C.; Fagerstrom, Carey J.

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles are the foundation of two organelles, centrosomes and cilia. Centriole numbers and functions are tightly controlled, and mutations in centriole proteins are linked to a variety of diseases, including microcephaly. Loss of the centriole protein Asterless (Asl), the Drosophila melanogaster orthologue of Cep152, prevents centriole duplication, which has limited the study of its nonduplication functions. Here, we identify populations of cells with Asl-free centrioles in developing Drosophila tissues, allowing us to assess its duplication-independent function. We show a role for Asl in controlling centriole length in germline and somatic tissue, functioning via the centriole protein Cep97. We also find that Asl is not essential for pericentriolar material recruitment or centrosome function in organizing mitotic spindles. Lastly, we show that Asl is required for proper basal body function and spermatid axoneme formation. Insights into the role of Asl/Cep152 beyond centriole duplication could help shed light on how Cep152 mutations lead to the development of microcephaly. PMID:27185836

  5. Hyperleptinemia is required for the development of leptin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A Knight

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Leptin regulates body weight by signaling to the brain the availability of energy stored as fat. This negative feedback loop becomes disrupted in most obese individuals, resulting in a state known as leptin resistance. The physiological causes of leptin resistance remain poorly understood. Here we test the hypothesis that hyperleptinemia is required for the development of leptin resistance in diet-induced obese mice. We show that mice whose plasma leptin has been clamped to lean levels develop obesity in response to a high-fat diet, and the magnitude of this obesity is indistinguishable from wild-type controls. Yet these obese animals with constant low levels of plasma leptin remain highly sensitive to exogenous leptin even after long-term exposure to a high fat diet. This shows that dietary fats alone are insufficient to block the response to leptin. The data also suggest that hyperleptinemia itself can contribute to leptin resistance by downregulating cellular response to leptin as has been shown for other hormones.

  6. Solenoid hammer valve developed for quick-opening requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrench, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Quick-opening lightweight solenoid hammer valve requires a low amount of electrical energy to open, and closes by the restoring action of the mechanical springs. This design should be applicable to many quick-opening requirements in fluid systems.

  7. Safeguards systems analysis research and development and the practice of safeguards at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zack, N.R.; Thomas, K.E.; Markin, J.T.; Tape, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos Safeguards Systems Group personnel interact with Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear materials processing facilities in a number of ways. Among them are training courses, formal technical assistance such as developing information management or data analysis software, and informal ad hoc assistance especially in reviewing and commenting on existing facility safeguards technology and procedures. These activities are supported by the DOE Office of Safeguards and Security, DOE Operations Offices, and contractor organizations. Because of the relationships with the Operations Office and facility personnel, the Safeguards Systems Group research and development (R and D) staff have developed an understanding of the needs of the entire complex. Improved safeguards are needed in areas such as materials control activities, accountability procedures and techniques, systems analysis and evaluation methods, and material handling procedures. This paper surveys the generic needs for efficient and cost effective enhancements in safeguards technologies and procedures at DOE facilities, identifies areas where existing safeguards R and D products are being applied or could be applied, and sets a direction for future systems analysis R and D to address practical facility safeguards needs

  8. fMRI orientation decoding in V1 does not require global maps or globally coherent orientation stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alink, Arjen; Krugliak, Alexandra; Walther, Alexander; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    The orientation of a large grating can be decoded from V1 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, even at low resolution (3-mm isotropic voxels). This finding has suggested that columnar-level neuronal information might be accessible to fMRI at 3T. However, orientation decodability might alternatively arise from global orientation-preference maps. Such global maps across V1 could result from bottom-up processing, if the preferences of V1 neurons were biased toward particular orientations (e.g., radial from fixation, or cardinal, i.e., vertical or horizontal). Global maps could also arise from local recurrent or top-down processing, reflecting pre-attentive perceptual grouping, attention spreading, or predictive coding of global form. Here we investigate whether fMRI orientation decoding with 2-mm voxels requires (a) globally coherent orientation stimuli and/or (b) global-scale patterns of V1 activity. We used opposite-orientation gratings (balanced about the cardinal orientations) and spirals (balanced about the radial orientation), along with novel patch-swapped variants of these stimuli. The two stimuli of a patch-swapped pair have opposite orientations everywhere (like their globally coherent parent stimuli). However, the two stimuli appear globally similar, a patchwork of opposite orientations. We find that all stimulus pairs are robustly decodable, demonstrating that fMRI orientation decoding does not require globally coherent orientation stimuli. Furthermore, decoding remained robust after spatial high-pass filtering for all stimuli, showing that fine-grained components of the fMRI patterns reflect visual orientations. Consistent with previous studies, we found evidence for global radial and vertical preference maps in V1. However, these were weak or absent for patch-swapped stimuli, suggesting that global preference maps depend on globally coherent orientations and might arise through recurrent or top-down processes related to the perception of

  9. Resource Requirements and Costs of Developing and Delivering MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M. Hollands

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Given the ongoing alarm regarding uncontrollable costs of higher education, it would be reasonable to expect not only concern about the impact of MOOCs on educational outcomes, but also systematic efforts to document the resources expended on their development and delivery. However, there is little publicly available information on MOOC costs that is based on rigorous analysis. In this article, we first address what institutional resources are required for the development and delivery of MOOCs, based on interviews conducted with 83 administrators, faculty members, researchers, and other actors in the MOOCspace. Subsequently, we use the ingredients method to present cost analyses of MOOC production and delivery at four institutions. We find costs ranging from $38,980 to $325,330 per MOOC, and costs per completer of $74-$272, substantially lower than costs per completer of regular online courses, by merit of scalability. Based on this metric, MOOCs appear more cost-effective than online courses, but we recommend judging MOOCs by impact on learning and caution that they may only be cost-effective for the most self-motivated learners. By demonstrating the methods of cost analysis as applied to MOOCs, we hope that future assessments of the value of MOOCs will combine both cost information and effectiveness data to yield cost-effectiveness ratios that can be compared with the cost-effectiveness of alternative modes of education delivery. Such information will help decision-makers in higher education make rational decisions regarding the most productive use of limited educational resources, to the benefit of both learners and taxpayers.

  10. spib is required for primitive myeloid development in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ricardo M B; Soto, Ximena; Chen, Yaoyao; Zorn, Aaron M; Amaya, Enrique

    2008-09-15

    Vertebrate blood formation occurs in 2 spatially and temporally distinct waves, so-called primitive and definitive hematopoiesis. Although definitive hematopoiesis has been extensively studied, the development of primitive myeloid blood has received far less attention. In Xenopus, primitive myeloid cells originate in the anterior ventral blood islands, the equivalent of the mammalian yolk sac, and migrate out to colonize the embryo. Using fluorescence time-lapse video microscopy, we recorded the migratory behavior of primitive myeloid cells from their birth. We show that these cells are the first blood cells to differentiate in the embryo and that they are efficiently recruited to embryonic wounds, well before the establishment of a functional vasculature. Furthermore, we isolated spib, an ETS transcription factor, specifically expressed in primitive myeloid precursors. Using spib antisense morpholino knockdown experiments, we show that spib is required for myeloid specification, and, in its absence, primitive myeloid cells retain hemangioblast-like characteristics and fail to migrate. Thus, we conclude that spib sits at the top of the known genetic hierarchy that leads to the specification of primitive myeloid cells in amphibians.

  11. Status of Technical Requirements Development for Maintenance Effectiveness Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Kyu; Kim, Yun Il; Lee, Chang Ju; Chang, Gun Hyun

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that proper maintenance at nuclear power plant is essential to plant safety and that there is a clear link between effective maintenance and safety as it relates to such factors as the number of transients and challenges to safety systems and the associated need for operability, availability, and reliability of safety equipment. Good maintenance is also important in providing assurance that failures of non-safety related structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that could initiate, adversely affect, or mitigate a transient or an accident are also minimized. Maintenance is also important to ensure that design assumptions and margins in the original design basis are maintained and are not degraded to an unacceptable level. Therefore, good maintenance practice at nuclear power plants is of utmost importance in protecting public health and safety. This paper introduces the status of the development of regulatory technical requirements (Drafts) for utility's management of maintenance effectiveness. The process of Maintenance Effectiveness Management is shown in Figure 1

  12. Developing Formal Correctness Properties from Natural Language Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikora, Allen P.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the rationale of the program to transform natural language specifications into formal notation.Specifically, automate generation of Linear Temporal Logic (LTL)correctness properties from natural language temporal specifications. There are several reasons for this approach (1) Model-based techniques becoming more widely accepted, (2) Analytical verification techniques (e.g., model checking, theorem proving) significantly more effective at detecting types of specification design errors (e.g., race conditions, deadlock) than manual inspection, (3) Many requirements still written in natural language, which results in a high learning curve for specification languages, associated tools and increased schedule and budget pressure on projects reduce training opportunities for engineers, and (4) Formulation of correctness properties for system models can be a difficult problem. This has relevance to NASA in that it would simplify development of formal correctness properties, lead to more widespread use of model-based specification, design techniques, assist in earlier identification of defects and reduce residual defect content for space mission software systems. The presentation also discusses: potential applications, accomplishments and/or technological transfer potential and the next steps.

  13. Innovative Approach for Developing Spacecraft Interior Acoustic Requirement Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Dandaroy, Indranil; Allen, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is an American spacecraft for carrying four astronauts during deep space missions. This paper describes an innovative application of Power Injection Method (PIM) for allocating Orion cabin continuous noise Sound Pressure Level (SPL) limits to the sound power level (PWL) limits of major noise sources in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) during all mission phases. PIM is simulated using both Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and Hybrid Statistical Energy Analysis-Finite Element (SEA-FE) models of the Orion MPCV to obtain the transfer matrix from the PWL of the noise sources to the acoustic energies of the receivers, i.e., the cavities associated with the cabin habitable volume. The goal of the allocation strategy is to control the total energy of cabin habitable volume for maintaining the required SPL limits. Simulations are used to demonstrate that applying the allocated PWLs to the noise sources in the models indeed reproduces the SPL limits in the habitable volume. The effects of Noise Control Treatment (NCT) on allocated noise source PWLs are investigated. The measurement of source PWLs of involved fan and pump development units are also discussed as it is related to some case-specific details of the allocation strategy discussed here.

  14. Analytical Evaluation of Preliminary Drop Tests Performed to Develop a Robust Design for the Standardized DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.; Smith, N.L.; Snow, S.D.; Rahl, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a design concept for a set of standard canisters for the handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository, of DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The standardized DOE SNF canister has to be capable of handling virtually all of the DOE SNF in a variety of potential storage and transportation systems. It must also be acceptable to the repository, based on current and anticipated future requirements. This expected usage mandates a robust design. The canister design has four unique geometries, with lengths of approximately 10 feet or 15 feet, and an outside nominal diameter of 18 inches or 24 inches. The canister has been developed to withstand a drop from 30 feet onto a rigid (flat) surface, sustaining only minor damage - but no rupture - to the pressure (containment) boundary. The majority of the end drop-induced damage is confined to the skirt and lifting/stiffening ring components, which can be removed if de sired after an accidental drop. A canister, with its skirt and stiffening ring removed after an accidental drop, can continue to be used in service with appropriate operational steps being taken. Features of the design concept have been proven through drop testing and finite element analyses of smaller test specimens. Finite element analyses also validated the canister design for drops onto a rigid (flat) surface for a variety of canister orientations at impact, from vertical to 45 degrees off vertical. Actual 30-foot drop testing has also been performed to verify the final design, though limited to just two full-scale test canister drops. In each case, the analytical models accurately predicted the canister response

  15. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

    2001-01-01

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes

  16. General-purpose heat source development. Phase I: design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, E.C.; Zocher, R.W.

    1978-09-01

    Studies have been performed to determine the necessary design requirements for a 238 PuO 2 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS). Systems and missions applications, as well as accident conditions, were considered. The results of these studies, along with the recommended GPHS design requirements, are given in this report

  17. Activation of CuZn superoxide dismutases from Caenorhabditis elegans does not require the copper chaperone CCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Laran T; Culotta, Valeria Cizewski

    2005-12-16

    Reactive oxygen species are produced as the direct result of aerobic metabolism and can cause damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids. A principal defense against reactive oxygen species involves the superoxide dismutases (SOD) that act to detoxify superoxide anions. Activation of CuZn-SODs in eukaryotic cells occurs post-translationally and is generally dependent on the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS), which inserts the catalytic copper cofactor and catalyzes the oxidation of a conserved disulfide bond that is essential for activity. In contrast to other eukaryotes, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans does not contain an obvious CCS homologue, and we have found that the C. elegans intracellular CuZn-SODs (wSOD-1 and wSOD-5) are not dependent on CCS for activation when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CCS-independent activation of CuZn-SODs is not unique to C. elegans; however, this is the first organism identified that appears to exclusively use this alternative pathway. As was found for mammalian SOD1, wSOD-1 exhibits a requirement for reduced glutathione in CCS-independent activation. Unexpectedly, wSOD-1 was inactive even in the presence of CCS when glutathione was depleted. Our investigation of the cysteine residues that form the disulfide bond in wSOD-1 suggests that the ability of wSODs to readily form this disulfide bond may be the key to obtaining high levels of activation through the CCS-independent pathway. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the CuZn-SODs of C. elegans have uniquely evolved to acquire copper without the copper chaperone and this may reflect the lifestyle of this organism.

  18. Reservoir Maintenance and Development Task Report for the DOE Geothermal Technologies Office GeoVision Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Finger, John T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carrigan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foris, Adam [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kennedy, Mack B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Corbet, Thomas F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Doughty, Christine A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pye, Steven [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sonnenthal, Eric L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report documents the key findings from the Reservoir Maintenance and Development (RM&D) Task of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE), Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) Geothermal Vision Study (GeoVision Study). The GeoVision Study had the objective of conducting analyses of future geothermal growth based on sets of current and future geothermal technology developments. The RM&D Task is one of seven tasks within the GeoVision Study with the others being, Exploration and Confirmation, Potential to Penetration, Institutional Market Barriers, Environmental and Social Impacts, Thermal Applications, and Hybrid Systems. The full set of findings and the details of the GeoVision Study can be found in the final GeoVision Study report on the DOE-GTO website. As applied here, RM&D refers to the activities associated with developing, exploiting, and maintaining a known geothermal resource. It assumes that the site has already been vetted and that the resource has been evaluated to be of sufficient quality to move towards full-scale development. It also assumes that the resource is to be developed for power generation, as opposed to low-temperature or direct use applications. This document presents the key factors influencing RM&D from both a technological and operational standpoint and provides a baseline of its current state. It also looks forward to describe areas of research and development that must be pursued if the development geothermal energy is to reach its full potential.

  19. Lead Research and Development Activity for DOE's High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program (Topic 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Fenton, PhD; Darlene Slattery, PhD; Nahid Mohajeri, PhD

    2012-09-05

    The Department of Energy’s High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program was begun in 2006 with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) as the lead organization. During the first three years of the program, FSEC was tasked with developing non-Nafion® proton exchange membranes with improved conductivity for fuel cells. Additionally, FSEC was responsible for developing protocols for the measurement of in-plane conductivity, providing conductivity measurements for the other funded teams, developing a method for through-plane conductivity and organizing and holding semiannual meetings of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG). The FSEC membrane research focused on the development of supported poly[perfluorosulfonic acid] (PFSA) – Teflon membranes and a hydrocarbon membrane, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The fourth generation of the PFSA membrane (designated FSEC-4) came close to, but did not meet, the Go/No-Go milestone of 0.1 S/cm at 50% relative humidity at 120 °C. In-plane conductivity of membranes provided by the funded teams was measured and reported to the teams and DOE. Late in the third year of the program, DOE used this data and other factors to decide upon the teams to continue in the program. The teams that continued provided promising membranes to FSEC for development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) that could be tested in an operating fuel cell. FSEC worked closely with each team to provide customized support. A logic flow chart was developed and discussed before MEA fabrication or any testing began. Of the five teams supported, by the end of the project, membranes from two of the teams were easily manufactured into MEAs and successfully characterized for performance. One of these teams exceeded performance targets, while the other requires further optimization. An additional team developed a membrane that shows great promise for significantly reducing membrane costs and increasing membrane lifetime.

  20. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Gamat

    Full Text Available The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their

  1. Geothermal Program Review VII: proceedings. DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Each year the Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an indepth review of its entire geothermal R and D program. The 2--3 day conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R and D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. This year's conference, Program Review 7, was held in San Francisco on March 21--23, 1989. As indicated by its title, ''DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace'', Program Review 7 emphasized developing technologies, concepts, and innovations having potential for commercial application in the foreseeable future. Program Review 7 was comprised of eight sessions including an opening session and a special presentation on the ''Role of Geothermal Energy in Minimizing Global Environmental Problems.'' The five technical sessions covered GTD-sponsored R and D in the areas of hydrothermal (two sessions), hot dry rock, geopressured, and magma. Presentations were made by the relevant field researchers, and sessions were chaired by the appropriate DOE Operations Office Geothermal Program Manager. The technical papers and commentary of invited speakers contained in these Proceedings have been compiled in the order in which they were presented at Program Review 7.

  2. Progress towards developing consistent design and evaluation guidelines for DOE facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Short, S.A.; McDonald, J.R.; McCann, M.W. Jr.; Reed, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Probabilistic definitions of earthquake, wind and tornado natural phenomena hazards for many Department of Energy (DOE) facilities throughout the United States have been developed. In addition, definitions of the flood hazards which might affect these locations are currently being developed. The Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel is now preparing a document to provide guidance and criteria for DOE facility managers to assure that DOE facilities are adequately constructed to resist the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquake, strong wind and flood. The intent of this document is to provide instruction on how to utilize the hazard definitions to evaluate existing facilities and design new facilities in a manner such that the risk of adverse consequences is consistent with the cost, function, and danger to the public or environment of the facility. Potential effects on facilities of natural phenomena hazards are emphasized in this paper. The philosophy for mitigating these effects to be employed in the design and evaluation guidelines is also presented

  3. Functional requirement specification in the packaging development chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutters, Diederick; ten Klooster, Roland

    2008-01-01

    As it is clear that the full packaging life cycle – at least partially – coincides with the product life cycle, both cycles are interwoven. Each has a network of functional requirements, with specific hierarchic propensities. These networks overlap, with prevailing hierarchies playing important

  4. Affordable Development and Demonstration of a Small NTR Engine and Stage: A Preliminary NASA, DOE, and Industry Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Sefcik, Robert J.; Fittje, James E.; McCurdy, David R.; Qualls, Arthur L.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Werner, James E.; Weitzberg, Abraham; Joyner, Claude R.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) represents the next evolutionary step in cryogenic liquid rocket engines. Deriving its energy from fission of uranium-235 atoms contained within fuel elements that comprise the engine's reactor core, the NTR can generate high thrust at a specific impulse of approx. 900 seconds or more - twice that of today's best chemical rockets. In FY'11, as part of the AISP project, NASA proposed a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) effort that envisioned two key activities - "Foundational Technology Development" followed by system-level "Technology Demonstrations". Five near-term NTP activities identified for Foundational Technology Development became the basis for the NCPS project started in FY'12 and funded by NASA's AES program. During Phase 1 (FY'12-14), the NCPS project was focused on (1) Recapturing fuel processing techniques and fabricating partial length "heritage" fuel elements for the two candidate fuel forms identified by NASA and the DOE - NERVA graphite "composite" and the uranium dioxide (UO2) in tungsten "cermet". The Phase 1 effort also included: (2) Engine Conceptual Design; (3) Mission Analysis and Requirements Definition; (4) Identification of Affordable Options for Ground Testing; and (5) Formulation of an Affordable and Sustainable NTP Development Strategy. During FY'14, a preliminary plan for DDT&E was outlined by GRC, the DOE and industry for NASA HQ that involved significant system-level demonstration projects that included GTD tests at the NNSS, followed by a FTD mission. To reduce development costs, the GTD and FTD tests use a small, low thrust (approx. 7.5 or 16.5 klbf) engine. Both engines use graphite composite fuel and a "common" fuel element design that is scalable to higher thrust (approx. 25 klbf) engines by increasing the number of elements in a larger diameter core that can produce greater thermal power output. To keep the FTD mission cost down, a simple "1-burn" lunar flyby mission was considered along with

  5. Financial development and economic growth in Ghana: Does the measure of financial development matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Adu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the long-run growth effects of financial development in Ghana. We find that the growth effect of financial development is sensitive to the choice of proxy. Both the credit to the private sector as ratios to GDP and total domestic credit are conducive for growth, while broad money stock to GDP ratio is not growth-inducing. The indexes created from principal component analysis confirmed the sensitivity of the effect to the choice of proxy. The findings here suggest that whether financial development is good or bad for growth depends on the indicator used to proxy for financial development.

  6. Development of the Visual Word Form Area Requires Visual Experience: Evidence from Blind Braille Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Judy S; Kanjlia, Shipra; Merabet, Lotfi B; Bedny, Marina

    2017-11-22

    Learning to read causes the development of a letter- and word-selective region known as the visual word form area (VWFA) within the human ventral visual object stream. Why does a reading-selective region develop at this anatomical location? According to one hypothesis, the VWFA develops at the nexus of visual inputs from retinotopic cortices and linguistic input from the frontotemporal language network because reading involves extracting linguistic information from visual symbols. Surprisingly, the anatomical location of the VWFA is also active when blind individuals read Braille by touch, suggesting that vision is not required for the development of the VWFA. In this study, we tested the alternative prediction that VWFA development is in fact influenced by visual experience. We predicted that in the absence of vision, the "VWFA" is incorporated into the frontotemporal language network and participates in high-level language processing. Congenitally blind ( n = 10, 9 female, 1 male) and sighted control ( n = 15, 9 female, 6 male), male and female participants each took part in two functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments: (1) word reading (Braille for blind and print for sighted participants), and (2) listening to spoken sentences of different grammatical complexity (both groups). We find that in blind, but not sighted participants, the anatomical location of the VWFA responds both to written words and to the grammatical complexity of spoken sentences. This suggests that in blindness, this region takes on high-level linguistic functions, becoming less selective for reading. More generally, the current findings suggest that experience during development has a major effect on functional specialization in the human cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The visual word form area (VWFA) is a region in the human cortex that becomes specialized for the recognition of written letters and words. Why does this particular brain region become specialized for reading? We

  7. Integrating NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) and CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) requirements during remedial responses at DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, M.B.; Smith, E.D.; Sharples, F.E.; Eddlemon, G.K.

    1990-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.4, issued October 6, 1989, calls for integrating the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) with those of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. CERCLA requires that decisions on site remediation be made through a formal process called a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). According to the DOE order, integration is to be accomplished by conducting the NEPA and CERCLA environmental planning and review procedures concurrently. The primary instrument for integrating the processes is to be the RI/FS process, which will be supplemented as needed to meet the procedural and documentational requirements of NEPA. The final product of the integrated process will be a single, integrated set of documents; namely, an RI report and an FS-EIS that satisfy the requirements of both NEPA and CERCLA. The contents of the report include (1) an overview and comparison of the requirements of the two processes; (2) descriptions of the major tasks included in the integrated RI/FS-EIS process; (3) recommended contents for integrated RI/FS-EIS documents; and (4)a discussion of some potential problems in integrating NEPA and CERCLA that fall outisde the scope of the RI/FS-EIS process, with suggestions for resolving some of these problems. 15 refs.

  8. Integrating NEPA [National Environmental Policy Act] and CERCLA [Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act] requirements during remedial responses at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.B.; Smith, E.D.; Sharples, F.E.; Eddlemon, G.K.

    1990-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.4, issued October 6, 1989, calls for integrating the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) with those of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. CERCLA requires that decisions on site remediation be made through a formal process called a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). According to the DOE order, integration is to be accomplished by conducting the NEPA and CERCLA environmental planning and review procedures concurrently. The primary instrument for integrating the processes is to be the RI/FS process, which will be supplemented as needed to meet the procedural and documentational requirements of NEPA. The final product of the integrated process will be a single, integrated set of documents; namely, an RI report and an FS-EIS that satisfy the requirements of both NEPA and CERCLA. The contents of the report include (1) an overview and comparison of the requirements of the two processes; (2) descriptions of the major tasks included in the integrated RI/FS-EIS process; (3) recommended contents for integrated RI/FS-EIS documents; and (4)a discussion of some potential problems in integrating NEPA and CERCLA that fall outisde the scope of the RI/FS-EIS process, with suggestions for resolving some of these problems. 15 refs

  9. DOE groundwater protection strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, S.

    1988-01-01

    EH is developing a DOE-wide Groundwater Quality Protection Strategy to express DOE's commitment to the protection of groundwater quality at or near its facilities. This strategy responds to a September 1986 recommendation of the General Accounting Office. It builds on EPA's August 1984 Ground-Water Protection Strategy, which establishes a classification system designed to protect groundwater according to its value and vulnerability. The purposes of DOE's strategy are to highlight groundwater protection as part of current DOE programs and future Departmental planning, to guide DOE managers in developing site-specific groundwater protection practices where DOE has discretion, and to guide DOE's approach to negotiations with EPA/states where regulatory processes apply to groundwater protection at Departmental facilities. The strategy calls for the prevention of groundwater contamination and the cleanup of groundwater commensurate with its usefulness. It would require long-term groundwater protection with reliance on physical rather than institutional control methods. The strategy provides guidance on providing long-term protection of groundwater resources; standards for new remedial actions;guidance on establishing points of compliance; requirements for establishing classification review area; and general guidance on obtaining variances, where applicable, from regulatory requirements. It also outlines management tools to implement this strategy

  10. 14 CFR 152.111 - Application requirements: Airport development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... sketch or sketches of the airport layout indicating the location for each item of work proposed, using... Department of Housing and Urban Development as an area of special flood hazard as defined in the Flood...

  11. Relationship between body weight at first mating and subsequent body development, feed intake, and reproductive performance of rabbit does

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, J.M.; Meijerhof, R.; Noordhuizen, J.P.T.M.; Kemp, B.

    2002-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the relationships between BW at first insemination and subsequent body development, feed intake, reproductive performance, and culling rate of rabbit does. Young rabbit does are vulnerable to body energy deficit in first lactation, resulting in

  12. Does Motor Development in Infancy Predict Spinal Pain in Later Childhood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Hestbaek, Lise

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Longitudinal cohort study. Background Spinal pain is responsible for a huge personal and societal burden but the aetiology remains unclear. Deficits in motor control have been implicated with spinal pain in adults, and delayed motor development is associated with a range of health...... a child first sits or walks without support does not influence the likelihood that they will experience spinal pain in later childhood. Level of Evidence Etiology 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 15 Sep 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7484....

  13. 20 CFR 411.410 - Does each referral from an EN to a State VR agency require its own agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... agency for services, although an EN and a State VR agency may want to enter into an individualized agreement to meet the needs of a single beneficiary. ...' Participation Agreements Between Employment Networks and State Vr Agencies § 411.410 Does each referral from an...

  14. Overview of the applications of cement-based immobilization technologies developed at US DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25-mm-(1-in.-) diam pellets in a glove box to producing 240-m-(800-ft-) diam grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of immobilization materials. The US DOE sites and their programs are: (1) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Hydrofracture Grout; (2) Hanford, Transportable Grout Facility (TGF); (3) Savannah River Plant (SRP), Nitrate Saltcrete; (4) EG and G Idaho, Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP); (5) Mound Laboratory (ML), Waste Pelletization Process; (6) ORNL, FUETAP Concretes, and (7) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Inert Carrier Concrete Process (ICCP). The major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems are also presented. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is included along with a discussion of future trends in cement-based waste form developments and applications. 35 refs., 12 figs

  15. Environmental management for dredging sediments - the requirement of developing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manap, Norpadzlihatun; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research has characterized the effects of dredging, an underwater excavation process for navigational purposes or material extraction, and has shown its association with a number of chemical, physical and biological impacts. Due to this, much environmental management has been applied in the dredging industry in order to manage its detrimental effects. However, developing nations may have different approaches towards their dredging environmental management to compare to their companions with higher economic strength. Moreover, scientific evidence to make an informed decision is often lacking, hence affecting the number of research executed at these nations, limiting their efforts to preserve the environment. This paper reviews the dredging environmental impacts and its two important factors, dredging technology and sediment characteristic, that determine the magnitude of impacts through literature review, and discusses the need for a more integrated dredging environmental management to be developed for developing nations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Developing countries` energy requirements; Besoins energetiques des pays en developpement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arques, P. [Ecole Centrale Lyonnaise, 69 - Ecully (France)

    1995-03-01

    The amount of electric power and bacteriologically clean water produced in developing countries today is insufficient for the people`s needs. In order to develop successfully, these countries must necessarily achieve a threshold which, for the whole planet, will come to 1 000 000 MW of electricity. One way this can be done is by building several hundred power plants, with all the concomitant pollution problems. Another solution is Stirling motors, which use the power of sunlight to pump and pasteurize water and to generate electricity for one or more families, or for developmental home industries. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs.

  17. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  18. How does blastomere removal affect embryonic development? : A time-lapse analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Hindkjær, Johnny Juhl; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    of the 6-10 cell embryo. It has been argued that blastomere removal does not affect embryonic development, but few studies have focussed on safety of the procedure. Recently, time-lapse studies on mice have suggested that blastomere removal affects embryonic development. The present study was conducted...... to evaluate the effect of blastomere biopsy on early human embryonic development using time-lapse analysis. Materials and methods: Couples undergoing IVF treatment or PGD were requested permission to include embryos in the project. The diagnosis healthy/diseased was made by analysis of a single blastomere....... For PGD 56 human embryos were biopsied 68 hours after fertilisation, the majority at the eight cell stage. As controls 43 non-biopsied embryos at the 6-8 cell stage were selected. All embryos were cultured until 5 days after fertilisation in a time-lapse incubator (EmbryoScope™). Key events such as time...

  19. The Development of Female Sexual Behavior Requires Prepubertal Estradiol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brock, O.; Baum, M.J.; Bakker, J.

    2011-01-01

    The classic view of brain and behavioral sexual differentiation holds that the neural mechanisms controlling sexual behavior in female rodents develop in the absence ofovarian sex hormone actions. However,inaprevious study, female aromatase knock-out (ArKO) mice, which cannot convert testosterone to

  20. Commercialization is Required for Sustainable Space Exploration and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.; Olson, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Space Exploration policy outlines an exciting new direction in space for human and robotic exploration and development beyond low Earth orbit. Pressed by this new visionary guidance, human civilization will be able to methodically build capabilities to move off Earth and into the solar system in a step-by-step manner, gradually increasing the capability for humans to stay longer in space and move further away from Earth. The new plans call for an implementation that would create an affordable and sustainable program in order to span over generations of explorers, each new generation pushing back the boundaries and building on the foundations laid by the earlier. To create a sustainable program it is important to enable and encourage the development of a selfsupporting commercial space industry leveraging both traditional and non-traditional segments of the industrial base. Governments will not be able to open the space frontier on their own because their goals change over relatively short timescales and because the large costs associated with human spaceflight cannot be sustained. A strong space development industrial sector is needed that can one day support the needs of commercial space enterprises as well as provide capabilities that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and other national space agencies can buy to achieve their exploration goals. This new industrial space sector will someday provide fundamental capabilities like communications, power, logistics, and even cargo and human space transportation, just as commercial companies are able to provide these services on Earth today. To help develop and bolster this new space industrial sector, NASA and other national space agencies can enable and facilitate it in many ways, including reducing risk by developing important technologies necessary for commercialization of space, and as a paying customer, partner, or anchor tenant. This transition from all or mostly government

  1. Buy, don't build -- What does that mean for a software developer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, T.; Rahi, M.A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-01-01

    The buzz phrase of the 1990's for the petroleum software industry has become ''buy, don't build.'' For an end user in an oil company, this generally means acquiring application software rather than developing it internally. The concept of buy, don't build can also apply for a software developer. Purchasing software toolkit components can expedite the development of an application as well as reduce future support requirements

  2. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

  3. Developing clinical guidelines: how much rigour is required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Munib; Ranmal, Rita; McElroy, Helen; Dudley, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Clinical guidelines that are rigorously developed play a fundamental role in improving healthcare and reducing unnecessary variations in practice. National guidelines are increasingly used by healthcare professionals, patients and commissioners; however, national bodies are unable to meet the demand for guidance on all topics. There are fewer resources available for guidance produced locally or by specialty groups, and it is necessary to achieve a balance between pragmatism and rigour while conforming to the widely accepted norms of what constitutes a good guideline. This paper introduces the key concepts around this topic with suggestions for those interested in developing their own guideline. An example of challenges encountered in generating high-quality clinical guidance is given in box 1. Box 1 Challenges in guideline development Professor Johnson runs a local developmental paediatrics service with eight other colleagues. All have different ways of managing children with PAVING syndrome. This was difficult for patients and staff and has led to disagreements on how certain patients should be managed. As a result, Professor Johnson developed a Guideline Development Group to look at the management of PAVING syndrome. The group identified 12 clinical questions (including diagnosis, exclusion of comorbidities, treatment modalities), searched the PubMed database and found some useful evidence that they used to formulate key recommendations. For one question about behavioural therapy, PubMed did not suggest any evidence so they informally arrived at a consensus among themselves and wrote up their guideline. On the back of this success, they applied for the guideline to be endorsed or supported by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH). To their frustration, it was turned down on methodological grounds. Professor Johnson wrote to the RCPCH saying that he was "pretty peeved that the PAVING syndrome guideline had been rejected" for the College

  4. Using quality requirements to systematically develop a national accessibility portal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alberts, R

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available be provided by less systematic approaches (Hyatt and Rosenberg, 1996). The authors stress that there are certain inherent weaknesses in the model with regard to the usability characteristics. They suggest the extension of the attributes to include more... that belong to the common framework (ATIS, 2006). It should also support a growing number of users that the portal can service (user growth). For the development of the NAP portal, the same route as Hyatt and Rosenberg (1996) was followed and the ISO model...

  5. DOE methods compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leasure, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established an analytical methods compendium development program to integrate its environmental analytical methods. This program is administered through DOE's Laboratory Management Division (EM-563). The primary objective of this program is to assemble a compendium of analytical chemistry methods of known performance for use by all DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program. This compendium will include methods for sampling, field screening, fixed analytical laboratory and mobile analytical laboratory analyses. It will also include specific guidance on the proper selection of appropriate sampling and analytical methods in using specific analytical requirements

  6. Does higher economic and financial development lead to environmental degradation: Evidence from BRIC countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamazian, Artur [Department of Financial Economics and Accounting, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: artur.tamazian@usc.es; Chousa, Juan Pineiro [Department of Financial Economics and Accounting, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: efjpch@usc.es; Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya [Department of Financial Economics and Accounting, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: kc_dcm@yahoo.co.in

    2009-01-15

    A vast number of studies addressed the environmental degradation and economic development but not financial development. Moreover, as argued by Stern [2004. The rise and fall of the environmental Kuznets curve. World Development 32, 1419-1439] they present important econometric weaknesses. Using standard reduced-form modeling approach and controlling for country-specific unobserved heterogeneity, we investigate the linkage between not only economic development and environmental quality but also the financial development. Panel data over period 1992-2004 is used. We find that both economic and financial development are determinants of the environmental quality in BRIC economies. We show that higher degree of economic and financial development decreases the environmental degradation. Our analysis suggests that financial liberalization and openness are essential factors for the CO{sub 2} reduction. The adoption of policies directed to financial openness and liberalization to attract higher levels of R and D-related foreign direct investment might reduce the environmental degradation in countries under consideration. In addition, the robustness check trough the inclusion of US and Japan does not alter our main findings.

  7. Does higher economic and financial development lead to environmental degradation. Evidence from BRIC countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamazian, Artur; Chousa, Juan Pineiro; Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya [Department of Financial Economics and Accounting, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    A vast number of studies addressed the environmental degradation and economic development but not financial development. Moreover, as argued by Stern [2004. The rise and fall of the environmental Kuznets curve. World Development 32, 1419-1439] they present important econometric weaknesses. Using standard reduced-form modeling approach and controlling for country-specific unobserved heterogeneity, we investigate the linkage between not only economic development and environmental quality but also the financial development. Panel data over period 1992-2004 is used. We find that both economic and financial development are determinants of the environmental quality in BRIC economies. We show that higher degree of economic and financial development decreases the environmental degradation. Our analysis suggests that financial liberalization and openness are essential factors for the CO{sub 2} reduction. The adoption of policies directed to financial openness and liberalization to attract higher levels of R and D-related foreign direct investment might reduce the environmental degradation in countries under consideration. In addition, the robustness check trough the inclusion of US and Japan does not alter our main findings. (author)

  8. Does higher economic and financial development lead to environmental degradation. Evidence from BRIC countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamazian, Artur; Chousa, Juan Pineiro; Vadlamannati, Krishna Chaitanya

    2009-01-01

    A vast number of studies addressed the environmental degradation and economic development but not financial development. Moreover, as argued by Stern [2004. The rise and fall of the environmental Kuznets curve. World Development 32, 1419-1439] they present important econometric weaknesses. Using standard reduced-form modeling approach and controlling for country-specific unobserved heterogeneity, we investigate the linkage between not only economic development and environmental quality but also the financial development. Panel data over period 1992-2004 is used. We find that both economic and financial development are determinants of the environmental quality in BRIC economies. We show that higher degree of economic and financial development decreases the environmental degradation. Our analysis suggests that financial liberalization and openness are essential factors for the CO 2 reduction. The adoption of policies directed to financial openness and liberalization to attract higher levels of R and D-related foreign direct investment might reduce the environmental degradation in countries under consideration. In addition, the robustness check trough the inclusion of US and Japan does not alter our main findings. (author)

  9. Requirements for future developments from utility point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordloef, S.; Besch, O.A.

    1995-01-01

    On the BWR side the development of fuel has continued and during the recent years many new designs have entered the market such as ABB Atom SVEA-96, Siemens Atrium, GE-12 etc. These new designs provide new possibilities to optimize the core design and also give better utilization of the uranium. The future development work should emphasize on less susceptibility to severe secondary damage and also higher resistance to debris failure. Another utility demand is to increase the thermal margins such as dryout and PCI performance in order to avoid any restrictions during load, follow up and start up conditions. For three decades the PWR fuel design and the selection of material led to a satisfying results in the overall operational behaviour, which resulted in higher utilization of the fuel and materials. At the beginning of the seventieth, the utilities started with burnups of 30 MWd/kg u . Nowadays, burnups of 42 MWd/kg u are reached and burnups of 50 MWd/kg u as transition burnups are designed. The increase of enrichment from 3.0 w/o U-235 to 4.0 w/o U-235, the change of guide thimble and spacer material from stainless steel or inconel to zircalloy alloys and the different fuel core loading strategy from out-in-in to in-in-out improved the use of fuel and reduced the number of fresh fuel assemblies for reloads. (orig./HP)

  10. Development of requirements tracking and verification technology for the NPP software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chul Hwan; Kim, Jang Yeol; Lee, Jang Soo; Song, Soon Ja; Lee, Dong Young; Kwon, Kee Choon

    1998-12-30

    Searched and analyzed the technology of requirements engineering in the areas of aerospace and defense industry, medical industry and nuclear industry. Summarized the status of tools for the software design and requirements management. Analyzed the software design methodology for the safety software of NPP. Development of the design requirements for the requirements tracking and verification system. Development of the background technology to design the prototype tool for the requirements tracking and verification.

  11. Development of requirements tracking and verification technology for the NPP software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chul Hwan; Kim, Jang Yeol; Lee, Jang Soo; Song, Soon Ja; Lee, Dong Young; Kwon, Kee Choon

    1998-01-01

    Searched and analyzed the technology of requirements engineering in the areas of aerospace and defense industry, medical industry and nuclear industry. Summarized the status of tools for the software design and requirements management. Analyzed the software design methodology for the safety software of NPP. Development of the design requirements for the requirements tracking and verification system. Development of the background technology to design the prototype tool for the requirements tracking and verification

  12. Does Foreign Direct Investment Provide Desirable Development Finance? The Case of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Liang

    2007-01-01

    Foreign direct investment (FDI) is often considered as a cost-effective and risk-reducing source for development finance. This paper, however, shows that FDI finance often entails underestimated risks and costs. FDI might react sensitively to business cycles and might not be as "permanent" as conventionally believed. FDI might also accelerate other forms of capital flow in times of financial difficulties and, hence, destabilize financial order. In addition to the risks, compensations to FDI and the high import-dependency of FDI-related trade lead to a considerable drain on the balance of payments. Moreover, the reliance on foreign capital for development finance is equivalent to building a Ponzi financing scheme and,therefore, is unsustainable. Given the fact that FDI financing is risky and costly and China does not lack savings, it is suggested in the present paper that China's efforts in attracting FDI should not aim at external capital provisioning.

  13. Private Appropriation, Public Dissemination and Commercial Product Development in Genomics (DOE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebecca S. Eisenberg

    2003-03-19

    With DOE funding, I have conducted research on the topic of patents and technology transfer in the Human Genome Project since 1994. My research has proceeded along the following tracks: (1) research and monitoring of legal developments relating to (a) the patenting of DNA sequences and (b) the role of patents in technology transfer; (2) investigating and monitoring the strategies of different institutions in the public and private sector that are involved in DNA sequencing with respect to patenting and disseminating sequence information; (3) investigating and monitoring the impact of these strategies on those who use sequence information in research and product development. I have published commentary as my research proceeds in a variety of forums directed at scientists, lawyers, and science policy-makers.

  14. Does stress mediate the development of substance use disorders among youth transitioning to young adulthood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Jack; Kirisci, Levent; Reynolds, Maureen; Tarter, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    Stress is a well-documented factor in the development of addiction. However, no longitudinal studies to date have assessed the role of stress in mediating the development of substance use disorders (SUD). Our previous results have demonstrated that a measure called Transmissible Liability Index (TLI) assessed during pre-adolescent years serves as a significant predictor of risk for substance use disorder among young adults. However, it remains unclear whether life stress mediates the relationship between TLI and SUD, or whether stress predicts SUD. We conducted a longitudinal study involving 191 male subjects to assess whether life stress mediates the relationship between TLI as assessed at age 10-12 and subsequent development of SUD at age 22, after controlling for other relevant factors. Logistic regression demonstrated that the development of SUD at age 22 was associated with stress at age 19. A path analysis demonstrated that stress at age 19 significantly predicted SUD at age 22. However, stress did not mediate the relationship between the TLI assessed at age 10-12 and SUD in young adulthood. These findings confirm that stress plays a role in the development of SUD, but also shows that stress does not mediate the development of SUD. Further studies are warranted to clarify the role of stress in the etiology of SUD.

  15. 24 CFR 972.115 - Relationship between required conversions and HOPE VI developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... conversions and HOPE VI developments. 972.115 Section 972.115 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Relationship between required conversions and HOPE VI developments. HUD actions to approve or deny proposed HOPE VI revitalization plans must be consistent with the requirements of this subpart. Developments...

  16. Does gender inequality hinder development and economic growth ? evidence and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Bandiera, Oriana; Natraj, Ashwini

    2013-01-01

    Does the existing evidence support policies that foster growth by reducing gender inequality? The authors argue that the evidence based on differences across countries is of limited use for policy design because it does not identify the causal link from inequality to growth. This, however does not imply that inequality-reducing policies are ineffective. In other words, the lack of evidence...

  17. When does time matter? maternal employment, children's time with parents, and child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, Amy; Felfe, Christina

    2014-10-01

    This study tests the two assumptions underlying popularly held notions that maternal employment negatively affects children because it reduces time spent with parents: (1) that maternal employment reduces children's time with parents, and (2) that time with parents affects child outcomes. We analyze children's time-diary data from the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and use child fixed-effects and IV estimations to account for unobserved heterogeneity. We find that working mothers trade quantity of time for better "quality" of time. On average, maternal work has no effect on time in activities that positively influence children's development, but it reduces time in types of activities that may be detrimental to children's development. Stratification by mothers' education reveals that although all children, regardless of mother's education, benefit from spending educational and structured time with their mothers, mothers who are high school graduates have the greatest difficulty balancing work and child care. We find some evidence that fathers compensate for maternal employment by increasing types of activities that can foster child development as well as types of activities that may be detrimental. Overall, we find that the effects of maternal employment are ambiguous because (1) employment does not necessarily reduce children's time with parents, and (2) not all types of parental time benefit child development.

  18. Polycystic ovarian morphology in normal women does not predict the development of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M K; Hall, J E; Adams, J M; Lee, H; Welt, C K

    2006-10-01

    Polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) is present in 25% of normal women in the absence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); however, the natural history of PCOM is unknown. We hypothesized that the presence of PCOM predisposes the development of PCOS. The study was a longitudinal follow-up study over 8.2 +/- 5.2 yr (mean +/- sd; range 1.7-17.5 yr). The study took place in an outpatient setting. Women who took part in a previous study as a normal control and had an ultrasound examination (n = 40) participated. Subjects underwent an interval menstrual history, physical exam, blood sampling, and repeat ultrasound in the follicular phase. Development of PCOS was diagnosed by irregular menses and hyperandrogenism, in the absence of other disorders. Changes in ovarian morphology over time were evaluated. At the baseline visit, 23 women (57.5%) had PCOM and 17 (42.5%) had normal ovarian morphology. One subject with PCOM developed irregular menses and presumptive PCOS. Eleven subjects with PCOM no longer met the criteria for PCOM at follow-up. There was no factor that predicted the change to normal ovarian morphology at the follow-up visit. These data suggest that PCOM in women with regular ovulatory cycles does not commonly predispose the development of PCOS. Although it is unusual to develop PCOM if the ovaries are normal on first assessment, ovaries in women with PCOM no longer meet the criteria for PCOM in approximately half of cases over time.

  19. Does Chess Training Affect Conceptual Development of Six-Year-Old Children in Turkey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigirtmac, Ayperi Dikici

    2012-01-01

    Many studies propose that chess is a game requiring cognitive skills and has positive effects on mental development. In recent years, chess training has also been emphasised as important during the early childhood period. However, no studies have been done with six-year-old children. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not…

  20. An approach for assessing development and deployment risks in the DOE fuel cycle options evaluation and screening study - 5267

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehin, J.C.; Worrall, A.; Oakley, B.; Jenni, K.; Taiwo, T.; Wigeland, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research/development road-map is the development of sustainable nuclear fuel cycles that can improve natural resource utilization and provide solutions to the management of nuclear wastes. Recently, an evaluation and screening (ES) of fuel cycle systems has been conducted to identify those options that provide the best opportunities for obtaining such improvements and also to identify the required research and development activities that can support the development of advanced fuel cycle options. In order to evaluate and screen fuel cycle systems in the ES study, nine criteria were used including Development and Deployment Risk (DDR). More specifically, this criterion was represented by the following metrics: Development time, development cost, deployment cost from prototypic validation to first-of-a-kind commercial, compatibility with the existing nuclear fuel cycle infrastructure, existence of regulations for the fuel cycle and familiarity with licensing, and existence of market incentives and/or barriers to commercial implementation of fuel cycle processes. Given the comprehensive nature of the study, a systematic approach was needed to determine metric data for the DDR criterion. As would be expected, the Evaluation Group representing the once-through use of uranium in thermal reactors is always the highest ranked fuel cycle Evaluation Group for this DDR criterion. Evaluation Groups that consist of once-through fuel cycles that use existing reactor types are consistently ranked very high. The highest ranked limited and continuous recycle fuel cycle Evaluation Groups are those that recycle Pu in thermal reactors. The lowest ranked fuel cycles are predominately continuous recycle single stage and multi-stage fuel cycles that involve TRU and/or U 233 recycle. (authors)

  1. How does social essentialism affect the development of inter-group relations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marjorie; Leslie, Sarah-Jane; Saunders, Katya; Dunham, Yarrow; Cimpian, Andrei

    2018-01-01

    Psychological essentialism is a pervasive conceptual bias to view categories as reflecting something deep, stable, and informative about their members. Scholars from diverse disciplines have long theorized that psychological essentialism has negative ramifications for inter-group relations, yet little previous empirical work has experimentally tested the social implications of essentialist beliefs. Three studies (N = 127, ages 4.5-6) found that experimentally inducing essentialist beliefs about a novel social category led children to share fewer resources with category members, but did not lead to the out-group dislike that defines social prejudice. These findings indicate that essentialism negatively influences some key components of inter-group relations, but does not lead directly to the development of prejudice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Development of a New Sesame Product using QFD and DOE methods: A Case Study of Sesame Product in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Zare Ahmadabadi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to identify customer’s needs for new sesame products, converting requirements into product and process qualitative characteristics, and improving the new product quality. Based on morphological approach and point of views of the manufacturers of sesame products and customers(384 persons, new ideas were extracted and between them a chocolate sesame product was selected. By coducting a survey of consumer expectations(382 sample taste of new product was examined and translated into technical specifications. The paper considers the implementation of the Quality Function Deployment (QFD and DOE in BAH(Booz, Allen and Hamilton framework for the development of new food products. It also aims to meet the challenge of satisfying customer’s inconstant demands and, in turn, to make the business thrive. The results show that main quality features for final product are in good taste, no bitter-taste and be Fresh. Satisfying these requirements are relative to parameters such as sesame variety, chocolate melting point, control of cooking time and oven temperature

  3. 10 CFR 770.8 - May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... facilities for economic development at less than fair market value? 770.8 Section 770.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TRANSFER OF REAL PROPERTY AT DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT § 770.8 May DOE transfer real property at defense nuclear facilities for economic development at less than fair market...

  4. Development of requirements and functional specifications for crash event data recorders : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. DOT has conducted research on the requirements for a Crash Event Data Recorder to facilitate the reconstruction of commercial motor vehicle crashes. This report documents the work performed on the Development of Requirements and Functiona...

  5. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  6. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  7. US DOE Office of Technology Innovation and Development - Integration of the EM R and D Program in 2012 and Beyond - 12537

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazo, Yvette T.; DeLeon, Gary; Schneider, Steve; Gerdes, Kurt; Szilagyi, Andy [Office of Technology Innovation and Development, U.S. DOE, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Wellman, Dawn; Bredt, Paul [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Pierce, Eric [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (United States); Marra, Jim [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Applied research and technology development has the potential to accelerate environmental cleanup and reduce the cost for cleanup and closure of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites throughout the United States. Providing the scientific understanding, knowledge, and technologies to enable successful completion of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) mission, the Technology Innovation and Development program is transforming science and innovation into practical solutions for environmental cleanup. Through integration, collaboration, and communication with DOE partner organization, DOE site managers and contractors, these technologies will reduce human health and environmental risk, cost, and time associated with cleanup and closure. The Office of Technology Innovation and Development (OTID) focused efforts in fiscal year 2011 (FY 2011) to a proactive, visionary program balance with integrated, cross-disciplinary applied research and technology development activities. This transition provides the necessary scientific and technical advancements to address near-term needs. In addition, it fills the critical role in providing scientific approaches and advanced technologies that look beyond today's known needs and requirements to provide innovative technologies to make the necessary long-term changes required to facilitate cleanup and bring sites to closure. The outcomes and impacts of this strategy are summarized in the Impact Plan, which describes potential reduction in life-cycle costs through the development and deployment of advanced technologies supporting EM needs associated with waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, deactivation and decommissioning, and spent nuclear fuel and materials disposition. Additionally, the OTID International Program Strategic Plan 2010-2015 outlines cooperation and collaboration with the international community that has similar nuclear legacy management experience and expertise to foster

  8. An overview of what is required and when for developing a beamline at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    This report discusses these topics: reviews required for developing a beamline at the ALS; work items and documentation required for the beamline design review; information to be communicated to the ALS staff before the beamline readiness review; work items and documentation required for the beamline readiness review; contacts for information, technical questions, and sources of additional information; and checklist of what is required and when for developing a beamline

  9. On the concept and legal nature of sustainable development: Does 'environmental law' exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prica Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of sustainable development has developed within the triangular framework of economic, social and environmental policy. It has been the result of man's endeavor in the course of development of mankind to harmonize the relations between economy and ecology for the purpose of satisfying the present needs but without endangering the prospects of future generations to satisfy their own needs. The principle of sustainable development has been present in the international legislation for the past 40 years. The antagonism between economy and ecology has never ceased. Quite the reverse, at the beginning of the 21st century, mankind has encountered the dramatic effects of the rampant global politics and the unpromising prospects of man's subsistence and development. The reason is certainly to be found in the fact that the environment protection policy does not have an adequate legal framework, which is not a matter of legal technique but a matter of substance in global politics. Consequently, this discussion on the legal nature of sustainable development takes us from technique to substance. First, the author analyzes the international legislation and judicature on the issues of sustainable development; thereupon, the author concludes that the principle of sustainable development has not obtained the rank and the outreach of a legal principle (source of law in the international law, which ultimately makes the very existence of environmental law highly disputable. If sustainable development as a fundamental principle (supra-principle does not have the power of a binding principle, the existing international legal sources concerning certain aspects of the living environment are nothing but arable land covered by sand. Actually, the significant feature of the existing international sources on sustainable development is 'the legal ideology' which, being an instrument of environmental policy rather than an instrument of environmental law, actually

  10. Employment of personnel of a security service company does not require the consent of the works council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    If a company or institution hires personnel of a security service company to protect its premises, this kind of employment does not mean the company carries on temporary employment business. Within the purview of section 99, sub-section 1 of the BetrVG (Works Constitution Act), the security service personnel is not 'employed' in the proper sense even if the security tasks fulfilled by them are done at other times by regular employees of the company or institution. The court decision also decided that the Works Council need not give consent to employment of foreign security personnel. Federal Labour Court, decision dated May 5, 1992 - 1 ABR 78/91. (orig./HP) [de

  11. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document establishes the Transportation system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are derived from the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document (CRD). The Transportation System Requirements Document (TSRD) was developed in accordance with LP-3.1Q-OCRWM, Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of National Transportation Level-2 Baseline Requirements. As illustrated in Figure 1, the TSRD forms a part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Technical Baseline

  12. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture

  13. Industry participation in DOE-sponsored geopressured geothermal resource development. Final report, 1 September 1977-30 April 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffer, H.F.

    1979-01-01

    A series of DOE/Industry forums were carried out to keep industry advised of the DOE program to develop the geopressured geothermal resources of the Gulf Coast. A total of eighteen meetings were held with registered attendance of 621 representing a good cross section of industry, state, and federal agencies. An Overview Group and four working subgroups - site selection, drilling and testing, environmental/laboratory research, and legal institutional were established to subdivide the DOE programs into areas of interest and expertise. During the contract period three overview, four site selection, three drilling and testing, five environmental/laboratory research and three legal/institutional meetings have been conducted. Interest in and attendance at the meetings continue to grow reflecting increased industry contact with the DOE Geopressured Geothermal Resource Development Program. Two other studies were carried out for DOE under this contract; a Salt Water Disposal Study and an Industry Survey to evaluate the DOE Resource Development Program. The Salt Water Disposal Study reviewed subsurface salt water disposal experience on the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast. This preliminary study concluded that subsurface brine disposal should be possible in the areas of interest with adequate evaluation of the geology of each area and a well designed and constructed surface and subsurface facility. The industry survey indicated general satisfaction with the technical design of the resource evaluation program but felt the program should be moving faster.

  14. 7 CFR 400.171 - Qualifying when a state does not require that an Annual Statutory Financial Statement be filed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Annual Statutory Financial Statement be filed. 400.171 Section 400.171 Agriculture Regulations of the... filing an Annual Statutory Financial Statement must, in addition to the requirements of § 400.170 (a), (b), (c) and (d), submit an Annual Statutory Financial Statement audited by a Certified Public Accountant...

  15. Does the digital age require new models of democracy? : lasswell's policy scientist of democracy vs. Liquid democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelena Gregorius

    2015-01-01

    This essay provides a debate about Lasswell’s policy scientist of democracy (PSOD, 1948) in comparison to the model of liquid democracy (21st century) based on the question if the digital age requires new models of democracy. The PSOD of Lasswell, a disciplinary persona, is in favour of an elitist

  16. 20 CFR 10.609 - How does OWCP decide whether new evidence requires modification of the prior decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requires modification of the prior decision? 10.609 Section 10.609 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS.... (b) A claims examiner who did not participate in making the contested decision will conduct the merit... all the evidence in the record. A copy of the decision will be provided to the agency. (c) An employee...

  17. 20 CFR 655.1110 - What requirements does the NRDAA impose in the filing of an Attestation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT OF FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES What Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1110 What... hearing before the BALCA upon the request of any interested party. The BALCA proceeding shall be limited...

  18. The study on knowledge transferring incentive for information system requirement development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang [School of Economics and Business Administration, Chongqing University (China)

    2015-03-10

    Information system requirement development is a process of users’ knowledge sharing and transferring. However the tacit requirements developing is a main problem during requirement development process, for the reason of difficult to encoding, express, and communicate. Knowledge fusion and corporate effort is needed to finding tacit requirements. Under this background, our paper try to find out the rule of effort dynamic evolutionary of software developer and user by building an evolutionary game model on the condition of incentive system. And in addition this paper provides an in depth discussion at the end of this paper.

  19. The study on knowledge transferring incentive for information system requirement development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Information system requirement development is a process of users’ knowledge sharing and transferring. However the tacit requirements developing is a main problem during requirement development process, for the reason of difficult to encoding, express, and communicate. Knowledge fusion and corporate effort is needed to finding tacit requirements. Under this background, our paper try to find out the rule of effort dynamic evolutionary of software developer and user by building an evolutionary game model on the condition of incentive system. And in addition this paper provides an in depth discussion at the end of this paper

  20. Market analysis, energy savings potential, and future development requirements for Radiance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE), Building Equipment Division has funded the development of a sophisticated computer rendering program called Radiance at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL). The project review study included: (1) Surveys of the lighting profession to determine how designers would use an improved, user-friendly Radiance, (2) Elucidation of features, including how Radiance could be used to save energy, which could be incorporated into Radiance to facilitate its more widespread use, (3) Outline of a development plan and determination of what costs the DOE might incur if it were to proceed with the development of an improved version, and (4) Weighing the anticipated development costs against anticipated energy-saving benefits.

  1. Does energy efficiency improve technological change and economic growth in developing countries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantore, Nicola; Calì, Massimiliano; Velde, Dirk Willem te

    2016-01-01

    Does a trade-off exist between energy efficiency and economic growth? This question underlies some of the tensions between economic and environmental policies, especially in developing countries that often need to expand their industrial base to grow. This paper contributes to the debate by analyzing the relationship between energy efficiency and economic performance at the micro- (total factor productivity) and macro-level (countries' economic growth). It uses data on a large sample of manufacturing firms across 29 developing countries to find that lower levels of energy intensity are associated with higher total factor productivity for the majority of these countries. The results are robust to a variety of checks. Suggestive cross-country evidence points towards the same relation measured at the macro-level as well. - Highlights: •Total factor productivity is an accurate proxy of technological change. •Energy efficiency triggers total factor productivity especially in manufacturing. •Technological change via energy efficiency in manufacturing is an engine of growth.

  2. What Bed Size Does a Patient Need? The Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Space Required to Turn in Bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggermann, Neal; Smith, Kathryn; Kumpar, Dee

    A bed that is too small to allow patients to turn from supine to side lying increases the difficulty of mobilizing patients, which can increase risk of musculoskeletal injury to caregivers, increase risk of pressure injuries to patients, and reduce patient comfort. Currently, no guidance is available for what patient sizes are accommodated by the standard 91cm (36 in.)-wide hospital bed, and no studies have evaluated the relationship between anthropometric attributes and space required to turn in bed. The purpose of this research was to determine how much space individuals occupy when turning from supine to side lying as predicted by their anthropometry (i.e., body dimensions) to establish guidance on selecting the appropriate bed size. Forty-seven adult participants (24 female) with body mass index (BMI) from 20 to 76 kg/m participated in a laboratory study. Body dimensions were measured, and the envelope of space required to turn was determined using motion capture. Linear regressions estimated the relationship between anthropometric attributes and space occupied when turning. BMI was strongly correlated (R = .88) with the space required to turn. Based on the linear regressions, individuals with BMI up to 35 kg/m could turn left and right within 91 cm and individuals with BMI up to 45 kg/m could turn one direction within 91 cm. BMI is a good predictor of the space required to turn from supine to lateral. Nurses should consider placing patients that are unable to laterally reposition themselves on a wider bed when BMI is greater than 35 kg/m and should consider placing all patients greater than 45 kg/m on a wider bed regardless of mobility. Hospital administrators can use historical demographic information about the BMI of their patient populations to plan facility-level equipment procurement for equipment that accommodates their patients.

  3. 75 FR 20269 - Regulatory Reporting Requirements for the Indian Community Development Block Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    .... Second, this rule requires ICDBG grantees to use the Logic Model form developed as part of HUD's Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) process. The required use of the Logic Model will conform the ICDBG reporting requirements to those of other HUD competitive funding programs, and enhance the evaluation of...

  4. Establishing Reusable Requirements Derived from Laws and Regulations for Medical Device Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauksdóttir, Dagný; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Ritsing, Brian

    2016-01-01

    skills and consumes significant effort in product development. Therefore initiating reuse from the analysis and elicitation of requirements from standards and regulations may provide promising potential for gaining efficiency in development and also for assuring sufficient quality of the work...

  5. Developing a Predictive for Unscheduled Maintenance Requirements on United States Air Force Installations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kovich, Matthew D; Norton, J. D

    2008-01-01

    .... This paper develops one such method by using linear regression and time series analysis to develop a predictive model to forecast future year man-hour and funding requirements for unscheduled maintenance...

  6. Developing a Predictive Model for Unscheduled Maintenance Requirements on United States Air Force Installations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kovich, Matthew D; Norton, J. D

    2008-01-01

    .... This paper develops one such method by using linear regression and time series analysis to develop a predictive model to forecast future year man-hour and funding requirements for unscheduled maintenance...

  7. Delayed action does not always require the ventral stream: a study on a patient with visual form agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Constanze; Schenk, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested that while movements directed at visible targets are processed within the dorsal stream, movements executed after delay rely on the visual representations of the ventral stream (Milner & Goodale, 2006). This interpretation is supported by the observation that a patient with ventral stream damage (D.F.) has trouble performing accurate movements after a delay, but performs normally when the target is visible during movement programming. We tested D.F.'s visuomotor performance in a letter-posting task whilst varying the amount of visual feedback available. Additionally, we also varied whether D.F. received tactile feedback at the end of each trial (posting through a letter box vs posting on a screen) and whether environmental cues were available during the delay period (removing the target only vs suppressing vision completely with shutter glasses). We found that in the absence of environmental cues patient D.F. was unaffected by the introduction of delay and performed as accurately as healthy controls. However, when environmental cues and vision of the moving hand were available during and after the delay period, D.F.'s visuomotor performance was impaired. Thus, while healthy controls benefit from the availability of environmental landmarks and/or visual feedback of the moving hand, such cues seem less beneficial to D.F. Taken together our findings suggest that ventral stream damage does not always impact the ability to make delayed movements but compromises the ability to use environmental landmarks and visual feedback efficiently. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Overview of the development of a biosphere modelling capability for UK DoE (HMIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nancarrow, D.J.; Ashton, J.; Little, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    A programme of research has been funded, since 1982, by the United Kingdom Department of the Environment (Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution, HMIP), to develop a procedure for post-closure radiological assessment of underground disposal facilities for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. It is conventional to regard the disposal system as comprising the engineered barriers of the repository, the geological setting which provides natural barriers to migration, and the surface environment or biosphere. The requirement of a biosphere submodel, therefore, is to provide estimates, for given radionuclide inputs, of the dose or probability distribution function of dose to a maximally exposed individual as a function of time. This paper describes the development of the capability for biosphere modelling for HMIP in the context of the development of other assessment procedures. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Requirements Development Issues for Advanced Life Support Systems: Solid Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levri, Julie A.; Fisher, John W.; Alazraki, Michael P.; Hogan, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Long duration missions pose substantial new challenges for solid waste management in Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems. These possibly include storing large volumes of waste material in a safe manner, rendering wastes stable or sterilized for extended periods of time, and/or processing wastes for recovery of vital resources. This is further complicated because future missions remain ill-defined with respect to waste stream quantity, composition and generation schedule. Without definitive knowledge of this information, development of requirements is hampered. Additionally, even if waste streams were well characterized, other operational and processing needs require clarification (e.g. resource recovery requirements, planetary protection constraints). Therefore, the development of solid waste management (SWM) subsystem requirements for long duration space missions is an inherently uncertain, complex and iterative process. The intent of this paper is to address some of the difficulties in writing requirements for missions that are not completely defined. This paper discusses an approach and motivation for ALS SWM requirements development, the characteristics of effective requirements, and the presence of those characteristics in requirements that are developed for uncertain missions. Associated drivers for life support system technological capability are also presented. A general means of requirements forecasting is discussed, including successive modification of requirements and the need to consider requirements integration among subsystems.

  10. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Tau In Vivo Does Not Require Effector Function and Microglial Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hye Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The spread of tau pathology correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. In vitro, tau antibodies can block cell-to-cell tau spreading. Although mechanisms of anti-tau function in vivo are unknown, effector function might promote microglia-mediated clearance. In this study, we investigated whether antibody effector function is required for targeting tau. We compared efficacy in vivo and in vitro of two versions of the same tau antibody, with and without effector function, measuring tau pathology, neuron health, and microglial function. Both antibodies reduced accumulation of tau pathology in Tau-P301L transgenic mice and protected cultured neurons against extracellular tau-induced toxicity. Only the full-effector antibody enhanced tau uptake in cultured microglia, which promoted release of proinflammatory cytokines. In neuron-microglia co-cultures, only effectorless anti-tau protected neurons, suggesting full-effector tau antibodies can induce indirect toxicity via microglia. We conclude that effector function is not required for efficacy, and effectorless tau antibodies may represent a safer approach to targeting tau.

  11. A holistic water balance of Austria - how does the quantitative proportion of urban water requirements relate to other users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanham, D

    2012-01-01

    Traditional water use statistics only include the blue water withdrawal/consumption of municipalities, industry and irrigated agriculture. When, however, green water use of the agricultural sector is included as well as the virtual water use/water footprint (WF), water use quantity statistics become very different. In common water use statistics, Austria withdraws in total about 2.5 km(3) per year, only 3% of available resources (total discharge 81.4 km(3) = surface and ground water). The total water consumption (0.5 km(3)) is less than 1% of available resources. Urban (municipal) water requirements account for 27% of total withdrawal or 33% of consumption. When agricultural green water use (cropland) is included in statistics, the fraction of municipal water requirements diminishes to 7.6% of total withdrawal and 2.5% of total consumption. If the evapotranspiration of grassland and alpine meadows is also included in agricultural green water use, this fraction decreases to 3.2% and 0.9% respectively. When the WF is assessed as base value for water use in Austria, the municipal water use represents 5.8% of this value. In this globalized world, these traditional water use statistics are no longer recommendable. Only a holistic water balance approach really represents water use statistics.

  12. Report on Performance of Prototype Dynatronix Power Supplies Developed Under a Phase I DOE SBIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Merriman, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prototype power supplies fabricated by Dynatronix, Inc. This project supports the advancement of electroforming capabilities to produce ultra-high purity copper. Ultra-high purity copper is an essential material used for a range of current and future fundamental nuclear physics programs such as the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The Mach 30 power supplies are a new design built to the specifications from the requirements of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with regard to timing, voltage, current output, and the required tolerances. The parameters used in these tests were developed empirically over a number of years based on a combination of thermodynamic and kinetics of the electroplating process. The power supplies were operated in a typical cleanroom environment for the production electroforming at PNNL. The units that were received by PNNL in July, 2010 have performed satisfactorily and have demonstrated short term durability.

  13. DOE goals: Excellence, openness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T.H.

    1989-01-01

    The author feels that the benefit of the experience and programmatic resources it has developed since passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1982 and of the sound and flexible policy framework provided by the amendments, DOE is confident that program objectives can be met on a schedule that balances the needs for technical excellence, institutional openness, and timely acceptance. As the program evolves, DOE will continue to assess how effectively policies are serving program objectives. The need for flexibility in developing a first-of-a-kind system is essential. But flexibility does not alter the need for program stability, which, in turn, requires a commonly shared commitment to realizing the program's goals. This commitment must rest upon a pragmatic understanding of the realities of waste-management system development

  14. Release of the repressive activity of rice DELLA protein SLR1 by gibberellin does not require SLR1 degradation in the gid2 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Hirano, Ko; Hasegawa, Yasuko; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2008-09-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa) DELLA protein SLR1 acts as a repressor of gibberellin (GA) signaling. GA perception by GID1 causes SLR1 protein degradation involving the F-box protein GID2; this triggers GA-associated responses such as shoot elongation and seed germination. In GA-insensitive and GA biosynthesis mutants, SLENDER RICE1 (SLR1) accumulates to high levels, and the severity of dwarfism is usually correlated with the level of SLR1 accumulation. An exception is the GA-insensitive F-box mutant gid2, which shows milder dwarfism than mutants such as gid1 and cps even though it accumulates higher levels of SLR1. The level of SLR1 protein in gid2 was decreased by loss of GID1 function or treatment with a GA biosynthesis inhibitor, and dwarfism was enhanced. Conversely, overproduction of GID1 or treatment with GA(3) increased the SLR1 level in gid2 and reduced dwarfism. These results indicate that derepression of SLR1 repressive activity can be accomplished by GA and GID1 alone and does not require F-box (GID2) function. Evidence for GA signaling without GID2 was also provided by the expression behavior of GA-regulated genes such as GA-20oxidase1, GID1, and SLR1 in the gid2 mutant. Based on these observations, we propose a model for the release of GA suppression that does not require DELLA protein degradation.

  15. Development of a stand-alone microcomputer based DOE contractor generic radiation worker safety course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, D.B.; Gardner, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed Computer Based Training (CBT) materials for radiation and industrial safety. First released for general Fast Flux Test Facility in November, 1984. This course has now been taken by nearly 350 people. Completion times for new personnel average around eight hours. The next project undertaken was construction of a Radiation Worker Safety course generic enough for use by all contractors at the Hanford site. The design process of the Hanford site course indicated that the quantity of ''DOE common material'' may be sufficient to warrant consideration of a larger target population. Specifically, the course will be designed to run on an IBM-PC or compatible computer having 256K RAM, a standard IBM color graphics card or equivalent, a color graphics monitor, and two floppy disk drives or one hard disk. The target student population includes those who routinely work in Radiation Areas, especially crafts people. We are not targeting Health Physics personnel, except, possibly, for introductory training, nor are we directing the course toward ''casual'' or escorted workers

  16. Impact of Requirements Elicitation Processes on Success of Information System Development Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bormane Līga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Requirements articulating user needs and corresponding to enterprise business processes are a key to successful implementation of information system development projects. However, the parties involved in projects frequently are not able to agree on a common development vision and have difficulties expressing their needs. Several industry experts have acknowledged that requirements elicitation is one of the most difficult tasks in development projects. This study investigates the impact of requirements elicitation processes on project outcomes depending on the applied project development methodology.

  17. Bank regulation and financial fragility in developing countries: Does bank structure matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Klomp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using data for 1238 banks located in 94 developing and emerging countries, we explore whether the impact of bank regulation and supervision on banking risk (measured by the banks’ Z-scores depends on bank structure. Our findings suggest that stricter regulation and supervision increases the banks’ Z-scores. Notably capital requirements and supervisory control diminish banking risk. However, the effectiveness of other dimensions of regulation and supervision depends on the organizational structure of banks. Notably activity restrictions reduce risk of large and foreign owned banks, while liquidity restrictions have most effect on the Z-scores of unlisted and commercial banks.

  18. Does the Limpopo River Basin have sufficient water for massive irrigation development in the plains of Mozambique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zaag, Pieter; Juizo, Dinis; Vilanculos, Agostinho; Bolding, Alex; Uiterweer, Nynke Post

    This paper verifies whether the water resources of the transboundary Limpopo River Basin are sufficient for the planned massive irrigation developments in the Mozambique part of this basin, namely 73,000 ha, in addition to existing irrigation (estimated at 9400 ha), and natural growth of common use irrigation (4000 ha). This development includes the expansion of sugar cane production for the production of ethanol as a biofuel. Total additional water requirements may amount to 1.3 × 10 9 m 3/a or more. A simple river basin simulation model was constructed in order to assess different irrigation development scenarios, and at two storage capacities of the existing Massingir dam. Many uncertainties surround current and future water availability in the Lower Limpopo River Basin. Discharge measurements are incomplete and sometimes inconsistent, while upstream developments during the last 25 years have been dramatic and future trends are unknown. In Mozambique it is not precisely known how much water is currently consumed, especially by the many small-scale users of surface and shallow alluvial groundwater. Future impacts of climate change increase existing uncertainties. Model simulations indicate that the Limpopo River does not carry sufficient water for all planned irrigation. A maximum of approx. 58,000 ha of irrigated agriculture can be sustained in the Mozambican part of the basin. This figure assumes that Massingir will be operated at increased reservoir capacity, and implies that only about 44,000 ha of new irrigation can be developed, which is 60% of the envisaged developments. Any additional water use would certainly impact downstream users and thus create tensions. Some time will elapse before 44,000 ha of new irrigated land will have been developed. This time could be used to improve monitoring networks to decrease current uncertainties. Meanwhile the four riparian Limpopo States are preparing a joint river basin study. In this study a methodology could be

  19. Development of the switch requirements and architecture of a safety data communication system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K.I.; Lee, J.K.; Park, H.Y.; Koo, I.S.

    2004-12-01

    In accordance with digitalising the Instrumentation and Control(I and C) systems in the integral reactor, a communication network is required for effective information exchanges between the different equipment, an enhancement of the design flexibility, a simple installation and cost reduction. Generally, a communication network consists of a topology, the protocol, a communication medium, an interconnection device, etc. In this report, the development methods of switch and the architecture of a Safety Data Communication System(SDCS) are investigated and analyzed. In this report, the design requirements for switch are presented, which are the essential requirements to develop the switch in a SDCS of the SMART-P. To establish these requirements, the evaluation and analysis of the design and implementation method of the COTS switches, the architecture of SDCS and the design requirements of a SDCS were performed. At the detail design stage, these requirements will be used for the top-tier requirements, especially the design target and design basis. To develop the detail design requirements in the future, more quantitative and qualitative analyses are required. In the case of selecting the COTS switch and developing the switch, these requirements will also be used for the evaluation guide

  20. Development of the switch requirements and architecture of a safety data communication system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K.I.; Lee, J.K.; Park, H.Y.; Koo, I.S

    2004-12-01

    In accordance with digitalising the Instrumentation and Control(I and C) systems in the integral reactor, a communication network is required for effective information exchanges between the different equipment, an enhancement of the design flexibility, a simple installation and cost reduction. Generally, a communication network consists of a topology, the protocol, a communication medium, an interconnection device, etc. In this report, the development methods of switch and the architecture of a Safety Data Communication System(SDCS) are investigated and analyzed. In this report, the design requirements for switch are presented, which are the essential requirements to develop the switch in a SDCS of the SMART-P. To establish these requirements, the evaluation and analysis of the design and implementation method of the COTS switches, the architecture of SDCS and the design requirements of a SDCS were performed. At the detail design stage, these requirements will be used for the top-tier requirements, especially the design target and design basis. To develop the detail design requirements in the future, more quantitative and qualitative analyses are required. In the case of selecting the COTS switch and developing the switch, these requirements will also be used for the evaluation guide.

  1. Visuospatial bootstrapping: Binding useful visuospatial information during verbal working memory encoding does not require set-shifting executive resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calia, Clara; Darling, Stephen; Havelka, Jelena; Allen, Richard J

    2018-05-01

    Immediate serial recall of digits is better when the digits are shown by highlighting them in a familiar array, such as a phone keypad, compared with presenting them serially in a single location, a pattern referred to as "visuospatial bootstrapping." This pattern implies the establishment of temporary links between verbal and spatial working memory, alongside access to information in long-term memory. However, the role of working memory control processes like those implied by the "Central Executive" in bootstrapping has not been directly investigated. Here, we report a study addressing this issue, focusing on executive processes of attentional shifting. Tasks in which information has to be sequenced are thought to be heavily dependent on shifting. Memory for digits presented in keypads versus single locations was assessed under two secondary task load conditions, one with and one without a sequencing requirement, and hence differing in the degree to which they invoke shifting. Results provided clear evidence that multimodal binding (visuospatial bootstrapping) can operate independently of this form of executive control process.

  2. Transferable site remediation technologies developed by U.S. DOE Office of Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    To provide needed technologies for site remediation, the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology (OST) is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater. The Technology Investment Decision model serves as a framework for technology management in OST. Seven technology maturation stages are used in the model. These stages run from basic research through implementation. The Innovative Technology Summary Reports (ITSRs) provide a technical synopsis of an individual technology that has been developed. An ITSR is prepared for each technology that is successfully demonstrated in the field. The information required to produce an ITSR is collected as the technology matures through the Technology Investment Decision Process. As of July 1996 there have been thirteen ITSRs completed. This paper describes those thirteen technologies

  3. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples

  4. When sustainability of a tourism destination is a requirement: Does the consumer perceive sacrifices in diving experiences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyanna de Lourdes Saraiva do Nascimento

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Consumer behaviour refers to some subjective characteristics of individuals, their cultural principles and living experiences throughout their lives, aspects that awaken the individual’s desire to consume certain products and services and sometimes the tendency to give up some personal and discretionary resources to concretize this consumption, in other words, to make sacrifices. In this present study, the emphasis focuses on the understanding of the way Dutch and Brazilian consumers carry out the sacrifice in diving experiences, while the practice of sustainability is required. Therefore, the aspects that motivated this study are related to the need to explore the sacrifice theme in consumer relations, mainly when associated with products and services where the hedonic experience is felt, as it is through diving. The research is interpretative, considering that it captures objective results from the studied phenomenon, by using semi-structured interviews collected with divers, totalling twenty-three interviews in Brazil and Netherlands. The collected data was analysed according to content analysis. The results pointed out the relationship between sacrifices and sustainability, in diving experiences associated with the abdication of resources such as: recreation, time, comfort and money. Moreover, the predisposition to sacrifice something is directly related to living experiences during the practice of the activity, considering that it awakens positive feelings and generates a strong individual affective commitment. These aspects emphasize the provision of the individuals to follow the rules for sustainability determined by tourist destinations for diving, as well as the desire to explore without destroying, aiming to keep practicing that activity are that location.

  5. 1997 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, P.

    1998-01-01

    Hanford's missions are to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford's environmental management or cleanup mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infra structure, site) for other missions. Hanford's science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford's original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation's defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford's operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The cleanup activity is an immense and challenging undertaking, which includes characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues

  6. 1999 Annual Report on Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress as Required by DOE Order 5400.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEGALL, P.

    2000-01-01

    Hanford's missions are to safely clean-up and manage the site's legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford's environmental management or clean-up mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infrastructure, and site) for other missions. Hanford's science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford's original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation's defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford's operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The clean-up activity is an immense and challenging undertaking. Including characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues

  7. Performance planning and measurement for DOE EM-International Technology Integration Program. A report on a performance measurement development workshop for DOE's environmental management international technology integration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.B.; Reed, J.H.; Wyler, L.D.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the process and results from an effort to develop metrics for program accomplishments for the FY 1997 budget submission of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management International Technology Integration Program (EM-ITI). The four-step process included interviews with key EM-ITI staff, the development of a strawman program logic chart, and all day facilitated workshop with EM-ITI staff during which preliminary performance plans and measures were developed and refined, and a series of follow-on discussions and activities including a cross-organizational project data base. The effort helped EM-ITI to crystallize and develop a unified vision of their future which they can effectively communicate to their own management and their internal and external customers. The effort sets the stage for responding to the Government Performance and Results Act. The metrics developed may be applicable to other international technology integration programs. Metrics were chosen in areas of eight general performance goals for 1997-1998: (1) number of forums provided for the exchange of information, (2) formal agreements signed, (3) new partners identified, (4) customers reached and satisfied, (5, 6) dollars leveraged by EM technology focus area and from foreign research, (7) number of foreign technologies identified for potential use in remediation of DOE sites, and (8) projects advanced through the pipeline

  8. Does bisphenol A induce superfeminization in Marisa cornuarietis? Part II: toxicity test results and requirements for statistical power analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Valery E; Aufderheide, John; Warbritton, Ryan; van der Hoeven, Nelly; Caspers, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    This study presents results of the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on adult egg production, egg hatchability, egg development rates and juvenile growth rates in the freshwater gastropod, Marisa cornuarietis. We observed no adult mortality, substantial inter-snail variability in reproductive output, and no effects of BPA on reproduction during 12 weeks of exposure to 0, 0.1, 1.0, 16, 160 or 640 microg/L BPA. We observed no effects of BPA on egg hatchability or timing of egg hatching. Juveniles showed good growth in the control and all treatments, and there were no significant effects of BPA on this endpoint. Our results do not support previous claims of enhanced reproduction in Marisa cornuarietis in response to exposure to BPA. Statistical power analysis indicated high levels of inter-snail variability in the measured endpoints and highlighted the need for sufficient replication when testing treatment effects on reproduction in M. cornuarietis with adequate power.

  9. 23 CFR 636.119 - How does this part apply to a project developed under a public-private partnership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... public-private partnership? 636.119 Section 636.119 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... does this part apply to a project developed under a public-private partnership? (a) In order for a... Federal-aid procurement procedures will depend on the nature of the public-private agreement. (1) If the...

  10. SNF project's MCO compliance assessment with DOE ''general design criteria,'' order 6430.1A and ''SNF project MCO additional NRC requirements,'' HNF-SD-SNF-DB-005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GOLDMANN, L.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document is presented to demonstrate the MCOs compliance to the major design criteria invoked on the MCO. This document is broken down into a section for the MCO's evaluation against DOE Order 6430.1A General Design Criteria sixteen divisions and then the evaluation of the MCO against HNF-SD-SNF-DB-005 ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Multi-Canister Overpack Additional NRC Requirements.'' The compliance assessment is presented as a matrix in tabular form. The MCO is the primary container for the K-basin's spent nuclear fuel as it leaves the basin pools and through to the 40 year interim storage at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The MCO and its components interface with; the K basins, shipping cask and transportation system, Cold Vacuum Drying facility individual process bays and equipment, and CSB facility including the MCO handling machine (MHM), the storage tubes, and the MCO work stations where sampling, welding, and inspection of the MCO is performed. As the MCO is the primary boundary for handling, process, and storage, its main goals are to minimize the spread of its radiological contents to the outside of the MCO and provide for nuclear criticality control. The MCO contains personnel radiation shielding only on its upper end, in the form of a shield plug, where the process interfaces are located. Shielding beyond the shield plug is the responsibility of the using facilities. The design of the MCO and its components is depicted in drawings H-2-828040 through H-2-828075. Not every drawing number in the sequence is used. The first drawing number, H-2-828040, is the drawing index for the MCO. The design performance specification for the MCO is HW-S-0426, and was reviewed and approved by the interfacing design authorities, the safety, regulatory, and operations groups, and the local DOE office. The current revision for the design performance specification is revision 5. The designs of the MCO have been reviewed and approved in a similar way and the reports

  11. 24 CFR 972.124 - Standards for identifying public housing developments subject to required conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... March 16, 2009, the specified vacancy rate is 15 percent. For a conversion analysis performed after that... housing developments subject to required conversion. 972.124 Section 972.124 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONVERSION OF PUBLIC HOUSING TO TENANT-BASED...

  12. A Quantitative Study of Global Software Development Teams, Requirements, and Software Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between global software development teams, effective software requirements, and stakeholders' perception of successful software development projects within the field of information technology management. It examined the critical relationship between Global Software Development (GSD) teams creating effective…

  13. Weapon System Requirements: Detailed Systems Engineering Prior to Product Development Positions Programs for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    modified, replaced, or sustained by consumers or different manufacturers in addition to the manufacturer that developed the system. It also allows...WEAPON SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS Detailed Systems Engineering Prior to Product Development Positions Programs for Success...Engineering Prior to Product Development Positions Programs for Success Why GAO Did This Study Cost and schedule growth in DOD major defense

  14. Evolution of facility layout requirements and CAD [computer-aided design] system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.

    1990-06-01

    The overall configuration of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) including the infrastructure and land boundary requirements were developed using a computer-aided design (CAD) system. The evolution of the facility layout requirements and the use of the CAD system are discussed. The emphasis has been on minimizing the amount of input required and maximizing the speed by which the output may be obtained. The computer system used to store the data is also described

  15. Development of functional requirements for electronic health communication: preliminary results from the ELIN project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Tom; Grimsmo, Anders

    2005-01-01

    User participation is important for developing a functional requirements specification for electronic communication. General practitioners and practising specialists, however, often work in small practices without the resources to develop and present their requirements. It was necessary to find a method that could engage practising doctors in order to promote their needs related to electronic communication. Qualitative research methods were used, starting a process to develop and study documents and collect data from meetings in project groups. Triangulation was used, in that the participants were organised into a panel of experts, a user group, a supplier group and an editorial committee. The panel of experts created a list of functional requirements for electronic communication in health care, consisting of 197 requirements, in addition to 67 requirements selected from an existing Norwegian standard for electronic patient records (EPRs). Elimination of paper copies sent in parallel with electronic messages, optimal workflow, a common electronic 'envelope' with directory services for units and end-users, and defined requirements for content with the possibility of decision support were the most important requirements. The results indicate that we have found a method of developing functional requirements which provides valid results both for practising doctors and for suppliers of EPR systems.

  16. An Empirical Assessment of the Impact of Requirements Uncertainty on Development Quality Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aldaijy, Ayad Y

    2004-01-01

    .... The main purpose of this research is to examine the impact of requirements uncertainty and task uncertainty on outcomes in software development projects, limiting the attention to process and product quality...

  17. Analysis of requirements for accelerating the development of geothermal energy resources in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    Various resource data are presented showing that geothermal energy has the potential of satisfying a singificant part of California's increasing energy needs. General factors slowing the development of geothermal energy in California are discussed and required actions to accelerate its progress are presented. Finally, scenarios for developing the most promising prospects in the state directed at timely on-line power are given. Specific actions required to realize each of these individual scenarios are identified.

  18. Defining project scenarios for the agile requirements engineering product-line development questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Kunwu; Lempert, Meli; Tang, Yan; Tian, Kun; Cooper, Kendra M.L.; Franch Gutiérrez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Current agile methods are focused on practices of small, rapid developing and iteration, more people oriented, less documentation projects, and the use of the methods in large, product line projects are somehow difficult. UTD and GESSI have started a project to develop an expert system that can assist a requirements enginer in selecting a requirements engineering process that is well suited for their project, in particular with respect to the use of agile and product line engineering methods....

  19. Developing a survey to collect expertise in agile product line requirements engineering processes

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Kunwu; Lempert, Meli; Tang, Yan; Tian, Kun; Cooper, Kendra M.L.; Franch Gutiérrez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Current agile methods are focused on practices of small, rapid developing and iteration, more people oriented, less documentation projects, and the use of the methods in large, product line projects are somehow difficult. UTD and GESSI have started a project to develop an expert system that can assist a requirements enginer in selecting a requirements engineering process that is well suited for their project, in particular with respect to the use of agile and product line engineering methods....

  20. Development of requirements tracking and verification system for the software design of distributed control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chul Hwan; Kim, Jang Yeol; Kim, Jung Tack; Lee, Jang Soo; Ham, Chang Shik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    In this paper a prototype of Requirement Tracking and Verification System(RTVS) for a Distributed Control System was implemented and tested. The RTVS is a software design and verification tool. The main functions required by the RTVS are managing, tracking and verification of the software requirements listed in the documentation of the DCS. The analysis of DCS software design procedures and interfaces with documents were performed to define the user of the RTVS, and the design requirements for RTVS were developed. 4 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  1. Design requirements and development of an airborne descent path definition algorithm for time navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, K. H.; Thompson, J. L.; Groce, J. L.; Schwab, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The design requirements for a 4D path definition algorithm are described. These requirements were developed for the NASA ATOPS as an extension of the Local Flow Management/Profile Descent algorithm. They specify the processing flow, functional and data architectures, and system input requirements, and recommended the addition of a broad path revision (reinitialization) function capability. The document also summarizes algorithm design enhancements and the implementation status of the algorithm on an in-house PDP-11/70 computer. Finally, the requirements for the pilot-computer interfaces, the lateral path processor, and guidance and steering function are described.

  2. Development of requirements tracking and verification system for the software design of distributed control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chul Hwan; Kim, Jang Yeol; Kim, Jung Tack; Lee, Jang Soo; Ham, Chang Shik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In this paper a prototype of Requirement Tracking and Verification System(RTVS) for a Distributed Control System was implemented and tested. The RTVS is a software design and verification tool. The main functions required by the RTVS are managing, tracking and verification of the software requirements listed in the documentation of the DCS. The analysis of DCS software design procedures and interfaces with documents were performed to define the user of the RTVS, and the design requirements for RTVS were developed. 4 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  3. Development of Regulatory Technical Requirements for the Advanced Integral Type Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the current status of the study on the development of regulatory technical requirements for the licensing review of an advanced integral type research reactor of which the license application is expected in a few years. According to the Atomic Energy Act of Korea, both research and education reactors are subject to the technical requirements for power reactors in the licensing review. But, some of the requirements may not be applicable or insufficient for the licensing reviews of reactors with unique design features. Thus it is necessary to identify which review topics or areas can not be addressed by the existing requirements and to develop the required ones newly or supplement appropriately. Through the study performed so far, it has been identified that the following requirements need to be developed newly for the licensing review of SMART-P: the use of proven technology, the interfacial facility, the non-safety systems, and the metallic fuels. The approach and basis for the development of each of the requirements are discussed. (authors)

  4. UNDERSTANDING THAI CULTURE AND ITS IMPACT ON REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING PROCESS MANAGEMENT DURING INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerasak Thanasankit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of Thai culture on managing the decision making process in requirements engineering and contribution a better understand of its influence on the management of requirements engineering process. The paper illustrates the interaction of technology and culture and shows that rather than technology changing culture, culture can change the way technology is used. Thai culture is naturally inherent in Thai daily life and Thais bring that into their work practices. The concepts of power and uncertainty in Thai culture contribute toward hierarchical forms of communication and decision making process in Thailand, especially during requirements engineering, where information systems requirements need to be established for further development. The research shows that the decision making process in Thailand tends to take a much longer time, as every stage during requirements engineering needs to be reported to management for final decisions. The tall structure of Thai organisations also contributes to a bureaucratic, elongated decision-making process during information systems development. Understanding the influence of Thai culture on requirements engineering and information systems development will assist multinational information systems consulting organisations to select, adapt, better manage, or change requirements engineering process and information systems developments methodologies to work best with Thai organisations.

  5. AFCOMS (Air Force Commissary Service): Does this SOA Need an Executive Development Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    ll)NALHuKAU U STADARS 19,l liii I0 󈧽 AAfR WAR COLLG RESEARCH REPORT LZ? e lNo. AU-AWC-35-011 - N4 AFCOMS: DOES THIS SQA NEED AN EXECUTIVE cm...high incidence of safety and physical security violations. Serious deficiencies existed in the financial management area. Accounting errors were not

  6. Developing Mentoring Competency: Does a One Session Training Workshop Have Impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chloe; Ford, Jennifer; Van Lieshout, Ryan J; Saperson, Karen; McConnell, Meghan; McCabe, Randi

    2016-06-01

    Mentorship remains vital to the career development, research productivity, and professional advancement of healthcare professionals in all disciplines of academic medicine. Recent studies describe mentor training initiatives aimed at increasing mentoring competency through multisession training curricula. Although the published results of these programs are promising, they require the following: (1) substantial financial resources from the institution, and (2) continuous participation and time commitment from faculty, which may reduce participation and effectiveness. A single, half-day of evidence-based mentor training would represent a more cost-effective and accessible option for educating mentors. The present study investigates the impact of a half-day interactive mentor training workshop on mentoring competency in faculty, staff, and trainees of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University. Overall, participants' self-reported mentoring competency mean scores were significantly higher post-workshop compared to pre-workshop ratings [mean = 4.48 vs. 5.02 pre- and post-workshop, respectively; F(1, 31) = 18.386, P < 0.001, η p2 = 0.37]. Survey respondents gave positive feedback and reported greater understanding of mentorship and specific mentoring changes they planned to apply after attending the workshop. Academic and healthcare institutions may use this framework to guide the development of a half-day mentoring workshop into their education programs.

  7. Developing the (ASTM) voluntary consensus standards required to help implement the National Energy Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The recommended guide is the first American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) matrix in a family of such documents that combined, will help manage the development of the ASTM standards considered necessary to implement the current National Plan for Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration. It is expected that the guide will provide a framework for standards development to complement the nation's research and development in support of critical energy needs. The recommended guide identifies the energy-critical areas that are to be developed, the master ASTM recommended guide for developing the standards required to help the National Plan, the section in which each energy-critical area is covered, and the suggested ASTM lead committee responsible for each area (fossil, solar, geothermal, conservation, fusion, and fission reactor development). A comprehensive matrix to identify the areas of need for which ASTM standards will be required to help implement the National Energy Plan is also presented

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  9. Does local government have capacity for enabling local economic development? Lessons from Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eris D Schoburgh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of the Caribbean Local Economic Development Project (CARILED1began in 2012 in seven countries for a duration of six years, to support sustainable economic growth in the region. CARILED has introduced the idea of local economic development (LED to the ‘development’ debate in the region but has also brought the organisational capacity of local government, and local government’s role as ‘facilitator’ of LED,to the fore. This paper assesses organizational behaviour and capability in local government in Jamaica to determine the state of readiness for a developmental role. The paper draws on two sets of research data to aid its analysis–a capacity audit (CAPAUD conducted in 2010 and an organisational analysis (OAcommissioned by the Ministry of Local Government in 2010, both of which targeted a sample of local authorities in Jamaica. The study found that when assessed against established criteria for an LED organisation, ie: research and information provision; marketing and coordination; learning and innovation; and leadership - local government’s institutional and organisational capacity for development is unevenly distributed. For instance, local leaders understood organisational purpose but efforts to give effect to this appeared undeveloped, sporadic and uni-directional. It was also evident that participatory strategies are used to gain information from communities but these were often devoid of systematic research methodologies rendering formal community impact on local planning negligent. Finally there is strong potential for the kind of administrative leadership required by a developmental local government to evolve,indicated by the quality of training, quantum of managerial/supervisory staff, and stability of staff establishment. However, this potential is threatened by the deficiencies in the non-traditional functional areas that are strategic to the organisation’s effectiveness as a ‘facilitator’ of LED, ie

  10. A Proposal to Elicit Usability Requirements within a Model-Driven Development Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isela Ormeno, Y; Panach, I; Condori-Fernandez, O.N.; Pastor, O.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays there are sound Model-Driven Development (MDD) methods that deal with functional requirements, but in general, usability is not considered from the early stages of the development. Analysts that work with MDD implement usability features manually once the code has been generated. This

  11. U.S. DOE Progress Towards Developing Low-Cost, High Performance, Durable Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchins, Cassidy; Kleen, Greg J; Spendelow, Jacob S; Kopasz, John; Peterson, David; Garland, Nancy L; Ho, Donna Lee; Marcinkoski, Jason; Martin, Kathi Epping; Tyler, Reginald; Papageorgopoulos, Dimitrios C

    2012-12-18

    Low cost, durable, and selective membranes with high ionic conductivity are a priority need for wide-spread adoption of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Electrolyte membranes are a major cost component of PEMFC stacks at low production volumes. PEMFC membranes also impose limitations on fuel cell system operating conditions that add system complexity and cost. Reactant gas and fuel permeation through the membrane leads to decreased fuel cell performance, loss of efficiency, and reduced durability in both PEMFCs and DMFCs. To address these challenges, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program, in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, supports research and development aimed at improving ion exchange membranes for fuel cells. For PEMFCs, efforts are primarily focused on developing materials for higher temperature operation (up to 120 °C) in automotive applications. For DMFCs, efforts are focused on developing membranes with reduced methanol permeability. In this paper, the recently revised DOE membrane targets, strategies, and highlights of DOE-funded projects to develop new, inexpensive membranes that have good performance in hot and dry conditions (PEMFC) and that reduce methanol crossover (DMFC) will be discussed.

  12. U.S. DOE Progress Towards Developing Low-Cost, High Performance, Durable Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios C. Papageorgopoulos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low cost, durable, and selective membranes with high ionic conductivity are a priority need for wide-spread adoption of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. Electrolyte membranes are a major cost component of PEMFC stacks at low production volumes. PEMFC membranes also impose limitations on fuel cell system operating conditions that add system complexity and cost. Reactant gas and fuel permeation through the membrane leads to decreased fuel cell performance, loss of efficiency, and reduced durability in both PEMFCs and DMFCs. To address these challenges, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program, in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, supports research and development aimed at improving ion exchange membranes for fuel cells. For PEMFCs, efforts are primarily focused on developing materials for higher temperature operation (up to 120 °C in automotive applications. For DMFCs, efforts are focused on developing membranes with reduced methanol permeability. In this paper, the recently revised DOE membrane targets, strategies, and highlights of DOE-funded projects to develop new, inexpensive membranes that have good performance in hot and dry conditions (PEMFC and that reduce methanol crossover (DMFC will be discussed.

  13. A Scenario-Based Process for Requirements Development: Application to Mission Operations Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Duane L.; Boyles, Carole A.

    2008-01-01

    The notion of using operational scenarios as part of requirements development during mission formulation (Phases A & B) is widely accepted as good system engineering practice. In the context of developing a Mission Operations System (MOS), there are numerous practical challenges to translating that notion into the cost-effective development of a useful set of requirements. These challenges can include such issues as a lack of Project-level focus on operations issues, insufficient or improper flowdown of requirements, flowdown of immature or poor-quality requirements from Project level, and MOS resource constraints (personnel expertise and/or dollars). System engineering theory must be translated into a practice that provides enough structure and standards to serve as guidance, but that retains sufficient flexibility to be tailored to the needs and constraints of a particular MOS or Project. We describe a detailed, scenario-based process for requirements development. Identifying a set of attributes for high quality requirements, we show how the portions of the process address many of those attributes. We also find that the basic process steps are robust, and can be effective even in challenging Project environments.

  14. DOE ZERH Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with PV, with 2x4 16: on center walls with R-13.5 dense packed cellulose and 1.5” polyiso rigid; basement with 2.5: polyiso on interior; unvented attic with R-48 ocsf under roof deck; ERV tied to wall hung boiler with hydro coil.

  15. How Does Corruption in Developing Countries Affect Corporate Investment and Tax Compliance?

    OpenAIRE

    Riedel, Nadine; Fuest, Clemens; Maffini, Giorgia

    2010-01-01

    Using a rich panel data base for firms in Asian countries, we assess the effect of public sector corruption on corporate assets investment and tax payments. Our findings suggest that public sector corruption does not deter investment activities of national firms while asset investment of multinational corporations is significantly reduced in corrupt environments. Moreover, the findings indicate that corruption exerts a quantitatively large negative effect on corporate tax payments, especially...

  16. Observations concerning a new DOE Civilian Reactor Development Program derived from the NPOVS task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Options Viability Study (NPOVS) addressed many issues which relate to a DOE program plan. The study, by design, did not compare reactor types; however, it provides extensive background which can be drawn upon for the purposes of planning a new program. The discussion and recommendations of this paper draw heavily on NPOVS but are not constrained to the NPOVS time frame or to its emphasis on passive safety

  17. Opportunities for scientists to influence policy: When does radiation metrology matter in development of national policy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coursey, Bert M.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate measurements of radiation and radioactivity rarely rise to the level of national policy. The things that matter most to ordinary citizens do not normally include questions of science and technology. Citizens are more often concerned with issues close to home relating to commerce, health, safety, security and the environment. When questions of confidence in measurements arise, they are first directed to the ministry that has responsibilities in that area. When the required uncertainty in field measurements challenges the capability of the regulatory authorities, the National Metrology Institute may be asked to develop transfer standards to enhance the capabilities of the ministry with the mission lead. In this paper, we will consider eight instances over the past nine decades in which questions in radiation and radionuclide metrology in the US did rise to the level that they influenced decisions on national policy. These eight examples share some common threads. Radioactivity and ionizing radiation are useful tools in many disciplines, but can often represent potential or perceived threats to health and public safety. When unforeseen applications of radiation arise, or when environmental radioactivity from natural and man-made sources presents a possible health hazard, the radiation metrologists may be called upon to provide the technical underpinning for policy development. - Highlights: • We review instances in which accurate measurements of radiation influence policy. • Heads of state rely on senior science advisors to frame policy decisions. • Metrologists support federal agencies that have mission leads in different fields. • Metrologists are called on when other agencies lack requisite expertise. • Radionuclide metrologists must recognize and accept challenges

  18. Using GIS to develop socio-economic profiles of areas adjacent to DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.C.; Saraswatula, S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the research addressed in this paper is to identify and analyze the offsite effects of DOE activities at the Savannah River Site. The paper presents the socio-economic conditions of the areas surrounding the site in order to evaluate the possible effects of DOE activities. The study employed a geographic information system (GIS) in order to evaluate spatial relationships between otherwise unrelated factors. Socio-economic data used in the study are publicly available and were obtained mainly from the Bureau of the Census. The Department of Energy (DOE), currently dealing with the environmental management of a large number of sites throughout the United States, must consider the effects of its activities on surrounding populations and ensure compliance with the various federal regulations, such as the executive order on environmental justice. Environmental justice is the process of studying and achieving equal distribution of the effects of environmental pollution on populations across social and economic lines. An executive order signed by the President has directed federal agencies, including the Department of Energy, to make achieving environmental justice a part of the agency's mission by identifying and addressing disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of its programs, policies, and activities on minority and low-income populations

  19. Transforming Functional Requirements from UML into BPEL to Efficiently Develop SOA-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Anisha; Subramanian, Nary

    The intended behavior of any system such as services, tasks or functions can be captured by functional requirements of the system. As our dependence on online services has grown steadily, the web applications are being developed employing the SOA. BPEL4WS provides a means for expressing functional requirements of an SOA-based system by providing constructs to capture business goals and objectives for the system. In this paper we propose an approach for transforming user-centered requirements captured using UML into a corresponding BPEL specification, where the business processes are captured by means of use-cases from which UML sequence diagrams and activity diagrams are extracted. Subsequently these UML models are mapped to BPEL specifications that capture the essence of the initial business requirements to develop the SOA-based system by employing CASE tools. A student housing system is used as a case study to illustrate this approach and the system is validated using NetBeans.

  20. The Use of Cognitive Maps for Requirements Elicitation in Product Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Dias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches Engineering Requirements concepts and proposes the use of cognitive maps as support to the problem identification of the stakeholders during the requirements elicitation process. It presents a case study of the aerospace cluster of São José dos Campos, State of São Paulo. The cognitive map technique was developed to represent the views of the individuals, generating cognitive maps, which, in an aggregated way, express graphically the collective vision to support the decision-making process. Applied to Engineering Requirements, it has revealed the potential to promote the convergence of different points of view on the actual stakeholders’ needs in innovative fashion. This technique has demonstrated effectiveness when approaching the stated requirements early in the development process implemented throughout the life cycle of the system/product.

  1. Structuring requirements as necessary premise for customer-oriented development of complex products: A generic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Klute

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Complex products like for example intra-logistical facilities make high demands on developers and producers and involve high investment and operating costs. When planning and developing and also making buying decisions the facility utilization and the thus ensuing requirements on the facility and its components are inadequately considered to date. Nevertheless, with regard to customer-directed product design, these requirements must all be taken into account – especially as they can contribute to possible savings. In this context, it is necessary to survey and systematically regard requirements from a large number of areas like for example the operator, the facility producer and also requirements of external parties such as the law and to implement into adequate product characteristics to produce customer-oriented products. This is, however, a difficult task because of the diversity of stakeholders involved and their numerous and often divergent requirements. Therefore, it is essential to structure the requirements, so that planners and developers are able to manage the large amount of information. Structure models can be used in this context to cluster requirements. Within the German Collaborative Research Centre 696 a 10-dimensional model has been developed. This model allows structuring of all requirements on intra-logistical facilities or respectively complex products in general. In the context of dealing with hundreds of data records, structuring requirements is mandatory to achieve accuracy, clarity and consequently satisfactory results when transforming requirements into product characteristics which fit customer needs. In the paper an excerpt of this model is presented. Design/methodology/approach: In literature a multitude of methods which deal with the topic of structuring exist. The methods have been analysed regarding their purpose and their level of specification, i.e. the number of differentiated categories, to check if

  2. Traceability and communication of requirements in digital and I and C systems development - Project report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, T.; Frederiksen, R.; Thunem, A.P.J.; Holmberg, J.E.; Valkonen, J.; Ventae, O.

    2004-03-01

    The overall objective of the TACO project is to improve the knowledge on principles and best practices related to the issues concretised in the preproject. On basis of experiences in the Nordic countries, the project aims at identifying the best practices and most important criteria for ensuring effective communication in relation to requirements elicitation and analysis, understandability of requirements to all parties, and traceability of requirements through the different design phases. It is expected that the project will provide important input to the development of guidelines and establishment of recommended practices related to these activities. In the year 2003, the TACO-project concentrated on four central issues: 1) Representation of requirements origins. 2) Traceability techniques. 3) Configuration management and the traceability of requirements. 4) Identification and categorisation of system aspects and their models The work was presented at the first TACO Industrial Seminar, which took place in Stockholm on the 12th of December 2003. The seminar was hosted by SKI. (au)

  3. Development of High-Level Safety Requirements for a Pyroprocessing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Jun; Jo, Woo Jin; You, Gil Sung; Choung, Won Myung; Lee, Ho Hee; Kim, Hyun Min; Jeon, Hong Rae; Ku, Jeong Hoe; Lee, Hyo Jik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a pyroproceesing technology to reduce the waste volume and recycle some elements. The pyroprocessing includes several treatment processes which are related with not only radiological and physical but also chemical and electrochemical properties. Thus, it is of importance to establish safety design requirements considering all the aspects of those properties for a reliable pyroprocessing facility. In this study, high-level requirements are presented in terms of not only radiation protection, nuclear criticality, fire protection, and seismic safety but also confinement and chemical safety for the unique characteristics of a pyroprocessing facility. Several high-level safety design requirements such as radiation protection, nuclear criticality, fire protection, seismic, confinement, and chemical processing were presented for a pyroprocessing facility. The requirements must fulfill domestic and international safety technology standards for a nuclear facility. Furthermore, additional requirements should be considered for the unique electrochemical treatments in a pyroprocessing facility.

  4. Development of procedural requirements for life extension of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Son, Moon Kyu [Korea Association for Nuclear Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Cheol Hun [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Keun Sun [Sunmoon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Won Phil [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Ji Hwan [Baekseok College Cultural Studies, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    Current status of regulatory aspects of life extension and upgrading of NPPs is reviewed for major foreign countries. Most countries require similar technical requirements; however, procedural aspects differ country by country. Regulatory systems suitable for NPP life extension is investigated. The procedure and requirements for reassessment of design life should be established first; then it can be incorporated into the PSR system. The concept of 'Current Licensing Basis (CLB)' can be adopted in Korea, but further elaboration for terms and definitions is needed for common understanding between interested groups. The procedure for maintenance and backfitting should also be improved. The Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) that require development of regulatory requirements for life extension are identified based on extensive analysis of foreign experiences. By analyzing the rules and regulations related to life extension. Basic directions are suggested to harmonize or establish regulatory systems for life extension, two-step licensing, PSR, and backfitting.

  5. Development of utility generic functional requirements for electronic work packages and computer-based procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Nuclear Electronic Work Packages - Enterprise Requirements (NEWPER) initiative is a step toward a vision of implementing an eWP framework that includes many types of eWPs. This will enable immediate paper-related cost savings in work management and provide a path to future labor efficiency gains through enhanced integration and process improvement in support of the Nuclear Promise (Nuclear Energy Institute 2016). The NEWPER initiative was organized by the Nuclear Information Technology Strategic Leadership (NITSL) group, which is an organization that brings together leaders from the nuclear utility industry and regulatory agencies to address issues involved with information technology used in nuclear-power utilities. NITSL strives to maintain awareness of industry information technology-related initiatives and events and communicates those events to its membership. NITSL and LWRS Program researchers have been coordinating activities, including joint organization of NEWPER-related meetings and report development. The main goal of the NEWPER initiative was to develop a set of utility generic functional requirements for eWP systems. This set of requirements will support each utility in their process of identifying plant-specific functional and non-functional requirements. The NEWPER initiative has 140 members where the largest group of members consists of 19 commercial U.S. nuclear utilities and eleven of the most prominent vendors of eWP solutions. Through the NEWPER initiative two sets of functional requirements were developed; functional requirements for electronic work packages and functional requirements for computer-based procedures. This paper will describe the development process as well as a summary of the requirements.

  6. Reframing the HIV/AIDS debate in developing countries IV: does ethics have anything to offer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, J

    2004-01-01

    Dealing with HIV/AIDS is one of the major ethical challenges facing the world today. It is suggested that an expanded discourse on ethics, divided into three levels, can help give a fuller understanding of all aspects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The levels are: (1) micro level (doctor-patient relationship); (2) meso level (civic and public health ethics); and (3) macro level (ethics of international relationships). At the micro level, the four principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice apply to HIV patients, as to any other. However, the overwhelming demand for medical care, and the lack of doctor availability in developing countries seriously limits their application. At the meso level, the Tavistock principles give a framework for health systems. The principles are: rights to health and health care; balancing resources among competing needs; comprehensiveness; cooperation among patients, clinicians and managers; focus on improvement, safety and openness. In this context, rights are respected by not discriminating on the basis of sex, geography, tribe or race. A balance has to be struck between treatment and prevention. Comprehensiveness means not ignoring palliative care and health improvement strategies. Cooperation requires 'the reciprocity and interdependence that characterise community'. The remaining principles are self-explanatory, but frequently ignored in health planning. At a macro level, there is a need for ethical discourse about issues like increasing inequality between rich and poor countries; the use of economic levers by developed countries to the disadvantage of developing countries; the international debt crisis; the tiny health care spend (US5-10 dollars per capita per annum) in Africa; and other problems like refugee and migrant labour movements. These factors fuel global instability and the HIV/AIDS pandemic, as well as contributing to the threat of terrorism and environmental degradation. We need to look at how

  7. Account of requirements for modernization in VPBER-600 enhanced safety reactor instrumentation and control system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shashkin, S.L.; Pobedonostsev, A.B.; Drumov, V.V.; Chudin, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) with VPBER-600 reactor is a station of new generation. The specified term of reactor plant operation is 60 years and taking into account that the proposed term of starting the first power unit is on the turn of centuries one can definitely state that for Russia conditions VPBER-600 is a plant of 21 century. Such far removed term for NPP now in the stage of development as it can seem does not put the problems of modernization as first order tasks. But open-quotes...who does not think about future lives in the past.close quotes It is that the NPP instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems are in the most degree subjected to the influence of factors which favor their modifications. These factors can be arbitrarily divided into two groups: (1) inner factors, i.e. changes (failures, aging, etc) in I ampersand C components as well as changes dictated by technological reasons (change of equipment composition, control algorithms, operation modes); (2) outer factors, i.e. intensive development of information technologies and rapid improvement of electronic components. This presentation addresses the problem of modernization of the safety instrumentation for this next generation facility, and the research effort it will entail. The system is designed to allow for modernization, and the relatively easy adoption of new instrumentation and technology as it becomes available

  8. Development of regulatory requirements/guides for desalination unit coupled with nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik

    2005-10-01

    The basic design of System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART), a small-to-medium sized integral type pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capacity of 330MWth, has been developed in Korea. In order to demonstrate the safety and performance of the SMART design, 'Development Project of SMART-P (SMART-Pilot Plant)' has been being performed as one of the 'National Mid and Long-term Atomic Energy R and D Programs', which includes design, construction, and start-up operation of the SMART-P with the capacity of 65MWth, a 1/5 scaled-down design of the SMART. At the same time, a study on the development of regulatory requirements/guides for the desalination unit coupled with nuclear plant has been carried out by KINS in order to prepare for the forthcoming SMART-P licensing. The results of this study performed from August of 2002 to October of 2005 can be summarized as follows: (1) The general status of desalination technologies has been survey. (2) The design of the desalination plant coupled with the SMART-P has been investigated. (3) The regulatory requirements/guides relevant to a desalination unit coupled with a nuclear plant have been surveyed. (4) A direction on the development of domestic regulatory requirements/guides for a desalination unit has been established. (5) A draft of regulatory requirements/guides for a desalination unit has been developed. (6) Expert technical reviews have been performed for the draft regulatory requirements/guides for a desalination unit. The draft regulatory requirements/guides developed in this study will be finalized and can be applied directly to the licensing of the SMART-P and SMART. Furthermore, it will be also applied to the licensing of the desalination unit coupled with the nuclear plant

  9. Does application of the Rosiwal principle to lunar soils require that concentrations of solar-wind-implanted species be grain-size independent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    A reconsideration of the application of the Rosiwal Principle to lunar soils indicates a flaw in arguments put forth previously by Criswell. Specifically, by introducing a boundary condition which must exist at the lunar surface, it is shown that concentrations of solar-wind-implanted species showing a dependence on grain size may be able to develop in soils at concentration levels below those required for saturation of grain surfaces. As a result, observed grain-size-dependent concentrations of solar-wind species in lunar soils do not necessarily require the exposure time scales or solar-wind fluxes deduced from the arguments of Criswell. (Auth.)

  10. Development of CSA N1600-14: general requirements for nuclear emergency management programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellar, C. [Canadian Standards Association Group, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Coles, J. [Ontario Power Generation, Darlington, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    CSA Group has published a new standard on General requirements for nuclear emergency management programs (CSA N1600-14). The standard establishes criteria for the emergency management programs of on- and off-site organizations to address nuclear emergencies at Canadian nuclear power plants (NPPs). It provides the requirements to develop, implement, evaluate, maintain, and continuously improve a nuclear emergency management program for prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery from a nuclear emergency at a NPP. This paper discusses the development of the standard, and provides the key drivers, structure, scope, and outline of the standard, while highlighting key features, impacts, and benefits. (author)

  11. Planning required in the development of radiation protection guidance for underground engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, R H [U.S. Public Health Service, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The potential variety of engineering applications from the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosives indicates an increased need for applicable radiation protection guidance to protect the public health of potentially exposed populations. To insure the orderly development of such uses, additional operational data as well as bioeffects data will be required to develop appropriate criteria and guidance to inform health officials and the public of the significance of possible exposures. The required planning includes an evaluation of the potential benefits and risks as well as the size and age of population, multiplicity of sources, likely and unlikely future uses, and the total environmental impact. (author)

  12. Planning required in the development of radiation protection guidance for underground engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.

    1969-01-01

    The potential variety of engineering applications from the peaceful uses of underground nuclear explosives indicates an increased need for applicable radiation protection guidance to protect the public health of potentially exposed populations. To insure the orderly development of such uses, additional operational data as well as bioeffects data will be required to develop appropriate criteria and guidance to inform health officials and the public of the significance of possible exposures. The required planning includes an evaluation of the potential benefits and risks as well as the size and age of population, multiplicity of sources, likely and unlikely future uses, and the total environmental impact. (author)

  13. Development of subcontractor indirect cost and other direct cost at the DOE Fernald Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossman, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) took great strides in the development of cost estimates at Fernald. There have been many opportunities to improve on how the policies and procedures pertaining to cost estimates were to be implemented. As FERMCO took over the existing Fernald facility, the Project Controls Division began to format the estimating procedures and tools to do business at Fernald. The Estimating Department looked at the problems that pre-existed at the site. One of the key problems that FERMCO encountered was how to summarized the direct and indirect accounts of each subcontracted estimate. Direct costs were broken down by prime and sub-prime accounts. This presented a level of detail that had not been experienced at the site before; it also created many issues concerning accounts and definitions to be applied to ''all other accounts associated with a project.'' Existing subcontract indirect cost accounts were reviewed from existing historical estimates. It was found that some were very detailed and some were not. The Estimating Department was given the task of standardizing the accounts and percentages for each of the subcontractor indirect costs. Then, as the project progressed, the percentages could be revised with actual estimates, subcontract comparisons, or with level of effort (LOE) accounts, which would represent qualified people assigned a task for the completion of each project. The approach is to assign particular employees to perform a specific task within a project from start to finish, and then to reassign the individual(s) to a new project (if it was available) integrating the expertise available with the skills required by the other operable units

  14. Modifications to LLNL Plutonium Packaging Systems (PuPS) to achieve ASME VIII UW-13.2(d) Requirements for the DOE Standard 3013-00 Outer Can Weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, D; Dodson, K

    2001-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Packaging System (PuPS) prepares packages to meet the DOE Standard 3013 (Reference 1). The PuPS equipment was supplied by the British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL). The DOE Standard 3013 requires that the welding of the Outer Can meets ASME Section VIII Division 1 (Reference 2). ASME Section VIII references to ASME Section IX (Reference 3) for most of the welding requirements, but UW-13.2 (d) of Section VIII requires a certain depth and width of the weld. In this document the UW-13.2(d) requirement is described as the (a+b)/2t s ratio. This ratio has to be greater than or equal to one to meet the requirements of UW-13.2(d). The Outer Can welds had not been meeting this requirement. Three methods are being followed to resolve this issue: (1) Modify the welding parameters to achieve the requirement, (2) Submit a weld case to ASME that changes the UW-13.2(d) requirement for their review and approval, and (3) Change the requirements in the DOE-STD-3013. Each of these methods are being pursued. This report addresses how the first method was addressed for the LLNL PuPS. The experimental work involved adjusting the Outer Can rotational speed and the power applied to the can. These adjustments resulted in being able to achieve the ASME VIII, UW-13.2(d) requirement

  15. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonal, Digby D.; Marx, Brian M.; Ahn, Sejin; Ruiz, Julio de; Soundararajan, Balaji; Smith, Morgan; Coulson, Wendy

    2005-06-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO3, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair.

  16. Safety Design Approach for the Development of Safety Requirements for Design of Commercial HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Yan, Xing; Sakaba, Nariaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The research committee on “Safety requirements for HTGR design” was established in 2013 under the Atomic Energy Society of Japan to develop the draft safety requirements for the design of commercial High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), which incorporate the HTGR safety features demonstrated using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), lessons learned from the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and requirements for the integration of the hydrogen production plants. The safety design approach for the commercial HTGRs which is a basement of the safety requirements is determined prior to the development of the safety requirements. The safety design approaches for the commercial HTGRs are to confine the radioactive materials within the coated fuel particles not only during normal operation but also during accident conditions, and the integrity of the coated fuel particles and other requiring physical barriers are protected by the inherent and passive safety features. This paper describes the main topics of the research committee, the safety design approaches and the safety functions of the commercial HTGRs determined in the research committee. (author)

  17. Traceability and communication of requirements in digital I and C systems development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivertsen, T.; Fredriksen, Rune; Thunem, A.P.J. [Inst. for Energy Technology, Halden (Norway); Holmberg, J.E.; Valkonen, J.; Ventae, O. [VTT (Finland); Andersson, J.O. [Ringhals AB (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    The overall objective of the TACO project has been to improve the knowledge on principles and best practices related to the traceability and communication of requirements in digital I and C systems development. On the basis of experiences in the Nordic countries, the project has aimed at identifying the best practices and most important criteria for ensuring effective communication in relation to requirements elicitation and analysis, understandability of requirements to all parties, and traceability of requirements through the different design phases. It is expected that the project will provide important input to the development of guidelines and establishment of recommended practices related to these activities. The report provides a summary of the project activities and deliverables, discusses possible application areas, and provides a link to its utilization in the project 'Management of Requirements in NPP Modernization Projects' (NKS-R-2005-47). In the preparation of the final report, a number of application areas have been identified where the TACO deliverables, first of all the TACO Shell and the TACO Traceability Model, can be utilized. The report aims at facilitating such utilization, by defining the context and main issues, explaining the main aspects of the deliverables, discussing the challenges experienced in the different application domains with respect requirements management, traceability and communication and how can the TACO results contribute to solving these challenges. (au)

  18. Traceability and communication of requirements in digital I and C systems development - the TACO project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, Terje; Fredriksen, Rune; Thunem, Atoosa P-J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the issues studied in the TACO project, a current activity partially funded by Nordic nuclear safety research through the NKS-R programme (NKS-R project number NKS R2 002 1 6). For more details, the reader is referred to the two project reports already delivered by the project (see section 9). On basis of experiences in the Nordic countries, the TACO project aims at identifying the best practices and most important criteria for ensuring effective communication in relation to requirements elicitation and analysis, understandability of requirements to all parties, and traceability of requirements through the different design phases. It is expected that the project will provide important input to the development of guidelines and establishment of recommended practices related to these activities. The overall aim of the preproject, which was carried out in the second half of 2002, was to identify the main issues related to traceability and communication of requirements in digital I and C systems development. By focusing on the identification of main issues, the preproject provided a basis for prioritising further work, while at the same time providing some initial recommendations related to these issues. The establishment of a Nordic expert network within the subject was another important result of the preproject. Further work has concentrated on four central and related issues, viz.; Representation of requirements origins; Traceability techniques; Configuration management and the traceability of requirements; Identification and categorisation of system aspects and their models. (Author)

  19. Traceability and communication of requirements in digital I and C systems development. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, T.; Fredriksen, Rune; Thunem, A.P.J.; Holmberg, J.E.; Valkonen, J.; Ventae, O.; Andersson, J.O.

    2005-10-01

    The overall objective of the TACO project has been to improve the knowledge on principles and best practices related to the traceability and communication of requirements in digital I and C systems development. On the basis of experiences in the Nordic countries, the project has aimed at identifying the best practices and most important criteria for ensuring effective communication in relation to requirements elicitation and analysis, understandability of requirements to all parties, and traceability of requirements through the different design phases. It is expected that the project will provide important input to the development of guidelines and establishment of recommended practices related to these activities. The report provides a summary of the project activities and deliverables, discusses possible application areas, and provides a link to its utilization in the project 'Management of Requirements in NPP Modernization Projects' (NKS-R-2005-47). In the preparation of the final report, a number of application areas have been identified where the TACO deliverables, first of all the TACO Shell and the TACO Traceability Model, can be utilized. The report aims at facilitating such utilization, by defining the context and main issues, explaining the main aspects of the deliverables, discussing the challenges experienced in the different application domains with respect requirements management, traceability and communication and how can the TACO results contribute to solving these challenges. (au)

  20. Virtual environment and computer-aided technologies used for system prototyping and requirements development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cory; Maida, James; Goldsby, Michael; Clark, Jim; Wu, Liew; Prenger, Henk

    1993-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom (SSF) Data Management System (DMS) consists of distributed hardware and software which monitor and control the many onboard systems. Virtual environment and off-the-shelf computer technologies can be used at critical points in project development to aid in objectives and requirements development. Geometric models (images) coupled with off-the-shelf hardware and software technologies were used in The Space Station Mockup and Trainer Facility (SSMTF) Crew Operational Assessment Project. Rapid prototyping is shown to be a valuable tool for operational procedure and system hardware and software requirements development. The project objectives, hardware and software technologies used, data gained, current activities, future development and training objectives shall be discussed. The importance of defining prototyping objectives and staying focused while maintaining schedules are discussed along with project pitfalls.

  1. Depletion of rat cortical norepinephrine and the inhibition of [3H]norepinephrine uptake by xylamine does not require monoamine oxidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudley, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of monoamine oxidase A through pretreatment of rats with clorgyline or the pro-drug MDL 72,394 did not block the amine-depleting action of xylamine. Xylamine treatment resulted in a loss of approximately 60% of the control level of norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex. A 1-hr pretreatment, but not a 24-hr pretreatment, with the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, L-deprenyl, prevented the depletion of norepinephrine by xylamine. In addition, pretreatment with MDL 72,974, a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor without amine-releasing or uptake - inhibiting effects, did not prevent cortical norepinephrine levels. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by either MDL 72,974 or MDL 72,394 did not prevent the inhibition of [ 3 H]norepinephrine uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes by xylamine. These data indicate that monoamine oxidase does not mediate the amine-releasing or uptake inhibiting properties of xylamine. The protection afforded by L-deprenyl following a 1-hr pretreatment most probably was due to accumulation of its metabolite, L-amphetamine, which would inhibit the uptake carrier. A functional carrier is required for depletion since desipramine administered 1 hr prior to xylamine, was also able to prevent depletion of norepinephrine

  2. Towards an Automated Requirements-driven Development of Smart Cyber-Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Vinarek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Invariant Refinement Method for Self Adaptation (IRM-SA is a design method targeting development of smart Cyber-Physical Systems (sCPS. It allows for a systematic translation of the system requirements into the system architecture expressed as an ensemble-based component system (EBCS. However, since the requirements are captured using natural language, there exists the danger of their misinterpretation due to natural language requirements' ambiguity, which could eventually lead to design errors. Thus, automation and validation of the design process is desirable. In this paper, we (i analyze the translation process of natural language requirements into the IRM-SA model, (ii identify individual steps that can be automated and/or validated using natural language processing techniques, and (iii propose suitable methods.

  3. Myocardin-related transcription factors are required for cardiac development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Carroll, Kelli J.; Cenik, Bercin K.; Chen, Beibei; Liu, Ning; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2015-01-01

    Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors A and B (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) are highly homologous proteins that function as powerful coactivators of serum response factor (SRF), a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor essential for cardiac development. The SRF/MRTF complex binds to CArG boxes found in the control regions of genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and muscle contraction, among other processes. While SRF is required for heart development and function, the role of MRTFs in the d...

  4. The role of advanced nuclear power technologies in developing countries: Criteria and design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    The document includes the papers presented at the following two technical committee meetings organized by the IAEA: Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Criteria for the Introduction of Advanced Nuclear Power Technologies for Specific Applications in Developing Countries, Vienna, 27-30 June 1988 (14 papers) and Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Design Requirements for the Application of Advanced Concepts in Developing Countries, Vienna, 6-9 December 1988 (16 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  5. Resource requirements of inclusive urban development in India: insights from ten cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Nagpure, Ajay; Reiner, Mark; Ramaswami, Anu

    2018-02-01

    This paper develops a methodology to assess the resource requirements of inclusive urban development in India and compares those requirements to current community-wide material and energy flows. Methods include: (a) identifying minimum service level benchmarks for the provision of infrastructure services including housing, electricity and clean cooking fuels; (b) assessing the percentage of homes that lack access to infrastructure or that consume infrastructure services below the identified benchmarks; (c) quantifying the material requirements to provide basic infrastructure services using India-specific design data; and (d) computing material and energy requirements for inclusive development and comparing it with current community-wide material and energy flows. Applying the method to ten Indian cities, we find that: 1%-6% of households do not have electricity, 14%-71% use electricity below the benchmark of 25 kWh capita-month-1 4%-16% lack structurally sound housing; 50%-75% live in floor area less than the benchmark of 8.75 m2 floor area/capita; 10%-65% lack clean cooking fuel; and 6%-60% lack connection to a sewerage system. Across the ten cities examined, to provide basic electricity (25 kWh capita-month-1) to all will require an addition of only 1%-10% in current community-wide electricity use. To provide basic clean LPG fuel (1.2 kg capita-month-1) to all requires an increase of 5%-40% in current community-wide LPG use. Providing permanent shelter (implemented over a ten year period) to populations living in non-permanent housing in Delhi and Chandigarh would require a 6%-14% increase over current annual community-wide cement use. Conversely, to provide permanent housing to all people living in structurally unsound housing and those living in overcrowded housing (social policies that seek to provide basic infrastructure provisioning for all residents would not dramatically increasing current community-wide resource flows.

  6. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'', and DOE 6430.1A, ''General Design Criteria''. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ''Glove Box Fire Protection'' and ''Filter Plenum Fire Protection''. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities

  7. Technology Requirements and Development for Affordable High-Temperature Distributed Engine Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    long lasting, high temperature modules is to use high temperature electronics on ceramic modules. The electronic components are “ brazed ” onto the...Copyright © 2012 by ISA Technology Requirements and Development for Affordable High - Temperature Distributed Engine Controls Alireza Behbahani 1...with regards to high temperature capability. The Government and Industry Distributed Engine Controls Working Group (DECWG) [5] has been established

  8. Effective Electronic Security: Process for the Development and Validation from Requirements to Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    ABBREVIATIONS ANSI American National Standards Institute ASIS American Society of Industrial Security CCTV Closed Circuit Television CONOPS...is globally recognized for the development and maintenance of standards. ASTM defines a specification as an explicit set of requirements...www.rkb.us/saver/. One of the SAVER reports titled CCTV Technology Handbook has a chapter on system design. The report uses terms like functional

  9. Improving the Communication Skills of IS Developers during Requirements Elicitation Using Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurban, Mustafa H.; Austria, Richmond D.

    2009-01-01

    The improvement of communication skills among Information Systems (IS) developers can be considered as a strategy to mitigate the risk of project failure during IS design. This paper addresses issues on various communication barriers normally encountered during its requirements elicitation (RE) stage. This study aims to adopt experiential learning…

  10. Development Modules for Specification of Requirements for a System of Verification of Parallel Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy Yu. Meltsov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the development of one of the modules of the system verification of parallel algorithms that are used to verify the inference engine. This module is designed to build the specification requirements, the feasibility of which on the algorithm is necessary to prove (test.

  11. Risk factors for the development of cataract requiring surgery in uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijssens, K.M.; Rothova, A.; van de Vijver, D.A.M.C.; Stilma, J.S.; de Boer, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the possible risk factors for the development of cataract requiring surgery in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Data of 53 children with JIA-associated uveitis, of whom 27 had undergone cataract

  12. A Framework for Assessing Continuing Professional Development Activities for Satisfying Pharmacy Revalidation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donyai, Parastou; Alexander, Angela M.; Denicolo, Pam M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The United Kingdom's pharmacy regulator contemplated using continuing professional development (CPD) in pharmacy revalidation in 2009, simultaneously asking pharmacy professionals to demonstrate the value of their CPD by showing its relevance and impact. The idea of linking new CPD requirements with revalidation was yet to be…

  13. 77 FR 22583 - Allocations, Common Application, Waivers, and Alternative Requirements for Community Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... Action Plan for Disaster Recovery on the grantee's official web site for no less than 7 calendar days to... Application, Waivers, and Alternative Requirements for Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Disaster...: This Notice advises the public of the allocation of CDBG disaster recovery funds for the purpose of...

  14. ModSAF-based development of operational requirements for light armored vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanotti, John; Palmarini, Marc

    2003-09-01

    Light Armoured Vehicles (LAVs) are being developed to meet the modern requirements of rapid deployment and operations other than war. To achieve these requirements, passive armour is minimized and survivability depends more on sensors, computers, countermeasures and communications to detect and avoid threats. The performance, reliability, and ultimately the cost of these systems, will be determined by the technology trends and the rates at which they mature. Defining vehicle requirements will depend upon an accurate assessment of these trends over a longer term than was previously needed. Modelling and simulation are being developed to study these long-term trends and how they contribute to establishing vehicle requirements. ModSAF is being developed for research and development, in addition to the original requirement of Simulation and Modelling for Acquisition, Rehearsal, Requirements and Training (SMARRT), and is becoming useful as a means for transferring technology to other users, researchers and contractors. This procedure eliminates the need to construct ad hoc models and databases. The integration of various technologies into a Defensive Aids Suite (DAS) can be designed and analyzed by combining field trials and laboratory data with modelling and simulation. ModSAF (Modular Semi-Automated Forces,) is used to construct the virtual battlefield and, through scripted input files, a "fixed battle" approach is used to define and implement contributions from three different sources. These contributions include: models of technology and natural phenomena from scientists and engineers, tactics and doctrine from the military and detailed analyses from operations research. This approach ensures the modelling of processes known to be important regardless of the level of information available about the system. Survivability of DAS-equipped vehicles based on future and foreign technology can be investigated by ModSAF and assessed relative to a test vehicle. A vehicle can

  15. [Does the public sector have an independent research role in the development of drugs?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grønlykke, Thor Buch

    2003-04-14

    Exclusively private companies do drug development. The State contributes with education of academics and basic research constituting the basis of half of the drugs developed by the private companies. The Danish private drug research amounts to six billion DKK per year, corresponding to the estimated price of the development of one new drug. The development shows a negative tendency. There are doubts about the scientific credibility, the number of new drugs is declining, drug development costs are rising, and the competitiveness in Europe is declining compared with the one of The United States. Continued improvement of Danish drug development can be achieved by stimulation of the public research related to drug development.

  16. Coding a Weather Model: DOE-FIU Science & Technology Workforce Development Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Jon David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    DOE Fellow, Andres Cremisini, completed a 10-week internship with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Under the management of Kristopher Klingler and the mentorship of Jon Bradley, he was tasked with conceiving and coding a realistic weather model for use in physical security applications. The objective was to make a weather model that could use real data to accurately predict wind and precipitation conditions at any location of interest on the globe at any user-determined time. The intern received guidance on software design, the C++ programming language and clear communication of project goals and ongoing progress. In addition, Mr. Cremisini was given license to structure the program however he best saw fit, an experience that will benefit ongoing research endeavors.

  17. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO

  18. REQUIREMENTS FOR SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT LIFE CYCLE MODELS FOR LARGE-SCALE DEFENSE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Alpaslan DEMIR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available TLarge-scale defense system projects are strategic for maintaining and increasing the national defense capability. Therefore, governments spend billions of dollars in the acquisition and development of large-scale defense systems. The scale of defense systems is always increasing and the costs to build them are skyrocketing. Today, defense systems are software intensive and they are either a system of systems or a part of it. Historically, the project performances observed in the development of these systems have been signifi cantly poor when compared to other types of projects. It is obvious that the currently used systems development life cycle models are insuffi cient to address today’s challenges of building these systems. Using a systems development life cycle model that is specifi cally designed for largescale defense system developments and is effective in dealing with today’s and near-future challenges will help to improve project performances. The fi rst step in the development a large-scale defense systems development life cycle model is the identifi cation of requirements for such a model. This paper contributes to the body of literature in the fi eld by providing a set of requirements for system development life cycle models for large-scale defense systems. Furthermore, a research agenda is proposed.

  19. Defence-in-depth and development of safety requirements for advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.; Gasparini, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper addresses a general approach for the preparation of the design safety requirements using the IAEA Safety Objectives and the strategy of defence-in-depth. It proposes a general method (top-down approach) to prepare safety requirements for a given kind of reactor using the IAEA requirements for nuclear power plants as a starting point through a critical interpretation and application of the strategy of defence-in-depth. The IAEA has recently developed a general methodology for screening the defence-in-depth of nuclear power plants starting from the fundamental safety objectives as proposed in the IAEA Safety Fundamentals. This methodology may provide a useful tool for the preparation of safety requirements for the design and operation of any kind of reactor. Currently the IAEA is preparing the technical basis for the development of safety requirements for Modular High Temperature Gas Reactors, with the aim of showing the viability of the method. A draft TECDOC has been prepared and circulated among several experts for comments. This paper is largely based on the content of the draft TECDOC. (authors)

  20. How to integrate legal requirements into a requirements engineering methodology for the development of security and privacy patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compagna, L.; El Khoury, P.; Krausová, A.; Massacci, F.; Zannone, N.

    2009-01-01

    Laws set requirements that force organizations to assess the security and privacy of their IT systems and impose them to implement minimal precautionary security measures. Several IT solutions (e.g., Privacy Enhancing Technologies, Access Control Infrastructure, etc.) have been proposed to address

  1. The development of the world's population as a factor determining future energy requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vossebrecker, H.; Henssen, H.

    1988-01-01

    Urgently desired economic developments improving the conditions of living in the developing countries and, in the long term, introducing a stabilization of the world's population, result in a considerable rise in world energy requirement. This, in turn, causes conflicts and raises major ecological dangers because of the accelerated depletion of fossil sources of energy it entails. The severity of the CO 2 problem emerges clearly only when seen in connection with the population growth of the developing countries. Undoubtedly, therefore, the fossil sources of energy will have to give up their present leading role in world energy supply because of the intolerable environmental pollution they produce and because of the dwindling oil and gas reserves. The only hope remaining for the present is the possibility of nuclear power and renewable energies pointly being able to meet requirements, while all economically reasonable conservation potentials are being exploited. (orig./UA) [de

  2. Dicer Is Required for Normal Cerebellar Development and to Restrain Medulloblastoma Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique Zindy

    Full Text Available Dicer, a ribonuclease III enzyme, is required for the maturation of microRNAs. To assess its role in cerebellar and medulloblastoma development, we genetically deleted Dicer in Nestin-positive neural progenitors and in mice lacking one copy for the Sonic Hedgehog receptor, Patched 1. We found that conditional loss of Dicer in mouse neural progenitors induced massive Trp53-independent apoptosis in all proliferative zones of the brain and decreased proliferation of cerebellar granule progenitors at embryonic day 15.5 leading to abnormal cerebellar development and perinatal lethality. Loss of one copy of Dicer significantly accelerated the formation of mouse medulloblastoma of the Sonic Hedgehog subgroup in Patched1-heterozygous mice. We conclude that Dicer is required for proper cerebellar development, and to restrain medulloblastoma formation.

  3. A study to develop the domestic functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Park, Kun Chul [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    The present research has been made to develop and review critically the functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU such as SDS-1, SDS2, ECCS, and containment. Based on R documents for this, a systematic study was made to develop the domestic regulation statements. Also, the conventional laws are carefully reviewed to see the compatibility to CANDU. Also, the safety assessment method for CANDU was studied by reviewing C documents and recommendation of IAEA. Through the present works, the vague policy in the CANDU safety regulation is cleaning up in a systematic form and a new frame to measure the objective risk of nuclear power plants was developed.

  4. Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

    1996-01-01

    This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies

  5. A study to develop the domestic functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Woong; Lee, Jae Young; Bang, Kwang Hyun [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-03-15

    The present research has been made to develop and review critically the functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU such as SOS-1, SOS-2, ECCS and containment. Based on R documents for this, a systematic study was made to develop the domestic regulation statements. Also, the conventional laws are carefully reviewed to see the compatibility to CANDU. Also, the safety assessment method for CANDU was studied by reviewing C documents and recommendation of IAEA. Through the present works, the vague policy in the CANDU safety regulation is cleaning up in a systematic form and a new frame to measure the objective risk of nuclear power plants was developed.

  6. Mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation in Advanced Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, J. D.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Barta, D. J.; Dragg, J.; Henninger, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation and robotics for Advanced Life Support Systems (ALSS). The focus is on requirements and applications for command and control, control and monitoring, situation assessment and response, diagnosis and recovery, adaptive planning and scheduling, and other automation applications in addition to mechanized equipment and robotics applications to reduce the excessive human labor requirements to operate and maintain an ALSS. Based on principles of systems engineering, an approach is proposed to assess requirements for automation and robotics using mission simulation tools. First, the story of a simulated mission is defined in terms of processes with attendant types of resources needed, including options for use of automation and robotic systems. Next, systems dynamics models are used in simulation to reveal the implications for selected resource allocation schemes in terms of resources required to complete operational tasks. The simulations not only help establish ALSS design criteria, but also may offer guidance to ALSS research efforts by identifying gaps in knowledge about procedures and/or biophysical processes. Simulations of a planned one-year mission with 4 crewmembers in a Human Rated Test Facility are presented as an approach to evaluation of mission feasibility and definition of automation and robotics requirements.

  7. 25 CFR 63.13 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the Bureau of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence... GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of Character and Suitability for Employment § 63.13 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act...

  8. 31 CFR 30.6 - Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirement under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply... recipient's employees? 30.6 Section 30.6 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.6 Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply...

  9. 31 CFR 30.5 - Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirements under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply... recipient? 30.5 Section 30.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.5 Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the...

  10. Does Professional Development Change Teaching Practice? Results from a Three-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Andrew C.; Garet, Michael S.; Desimone, Laura; Yoon, Kwang Suk; Birman, Beatrice F.

    This report, the third in a series of reports from the longitudinal evaluation of the Eisenhower Professional Development Program, examines the effects of professional development on improving classroom teaching practice. The Eisenhower Professional Development Program, Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, is the federal…

  11. Design Requirements, Epistemic Uncertainty and Solution Development Strategies in Software Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, Linden J.; Onarheim, Balder; Christensen, Bo Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential involvement of “epistemic uncertainty” in mediating between complex design requirements and strategic switches in software design strategies. The analysis revealed that the designers produced an initial “first-pass” solution to the given design brief in a bre...... a view of software design as involving a mixed breadth-first and depth-first solution development approach, with strategic switching to depth-first design being triggered by requirement complexity and being mediated by associated feelings of uncertainty....

  12. Does the Coordination of Verbal and Motor Information Explain the Development of Counting in Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camos, Valerie; Barrouillet, Pierre; Fayol, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Tested in three experiments hypothesis that coordinating saying number-words and pointing to each object to count requires use of the central executive and that cost of coordination decreases with age. Found that for 5- and 9-year-olds and adults, manipulating difficulty of each component affected counting performance but did not make coordination…

  13. Does financial development increase energy consumption? The role of industrialization and urbanization in Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lean, Hooi Hooi

    2012-01-01

    This paper assesses the relationship among energy consumption, financial development, economic growth, industrialization and urbanization in Tunisia from 1971 to 2008. The autoregressive distributed lag bounds testing approach to cointegration and Granger causality tests is employed for the analysis. The result confirms the existence of long-run relationship among energy consumption, economic growth, financial development, industrialization and urbanization in Tunisia. Long-run bidirectional causalities are found between financial development and energy consumption, financial development and industrialization, and industrialization and energy consumption. Hence, sound and developed financial system that can attract investors, boost the stock market and improve the efficiency of economic activities should be encouraged in the country. Nevertheless, promoting industrialization and urbanization can never be left out from the process of development. We add light to policy makers with the role of financial development, industrialization and urbanization in the process of economic development. - Highlights: ► We find the existence of long-run relationship among variables. ► Financial development is positively related to energy consumption. ► Bidirectional causal relationship between financial development and energy consumption. ► Sound and developed financial system should be encouraged.

  14. Does Digital Video Enhance Student Learning in Field-Based Experiments and Develop Graduate Attributes beyond the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek

    2016-01-01

    The connection between fieldwork and development of graduate attributes is explored in this paper. Digital technologies present opportunities to potentially enhance the learning experience of students undertaking fieldwork, and develop core digital attributes and competencies required by Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and employers. This…

  15. FDI and Economic Growth — Does the Quality of Banking Development Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Hakimah Haji Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the role of banking development quality in the FDI-growth nexus from 1998 to 2009. Banking development quality is measured using two standardized intermediation  cost indicators and an index of banking development quality that is constructed based on the following indicators: overhead costs to total assets and net interest margin. The results for developed countries show that, on its own, FDI is negatively related to economic growth. However, when FDI is interacted with a banking development quality index, the quality of banking development is found to play a positive role in influencing the effects of FDI on economic growth. This suggests that the quality of banking development serves as an absorptive capacity that allows developed countries to benefit from the positive growth effects of FDI. On the contrary, for emerging countries, the findings indicate that banking development quality plays no role in influencing the impact of FDI on economic growth. This implies that the quality of banking development in emerging countries has yet to reach a level that allows it to importantly influence the growth effects of FDI.

  16. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  17. Remedial technology and characterization development at the SRS F/H Retention Basins using the DOE SAFER methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, W.C. Jr.; Kuelske, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) is a strategy used to accelerate and improve the environmental assessment and remediation of the F/H Retention Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). TMs strategy combines the data quality objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to focus on data collection and converge on a remedial action early. This approach emphasizes stakeholder involvement throughout the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process. The SAFER methodology is being applied to the characterization, technology development, and remediation tasks for the F/H Retention Basins. This ''approach was initiated in the scoping phase of these projects through the involvment of major stakeholders; Department of Energy (DOE)-Savannah River Field Office, DOE-Headquarters, Westinghouse Savannah River Company, United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the state of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), in the development of the Remedial Investigation (RI) workplans. A major activity that has been initiated is the development and implementation of a phase I workplan to identify preliminary contaminants of concern (pCOCs). A sampling plan was developed and approved by the major stakeholders for preliminary characterization of wastes remaining in the F/H Retention Basins. The involvement of stakeholders, development of a site conceptual model, development of remedial objectives for probable conditions, identification of the problem and reasonable deviations, and development of initial decision rules in the planning stages will ensure that preliminary data needs are identified and obtained prior to the initiation of the assessment and implementation phases of the projects resulting in the final remediation of the sites in an accelerated and more cost effective manner

  18. Post-irradiation dietary vitamin E does not affect the development of radiation-induced lung damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegman, Erwin M.; Gameren, Mieke M. van; Kampinga, Harm H.; Szabo, Ben G.; Coppes, Rob P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether application of post-irradiation vitamin E, an anti-oxidant, could prevent the development of radiation induced lung damage. Wistar rats were given vitamin E enriched or vitamin E deprived food starting from 4 weeks after 18 Gy single dose irradiation of the right thorax. Neither breathing frequencies nor CT density measurements revealed differences between the groups. It is concluded that post-irradiation vitamin E does not influence radiation-induced fibrosis to the lung

  19. An Algorithm Measuring Donor Cell-Free DNA in Plasma of Cellular and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients That Does Not Require Donor or Recipient Genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul MK Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell-free DNA (cfDNA has significant potential in the diagnosis and monitoring of clinical conditions but accurately and easily distinguishing the relative proportion of DNA molecules in a mixture derived from two different sources (i.e. donor and recipient tissues after transplantation is challenging. In human cellular transplantation there is currently no useable method to detect in vivo engraftment and blood-based non-invasive tests for allograft rejection in solid organ transplantation are either non-specific (e.g. creatinine in kidney transplantation, liver enzymes in hepatic transplantation or absent (i.e. heart transplantation. Elevated levels of donor cfDNA have been shown to correlate with solid organ rejection but complex methodology limits implementation of this promising biomarker. We describe a cost-effective method to quantify donor cfDNA in recipient plasma using a panel of high-frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms, next-generation (semiconductor sequencing and a novel mixture model algorithm. In vitro, our method accurately and rapidly determined donor/recipient DNA admixture. For in vivo testing, donor cfDNA was serially quantified in an infant with a urea cycle disorder after receiving six daily infusions of donor liver cells. Donor cfDNA isolated from 1-2 ml of recipient plasma was detected as late as 24 weeks after infusion suggesting engraftment. The percentage of circulating donor cfDNA was also assessed in pediatric and adult heart transplant recipients undergoing routine endomyocardial biopsy with levels observed to be stable over time and generally measuring <1% in cases without moderate or severe cellular rejection. Unlike existing non-invasive methods used to define the proportion of donor cfDNA in solid organ transplant patients, our assay does not require sex mismatch, donor genotyping or whole-genome sequencing and potentially has broad application to detect cellular engraftment or allograft injury after

  20. Commensal Bacteria-Induced Inflammasome Activation in Mouse and Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Potassium Efflux but Does Not Require Phagocytosis or Bacterial Viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejie Chen

    Full Text Available Gut commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in part by activating the inflammasome and inducing secretion of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß. Although much has been learned about inflammasome activation by bacterial pathogens, little is known about how commensals carry out this process. Accordingly, we investigated the mechanism of inflammasome activation by representative commensal bacteria, the Gram-positive Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis and the Gram-negative Bacteroides fragilis. B. infantis and B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion by primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages after overnight incubation. IL-1ß secretion also occurred in response to heat-killed bacteria and was only partly reduced when phagocytosis was inhibited with cytochalasin D. Similar results were obtained with a wild-type immortalized mouse macrophage cell line but neither B. infantis nor B. fragilis induced IL-1ß secretion in a mouse macrophage line lacking the nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome. IL-1ß secretion in response to B. infantis and B. fragilis was significantly reduced when the wild-type macrophage line was treated with inhibitors of potassium efflux, either increased extracellular potassium concentrations or the channel blocker ruthenium red. Both live and heat-killed B. infantis and B. fragilis also induced IL-1ß secretion by human macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells or primary monocyte-derived macrophages after 4 hours of infection, and the secretion was inhibited by raised extracellular potassium and ruthenium red but not by cytochalasin D. Taken together, our findings indicate that the commensal bacteria B. infantis and B. fragilis activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages by a mechanism that involves potassium efflux and that does not require bacterial viability or phagocytosis.

  1. Easing the capacity crunch : infrastructure requirements to support rapidly developing oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zupan, L.

    2003-01-01

    Through annual consultation with its customers, Enbridge develops a supply and demand forecast which forms the basis for the company's development. It is complex to develop the appropriate pipeline infrastructure to support resource development, based on the significant forecast growth in supply in Alberta from oil sands and the limited traditional markets. The largest crude oil pipeline serving the oil sands industry in Alberta is owned and operated by Enbridge. The first customer was Suncor, followed by PetroCanada and EnCana. In 2002, a pipeline concept was developed by Enbridge to provide a link to Edmonton via a new large diameter pipeline. The mainline system which originates in Edmonton is expected to evolve and grow as oil sands production comes on line. The completion of Terrace Phase III expansion is one of the priorities for Enbridge in 2003. Other projects involve the extension of one of its lines from Mokena to Chicago, the segregation of batches on the system to improve quality of its deliveries, and extension and expansion into new markets. Shipper support will determine the scale of these developments. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) has undergone a market study, as has Enbridge (Oil Sands Markets Study) in an effort to better understand markets and potential markets. It will assist in the determination of which pipeline infrastructure requires expansion, as well as the extent of infrastructure required to support new markets. tabs., figs

  2. Traceability and communication of requirements in digital I and C systems development - Project report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivertsen, T.; Fredrikson, R.; Thunem, A.P.J. [Institute for Energy Technology, Halden (Norway); Holmberg, J.E.; Valkonen, J.; Ventae, O. [VTT (Finland); Andersson, J.O. [Ringhals AB (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    In 2004, the work has focused on providing a unified exposition on the issues studied and thereby facilitating a common approach to requirements handling, from their origins and through the different development phases. Emphasis has been put on the development of the TACO Traceability Model. The model supports understandability, communication and traceability by providing a common basis, in the form of a requirements change history, for different kinds of analysis and presentation of different requirements perspectives. Traceability is facilitated through the representation of requirements changes in terms of a change history tree built up by composition of instances of a number of change types, and by providing analysis on the basis of this representation. Much of the strength of the TACO Traceability Model is that it aims at forming the logic needed for formalising the activities related to change management and hence their further automation. The work was presented at the second TACO Industrial Seminar, which took place in Helsinki on the 8th of December 2004. Minutes of the seminar are included in appendix B. (au)

  3. Advanced fuel development at AECL: What does the future hold for CANDU fuels/fuel cycles?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupferschmidt, W.C.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper outlines advanced fuel development at AECL. It discusses expanding the limits of fuel utilization, deploy alternate fuel cycles, increase fuel flexibility, employ recycled fuels; increase safety and reliability, decrease environmental impact and develop proliferation resistant fuel and fuel cycle.

  4. Developing role of short-lived radionuclides in nuclear medical practice. DOE symposium series; 56

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paras, P.; Thiessen, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to define the developing role and state-of-the-art development of short-lived radionuclides (SLR's) in current nuclear medical practice. Special emphasis was placed on radionuclides with general-purpose labeling capabilities. The need for high-purity labeling-grade iodine-123 was emphasized in the program. Papers have been separately abstracted for the data base

  5. Does Facial Expression Recognition Provide a Toehold for the Development of Emotion Understanding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Paul S.; Downs, Andrew; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored predictions from basic emotion theory (BET) that facial emotion expression recognition skills are insular with respect to their own development, and yet foundational to the development of emotional perspective-taking skills. Participants included 417 preschool children for whom estimates of these 2 emotion understanding…

  6. Isl1 is required for multiple aspects of motor neuron development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xingqun; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Xu, ZengGuang; Lanuza, Guillermo M; Liu, Yali; Zhuang, Tao; Chen, Yihan; Pfaff, Samuel L; Evans, Sylvia M; Sun, Yunfu

    2011-07-01

    The LIM homeodomain transcription factor Islet1 (Isl1) is expressed in multiple organs and plays essential roles during embryogenesis. Isl1 is required for the survival and specification of spinal cord motor neurons. Due to early embryonic lethality and loss of motor neurons, the role of Isl1 in other aspects of motor neuron development remains unclear. In this study, we generated Isl1 mutant mouse lines expressing graded doses of Isl1. Our study has revealed essential roles of Isl1 in multiple aspects of motor neuron development, including motor neuron cell body localization, motor column formation and axon growth. In addition, Isl1 is required for survival of cranial ganglia neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of CMOS Pixel Sensors fully adapted to the ILD Vertex Detector Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Dorokhov, Andrei; Goffe, Mathieu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Morel, Frederic; Valin, Isabelle; Voutsinas, Georgios; Zhang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are making steady progress towards the specifications of the ILD vertex detector. Recent developments are summarised, which show that these devices are close to comply with all major requirements, in particular the read-out speed needed to cope with the beam related background. This achievement is grounded on the double- sided ladder concept, which allows combining signals generated by a single particle in two different sensors, one devoted to spatial resolution and the other to time stamp, both assembled on the same mechanical support. The status of the development is overviewed as well as the plans to finalise it using an advanced CMOS process.

  8. How Does Transformational Leadership Promote Innovation in Construction? The Mediating Role of Innovation Climate and the Multilevel Moderation Role of Project Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanchun Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Innovation plays a critical role in the sustainable development of the construction industry. This research aims at examining transformational leadership’s role in shaping employees’ innovative behavior by analyzing the mediating effect of innovation climate and the cross-level moderating effect of innovativeness as a project requirement. To achieve this aim, a questionnaire survey was conducted with 300 construction industry professionals in China and 251 valid replies were received. Data collected by the questionnaire were analyzed using the method of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM. The results showed that transformational leaders could nurture a mutual climate for innovation to motivate employees’ innovative behaviors. In addition, innovativeness as a project requirement at the project level strengthens the indirect link amongst transformational leadership and innovative behavior via the innovation climate. Therefore, in the presence of higher innovativeness as a project requirement, transformational leadership is more prone to exert a positive influence upon an individual’s innovative behavior via the perceived innovation climate. The research findings improve understanding of the roles of leadership and innovation climate in affecting individual behavioral outcomes, and could help project managers and leaders encourage innovative ideas within project organizations.

  9. Does the Sustainable PPI Investments Promote Financial Market’s Sustainable Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1980s, most developing countries adopt a policy of attracting investments for Private Participation in Infrastructure (PPI projects. With a perspective of sustainability, this paper offers a first attempt to examine whether the sustainable PPI investments promote financial market development. First, we demonstrate how the PPI policy enlargers the size of financial markets and then fosters the liquidity of financial markets in the static and dynamic conditions. Using the data from 33 developing countries during 1997–2012, we discover the significant promotion effect of PPI investments on the development of financial markets in the dimensions of size and liquidity. Additionally, we confirm the significant mediator effect of financial market size for the positive relationship between PPI investments and financial market liquidity. Both the promotion effect and mediation effect are robust to different control variables and estimation techniques used.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development, LLC, Libertyville, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    These single-family, HERS 45 homes incorporate 2×6 wood framed walls with R-20 open cell spray insulation and OSB. The builder, StreetScape Development, won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  11. Does Financial Development Reduce CO2 Emissions in Malaysian Economy? A Time Series Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Solarin, Sakiru Adebola; Mahmood, Haider

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with the question whether financial development reduces CO2 emissions or not in case of Malaysia. For this purpose, we apply the bounds testing approach to cointegration for long run relations between the variables. The study uses annual time series data over the period 1971-2008. Ng-Perron stationarity test is applied to test the unit root properties of the series. Our results validate the presence of cointegration between CO2 emissions, financial development, energy co...

  12. Parenting and Child Development in Adoptive Families: Does Parental Sexual Orientation Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Farr, Rachel H.; Forssell, Stephen L.; Patterson, Charlotte J.

    2010-01-01

    This study, funded by Williams Institute, investigated child development and parenting in 106 families headed by 27 lesbian, 29 gay, and 50 heterosexual couples with young adopted children. Parents and teachers reported that, on average, children were developing in typical ways. Measures of children’s adjustment, parenting approaches, parenting stress, and couple relationship adjustment were not significantly associated with parental sexual orientation. However, several family process variabl...

  13. Aid Allocation across Sectors: Does aid fit well with recipients' development priorities?

    OpenAIRE

    KASUGA Hidefumi

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates whether aid flows to developing countries fit well with their development priorities. In particular, we examine aid allocation across sectors in a given recipient country by using sectoral data on aid and indicators that measure the recipient's need for aid in each sector. The data show that inter-recipient aid allocation reflects the recipient's need. However, we found no evidence that inter-sectoral allocation fits with national priorities except in high- and middle-...

  14. A REVIEW OF FINANCE–GROWTH NEXUS THEORIES: HOW DOES DEVELOPMENT FINANCE FITS IN?

    OpenAIRE

    MARWA Nyankomo; ZHANJE Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The finance growth-nexus debates have been contentious over the past three decades both empirically and theoretically. To contribute to this debate, the current paper presents a concise review of finance-growths nexus theoretical development and the current debate around growth-finance nexus theories. Then, it extends the current theoretical debate to include development finance within the broader scheme of finance-growth discourse. The key emerging trend is that, most of the contemporary the...

  15. Decoupling reconsidered: Does world society integration influence the relationship between the environment and economic development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhofer, Wesley; Jorgenson, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    This study advances scholarship on environment and development by examining whether nations more embedded in the pro-environmental world society are more or less likely to experience a relative decoupling between economic development and carbon emissions over time. The authors calculate a network centrality measure using national-level membership data on environmental international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs), and then employ the measure to create four subsamples of nations that are relatively more or less integrated in the environmental world society. The authors use interactions between measures of economic development and time in two-way fixed effects models to estimate the potentially changing effects of development on carbon emissions for the four subsamples of nations from 1970 to 2009. Results indicate that nations that are the most embedded in the environmental world society experienced a moderate decrease through time in the effect of development on carbon emissions, while the effect of development on emissions increased through time in the most peripheral nations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Haendeloe area in Norrkoeping, Sweden: Does it fit for Industrial Symbiosis development?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatefipour, Saeid; Baas, Leenard; Eklund, Mats (Div. of Environmental Technology and Management - Dept. of Management and Engineering, Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden)), e-mail: saeid.hatefipour@liu.se

    2011-06-15

    Today, sustainable cities/regions are playing an important role in sustainable development projects. The overall aim of the current paper is to demonstrate an Industrial Symbiosis development in the Haendeloe area of Norrkoeping city in the Oestergoetland county of Sweden. It is part of a research program called 'Sustainable Norrkoeping' focusing on developing links between the industrial and the urban part of the city. As analysis of the current situation is important for understanding the future development, the paper tries to map the current industrial symbiosis links and symbiotic network to identify potentials exist. To achieve this, paper gives a general view of how this area has been developed, constructed, and grown. The next stage is devoted to an inventory of different actors, stakeholders, and companies, their processes and relationships in the form of energy, materials and by-products exchanges, flows and streams into and out of the Haendeloe area considering the Haendeloe/Norrkoeping as system boundaries. In addition, by describing different tools, elements and approaches of industrial symbiosis and considering and applying two main key tools as industrial inventories and input/output matching the paper also tries to show that whether the already industrial activities formed inside the Haendeloe fits for an industrial symbiosis development

  17. Role of neighbourhoods in child growth and development: does 'place' matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avan, Bilal Iqbal; Kirkwood, Betty

    2010-07-01

    It is estimated that at least 200 million children--mostly from developing countries--suffer from developmental delays. The study aims to contribute to an understanding of the contextual environment in which a child grows and develops in such setup; and in particular to evaluate the relative contributions of socio-economic status and rural-urban neighbourhoods on growth and psychomotor development. A cross-sectional study was conducted from May to November 2002 in 15 rural and 11 urban communities of Sindh, Pakistan. 1,244 children aged less than 3 years were assessed via home visits using Bayley's Infant Developmental Scale for psychomotor development, anthropometry and a socio-economic and demographic questionnaire. A socio-economic index was created using principal component analysis, and the study hypotheses explored through hierarchical linear modelling. We found that sub-optimal growth and development were prevalent among the study's children. Overall the mean psychomotor development (PD) index was 96.0 (SD 16.7), with 23% assessed as having delayed development, and undernourished with 39.8% stunted, 30.9% underweight and 18.1% wasted. Lower socio-economic status and living in a rural rather than urban neighbourhood were all found to have strong associations with lower psychomotor scores and with undernutrition. Rural-urban differences in undernutrition were explained by the lower socio-economic status of families in rural areas. By contrast, rural-urban differences in psychomotor scores remained strong even after controlling for differences in socio-economic status. It was estimated that rural residence accounted for 28% of cases of delayed psychomotor development among study children. Improvements in socio-economic status are vital to achieve optimal growth and development during early childhood. The study draws attention to the importance of taking heed of contextual needs, especially relating to differences between rural and urban neighbourhoods, in the

  18. p53 is required for brain growth but is dispensable for resistance to nutrient restriction during Drosophila larval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Esteban G; Sierralta, Jimena; Glavic, Alvaro

    2018-01-01

    Animal growth is influenced by the genetic background and the environmental circumstances. How genes promote growth and coordinate adaptation to nutrient availability is still an open question. p53 is a transcription factor that commands the cellular response to different types of stresses. In adult Drosophila melanogaster, p53 regulates the metabolic adaptation to nutrient restriction that supports fly viability. Furthermore, the larval brain is protected from nutrient restriction in a phenomenon called 'brain sparing'. Therefore, we hypothesised that p53 may regulate brain growth and show a protective role over brain development under nutrient restriction. Here, we studied the function of p53 during brain growth in normal conditions and in animals subjected to developmental nutrient restriction. We showed that p53 loss of function reduced animal growth and larval brain size. Endogenous p53 was expressed in larval neural stem cells, but its levels and activity were not affected by nutritional stress. Interestingly, p53 knockdown only in neural stem cells was sufficient to decrease larval brain growth. Finally, we showed that in p53 mutant larvae under nutrient restriction, the energy storage levels were not altered, and these larvae generated adults with brains of similar size than wild-type animals. Using genetic approaches, we demonstrate that p53 is required for proper growth of the larval brain. This developmental role of p53 does not have an impact on animal resistance to nutritional stress since brain growth in p53 mutants under nutrient restriction is similar to control animals.

  19. Does financial aid help or harm developing countries: Case of Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglantina Hysa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Development aid is a financial aid given by governments, NGOs, global and regional unions, or private entities to support the development of developing countries, as a consequence also of Albania as one of them. Its main reason is decreasing poverty and encouraging development. Many literatures reveal evidences of the impact these financial aids have on the economic growth of a country. This paper creates a link between the research done and the practice by making a detailed description of the phenomena and making clear how the effects are derived. It further analyzes the economic development of Albania in terms of net income during the last 30 years, and the corresponding financial aid allocation for each year. Starting with the interpretation of the financial aid amount allocated each year; this research paper also extends the information regarding the fields of economy where this aid is invested. The descriptive statistics shows that financial aid has noticeably increased from year to year and its impact on the economy as well.

  20. Security and trust requirements engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgini, P.; Massacci, F.; Zannone, N.; Aldini, A.; Gorrieri, R.; Martinelli, F.

    2005-01-01

    Integrating security concerns throughout the whole software development process is one of today’s challenges in software and requirements engineering research. A challenge that so far has proved difficult to meet. The major difficulty is that providing security does not only require to solve

  1. Family Income and Child Cognitive and Noncognitive Development in Australia: Does Money Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Rasheda; Nghiem, Son

    2016-06-01

    This article investigates whether family income affects children's cognitive and noncognitive development by exploiting comprehensive information from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. We include variables that represent parental investment, parental stress, and neighborhood characteristics to examine if these factors mediate the effects of income. Using dynamic panel data, we find that family income is significantly associated with children's cognitive skills but not with noncognitive skills. Mother's education, parent's physical and mental health, parenting styles, child's own health, and presence of both biological parents are the most important factors for children's noncognitive development. For cognitive development, income as well as parents' education, child's birth weight, and number of books that children have at home are highly significant factors. We also find strong evidence to support the skill formation theory that children's previous cognitive and noncognitive outcomes are significantly related to their current outcomes.

  2. How does imperviousness develop and affect runoff generation in an urbanizing watershed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Krebs

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Imperviousness associated with urbanization remains one of the biggest challenges in sustainable urban design. The replacement of forests, marshlands, buffers, and wetlands with impervious surfaces, strongly influences hydrological processes in urbanizing areas. This study analyzed the contribution of four constructed surfaces types – roofs, yards, roads, and an international airport – to surface runoff within a 21 km2 watershed, and presents the development over five decades (1977−2030. The land-cover model, used to assess watershed imperviousness in 2030, utilized coefficients between impervious areas generating surface runoff and the floor area, developed during the study. The conducted imperviousness analysis allowed the evaluation of land-use development impacts on the stream network, and the identification of hydrologically active areas for urban planning and stormwater management. Research revealed the importance of yard imperviousness related to suburban residential housing for stormwater runoff generation, and the impacts of transport-related imperviousness on stormwater runoff.

  3. Lattice QCD Application Development within the US DOE Exascale Computing Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Richard [Boston U.; Christ, Norman [Columbia U.; DeTar, Carleton [Utah U.; Edwards, Robert [Jefferson Lab; Mackenzie, Paul [Fermilab

    2017-10-30

    In October, 2016, the US Department of Energy launched the Exascale Computing Project, which aims to deploy exascale computing resources for science and engineering in the early 2020's. The project brings together application teams, software developers, and hardware vendors in order to realize this goal. Lattice QCD is one of the applications. Members of the US lattice gauge theory community with significant collaborators abroad are developing algorithms and software for exascale lattice QCD calculations. We give a short description of the project, our activities, and our plans.

  4. Lattice QCD Application Development within the US DOE Exascale Computing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Richard; Christ, Norman; DeTar, Carleton; Edwards, Robert; Mackenzie, Paul

    2018-03-01

    In October, 2016, the US Department of Energy launched the Exascale Computing Project, which aims to deploy exascale computing resources for science and engineering in the early 2020's. The project brings together application teams, software developers, and hardware vendors in order to realize this goal. Lattice QCD is one of the applications. Members of the US lattice gauge theory community with significant collaborators abroad are developing algorithms and software for exascale lattice QCD calculations. We give a short description of the project, our activities, and our plans.

  5. Lattice QCD Application Development within the US DOE Exascale Computing Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brower Richard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In October, 2016, the US Department of Energy launched the Exascale Computing Project, which aims to deploy exascale computing resources for science and engineering in the early 2020’s. The project brings together application teams, software developers, and hardware vendors in order to realize this goal. Lattice QCD is one of the applications. Members of the US lattice gauge theory community with significant collaborators abroad are developing algorithms and software for exascale lattice QCD calculations. We give a short description of the project, our activities, and our plans.

  6. Guide to good practices for developing and conducting case studies: DOE handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    Learning from experience is often very costly to a facility in terms of injured personnel, damaged equipment, and wasted time. Learning from the experience gained at the facility and from industry can prevent repeating costly mistakes. This guide contains a method for learning from experience to prevent mistakes from occurring; that method is the case study. This guide describes how to develop and present case studies. This guide provides the instructional developer insight on the best kind of case study to use and includes examples of the various types of case studies.

  7. Histone demethylases UTX and JMJD3 are required for NKT cell development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Daniel; Yagi, Ryoji; Cui, Kairong; Proctor, William R; Wang, Chaochen; Placek, Katarzyna; Pohl, Lance R; Wang, Rongfu; Ge, Kai; Zhu, Jinfang; Zhao, Keji

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK)T cells and conventional T cells share phenotypic characteristic however they differ in transcription factor requirements and functional properties. The role of histone modifying enzymes in conventional T cell development has been extensively studied, little is known about the function of enzymes regulating histone methylation in NKT cells. We show that conditional deletion of histone demethylases UTX and JMJD3 by CD4-Cre leads to near complete loss of liver NKT cells, while conventional T cells are less affected. Loss of NKT cells is cell intrinsic and not due to an insufficient selection environment. The absence of NKT cells in UTX/JMJD3-deficient mice protects mice from concanavalin A-induced liver injury, a model of NKT-mediated hepatitis. GO-analysis of RNA-seq data indicates that cell cycle genes are downregulated in UTX/JMJD3-deleted NKT progenitors, and suggest that failed expansion may account for some of the cellular deficiency. The phenotype appears to be demethylase-dependent, because UTY, a homolog of UTX that lacks catalytic function, is not sufficient to restore their development and removal of H3K27me3 by deletion of EZH2 partially rescues the defect. NKT cell development and gene expression is sensitive to proper regulation of H3K27 methylation. The H3K27me3 demethylase enzymes, in particular UTX, promote NKT cell development, and are required for effective NKT function.

  8. Manpower requirements and development for the new 33-GW nuclear generation plan of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, K.

    1980-01-01

    The future planned level of nuclear power generation was recently amended by the Japan Atomic Energy Commission to 33 GW by the year 1985. It means that further construction of at least 19 nuclear power plants of 1000 MW(e) each will be needed for the accomplishment of this new plan during the next seven years. The technical manpower requirement for this new plan is estimated in this paper by use of a typical model, which requires a staff of 100 persons for the normal operation of a 1000-MW(e) nuclear power plant. Among these technical staff members, the number of well-trained and experienced persons, i.e. 'key personnel', is considered to be 28. A comparison between manpower requirement and supply for the new plan is made for reactor operators, technical staff, radiation safety staff and maintenance staff. Through this comparison, nuclear training programmes for the development of manpower needed for operation and maintenance is reviewed both from the aspects of quality and quantity by taking into account the functions of the existing training courses in Japan. In addition, the periodic inspection of a nuclear power plant requires almost 1300 persons per power plant; they do not belong to the nuclear power companies, but to either directly related or sub-contracted companies. The educational problems for the 'key personnel' among these people are discussed, and a new programme is proposed. (author)

  9. Work-related learning and skill development in Europe: Does initial skill mismatch matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira Sequeda, Maria; Künn-Nelen, Annemarie; de Grip, Andries

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills. We analyze the extent to which training and informal learning on the job are related to employee skill development and consider

  10. Why does site visit matter in global software development: A knowledge-based perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahedi, Mansooreh; Babar, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Face-to-Face (F2F) interaction is a strong means to foster social relationships and effective knowledge sharing within a team. However, communication in Global Software Development (GSD) teams is usually restricted to computer-mediated conversation that is perceived to be less effective...

  11. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  12. How Does a Community of Principals Develop Leadership for Technology-Enhanced Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Libby F.; Bowyer, Jane B.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2010-01-01

    Active principal leadership can help sustain and scale science curriculum reform. This study illustrates how principal leadership developed in a professional learning community to support a technology-enhanced science curriculum reform funded by the National Science Foundation. Seven middle school and high school principals in one urban-fringe…

  13. What does the Development of the European Core Curriculum for Cardiovascular Nurses Mean for Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Lis; Lin, Stella Hsi-Man; Ferry, Cate; Gallagher, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    A core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses has recently been published by the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. This core curriculum was envisaged to bridge the educational gap between qualification as a nurse and an advance practice role. In addition, the shared elements and international consensus on core themes creates a strong pathway for nursing career development that is directly relevant to Australia. Education programs for nurses in Australia must meet the mandatory standards of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC), but without a national core curriculum, there can be considerable variation in the content of such courses. The core curriculum is developed to be adapted locally, allowing the addition of nationally relevant competencies, for example, culturally appropriate care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals. Two existing specialist resources could be utilised to deliver a tailored cardiovascular core curriculum; the Heart Education Assessment and Rehabilitation Toolkit (HEART) online (www.heartonline.org.au) and HeartOne (www.heartone.com.au). Both resources could be further enhanced by incorporating the core curriculum. The release of the European core curriculum should be viewed as a call to action for Australia to develop a core curriculum for cardiovascular nurses. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Does the boat float? - The impact of teaching sustainable development in design and engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Eyto, A.; McMahon, M.; Mulder, K.F.; Wever, R.; De Werk, G.; Overschie, M.G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Education for sustainable development fundamentally calls for a change in the way we educate (teaching methodologies), what we teach (the curriculum and subject matter), and why we do it (learning outcomes & professional impact) (Bhamra & Dewberry, 2007). But what should this change look like in

  15. Developing Face-to-Face Argumentation Skills: Does Arguing on the Computer Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanou, Kalypso

    2013-01-01

    Arguing on the computer was used as a method to promote development of face-to-face argumentation skills in middle schoolers. In the study presented, sixth graders engaged in electronic dialogues with peers on a controversial topic and in some reflective activities based on transcriptions of the dialogues. Although participants initially exhibited…

  16. Going global – does career development need to think bigger to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as a means of examining new demands on our practice as career practitioners. Through this approach, high level concepts will be dealt with, and finally drill down to their meaning in practice through strategic interpretation of world order change and the increasing role career development can play in helping us all make ...

  17. Folklore Epistemology: How Does Traditional Folklore Contribute to Children's Thinking and Concept Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbenyega, Joseph S.; Tamakloe, Deborah E.; Klibthong, Sunanta

    2017-01-01

    This research utilised a "stimulated recall" methodology [Calderhead, J. 1981. "Stimulated Recall: A Method for Research on Teaching." "British Journal of Educational Psychology" 51: 211-217] to explore the potential of African folklore, specifically Ghanaian folk stories in the development of children's reflective…

  18. Individual Differences in Moral Development: Does Intelligence Really Affect Children's Moral Reasoning and Moral Emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beißert, Hanna M; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between intelligence and individual differences in children's moral development across a range of different moral transgressions. Taking up prior research that showed morality and intelligence to be related in adolescents and adults, the current study wants to test if these findings can be extended to younger children. The study was designed to address some of the shortcomings in prior research by examining young children aged between 6 years; 4 months and 8 years; 10 months, using a broad concept of moral development including emotional aspects and applying an approach that is closely connected to children's daily lives. Participants ( N = 129) completed a standardized intelligence test and were presented four moral transgression stories to assess moral development. Results demonstrated that findings from prior research with adolescents or adults cannot simply be extended to younger participants. No significant correlations of moral development and intelligence were found for any of the presented stories. This provides first evidence that - at least in middle childhood - moral developmental status seems to be independent from children's general intelligence assessed by figural inductive reasoning tests.

  19. Where the financial and economic crisis does bite : Impact on the Least Developed Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.G. van Bergeijk (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis paper looks beyond the comparatively good performance of the large emerging economies that gave rise to the mainstream narrative of decoupling. I discuss the negative economic and social impacts of the financial and economic crisis on the Least Developed Countries that the

  20. Assessment of infrastructure development requirements for embarking on nuclear power program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.; Ilijovski, I.; Popovski, V.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades nuclear energy has been proven as reliable and economical energy supply that is capable of meeting demanding energy market requirements. Many countries around the world consider entering into new nuclear energy programs and building new power reactors for satisfying their increasing electrical energy needs. A nuclear power program is a major undertaking requiring careful planning, preparation and investment, and human resources for building adequate nuclear infrastructure. Preparations for making a decision to enter into a new nuclear energy program requires a significant amount of financial and human resources, time, and assistance from already developed countries and international nuclear organizations. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from Vienna provides technical help, financial assistance, and documented knowledge that are important for countries facing the challenge of entering nuclear programs for the first time. The IAEA organizes technical courses and information exchange meetings for new countries at which experiences and lessons learned are provided to new countries. This paper describes the key activities in the process for making a decision to enter a new nuclear energy program. It describes the efforts currently being conducted in the Republic of Macedonia in the direction of collecting information, performing various feasibility studies, and engaging in regional cooperation for utilizing experiences of the regional countries in performing such activities, and in developing their nuclear power programs. This paper also provides an overview of the IAEA documents and recommendations that are relevant for this topic

  1. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program. Joint Research and Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Don

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's electrical generation capability. By the end of 2014, about one-third of the existing domestic fleet will have passed their 40th anniversary of power operations, and about one-half of the fleet will reach the same 40-year mark within this decade. Recognizing the challenges associated with pursuing extended service life of commercial nuclear power plants, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy [NE] and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs (DOE-NE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability [LWRS] Program and EPRI's Long-Term Operations [LTO] Program) to address these challenges. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a memorandum of understanding in late 2010 to @@@establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be coordinated to the benefit of both parties.@@@ This document represents the third annual revision to the initial version (March 2011) of the plan as called for in the memorandum of understanding.

  2. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program. Joint Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Don

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation’s electrical generation capability. By the end of 2014, about one-third of the existing domestic fleet will have passed their 40th anniversary of power operations, and about one-half of the fleet will reach the same 40-year mark within this decade. Recognizing the challenges associated with pursuing extended service life of commercial nuclear power plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs (DOE-NE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability [LWRS] Program and EPRI’s Long-Term Operations [LTO] Program) to address these challenges. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a memorandum of understanding in late 2010 to “establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be coordinated to the benefit of both parties.” This document represents the third annual revision to the initial version (March 2011) of the plan as called for in the memorandum of understanding.

  3. Fibroblast growth factor signaling is required for early somatic gonad development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerberg, Dena M; Sano, Kaori; Draper, Bruce W

    2017-09-01

    The vertebrate ovary and testis develop from a sexually indifferent gonad. During early development of the organism, primordial germ cells (the gamete lineage) and somatic gonad cells coalesce and begin to undergo growth and morphogenesis to form this bipotential gonad. Although this aspect of development is requisite for a fertile adult, little is known about the genetic regulation of early gonadogenesis in any vertebrate. Here, we provide evidence that fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling is required for the early growth phase of a vertebrate bipotential gonad. Based on mutational analysis in zebrafish, we show that the Fgf ligand 24 (Fgf24) is required for proliferation, differentiation, and morphogenesis of the early somatic gonad, and as a result, most fgf24 mutants are sterile as adults. Additionally, we describe the ultrastructural elements of the early zebrafish gonad and show that distinct somatic cell populations can be identified soon after the gonad forms. Specifically, we show that fgf24 is expressed in an epithelial population of early somatic gonad cells that surrounds an inner population of mesenchymal somatic gonad cells that are in direct contact with the germ cells, and that fgf24 is required for stratification of the somatic tissue. Furthermore, based on gene expression analysis, we find that differentiation of the inner mesenchymal somatic gonad cells into functional cell types in the larval and early juvenile-stage gonad is dependent on Fgf24 signaling. Finally, we argue that the role of Fgf24 in zebrafish is functionally analogous to the role of tetrapod FGF9 in early gonad development.

  4. Developments of radiation safety requirements for the management of radiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Seock; Choi, Jin Ho; Cheong, Yuon Young

    2002-03-01

    The approach of the risk-informed regulatory options was studied to develop the radiation safety requirements for the managements for radiation devices. The task analysis, exposure, accident scenario development, risk analysis, and systematic approach for regulatory options was considered in full, based on the NRC report, 'NUREG/CR-6642', and the translation of its core part was conducted for ongoing research. In this methodology, the diamond tree that includes human factors, etc, additionally with normal event tree, was used. According to the analysis results of this approach, the risk analysis and the development of regulatory options were applied for the electron linear accelerators and the qualitative results were obtained. Because the field user groups were participated in this study could contribute to the basis establishment of the risk-informed regulation policy through securing consensus and inducing particle interests. It will make an important role of establishing the detail plan of ongoing research

  5. Development and manufacturing of special fission chambers for in-core measurement requirements in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geslot, B.; Berhouet, F.; Oriol, L.; Breaud, S.; Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    The Dosimetry Command control and Instrumentation Laboratory (LDCI) at CEA/Cadarache is specialized in the development, design and manufacturing of miniature fission chambers (from 8 mm down to 1.5 mm in diameter). The LDCI fission chambers workshop specificity is its capacity to manufacture and distribute special fission chambers with fissile deposits other than U 235 (typically Pu 242 , Np 237 , U 238 , Th 232 ). We are also able to define the characteristics of the detector for any in-core measurement requirements: sensor geometry, fissile deposit material and mass, filling gas composition and pressure, operating mode (pulse, current or Campbelling) with associated cable and electronics. The fission chamber design relies on numerical simulation and modeling tools developed by the LDCI. One of our present activities in fission chamber applications is to develop a fast neutron flux instrumentation using Campbelling mode dedicated to measurements in material testing reactors. (authors)

  6. Development and manufacturing of special fission chambers for in-core measurement requirements in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geslot, B.; Berhouet, F.; Oriol, L.; Breaud, S.; Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F. [CEA, DEN, Dosimetry Command Control and Instrumentation Laboratory, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    The Dosimetry Command control and Instrumentation Laboratory (LDCI) at CEA/Cadarache is specialized in the development, design and manufacturing of miniature fission chambers (from 8 mm down to 1.5 mm in diameter). The LDCI fission chambers workshop specificity is its capacity to manufacture and distribute special fission chambers with fissile deposits other than U{sup 235} (typically Pu{sup 242}, Np{sup 237}, U{sup 238}, Th{sup 232}). We are also able to define the characteristics of the detector for any in-core measurement requirements: sensor geometry, fissile deposit material and mass, filling gas composition and pressure, operating mode (pulse, current or Campbelling) with associated cable and electronics. The fission chamber design relies on numerical simulation and modeling tools developed by the LDCI. One of our present activities in fission chamber applications is to develop a fast neutron flux instrumentation using Campbelling mode dedicated to measurements in material testing reactors. (authors)

  7. Developments of radiation safety requirements for the management of radiation devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Seock [Pohang Accelerator Lab, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Ho [Gachun University of Medicine and science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Yuon Young [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2002-03-15

    The approach of the risk-informed regulatory options was studied to develop the radiation safety requirements for the managements for radiation devices. The task analysis, exposure, accident scenario development, risk analysis, and systematic approach for regulatory options was considered in full, based on the NRC report, 'NUREG/CR-6642', and the translation of its core part was conducted for ongoing research. In this methodology, the diamond tree that includes human factors, etc, additionally with normal event tree, was used. According to the analysis results of this approach, the risk analysis and the development of regulatory options were applied for the electron linear accelerators and the qualitative results were obtained. Because the field user groups were participated in this study could contribute to the basis establishment of the risk-informed regulation policy through securing consensus and inducing particle interests. It will make an important role of establishing the detail plan of ongoing research.

  8. Heterochromatin Reorganization during Early Mouse Development Requires a Single-Stranded Noncoding Transcript

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Casanova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The equalization of pericentric heterochromatin from distinct parental origins following fertilization is essential for genome function and development. The recent implication of noncoding transcripts in this process raises questions regarding the connection between RNA and the nuclear organization of distinct chromatin environments. Our study addresses the interrelationship between replication and transcription of the two parental pericentric heterochromatin (PHC domains and their reorganization during early embryonic development. We demonstrate that the replication of PHC is dispensable for its clustering at the late two-cell stage. In contrast, using parthenogenetic embryos, we show that pericentric transcripts are essential for this reorganization independent of the chromatin marks associated with the PHC domains. Finally, our discovery that only reverse pericentric transcripts are required for both the nuclear reorganization of PHC and development beyond the two-cell stage challenges current views on heterochromatin organization.

  9. Intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein from the drug resistant human bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 does not require cell-to-cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui-liang; Zheng, Yong-jun; Cheng, Xiao-zhi; Lv, Yi-song; Gao, Rui; Mao, Hou-ping; Chen, Qin

    2013-09-01

    The efflux activity of transmembrane P-glycoprotein prevents various therapeutic drugs from reaching lethal concentrations in cancer cells, resulting in multidrug resistance. We investigated whether drug resistant bladder cancer cells could transfer functional P-glycoprotein to sensitive parental cells. Drug sensitive BIU-87 bladder cancer cells were co-cultured for 48 hours with BIU-87/ADM, a doxorubicin resistant derivative of the same cell line, in a Transwell® system that prevented cell-to-cell contact. The presence of P-glycoprotein in recipient cell membranes was established using fluorescein isothiocyanate, laser scanning confocal microscopy and Western blot. P-glycoprotein mRNA levels were compared between cell types. Rhodamine 123 efflux assay was done to confirm that P-glycoprotein was biologically active. The amount of P-glycoprotein protein in BIU-87 cells co-cultured with BIU-87/ADM was significantly higher than in BIU-87 cells (0.44 vs 0.25) and BIU-87/H33342 cells (0.44 vs 0.26, each p transfer. P-glycoprotein mRNA expression was significantly higher in BIU-87/ADM cells than in co-cultured BIU-87 cells (1.28 vs 0.30), BIU-87/H33342 (0.28) and BIU-87 cells (0.25, each p <0.001), ruling out a genetic mechanism. After 30 minutes of efflux, rhodamine 123 fluorescence intensity was significantly lower in BIU-87/ADM cells (5.55 vs 51.45, p = 0.004) and co-cultured BIU-87 cells than in BIU-87 cells (14.22 vs 51.45, p <0.001), indicating that P-glycoprotein was functional. Bladder cancer cells can acquire functional P-glycoprotein through a nongenetic mechanism that does not require direct cell contact. This mechanism is consistent with a microparticle mediated process. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past five-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information has been analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF SHOPPING CENTERS IN POLAND AGAINST THE BACKGROUND OF KEY STAKEHOLDERS’ REQUIREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Miklińska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shopping centers have been a permanent element of the landscape of many Polish cities for over twenty years now. Their operation as large commercial facilities, and therefore essential elements of the urban logistics system, poses many challenges. In addition, it is related to the existence and manifestation of the requirements of their key stakeholders. The purpose of the article is to outline the process of development of shopping centers in Poland against the background of European trends, and in addition, to draw attention to the existence of various types of shopping centers, the regularities related to their operation and the expectations of their major stakeholders. The article also discusses selected latest trends affecting the current perception of shopping centers and significantly affecting the formation of requirements of the stakeholders associated with them.

  12. Does Motor Development in Infancy Predict Spinal Pain in Later Childhood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Hestbaek, Lise

    2017-01-01

    first sat, and first walked without support. Predictors were measured by parent-report when the children were aged 6, and 18 months, along with a comprehensive list of covariates, including; child sex, birthweight and cognitive development, socioeconomic indicators, and parental health variables......Study Design Longitudinal cohort study. Background Spinal pain is responsible for a huge personal and societal burden but the aetiology remains unclear. Deficits in motor control have been implicated with spinal pain in adults, and delayed motor development is associated with a range of health...... problems and risks in children. Objectives To assess whether there is an independent relationship between the age at which infants first sit and walk without support, and spinal pain at age 11 years. Methods Data from the Danish National Birth Cohort were analysed. Predictors were age at which the child...

  13. Does foreign aid in education foster gender equality in developing countries?

    OpenAIRE

    Maiga, Eugenie W. H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of foreign aid on gender equality in education outcomes in developing countries. Heterogeneity effects by type of aid received and by type of recipients are investigated using system GMM methods. The results indicate that aggregate aid disbursements to the education sector negatively affect gender parity in enrolment at the secondary and tertiary education levels and have no impact on gender parity in primary education. No impact of subsector specific aid was fo...

  14. External Shocks and Banking Crises in Developing Countries: Does the Exchange Rate Regime Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Chandima Mendis

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines some determinants of banking crises in developing economies. Specifically, the effects of terms of trade shocks and capital flows are analyzed. The choice of the nominal exchange rate regime is found to be a crucial factor in the way various shocks are transmitted through the monetary sector. A logit model is used on panel data and preliminary results indicate that countries with flexible regimes were able to lessen the impact of external shocks on the domestic economy. Th...

  15. Does legal physician-assisted dying impede development of palliative care? The Belgian and Benelux experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambaere, Kenneth; Bernheim, Jan L

    2015-08-01

    In 2002, physician-assisted dying was legally regulated in the Netherlands and Belgium, followed in 2009 by Luxembourg. An internationally frequently expressed concern is that such legislation could stunt the development of palliative care (PC) and erode its culture. To study this, we describe changes in PC development 2005-2012 in the permissive Benelux countries and compare them with non-permissive countries. Focusing on the seven European countries with the highest development of PC, which include the three euthanasia-permissive and four non-permissive countries, we compared the structural service indicators for 2005 and 2012 from successive editions of the European Atlas of Palliative Care. As an indicator for output delivery of services to patients, we collected the amounts of governmental funding of PC 2002-2011 in Belgium, the only country where we could find these data. The rate of increase in the number of structural PC provisions among the compared countries was the highest in the Netherlands and Luxembourg, while Belgium stayed on a par with the UK, the benchmark country. Belgian government expenditure for PC doubled between 2002 and 2011. Basic PC expanded much more than endowment-restricted specialised PC. The hypothesis that legal regulation of physician-assisted dying slows development of PC is not supported by the Benelux experience. On the contrary, regulation appears to have promoted the expansion of PC. Continued monitoring of both permissive and non-permissive countries, preferably also including indicators of quantity and quality of delivered care, is needed to evaluate longer-term effects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Does the inclusion of 'professional development' teaching improve medical students' communication skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background This study investigated whether the introduction of professional development teaching in the first two years of a medical course improved students' observed communication skills with simulated patients. Students' observed communication skills were related to patient-centred attitudes, confidence in communicating with patients and performance in later clinical examinations. Methods Eighty-two medical students from two consecutive cohorts at a UK medical school completed two videoed consultations with a simulated patient: one at the beginning of year 1 and one at the end of year 2. Group 1 (n = 35) received a traditional pre-clinical curriculum. Group 2 (n = 47) received a curriculum that included communication skills training integrated into a 'professional development' vertical module. Videoed consultations were rated using the Evans Interview Rating Scale by communication skills tutors. A subset of 27% were double-coded. Inter-rater reliability is reported. Results Students who had received the professional development teaching achieved higher ratings for use of silence, not interrupting the patient, and keeping the discussion relevant compared to students receiving the traditional curriculum. Patient-centred attitudes were not related to observed communication. Students who were less nervous and felt they knew how to listen were rated as better communicators. Students receiving the traditional curriculum and who had been rated as better communicators when they entered medical school performed less well in the final year clinical examination. Conclusions Students receiving the professional development training showed significant improvements in certain communication skills, but students in both cohorts improved over time. The lack of a relationship between observed communication skills and patient-centred attitudes may be a reflection of students' inexperience in working with patients, resulting in 'patient-centredness' being an abstract concept

  17. Does the inclusion of 'professional development' teaching improve medical students' communication skills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubacki Angela M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated whether the introduction of professional development teaching in the first two years of a medical course improved students' observed communication skills with simulated patients. Students' observed communication skills were related to patient-centred attitudes, confidence in communicating with patients and performance in later clinical examinations. Methods Eighty-two medical students from two consecutive cohorts at a UK medical school completed two videoed consultations with a simulated patient: one at the beginning of year 1 and one at the end of year 2. Group 1 (n = 35 received a traditional pre-clinical curriculum. Group 2 (n = 47 received a curriculum that included communication skills training integrated into a 'professional development' vertical module. Videoed consultations were rated using the Evans Interview Rating Scale by communication skills tutors. A subset of 27% were double-coded. Inter-rater reliability is reported. Results Students who had received the professional development teaching achieved higher ratings for use of silence, not interrupting the patient, and keeping the discussion relevant compared to students receiving the traditional curriculum. Patient-centred attitudes were not related to observed communication. Students who were less nervous and felt they knew how to listen were rated as better communicators. Students receiving the traditional curriculum and who had been rated as better communicators when they entered medical school performed less well in the final year clinical examination. Conclusions Students receiving the professional development training showed significant improvements in certain communication skills, but students in both cohorts improved over time. The lack of a relationship between observed communication skills and patient-centred attitudes may be a reflection of students' inexperience in working with patients, resulting in 'patient-centredness' being

  18. Pharma Success in Product Development—Does Biotechnology Change the Paradigm in Product Development and Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, Ronald P

    2016-01-01

    The biotechnology segment of the overall biopharma industry has existed for only about 40–45 years, as a driver of new product development. This driving force was initiated with the FDA approval of recombinant human insulin in 1982, originating from the Genentech company. The pharma industry in the early years of 1970s and 1980s engaged with biotechnology companies only to a small extent with their in-licensing of a few recombinant molecules, led by Roche, Eli Lilly, and Johnson and Johnson. However, subsequently and dramatically over the last 25 years, biotechnology has become a primary driver of product and technology innovation and has become a cornerstone in new product development by all biopharma companies. This review demonstrates these evolutionary changes regarding approved products, product pipelines, novelty of the products, FDA approval rates, product sales, financial R&D investments in biotechnology, partnerships, mergers and acquisitions, and patent issues. We now have about 300 biotechnology products approved in USA covering 16 medical disciplines and about 250 indications, with the engagement of 25 pharma companies, along with their biotechnology company innovators and partners. The biotechnology pipeline involves over 1000 molecules in clinical trials, including over 300 molecules associated with the top 10 pharma companies. Product approval rates by the FDA for biotechnology products are over double the rate for drugs. Yes, the R&D paradigm has changed with biotechnology now as one of the major focuses for new product development with novel molecules by the whole biopharma industry.

  19. Does financial development reduce environmental degradation? Evidence from a panel study of 129 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mulali, Usama; Tang, Chor Foon; Ozturk, Ilhan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of financial development on CO2 emission in 129 countries classified by the income level. A panel CO2 emission model using urbanisation, GDP growth, trade openness, petroleum consumption and financial development variables that are major determinants of CO2 emission was constructed for the 1980-2011 period. The results revealed that the variables are cointegrated based on the Pedroni cointegration test. The dynamic ordinary least squares (OLS) and the Granger causality test results also show that financial development can improve environmental quality in the short run and long run due to its negative effect on CO2 emission. The rest of the determinants, especially petroleum consumption, are determined to be the major source of environmental damage in most of the income group countries. Based on the results obtained, the investigated countries should provide banking loans to projects and investments that can promote energy savings, energy efficiency and renewable energy to help these countries reduce environmental damage in both the short and long run.

  20. Does the vaginal microbiota play a role in the development of cervical cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrgiou, Maria; Mitra, Anita; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary but not sufficient for the development of cervical cancer. The factors promoting persistence as well those triggering carcinogenetic pathways are incompletely understood. Rapidly evolving evidence indicates that the vaginal microbiome (VM) may play a functional role (both protective and harmful) in the acquisition and persistence of HPV, and subsequent development of cervical cancer. The first studies examining the VM and the presence of an HPV infection using next-generation sequencing techniques identified higher microbial diversity in HPV-positive as opposed to HPV-negative women. Furthermore, there appears to be a temporal relationship between the VM and HPV infection in that specific community state types may be correlated with a higher chance of progression or regression of the infection. Studies describing the VM in women with preinvasive disease (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia [SIL]) consistently demonstrate a dysbiosis in women with the more severe disease. Although it is plausible that the composition of the VM may influence the host's innate immune response, susceptibility to infection, and the development of cervical disease, the studies to date do not prove causality. Future studies should explore the causal link between the VM and the clinical outcome in longitudinal samples from existing biobanks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.