WorldWideScience

Sample records for require damage control

  1. A modal H∞-norm-based performance requirement for damage-tolerant active controller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genari, Helói F. G.; Mechbal, Nazih; Coffignal, Gérard; Nóbrega, Eurípedes G. O.

    2017-04-01

    Damage-tolerant active control (DTAC) is a recent research area that encompasses control design methodologies resulting from the application of fault-tolerant control methods to vibration control of structures subject to damage. The possibility of damage occurrence is not usually considered in the active vibration control design requirements. Damage changes the structure dynamics, which may produce unexpected modal behavior of the closed-loop system, usually not anticipated by the controller design approaches. A modal H∞ norm and a respective robust controller design framework were recently introduced, and this method is here extended to face a new DTAC strategy implementation. Considering that damage affects each vibration mode differently, this paper adopts the modal H∞ norm to include damage as a design requirement. The basic idea is to create an appropriate energy distribution over the frequency range of interest and respective vibration modes, guaranteeing robustness, damage tolerance, and adequate overall performance, taking into account that it is common to have previous knowledge of the structure regions where damage may occur during its operational life. For this purpose, a structural health monitoring technique is applied to evaluate modal modifications caused by damage. This information is used to create modal weighing matrices, conducting to the modal H∞ controller design. Finite element models are adopted for a case study structure, including different damage severities, in order to validate the proposed control strategy. Results show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology with respect to damage tolerance.

  2. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  3. Tactical Damage Control Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Andrew D; Miles, Ethan A; Cap, Andrew P; Strandenes, Geir; Kane, Shawn F

    2015-08-01

    Recently the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care changed the guidelines on fluid use in hemorrhagic shock. The current strategy for treating hemorrhagic shock is based on early use of components: Packed Red Blood Cells (PRBCs), Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) and platelets in a 1:1:1 ratio. We suggest that lack of components to mimic whole blood functionality favors the use of Fresh Whole Blood in managing hemorrhagic shock on the battlefield. We present a safe and practical approach for its use at the point of injury in the combat environment called Tactical Damage Control Resuscitation. We describe pre-deployment preparation, assessment of hemorrhagic shock, and collection and transfusion of fresh whole blood at the point of injury. By approaching shock with goal-directed therapy, it is possible to extend the period of survivability in combat casualties. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Damage control in vascular injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenen, L. P.H.

    2017-01-01

    The highest goal in damage control surgery is to stop the bleeding. Major injuries to the vessels therefore pose the major challenge in the damage control approach. Optimal care can be provided in combination with receiving and treatment rooms with CT, operative and endovascular capabilities. For

  5. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  6. [Damage control in field surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, I M; Manukovskiĭ, V A; Badalov, V I; Severin, V V; Golovko, K P; Denisenko, V V

    2011-09-01

    Damage control surgery (DCS) is an important option in the store of war surgery and surgery of trauma. The main purpose of our investigation was to specify the percentage of the injured who need DCS. We performed retrospective study of the patients in the combat operations in Chechnya (1994-2002) and in peacetime (2005-2010). Total lethality in group with the standard surgical approach was 62.3%. It was significantly higher than the lethality in group of patients who underwent DCS - 50.0% (p < 0.05). Thus, the experience of DCS in War Surgery Department confirms that DCS is perspective tendency in treatment of patients with severe and extremely severe trauma, and allows decreasing lethality in 12.3%.

  7. Damage control resuscitation for abdominal war injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-wei DING

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the concept of comprehensive treatment for military trauma has been comprehensively updated. The application of damage control surgery has significantly improved the clinical outcome of severe abdominal injury. With appropriate surgical intervention, post-trauma fluid resuscitation plays an increasingly important role in the treatment of abdominal injury. The damage control resuscitation strategy addresses the importance of permissive hypotension and haemostatic resuscitation for patients with severe trauma, under the guidance of damage control surgical principle. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.03.02

  8. Damage Control Technology - A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    The Canadian Navy has identified the reduction of the total operating cost ( TOC ) of new ships as a priority. The major contributors to the TOC of a...Corporation, California, USA AC-CAS Group Co. Ltd., Bangkok, Thailand Apollo Fire Detectors, Hempshire, England, UK Compania Panamena de Sistemas ...National Defence DRDC Defence Research and Development Canada TOC Total Operating Cost BDCS Battle Damage Control System DC-ARM Damage Control

  9. Damage control in orthopedics and traumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez R, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    The damage control allows the clinician to institute a rapid process that avoids early death from over aggressive treatment of an injury and lack of attention to the underlying physiological state of victim. This concept allows rapid control and support of the patients underlying physiological condition in an attempt to avoid the triad of death: bleeding, hypothermia and metabolic acidosis. We revised the several indications to damage control in orthopedics in the patients with polytrauma, isolated extremity injury as femur fracture, and the geriatric patients and crane cephalic trauma

  10. Risk based decision aid for damage control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, J.L.; Keijer, W.; Gillis, M.P.W.

    2003-01-01

    The current trend in ship design is to reduce the crew. Special attention should be paid to damage control, which is a labour intensive task. Having less crew members implies that more tasks have to be automated. It also means a reduction of the available 'human sensors’, which leads to difficulties

  11. 29 CFR 500.123 - Property damage insurance required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MIGRANT AND SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKER PROTECTION Motor Vehicle Safety and Insurance for Transportation of Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers, Housing Safety and Health for Migrant Workers Insurance § 500.123 Property damage insurance required. (a) When a person who is an employer of a migrant or...

  12. Validation of the mortality prediction equation for damage control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , preoperative lowest pH and lowest core body temperature to derive an equation for the purpose of predicting mortality in damage control surgery. It was shown to reliably predict death despite damage control surgery. The equation derivation ...

  13. Remotely controlled working gear and mobile systems for damage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, G.W.; Salaske, M.; Selig, M.

    1975-01-01

    The chassis of the light MF3 manipulator vehicle and the necessary electric control system have reached and advanced stage of construction. Bids will soon be invited for the mission control system with multiplexers of whole MF3 unit and for simple equipment for damage assessment. All major problems have been clarified in the course of the design phase of the light electric EMSM II Master-Slave manipulators intended for this service. The prototype of the electric EMSM I Master-Slave manipulator has been equipped with some of the supplementary tools required for test missions. (orig.) [de

  14. SRS control system upgrade requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    This document defines requirements for an upgrade of the Sodium Removal System (SRS) control system. The upgrade is being performed to solve a number of maintainability and operability issues. The upgraded system will provide the same functions, controls and interlocks as the present system, and in addition provide enhanced functionality in areas discussed in this document

  15. Post-flood damage data: requirements for disaster forensic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolan Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disaster forensic investigation analyses the unfolding of a disaster and attempts to identify its multiple causes of damage which can lead to (i improved disaster prevention and management from lessons learnt, and (ii more effective mitigation measures in the aftermath of a disaster. The way in which damage data are collected after a flood event as well as the types of collected data influences their usability within forensic investigations. In order to explore whether or not existing data can be used for disaster forensic analysis, the European Project IDEA (Improving Damage assessments to Enhance cost-benefit Analyses is investigating existing gaps in damage information so as to identify possible paths towards improving data quality. This paper focuses in detail on a forensic analysis of the interlinked damage to economic activities and infrastructure in the Severn floods of 2007 in the UK. Besides investigating the usability of existing data, this research investigated: (i the relative weight of direct and indirect costs to business and infrastructure companies; (ii to what extent damage to infrastructure has impacted on indirect damage to businesses. Finally recommendations for improving the data for use in forensic investigation are offered.

  16. [Damage control in trauma patients with hemodynamic instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thorben; Doll, Dietrich; Kliebe, Frank; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Kühne, Christian

    2010-10-01

    The term "Damage-control" is borrowed from naval terminology. It means the initial control of a damaged ship. Because of the lethal triad in multiple injured patients the classical concept of definitive surgically therapy in the acute phase of the injury has a high rate of complications such as exsanguination, sepsis, heart failure and multiple organ failure. The core idea of the damage control concept was to minimize the additional trauma by surgical operations in these critical patients in the first phase. This means temporary control of a hemorrhage and measures for stopping abdominal contamination. After 24 - 48 hours in the intensive care unit and correction of physiological disturbances further interventions are performed for definitively treatment of the injuries. Summarized, the damage control strategy comprises an abbreviated operation, intensive care unit resuscitation, and a return to the operating room for the definitive operation after hemodynamic stabilisation of the patient. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Integrated Damage-Adaptive Control System (IDACS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI, in collaboration with Boeing Phantom Works, proposes to develop and test an efficient Integrated Damage Adaptive Control System (IDACS). The proposed system is...

  18. Fatigue-Damage Estimation and Control for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barradas Berglind, Jose de Jesus

    How can fatigue-damage for control of wind turbines be represented? Fatigue-damage is indeed a crucial factor in structures such as wind turbines that are exposed to turbulent and rapidly changing wind flow conditions. This is relevant both in their design stage and during the control......, the inclusion of fatigue-damage within feedback control loops is of special interest. Four strategies in total are proposed in this work: three for the wind turbine level and one for the wind farm level. On one hand, the three strategies in the turbine level are based on hysteresis operators and strive......-damage estimation in wind turbine components, to the mixed objective operation of wind energy conversion systems, and to the synthesis of control strategies that include hysteresis operators....

  19. Fatigue-Damage Estimation and Control for Wind Turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Barradas Berglind, Jose de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    How can fatigue-damage for control of wind turbines be represented? Fatigue-damage is indeed a crucial factor in structures such as wind turbines that are exposed to turbulent and rapidly changing wind flow conditions. This is relevant both in their design stage and during the control of their operation. Accordingly, the most recognized methods of fatigue-damage estimation are discussed in this thesis.In wind energy conversion systems there is an intrinsic trade-off between power generation m...

  20. FRF-based structural damage detection of controlled buildings with podium structures: Experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. L.; Huang, Q.; Zhan, S.; Su, Z. Q.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    How to use control devices to enhance system identification and damage detection in relation to a structure that requires both vibration control and structural health monitoring is an interesting yet practical topic. In this study, the possibility of using the added stiffness provided by control devices and frequency response functions (FRFs) to detect damage in a building complex was explored experimentally. Scale models of a 12-storey main building and a 3-storey podium structure were built to represent a building complex. Given that the connection between the main building and the podium structure is most susceptible to damage, damage to the building complex was experimentally simulated by changing the connection stiffness. To simulate the added stiffness provided by a semi-active friction damper, a steel circular ring was designed and used to add the related stiffness to the building complex. By varying the connection stiffness using an eccentric wheel excitation system and by adding or not adding the circular ring, eight cases were investigated and eight sets of FRFs were measured. The experimental results were used to detect damage (changes in connection stiffness) using a recently proposed FRF-based damage detection method. The experimental results showed that the FRF-based damage detection method could satisfactorily locate and quantify damage.

  1. Psychological harm after PANE: NEPA's requirement to consider psychological damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, W.S. III

    1984-01-01

    In Metropolitan Edison Co. v. People Against Nuclear Energy (PANE), the Supreme Court held that the National Environmental Policy Act does not require the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to consider the probable impact of its actions on psychological health. The Court's opinion, however, supports the conclusion that NEPA generally requires federal agencies to consider such probable impacts. This article examines the scope of federal responsibility following this decision. It delineates the causal relationship test that the Court adopted in PANE, and discusses possible obstacles to the consideration of psychological impacts under NEPA. It divides federal actions into four categories, then considers the benefits and burdens of the ruling using the NRC's responsibility to consider psychological health effects before licensing new nuclear reactors. 221 references

  2. Seaway Information System Management and Control Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-01

    This report examines in detail the control and information system requirements of the St. Lawrence Seaway development program in terms of the needs of the vessel traffic controllers and the management users. Structural control models of Seaway operat...

  3. NDE of Damage in Aircraft Flight Control Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, David K.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Dayal, Vinay

    2007-01-01

    Flight control surfaces on an aircraft, such as ailerons, flaps, spoilers and rudders, are typically adhesively bonded composite or aluminum honeycomb sandwich structures. These components can suffer from damage caused by hail stone, runway debris, or dropped tools during maintenance. On composites, low velocity impact damages can escape visual inspection, whereas on aluminum honeycomb sandwich, budding failure of the honeycomb core may or may not be accompanied by a disbond. This paper reports a study of the damage morphology in such structures and the NDE methods for detecting and characterizing them. Impact damages or overload failures in composite sandwiches with Nomex or fiberglass core tend to be a fracture or crinkle or the honeycomb cell wall located a distance below the facesheet-to-core bondline. The damage in aluminum honeycomb is usually a buckling failure, propagating from the top skin downward. The NDE methods used in this work for mapping out these damages were: air-coupled ultrasonic scan, and imaging by computer aided tap tester. Representative results obtained from the field will be shown

  4. Future Naval Concepts -- Crew Reductions through Improved Damage Control Communications (FNC-CRIDCC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Street, Thomas T; Williams, Frederick W; Cooper, L. S; Halloway, III, Kenneth E; Rininger, Michael; Miller, Charles; Shirley, Bradley; Genovese, Samuel; Showalter, David; Zak, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The object of the Damage Control (DC) Triad program was to develop a Damage Control Communications system, which would be damage tolerant and remain operable in casualty situations where DC communications are vital...

  5. Damage control kirurgi--en gennemgang af et Cochranereview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boel, Thomas; Hillingsø, Jens G; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    Damage Control Surgery (DCS) has been the approach in dealing with multi-trauma patients for the last 15 years. In this Cochrane-review the authors seek to compare the outcome of DCS with the outcome after the conventional strategy which is often a time-consuming operation with definitive repair...

  6. The management of colonic trauma in the damage control era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazi, B; Bruce, J L; Laing, G L; Sartorius, B; Clarke, D L

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The purpose of this study was to audit our current management of colonic trauma, and to review our experience of colonic trauma in patients who underwent initial damage control (DC) surgery. METHODS All patients treated for colonic trauma between January 2012 and December 2014 by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service were included in the study. Data reviewed included mechanism of injury, method of management (primary repair [PR], primary diversion [PD] or DC) and outcome (complications and mortality rate). Results A total of 128 patients sustained a colonic injury during the study period. Ninety-seven per cent of the injuries were due to penetrating trauma. Of these cases, 56% comprised stab wounds (SWs) and 44% were gunshot wounds (GSWs). Management was by PR in 99, PD in 20 and DC surgery in 9 cases. Among the 69 SW victims, 57 underwent PR, 9 had PD and 3 required a DC procedure. Of the 55 GSW cases, 40 were managed with PR, 9 with PD and 6 with DC surgery. In the PR group, there were 16 colonic complications (5 cases of breakdown and 11 of wound sepsis). Overall, nine patients (7%) died. CONCLUSIONS PR of colonic trauma is safe and should be used for the majority of such injuries. Persistent acidosis, however, should be considered a contraindication. In unstable patients with complex injuries, the optimal approach is to perform DC surgery. In this situation, formal diversion is contraindicated, and the injury should be controlled and dropped back into the abdomen at the primary operation. At the repeat operation, if the physiological insult has been reversed, then formal repair of the colonic injury is acceptable.

  7. Self-repairing control for damaged robotic manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisler, G.R.; Robinett, R.D.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-03-01

    Algorithms have been developed allowing operation of robotic systems under damaged conditions. Specific areas addressed were optimal sensor location, adaptive nonlinear control, fault-tolerant robot design, and dynamic path-planning. A seven-degree-of-freedom, hydraulic manipulator, with fault-tolerant joint design was also constructed and tested. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

  8. Damage control apronectomy for necrotising fasciitis and strangulated umbilical hernia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coyle, P

    2012-01-31

    We present a case of a 50-year-old morbidly obese woman who presented with a case of necrotizing fasciitis of the anterior abdominal wall due to a strangulated umbilical hernia. The case was managed through damage control surgery (DCS) with an initial surgery to stabilise the patient and a subsequent definitive operation and biological graft hernia repair. We emphasise the relevance of DCS principles in the management of severe abdominal sepsis.

  9. Damage control kirurgi--en gennemgang af et Cochranereview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boel, Thomas; Hillingsø, Jens G; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    . However, no randomised controlled trials are found, and thus it is not possible to say whether DCS is superior to the conventional approach or not. It is not possible to perform any RCT with these patients. According to literature in general on this subject we believe, nevertheless, that the principles......Damage Control Surgery (DCS) has been the approach in dealing with multi-trauma patients for the last 15 years. In this Cochrane-review the authors seek to compare the outcome of DCS with the outcome after the conventional strategy which is often a time-consuming operation with definitive repair...

  10. Harvest operations for density management: planning requirements, production, costs, stand damage, and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loren D. Kellogg; Stephen J. Pilkerton

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, several studies have been undertaken to determine the planning requirements, productivity, costs, and residual stand damage of harvest operations in thinning treatments designed to promote development of complex forest structure in order to enhance ecological functioning and biological diversity. Th ese studies include the Oregon State...

  11. Tracing And Control Of Engineering Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Philip R.; Stoller, Richard L.; Neville, Ted; Boyle, Karen A.

    1991-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is data-base/word-processing software system created to document and maintain order of both requirements and descriptions associated with engineering project. Implemented on IBM PC under PC-DOS. Written with CLIPPER.

  12. Genome-Wide Requirements for Resistance to Functionally Distinct DNA-Damaging Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic and therapeutic differences in the cellular response to DNA-damaging compounds are not completely understood, despite intense study. To expand our knowledge of DNA damage, we assayed the effects of 12 closely related DNA-damaging agents on the complete pool of ~4,700 barcoded homozygous deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In our protocol, deletion strains are pooled together and grown competitively in the presence of compound. Relative strain sensitivity is determined by hybridization of PCR-amplified barcodes to an oligonucleotide array carrying the barcode complements. These screens identified genes in well-characterized DNA-damage-response pathways as well as genes whose role in the DNA-damage response had not been previously established. High-throughput individual growth analysis was used to independently confirm microarray results. Each compound produced a unique genome-wide profile. Analysis of these data allowed us to determine the relative importance of DNA-repair modules for resistance to each of the 12 profiled compounds. Clustering the data for 12 distinct compounds uncovered both known and novel functional interactions that comprise the DNA-damage response and allowed us to define the genetic determinants required for repair of interstrand cross-links. Further genetic analysis allowed determination of epistasis for one of these functional groups.

  13. Protein damage and repair controlling seed vigor and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogé, Laurent; Broyart, Caroline; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Jallet, Denis; Bourdais, Gildas; Job, Dominique; Grappin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of abnormal isoaspartyl residues derived from aspartyl or asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous protein misfolding in cells. The repair enzyme protein L: -isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) counteracts such damage by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal isoaspartyl residues to their normal aspartyl forms. Thus, this enzyme contributes to the survival of many organisms, including plants. Analysis of the accumulation of isoaspartyl-containing proteins and its modulation by the PIMT repair pathway, using germination tests, immunodetection, enzymatic assays, and HPLC analysis, gives new insights in understanding controlling mechanisms of seed longevity and vigor.

  14. A methodology to describe process control requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ganni, V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to describe process control requirements for helium refrigeration plants. The SSC requires a greater level of automation for its refrigeration plants than is common in the cryogenics industry, and traditional methods (e.g., written descriptions) used to describe process control requirements are not sufficient. The methodology presented in this paper employs tabular and graphic representations in addition to written descriptions. The resulting document constitutes a tool for efficient communication among the different people involved in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of the control system. The methodology is not limited to helium refrigeration plants, and can be applied to any process with similar requirements. The paper includes examples

  15. TRACER - TRACING AND CONTROL OF ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is a database/word processing system created to document and maintain the order of both requirements and descriptive material associated with an engineering project. A set of hierarchical documents are normally generated for a project whereby the requirements of the higher level documents levy requirements on the same level or lower level documents. Traditionally, the requirements are handled almost entirely by manual paper methods. The problem with a typical paper system, however, is that requirements written and changed continuously in different areas lead to misunderstandings and noncompliance. The purpose of TRACER is to automate the capture, tracing, reviewing, and managing of requirements for an engineering project. The engineering project still requires communications, negotiations, interactions, and iterations among people and organizations, but TRACER promotes succinct and precise identification and treatment of real requirements separate from the descriptive prose in a document. TRACER permits the documentation of an engineering project's requirements and progress in a logical, controllable, traceable manner. TRACER's attributes include the presentation of current requirements and status from any linked computer terminal and the ability to differentiate headers and descriptive material from the requirements. Related requirements can be linked and traced. The program also enables portions of documents to be printed, individual approval and release of requirements, and the tracing of requirements down into the equipment specification. Requirement "links" can be made "pending" and invisible to others until the pending link is made "binding". Individuals affected by linked requirements can be notified of significant changes with acknowledgement of the changes required. An unlimited number of documents can be created for a project and an ASCII import feature permits existing documents to be incorporated

  16. Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illian, Howard F.

    2010-12-20

    Frequency control is an essential requirement of reliable electric power system operations. Determination of frequency control depends on frequency measurement and the practices based on these measurements that dictate acceptable frequency management. This report chronicles the evolution of these measurements and practices. As technology progresses from analog to digital for calculation, communication, and control, the technical basis for frequency control measurement and practices to determine acceptable performance continues to improve. Before the introduction of digital computing, practices were determined largely by prior experience. In anticipation of mandatory reliability rules, practices evolved from a focus primarily on commercial and equity issues to an increased focus on reliability. This evolution is expected to continue and place increased requirements for more precise measurements and a stronger scientific basis for future frequency management practices in support of reliability.

  17. Technical safety requirements control level verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STEWART, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) control level verification process was developed for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) TSRs at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA, at the direction of the US. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The objective of the effort was to develop a process to ensure that the TWRS TSR controls are designated and managed at the appropriate levels as Safety Limits (SLs), Limiting Control Settings (LCSs), Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs), Administrative Controls (ACs), or Design Features. The TSR control level verification process was developed and implemented by a team of contractor personnel with the participation of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH), the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) integrating contractor, and RL representatives. The team was composed of individuals with the following experience base: nuclear safety analysis; licensing; nuclear industry and DOE-complex TSR preparation/review experience; tank farm operations; FDH policy and compliance; and RL-TWRS oversight. Each TSR control level designation was completed utilizing TSR control logic diagrams and TSR criteria checklists based on DOE Orders, Standards, Contractor TSR policy, and other guidance. The control logic diagrams and criteria checklists were reviewed and modified by team members during team meetings. The TSR control level verification process was used to systematically evaluate 12 LCOs, 22 AC programs, and approximately 100 program key elements identified in the TWRS TSR document. The verification of each TSR control required a team consensus. Based on the results of the process, refinements were identified and the TWRS TSRs were modified as appropriate. A final report documenting key assumptions and the control level designation for each TSR control was prepared and is maintained on file for future reference. The results of the process were used as a reference in the RL review of the final TWRS TSRs and control suite. RL

  18. Technical safety requirements control level verification; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STEWART, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) control level verification process was developed for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) TSRs at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA, at the direction of the US. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The objective of the effort was to develop a process to ensure that the TWRS TSR controls are designated and managed at the appropriate levels as Safety Limits (SLs), Limiting Control Settings (LCSs), Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs), Administrative Controls (ACs), or Design Features. The TSR control level verification process was developed and implemented by a team of contractor personnel with the participation of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH), the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) integrating contractor, and RL representatives. The team was composed of individuals with the following experience base: nuclear safety analysis; licensing; nuclear industry and DOE-complex TSR preparation/review experience; tank farm operations; FDH policy and compliance; and RL-TWRS oversight. Each TSR control level designation was completed utilizing TSR control logic diagrams and TSR criteria checklists based on DOE Orders, Standards, Contractor TSR policy, and other guidance. The control logic diagrams and criteria checklists were reviewed and modified by team members during team meetings. The TSR control level verification process was used to systematically evaluate 12 LCOs, 22 AC programs, and approximately 100 program key elements identified in the TWRS TSR document. The verification of each TSR control required a team consensus. Based on the results of the process, refinements were identified and the TWRS TSRs were modified as appropriate. A final report documenting key assumptions and the control level designation for each TSR control was prepared and is maintained on file for future reference. The results of the process were used as a reference in the RL review of the final TWRS TSRs and control suite. RL

  19. WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

    2009-12-31

    The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just

  20. Role of transfused red blood cells for shock and coagulopathy within remote damage control resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Philip C; Doctor, Allan

    2014-05-01

    The philosophy of damage control resuscitation (DCR) and remote damage control resuscitation (RDCR) can be summarized by stating that the goal is to prevent death from hemorrhagic shock by "staying out of trouble instead of getting out of trouble." In other words, it is preferred to arrest the progression of shock, rather than also having to reverse this condition after significant tissue damage and organ injury cascades are established. Moreover, to prevent death from exsanguination, a balanced approach to the treatment of both shock and coagulopathy is required. This was military doctrine during World War II, but seemed to be forgotten during the last half of the 20th century. Damage control resuscitation and RDCR have revitalized the approach, but there is still more to learn about the most effective and safe resuscitative strategies to simultaneously treat shock and hemorrhage. Current data suggest that our preconceived notions regarding the efficacy of standard issue red blood cells (RBCs) during the hours after transfusion may be false. Standard issue RBCs may not increase oxygen delivery and may in fact decrease it by disturbing control of regional blood flow distribution (impaired nitric oxide processing) and failing to release oxygen, even when perfusing hypoxic tissue (abnormal oxygen affinity). Standard issue RBCs may assist with hemostasis but appear to have competing effects on thrombin generation and platelet function. If standard issue or RBCs of increased storage age are not optimal, then are there alternatives that will allow for an efficacious and safe treatment of shock while also supporting hemostasis? Studies are required to determine if fresh RBCs less than 7 to 10 days provide an outcome advantage. A resurgence in the study of whole blood stored at 4°C for up to 10 days also holds promise. Two randomized controlled trials in humans have indicated that following transfusion with either whole blood stored at 4°C or platelets stored at 4

  1. Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to antioxidants, oxidative damage and cardiovascular health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) t to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to antioxidants, oxidative damage and cardiovascular health. This guidance has been drawn from scientific...... opinions of the NDA Panel on such health claims. Thus, this guidance document represents the views of the NDA Panel based on the experience gained to date with the evaluation of health claims in these areas. It is not intended that the document should include an exhaustive list of beneficial effects...

  2. Controlling the response to DNA damage by the APC/C-Cdh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, H Rudolf; Guerrero Llobet, S; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-03-01

    Proper cell cycle progression is safeguarded by the oscillating activities of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. An important player in the regulation of mitotic cyclins is the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase. Prior to entry into mitosis, the APC/C remains inactive, which allows the accumulation of mitotic regulators. APC/C activation requires binding to either the Cdc20 or Cdh1 adaptor protein, which sequentially bind the APC/C and facilitate targeting of multiple mitotic regulators for proteasomal destruction, including Securin and Cyclin B, to ensure proper chromosome segregation and mitotic exit. Emerging data have indicated that the APC/C, particularly in association with Cdh1, also functions prior to mitotic entry. Specifically, the APC/C-Cdh1 is activated in response to DNA damage in G2 phase cells. These observations are in line with in vitro and in vivo genetic studies, in which cells lacking Cdh1 expression display various defects, including impaired DNA repair and aberrant cell cycle checkpoints. In this review, we summarize the current literature on APC/C regulation in response to DNA damage, the functions of APC/C-Cdh1 activation upon DNA damage, and speculate how APC/C-Cdh1 can control cell fate in the context of persistent DNA damage.

  3. Requirements and solutions for accelerator control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anicic, D.; Blumer, T.; Jirousek, I.; Lutz, H.; Mezger, A.

    2001-01-01

    Throughout the life cycle of control systems, we are faced with the question of what fabulous new piece of hardware or software should be used and how to integrate this into a viable system. Accelerators cover a wide range, from simple cyclotrons for isotope production, to cascades of cyclotrons for variable energy and multiple particles, this precludes a standard answer for all cases. The system requirements according to the purpose and nature of the accelerator are analyzed and we try to extract some guidelines for implementation, development and maintenance of the appropriate control systems. We then try to analyze present trends in a selection of fields like operating systems, commercial systems, software sharing, field busses, etc

  4. Requirements for quality control of analytical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmoreland, R.D.; Bartling, M.H.

    1990-07-01

    The National Contingency Plan (NCP) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) provides procedures for the identification, evaluation, and remediation of past hazardous waste disposal sites. The Hazardous Materials Response section of the NCP consists of several phases: Preliminary Assessment, Site Inspection, Remedial Investigation, Feasibility Study, Remedial Design, and Remedial Action. During any of these phases, analysis of soil, water, and waste samples may be performed. The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) is involved in performing field investigations and sample analyses pursuant to the NCP for the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies. The purpose of this document is to specify the requirements of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the control of accuracy, precision, and completeness of samples and data from the point of collection through analysis. Requirements include data reduction and reporting of resulting environmentally related data. Because every instance and concern may not be addressed in this document, HAZWRAP subcontractors are encouraged to discuss any questions with the Analytical Quality Control Specialist (AQCS) and the HAZWRAP Project Manager. This revision supercedes all other versions of this document

  5. Tracking and Control of Gas Turbine Engine Component Damage/Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaw, Link C.; Wu, Dong N.; Bryg, David J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes damage mechanisms and the methods of controlling damages to extend the on-wing life of critical gas turbine engine components. Particularly, two types of damage mechanisms are discussed: creep/rupture and thermo-mechanical fatigue. To control these damages and extend the life of engine hot-section components, we have investigated two methodologies to be implemented as additional control logic for the on-board electronic control unit. This new logic, the life-extending control (LEC), interacts with the engine control and monitoring unit and modifies the fuel flow to reduce component damages in a flight mission. The LEC methodologies were demonstrated in a real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation. The results show that LEC is not only a new paradigm for engine control design, but also a promising technology for extending the service life of engine components, hence reducing the life cycle cost of the engine.

  6. Program requirements to determine and relate fuel damage and failure thresholds to anticipated conditions in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyd, R.F.; Croucher, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    Anticipated transients, licensing criteria, and damage mechanisms for PWR fuel rods are reviewed. Potential mechanistic fuel rod damage limits for PWRs are discussed. An expermental program to be conducted out-of-pile and in the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) to generate a safety data base to define mechanistic fuel damage and failure thresholds and to relate these thresholds to the thermal-hydraulic and power conditions in a PWR is proposed. The requirements for performing the tests are outlined. Analytical support requirements are defined

  7. As we age: Does slippage of quality control in the immune system lead to collateral damage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2015-09-01

    The vertebrate adaptive immune system is remarkable for its possession of a very broad range of antigen receptors imbuing the system with exquisite specificity, in addition to the phagocytic and inflammatory cells of the innate system shared with invertebrates. This system requires strict control both at the level of the generation the cells carrying these receptors and at the level of their activation and effector function mediation in order to avoid autoimmunity and mitigate immune pathology. Thus, quality control checkpoints are built into the system at multiple nodes in the response, relying on clonal selection and regulatory networks to maximize pathogen-directed effects and minimize collateral tissue damage. However, these checkpoints are compromised with age, resulting in poorer immune control manifesting as tissue-damaging autoimmune and inflammatory phenomena which can cause widespread systemic disease, paradoxically compounding the problems associated with increased susceptibility to infectious disease and possibly cancer in the elderly. Better understanding the reasons for slippage of immune control will pave the way for developing rational strategies for interventions to maintain appropriate immunity while reducing immunopathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    mitotic entry. In early mitosis, TopBP1 marks sites of and promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, TopBP1 is required for focus formation of the structure-selective nuclease and scaffold protein SLX4 in mitosis. Persistent TopBP1 foci transition into 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs) in G1 and precise...... temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin...

  9. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Genome integrity is critically dependent on timely DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation. Replication stress delays replication into G2/M, which in turn impairs proper chromosome segregation and inflicts DNA damage on the daughter cells. Here we show that TopBP1 forms foci upon mitotic entry. In early mitosis, TopBP1 marks sites of and promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, TopBP1 is required for focus formation of the structure-selective nuclease and scaffold protein SLX4 in mitosis. Persistent TopBP1 foci transition into 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs) in G1 and precise temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin recruitment of SLX4 and by facilitating unscheduled DNA synthesis. PMID:26283799

  10. Development of damage control training scenarios of naval ships based on simplified vulnerability analysis results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ki Park

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the growing interest in damage control training for the naval ships and their organizations, expectations for a new concept of training program have also increased. The existing training programs and its concept focus on training crew to be more proficient and skilled so that they can respond better to damage situations, i.e., fires and flooding. This paper suggests a development procedure of damage control training scenarios using the survivability analysis results as a new concept of damage control training programs employing advanced systems such as damage control console, automation system, and kill cards. This approach could help the decision maker not only enhance his or her capability but also improve the reacting capability of crew members for complex situations induced by a weapon hit.

  11. Cirurgia para controle de danos: estado atual Damage control surgery: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Camargo Leão Edelmuth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A cirurgia de controle de danos é um conceito amplamente aceito atualmente entre os especialistas em trauma abdominal quando se trata de doentes gravemente traumatizados. Nestes pacientes a morte decorre, na maioria das vezes, da instalação da tríade letal (hipotermia, coagulopatia e acidose e não da incapacidade de reparar as graves lesões presentes. Nesta revisão, os autores abordam a tríade letal, em suas três fases, e enfatizam as medidas adotadas para preveni-las. Além de discutirem a indicação e o emprego da cirurgia para o controle de danos em seus vários estágios. A restauração dos padrões fisiológicos do doente na UTI, para que o mesmo possa ser submetido à operação definitiva e ao fechamento da cavidade abdominal, outro desafio no paciente traumatizado grave, também é discutida.The damage control surgery is a widely accepted concept today among abdominal trauma specialists when it comes to the severely traumatized. In these patients, the death is due, in most cases, to the installation of the lethal triad (hypothermia, coagulopathy and acidosis and not the inability to repair the serious initial damage. In this review, the authors address the lethal triad in its three phases and emphasize the measures taken to prevent them, as well as discussing the indication and employment of damage control surgery in its various stages. Restoring the physiological status of the patient in the ICU, so that he/she can be submitted to final operation and closure of the abdominal cavity, another challenge in severe trauma patients, is also discussed.

  12. Guidance for the scientific requirements for health claims related to antioxidants, oxidative damage and cardiovascular health (Revision 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2018-01-01

    of additional health claim applications related to antioxidants, oxidative damage and cardiovascular health, and the information collected from a Grant launched in 2014. This guidance is intended to assist applicants in preparing applications for the authorisation of health claims related to the antioxidants......EFSA asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to update the guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to antioxidants, oxidative damage and cardiovascular health published in 2011. The update takes into accounts experiences gained with evaluation......, oxidative damage and cardiovascular health. The document was subject to public consultation (from 12 July to 3 September 2017). This document supersedes the guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to antioxidants, oxidative damage and cardiovascular health published in 2011...

  13. Reducing feedback requirements of workload control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrich, Peter; Land, Martin; van der Zee, Durk; Gaalman, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    The workload control concept is known as a robust shop floor control concept. It is especially suited for the dynamic environment of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) within the make-to-order sector. Before orders are released to the shop floor, they are collected in an ‘order pool’. To

  14. Motor Control Research Requires Nonlinear Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    The author comments on the original article "The Cinderella of psychology: The neglect of motor control in the science of mental life and behavior," by D. A. Rosenbaum. Rosenbaum draws attention to the study of motor control and evaluates seven possible explanations for why the topic has been relatively neglected. The point of this comment is that…

  15. Control of cavitation using dissolved carbon dioxide for damage-free megasonic cleaning of wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sangita

    This dissertation describes the finding that dissolved carbon dioxide is a potent inhibitor of sonoluminescence and describes the implications of the finding in the development of improved megasonic cleaning formulations. Megasonic cleaning, or the removal of contaminants particles from wafer surfaces using sound-irradiated cleaning fluids, has been traditionally used in the semiconductor industry for cleaning of wafers. A critical challenge in the field is to achieve removal of small particles (22 nm to 200 nm) without causing damage to fine wafer features. The work described here addresses this challenge by identifying sonoluminescence and solution pH as two key factors affecting damage and cleaning efficiency, respectively and establishing novel means to control them using CO2(aq) release compounds in the presence of acids and bases. Sonoluminescence (SL) behavior of the major dissolved gases such as Ar, Air, N2, O2 and CO2 was determined using a newly designed Cavitation Threshold Cell (CT Cell). SL, which is the phenomenon of release of light in sound-irradiated liquids, is a sensitive indicator of cavitation, primarily transient cavitation. It was found that all the tested dissolved gases such as Ar, Air, N2 and O2, generated SL signal efficiently. However, dissolved CO2 was found to be completely incapable of generating SL signal. Based on this interesting result, gradual suppression of SL signal was demonstrated using CO2(aq). It was further demonstrated that CO2(aq) is not only incapable but is also a potent inhibitor of SL. The inhibitory role of CO2(aq) was established using a novel method of controlled in-situ release of CO 2 from NH4HCO3. ~130 ppm CO2(aq) was shown to be necessary and sufficient for complete suppression of SL generation in air saturated DI water. The method however required acidification of solution for significant release of CO2, making it unsuitable for the design of cleaning solutions at high pH. Analysis of the underlying ionic

  16. Design requirement on KALIMER control rod assembly duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W.; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O.; Kim, Y. J.

    1998-03-01

    This document establishes the design guidelines which are needs for designing the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER as design requirements. it describes control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER and its requirements that includes functional requirements, performance requirements, interfacing systems, design limits and strength requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. The control rod system consists of three parts, which are drive mechanism, drive-line, and absorber bundle. This report deals with the absorber bundle and its outer duct only because the others are beyond the scope of fuel system design. The guidelines for design requirements intend to be used for an improved design of the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER. (author). 19 refs

  17. Design requirement on KALIMER control rod assembly duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, W.; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O.; Kim, Y. J

    1998-03-01

    This document establishes the design guidelines which are needs for designing the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER as design requirements. it describes control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER and its requirements that includes functional requirements, performance requirements, interfacing systems, design limits and strength requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. The control rod system consists of three parts, which are drive mechanism, drive-line, and absorber bundle. This report deals with the absorber bundle and its outer duct only because the others are beyond the scope of fuel system design. The guidelines for design requirements intend to be used for an improved design of the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER. (author). 19 refs.

  18. Remotely controlled working equipment and mobile systems for damage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, G.W.; Salaske, M.

    1975-01-01

    All functions of the MF3 vehicle with its variable geometry chassis were verified in accordance with specifications. Fixed price bids have now been submitted by industries on the action control system and the EMSM II manipulators. Tests of the EMSM I manipulator with supplements especially the remotely controlled application of tools, have been started. (orig.) [de

  19. Key requirements for future control room functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornelli, Carlo; Zuelli, Roberto; Marinelli, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    ) and the observability needs highlighted within WP5 led to the definition of the requirements with a Web of Cell (WoC) point of view. The main European Distribution System Operators (DSOs) provided a valuable contribution in the definition of the evolvDSO Use Cases. Their analysis lead to the definition of further...

  20. 42 CFR 84.40 - Quality control plans; filing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality control plans; filing requirements. 84.40... Control § 84.40 Quality control plans; filing requirements. As a part of each application for approval or... proposed quality control plan which shall be designed to assure the quality of respiratory protection...

  1. 42 CFR 84.256 - Quality control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality control requirements. 84.256 Section 84.256... § 84.256 Quality control requirements. (a) In addition to the construction and performance requirements specified in §§ 84.251, 84.252, 84.253, 84.254, and 84.255, the quality control requirements in paragraphs...

  2. Fatigue Damage Estimation and Data-based Control for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barradas Berglind, Jose de Jesus; Wisniewski, Rafal; Soltani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    based on hysteresis operators, which can be used in control loops. The authors propose a data-based model predictive control (MPC) strategy that incorporates an online fatigue estimation method through the objective function, where the ultimate goal in mind is to reduce the fatigue damage of the wind......The focus of this work is on fatigue estimation and data-based controller design for wind turbines. The main purpose is to include a model of the fatigue damage of the wind turbine components in the controller design and synthesis process. This study addresses an online fatigue estimation method...... turbine components. The outcome is an adaptive or self-tuning MPC strategy for wind turbine fatigue damage reduction, which relies on parameter identification on previous measurement data. The results of the proposed strategy are compared with a baseline model predictive controller....

  3. Seismic resistance of equipment and building service systems: review of earthquake damage design requirements, and research applications in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjei, R.E.; Chakravartula, B.C.; Yanev, P.I.

    1979-01-01

    The history of earthquake damage and the resulting code design requirements for earthquake hazard mitigation for equipment in the USA is reviewed. Earthquake damage to essential service systems is summarized; observations for the 1964 Alaska and the 1971 San Fernando, California, earthquakes are stressed, and information from other events is included. USA building codes that reflect lessons learned from these earthquakes are discussed; brief summaries of widely used codes are presented. In conclusion there is a discussion of the desirability of adapting advanced technological concepts from the nuclear industry to equipment in conventional structures. (author)

  4. Control of Antimicrobial Resistance Requires an Ethical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Parsonage

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ethical behavior encompasses actions that benefit both self and society. This means that tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR becomes an ethical obligation, because the prospect of declining anti-infectives affects everyone. Without preventive action, loss of drugs that have saved lives over the past century, will condemn ourselves, people we know, and people we don’t know, to unacceptable risk of untreatable infection. Policies aimed at extending antimicrobial life should be considered within an ethical framework, in order to balance the choice, range, and quality of drugs against stewardship activities. Conserving availability and effectiveness for future use should not compromise today’s patients. Practices such as antimicrobial prophylaxis for healthy people ‘at risk’ should receive full debate. There are additional ethical considerations for AMR involving veterinary care, agriculture, and relevant bio-industries. Restrictions for farmers potentially threaten the quality and quantity of food production with economic consequences. Antibiotics for companion animals do not necessarily spare those used for humans. While low-income countries cannot afford much-needed drugs, pharmaceutical companies are reluctant to develop novel agents for short-term return only. Public demand encourages over-the-counter, internet, black market, and counterfeit drugs, all of which compromise international control. Prescribers themselves require educational support to balance therapeutic choice against collateral damage to both body and environment. Predicted mortality due to AMR provides justification for international co-operation, commitment and investment to support surveillance and stewardship along with development of novel antimicrobial drugs. Ethical arguments for, and against, control of antimicrobial resistance strategies are presented and discussed in this review.

  5. Effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a small horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, A F; Freris, L L; Graham, J M.R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    An experiment into the effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a 5 kW, two bladed, teetered HAWT has been performed. It has been shown that control activity influences the distribution of strain in the blade but that in a high rotor speed, high cycle fatigue regime this has little influence on damage rate. The experiment was conducted on a small test turbine by implementing variable speed stall, pitch and yaw control strategies and measuring blade flapwise strain response at root and midspan locations. A full description of the investigation is provided. (au)

  6. Micronutrient special issue: Coenzyme Q10 requirements for DNA damage prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, Constance; Döring, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) is an essential component for electron transport in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and serves as cofactor in several biological processes. The reduced form of CoQ 10 (ubiquinol, Q 10 H 2 ) is an effective antioxidant in biological membranes. During the last years, particular interest has been grown on molecular effects of CoQ 10 supplementation on mechanisms related to DNA damage prevention. This review describes recent advances in our understanding about the impact of CoQ 10 on genomic stability in cells, animals and humans. With regard to several in vitro and in vivo studies, CoQ 10 provides protective effects on several markers of oxidative DNA damage and genomic stability. In comparison to the number of studies reporting preventive effects of CoQ 10 on oxidative stress biomarkers, CoQ 10 intervention studies in humans with a direct focus on markers of DNA damage are limited. Thus, more well-designed studies in healthy and disease populations with long-term follow up results are needed to substantiate the reported beneficial effects of CoQ 10 on prevention of DNA damage.

  7. Micronutrient special issue: Coenzyme Q{sub 10} requirements for DNA damage prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelzer, Constance, E-mail: schmelzer@fbn-dummerstorf.de [Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology (FBN), Nutritional Physiology, Wilhelm-Stahl-Allee 2, 18196 Dummerstorf (Germany); Doering, Frank [University of Kiel, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Molecular Prevention, Heinrich-Hecht-Platz 10, 24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    Coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) is an essential component for electron transport in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and serves as cofactor in several biological processes. The reduced form of CoQ{sub 10} (ubiquinol, Q{sub 10}H{sub 2}) is an effective antioxidant in biological membranes. During the last years, particular interest has been grown on molecular effects of CoQ{sub 10} supplementation on mechanisms related to DNA damage prevention. This review describes recent advances in our understanding about the impact of CoQ{sub 10} on genomic stability in cells, animals and humans. With regard to several in vitro and in vivo studies, CoQ{sub 10} provides protective effects on several markers of oxidative DNA damage and genomic stability. In comparison to the number of studies reporting preventive effects of CoQ{sub 10} on oxidative stress biomarkers, CoQ{sub 10} intervention studies in humans with a direct focus on markers of DNA damage are limited. Thus, more well-designed studies in healthy and disease populations with long-term follow up results are needed to substantiate the reported beneficial effects of CoQ{sub 10} on prevention of DNA damage.

  8. Technology requirement for Halal quality control | Husny | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technology requirement for Halal quality control. ... Findings show that each industry segments have different technology characteristics preference. ... Keywords: halal industry, quality control; technology assistance; food and beverage; ...

  9. 30 CFR 28.30 - Quality control plans; filing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality control plans; filing requirements. 28... PROTECTION FOR TRAILING CABLES IN COAL MINES Quality Control § 28.30 Quality control plans; filing... part, each applicant shall file with MSHA a proposed quality control plan which shall be designed to...

  10. 40 CFR 63.2343 - What are my requirements for emission sources not requiring control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are my requirements for emission sources not requiring control? 63.2343 Section 63.2343 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... (Non-Gasoline) What This Subpart Covers § 63.2343 What are my requirements for emission sources not...

  11. The Effectiveness of a Damage Control Resuscitation Strategy for Vascular Injury in a Combat Support Hospital: Results of a Case Control Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fox, Charles J; Gillespie, David L; Cox, E. D; Mehta, Sumeru G; Kragh, Jr., John J; Salinas, Jose; Holcomb, John B

    2008-01-01

    ...). Standard damage control principles are routinely applied to achieve rapid hemorrhage control, and to initiate a hemostatic resuscitation plan that will correct metabolic imbalances and prevent...

  12. Slx4 becomes phosphorylated after DNA damage in a Mec1/Tel1-dependent manner and is required for repair of DNA alkylation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flott, Sonja; Rouse, John

    2005-01-01

    Members of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, mutated in several syndromes associated with cancer predisposition, are key regulators of genome stability. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SLX4 gene is required for cell viability in the absence of Sgs1, the only yeast RecQ helicase. SLX4 encodes one subunit of the heterodimeric Slx1–Slx4 endonuclease, although its cellular function is not clear. Slx1–Slx4 was reported to preferentially cleave replication fork-like structures in vitro, and cells lacking SLX4 are hypersensitive to DNA alkylation damage. Here we report that Slx4 becomes phosphorylated in cells exposed to a wide range of genotoxins. Even though it has been proposed that the role of Slx4 is restricted to S-phase, Slx4 phosphorylation is observed in cells arrested in G1 or G2 phases of the cell cycle, but not during an unperturbed cell cycle. Slx4 phosphorylation is completely abolished in cells lacking the Mec1 and Tel1 protein kinases, critical regulators of genome stability, but is barely affected in the absence of both Rad53 and Chk1 kinases. Finally we show that, whereas both Slx1 and Slx4 are dispensable for activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, Slx4, but not Slx1, is required for repair of DNA alkylation damage in both aynchronously growing cells and in G2-phase-arrested cells. These results reveal Slx4 as a new target of the Mec1/Tel1 kinases, with a crucial role in DNA repair that is not restricted to the processing of stalled replisomes. PMID:15975089

  13. Body mass index affects time to definitive closure after damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Dooley, Adam C; Weinberg, Jordan A; McGwin, Gerald; MacLennan, Paul A; Griffin, Russell L; Rue, Loring W; Reiff, Donald A

    2009-06-01

    A growing body of literature demonstrates that irrespective of the mechanism of injury, obesity is associated with significantly worse morbidity and mortality after trauma. Among patients requiring damage control laparotomy (DCL), clinical experience suggests that obesity affects time to definitive closure though this association has never been demonstrated quantitatively. All patients at an academic Level I trauma center requiring a DCL between January 2002 and December 2006 (N = 148) were included. Information pertaining to demographic, injury, and clinical characteristics was abstracted from patient medical records. The risk of specific complications including pneumonia, renal failure, and sepsis was compared between normal and overweight/obese patients, as measured by body mass index (BMI). The lengths of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and mechanical ventilation as well as time to abdominal closure were also compared. The risk of pneumonia, sepsis, and renal failure was 2.05-times, 1.77-times, and 2.84-times higher among overweight patients compared with patients with a normal BMI. The risk of pneumonia, sepsis, and renal failure was 2.01-times, 4.24-times, and 1.85-times higher among obese patients compared with those with a normal BMI. Obese patients also had a significantly longer ICU length of stay (28.7 days vs. 15.1 days; p < 0.0001), longer hospitalization (39.3 days vs. 27.0 days; p = 0.008), and time to definitive closure (8.4 days vs. 3.9 days; p = 0.03) compared with patients with a normal BMI. Among patients requiring DCL, those who are overweight or obese have a prolonged time to definitive closure. These patients also experience a significantly longer ICU course and a higher risk of pneumonia.

  14. Customer requirement modeling and mapping of numerical control machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqi Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to better obtain information about customer requirement and develop products meeting customer requirement, it is necessary to systematically analyze and handle the customer requirement. This article uses the product service system of numerical control machine as research objective and studies the customer requirement modeling and mapping oriented toward configuration design. It introduces the conception of requirement unit, expounds the customer requirement decomposition rules, and establishes customer requirement model; it builds the house of quality using quality function deployment and confirms the weight of technical feature of product and service; it explores the relevance rules between data using rough set theory, establishes rule database, and solves the target value of technical feature of product. Using economical turning center series numerical control machine as an example, it verifies the rationality of proposed customer requirement model.

  15. A performance requirements analysis of the SSC control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, S.M.; Low, K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of analysis of the performance requirements of the Superconducting Super Collider Control System. We quantify the performance requirements of the system in terms of response time, throughput and reliability. We then examine the effect of distance and traffic patterns on control system performance and examine how these factors influence the implementation of the control network architecture and compare the proposed system against those criteria. (author)

  16. Ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 is required for cellular response to DNA damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moudrý, Pavel; Lukas, C.; Macůrek, Libor; Hanzlíková, Hana; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lukas, J.; Bartek, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 8 (2012), s. 1573-1582 ISSN 1538-4101 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/0353; GA ČR GAP301/10/1525 Grant - others:7.RP EU(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : 53BP1 * DNA damage response * UBA1 * UBA6 * ubiquitylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.243, year: 2012

  17. Intraintestinal drainage as a damage control surgery adjunct in a hypothermic traumatic shock swine model with multiple bowel perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wu; Ding, Weiwei; Liu, Xingdong; Kao, Xiaomin; Xu, Xingwei; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2014-11-01

    Temporary bowel ligation (TL) has been proposed to prevent contamination as a damage control procedure in multiple bowel perforations. However, bacteria translocation and intestinal ischemia may develop in a prolonged duration. We here hypothesized that intraintestinal drainage combined with temporary ligation (D-TL) would decrease intestinal injury and improve survivals in a gunshot multiple bowel perforation swine model in the setting of a damage control surgery. The abdomen was shot one time with an experimental modified gun whereas pigs were hemorrhaged to a mean arterial pressure of 40 mm Hg and maintained in shock for 40 min. Cold lactated Ringer solution was gradually infused to induce hypothermia. Animals were randomized to primary anastomosis, TL and intraintestinal D-TL groups (n = 8). Animals were resuscitated for 12 h with the shed blood and lactated Ringer solution. Delayed anastomosis was performed in TL and D-TL animals after resuscitation. Surviving animals were humanely killed 24 h after operation. Systemic hemodynamic parameters were recorded and blood samples were obtained for biochemical assays. Intra-abdominal pressure, portal vein and peripheral vein bacterial cultures, small intestine hematoxylin-eosin staining, and transmission electron microscopy examination were performed at 0, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after the surgery. All animals suffered extreme physiologic conditions as follows: hypothermia, severe acidosis, hypotension, and depressed cardiac output. Compared with the primary anastomosis and TL group, D-TL animals required less resuscitation fluid, suffered a lower intra-abdominal hypertension and bacterial translocation, normalized lactate levels faster, had lower serum creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase levels and tissue TNF-α level, and nuclear factor-kB activations and thus had greater early survival. Compared with primary intestinal anastomosis and TL, rapid bowel ligation combined with intraintestinal drainage as a damage

  18. Remote sensing bio-control damage on aquatic invasive alien plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Naeem

    Satellite based remote sensing provides a synoptic view of ... information system for multi-temporal analysis (Albright et al., 2004) which ... control damage based on the colour of the foliage using aerial photography and conventional .... It was reported that the ratio of two chlorophyll fluorescence bands can be used to detect ...

  19. Impact of Higher Fidelity Models on Simulation of Active Aerodynamic Load Control For Fatigue Damage Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Resor, B.; Wilson, D.; Berg, D.; Berg, J.; Barlas, T.; Van Wingerden, J.W.; Van Kuik, G.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Active aerodynamic load control of wind turbine blades is being investigated by the wind energy research community and shows great promise, especially for reduction of turbine fatigue damage in blades and nearby components. For much of this work, full system aeroelastic codes have been used to

  20. A novel cis-acting element required for DNA damage-inducible expression of yeast DIN7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitani, Ayako; Yoshida, Minoru; Ling Feng

    2008-01-01

    Din7 is a DNA damage-inducible mitochondrial nuclease that modulates the stability of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. How DIN7 gene expression is regulated, however, has remained largely unclear. Using promoter sequence alignment, we found a highly conserved 19-bp sequence in the promoter regions of DIN7 and NTG1, which encodes an oxidative stress-inducible base-excision-repair enzyme. Deletion of the 19-bp sequence markedly reduced the hydroxyurea (HU)-enhanced DIN7 promoter activity. In addition, nuclear fractions prepared from HU-treated cells were used in in vitro band shift assays to reveal the presence of currently unidentified trans-acting factor(s) that preferentially bound to the 19-bp region. These results suggest that the 19-bp sequence is a novel cis-acting element that is required for the regulation of DIN7 expression in response to HU-induced DNA damage

  1. 21 CFR 111.117 - What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for equipment, instruments, and controls? 111.117 Section 111.117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.117 What quality control operations...

  2. Damage control strategy for the treatment of perforated diverticulitis with generalized peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, M; Agha, A; Heitland, W; Gundling, F; Steiner, P; Iesalnieks, I

    2016-08-01

    The best surgical strategy for the management of perforated diverticulitis with generalized peritonitis of the sigmoid colon is not clearly defined. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the value of a damage control strategy. All patients who underwent emergency laparotomy for perforated diverticular disease of the sigmoid colon with generalized peritonitis between 2010 and 2015 were included. The damage control strategy (study group), included a two- stage procedure: limited resection of the diseased colonic segment, closure of proximal colon and distal stump, and application of an abdominal vacuum at the initial surgery followed by second-look laparotomy 24-48 h later At this point a choice was made between anastomosis and Hartmann's procedure. The control group consisted of patients receiving definitive reconstruction (anastomosis or Hartmann's procedure) at the initial operation. Thirty-seven patients were included in the study. Damage control strategy was applied in 19 patients and the control group consisted of 18 patients. Both groups were comparable in terms of demographics, severity of peritonitis, and comorbidities. The overall postoperative mortality was 11 % (n = 4). There were no statistically significant differences between both groups regarding postoperative morbidity and mortality; however, a significantly higher proportion of patients in the control group had a stoma after the initial hospital stay (83 vs. 47 %, p = 0.038). This difference was still significant after adjustment for sex, age, Mannheim Peritonitis Index, American Society of Anesthesiologists class and presence of septic shock at presentation. At the end of the follow-up period, 15 of 17 survivors in the study group and 13 of 16 survivors in the control group had their intestinal continuity restored (p = 0.66). Damage control strategy in patients with generalized peritonitis due to perforated diverticulitis leads to a significantly reduced stoma rate

  3. Colonic injuries and the damage control abdomen: does management strategy matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoff, Patrick; Perales, Paul; Laguna, Benjamin; Holena, Daniel; Reilly, Patrick; Sims, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Background The optimal management of colon injury patients requiring damage control laparotomy (DCL) is controversial. The objective of this study was to assess the safety of colonic resection and anastomosis versus fecal diversion in trauma patients requiring DCL. Methods Patients with traumatic colon injuries undergoing DCL between 2000 and 2010 were identified by the database and chart review. Those who died within 48 h were excluded. Patients were divided into two groups: those undergoing one or more colonic anastomoses with or without distal colostomy (group 1) and those undergoing colostomy only or one or more colonic anastomoses with a protecting proximal ostomy (group 2). Variables were compared using Wilcoxon rank sum, χ2, or Fisher exact tests as appropriate. Results Sixty-one patients were included (group 1, n = 28 and group 2, n = 33). Fascial closure rates (group 1, 50% versus group 2, 61%; P = 0.45), hospital length of stay (29 versus 23 d; P = 0.89), and in-patient mortality (11% versus 12%; P = 1.0) were similar between groups. There were a total of 11 anastomotic leaks, five of which were related to non-colonic enteric repairs. Colonic anastomosis leak rates were 16% overall (six of the 38 patients), 14% in group 1 (four of the 28 patients), and 20% in group 2 (two of the 10 patients). Compared with patients who did not leak, patients who leaked had a higher median age (37 versus 25 y; P = 0.05), greater likelihood of not achieving facial closure before post-injury day 5 (18% versus 2%; P = 0.003), and a longer hospital length of stay (46 versus 25 d; P = 0.003). Conclusions Outcomes after colonic injury in the setting of DCL were similar regardless of the surgical management strategy. Based on these findings, a strategy of diversion over anastomosis cannot be strongly recommended. PMID:22884449

  4. Lesiones torácicas graves y el enfoque del control de daños Severe thoracic lesions and the damage control approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Miguel Morales Wong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años se han desarrollado nuevas estrategias para el tratamiento del trauma grave con lesiones exanguinantes o sin ellas, pero son estas últimas las que más requieren un cambio de la forma de actuar en aras de mejorar la supervivencia. Tales estrategias quirúrgicas se han denominado cirugía de control de daños, que en esencia evita complicaciones como la tríada letal de acidosis, hipotermia y coagulopatía. A diferencia del control de daños en el abdomen, existen lesiones torácicas que requieren una reparación inicial durante el acto quirúrgico, pero pueden hallarse otras cuya reparación puede ser secundaria. El método de control de daños en las lesiones torácicas debe llevarse a cabo con procedimientos que sean técnicamente rápidos y simples, para postergar el tratamiento definitivo de las lesiones que no requieran una reparación inmediata en pacientes in extremisNew strategies have been developed in the last years to treat severe trauma with exsanguinating lesions or without them. The latter demand more changes in the way of acting in order to improve survival. Such surgical strategies have been called damage control surgery that in essence prevent complications such as the lethal triad of acidosis, hypothermia and coagulopathy. Unlike the control of abdomen damage, there are thoracic lesions requiring an initial repair during surgery, but there may be found others, whose repair is secondary. The damage control method in the thoracic lesions should be conducted with technically fast and simple procedures to postpone the definitive treatment of the lesions that do not require an immediate repair in patients in extremis

  5. Primary repair of civilian colon injuries is safe in the damage control scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashuk, Jeffry L; Cothren, C Clay; Moore, Ernest E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Biffl, Walter L; Barnett, Carlton C

    2009-10-01

    Although the safety of primary repair/anastomosis for civilian colon injuries after standard laparotomy (SL) has been established, recent civilian and military reports have questioned the advisability of this technique in the patient requiring damage control laparotomy (DL). We hypothesized that, even in the high-risk DL group, primary repair could be safely used after patient stabilization and that the open abdomen would facilitate the safety of this procedure. All patients admitted to our level 1 trauma center with a colon injury over a 7-year period were reviewed from a prospectively collected database. Patients were categorized as having undergone either SL or DL at initial operation. Primary variables of interest were as follows: injury patterns; method of primary repair (suture repair, resection and primary anastomosis, resection and delayed anastomosis); diversion techniques (planned diversion or diversion for anastomotic dehiscence); and colon-related morbidity and mortality. High-risk status in the DL group was identified by the following physiologic variables: mean injury severity score (ISS), red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, ventilator days, and intensive care unit (ICU) duration of stay. During the study period, 309 patients had colonic wounds identified at laparotomy. Of these 309 patients, 280 (91%) underwent SL, of which 277 (98.9%) had primary colonic repair/anastomosis. In the SL group, 1 (0.3%) patient required diversion for subsequent leak and 2 (0.6%) patients had planned diversion The remaining 29 hemodynamically unstable patients required DL. Mean +/- standard deviation indices of injury severity in this group included: ISS = 36.2 +/- 15.8, RBC = 28.7 +/- 25.4 units, ventilator days = 20.1 +/- 16.3, ICU duration of stay = 29.5 +/- 21.6 days. Of the 29 patients in the DL group, 21 (72%) had bowel continuity successfully reestablished in 2.6 +/- 2 days after initial attempts at primary suture repair or resection/anastomosis. A total of 4 (16

  6. System requirements specification for waste information and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.R.

    1994-09-01

    This document defines the requirements for the Waste Information and Control System (WICS). The document defines the functions, constraints, and objectives that pertain to WICS. This shall serve as the baseline document to ensure the needs of the Hazardous Material Control group (HMC) at 222-S Laboratory are met with regard to assurance of accuracy and quality of data taken with WICS

  7. Minimal requirements for quality controls in radiotherapy with external beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Physical dosimetric guidelines have been developed by the Italian National Institute of Health study group on quality assurance in radiotherapy to define protocols for quality controls in external beam radiotherapy. While the document does not determine strict rules or firm recommendations, it suggests minimal requirements for quality controls necessary to guarantee an adequate degree of accuracy in external beam radiotherapy [it

  8. Damage by insect pests to the Djingarey Ber Mosque in Timbuktu: detection and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Maistrello

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Djingarey Ber Mosque in Timbuktu (Mali is one of the most significant earthen construction in West Africa. Originally constructed in 1327, it was included in 1988 on the World Heritage UNESCO List for its unique architecture and historical importance. During its restoration, recently undertaken by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, the wooden parts of the roof and architraves showed clear signs of threatening insect presence. In order to identify the pests responsible of the damage, evaluate its extent and suggest a proper control strategy, a detailed survey was performed inside the Mosque complex and in its immediate surroundings. The entomological inspection, performed in the dry-cold season, allowed to detect signs of insect damage in most of the wooden elements, even in the recently replaced beams, but also in walls, pillars and the precious decorated panels. Damages in the wood elements could be attributed to Amitermes evuncifer Silvestri (Termitidae, Bostrychoplites zycheli Marseuli (Bostrichidae and Lyctus africanus Lesne (Lyctidae, which were collected alive on site. Injures in the walls and decorated panels appeared to be performed by hymenopterans such as “plasterer bees” (Colletidae and Sphecidae. From the evaluation of the type and extent of damage in relation to the architecture and materials used in its construction and decoration, the most serious pest and the worse threat for the mosque is represented by termites. Control and preventive measures, in the view of a sustainable, long-lasting integrated management are suggested.

  9. Driving safety after brain damage: follow-up of twenty-two patients with matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R T; Golden, R S; Butter, J; Tepper, D; Rothke, S; Holmes, J; Sahgal, V

    1990-02-01

    Driving after brain damage is a vital issue, considering the large number of patients who suffer from cerebrovascular and traumatic encephalopathy. The ability to operate a motor vehicle is an integral part of independence for most adults and so should be preserved whenever possible. The physician may estimate a patient's ability to drive safely based on his own examination, the evaluation of a neuropsychologist, and a comprehensive driving evaluation--testing, driving simulation, behind-the-wheel observation--with a driving specialist. This study sought to evaluate the ability of brain-damaged individuals to operate a motor vehicle safely at follow-up. These patients had been evaluated (by a physician, a neuropsychologist, and a driving specialist) and were judged able to operate a motor vehicle safely after their cognitive insult. Twenty-two brain-damaged patients who were evaluated at our institution were successfully followed up to five years (mean interval of 2.67 years). Patients were interviewed by telephone. Their driving safely was compared with a control group consisting of a close friend or spouse of each patient. Statistical analysis revealed no difference between patient and control groups in the type of driving, the incidence of speeding tickets, near accidents, and accidents, and the cost of vehicle damage when accidents occurred. The patient group was further divided into those who had, and those who had not experienced driving difficulties so that initial neuropsychologic testing could be compared. No significant differences were noted in any aspect of the neuropsychologic test battery. We conclude that selected brain-damaged patients who have passed a comprehensive driving assessment as outlined were as fit to drive as were their normal matched controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Implementation of Energy Code Controls Requirements in New Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hatten, Mike [Solarc Energy Group, LLC, Seattle, WA (United States); Jones, Dennis [Group 14 Engineering, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Cooper, Matthew [Group 14 Engineering, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    2017-03-24

    Most state energy codes in the United States are based on one of two national model codes; ANSI/ASHRAE/IES 90.1 (Standard 90.1) or the International Code Council (ICC) International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Since 2004, covering the last four cycles of Standard 90.1 updates, about 30% of all new requirements have been related to building controls. These requirements can be difficult to implement and verification is beyond the expertise of most building code officials, yet the assumption in studies that measure the savings from energy codes is that they are implemented and working correctly. The objective of the current research is to evaluate the degree to which high impact controls requirements included in commercial energy codes are properly designed, commissioned and implemented in new buildings. This study also evaluates the degree to which these control requirements are realizing their savings potential. This was done using a three-step process. The first step involved interviewing commissioning agents to get a better understanding of their activities as they relate to energy code required controls measures. The second involved field audits of a sample of commercial buildings to determine whether the code required control measures are being designed, commissioned and correctly implemented and functioning in new buildings. The third step includes compilation and analysis of the information gather during the first two steps. Information gathered during these activities could be valuable to code developers, energy planners, designers, building owners, and building officials.

  11. The contribution of material control to meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) is in the process of implementing a set of performance requirements for material control and accountability (MC ampersand A). These graded requirements set a uniform level of performance for similar materials at various facilities with respect to the threat of an insider adversary stealing special nuclear material (SNM). These requirements are phrased in terms of detecting the theft of a goal quantity of SNM within a specified time period and with a probability greater than or equal to a specified value and include defense in-depth requirements

  12. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  13. Influences of load characteristics on impaired control of grip forces in patients with cerebellar damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandauer, B; Timmann, D; Häusler, A; Hermsdörfer, J

    2010-02-01

    Various studies showed a clear impairment of cerebellar patients to modulate grip force in anticipation of the loads resulting from movements with a grasped object. This failure corroborated the theory of internal feedforward models in the cerebellum. Cerebellar damage also impairs the coordination of multiple-joint movements and this has been related to deficient prediction and compensation of movement-induced torques. To study the effects of disturbed torque control on feedforward grip-force control, two self-generated load conditions with different demands on torque control-one with movement-induced and the other with isometrically generated load changes-were directly compared in patients with cerebellar degeneration. Furthermore the cerebellum is thought to be more involved in grip-force adjustment to self-generated loads than to externally generated loads. Consequently, an additional condition with externally generated loads was introduced to further test this hypothesis. Analysis of 23 patients with degenerative cerebellar damage revealed clear impairments in predictive feedforward mechanisms in the control of both self-generated load types. Besides feedforward control, the cerebellar damage also affected more reactive responses when the externally generated load destabilized the grip, although this impairment may vary with the type of load as suggested by control experiments. The present findings provide further support that the cerebellum plays a major role in predictive control mechanisms. However, this impact of the cerebellum does not strongly depend on the nature of the load and the specific internal forward model. Contributions to reactive (grip force) control are not negligible, but seem to be dependent on the physical characteristics of an externally generated load.

  14. A COMPARISON OF THE CLASS ACTION FOR DAMAGES IN THE AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM TO THE BRAZILIAN CLASS ACTION: THE REQUIREMENTS OF ADMISSIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Grinover

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After describing the class action for damages in the American judicial system, with the requisites of ‘prevalence’ and ‘superiority,’ the study passes to the examiner of the requirements of the admissibility of the Brazilian class action for damages, concluding on the existence of the same requisites, even in a civil law system.

  15. Age and excuses for forgetting: self-handicapping versus damage-control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erber, J T; Prager, I G

    2000-01-01

    Either before or after being interviewed for a volunteer position, a young or old protagonist (i.e., target) gave an excuse for forgetting. Study participants (i.e., perceivers) had a higher opinion of the target's memory, were more confident in the target's capability of performing memory-related tasks, and attributed the target's memory failures more to bad luck when the excuse was given after (damage-control strategy) rather than before (self-handicapping strategy) the interview. Moreover, the excuse given before the interview had no significant effect on perceivers' judgments when compared with data from an earlier study in which the target gave no excuse for forgetting. The present findings suggest that a damage-control strategy can ameliorate negative capability impressions.

  16. A Small-Molecule Inducible Synthetic Circuit for Control of the SOS Gene Network without DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Jeffrey M; Culyba, Matthew J; Liu, Monica Yun; Mo, Charlie Y; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2017-11-17

    The bacterial SOS stress-response pathway is a pro-mutagenic DNA repair system that mediates bacterial survival and adaptation to genotoxic stressors, including antibiotics and UV light. The SOS pathway is composed of a network of genes under the control of the transcriptional repressor, LexA. Activation of the pathway involves linked but distinct events: an initial DNA damage event leads to activation of RecA, which promotes autoproteolysis of LexA, abrogating its repressor function and leading to induction of the SOS gene network. These linked events can each independently contribute to DNA repair and mutagenesis, making it difficult to separate the contributions of the different events to observed phenotypes. We therefore devised a novel synthetic circuit to unlink these events and permit induction of the SOS gene network in the absence of DNA damage or RecA activation via orthogonal cleavage of LexA. Strains engineered with the synthetic SOS circuit demonstrate small-molecule inducible expression of SOS genes as well as the associated resistance to UV light. Exploiting our ability to activate SOS genes independently of upstream events, we further demonstrate that the majority of SOS-mediated mutagenesis on the chromosome does not readily occur with orthogonal pathway induction alone, but instead requires DNA damage. More generally, our approach provides an exemplar for using synthetic circuit design to separate an environmental stressor from its associated stress-response pathway.

  17. Safety of performing a delayed anastomosis during damage control laparotomy in patients with destructive colon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Carlos A; Pino, Luis F; Badiel, Marisol; Sánchez, Alvaro I; Loaiza, Jhon; Ballestas, Leonardo; Puyana, Juan Carlos

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies report the safety and feasibility of performing delayed anastomosis (DA) in patients undergoing damage control laparotomy (DCL) for destructive colon injuries (DCIs). Despite accumulating experience in both civilian and military trauma, questions regarding how to best identify high-risk patients and minimize the number of anastomosis-associated complications remain. Our current practice is to perform a definitive closure of the colon during DCL, unless there is persistent acidosis, bowel wall edema, or evidence of intra-abdominal abscess. In this study, we evaluated the safety of this approach by comparing outcomes of patients with DCI who underwent definitive closure of the colon during DCL versus patients managed with colostomy with or without DCL. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with penetrating DCI during 2003 to 2009. Severity of injury, surgical management, and clinical outcome were assessed. Sixty patients with severe gunshot wounds and three patients with stab wounds were included in the analysis. DCL was required in 30 patients, all with gunshot wounds. Three patients died within the first 48 hours, three underwent colostomy, and 24 were managed with DA. Thirty-three patients were managed with standard laparotomy: 26 patients with primary anastomosis and 7 with colostomy. Overall mortality rate was 9.5%. Three late deaths occurred in the DCL group, and only one death was associated with an anastomotic leak. Performing a DA in DCI during DCL is a reliable and feasible approach as long as severe acidosis, bowel wall edema, and/or persistent intra-abdominal infections are not present.

  18. Role of damage control enterostomy in management of children with peritonitis from acute intestinal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel A Ameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal anastomosis in severely ill children with peritonitis from intestinal perforation, intestinal gangrene or anastomotic dehiscence (acute intestinal disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Enterostomy as a damage control measure may be an option to minimize the high morbidity and mortality. This report evaluates the role of damage control enterostomy in the treatment of these patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 52 children with acute intestinal disease who had enterostomy as a damage control measure in 12 years. Results: There were 34 (65.4% boys and 18 (34.6% girls aged 3 days-13 years (median 9 months, comprising 27 (51.9% neonates and infants and 25 (48.1% older children. The primary indication for enterostomy in neonates and infants was intestinal gangrene 25 (92.6% and perforated typhoid ileitis 22 (88% in older children. Enterostomy was performed as the initial surgery in 33 (63.5% patients and as a salvage procedure following anastomotic dehiscence in 19 (36.5% patients. Enterostomy-related complications occurred in 19 (36.5% patients, including 11 (21.2% patients with skin excoriations and eight (15.4% with hypokalaemia. There were four (7.7% deaths (aged 19 days, 3 months, 3½ years and 10 years, respectively directly related to the enterostomy, from hypokalaemia at 4, 12, 20 and 28 days postoperatively, respectively. Twenty other patients died shortly after surgery from their primary disease. Twenty of 28 surviving patients have had their enterostomy closed without complications, while eight are awaiting enterostomy closure. Conclusion: Damage-control enterostomy is useful in management of severely ill children with intestinal perforation or gangrene. Careful and meticulous attention to fluid and electrolyte balance, and stoma care, especially in the first several days following surgery, are important in preventing morbidity and mortality.

  19. Severe hepatic trauma: nonoperative management, definitive repair, or damage control surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppäniemi, Ari K; Mentula, Panu J; Streng, Mari H; Koivikko, Mika P; Handolin, Lauri E

    2011-12-01

    Management of severe liver injuries has evolved to include the options for nonoperative management and damage control surgery. The present study analyzes the criteria for choosing between nonoperative management and early surgery, and definitive repair versus damage control strategy during early surgery. In a retrospective analysis of 144 patients with severe (AAST grade III-V) liver injuries (94% blunt trauma), early laparotomy was performed in 50 patients. Initial management was nonoperative in 94 blunt trauma patients with 8 failures. Uni- and multivariate analyses were used to calculate predictor odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Factors associated with early laparotomy in blunt trauma included shock on admission, associated grade IV-V splenic injury, grade IV-V head injury, and grade V liver injury. Only shock was an independent predictor (OR, 26.1; 95% CI, 8.9-77.1; P < 0.001). The presence of a grade IV-V splenic injury predicted damage control strategy (OR infinite; P = 0.021). Failed nonoperative management was associated with grade IV-V splenic injury (OR, 14.00; 95% CI, 1.67-117.55), and shock (OR, 6.82; 95% CI, 1.49-31.29). The hospital mortality rate was 15%; 8 of 21 deaths were liver-related. Shock (OR, 9.3; 95% CI, 2.4-35.8; P = 0.001) and severe head injury (OR, 9.25; 95% CI, 3.0-28.9; P = 0.000) were independent predictors for mortality. In patients with severe liver injury, associated severe splenic injury favors early laparotomy and damage control strategy. Patients who arrive in shock or have an associated severe splenic injury should not be managed nonoperatively. In addition to severe head injury, uncontrollable bleeding from the liver injury is still a major cause of early death.

  20. Damage control resuscitation using blood component therapy in standard doses has a limited effect on coagulopathy during trauma hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sirat; Davenport, Ross; Raza, Imran; Glasgow, Simon; De'Ath, Henry D; Johansson, Pär I; Curry, Nicola; Stanworth, Simon; Gaarder, Christine; Brohi, Karim

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effectiveness of blood component therapy in the correction of trauma-induced coagulopathy during hemorrhage. Severe hemorrhage remains a leading cause of mortality in trauma. Damage control resuscitation strategies target trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) with the early delivery of high-dose blood components such as fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelet transfusions. However, the ability of these products to correct TIC during hemorrhage and resuscitation is unknown. This was an international prospective cohort study of bleeding trauma patients at three major trauma centers. A blood sample was drawn immediately on arrival and after 4, 8 and 12 packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. FFP, platelet and cryoprecipitate use was recorded during these intervals. Samples were analyzed for functional coagulation and procoagulant factor levels. One hundred six patients who received at least four PRBC units were included. Thirty-four patients (32 %) required a massive transfusion. On admission 40 % of patients were coagulopathic (ROTEM CA5 ≤ 35 mm). This increased to 58 % after four PRBCs and 81 % after eight PRBCs. On average all functional coagulation parameters and procoagulant factor concentrations deteriorated during hemorrhage. There was no clear benefit to high-dose FFP therapy in any parameter. Only combined high-dose FFP, cryoprecipitate and platelet therapy with a high total fibrinogen load appeared to produce a consistent improvement in coagulation. Damage control resuscitation with standard doses of blood components did not consistently correct trauma-induced coagulopathy during hemorrhage. There is an important opportunity to improve TIC management during damage control resuscitation.

  1. [Operative treatment strategies for multiple trauma patients : early total care versus damage control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klüter, T; Lippross, S; Oestern, S; Weuster, M; Seekamp, A

    2013-09-01

    The treatment of multiple trauma patients is a great challenge for an interdisciplinary team. After preclinical care and subsequent treatment in the emergency room the order of the interventions is prioritized depending of the individual risk stratification. For planning the surgery management it is essential to distinguish between absolutely essential operations to prevent life-threatening situations for the patient and interventions with shiftable indications, depending on the general condition of the patient. All interventions need to be done without causing significant secondary damage to prohibit hyperinflammation and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The challenge consists in determination of the appropriate treatment at the right point in time. In general the early primary intervention, early total care, is differentiated from the damage control concept.

  2. Phosphorylation of MCT-1 by p44/42 MAPK is required for its stabilization in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandi, S; Reinert, Line; Hachem, A

    2007-01-01

    We discovered a novel oncogene in a T-cell lymphoma cell line, multiple copies in T-cell lymphoma-1 (MCT-1), that has been shown to decrease cell-doubling time, shorten the duration of G(1) transit time and/or G(1)-S transition, and transform NIH3T3 fibroblasts. We subsequently demonstrated...... that there were significantly increased levels of MCT-1 protein in a subset of primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Levels of MCT-1 protein were shown to be increased after exposure to DNA damaging agents. This increase did not require new protein synthesis, suggesting that post-translational mechanisms were...... growth and proliferation through phosphorylation-dependent regulation of several substrates. The MCT-1 protein is predicted to have numerous putative phosphorylation sites. Using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches, we established that phosphorylation of MCT-1 protein by p44/p42...

  3. Requirements for VICTORIA Class Fire Control System: Contact Management Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Requirements for VICTORIA Class Fire Control System Contact Management Function Tab Lamoureux CAE Integrated Enterprise Solutions...Contract Report DRDC-RDDC-2014-C190 July 2014 © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the...i Abstract …….. The VICTORIA Class Submarines (VCS) are subject to a continuing program of technical upgrades. One such program is

  4. Definition of areas requiring criticality alarm annunciation and emergency control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The design of fissile material handling at British Nuclear Fuels plc requires the provision of a criticality incident detection system unless a specific case for omission can be formally made. Where such systems are provided, the 100 mSv contour resulting from a reference criticality incident must be restricted to an area of administrative control within which it is reasonably practicable to provide alarm annunciation and for which emergency arrangements can be defined. For typical reprocessing plant applications, the definition of these areas, and their restriction by provision of shielding where necessary, potentially requires a very large number of three dimensional neutron transport calculations in complex geometries. However, by considering the requirements and nature of this assessment, simple generic methods have been developed and justified. Consequently, rapid and inexpensive assessments of control areas can be carried out

  5. Methionine Uptake and Required Radiation Dose to Control Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iuchi, Toshihiko, E-mail: tiuchi@chiba-cc.jp [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Bay Advanced Imaging and Radiation Oncology Clinic, Makuhari, Chiba (Japan); Uchino, Yoshio [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Chiba Ryogo Center, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Makiko [Division of Surgical Pathology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [Division of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the feasibility of radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on the use of methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET), and the correlation among MET uptake, radiation dose, and tumor control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GBM who underwent MET-PET prior to radiation therapy were enrolled. MET uptake in 30 regions of interest (ROIs) from 22 GBMs, biologically effective doses (BEDs) for the ROIs and their ratios (MET uptake:BED) were compared in terms of whether the ROIs were controlled for >12 months. Results: MET uptake was significantly correlated with tumor control (odds ratio [OR], 10.0; P=.005); however, there was a higher level of correlation between MET uptake:BED ratio and tumor control (OR, 40.0; P<.0001). These data indicated that the required BEDs for controlling the ROIs could be predicted in terms of MET uptake; BED could be calculated as [34.0 × MET uptake] Gy from the optimal threshold of the MET uptake:BED ratio for tumor control. Conclusions: Target delineation based on MET-PET was demonstrated to be feasible for radiation therapy treatment planning. MET-PET could not only provide precise visualization of infiltrating tumor cells but also predict the required radiation doses to control target regions.

  6. Capacitor requirements for controlled thermonuclear experiments and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.; Hoffman, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    Future controlled thermonuclear experiments as well as controlled thermonuclear reactors will require substantial numbers of capacitors. The demands on these units are likely to be quite severe and quite different from the normal demands placed on either present energy storage capacitors or present power factor correction capacitors. It is unlikely that these two types will suffice for all necessary Controlled Thermonuclear Research (CTR) applications. The types of capacitors required for the various CTR operating conditions are enumerated. Factors that influence the life, cost and operating abilities of these types of capacitors are discussed. The problems of capacitors in a radiation environment are considered. Areas are defined where future research is needed. Some directions that this research should take are suggested. (U.S.)

  7. Capacitor requirements for controlled thermonuclear experiments and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.; Hoffman, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    Future controlled thermonuclear experiments as well as controlled thermonuclear reactors will require substantial numbers of capacitors. The demands on these units are likely to be quite severe and quite different from the normal demands placed on either present energy storage capacitors or present power factor correction capacitors. It is unlikely that these two types will suffice for all necessary Controlled Thermonuclear Research (CTR) applications. The types of capacitors required for the various CTR operating conditions are enumerated. Factors that influence the life, cost and operating abilities of these types of capacitors are discussed. The problems of capacitors in a radiation environment are considered. Areas are defined where future research is needed. Some directions that this research should take are suggested

  8. Detector Control System for an LHC experiment - User Requirements Document

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the user requirements for a detector control system kernel for the LHC experiments following the ESA standard PSS-05 [1]. The first issue will be used to provide the basis for an evaluation of possible development philosophies for a kernel DCS. As such it will cover all the major functionality but only to a level of detail sufficient for such an evaluation to be performed. Many of the requirements are therefore intentionally high level and generic, and are meant to outline the functionality that would be required of the kernel DCS, but not yet to the level of the detail required for implementation. The document is also written in a generic fashion in order not to rule out any implementation technology.

  9. Requirements for active resistive wall mode (RWM) feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Y; Kim, J S; Chu, M S; Jackson, G L; La Haye, R J; Strait, E J; Liu, Y Q; Marrelli, L; Okabayashi, M; Reimerdes, H

    2010-01-01

    The requirements for active resistive wall mode (RWM) feedback control have been systematically investigated and established using highly reproducible current-driven RWMs in ohmic discharges in DIII-D. The unambiguous evaluation of active RWM feedback control was not possible in previous RWM studies primarily due to the variability of the onset of the pressure-driven RWMs; the stability of the pressure-driven RWM is thought to be sensitive to various passive stabilization mechanisms. Both feedback control specifications and physics requirements for RWM stabilization have been clarified using the current-driven RWMs in ohmic discharges, when little or no passive stabilization effects are present. The use of derivative gain on top of proportional gain is found to be advantageous. An effective feedback control system should be equipped with a power supply with bandwidth greater than the RWM growth rate. It is beneficial to apply a feedback field that is toroidally phase-shifted from the measured RWM phase in the same direction as the plasma current. The efficacy of the RWM feedback control will ultimately be determined by the plasma fluctuations on internal diagnostics, as well as on external magnetics. The proximity of the feedback coils to the plasma appears to be an important factor in determining the effectiveness of the RWM feedback coils. It is desirable that an RWM feedback control system simultaneously handles error field correction at a low frequency, along with direct RWM feedback at a high frequency. There is an indication of the influence of a second least stable RWM, which had been theoretically predicted but never identified in experiments. A preliminary investigation based on active MHD spectroscopic measurement showed a strong plasma response around 400 Hz where the typical plasma response associated with the first least stable RWM was expected to be negligible. Present active feedback control requirements are based on a single mode assumption, so the

  10. Perceptual relearning of binocular fusion after hypoxic brain damage: four controlled single-case treatment studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaadt, Anna-Katharina; Schmidt, Lena; Kuhn, Caroline; Summ, Miriam; Adams, Michaela; Garbacenkaite, Ruta; Leonhardt, Eva; Reinhart, Stefan; Kerkhoff, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Hypoxic brain damage is characterized by widespread, diffuse-disseminated brain lesions, which may cause severe disturbances in binocular vision, leading to diplopia and loss of stereopsis, for which no evaluated treatment is currently available. The study evaluated the effects of a novel binocular vision treatment designed to improve binocular fusion and stereopsis as well as to reduce diplopia in patients with cerebral hypoxia. Four patients with severely reduced convergent fusion, stereopsis, and reading duration due to hypoxic brain damage were treated in a single-subject baseline design, with three baseline assessments before treatment to control for spontaneous recovery (pretherapy), an assessment immediately after a treatment period of 6 weeks (posttherapy), and two follow-up tests 3 and 6 months after treatment to assess stability of improvements. Patients received a novel fusion and dichoptic training using 3 different devices designed to slowly increase fusional and disparity angle. After the treatment, all 4 patients improved significantly in binocular fusion, subjective reading duration until diplopia emerged, and 2 of 4 patients improved significantly in local stereopsis. No significant changes were observed during the pretherapy baseline period and the follow-up period, thus ruling out spontaneous recovery and demonstrating long-term stability of treatment effects. This proof-of-principle study indicates a substantial treatment-induced plasticity after hypoxia in the relearning of binocular vision and offers a viable treatment option. Moreover, it provides new hope and direction for the development of effective rehabilitation strategies to treat neurovisual deficits resulting from hypoxic brain damage.

  11. Farmer survey in the hinterland of Kisangani (Democratic Republic of Congo) on rodent crop damage and rodent control techniques used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drazo, Nicaise Amundala; Kennis, Jan; Leirs, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a survey on rodent crop damage among farmers in the hinterland of Kisangani (Democratic Republic of Congo). We studied the amount of crop damage, the rodent groups causing crop damage, the growth stages affected and the control techniques used. We conducted this survey in three...... municipalities using a standard questionnaire form translated into local languages, between November 2005 and June 2006 and during July 2007. We used the Quotas method and interviewed 70 households per municipality. Farmers indicated rodent groups implicated in crop damage on color photographs. Two types...... of survey techniques were used: individual and focus-group surveys. The sugar cane rat, Thryonomys sp. and Lemniscomys striatus caused most damage to crops, but inside granaries, Rattus rattus was the primary pest species eating stored food supplies and causing damage to stored goods. Cassava and maize were...

  12. Surface Contaminant Control Technologies to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The large high-power solid lasers, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF of America and the Shenguang-III (SG-III laser facility of China, can output over 2.1 MJ laser pulse for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF experiments. Because of the enhancement of operating flux and the expansion of laser driver scale, the problem of contamination seriously influences their construction period and operation life. During irradiation by intense laser beams, the contaminants on the metallic surface of beam tubes can be transmitted to the optical surfaces and lead to damage of optical components. For the high-power solid-state laser facilities, contamination control focuses on the slab amplifiers, spatial filters, and final-optical assemblies. In this paper, an effective solution to control contaminations including the whole process of the laser driver is put forward to provide the safe operation of laser facilities, and the detailed technical methods of contamination control such as washing, cleanliness metrology, and cleanliness protecting are also introduced to reduce the probability of laser-induced damage of optics. The experimental results show that the cleanliness level of SG-III laser facility is much better to ensure that the laser facility can safely operate at high energy flux.

  13. Damage Control for Vascular Trauma from the Prehospital to the Operating Room Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Pikoulis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Early management of vascular injury, starting at the field, is imperative for survival no less than any operative maneuver. Contemporary prehospital management of vascular trauma, including appropriate fluid and volume infusion, tourniquets, and hemostatic agents, has reversed the historically known limb hemorrhage as a leading cause of death. In this context, damage control (DC surgery has evolved to DC resuscitation (DCR as an overarching concept that draws together preoperative and operative interventions aiming at rapidly reducing bleeding from vascular disruption, optimizing oxygenation, and clinical outcomes. This review addresses contemporary DCR techniques from the prehospital to the surgical setting, focusing on civilian vascular injuries.

  14. Damage Control for Vascular Trauma from the Prehospital to the Operating Room Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikoulis, Emmanouil; Salem, Karim M; Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Pikouli, Anastasia; Angelou, Anastasios; Pikoulis, Antreas; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Karavokyros, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Early management of vascular injury, starting at the field, is imperative for survival no less than any operative maneuver. Contemporary prehospital management of vascular trauma, including appropriate fluid and volume infusion, tourniquets, and hemostatic agents, has reversed the historically known limb hemorrhage as a leading cause of death. In this context, damage control (DC) surgery has evolved to DC resuscitation (DCR) as an overarching concept that draws together preoperative and operative interventions aiming at rapidly reducing bleeding from vascular disruption, optimizing oxygenation, and clinical outcomes. This review addresses contemporary DCR techniques from the prehospital to the surgical setting, focusing on civilian vascular injuries.

  15. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 2: System requirements and conceptual description

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    In the development of the business system for the SRB automated production control system, special attention had to be paid to the unique environment posed by the space shuttle. The issues posed by this environment, and the means by which they were addressed, are reviewed. The change in management philosphy which will be required as NASA switches from one-of-a-kind launches to multiple launches is discussed. The implications of the assembly process on the business system are described. These issues include multiple missions, multiple locations and facilities, maintenance and refurbishment, multiple sources, and multiple contractors. The implications of these aspects on the automated production control system are reviewed including an assessment of the six major subsystems, as well as four other subsystem. Some general system requirements which flow through the entire business system are described.

  16. Decreasing the damage in smart structures using integrated online DDA/ISMP and semi-active control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K; Amini, F

    2012-01-01

    Integrated structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration control has been considered recently by researchers. Up to now, all of the research in the field of integrated SHM and vibration control has been conducted using control devices and control algorithms to enhance system identification and damage detection. In this study, online SHM is used to improve the performance of structural vibration control, unlike previous research. Also, a proposed algorithm including integrated online SHM and a semi-active control strategy is used to reduce both damage and seismic response of the main structure due to strong seismic disturbance. In the proposed algorithm the nonlinear behavior of the building structure is simulated during the excitation. Then, using the measured data and the damage detection algorithm based on identified system Markov parameters (DDA/ISMP), a method proposed by the authors, damage corresponding to axial and bending stiffness of all structural elements is identified. In this study, a 20 t MR damper is employed as a control device to mitigate both damage and dynamic response of the building structure. Also, the interaction between SHM and a semi-active control strategy is assessed. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, a two bay two story steel braced frame structure is used. By defining the damage index and damage rate index, the input current of the MR damper is generated using a fuzzy logic controller. The obtained results show that the possibility of smart building creation is provided using the proposed algorithm. In comparison to the widely used strategy of only vibration control, it is shown that the proposed algorithm is more effective. Furthermore, in the proposed algorithm, the total consumed current intensity and generated control forces are considerably less than for the strategy of only vibration control. (paper)

  17. Decreasing the damage in smart structures using integrated online DDA/ISMP and semi-active control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, K.; Amini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Integrated structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration control has been considered recently by researchers. Up to now, all of the research in the field of integrated SHM and vibration control has been conducted using control devices and control algorithms to enhance system identification and damage detection. In this study, online SHM is used to improve the performance of structural vibration control, unlike previous research. Also, a proposed algorithm including integrated online SHM and a semi-active control strategy is used to reduce both damage and seismic response of the main structure due to strong seismic disturbance. In the proposed algorithm the nonlinear behavior of the building structure is simulated during the excitation. Then, using the measured data and the damage detection algorithm based on identified system Markov parameters (DDA/ISMP), a method proposed by the authors, damage corresponding to axial and bending stiffness of all structural elements is identified. In this study, a 20 t MR damper is employed as a control device to mitigate both damage and dynamic response of the building structure. Also, the interaction between SHM and a semi-active control strategy is assessed. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, a two bay two story steel braced frame structure is used. By defining the damage index and damage rate index, the input current of the MR damper is generated using a fuzzy logic controller. The obtained results show that the possibility of smart building creation is provided using the proposed algorithm. In comparison to the widely used strategy of only vibration control, it is shown that the proposed algorithm is more effective. Furthermore, in the proposed algorithm, the total consumed current intensity and generated control forces are considerably less than for the strategy of only vibration control.

  18. Damage Control Automation for Reduced Manning (DC-ARM) Supervisory Control System Software Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Downs, Ryan

    2002-01-01

    .... The SCS currently interfaces and controls the ship's automated fire main, outfitted with smart valves, a high-pressure water mist system, a video over IP system, a door position indication system...

  19. US Export Controls and Technology Transfer Requirements: A UK Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    34 (La Franchi , 2006). Such requirements make it difficult for partners to participate and generate a large administrative burden on team members, who...if this critical impediment to enhanced cooperation is to be removed. The U.S. export control system is broken; its technology transfer rules ...Retrieved April 3, 2009, from http://www.jsf.mil/news/news2009.htm La Franchi , P. (2006, July 4). Australia demands JSF resolution. Flight International

  20. The Effect of Faster Engine Response on the Lateral Directional Control of a Damaged Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ryan D.; Lemon, Kimberly A.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The integration of flight control and propulsion control has been a much discussed topic, especially for emergencies where the engines may be able to help stabilize and safely land a damaged aircraft. Previous research has shown that for the engines to be effective as flight control actuators, the response time to throttle commands must be improved. Other work has developed control modes that accept a higher risk of engine failure in exchange for improved engine response during an emergency. In this effort, a nonlinear engine model (the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k) has been integrated with a nonlinear airframe model (the Generic Transport Model) in order to evaluate the use of enhanced-response engines as alternative yaw rate control effectors. Tests of disturbance rejection and command tracking were used to determine the impact of the engines on the aircraft's dynamical behavior. Three engine control enhancements that improve the response time of the engine were implemented and tested in the integrated simulation. The enhancements were shown to increase the engine s effectiveness as a yaw rate control effector when used in an automatic feedback loop. The improvement is highly dependent upon flight condition; the airframe behavior is markedly improved at low altitude, low speed conditions, and relatively unchanged at high altitude, high speed.

  1. Quality control in the application of flow cytometric assays of genetic damage due to environmental contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreedy, C.D.; Jagoe, C.H.; Brisbin, I.L. Jr.; Wentworth, R.W.; Dallas, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical technologies, such as flow cytometry, are increasingly adopted by environmental toxicologists to identify resource damage associated with exposure to xenobiotics. One application of flow cytometry allows the rapid determination of the DNA content of large numbers of individual cells, and can be used to detect aneuploidy or other genetic abnormalities. The laboratory has used this methodology in studies of genetic toxicology of fish, birds, arid mammals exposed to organic pollutants, metals and radionuclides, However, without appropriate quality controls, false positive results and other artifacts can arise from sample handling and preparations, inter and intra-individual variations, instrument noise and other sources. The authors describe the routine measures this laboratory employs to maintain quality control of genomic DNA analysis, including the control of staining conditions, machine standardization, pulse-width doublet discrimination, and, in particular, the use of internal controls and the use of time as a cytometric parameter. Neglect of these controls can produce erroneous results, leading to conclusions of genetic abnormalities when none are present. Conversely, attention to these controls, routinely used in clinical settings, facilitates the interpretation of flow cytometric data and allows the application of this sensitive indicator of genotoxic effects to a variety of environmental problems

  2. Fuzzy stochastic damage mechanics (FSDM based on fuzzy auto-adaptive control theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-jun Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully interpret and describe damage mechanics, the origin and development of fuzzy stochastic damage mechanics were introduced based on the analysis of the harmony of damage, probability, and fuzzy membership in the interval of [0,1]. In a complete normed linear space, it was proven that a generalized damage field can be simulated through β probability distribution. Three kinds of fuzzy behaviors of damage variables were formulated and explained through analysis of the generalized uncertainty of damage variables and the establishment of a fuzzy functional expression. Corresponding fuzzy mapping distributions, namely, the half-depressed distribution, swing distribution, and combined swing distribution, which can simulate varying fuzzy evolution in diverse stochastic damage situations, were set up. Furthermore, through demonstration of the generalized probabilistic characteristics of damage variables, the cumulative distribution function and probability density function of fuzzy stochastic damage variables, which show β probability distribution, were modified according to the expansion principle. The three-dimensional fuzzy stochastic damage mechanical behaviors of the Longtan rolled-concrete dam were examined with the self-developed fuzzy stochastic damage finite element program. The statistical correlation and non-normality of random field parameters were considered comprehensively in the fuzzy stochastic damage model described in this paper. The results show that an initial damage field based on the comprehensive statistical evaluation helps to avoid many difficulties in the establishment of experiments and numerical algorithms for damage mechanics analysis.

  3. Effects of holistic nursing on protection and control of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patient' oral mucosa damage during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fenghua; Li Dongpo; Guo Ping; Liu Qiang; Fan Feiyue

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore if the overall care can effectively control nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients' oral mucosa damage during radiotherapy. Method: Forty-seven nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were randomly divided into test group (24 cases) and control group (23 cases). Patients in test group received mental nursing,oral care and health guidance plus the routine nursing, and patients in control group just given routine nursing. Result: The damaged degree of oral mucosal was lighter in test group than that in control group, and the difference was statistically significant (χ 2 =5.181 and 4.449, both P<0.05). Conclusion: The damage of oral mucosa can controlled effectively by holistic nursing during radiotherapy. (authors)

  4. [Technological innovations in radiation oncology require specific quality controls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, E; Mathot, M

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the field of radiotherapy has benefited from major technological innovations and continuously improving treatment efficacy, comfort and safety of patients. This mainly concerns the imaging techniques that allow 4D CT scan recording the respiratory phases, on-board imaging on linear accelerators that ensure perfect positioning of the patient for treatment and irradiation techniques that reduce very significantly the duration of treatment sessions without compromising quality of the treatment plan, including IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) and VMAT (Volumetric Modulated Arc therapy). In this context of rapid technological change, it is the responsibility of medical physicists to regularly and precisely monitor the perfect functioning of new techniques to ensure patient safety. This requires the use of specific quality control equipment best suited to these new techniques. We will briefly describe the measurement system Delta4 used to control individualized treatment plan for each patient treated with VMAT technology.

  5. Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthélémy Delecroix, Abd Elbasset Abaïdia, Cédric Leduc, Brian Dawson, Grégory Dupont

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of oral consumption of curcumin and piperine in combination on the recovery kinetics after exercise-induced muscle damage. Forty-eight hours before and following exercise-induced muscle damage, ten elite rugby players consumed curcumin and piperine (experimental condition or placebo. A randomized cross-over design was performed. Concentric and isometric peak torque for the knee extensors, one leg 6 seconds sprint performance on a non-motorized treadmill, counter movement jump performance, blood creatine kinase concentration and muscle soreness were assessed immediately after exercise, then at 24h, 48h and 72h post-exercise. There were moderate to large effects of the exercise on the concentric peak torque for the knee extensors (Effect size (ES = -1.12; Confidence interval at 90% (CI90%: -2.17 to -0.06, the one leg 6 seconds sprint performance (ES=-1.65; CI90% = -2.51to -0.80 and the counter movement jump performance (ES = -0.56; CI90% = -0.81 to -0.32 in the 48h following the exercise. There was also a large effect of the exercise on the creatine kinase level 72h after the exercise in the control group (ES = 3.61; CI90%: 0.24 to 6.98. This decrease in muscle function and this elevation in creatine kinase indicate that the exercise implemented was efficient to induce muscle damage. Twenty four hours post-exercise, the reduction (from baseline in sprint mean power output was moderately lower in the experimental condition (-1.77 ± 7.25%; 1277 ± 153W in comparison with the placebo condition (-13.6 ± 13.0%; 1130 ± 241W (Effect Size = -1.12; Confidence Interval 90%=-1.86 to -0.86. However, no other effect was found between the two conditions. Curcumin and piperine supplementation before and after exercise can attenuate some, but not all, aspects of muscle damage.

  6. Translational Control Protein 80 Stimulates IRES-Mediated Translation of p53 mRNA in Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jo Halaby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of the p53 tumor suppressor increases following DNA damage. This increase and subsequent activation of p53 are essential for the protection of normal cells against tumorigenesis. We previously discovered an internal ribosome entry site (IRES that is located at the 5′-untranslated region (UTR of p53 mRNA and found that the IRES activity increases following DNA damage. However, the mechanism underlying IRES-mediated p53 translation in response to DNA damage is still poorly understood. In this study, we discovered that translational control protein 80 (TCP80 has increased binding to the p53 mRNA in vivo following DNA damage. Overexpression of TCP80 also leads to increased p53 IRES activity in response to DNA damage. TCP80 has increased association with RNA helicase A (RHA following DNA damage and overexpression of TCP80, along with RHA, leads to enhanced expression of p53. Moreover, we found that MCF-7 breast cancer cells with decreased expression of TCP80 and RHA exhibit defective p53 induction following DNA damage and diminished expression of its downstream target PUMA, a proapoptotic protein. Taken together, our discovery of the function of TCP80 and RHA in regulating p53 IRES and p53 induction following DNA damage provides a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate IRES-mediated p53 translation in response to genotoxic stress.

  7. Superoxide dismutases: Dual roles in controlling ROS damage and regulating ROS signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Branicky, Robyn; Noë, Alycia; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2018-04-18

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are universal enzymes of organisms that live in the presence of oxygen. They catalyze the conversion of superoxide into oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Superoxide anions are the intended product of dedicated signaling enzymes as well as the byproduct of several metabolic processes including mitochondrial respiration. Through their activity, SOD enzymes control the levels of a variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species, thus both limiting the potential toxicity of these molecules and controlling broad aspects of cellular life that are regulated by their signaling functions. All aerobic organisms have multiple SOD proteins targeted to different cellular and subcellular locations, reflecting the slow diffusion and multiple sources of their substrate superoxide. This compartmentalization also points to the need for fine local control of ROS signaling and to the possibility for ROS to signal between compartments. In this review, we discuss studies in model organisms and humans, which reveal the dual roles of SOD enzymes in controlling damage and regulating signaling. © 2018 Wang et al.

  8. PSA requirements for use in the safety management. Risk based indicators and the configurational control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show the role of the risk based indicators- namely the core damage frequency (CDFI), the core damage probability indicators (CDPI) and the importance of the equipment together- in the risk based configuration control. 1 fig

  9. Prioritization of reactor control components susceptible to fire damage as a consequence of aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, W.; Vigil, R.; Nowlen, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Fire Vulnerability of Aged Electrical Components Test Program is to identify and assess issues of plant aging that could lead to an increase in nuclear power plant risk because of fires. Historical component data and prior analyses are used to prioritize a list of components with respect to aging and fire vulnerability and the consequences of their failure on plant safety systems. The component list emphasizes safety system control components, but excludes cables, large equipment, and devices encompassed in the Equipment Qualification (EQ) program. The test program selected components identified in a utility survey and developed test and fire conditions necessary to maximize the effectiveness of the test program. Fire damage considerations were limited to purely thermal effects

  10. Damage analysis of ceramic boron absorber materials in boiling water reactors and initial model for an optimum control rod management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.

    2000-01-01

    Operating experience has proved so far that BWR control rods cannot be used for the total reactor life time as originally presumed, but instead has to be considered as a consumable article. After only few operating cycles, the mechanism of absorber failure has been shown to be neutron induced boron carbide swelling and stress cracking of the absorber tubes, followed by erosion of the absorber material. In the case that operation of such a control rod is continued in control cells, this can lead to an increase of the local power density distribution in the core and, under certain conditions, can even cause fuel rod damage. A non destructive testing method has been developed called 'UNDERWATER NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY' applicable for any BWR control rod. 'Lead-control rods' being radiographed are used to evaluate their actual nuclear worth by the help of a special analytical procedure developed and verified by the author. Nuclear worth data plotted against bum up history data will allow to create an 'EMPIRIC MODEL'. This model includes the basic idea of operating control rods of a certain design first in a control position up to a target fluence limited to an amount just below the appearance of control rod washout. Afterwards they have to be moved in a shut down position to work therefor the total remaining holding period. The initial model is applicable to any CR-design as long as sufficient measuring-data and thus data about the nuclear worth are available. The results of these experiences are extrapolated to the whole reactor holding period. After modelling no further measurements of this particular control rod type are necessary in any reactor. The second focal point is to provide an APPROXIMATION EQUATION. By knowing the absorber radius, B 4 C density and absorber enclosure data an engineer will calculate reliably the working life of any control rod design on control position. indicated as maximum allowable neutron fluence margin until absorber wash-out starts. This

  11. Material control and accounting requirements for uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has defined material control and accounting (MC and A) requirement for low-enriched uranium enrichment plants licensed under 10 CFR parts 40 and 70. Following detailed assessment of potential safeguards issues relevant to these facilities, a new MC and A rule was developed. The primary safeguards considerations are detection of the loss of special nuclear material, detection of clandestine production of special nuclear material of low strategic significance for unauthorized use or distribution, and detection of unauthorized production of uranium enriched to ≥10 wt % U-235. The primary safeguards concerns identified were the large absolute limit of error associated with the material balance closing, the inability to shutdown some uranium enrichment technologies to perform a cleanout inventory of the process system, and the flexibility of some of these technologies to produce higher enrichments. Unauthorized production scenarios were identified for some technologies that could circumvent the detection of the production and removal of 5 kilograms of U-235 as high-enriched uranium through conventional material control and accounting programs. Safeguards techniques, including the use of production and process control information, measurements, and technical surveillance, were identified to compensate for these concerns

  12. Hybrid Automaton Based Controller Design for Damage Mitigation of Islanded Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sudipta

    Spurred by increasingly unpredictable weather, high penetration of renewable resources and a period of focused US government policy, it is widely expected that microgrids within the electric distribution system will show exponential growth in the coming decade. Microgrids comprise of power generation, delivery and consumption assets within restricted electrical boundaries and under contiguous control oversight that enables holistic management of these assets. Microgrids can be islanded and operated independent of a larger electric power network, and as such, a primary function of microgrids is to enhance the energy reliability of the underlying loads. In this work, we focus on naval shipboard power systems. Apart from being islanded, in the true sense, resiliency and damage mitigation are key considerations in the design and operation of these power systems. Islanded power systems encompass a rich diversity of discrete and continuous dynamic behavior in multiple time-scales. A high penetration of devices with power electronics interface, low inherent system inertia, and high density of switching devices can lead to rapid disturbance propagation and system failure without advanced damage mitigation strategies. Hybrid systems formalism incorporates continuous dynamics as well as discrete switching behavior into a modeling and control framework, thus allowing a complete system description while crystallizing concepts of safety into system design criteria. We build on existing work to enhance a Dynamic Mixed Integer Programming (DMIP) model of a power system that combines continuous time differential algebraic models with switching dynamics synthesized into mixed integer inequalities. We use this model to derive an optimal system reconfiguration strategy to prevent voltage collapse of a benchmark shipboard power system. However, this methodology is restricted by the computational complexity of dynamic programming and scalability of non-automated processes. To overcome

  13. Lack of association of colonic epithelium telomere length and oxidative DNA damage in Type 2 diabetes under good metabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Hugh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomeres are DNA repeat sequences necessary for DNA replication which shorten at cell division at a rate directly related to levels of oxidative stress. Critical telomere shortening predisposes to cell senescence and to epithelial malignancies. Type 2 diabetes is characterised by increased oxidative DNA damage, telomere attrition, and an increased risk of colonic malignancy. We hypothesised that the colonic mucosa in Type 2 diabetes would be characterised by increased DNA damage and telomere shortening. Methods We examined telomere length (by flow fluorescent in situ hybridization and oxidative DNA damage (flow cytometry of 8 – oxoguanosine in the colonic mucosal cells of subjects with type 2 diabetes (n = 10; mean age 62.2 years, mean HbA1c 6.9% and 22 matched control subjects. No colonic pathology was apparent in these subjects at routine gastrointestinal investigations. Results Mean colonic epithelial telomere length in the diabetes group was not significantly different from controls (10.6 [3.6] vs. 12.1 [3.4] Molecular Equivalent of Soluble Fluorochrome Units [MESF]; P = 0.5. Levels of oxidative DNA damage were similar in both T2DM and control groups (2.6 [0.6] vs. 2.5 [0.6] Mean Fluorescent Intensity [MFI]; P = 0.7. There was no significant relationship between oxidative DNA damage and telomere length in either group (both p > 0.1. Conclusion Colonic epithelium in Type 2 diabetes does not differ significantly from control colonic epithelium in oxidative DNA damage or telomere length. There is no evidence in this study for increased oxidative DNA damage or significant telomere attrition in colonic mucosa as a carcinogenic mechanism.

  14. Deficits of anticipatory grip force control after damage to peripheral and central sensorimotor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsdörfer, Joachim; Hagl, Elke; Nowak, Dennis A

    2004-11-01

    Healthy subjects adjust their grip force economically to the weight of a hand-held object. In addition, inertial loads, which arise from arm movements with the grasped object, are anticipated by parallel grip force modulations. Internal forward models have been proposed to predict the consequences of voluntary movements. Anesthesia of the fingers impairs grip force economy but the feedforward character of the grip force/load coupling is preserved. To further analyze the role of sensory input for internal forward models and to characterize the consequences of central nervous system damage for anticipatory grip force control, we measured grip force behavior in neurological patients. We tested a group of stroke patients with varying degrees of impaired fine motor control and sensory loss, a single patient with complete and permanent differentation from all tactile and proprioceptive input, and a group of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that exclusively impairs the motor system without affecting sensory modalities. Increased grip forces were a common finding in all patients. Sensory deficits were a strong but not the only predictor of impaired grip force economy. The feedforward mode of grip force control was typically preserved in the stroke patients despite their central sensory deficits, but was severely disturbed in the patient with peripheral sensory deafferentation and in a minority of stroke patients. Moderate deficits of feedforward control were also obvious in ALS patients. Thus, the function of the internal forward model and the precision of grip force production may depend on a complex anatomical and functional network of sensory and motor structures and their interaction in time and space.

  15. Asterless is required for centriole length control and sperm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Brian J.; Jacobs, Katherine C.; Fagerstrom, Carey J.

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles are the foundation of two organelles, centrosomes and cilia. Centriole numbers and functions are tightly controlled, and mutations in centriole proteins are linked to a variety of diseases, including microcephaly. Loss of the centriole protein Asterless (Asl), the Drosophila melanogaster orthologue of Cep152, prevents centriole duplication, which has limited the study of its nonduplication functions. Here, we identify populations of cells with Asl-free centrioles in developing Drosophila tissues, allowing us to assess its duplication-independent function. We show a role for Asl in controlling centriole length in germline and somatic tissue, functioning via the centriole protein Cep97. We also find that Asl is not essential for pericentriolar material recruitment or centrosome function in organizing mitotic spindles. Lastly, we show that Asl is required for proper basal body function and spermatid axoneme formation. Insights into the role of Asl/Cep152 beyond centriole duplication could help shed light on how Cep152 mutations lead to the development of microcephaly. PMID:27185836

  16. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Studies of factors that affect and controls the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Martin; Baeckstroem, Ann; Quanhong Feng; Berglund, Johan; Johansson, Malin; Mas Ivars, Diego; Olsson, Mats

    2009-05-01

    A tunnel was developed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in 2003 purposely for a large in-situ rock mechanics experiment, the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE). The tunnel had a large height/width ratio with a circular floor, primarily to control the stress situation around the tunnel and concentrate the stresses under the floor. An extensive set of data for understanding the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) was collected within section 47 of the tunnel. It consist of the blast design, blast sequences, convergence measurements during excavation, geological mapping of tunnel and cores, 3D-laser scanning of the tunnel geometry etc. Furthermore, in 2006, ultrasonic measurements along eight boreholes were carried out in order to estimate the extent of the EDZ in the tunnel. The collection of all these different information provides an opportunity to evaluate the mechanical damages caused by the excavation work. The overall aim with this project is to give feed-back to future planning of tunnelling on issues of importance for requirements with respect to minimising the EDZ in crystalline rock from the drill and blast method. A combination of the mapped geological features (tunnel and cores) and the geometry of the blasted tunnel obtained from the 3D-laser scanning were used to build a 3D model of the geology with emphasis on the geometry of the natural fractures. The rock mechanic response to the tunnelling was evaluated in a numerical model including the as-built geometry in combination with the 3D model of the geology. The modelling of the rock mechanical processes of importance for the EDZ could be calibrated against actual measurements. From observed changes in the ultrasonic wave velocity along the boreholes it was found that the locations of the velocity changes corresponded well with the location of the mapped fractures in the drill cores. This indicates that EDZ can be detected using the ultrasonic method with high accuracy. Furthermore, the

  17. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Studies of factors that affect and controls the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Martin; Baeckstroem, Ann; Quanhong Feng (AaF - Berg och Maetteknik, Stockholm (Sweden)); Berglund, Johan (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Johansson, Malin; Mas Ivars, Diego (Itasca Geomekanik AB, Solna (Sweden)); Olsson, Mats (SweBefo, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    A tunnel was developed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in 2003 purposely for a large in-situ rock mechanics experiment, the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE). The tunnel had a large height/width ratio with a circular floor, primarily to control the stress situation around the tunnel and concentrate the stresses under the floor. An extensive set of data for understanding the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) was collected within section 47 of the tunnel. It consist of the blast design, blast sequences, convergence measurements during excavation, geological mapping of tunnel and cores, 3D-laser scanning of the tunnel geometry etc. Furthermore, in 2006, ultrasonic measurements along eight boreholes were carried out in order to estimate the extent of the EDZ in the tunnel. The collection of all these different information provides an opportunity to evaluate the mechanical damages caused by the excavation work. The overall aim with this project is to give feed-back to future planning of tunnelling on issues of importance for requirements with respect to minimising the EDZ in crystalline rock from the drill and blast method. A combination of the mapped geological features (tunnel and cores) and the geometry of the blasted tunnel obtained from the 3D-laser scanning were used to build a 3D model of the geology with emphasis on the geometry of the natural fractures. The rock mechanic response to the tunnelling was evaluated in a numerical model including the as-built geometry in combination with the 3D model of the geology. The modelling of the rock mechanical processes of importance for the EDZ could be calibrated against actual measurements. From observed changes in the ultrasonic wave velocity along the boreholes it was found that the locations of the velocity changes corresponded well with the location of the mapped fractures in the drill cores. This indicates that EDZ can be detected using the ultrasonic method with high accuracy. Furthermore, the

  18. 21 CFR 111.127 - What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.127 What quality control operations are required for packaging and labeling operations? Quality control operations for packaging and...

  19. 21 CFR 111.130 - What quality control operations are required for returned dietary supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.130 What quality control operations are required for returned dietary supplements? Quality control operations for returned dietary...

  20. 40 CFR 63.2252 - What are the requirements for process units that have no control or work practice requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are the requirements for process units that have no control or work practice requirements? 63.2252 Section 63.2252 Protection of... Pollutants: Plywood and Composite Wood Products General Compliance Requirements § 63.2252 What are the...

  1. Requirement for aspartate-cleaved bid in apoptosis signaling by DNA-damaging anti-cancer regimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Arlette B.; Tait, Stephen W. G.; de Vries, Evert; Eldering, Eric; Borst, Jannie

    2004-01-01

    Lymphoid malignancies can escape from DNA-damaging anti-cancer drugs and gamma-radiation by blocking apoptosis-signaling pathways. How these regimens induce apoptosis is incompletely defined, especially in cells with nonfunctional p53. We report here that the BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bid is

  2. 50 CFR 23.52 - What are the requirements for replacing a lost, damaged, stolen, or accidentally destroyed CITES...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... lost, damaged, stolen, or accidentally destroyed CITES document? 23.52 Section 23.52 Wildlife and...) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD FAUNA AND FLORA (CITES) Application..., or accidentally destroyed CITES document? (a) Purpose. A Management Authority may issue a duplicate...

  3. Autophagy sequesters damaged lysosomes to control lysosomal biogenesis and kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Ikuko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Omori, Hiroko; Kimura, Tomonori; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Hamasaki, Maho; Noda, Takeshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2013-08-28

    Diverse causes, including pathogenic invasion or the uptake of mineral crystals such as silica and monosodium urate (MSU), threaten cells with lysosomal rupture, which can lead to oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis or necrosis. Here, we demonstrate that lysosomes are selectively sequestered by autophagy, when damaged by MSU, silica, or the lysosomotropic reagent L-Leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (LLOMe). Autophagic machinery is recruited only on damaged lysosomes, which are then engulfed by autophagosomes. In an autophagy-dependent manner, low pH and degradation capacity of damaged lysosomes are recovered. Under conditions of lysosomal damage, loss of autophagy causes inhibition of lysosomal biogenesis in vitro and deterioration of acute kidney injury in vivo. Thus, we propose that sequestration of damaged lysosomes by autophagy is indispensable for cellular and tissue homeostasis.

  4. Management of colon wounds in the setting of damage control laparotomy: a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Jordan A; Griffin, Russell L; Vandromme, Marianne J; Melton, Sherry M; George, Richard L; Reiff, Donald A; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Rue, Loring W

    2009-11-01

    Although colon wounds are commonly treated in the setting of damage control laparotomy (DCL), a paucity of data exist to guide management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with the management of colonic wounds in the context of DCL, using colonic wound outcomes after routine, single laparotomy (SL) as a benchmark. Consecutive patients during a 7-year period with full-thickness or devitalizing colon injury were identified. Early deaths (Colon-related complications (abscess, suture or staple leak, and stomal ischemia) were compared between those managed in the setting of DCL versus those managed by SL, both overall and as stratified by procedure (primary repair, resection and anastomosis, and resection and colostomy). One hundred fifty-seven patients met study criteria: 101 had undergone SL and 56 had undergone DCL. Comparison of DCL patients with SL patients was notable for a significant difference in colon-related complications (30% vs. 12%, p colon-related complications among those that underwent resection and anastomosis (DCL: 39% vs. SL: 18%, p colonic wounds in the setting of DCL is associated with a relatively high incidence of complications. The excessive incidence of leak overall and morbidity particular to resection and anastomosis, however, give us pause. Although stoma construction is not without its own complications in the setting of DCL, it may be the safer alternative.

  5. A directed-overflow and damage-control N-glycosidase in riboflavin biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelin, Océane; Huang, Lili; Hasnain, Ghulam; Jeffryes, James G.; Ziemak, Michael J.; Rocca, James R.; Wang, Bing; Rice, Jennifer; Roje, Sanja; Yurgel, Svetlana N.; Gregory, Jesse F.; Edison, Arthur S.; Henry, Christopher S.; deCrécy-Lagard, Valérie; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Plants and bacteria synthesize the essential human micronutrient riboflavin (vitamin B2) via the same multistep pathway. The early intermediates of this pathway are notoriously reactive, and may be overproduced in vivo because riboflavin biosynthesis enzymes lack feedback controls. Here we demonstrate disposal of riboflavin intermediates by COG3236 (DUF1768), a protein of previously unknown function that is fused to two different riboflavin pathway enzymes in plants and bacteria (RIBR and RibA, respectively). We present cheminformatic, biochemical, genetic, and genomic evidence to show that: (i) plant and bacterial COG3236 proteins cleave the N-glycosidic bond of the first two intermediates of riboflavin biosynthesis, yielding relatively innocuous products; (ii) certain COG3236 proteins are in a multienzyme riboflavin biosynthesis complex that gives them privileged access to riboflavin intermediates; and (iii) COG3236 action in Arabidopsis thaliana and Escherichia coli helps maintain flavin levels. COG3236 proteins thus illustrate two emerging principles in chemical biology: directed overflow metabolism, in which excess flux is diverted out of a pathway, and the pre-emption of damage from reactive metabolites. PMID:25431972

  6. History of the Innovation of Damage Control for Management of Trauma Patients: 1902-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Derek J; Ball, Chad G; Feliciano, David V; Moore, Ernest E; Ivatury, Rao R; Lucas, Charles E; Fabian, Timothy C; Zygun, David A; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-05-01

    To review the history of the innovation of damage control (DC) for management of trauma patients. DC is an important development in trauma care that provides a valuable case study in surgical innovation. We searched bibliographic databases (1950-2015), conference abstracts (2009-2013), Web sites, textbooks, and bibliographies for articles relating to trauma DC. The innovation of DC was then classified according to the Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, and Long-term study model of surgical innovation. The "innovation" of DC originated from the use of therapeutic liver packing, a practice that had previously been abandoned after World War II because of adverse events. It then "developed" into abbreviated laparotomy using "rapid conservative operative techniques." Subsequent "exploration" resulted in the application of DC to increasingly complex abdominal injuries and thoracic, peripheral vascular, and orthopedic injuries. Increasing use of DC laparotomy was followed by growing reports of postinjury abdominal compartment syndrome and prophylactic use of the open abdomen to prevent intra-abdominal hypertension after DC laparotomy. By the year 2000, DC surgery had been widely adopted and was recommended for use in surgical journals, textbooks, and teaching courses ("assessment" stage of innovation). "Long-term study" of DC is raising questions about whether the procedure should be used more selectively in the context of improving resuscitation practices. The history of the innovation of DC illustrates how a previously abandoned surgical technique was adapted and readopted in response to an increased understanding of trauma patient physiology and changing injury patterns and trauma resuscitation practices.

  7. STUDY ON THE BLASTING SEISMIC DAMAGE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR SMALL SPACING SOFT ROCK TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chengzhong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With a lot construction of transportation infrastructure in Chinese mountainous area, because of its unique advantages such as less land occupation, beautiful appearance and convenient route planning, small spacing tunnels are widely used. The shallow buried tunnel with small spacing, the blasting excavation will lead to tunnel surrounding rock especially in the middle rock wall damage and reduce the self-bearing capacity of surrounding rock. Through detecting and analyzing by the geological radar of the excavated red layer soft rock tunnel surrounding rock found that the middle rock wall loose circle thickness of the tunnel reaches to 1.8 m, the vault and sidewall loose circle thickness is about 1.2 m. Through selection of rational strengthening measures and blasting design scheme to improve drilling parameters and methods, as far as possible to protect the integrity and self-bearing capacity of the surrounding rock, the deformation and vibration of the tunnel would be controlled in reasonable limits and ensure the safety of tunnel construction.

  8. Comparative study of abdominal cavity temporary closure techniques for damage control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELO A. F. RIBEIRO JR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The damage control surgery, with emphasis on laparostomy, usually results in shrinkage of the aponeurosis and loss of the ability to close the abdominal wall, leading to the formation of ventral incisional hernias. Currently, various techniques offer greater chances of closing the abdominal cavity with less tension. Thus, this study aims to evaluate three temporary closure techniques of the abdominal cavity: the Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy - VAC, the Bogotá Bag and the Vacuum-pack. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, selecting 28 articles published in the last 20 years. The techniques of the bag Bogotá and Vacuum-pack had the advantage of easy access to the material in most centers and low cost, contrary to VAC, which, besides presenting high cost, is not available in most hospitals. On the other hand, the VAC technique was more effective in reducing stress at the edges of lesions, removing stagnant fluids and waste, in addition to acting at the cellular level by increasing proliferation and cell division rates, and showed the highest rates of primary closure of the abdominal cavity.

  9. Minimum power requirement for environmental control of aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, Juan Carlos; Bejan, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses two basic issues in the thermodynamic optimization of environmental control systems (ECS) for aircraft: realistic limits for the minimal power requirement, and design features that facilitate operation at minimal power consumption. Four models are proposed and optimized. In the first, the ECS operates reversibly, the air stream in the cabin is mixed to one temperature, and the cabin experiences heat transfer with the ambient, across its insulation. The cabin temperature is fixed. In the second model, the fixed cabin temperature is assigned to the internal solid surfaces of the cabin, and a thermal resistance separates these surfaces from the air mixed in the cabin. In the third model, the ECS operates irreversibly, based on the bootstrap air cycle. The fourth model combines the ECS features of the third model with the cabin-environment interaction features of the second model. It is shown that in all models the temperature of the air stream that the ECS delivers to the cabin can be optimized for operation at minimal power. The effect of other design parameters and flying conditions is documented. The optimized air delivery temperature is relatively insensitive to the complexity of the model; for example, it is insensitive to the size of the heat exchanger used in the bootstrap air cycle. This study adds to the view that robustness is a characteristic of optimized complex flow systems, and that thermodynamic optimization results can be used for orientation in the pursuit of more complex and realistic designs

  10. [Colonoscopy quality control as a requirement of colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Enrique; Alarcón-Fernández, Onofre; Jover, Rodrigo

    2013-11-01

    The strategies used in population-based colorectal screening strategies culminate in colonoscopy and consequently the success of these programs largely depends on the quality of this diagnostic test. The main factors to consider when evaluating quality are scientific-technical quality, safety, patient satisfaction, and accessibility. Quality indicators allow variability among hospitals, endoscopy units and endoscopists to be determined and can identify those not achieving recommended standards. In Spain, the working group for colonoscopy quality of the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology and the Spanish Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy have recently drawn up a Clinical Practice Guideline that contains the available evidence on the quality of screening colonoscopy, as well as the basic requirements that must be met by endoscopy units and endoscopists carrying out this procedure. The implementation of training programs and screening colonoscopy quality controls are strongly recommended to guarantee the success of population-based colorectal cancer screening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms and cardiovascular damage in hypertensive subjects: an Italian case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzo Federica

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO synthesized by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS plays an important role in regulation of endothelial function and in the control of blood pressure. However, the results from some studies on the association between three clinically relevant eNOS gene polymorphisms (G894T, T786C and intron 4b/a and essential hypertension are unclear. We designed a case-control study to evaluate the influence of eNOS polymorphisms on target organ damage in 127 hypertensives and 67 normotensives. Clinical evaluation, biochemical parameters, Urinary Albumin Excretion (UAE and echocardiogram were performed to characterize target organ damage. eNOS polymorphism were recognized by PCR method. Results The distribution of eNOS genotypes was similar in hypertensives and normotensives but 4aa was present in the 2.5% of hypertensives and completely absent in normotensives. Subjects with 4bb, G894T, and T786C genotypes showed an increased prevalence of target organ damage. Moreover prevalence of G894T and introne 4 variants was significantly higher in hypertensives than in normotensives both with cardiovascular damage. Logistic regression analysis didn't show any association between eNOS polymorphisms, Body Mass Index (BMI, hypertension, gender and cardiovascular damage. Only the age (OR 1.11; IC 95% 1.06–1.18 was predictive of cardiovascular damage in our population. Conclusion Our results seem to indicate a lack of association with eNOS variants and cardiovascular damage onset.

  12. Requirements for Scalable Access Control and Security Management Architectures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keromytis, Angelos D; Smith, Jonathan M

    2005-01-01

    Maximizing local autonomy has led to a scalable Internet. Scalability and the capacity for distributed control have unfortunately not extended well to resource access control policies and mechanisms...

  13. Antecedent conditions control carbon loss and downstream water quality from shallow, damaged peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand-Clement, E; Luscombe, D J; Anderson, K; Gatis, N; Benaud, P; Brazier, R E

    2014-09-15

    Losses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from drained peatlands are of concern, due to the effects this has on the delivery of ecosystem services, and especially on the long-term store of carbon and the provision of drinking water. Most studies have looked at the effect of drainage in deep peat; comparatively, little is known about the behaviour of shallow, climatically marginal peatlands. This study examines water quality (DOC, Abs(400), pH, E4/E6 and C/C) during rainfall events from such environments in the south west UK, in order to both quantify DOC losses, and understand their potential for restoration. Water samples were taken over a 19 month period from a range of drains within two different experimental catchments in Exmoor National Park; data were analysed on an event basis. DOC concentrations ranging between 4 and 21 mg L(-1) are substantially lower than measurements in deep peat, but remain problematic for the water treatment process. Dryness plays a critical role in controlling DOC concentrations and water quality, as observed through spatial and seasonal differences. Long-term changes in depth to water table (30 days before the event) are likely to impact on DOC production, whereas discharge becomes the main control over DOC transport at the time scale of the rainfall/runoff event. The role of temperature during events is attributed to an increase in the diffusion of DOC, and therefore its transport. Humification ratios (E4/E6) consistently below 5 indicate a predominance of complex humic acids, but increased decomposition during warmer summer months leads to a comparatively higher losses of fulvic acids. This work represents a significant contribution to the scientific understanding of the behaviour and functioning of shallow damaged peatlands in climatically marginal locations. The findings also provide a sound baseline knowledge to support research into the effects of landscape restoration in the future. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by

  14. Open abdomen in gastrointestinal surgery: Which technique is the best for temporary closure during damage control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Junior, Marcelo A F; Barros, Emily Alves; de Carvalho, Sabrina Marques; Nascimento, Vinicius Pereira; Cruvinel Neto, José; Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the 3 main techniques of temporary closure of the abdominal cavity, vacuum assisted closure (vacuum-assisted closure therapy - VAC), Bogota bag and Barker technique, in damage control surgery. METHODS After systematic review of the literature, 33 articles were selected to compare the efficiency of the three procedures. Criteria such as cost, infections, capacity of reconstruction of the abdominal wall, diseases associated with the technique, among others were analyzed. RESULTS The Bogota bag and Barker techniques present as advantage the availability of material and low cost, what is not observed in the VAC procedure. The VAC technique is the most efficient, not only because it reduces the tension on the boarders of the lesion, but also removes stagnant fluids and debris and acts at cellular level increasing cell proliferation and division. Bogota bag presents the higher rates of skin laceration and evisceration, greater need for a stent for draining fluids and wash-ups, higher rates of intestinal adhesion to the abdominal wall. The Barker technique presents lack of efficiency in closing the abdominal wall and difficulty on maintaining pressure on the dressing. The VAC dressing can generate irritation and dermatitis when the drape is applied, in addition to pain, infection and bleeding, as well as toxic shock syndrome, anaerobic sepsis and thrombosis. CONCLUSION The VAC technique, showed to be superior allowing a better control of liquid on the third space, avoiding complications such as fistula with small mortality, low infection rate, and easier capability on primary closure of the abdominal cavity. PMID:27648164

  15. Control excess stock and calculating damaged products as the effort to increase revenue (case study of SME FBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhasanah, N.; Mardhika, D. A.; Tanjung, W.; Gayatri, A. M.; Suri, Q. A.; Jingga; Safitri, R.; Supriyanto, A.

    2017-12-01

    Of small and medium scale (SME) is a business engaged in production. The growth product innovation of each year to year made competitiveness every SME very tight, and the sales must be high that avoid goods the product last year will be tough sold in the following year. Forecasting demand is needed so that no its production. In production process, besides products should also be considered about damaged products, resulting in a loss. In this study, researchers conducted a observations on SME FBS producing pants, shirts and shirts. SME FBS not having planning previous production, also in any period of production there always products be damaged. This study attempts to increase their SME FBS by controlling waste products, and those damaged products. According to the research conducted other products in some excess pants 1609 unit, and the shirts 187911 unit, and increase the income through control over the excess product obtained by 1% to the pants, and 52% to the shirts. For damaged product on period last year and future, increase 0.07% if the damaged on shirts can be sold, and 0.29% on pants if the broken sold.

  16. Vasopressor use after initial damage control laparotomy increases risk for anastomotic disruption in the management of destructive colon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter E; Nunn, Andrew M; Wormer, Blair A; Christmas, A Britton; Gibeault, Lindsay A; Green, John M; Sing, Ronald F

    2013-12-01

    Management of destructive colon injuries during damage control (DC) laparotomy is debated. The authors reviewed a single institution's experience with destructive colon injuries to identify risk factors for anastomotic failure after colon reconstruction. The authors identified all trauma patients sustaining destructive colon injuries between 2002 and 2011 from their medical center's trauma registry. Anastomotic leak was defined as suture or staple line disruption or enteral fistula formation. Of 171 identified patients, 68 had DC procedures, 41 (60%) had subsequent anastomoses performed during the same hospitalization, and 27 (40%) were diverted. The colon anastomotic leak rate in patients who underwent DC laparotomy was higher than in patients who were reconstructed at the primary operation in a non-DC setting (17% vs 6%, P = .09). The use of vasopressors after the initial DC operation more than quadrupled the leak rate to 50% (P = .02). Colonic anastomotic disruptions yield deadly consequences, and diversion rather than anastomosis should be used in patients who require vasopressor support after the initial DC procedure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. National Ignition Facility system design requirements NIF integrated computer controls SDR004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, E.

    1996-01-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the NIF Integrated Computer Control System. The Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) is covered in NIF WBS element 1.5. This document responds directly to the requirements detailed in the NIF Functional Requirements/Primary Criteria, and is supported by subsystem design requirements documents for each major ICCS Subsystem

  18. MSD in fuselage lap joints: Requirements for inspection intervals for typical fuselage lap joint panels with Multiple Site Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, G. P.

    1992-07-01

    Inspection of failed aircraft structures and fractography on fatigue specimens showed that after a high number of flights, cracks can appear simultaneously in riveted lap joints. When these crack tips approach each other, a mutual interaction causes an unexpected fast crack growth and new coalescence of cracks. The term Multiple Site Damage (MSD) is used when the mutual interaction of two or more damages is noticeable. A model to predict the fatigue life of a riveted lap joint and the minimum necessary inspection interval for safe aircraft operation is presented. The program was developed to simulate the fatigue process and aircraft inspection. Input for this analysis are scatter data for initiation, the stress distribution between frames and the geometry of the structure. Methods that can be used to avoid accidents due to MSD are reviewed. A test program to support the analysis is described.

  19. 21 CFR 111.135 - What quality control operations are required for product complaints?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.135 What quality control operations are required for...

  20. Independent predictors of enteric fistula and abdominal sepsis after damage control laparotomy: results from the prospective AAST Open Abdomen registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Matthew J; Dubose, Joseph J; Scalea, Thomas M; Holcomb, John B; Shrestha, Binod; Okoye, Obi; Inaba, Kenji; Bee, Tiffany K; Fabian, Timothy C; Whelan, James F; Ivatury, Rao R

    2013-10-01

    Enterocutaneous fistula (ECF), enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF), and intra-abdominal sepsis/abscess (IAS) are major challenges for surgeons caring for patients undergoing damage control laparotomy after trauma. To determine independent predictors of ECF, EAF, or IAS in patients undergoing damage control laparotomy after trauma, using the AAST Open Abdomen Registry. The AAST Open Abdomen registry of patients with an open abdomen following damage control laparotomy was used to identify patients who developed ECF, EAF, or IAS and to compare these patients with those without these complications. Univariate analyses were performed to compare these groups of patients. Variables from univariate analyses differing at P IAS. Fourteen level I trauma centers. A total of 517 patients with an open abdomen following damage control laparotomy. Complication of ECF, EAF, or IAS. More patients in the ECF/EAF/IAS group than in the group without these complications underwent bowel resection (63 of 111 patients [57%] vs 133 of 406 patients [33%]; P 48 hours after surgery, the ECF/EAF/IAS group received more colloids (P IAS group underwent almost twice as many abdominal reexplorations as did the group without these complications (mean [SD] number, 4.1 [4.1] vs 2.2 [3.4]; P IAS were a large bowel resection (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.56 [95% CI, 1.88-6.76]; P 48 hours of between 5 and 10 L (AOR, 2.11 [95% CI, 1.15-3.88]; P = .02) or more than 10 L (AOR, 1.93 [95% CI, 1.04-3.57]; P = .04), and an increasing number of reexplorations (AOR, 1.14 [95% CI, 1.06-1.21]; P IAS in patients with an open abdomen after damage control laparotomy.

  1. Planting and care of fine hardwood seedlings: Diagnosing and controlling wildlife damage in hardwood plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James McKenna; Keith Woeste

    2004-01-01

    Once trees are planted and begin growing, damage from wildlife can threaten their quality. In this publication we discuss how to identify and manage injury to hardwoods from wildlife to minimize losses.

  2. Mgm101p is a novel component of the mitochondrial nucleoid that binds DNA and is required for the repair of oxidatively damaged mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeusen, S.; Tieu, Q.; Wong, E.; Weiss, E.; Schieltz, D.; Yates, J.R.; Nunnari, J.

    1999-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during cell division is required for progeny to be respiratory competent. Maintenance involves the replication, repair, assembly, segregation, and partitioning of the mitochondrial nucleoid. MGM101 has been identified as a gene essential for mtDNA maintenance in S. cerevisiae, but its role is unknown. Using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified Mgm101p as a component of highly enriched nucleoids, suggesting that it plays a nucleoid-specific role in maintenance. Subcellular fractionation, indirect immunofluorescence and GFP tagging show that Mgm101p is exclusively associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid structure in cells. Furthermore, DNA affinity chromatography of nucleoid extracts indicates that Mgm101p binds to DNA, suggesting that its nucleoid localization is in part due to this activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells containing a temperature sensitive mgm101 allele suggests that Mgm101p is not involved in mtDNA packaging, segregation, partitioning or required for ongoing mtDNA replication. We examined Mgm101p's role in mtDNA repair. As compared with wild-type cells, mgm101 cells were more sensitive to mtDNA damage induced by UV irradiation and were hypersensitive to mtDNA damage induced by gamma rays and H2O2 treatment. Thus, we propose that Mgm101p performs an essential function in the repair of oxidatively damaged mtDNA that is required for the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. (author)

  3. Updated requirements for control room annunciation: an operations perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, E.; Lane, L.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of updating and aligning requirements for annunciation functionality and performance with current expectations for operational excellence. This redefinition of annunciation requirements was undertaken as one component of a project to characterize improvement priorities, establish the operational and economic basis for improvement, and identify preferred implementation options for Ontario Power Generation plants. The updated requirements express the kinds of information support annunciation should provide to Operations staff to support the detection, recognition and response to changes in plant conditions. The updated requirements were developed using several types of information: management and industry expectations for operations excellence, previous definitions of user needs for annunciation, and operational and ergonomic principles. Operations and engineering staff at several stations have helped refine and complete the initial requirements definition. Application of these updated requirements is expected to lead to more effective and task relevant annunciation system improvements that better serve plant operation needs. The paper outlines the project rationale, reviews development objectives, discusses the approaches applied for requirements definition and organization, describes key requirements findings in relation to current operations experience, and discusses the proposed application of these requirements for guiding future annunciation system improvements. (author)

  4. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2009-03-31

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  5. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  6. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load

  7. Radiation-resistant requirements analysis of device and control component for advanced spent fuel management process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tai Gil; Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. Y.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    It is known that high levels of radiation can cause significant damage by altering the properties of materials. A practical understanding of the effects of radiation - how radiation affects various types of materials and components - is required to design equipment to operate reliably in a gamma radiation environment. When designing equipment to operate in a high gamma radiation environment, such as will be present in a nuclear spent fuel handling facility, several important steps should be followed. In order to active test of the advanced spent fuel management process, the radiation-resistant analysis of the device and control component for active test which is concerned about the radiation environment is conducted. Also the system design process is analysis and reviewed. In the foreign literature, 'threshold' values are generally reported. the threshold values are normally the dose required to begin degradation in a particular material property. The radiation effect analysis for the device of vol-oxidation and metalization, which are main device for the advanced spent fuel management process, is performed by the SCALE 4.4 code. 5 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  8. No association between alcohol supplementation and autoantibodies to DNA damage in postmenopausal women in a controlled feeding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabir, S; Baer, D J; Johnson, L L; Frenkel, K; Dorgan, J F; Cambell, W; Hartman, T J; Clevidence, B; Albanes, D; Judd, J T; Taylor, P R

    2005-08-01

    Alcohol consumption is linked to increased breast cancer risk. Since oestrogens increase breast cancer risk, possibly through oxidative damage, and we have shown that alcohol consumption increases serum oestrogens, we tested whether moderate alcohol supplementation increased oxidative DNA damage among healthy postmenopausal women not on hormone replacement therapy in a randomized controlled crossover study. We used serum 5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxyuridine (5-HMdU) autoantibodies (aAbs) as a marker of oxidative DNA damage. The results showed no evidence for increased or decreased levels of oxidative DNA damage among women who consumed 15 g or 30 g alcohol per day for 8 weeks compared with women in the 0 g alcohol group. We conclude that among healthy women, it is possible that an 8-week trial of moderate alcohol supplementation might be too short to make enough 5-HMdU aAbs to compare differences by alcohol dose. In future studies, a panel of biomarkers for DNA damage should be used.

  9. Dosimetry control for radiation processing - basic requirements and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, M.; Tsrunchev, Ts.

    2004-01-01

    A brief review of the basic international codes and standards for dosimetry control for radiation processing (high doses dosimetry), setting up a dosimetry control for radiation processing and metrology control of the dosimetry system is made. The present state of dosimetry control for food processing and the Bulgarian long experience in food irradiation (three irradiation facilities are operational at these moment) are presented. The absence of neither national standard for high doses nor accredited laboratory for calibration and audit of radiation processing dosimetry systems is also discussed

  10. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley N. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair.

  11. 30 CFR 250.462 - What are the requirements for well-control drills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for well-control... Other Drilling Requirements § 250.462 What are the requirements for well-control drills? You must conduct a weekly well-control drill with each drilling crew. Your drill must familiarize the crew with its...

  12. 21 CFR 111.315 - What are the requirements for laboratory control processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements for laboratory control... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Laboratory Operations § 111.315 What are the requirements for laboratory control...

  13. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-01-01

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts

  14. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  15. Ergonomic requirements to control room design - evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, W.

    1985-01-01

    The method of evaluation introduced is the result of work carried out by the sub-committee 'Control Room Design' of the Engineering Standards Committee in DIN Standards, Ergonomy. This committee compiles standards for the design of control rooms (instrumentation and control) for the monitoring and operation of process engineering cycles. With the agreement of the committee - whom we wish to take the opportunity of thanking at this point for their constructive collaboration - a planned partial standard will be introduced thematically in the following, in order that knowledge gained from the discussion can be included in further work on the subject. The matter in question is a procedure for the qualitative evaluation of the duties to be performed under the control of operators in order that an assessment can be made of existing control concepts or such concepts as are to be found in the draft phase. (orig./GL) [de

  16. Efficient Phase Locking of Fiber Amplifiers Using a Low-Cost and High-Damage-Threshold Phase Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, Zhou; Yan-Xing, Ma; Xiao-Lin, Wang; Hao-Tong, Ma; Xiao-Jun, Xu; Ze-Jin, Liu

    2010-01-01

    We propose a low-cost and high-damage-threshold phase control system that employs a piezoelectric ceramic transducer modulator controlled by a stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm. Efficient phase locking of two fiber amplifiers is demonstrated. Experimental results show that energy encircled in the target pinhole is increased by a factor of 1.76 and the visibility of the fringe pattern is as high as 90% when the system is in close-loop. The phase control system has potential in phase locking of large-number and high-power fiber laser endeavors. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  17. Carbon-carbon composite and copper-composite bond damages for high flux component controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma facing components constitute the first wall in contact with plasma in fusion machines such as Tore Supra and ITER. These components have to sustain high heat flux and consequently elevated temperatures. They are made up of an armour material, the carbon-carbon composite, a heat sink structure material, the copper chromium zirconium, and a material, the OFHC copper, which is used as a compliant layer between the carbon-carbon composite and the copper chromium zirconium. Using different materials leads to the apparition of strong residual stresses during manufacturing, because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the materials, and compromises the lasting operation of fusion machines as damage which appeared during manufacturing may propagate. The objective of this study is to understand the damage mechanisms of the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond under solicitations that plasma facing components may suffer during their life. The mechanical behaviours of carbon-carbon composite and composite-copper bond were studied in order to define the most suitable models to describe these behaviours. With these models, thermomechanical calculations were performed on plasma facing components with the finite element code Cast3M. The manufacturing of the components induces high stresses which damage the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond. The damage propagates during the cooling down to room temperature and not under heat flux. Alternative geometries for the plasma facing components were studied to reduce damage. The relation between the damage of the carbon-carbon composite and its thermal conductivity was also demonstrated. (author) [fr

  18. Disentangling factors that control the vulnerability of forests to catastrophic wind damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracup, E.; Taylor, A.; MacLean, D.; Boulanger, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Wind is an important driver of forest dynamics along North America's north-eastern coastal forests, but also damages many commercially managed forests which society relies as an important source of wood fiber. Although the influence of wind on north-eastern forests is well recognized, knowledge of factors predisposing trees to wind damage is less known, especially in the context of large, powerful wind storm events. This is of particular concern as climate change is expected to alter the frequency and severity of strong wind storms affecting this region. On 29 September 2003, Hurricane Juan made landfall over Nova Scotia, Canada as a Category 2 hurricane with sustained winds of 158 km/h, and gusts of up to 185 km/h. Hurricane Juan variously damaged a swath of over 600,000 ha of forest. The damaged forest area was surveyed using aerial photography and LandSAT imagery and categorized according to level of wind damage sustained (none, low, moderate, severe) at a resolution of 15 x 15 m square cells. We used Random Forest to analyze and compare level of wind damage in each cell with a myriad of abiotic (exposure, depth to water table, soil composition, etc.) and biotic (tree species composition, canopy closure, canopy height, etc.) factors known or expected to predispose trees to windthrow. From our analysis, we identified topographic exposure, precipitation, and maximum gust speed as the top predictors of windthrow during Hurricane Juan. To our surprise, forest stand factors, such as tree species composition and height, had minimal effects on level of windthrow. These results can be used to construct predictive risk maps which can help society to assess the vulnerability of forests to future wind storm events.

  19. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in trans signalling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient...... recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identify TCOF1 (also known as Treacle), a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1...

  20. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Glas, Rickard, E-mail: rickard.glas@ki.se [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  1. Damage control surgery and open abdomen in trauma patients with exsanguinating bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutafchiĭski, V; Popivanov, G

    2014-01-01

    Acute coagulopathy with exsanguinating bleeding occurs in 2-5% of all trauma cases carrying mortality rate near 100% after conventional management. In the last few decades, the development of damage control surgery (DCS) in combination with the technique of open abdomen led to significantly improved survival among these patients. A descriptive study based on a retrospective analysis of 12 consecutive blast victims with exsanguinating bleeding underwent DCS and open abdomen management. All patients were soldiers injured during their deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan during 2002-2007, treated by our deployed surgical teams. Vacuum Assisted Closure (V.A.C., KCI) and vacuum pack (VP) was used for a temporary closure of abdomen. A cumulative analysis of all relevant series used these methods during the period 2000-2013 was performed. DCS was applied in 12 of 114 consecutive blast victims (10.5%) with survival rate 66.7% (8/12). Eleven had open abdomen with temporary closure with V.A.C. in 6 and VP in 5. Four patients died before the definitive closure (36.4%). The survivors (n = 8) were with a mean age 28.5 years, suffered from a critical trauma with a mean Injury Severity Score 35.5. V.A.C was used in 4 of them, VP in 3. Primary closure of abdomen was achieved in 6 (85.7%) within 3.5 days and mean 1.3 dressing changes. Due to ACS, the abdomen was closed through skin suture only and a creation of planned ventral hernia in 1 patient treated with VP (1/7, 14.3%). Wound infection was observed in 1 case (14.3%). Despite the small sample size, our series clearly demonstrate the benefits of DCS and open abdomen in trauma patients with exsangiunating bleeding. The survival rate is highly dependent on the rapid implementation of DCS in properly selected patients. V.A.C. and VP provide a high rate of primary fascial closure in trauma.

  2. Evaluation and qualification of novel control techniques with safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossner, S.; Wach, D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the questions related to the assessment and qualification of new I and C-systems. The tasks of nuclear power plant I and Cs as well as the efficiency of the new techniques are reflected. Problems with application of new I and Cs and the state of application in Germany and abroad are addressed. Starting from the essential differencies between conventional and new I and C-systems it is evaluated, if and in which way existing safety requirements can be met and to what extent new requirements need to be formulated. An overall concept has to be developed comprising the definition of graded requirement profiles for design and qualification. Associated qualification procedures and tools have to be adapted, developed and tuned upon each other. (orig./HP) [de

  3. 49 CFR 236.205 - Signal control circuits; requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic... car, (b) When points of a switch are not closed in proper position, (c) When an independently operated...

  4. A case of traumatic pancreaticoduodenal injury: a simple and an organ-preserving approach as damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sae Byeol; You, Jiyoung; Choi, Sang Yong

    2012-01-10

    Traumatic pancreaticoduodenal injury still remains challenging with high morbidity and mortality. Optimal management by performing simple and fast damage control surgery ensures better outcomes. A 36-year-old man was admitted with a combined pancreaticoduodenal injury after being assaulted. More than 80% of duodenal circumference (first portion) was disrupted and the neck of the pancreas was transected. Primary repair of the duodenum and pancreaticogastrostomy were performed. The stump of the proximal pancreatic duct was also sutured. The patient developed an intra-abdominal abscess with pancreatic fistula that eventually recovered by conservative treatment. Pancreaticogastrostomy can be a treatment option for pancreatic transection. Rapid and simple damage control surgery with functional preservation of the organ will be beneficial for trauma patients.

  5. Executive control and faithfulness: only long-term romantic relationships require prefrontal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Ryuhei; Yanagisawa, Kuniaki; Ashida, Hiroshi; Abe, Nobuhito

    2018-03-01

    Individuals in the early stages of a romantic relationship generally express intense passionate love toward their partners. This observation allows us to hypothesize that the regulation of interest in extra-pair relationships by executive control, which is supported by the function of the prefrontal cortex, is less required in individuals in the early stages of a relationship than it is in those who are in a long-term relationship. To test this hypothesis, we asked male participants in romantic relationships to perform a go/no-go task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which is a well-validated task that can measure right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) activity implicated in executive control. Subsequently, the participants engaged in a date-rating task in which they rated how much they wanted to date unfamiliar females. We found that individuals with higher right VLPFC activity better regulated their interest in dates with unfamiliar females. Importantly, this relationship was found only in individuals with long-term partners, but not in those with short-term partners, indicating that the active regulation of interest in extra-pair relationships is required only in individuals in a long-term relationship. Our findings extend previous findings on executive control in the maintenance of monogamous relationships by highlighting the role of the VLPFC, which varies according to the stage of the romantic relationship.

  6. Stage-by-stage licensing procedure, prevention of damage, control by administrative courts. Some comments on the Wyhl judgment of the Federal Administrative Court

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellner, D.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses the three main items of the Wyhl judgment of the Federal Administrative Court, of December 19, 1985 - 7C65/82, which are likely to set trends. The judgment clarifies the function of the socalled preliminary approval of the concept and its delimitation to the preliminary partial licence. According to the judgment, the first is a licensing requirement in substantial law. Precaution for preventing damage according to sec. 7, sub-sec (2) No. 3 Atomic Energy Act is regarded by the Court not as a prevention of hazards, but as the obligation to take every precaution to prevent damage, i.e. types of damage have to be taken into account that cannot be excluded to develop to a real hazard or potential risk. The problem of extent of control by the administrative courts is solved by the approach based on the legal functions of competence and responsibility that are to be drawn from the principle of division of power. (HSCH) [de

  7. Potential damage costs of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera infestation in Europe - the 'no control' scenario

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseler, J.H.H.; Fall, E.H.

    2010-01-01

    he Western Corn Rootworm (WCR or Dvv., Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte) was first detected in Europe in the early nineties in Serbia. Since then the beetle has spread to more than 15 European countries. We assess the potential damage costs of the invasive species Diabrotica virgifera

  8. Arabidopsis RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED directly regulates DNA damage responses through functions beyond cell cycle control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horvath, B.M.; Kourová, Hana; Nagy, S.; Nemeth, E.; Magyar, Z.; Papdi, C.; Ahmad, Z.; Sanchez-Perez, G.F.; Perilli, S.; Blilou, I.; Pettko-Szandtner, A.; Darula, Z.; Meszaros, T.; Binarová, Pavla; Bogre, L.; Scheres, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 9 (2017), s. 1261-1278 ISSN 0261-4189 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11657S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arabidopsis * BRCA1 * DNA damage response Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 9.792, year: 2016

  9. Required accuracy of tune measurement and parametrization of chromaticity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, R.

    1991-02-01

    The betatron tunes v x and v y will be measured by Fourier-analyzing a BPM signal generated by a beam which received a fast ( kick /f rev ) equals the fractional part of the tune, a beam blow-up can be observed. In this note the required accuracy of such a tune measurement is discussed. (author). 6 schemes

  10. Traumatic colon injury in damage control laparotomy-A multicenter trial: Is it safe to do a delayed anastomosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebe, Leah Carey; Jennings, Andrew; Tatebe, Ken; Handy, Alexandra; Prajapati, Purvi; Smith, Michael; Do, Tai; Ogola, Gerald O; Gandhi, Rajesh R; Duane, Therese M; Luk, Stephen; Petrey, Laura Bruce

    2017-04-01

    Delayed colonic anastomosis after damage control laparotomy (DCL) is an alternative to colostomies during a single laparotomy (SL) in high-risk patients. However, literature suggests increased colonic leak rates up to 27% with DCL, and various reported risk factors. We evaluated our regional experience to determine if delayed colonic anastomosis was associated with worse outcomes. A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed across three Level I trauma centers encompassing traumatic colon injuries from January 2006 through June 2014. Patients with rectal injuries or mortality within 24 hours were excluded. Patient and injury characteristics, complications, and interventions were compared between SL and DCL groups. Regional readmission data were utilized to capture complications within 6 months of index trauma. Of 267 patients, 69% had penetrating injuries, 21% underwent DCL, and the mortality rate was 4.9%. Overall, 176 received primary repair (26 in DCL), 90 had resection and anastomosis (28 in DCL), and 26 had a stoma created (10 end colostomies and 2 loop ileostomies in DCL). Thirty-five of 56 DCL patients had definitive colonic repair subsequent to their index operation. DCL patients were more likely to be hypotensive; require more resuscitation; and suffer acute kidney injury, pneumonia, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and death. Five enteric leaks (1.9%) and three enterocutaneous fistulas (ECF, 1.1%) were identified, proportionately distributed between DCL and SL (p = 1.00, p = 0.51). No difference was seen in intraperitoneal abscesses (p = 0.13) or surgical site infections (SSI, p = 0.70) between cohorts. Among SL patients, pancreas injuries portended an increased risk of intraperitoneal abscesses (p = 0.0002), as did liver injuries in DCL patients (p = 0.06). DCL was not associated with increased enteric leaks, ECF, SSI, or intraperitoneal abscesses despite nearly two-thirds having delayed repair. Despite this being a multicenter study, it is

  11. 75 FR 80066 - Quality Control Requirements for Direct Endorsement Lenders; Notice of Proposed Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5380-N-50] Quality Control Requirements... information: Title of Proposal: Quality Control Requirements for Direct Endorsement Lenders. OMB Control... a result, DE lenders will be responsible for conducting quality control on TPO originations of FHA...

  12. 21 CFR 111.65 - What are the requirements for quality control operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements for quality control... Process Control System § 111.65 What are the requirements for quality control operations? You must implement quality control operations in your manufacturing, packaging, labeling, and holding operations for...

  13. Interface Control Document for the EMPACT Module that Estimates Electric Power Transmission System Response to EMP-Caused Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werley, Kenneth Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mccown, Andrew William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)ory

    2016-06-26

    The EPREP code is designed to evaluate the effects of an Electro-Magnetic Pulse (EMP) on the electric power transmission system. The EPREP code embodies an umbrella framework that allows a user to set up analysis conditions and to examine analysis results. The code links to three major physics/engineering modules. The first module describes the EM wave in space and time. The second module evaluates the damage caused by the wave on specific electric power (EP) transmission system components. The third module evaluates the consequence of the damaged network on its (reduced) ability to provide electric power to meet demand. This third module is the focus of the present paper. The EMPACT code serves as the third module. The EMPACT name denotes EMP effects on Alternating Current Transmission systems. The EMPACT algorithms compute electric power transmission network flow solutions under severely damaged network conditions. Initial solutions are often characterized by unacceptible network conditions including line overloads and bad voltages. The EMPACT code contains algorithms to adjust optimally network parameters to eliminate network problems while minimizing outages. System adjustments include automatically adjusting control equipment (generator V control, variable transformers, and variable shunts), as well as non-automatic control of generator power settings and minimal load shedding. The goal is to evaluate the minimal loss of customer load under equilibrium (steady-state) conditions during peak demand.

  14. Comparative study of abdominal cavity temporary closure techniques for damage control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marcelo A F; Barros, Emily Alves; Carvalho, Sabrina Marques DE; Nascimento, Vinicius Pereira; Cruvinel, José; Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery, with emphasis on laparostomy, usually results in shrinkage of the aponeurosis and loss of the ability to close the abdominal wall, leading to the formation of ventral incisional hernias. Currently, various techniques offer greater chances of closing the abdominal cavity with less tension. Thus, this study aims to evaluate three temporary closure techniques of the abdominal cavity: the Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy - VAC, the Bogotá Bag and the Vacuum-pack. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, selecting 28 articles published in the last 20 years. The techniques of the bag Bogotá and Vacuum-pack had the advantage of easy access to the material in most centers and low cost, contrary to VAC, which, besides presenting high cost, is not available in most hospitals. On the other hand, the VAC technique was more effective in reducing stress at the edges of lesions, removing stagnant fluids and waste, in addition to acting at the cellular level by increasing proliferation and cell division rates, and showed the highest rates of primary closure of the abdominal cavity. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos, com ênfase em peritoneostomia, geralmente resulta em retração da aponeurose e perda da capacidade de fechar a parede abdominal, levando à formação de hérnias ventrais incisionais. Atualmente, várias técnicas oferecem maiores chances de fechamento da cavidade abdominal, com menor tensão. Deste modo, este estudo tem por objetivo avaliar três técnicas de fechamento temporário da cavidade abdominal: fechamento a vácuo (Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy - VAC), Bolsa de Bogotá e Vacuum-pack. Realizou-se uma revisão sistemática da literatura com seleção de 28 artigos publicados nos últimos 20 anos. As técnicas de Bolsa de Bogotá e Vacuum-pack tiveram como vantagem o acesso fácil ao material, na maioria dos centros, e baixo custo, ao contrário do que se observa na terapia a vácuo, VAC, que além de apresentar

  15. Satisfying regulatory and accreditation requirements for quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmeyer, Sharon S

    2013-03-01

    The Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) requires all US clinical laboratories that test "materials derived from the human body for the purpose of providing information for the diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of any disease..." to be regulated. The CLIA mandates are site neutral; based on test complexity; and focus on the three phases of the testing process (preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical). Many testing sites choose to meet the CLIA requirements by following the testing standards of a professional accreditation organization deemed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The three principal organizations are The Joint Commission, the College of American Pathologists, and COLA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Requirements for Control Room Computer-Based Procedures for use in Hybrid Control Rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna Helene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Many plants in the U.S. are currently undergoing control room modernization. The main drivers for modernization are the aging and obsolescence of existing equipment, which typically results in a like-for-like replacement of analogue equipment with digital systems. However, the modernization efforts present an opportunity to employ advanced technology that would not only extend the life, but enhance the efficiency and cost competitiveness of nuclear power. Computer-based procedures (CBPs) are one example of near-term advanced technology that may provide enhanced efficiencies above and beyond like for like replacements of analog systems. Researchers in the LWRS program are investigating the benefits of advanced technologies such as CBPs, with the goal of assisting utilities in decision making during modernization projects. This report will describe the existing research on CBPs, discuss the unique issues related to using CBPs in hybrid control rooms (i.e., partially modernized analog control rooms), and define the requirements of CBPs for hybrid control rooms.

  17. 46 CFR 164.019-13 - Production quality control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... establish procedures for maintaining quality control of the materials used in production, manufacturing... place of manufacture unless alternate procedures have been accepted by the Commandant. (c) Production... manufactured. A new lot must be started whenever any change is made in materials, design, or production method...

  18. 14 CFR 417.303 - Command control system requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... system must transmit a command signal that has the radio frequency characteristics and power needed for.... (c) Reliability prediction. A command control system must have a predicted reliability of 0.999 at... for each launch. Any demonstration of the system's predicted reliability must satisfy § 417.309(b). (d...

  19. Cdk2 is required for p53-independent G2/M checkpoint control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon H Chung

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The activation of phase-specific cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks is associated with ordered cell cycle transitions. Among the mammalian Cdks, only Cdk1 is essential for somatic cell proliferation. Cdk1 can apparently substitute for Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, which are individually dispensable in mice. It is unclear if all functions of non-essential Cdks are fully redundant with Cdk1. Using a genetic approach, we show that Cdk2, the S-phase Cdk, uniquely controls the G(2/M checkpoint that prevents cells with damaged DNA from initiating mitosis. CDK2-nullizygous human cells exposed to ionizing radiation failed to exclude Cdk1 from the nucleus and exhibited a marked defect in G(2/M arrest that was unmasked by the disruption of P53. The DNA replication licensing protein Cdc6, which is normally stabilized by Cdk2, was physically associated with the checkpoint regulator ATR and was required for efficient ATR-Chk1-Cdc25A signaling. These findings demonstrate that Cdk2 maintains a balance of S-phase regulatory proteins and thereby coordinates subsequent p53-independent G(2/M checkpoint activation.

  20. Direct and indirect control of the initiation of meiotic recombination by DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Argunhan

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination plays an essential role in the proper segregation of chromosomes at meiosis I in many sexually reproducing organisms. Meiotic recombination is initiated by the scheduled formation of genome-wide DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. The timing of DSB formation is strictly controlled because unscheduled DSB formation is detrimental to genome integrity. Here, we investigated the role of DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in the control of meiotic DSB formation using budding yeast. By using recombination defective mutants in which meiotic DSBs are not repaired, the effect of DNA damage checkpoint mutations on DSB formation was evaluated. The Tel1 (ATM pathway mainly responds to unresected DSB ends, thus the sae2 mutant background in which DSB ends remain intact was employed. On the other hand, the Mec1 (ATR pathway is primarily used when DSB ends are resected, thus the rad51 dmc1 double mutant background was employed in which highly resected DSBs accumulate. In order to separate the effect caused by unscheduled cell cycle progression, which is often associated with DNA damage checkpoint defects, we also employed the ndt80 mutation which permanently arrests the meiotic cell cycle at prophase I. In the absence of Tel1, DSB formation was reduced in larger chromosomes (IV, VII, II and XI whereas no significant reduction was found in smaller chromosomes (III and VI. On the other hand, the absence of Rad17 (a critical component of the ATR pathway lead to an increase in DSB formation (chromosomes VII and II were tested. We propose that, within prophase I, the Tel1 pathway facilitates DSB formation, especially in bigger chromosomes, while the Mec1 pathway negatively regulates DSB formation. We also identified prophase I exit, which is under the control of the DNA damage checkpoint machinery, to be a critical event associated with down-regulating meiotic DSB formation.

  1. Surgical management and outcome of blunt major liver injuries: experience of damage control laparotomy with perihepatic packing in one trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Being-Chuan; Fang, Jen-Feng; Chen, Ray-Jade; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Hsu, Yu-Pao

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to assess the clinical experience and outcome of damage control laparotomy with perihepatic packing in the management of blunt major liver injuries. From January 1998 to December 2006, 58 patients of blunt major liver injury, American Association for the Surgery of Trauma-Organ Injury Scale (AAST-OIS) equal or greater than III, were operated with perihepatic packing at our institute. Demographic data, intra-operative findings, operative procedures, adjunctive managements and outcome were reviewed. To determine whether there was statistical difference between the survivor and non-survivor groups, data were compared by using Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables, either Pearson's chi-square test or with Yates continuity correction for contingency tables, and results were considered statistically significant if phepatic artery ligation (n=11) and 7 patients required post-laparotomy hepatic transarterial embolization. Of the 58 patients, 28 survived and 30 died with a 52% mortality rate. Of the 30 deaths, uncontrolled liver bleeding in 24-h caused 25 deaths and delayed sepsis caused residual 5 deaths. The mortality rate versus OIS was grade III: 30% (6/20), grade IV: 54% (13/24), and grade V: 79% (11/14), respectively. On univariate analysis, the significant predictors of mortality were OIS grade (p=0.019), prolonged initial prothrombin time (PT) (p=0.004), active partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (p<0.0001) and decreased platelet count (p=0.005). The mortality rate of surgical blunt major liver injuries remains high even with perihepatic packing. Since prolonged initial PT, APTT and decreased platelet count were associated with high risk of mortality, we advocate combination of damage control resuscitation with damage control laparotomy in these major liver injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Detailed requirements and constraints for the control of flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänninen, Seppo; Kyritsis, Anastasios; Abdulhadi, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    between day-ahead production and consumption schedule and will leave energy markets with higher and less predictable need for balancing power. The actors involved in the future grid control are balance responsible Party (BRP), cell system operator (CSO), cell operational information system (COIS...... and voltage control now and in the future. Regarding the flexibility of electricity generation, gas turbines and other heat motors as reciprocating engines can be started quickest. The speed of power change is clearly the highest for heat motors and their minimum power is low. Also steam and combined heat...... and power plants can be utilised in the relatively quick increasing of the electricity generation. Slower power changes are possible also with the nuclear power but they cannot be carried out continuously. The regulation characteristics of hydro power are superb in comparison to the other electricity...

  3. Thermal damage control of dye-assisted laser tissue welding: effect of dye concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Buckley, Lisa A.; Prahl, Scott A.; Shaffer, Brian S.; Gregory, Kenton W.

    2001-05-01

    Successful laser-assisted tissue welding was implemented to provide proper weld strength with minimized tissue thermal injury. We investigated and compared the weld strengths and morphologic changes in porcine small intestinal submucose (SIS) and porcine ureteral tissues with various concentration of indocyanine green (ICG) and with a solid albumin sheet. The study showed that the tissues were welded at lower ICG concentration (0.05 mM) with minimized tissue thermal damage using an 800-nm wavelength diode laser.

  4. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 4: Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The implementation plan which is presented was developed to provide the means for the successful implementation of the automated production control system. There are three factors which the implementation plan encompasses: detailed planning; phased implementation; and user involvement. The plan is detailed to the task level in terms of necessary activities as the system is developed, refined, installed, and tested. These tasks are scheduled, on a preliminary basis, over a two-and-one-half-year time frame.

  5. Quality control in PET/CT systems. Experiences and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geworski, Lilli; Fitz, Eduard; Knoop, Bernd; Karwarth, Cornelia; Plotkin, Michail

    2010-01-01

    Today, in most cases PET examinations are performed using PET/CT hybrid systems. While acceptance testing and routine control of the basic modalities PET and CT, respectively, are described by appropriate regulations, corresponding instructions with regard to the interface connecting both are still missing. This interface includes the adjustment of gantries and patient bed to each other as well as the energy scaling of attenuation coefficients from CT energy to 511 keV. Measurements checking the mechanical adjustment (determination of off-set parameters) are performed following manufacturer's recommendation, with a typical frequency twice a year. On a Biograph 16 (Siemens, Inc.), these measurements were systematically extended to a weekly frequency over an observation period of 10 months, supplemented by measurements with additional load to the patient bed (up to 135 kg), and different vertical bed positions. The results show, that for the construction tested additional off-set measurements for routine control extending well beyond manufacturer's recommendation are not necessary. The energy scaling of attenuation coefficients is depending on methodological aspects and software implementation, and therefore is not part of routine control. On the contrary, the development of appropriate methods for acceptance testing to assess and to determine the mechanical adjustment in all its degrees of freedom as well as the accuracy of attenuation corrected emission data is urgently needed. (orig.)

  6. 40 CFR 1060.104 - What running loss emission control requirements apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What running loss emission control... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.104 What running loss emission control requirements apply? (a) Engines and equipment must meet running loss requirements as follows: (1...

  7. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements supervisory control software SSDR 1.5.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, J.; VanArsdall, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-01-01

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Supervisory Control Software, WBS 1.5.2, which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). This document responds directly to the requirements detailed in ICCS (WBS 1-5)

  8. Shielded chamber control stations: an answer to radiological protection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaboudiniere, Catherine.

    1979-06-01

    This study, carried out at the radiometallurgy laboratory of the Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centre, is based on an ergonomic approach. It shows that the shielded chamber control station, designed for human protection against ionizing radiations, demands an effort of adaptation on the part of the operator. This station does in fact meet radiological protection obligations but would benefit from certain improvements aimed at reducing the secondary fatigue of manipulators already under the strain of adapting to the machine. Fields in which improvements and/or changes are desirable have been investigated with special reference to telemanipulators. New and better designed instruments will soon appear on the telemanipulator market [fr

  9. Immunohistochemistry of colorectal cancer biomarker phosphorylation requires controlled tissue fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbey P Theiss

    Full Text Available Phosphorylated signaling molecules are biomarkers of cancer pathophysiology and resistance to therapy, but because phosphoprotein analytes are often labile, poorly controlled clinical laboratory practices could prevent translation of research findings in this area from the bench to the bedside. We therefore compared multiple biomarker and phosphoprotein immunohistochemistry (IHC results in 23 clinical colorectal carcinoma samples after either a novel, rapid tissue fixation protocol or a standard tissue fixation protocol employed by clinical laboratories, and we also investigated the effect of a defined post-operative "cold" ischemia period on these IHC results. We found that a one-hour cold ischemia interval, allowed by ASCO/CAP guidelines for certain cancer biomarker assays, is highly deleterious to certain phosphoprotein analytes, specifically the phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR, but shorter ischemic intervals (less than 17 minutes facilitate preservation of phosphoproteins. Second, we found that a rapid 4-hour, two temperature, formalin fixation yielded superior staining in several cases with select markers (pEGFR, pBAD, pAKT compared to a standard overnight room temperature fixation protocol, despite taking less time. These findings indicate that the future research and clinical utilities of phosphoprotein IHC for assessing colorectal carcinoma pathophysiology absolutely depend upon attention to preanalytical factors and rigorously controlled tissue fixation protocols.

  10. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean Water...

  11. 40 CFR 51.912 - What requirements apply for reasonably available control technology (RACT) and reasonably...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) What is the Reasonably Available Control Measures (RACM) requirement for areas designated nonattainment... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements apply for reasonably available control technology (RACT) and reasonably available control measures (RACM) under the 8-hour NAAQS...

  12. Assessing frost damages using dynamic models in walnut trees: exposure rather than vulnerability controls frost risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Charrier; Isabelle, Chuine; Marc, Bonhomme; Thierry, Améglio

    2018-05-01

    Frost damages develop when exposure overtakes frost vulnerability. Frost risk assessment therefore needs dynamic simulation of frost hardiness using temperature and photoperiod in interaction with developmental stage. Two models, including or not the effect of photoperiod, were calibrated using five years of frost hardiness monitoring (2007-2012), in two locations (low and high elevation) for three walnut genotypes with contrasted phenology and maximum hardiness (Juglans regia cv Franquette, J. regia × nigra 'Early' and 'Late'). The photothermal model predicted more accurate values for all genotypes (efficiency = 0.879; Root Mean Standard Error Predicted (RMSEP) = 2.55 °C) than the thermal model (efficiency = 0.801; RMSEP = 3.24 °C). Predicted frost damages were strongly correlated to minimum temperature of the freezing events (ρ = -0.983) rather than actual frost hardiness (ρ = -0.515), or ratio of phenological stage completion (ρ = 0.336). Higher frost risks are consequently predicted during winter, at high elevation, whereas spring is only risky at low elevation in early genotypes exhibiting faster dehardening rate. However, early frost damages, although of lower value, may negatively affect fruit production the subsequent year (R 2  = 0.381, P = 0.057). These results highlight the interacting pattern between frost exposure and vulnerability at different scales and the necessity of intra-organ studies to understand the time course of frost vulnerability in flower buds along the winter. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A Prospective Observational Study of Abdominal Injury Management in Contemporary Military Operations: Damage Control Laparotomy Is Associated With High Survivability and Low Rates of Fecal Diversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    and rural application of the damage control philosophy. Mil Med. 2001;166:490–493. 12. Eiseman B, Moore EE, Meldrum DR, et al. Feasibility of damage...application of tranex- amic acid in trauma emergency resuscitation (MATTERs) study. Arch Surg. 2012;147:113–119. 70. Penn-Barwell JG, Roberts S

  14. A Use Case Methodology to Handle Conflicting Controller Requirements for Future Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai; Uslar, Mathias; Tornelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a standards based requirements elicitation and analysis strategy tailored for smart grid control structure development. Control structures in electric power systems often span across several systems and stakeholders. Requirements elicitation for such control systems therefore...... requires coordination across many stakeholders and it is challenging to achieve a consistent design. To enable an iterative and distributed development we suggest a conflict management approach as a modular element of the design strategy, focusing on conflict identification and tracing. The idea...

  15. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lili; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Zallot, Rémi; Balmant, Kelly; Ziemak, Michael J.; Shanklin, John; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Fiehn, Oliver; Gregory, Jesse F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2016-06-20

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), with subfamily II being split into stand-alone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metal-dependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed a novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg2+ bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites.

  16. On Early Conflict Identification by Requirements Modeling of Energy System Control Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai; Gehrke, Oliver; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2015-01-01

    issues early. For requirements formulation of control structures, cyber and physical aspects need to be jointly represented to express interdependencies, check for consistency and discover potentially conflicting requirements. Early identification of potential conflicts may prevent larger problems...... at later design stages. However, languages employed for requirements modeling today do not offer the expressiveness necessary to represent control purposes in relation to domain level interactions and therefore miss several types of interdependencies. This paper introduces the idea of control structure...... modeling for early requirements checking using a suitable modeling language, and illustrates how this approach enables the identification of several classes of controller conflict....

  17. Mineralogical control on thermal damage and the presence of a thermal Kaiser effect during temperature-cycling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J.; Daoud, A.; Meredith, P. G.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems are in part controlled by the mechanical and thermal stresses acting on them and so it is important to understand the response of volcanic rocks to thermo-mechanical loading. One such response is the well-known `Kaiser stress-memory' effect observed under cyclic mechanical loading. By contrast, the presence of an analogous `Kaiser temperature-memory effect' during cyclic thermal loading has received little attention. We have therefore explored the possibility of a Kaiser temperature-memory effect using three igneous rocks of different composition, grain size and origin; Slaufrudalur Granophyre (SGP), Nea Kameni Andesite (NKA) and Seljadalur Basalt (SB). We present results from a series of thermal stressing experiments in which acoustic emissions (AE) were recorded contemporaneously with changing temperature. Samples of each rock were subjected to both a single heating and cooling cycle to a maximum temperature of 900 °C and multiple heating/cooling cycles to peak temperatures of 350°C, 500°C, 700°C and 900 °C (all at a constant rate of 1°C/min on heating and a natural cooling rate of memory effect in SGP, but not in either NKA and SB. We further find that the vast majority of thermal crack damage is generated upon cooling in the finer grained materials (NKA and SB), but that substantial thermal crack damage is generated during heating in the coarser grained SGP. The total amount of crack damage generated due to heating or cooling is dependent on the mineral composition and, most importantly, the grain size and arrangement, as well as the maximum temperature to which the rock is exposed. Knowledge of thermal stress history and the presence of a Kaiser temperature-memory effect is potentially important in understanding magma chamber dynamics, where the cyclic nature of mechanical and thermal inflation and deflation can lead to sequential accumulation of damage, potentially leading to critical rupture.

  18. Certified reference materials - beech leaves and spruce needles - for the quality control in monitoring damage in forests by acid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, E A; Griepink, B [Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Community Bureau of Reference; Muntau, H [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre

    1989-12-01

    The chemical determination of various elements in leaves or needles allows to establish the damage caused by acid deposition. To control the quality of such determinations the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) produced two Certified Reference Materials: Beech leaves (CRM No. 100) and Spruce needles (CRM No. 101). After a careful preparation procedure, a homogeneity study and a long term stability study, the materials were certified for: Cl, N, P and S in CRM No. 100, Al, Ca, Cl, Mg, Mn, N, P, S and Zn in CRM No. 101. Indicative values on the content of 19 majors and trace elements are also reported. (orig.).

  19. Relay tracking control for second-order multi-agent systems with damaged agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lijing; Li, Jing; Liu, Qin

    2017-11-01

    This paper investigates a situation where smart agents capable of sensory and mobility are deployed to monitor a designated area. A preset number of agents start tracking when a target intrudes this area. Some of the tracking agents are possible to be out of order over the tracking course. Thus, we propose a cooperative relay tracking strategy to ensure the successful tracking with existence of damaged agents. Relay means that, when a tracking agent quits tracking due to malfunction, one of the near deployed agents replaces it to continue the tracking task. This results in jump of tracking errors and dynamic switching of topology of the multi-agent system. Switched system technique is employed to solve this specific problem. Finally, the effectiveness of proposed tracking strategy and validity of the theoretical results are verified by conducting a numerical simulation. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Advanced materials for control of post-earthquake damage in bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Kshitij C; Saiidi, M Saiid; Cruz, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical modeling to study the seismic response of bridge systems with conventional and advanced details. For validation, a 33 m quarter-scale model of a four-span bridge incorporating innovative materials and details seismically tested on the shake tables at the University of Nevada, Reno was taken. The bridge specimen involved use of advanced materials and details to reduce damage at plastic hinges and minimize residual displacements. A three-dimensional, nonlinear model incorporating the response of the innovative materials was developed to study the bridge response using the finite-element software OpenSees. Existing finite-element formulations were used to capture the response of the advanced materials used in the bridge. The analytical model was found to be able to reproduce comparable bent displacements and bent shear forces within reasonable accuracy. The validated model was further used to study different types of bridges under suite of scaled bi-directional near-fault ground motions. Comparisons were made on behavior of five different bridge types, first conventional reinforced concrete bridge, second post-tensioned column bridge, third bridge with elastomeric rubber elements at the plastic hinge zone, fourth bridge with nickel–titanium superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) reinforcing bar and fifth bridge with CuAlMn superelastic SMA reinforcing bar. Both the SMA used bridges also utilized engineered cementitious composite element at the plastic hinge zone. The results showed effectiveness of the innovative interventions on the bridges in providing excellent recentering capabilities with minimal damage to the columns. (paper)

  1. Rab9-dependent autophagy is required for the IGF-IIR triggering mitophagy to eliminate damaged mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Chiang, Shu-Fen; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Jing-Ying; Lin, Ding-Yu; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2018-03-25

    Mitochondria dysfunction is the major characteristic of mitophagy, which is essential in mitochondrial quality control. However, excessive mitophagy contributes to cell death in a number of diseases, including ischemic stroke and hepatotoxicity. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and its receptor (IGF-IIR) play vital roles in the development of heart failure during hypertension. We found that IGF-II triggers IGF-IIR receptor activation, causing mitochondria dysfunction, resulting in mitophagy, and cardiomyocyte cell death. These results indicated that IGF-IIR activation triggers mitochondria fragmentation, leading to autophagosome formation, and loss of mitochondria content. These results are associated with Parkin-dependent mitophagy. Additionally, autophagic proteins Atg5, and Atg7 deficiency did not suppress IGF-IIR-induced mitophagy. However, Rab9 knockdown reduced mitophagy and maintained mitochondrial function. These constitutive mitophagies through IGF-IIR activation trigger mitochondria loss and mitochondrial ROS accumulation for cardiomyocyte viability decrease. Together, our results indicate that IGF-IIR predominantly induces mitophagy through the Rab9-dependent alternative autophagy. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. YNK1, the yeast homolog of human metastasis suppressor NM23, is required for repair of UV radiation- and etoposide-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Mengmeng; Jarrett, Stuart G.; Craven, Rolf [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States); Kaetzel, David M. [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States)], E-mail: dmkaetz@uky.edu

    2009-01-15

    In humans, NM23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in metastatic melanoma and breast carcinoma cells, and which possesses the ability to inhibit metastatic growth without significant impact on the transformed phenotype. NM23-H1 exhibits three enzymatic activities in vitro, each with potential to maintain genomic stability, a 3'-5' exonuclease and two kinases, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), and protein histidine kinase. Herein we have investigated the potential contributions of NM23 proteins to DNA repair in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains a single NM23 homolog, YNK1. Ablation of YNK1 delayed repair of UV- and etoposide-induced nuclear DNA damage by 3-6 h. However, YNK1 had no impact upon the kinetics of MMS-induced DNA repair. Furthermore, YNK1 was not required for repair of mitochondrial DNA damage. To determine whether the nuclear DNA repair deficit manifested as an increase in mutation frequency, the CAN1 forward assay was employed. An YNK1 deletion was associated with increased mutation rates following treatment with either UV (2.6x) or MMS (1.6x). Mutation spectral analysis further revealed significantly increased rates of base substitution and frameshift mutations following UV treatment in the ynk1{delta} strain. This study indicates a novel role for YNK1 in DNA repair in yeast, and suggests an anti-mutator function that may contribute to the metastasis suppressor function of NM23-H1 in humans.

  3. YNK1, the yeast homolog of human metastasis suppressor NM23, is required for repair of UV radiation- and etoposide-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Mengmeng; Jarrett, Stuart G.; Craven, Rolf; Kaetzel, David M.

    2009-01-01

    In humans, NM23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in metastatic melanoma and breast carcinoma cells, and which possesses the ability to inhibit metastatic growth without significant impact on the transformed phenotype. NM23-H1 exhibits three enzymatic activities in vitro, each with potential to maintain genomic stability, a 3'-5' exonuclease and two kinases, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), and protein histidine kinase. Herein we have investigated the potential contributions of NM23 proteins to DNA repair in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains a single NM23 homolog, YNK1. Ablation of YNK1 delayed repair of UV- and etoposide-induced nuclear DNA damage by 3-6 h. However, YNK1 had no impact upon the kinetics of MMS-induced DNA repair. Furthermore, YNK1 was not required for repair of mitochondrial DNA damage. To determine whether the nuclear DNA repair deficit manifested as an increase in mutation frequency, the CAN1 forward assay was employed. An YNK1 deletion was associated with increased mutation rates following treatment with either UV (2.6x) or MMS (1.6x). Mutation spectral analysis further revealed significantly increased rates of base substitution and frameshift mutations following UV treatment in the ynk1Δ strain. This study indicates a novel role for YNK1 in DNA repair in yeast, and suggests an anti-mutator function that may contribute to the metastasis suppressor function of NM23-H1 in humans

  4. Transaction-based building controls framework, Volume 2: Platform descriptive model and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyol, Bora A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haack, Jereme N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carpenter, Brandon J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lutes, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hernandez, George [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Transaction-based Building Controls (TBC) offer a control systems platform that provides an agent execution environment that meets the growing requirements for security, resource utilization, and reliability. This report outlines the requirements for a platform to meet these needs and describes an illustrative/exemplary implementation.

  5. Treated effluent disposal system process control computer software requirements and specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The software requirements for the monitor and control system that will be associated with the effluent collection pipeline system known as the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal System is covered. The control logic for the two pump stations and specific requirements for the graphic displays are detailed

  6. 28 CFR 570.43 - Inmates requiring a high degree of control and supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmates requiring a high degree of control and supervision. 570.43 Section 570.43 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS AND RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.43 Inmates requiring a high degree of control and supervision. Only the...

  7. 78 FR 11521 - Control of Communicable Disease; Foreign-Requirements for Importers of Nonhuman Primates (NHP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Part 71 Control of Communicable Disease; Foreign--Requirements for Importers of Nonhuman Primates (NHP... Primates (NHP) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human... live nonhuman primates (NHPs) by extending existing requirements for the importation of Macaca...

  8. Trauma hemostasis and oxygenation research position paper on remote damage control resuscitation: definitions, current practice, and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Donald H; Rappold, Joseph F; Badloe, John F; Berséus, Olle; Blackbourne, Lorne; Brohi, Karim H; Butler, Frank K; Cap, Andrew P; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Davenport, Ross; DePasquale, Marc; Doughty, Heidi; Glassberg, Elon; Hervig, Tor; Hooper, Timothy J; Kozar, Rosemary; Maegele, Marc; Moore, Ernest E; Murdock, Alan; Ness, Paul M; Pati, Shibani; Rasmussen, Todd; Sailliol, Anne; Schreiber, Martin A; Sunde, Geir Arne; van de Watering, Leo M G; Ward, Kevin R; Weiskopf, Richard B; White, Nathan J; Strandenes, Geir; Spinella, Philip C

    2014-05-01

    The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network held its third annual Remote Damage Control Resuscitation Symposium in June 2013 in Bergen, Norway. The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network is a multidisciplinary group of investigators with a common interest in improving outcomes and safety in patients with severe traumatic injury. The network's mission is to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality from traumatic hemorrhagic shock, in the prehospital phase of resuscitation through research, education, and training. The concept of remote damage control resuscitation is in its infancy, and there is a significant amount of work that needs to be done to improve outcomes for patients with life-threatening bleeding secondary to injury. The prehospital phase of resuscitation is critical in these patients. If shock and coagulopathy can be rapidly identified and minimized before hospital admission, this will very likely reduce morbidity and mortality. This position statement begins to standardize the terms used, provides an acceptable range of therapeutic options, and identifies the major knowledge gaps in the field.

  9. Use of external fixators for damage-control orthopaedics in natural disasters like the 2005 Pakistan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Syed; Saeed, Ayesha; Ch, Asad

    2014-08-01

    In the 2005 Pakistan earthquake, the great many injured with multiple fractures and open wounds provided a unique opportunity to practice damage-control orthopaedics. External fixators remain a time-tested tools for operating surgeons on such occasions. The locally manufactured, readily available Naseer-Awais (NA) external fixator filled such needs of this disaster with good outcome. This is a retrospective descriptive study of 19,700 patients that presented over seven months to the two centres established by the lead author (SMA) in Muzaffarabad and Mansehra just one night after the 2005 earthquake. A series of local and foreign orthopaedic surgeon teams operated in succession. The computerised patient data collection of 1,145 operations was retrospectively analysed. Of the 19,700 patients presenting to the SMA centres, 50% had limb injuries. Total fracture fixations were 1,145, of which 295 were external fixations: 185 were applied on the lower limb and 90 on upper limb, the majority were applied on tibia. External fixators are valuable damage-control tools in natural disasters and warfare injuries. The locally manufactured NA external fixator served the needs of the many limb injuries during the 2005 Pakistan earthquake.

  10. Technical Requirements Analysis and Control Systems (TRACS) Initial Operating Capability (IOC) documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Dana P.

    1991-01-01

    The Technical Requirements Analysis and Control Systems (TRACS) software package is described. TRACS offers supplemental tools for the analysis, control, and interchange of project requirements. This package provides the fundamental capability to analyze and control requirements, serves a focal point for project requirements, and integrates a system that supports efficient and consistent operations. TRACS uses relational data base technology (ORACLE) in a stand alone or in a distributed environment that can be used to coordinate the activities required to support a project through its entire life cycle. TRACS uses a set of keyword and mouse driven screens (HyperCard) which imposes adherence through a controlled user interface. The user interface provides an interactive capability to interrogate the data base and to display or print project requirement information. TRACS has a limited report capability, but can be extended with PostScript conventions.

  11. 40 CFR 63.2251 - What are the requirements for the routine control device maintenance exemption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are the requirements for the routine control device maintenance exemption? 63.2251 Section 63.2251 Protection of Environment... and Composite Wood Products General Compliance Requirements § 63.2251 What are the requirements for...

  12. Choice of Appropriate Control Values for Effective Analyses of Damage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venglár Michal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to a suitable choice of input parameters for the efficient running of a self-developed code used for damage detection. The code was prepared in Office Excel VBA, which used a non-destructive vibration-based method. The primary aim of the code is to determine the change in bending stiffness by using the FE model updating method, and the aim of the paper is to determine the effect of the input data on the bending stiffness calculations. The code was applied for a numerical model of a steel bar. The steel bar was a simply supported beam with a span of 3.5 m. The time of the calculations and precision of the identification were investigated. The values of the time consumption depend on the input values, the desired limit of the accepted error, and the length of the step in every iteration. Data from an experimental model was analysed. The model was made of wooden and plaster boards. The calculations were done in accordance with suitable input data from a parametric study.

  13. The DNA damage- and transcription-associated protein Paxip1 controls thymocyte development and emigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, E.; Faryabi, R.B.; Daniel, Jeremy Austin

    2012-01-01

    Histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is associated with promoters of active genes and found at hot spots for DNA recombination. Here we have shown that PAXIP1 (also known as PTIP), a protein associated with MLL3 and MLL4 methyltransferase and the DNA damage response, regulates RAG......-mediated cleavage and repair during V(D)J recombination in CD4 CD8 DP thymocytes. Loss of PAXIP1 in developing thymocytes diminished Jα H3K4me3 and germline transcription, suppressed double strand break formation at 3' Jα segments, but resulted in accumulation of unresolved T cell receptor α-chain gene (Tcra......) breaks. Moreover, PAXIP1 was essential for release of mature single positive (SP) αβ T cells from the thymus through transcriptional activation of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 as well as for natural killer T cell development. Thus, in addition to maintaining genome integrity during Tcra...

  14. Damage caused to our forests and its control up to 1918

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozicka, J

    1963-01-01

    Air pollution was mentioned as soon as 1699 by Chr. Lehman, chronicler of Krusne hory and its injurious effects were observed since the thirties of the nineteenth century by brothers Baar on their plot situated in the neighborhood of a manufactory chimney at Kdyne near Klatovy, as well as since 1843 by the surveyor William Rowland in managing the town forest of Pribram in the surroundings of silver works at Brezove hory. The problem of damage caused to our forests by air pollution arose the interest of our foresters 1850, when at the conference of the Bohemian Forestry Union held in Decin Rowland read a paper on air pollution in the area of Pribram and in surroundings of a brick-kiln at Zdiky in the Kaplice region. After 1853, the smoke effects began to be apparent in the Jachymov region, since 1880 in the Ostrava region, since the nineties of the past century in the Sokolovo, Loket, Karlovy Vary, Usti n. L. and Nachod regions and, since the first decade of the present century in the Bilina and Kladno regions. It was found that silver fir, Norway spruce and Scotch pine were the most sensitive species to smoke, whereas European larch proved to be very resistant. Broadleaved species showed also a good growth in the smoke affected areas. Basing on this experience, our foresters tried, therefore, to reduce the injouris smoke effects by growing broadleaved species in those areas. 12 references.

  15. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control: A multilevel and inter-disciplinary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ts' o, P.O.P.

    1990-09-01

    The main objectives of this Program Project is to develop strategy and technology for the study of gene structure, organization and function in a multi-disciplinary, highly coordinated manner. In Project I, Molecular Cytology, the establishment of all instrumentation for the computerized microscopic imaging system (CMIS) has been completed with the software in place, including measurement of the third dimension (along the Z-axis). The technique is now at hand to measure single copy DNA in the nucleus, single copy mRNA in the cell, and finally, we are in the process of developing mathematical approaches for the analysis of the relative spatial 3-D relationship among the chromosomes and the individual genes in the interphasal nucleus. Also, we have a sensitive and reliable method for measuring single-stranded DNA breaks which will be useful for the determination of damage to DNA caused by ionizing radiation. In Project II, the mapping of restriction fragments by 2-D enzymatic and electrophoretic analysis has been perfected for application. In Project III, a major finding is that the binding constant and effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotide analogues, Matagen, can be significantly improved by substituting 2{prime}-O-methylribos methylphosphonate backbones for the current 2{prime}-deoxyribomethylphosphonate backbones. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. A Novel Perfusion System for Damage Control of Hyperkalemia in Swine (Sus scrofa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-20

    randomized to the control or treatment group . In both groups , blood was pumped through an extracorporeal circuit (EC) with an in-line hemodialyzer. In...Results:Serum potassium concentration was significantly lower in the treatment than in the control group over time (P = 0.02). There was no difference...in serum total calcium concentration for group or time (P = 0.13 and 0.44, respectively) or platelet count between groups or over time (P = 0.28 and

  17. Future Naval Concepts -- Crew Reductions through Improved Damage Control Communications (FNC-CRIDCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-18

    requires a separate install of PostgreSQL ®. There were issues with an install script that builds the default database for the XCP. This install...would increase the reliability of this portion of the Triad prototype, since those items have a long history of usage in a variety of harsh

  18. ECT DAMAGE INDICATES STM DIVIDED INTO STM CONTROL & LTM TRACES: NEUROLOGICAL DEFINITION OF “CONFUSION”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Tarnow

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently it was shown that short term memory (STM free recall consists of two stages: the first few recalls empty working memory and a second stage, a reactivation stage, concludes the recall (Tarnow, 2015; for a review of the theoretical predictions see Murdock, 1974. Bayley et al (2000 investigated free recall in people who had undergone Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and found that both recency and primacy effects were normal. Here I investigate this further, and argue that this finding suggests a division of STM between STM Control and long term memory (LTM traces and that STM Control is not effected by ECT.Serial position probabilities from an investigation of Bayley et al (2000 were used to compare 11 subjects with ECT treatments to a control group and to a group of Alzheimer’s subjects.The free recall probabilities are found to be separable into the serial position curves and the overall probability of recall. This suggests that STM is separable into an STM Control structure (the serial position curve responsible for working memory and reactivation functions and LTM traces (the overall probability of recall.Using the ECT review of Abbott et al (2014a showing excess activity in MTL and lacking activity in the frontal lobes I suggest that STM Control is overworked trying to establish stable patterns in LTM. It could be that the confusion resulting from ECT is due to the failure of this process, suggesting a neurological definition of confusion.

  19. A pilot's opinion - VTOL control design requirements for the instrument approach task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, J. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents pilot opinion supported by test data concerning flight control and display concepts and control system design requirements for VTOL aircraft in the instrument approach task. Material presented is drawn from research flights in the following aircraft: Dornier DO-31, Short SC-1, LTV XC-142A, and Boeing-Vertol CH-46. The control system concepts and mechanizations employed in the above aircraft are discussed, and the effect of control system augmentation is shown on performance. Operational procedures required in the instrument approach task are described, with comments on need for automation and combining of control functions.

  20. A METHOD TO SET-UP CALIBRATION CURVE FOR INSTRUMENTED SPHERE IS100 TO CONTROL MECHANICAL DAMAGE DURING POST-HARVESTING AND HANDLING OF ORANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Carlo Di Renzo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Oranges quality is strictly dependent on their variety, pre-harvest and post-harvest practices. Especially post harvest management is responsible for fruits damages, causing quality deterioration and commercial losses, as underlined by many authors, which studied the influence of individual post harvest operations on the fruit quality. In this article Authors, using an instrumented sphere (IS 100 similar for shape and size to a true orange, showed a method for the control of orange damages along the processing line. Results allow a fundamental knowledge about the critical damage curve, which defines the incidence of the damages during the oranges processing and packaging. Data show that the fruit discharge (bins or boxes discharge and the packaging step are the most critical operations in order to reduce or eliminate the fruits collisions and the consequent damages

  1. 40 CFR 1060.102 - What permeation emission control requirements apply for fuel lines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What permeation emission control... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD AND STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.102 What permeation...

  2. 40 CFR 1060.103 - What permeation emission control requirements apply for fuel tanks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What permeation emission control... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD AND STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.103 What permeation...

  3. 40 CFR 75.21 - Quality assurance and quality control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... quality assurance audit or any other audit, the system is out-of-control. The owner or operator shall... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality assurance and quality control... assurance and quality control requirements. (a) Continuous emission monitoring systems. The owner or...

  4. Low-cost teleoperator-controlled vehicle for damage assessment and radiation dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyree, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    A low-cost, disposable, radio-controlled, remote-reading, ionizing radiation and surveillance teleoperator re-entry vehicle has been built. The vehicle carries equipment, measures radiation levels, and evaluates building conditions. The basic vehicle, radio control with amplifiers, telemetry, elevator, and video camera with monitor cost less than $2500. Velcro-mounted alpha, beta-gamma, and neutron sensing equipment is used in the present system. Many types of health physics radiation measuring equipment may be substituted on the vehicle. The system includes a black-and-white video camera to observe the environment surrounding the vehicle. The camera is mounted on a vertical elevator extendible to 11 feet above the floor. The present vehicle uses a video camera with an umbilical cord between the vehicle and the operators. Preferred operation would eliminate the umbilical. Video monitoring equipment is part of the operator control system. Power for the vehicle equipment is carried on board and supplied by sealed lead-acid batteries. Radios are powered by 9-V alkaline batteries. The radio control receiver, servo drivers, high-power amplifier and 49-MHz FM transceivers were irradiated at moderate rates with neutron and gamma doses to 3000 Rem and 300 Rem, respectively, to ensure system operation

  5. Specification of safety requirements for waste packages with respect to practicable quality control measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruendler, D.; Wurtinger, W.

    1987-01-01

    Waste packages for disposal in a repository in the Federal Republic of Germany have to meet safety requirements derived from site specific safety analyses. The examination of the waste packages with regard to compliance with these requirements is the main objective of quality control measures. With respect to quality control the requirements have to be specified in a way that practicable control measures can be applied. This is dealt with for the quality control of the activity inventory and the quality control of the waste form. The paper discusses the determination of the activity of hard-to-measure radionuclides and the specification of safety related requirements for the waste form and the packaging using typical examples

  6. Damage analysis: damage function development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Odette, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    The derivation and application of damage functions, including recent developments for the U.S. LMFBR and CTR programs, is reviewed. A primary application of damage functions is in predicting component life expectancies; i.e., the fluence required in a service spectrum to attain a specified design property change. An important part of the analysis is the estimation of the uncertainty in such fluence limit predictions. The status of standardizing the procedures for the derivation and application of damage functions is discussed. Improvements in several areas of damage function development are needed before standardization can be completed. These include increasing the quantity and quality of the data used in the analysis, determining the limitations of the analysis due to the presence of multiple damage mechanisms, and finally, testing of damage function predictions against data obtained from material surveillance programs in operating thermal and fast reactors. 23 references. (auth)

  7. A cross-sectional case control study on genetic damage in individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Gursatej; Kaur, Gurpreet; Nisar, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone base stations facilitate good communication, but the continuously emitting radiations from these stations have raised health concerns. Hence in this study, genetic damage using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay was assessed in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station and comparing it to that in healthy controls. The power density in the area within 300 m from the base station exceeded the permissive limits and was significantly (p = 0.000) higher compared to the area from where control samples were collected. The study participants comprised 63 persons with residences near a mobile phone tower, and 28 healthy controls matched for gender, age, alcohol drinking and occupational sub-groups. Genetic damage parameters of DNA migration length, damage frequency (DF) and damage index were significantly (p = 0.000) elevated in the sample group compared to respective values in healthy controls. The female residents (n = 25) of the sample group had significantly (p = 0.004) elevated DF than the male residents (n = 38). The linear regression analysis further revealed daily mobile phone usage, location of residence and power density as significant predictors of genetic damage. The genetic damage evident in the participants of this study needs to be addressed against future disease-risk, which in addition to neurodegenerative disorders, may lead to cancer.

  8. Requirements for implementing real-time control functional modules on a hierarchical parallel pipelined system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Thomas E.; Michaloski, John L.; Lumia, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of a robot control system leads to a broad range of processing requirements. One fundamental requirement of a robot control system is the necessity of a microcomputer system in order to provide sufficient processing capability.The use of multiple processors in a parallel architecture is beneficial for a number of reasons, including better cost performance, modular growth, increased reliability through replication, and flexibility for testing alternate control strategies via different partitioning. A survey of the progression from low level control synchronizing primitives to higher level communication tools is presented. The system communication and control mechanisms of existing robot control systems are compared to the hierarchical control model. The impact of this design methodology on the current robot control systems is explored.

  9. 21 CFR 111.113 - What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for a... Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.113 What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision? (a) Quality control personnel must...

  10. Software requirements specification for the program analysis and control system risk management module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHAEFER, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    TWR Program Analysis and Control System Risk Module is used to facilitate specific data processes surrounding the Risk Management program of the Tank Waste Retrieval environment. This document contains the Risk Management system requirements of the database system

  11. Controlled damaging and repair of self-organized nanostructures by atom manipulation at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurlu, O; Houselt, A van; Thijssen, W H A; Ruitenbeek, J M van; Poelsema, B; Zandvliet, H J W

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of controlled local demolition and repair of the recently discovered self-organized Pt nanowires on Ge(001) surfaces has been explored. These nanowires are composed of Pt dimers, which are found to be rather weakly bound to the underlying substrate. Using this property, we demonstrate the possibility of carrying the constituting dimers of the Pt nanowires from point to point with atomic precision at room temperature. Pt dimers can be picked-up in two configurations: (i) a horizontal configuration at the tip apex, resulting in double tip images and (ii) a configuration where the Pt dimer is attached to the side of the tip apex, resulting in well-defined atomically resolved images

  12. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 3: Package evaluation, modification and hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The software package evaluation was designed to analyze commercially available, field-proven, production control or manufacturing resource planning management technology and software package. The analysis was conducted by comparing SRB production control software requirements and conceptual system design to software package capabilities. The methodology of evaluation and the findings at each stage of evaluation are described. Topics covered include: vendor listing; request for information (RFI) document; RFI response rate and quality; RFI evaluation process; and capabilities versus requirements.

  13. Conceptual requirements for large fusion experiment control, data, robotics, and management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    The conceptual system requirements for the control, data, robotics, and project management (CDRM) system for the next generation of fusion experiments are developed by drawing on the success of the Tara control and data system. The requirements are described in terms of an integrated but separable matrix of well-defined interfaces among the various systems and subsystems. The study stresses modularity, performance, cost effectiveness, and exportability

  14. Timing clorpirifos + cypermethrin and indoxacarb applications to control European corn borer damage and fumonisin contamination in maize kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandino, Massimo; Peila, Alessandro; Reyneri, Amedeo

    2010-02-01

    European corn borer (ECB) is the main maize pest in central and southern Europe and it promotes the infection of maize with Fusarium verticillioides, which is able to produce fumonisins. Field experiments were performed from 2006 to 2007 in northwestern Italy to determine the effects of the timing of insecticide applications on maize fungal ear rot and fumonisin contamination in natural infection conditions. Four application timings and two insecticides (clorpirifos + cypermethrin and indoxacarb) were compared each year. In both years, the treatments applied at the beginning of a consistent ECB flight activity and at the flight peak showed the best efficacy to control the insect damage on ears. Fungal ear rot and fumonisin contamination were clearly affected by ECB control. The efficacy of the best application timing to control fumonisin occurrence was 73% in 2006 and 84% in 2007. Earlier insecticide applications showed lower fumonisin contamination than treatments applied after the adult flight peak. The production of maize and maize-based foods with a low fumonisin content may be enhanced through correct insecticide application against the second ECB generation. The optimum timing of insecticides is between the beginning of a consistent adult flight activity and the flight peak.

  15. Quality assurance requirements for control of procurement items and services for nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Requirements and guidelines are provided for the control of activities to be exercised during procurement of items and services which affect the quality of nuclear facilities. These requirements and guidelines apply to procurement activities for items and services such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, constructing, erecting, installing, inspecting, texting, maintaining and modifying

  16. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 1: Study background and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The solid rocket boosters assembly environment is described in terms of the contraints it places upon an automated production control system. The business system generated for the SRB assembly and the computer system which meets the business system requirements are described. The selection software process and modifications required to the recommended software are addressed as well as the hardware and configuration requirements necessary to support the system.

  17. Selective laser-induced photochemical dry etching of semiconductors controlled by ion-bombardment-induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Myers, D.R.; Vook, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    When a photochemical dry etching process requires direct participation of photogenerated carriers in the chemical reaction, it is sensitive to the electronic properties of the semiconductor. For such solid-excitation-based dry etching processes, the balance between reaction and carrier recombination rates determines the practical utility of a particular reaction for device fabrication. The distance from the surface at which the photocarriers are generated by light adsorption is determined by the absorption coefficient. In the absence of an external bias potential, only those carriers formed within a diffusion length of the surface space-charge region will have an opportunity to drive the dry etching reaction. When the absorption coefficient is high, most of the photons generate carriers within a diffusion length from the surface space-charge region, and the etching rate is largely determined by the balance between the rate of the carrier-driven reaction and the surface recombination velocity. When the recombination rate of free carriers in the bulk of the semiconductor is high, the effective diffusion length is reduced and fewer of the carriers generated in the subsurface region ever reach the surface. An important effect of ion bombardment is the creation of many lattice defects that increase the rate of recombination of electrons and holes. When a sufficient number of defects, which act as recombination sites, are formed during ion implantation, the recombination of photogenerated carriers at these defects in the subsurface region can greatly reduce the number of carriers which can reach the surface and drive a photochemical etching reaction

  18. Ageing Fxr deficient mice develop increased energy expenditure, improved glucose control and liver damage resembling NASH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Bjursell

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4 (Nr1h4, FXR is a bile acid activated nuclear receptor mainly expressed in the liver, intestine, kidney and adrenal glands. Upon activation, the primary function is to suppress cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the classic or neutral bile acid synthesis pathway. In the present study, a novel Fxr deficient mouse line was created and studied with respect to metabolism and liver function in ageing mice fed chow diet. The Fxr deficient mice were similar to wild type mice in terms of body weight, body composition, energy intake and expenditure as well as behaviours at a young age. However, from 15 weeks of age and onwards, the Fxr deficient mice had almost no body weight increase up to 39 weeks of age mainly because of lower body fat mass. The lower body weight gain was associated with increased energy expenditure that was not compensated by increased food intake. Fasting levels of glucose and insulin were lower and glucose tolerance was improved in old and lean Fxr deficient mice. However, the Fxr deficient mice displayed significantly increased liver weight, steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration and lobular inflammation together with elevated plasma levels of ALT, bilirubin and bile acids, findings compatible with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and cholestasis. In conclusion, ageing Fxr deficient mice display late onset leanness associated with elevated energy expenditure and improved glucose control but develop severe NASH-like liver pathology.

  19. Ageing Fxr deficient mice develop increased energy expenditure, improved glucose control and liver damage resembling NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjursell, Mikael; Wedin, Marianne; Admyre, Therése; Hermansson, Majlis; Böttcher, Gerhard; Göransson, Melker; Lindén, Daniel; Bamberg, Krister; Oscarsson, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4 (Nr1h4, FXR) is a bile acid activated nuclear receptor mainly expressed in the liver, intestine, kidney and adrenal glands. Upon activation, the primary function is to suppress cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the classic or neutral bile acid synthesis pathway. In the present study, a novel Fxr deficient mouse line was created and studied with respect to metabolism and liver function in ageing mice fed chow diet. The Fxr deficient mice were similar to wild type mice in terms of body weight, body composition, energy intake and expenditure as well as behaviours at a young age. However, from 15 weeks of age and onwards, the Fxr deficient mice had almost no body weight increase up to 39 weeks of age mainly because of lower body fat mass. The lower body weight gain was associated with increased energy expenditure that was not compensated by increased food intake. Fasting levels of glucose and insulin were lower and glucose tolerance was improved in old and lean Fxr deficient mice. However, the Fxr deficient mice displayed significantly increased liver weight, steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration and lobular inflammation together with elevated plasma levels of ALT, bilirubin and bile acids, findings compatible with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cholestasis. In conclusion, ageing Fxr deficient mice display late onset leanness associated with elevated energy expenditure and improved glucose control but develop severe NASH-like liver pathology.

  20. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control and laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, E.

    1996-01-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control ampersand Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Technology Requirements and Development for Affordable High-Temperature Distributed Engine Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    long lasting, high temperature modules is to use high temperature electronics on ceramic modules. The electronic components are “ brazed ” onto the...Copyright © 2012 by ISA Technology Requirements and Development for Affordable High - Temperature Distributed Engine Controls Alireza Behbahani 1...with regards to high temperature capability. The Government and Industry Distributed Engine Controls Working Group (DECWG) [5] has been established

  2. 13 CFR 127.202 - What are the requirements for control of an EDWOSB or WOSB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... experience of the extent and complexity needed to run the concern. The woman manager need not have the... ADMINISTRATION WOMEN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS FEDERAL CONTRACT ASSISTANCE PROCEDURES Eligibility Requirements To... be controlled by one or more women. Control by one or more women means that both the long-term...

  3. Man/machine interface for a nuclear cask remote handling control station: system design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.; Draper, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Design requirements are presented for a control station of a proposed semi-automated facility for remote handling of nuclear waste casks. Functional and operational man/machine interface: controls, displays, software format, station architecture, and work environment. In addition, some input is given to the design of remote sensing systems in the cask handling areas. 18 references, 9 figures, 12 tables

  4. High beta-palmitate fat controls the intestinal inflammatory response and limits intestinal damage in mucin Muc2 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-1,3 positions of the glycerol backbone (alpha, alpha'-palmitate, the predominant palmitate conformation in regular infant formula fat, is poorly absorbed and might cause abdominal discomfort. In contrast, palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-2 position (beta-palmitate, the main palmitate conformation in human milk fat, is well absorbed. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of high alpha, alpha'-palmitate fat (HAPF diet and high beta-palmitate fat (HBPF diet on colitis development in Muc2 deficient (Muc2(-/- mice, a well-described animal model for spontaneous enterocolitis due to the lack of a protective mucus layer. METHODS: Muc2(-/- mice received AIN-93G reference diet, HAPF diet or HBPF diet for 5 weeks after weaning. Clinical symptoms, intestinal morphology and inflammation in the distal colon were analyzed. RESULTS: Both HBPF diet and AIN-93G diet limited the extent of intestinal erosions and morphological damage in Muc2(-/- mice compared with HAPF diet. In addition, the immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg cell response as demonstrated by the up-regulation of Foxp3, Tgfb1 and Ebi3 gene expression levels was enhanced by HBPF diet compared with AIN-93G and HAPF diets. HBPF diet also increased the gene expression of Pparg and enzymatic antioxidants (Sod1, Sod3 and Gpx1, genes all reported to be involved in promoting an immunosuppressive Treg cell response and to protect against colitis. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows for the first time that HBPF diet limits the intestinal mucosal damage and controls the inflammatory response in Muc2(-/- mice by inducing an immunosuppressive Treg cell response.

  5. High beta-palmitate fat controls the intestinal inflammatory response and limits intestinal damage in mucin Muc2 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng; Bar-Yoseph, Fabiana; Levi, Liora; Lifshitz, Yael; Witte-Bouma, Janneke; de Bruijn, Adrianus C J M; Korteland-van Male, Anita M; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Renes, Ingrid B

    2013-01-01

    Palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-1,3 positions of the glycerol backbone (alpha, alpha'-palmitate), the predominant palmitate conformation in regular infant formula fat, is poorly absorbed and might cause abdominal discomfort. In contrast, palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-2 position (beta-palmitate), the main palmitate conformation in human milk fat, is well absorbed. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of high alpha, alpha'-palmitate fat (HAPF) diet and high beta-palmitate fat (HBPF) diet on colitis development in Muc2 deficient (Muc2(-/-)) mice, a well-described animal model for spontaneous enterocolitis due to the lack of a protective mucus layer. Muc2(-/-) mice received AIN-93G reference diet, HAPF diet or HBPF diet for 5 weeks after weaning. Clinical symptoms, intestinal morphology and inflammation in the distal colon were analyzed. Both HBPF diet and AIN-93G diet limited the extent of intestinal erosions and morphological damage in Muc2(-/-) mice compared with HAPF diet. In addition, the immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cell response as demonstrated by the up-regulation of Foxp3, Tgfb1 and Ebi3 gene expression levels was enhanced by HBPF diet compared with AIN-93G and HAPF diets. HBPF diet also increased the gene expression of Pparg and enzymatic antioxidants (Sod1, Sod3 and Gpx1), genes all reported to be involved in promoting an immunosuppressive Treg cell response and to protect against colitis. This study shows for the first time that HBPF diet limits the intestinal mucosal damage and controls the inflammatory response in Muc2(-/-) mice by inducing an immunosuppressive Treg cell response.

  6. 7 CFR 3015.170 - Damage, loss, or theft of equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage, loss, or theft of equipment. 3015.170 Section... Damage, loss, or theft of equipment. (a) Applicability. This section applies to equipment with a unit... damage, loss, or theft, the recipient does not have a control system in effect as required by § 3015.169...

  7. Process qualification and control in electron beams--requirements, methods, new concepts and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittendorfer, J.; Gratzl, F.; Hanis, D.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the status of process qualification and control in electron beam irradiation is analyzed in terms of requirements, concepts, methods and challenges for a state-of-the-art process control concept for medical device sterilization. Aspects from process qualification to routine process control are described together with the associated process variables. As a case study the 10 MeV beams at Mediscan GmbH are considered. Process control concepts like statistical process control (SPC) and a new concept to determine process capability is briefly discussed

  8. Concepts for Life Cycle Cost Control Required to Achieve Space Transportation Affordability and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Russel E.; Zapata, Edgar; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Robinson, John W.; Donahue, Benjamin B.

    2009-01-01

    Cost control must be implemented through the establishment of requirements and controlled continually by managing to these requirements. Cost control of the non-recurring side of life cycle cost has traditionally been implemented in both commercial and government programs. The government uses the budget process to implement this control. The commercial approach is to use a similar process of allocating the non-recurring cost to major elements of the program. This type of control generally manages through a work breakdown structure (WBS) by defining the major elements of the program. If the cost control is to be applied across the entire program life cycle cost (LCC), the approach must be addressed very differently. A functional breakdown structure (FBS) is defined and recommended. Use of a FBS provides the visibifity to allow the choice of an integrated solution reducing the cost of providing many different elements of like function. The different functional solutions that drive the hardware logistics, quantity of documentation, operational labor, reliability and maintainability balance, and total integration of the entire system from DDT&E through the life of the program must be fully defined, compared, and final decisions made among these competing solutions. The major drivers of recurring cost have been identified and are presented and discussed. The LCC requirements must be established and flowed down to provide control of LCC. This LCC control will require a structured rigid process similar to the one traditionally used to control weight/performance for space transportation systems throughout the entire program. It has been demonstrated over the last 30 years that without a firm requirement and methodically structured cost control, it is unlikely that affordable and sustainable space transportation system LCC will be achieved.

  9. Development of requirements tracking and verification system for the software design of distributed control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chul Hwan; Kim, Jang Yeol; Kim, Jung Tack; Lee, Jang Soo; Ham, Chang Shik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    In this paper a prototype of Requirement Tracking and Verification System(RTVS) for a Distributed Control System was implemented and tested. The RTVS is a software design and verification tool. The main functions required by the RTVS are managing, tracking and verification of the software requirements listed in the documentation of the DCS. The analysis of DCS software design procedures and interfaces with documents were performed to define the user of the RTVS, and the design requirements for RTVS were developed. 4 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  10. Environmental control and life support system requirements and technology needs for advanced manned space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Ferolyn T.; Sedej, Melaine; Lin, Chin

    1987-01-01

    NASA has completed an environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) technology R&D plan for advanced missions which gave attention to the drivers (crew size, mission duration, etc.) of a range of manned missions under consideration. Key planning guidelines encompassed a time horizon greater than 50 years, funding resource requirements, an evolutionary approach to goal definition, and the funding of more than one approach to satisfy a given perceived requirement. Attention was given to the ECLSS requirements of transportation and service vehicles, platforms, bases and settlements, ECLSS functions and average load requirements, unique drivers for various missions, and potentially exploitable commonalities among vehicles and habitats.

  11. Development of requirements tracking and verification system for the software design of distributed control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chul Hwan; Kim, Jang Yeol; Kim, Jung Tack; Lee, Jang Soo; Ham, Chang Shik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In this paper a prototype of Requirement Tracking and Verification System(RTVS) for a Distributed Control System was implemented and tested. The RTVS is a software design and verification tool. The main functions required by the RTVS are managing, tracking and verification of the software requirements listed in the documentation of the DCS. The analysis of DCS software design procedures and interfaces with documents were performed to define the user of the RTVS, and the design requirements for RTVS were developed. 4 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  12. 21 CFR 111.120 - What quality control operations are required for components, packaging, and labels before use in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for..., OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.120 What quality control operations are required for components, packaging, and...

  13. Main requirements and criteria for State nuclear material control and accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, B.G.; Goryunov, V.K.; Erastov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents comments and substantiation of the main requirements and criteria for the State nuclear materials (NM) control and accounting system in the draft of the federal Main regulations of NM control and accounting. The State NM control and accounting system structure and design principles, the list of nuclear and special non-nuclear materials which are subject to the control and accounting, NM control and accounting principles are considered. Measurement system for the values for NM control and accounting and measurement assurance program, NM transfer procedures, physical inventory taking, closing a material balance and evaluation of inventory difference and balance closure of bulk form NM are shown. Accounting units in the inventory, the system accounting report documentation and preliminary notifications, the NM control and accounting arrangement, the federal and departmental control in the State NM control and accounting system, the State NM control and accounting system supervision and requirement to the personnel carrying out the NM control and accounting are discussed [ru

  14. Design requirements of instrumentation and control systems for next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, In Soo; Lee, Byung Sun; Park, Kwang Hyun; Park, Heu Yoon; Lee, Dong Young; Kim, Jung Taek; Hwang, In Koo; Chung, Chul Hwan; Hur, Seop; Kim, Chang Hoi; Na, Nan Ju

    1994-03-01

    In this report, the basic design requirements of Instrumentation and Control systems for next generation reactor are described, which are top-tier level, to support the advanced I and C systems. It contains the requirements in accordance with the plant reliability, the plant performance, the operator's aid functions, the features for maintenance and testing, licensing issues for I and C systems. Advanced I and C systems are characterized such as the application of the digital and the human engineering technologies. To development of this requirements, the I and C systems for the foreign passive and the evolutionary types of reactor and the domestic conventional reators were reviewed and anlysed. At the detail design stage, these requirements will be used for top-tier requirements. To develop the detail design requirements in the future, more quantitive and qualitive analyses are need to be added. (Author) 44 refs

  15. Design requirements of instrumentation and control systems for next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, In Soo; Lee, Byung Sun; Park, Kwang Hyun; Park, Heu Yoon; Lee, Dong Young; Kim, Jung Taek; Hwang, In Koo; Chung, Chul Hwan; Hur, Seop; Kim, Chang Hoi; Na, Nan Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-01

    In this report, the basic design requirements of Instrumentation and Control systems for next generation reactor are described, which are top-tier level, to support the advanced I and C systems. It contains the requirements in accordance with the plant reliability, the plant performance, the operator`s aid functions, the features for maintenance and testing, licensing issues for I and C systems. Advanced I and C systems are characterized such as the application of the digital and the human engineering technologies. To development of this requirements, the I and C systems for the foreign passive and the evolutionary types of reactor and the domestic conventional reators were reviewed and anlysed. At the detail design stage, these requirements will be used for top-tier requirements. To develop the detail design requirements in the future, more quantitive and qualitive analyses are need to be added. (Author) 44 refs.

  16. Analysis of power and frequency control requirements in view of increased decentralized production and market liberalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roffel, B.; Boer, W.W. de

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach of the analysis of the minimum control requirements that are imposed on power producing units in the Netherlands, especially in the case when decentralized production increases. Also some effects of the liberalization on the control behavior are analyzed. First an overview is given of the amount and type of power production in the Netherlands, followed by a review of the control requirements. Next models are described, including a simplified model for the UCTE power system. The model was tested against frequency and power measurements after failure of a 558 MW production unit in the Netherlands. Agreement between measurements and model predictions proved to be good. The model was subsequently used to analyze the primary and secondary control requirements and the impact of an increase in decentralized power production on the fault restoration capabilities of the power system. Since the latter production units are not actively participating in primary and secondary control, fault restoration takes longer and becomes unacceptable when only 35% of the power producing units participate in secondary control. Finally, the model was used to study the impact of deregulation, especially the effect of 'block scheduling', on additional control actions of the secondary control. (Author)

  17. Oxidative damage markers are significantly associated with the carotid artery intima-media thickness after controlling for conventional risk factors of atherosclerosis in men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ha Yoon

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the association between oxidative damage markers and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT after controlling for conventional risk factors of atherosclerosis in multiple logistic regression models.Fifty-one case male participants (CIMT ≥ 0.9 mm were enrolled during their visits to Korean Genomic Rural Cohort Study of Wonju centers between May 1 and August 31, 2011, along with 51 control participants (CIMT < 0.9 mm selected using frequency matching by age group. The levels of oxidative damage markers, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyquuanosine (8-OHdG, malondialdehyde (MDA, and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (Isoprostane, were measured. Conditional logistic regression models were used to evaluate relative relationships between the oxidative damage markers and the risk of high CIMT.The markers of oxidative lipid (Isoprostane and MDA and DNA (8-OHdG damage were associated with CIMT after controlling for the conventional risk factors, including age, low density lipoprotein, body mass index, smoking history, alcohol consumption, and metabolic syndrome (ORs [95% CI] for Isoprostane: 3rd tertile, 8.47 [2.59-27.67]; for MDA: 3rd tertile, 8.47 [2.59-27.67]; for 8-OHdG: 3rd tertile, 5.58 [1.79-17.33]. When all the oxidative damage markers were incorporated in the same logistic regression model, only Isoprostane was significantly related to CIMT (OR [95% CI]: 4.22 [1.31-13.53] in 2nd tertile and 14.21 [3.34-60.56] in 3rd tertile.In this nested case-control study, the oxidative damage markers of lipid and DNA were associated with CIMT even after controlling for the conventional risk factors of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. User requirements and conceptual design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carannante, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Carannante@F4E.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Cavinato, Mario [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Gandini, Franco [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Granucci, Gustavo [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma ENEA-CNR-EURATOM, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Henderson, Mark; Purohit, Dharmesh [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Saibene, Gabriella; Sartori, Filippo [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Sozzi, Carlo [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma ENEA-CNR-EURATOM, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The ITER Electron Cyclotron (EC) plant is a complex system, essential for plasma operation. The system is being designed to supply up to 20 MW of power at 170 GHz; it consists of 24 RF sources (or Gyrotrons) connected by switchable transmission lines to four upper and one equatorial launcher. The complexity of the EC plant requires a Plant Controller, which provides the functional and operational interface with CODAC and the Plasma Control System and coordinates the various Subsystem Control Units, i.e. the local controllers of power supplies, Gyrotrons, transmission lines and launchers. A conceptual design of the Electron Cyclotron Control System (ECCS) was developed, starting from the collection of the user requirements, which have then been organized as a set of operational scenarios exploiting the EC system. The design consists in a thorough functional analysis, including also protection functions, and in the development of a conceptual I&C architecture. The main aim of the work was to identify the physics requirements and to translate them into control system requirements, in order to define the interfaces within the components of the ECCS. The definition of these interfaces is urgent because some of the subsystems are already in an advanced design phase. The present paper describes both the methodology used and the resulting design.

  19. MODIS information, data and control system (MIDACS) level 2 functional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D.; Salomonson, V.; Ormsby, J.; Sharts, B.; Folta, D.; Ardanuy, P.; Mckay, A.; Hoyt, D.; Jaffin, S.; Vallette, B.

    1988-01-01

    The MODIS Information, Data and Control System (MIDACS) Level 2 Functional Requirements Document establishes the functional requirements for MIDACS and provides a basis for the mutual understanding between the users and the designers of the EosDIS, including the requirements, operating environment, external interfaces, and development plan. In defining the requirements and scope of the system, this document describes how MIDACS will operate as an element of the EOS within the EosDIS environment. This version of the Level 2 Requirements Document follows an earlier release of a preliminary draft version. The sections on functional and performance requirements do not yet fully represent the requirements of the data system needed to achieve the scientific objectives of the MODIS instruments and science teams. Indeed, the team members have not yet been selected and the team has not yet been formed; however, it has been possible to identify many relevant requirements based on the present concept of EosDIS and through interviews and meetings with key members of the scientific community. These requirements have been grouped by functional component of the data system, and by function within each component. These requirements have been merged with the complete set of Level 1 and Level 2 context diagrams, data flow diagrams, and data dictionary.

  20. The Interaction between Checkpoint Kinase 1 (Chk1) and the Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) Complex Is Required for DNA Damage-induced Chk1 Phosphorylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiangzi; Aslanian, Aaron; Fu, Kang; Tsuji, Toshiya; Zhang, Youwei

    2014-01-01

    Chk1 is an essential mediator of the DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoint. However, how exactly Chk1 transduces the checkpoint signaling is not fully understood. Here we report the identification of the heterohexamic minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex that interacts with Chk1 by mass spectrometry. The interaction between Chk1 and the MCM complex was reduced by DNA damage treatment. We show that the MCM complex, at least partially, contributes to the chromatin association of Chk1, allowing for immediate phosphorylation of Chk1 by ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) in the presence of DNA damage. Further, phosphorylation of Chk1 at ATR sites reduces the interaction between Chk1 and the MCM complex, facilitating chromatin release of phosphorylated Chk1, a critical step in the initiation and amplification of cell cycle checkpoint. Together, these data provide novel insights into the activation of Chk1 in response to DNA damage. PMID:25049228

  1. Gamified Cognitive Control Training for Remitted Depressed Individuals: User Requirements Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaeke, Jasmien; Van Looy, Jan; Hoorelbeke, Kristof; Baeken, Chris; Koster, Ernst Hw

    2018-04-05

    The high incidence and relapse rates of major depressive disorder demand novel treatment options. Standard treatments (psychotherapy, medication) usually do not target cognitive control impairments, although these seem to play a crucial role in achieving stable remission. The urgent need for treatment combined with poor availability of adequate psychological interventions has instigated a shift toward internet interventions. Numerous computerized programs have been developed that can be presented online and offline. However, their uptake and adherence are oftentimes low. The aim of this study was to perform a user requirements analysis for an internet-based training targeting cognitive control. This training focuses on ameliorating cognitive control impairments, as these are still present during remission and can be a risk factor for relapse. To facilitate uptake of and adherence to this intervention, a qualitative user requirements analysis was conducted to map mandatory and desirable requirements. We conducted a user requirements analysis through a focus group with 5 remitted depressed individuals and individual interviews with 6 mental health care professionals. All qualitative data were transcribed and examined using a thematic analytic approach. Results showed mandatory requirements for the remitted sample in terms of training configuration, technological and personal factors, and desirable requirements regarding knowledge and enjoyment. Furthermore, knowledge and therapeutic benefits were key requirements for therapists. The identified requirements provide useful information to be integrated in interventions targeting cognitive control in depression. ©Jasmien Vervaeke, Jan Van Looy, Kristof Hoorelbeke, Chris Baeken, Ernst HW Koster. Originally published in JMIR Serious Games (http://games.jmir.org), 05.04.2018.

  2. Facilitating control in growing organizations : A study of new requirements on systematization

    OpenAIRE

    Flyman, Elin; Nilsson, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Organizational growth poses new challenges for top management. In small organizations, coordination and communication is spontaneous and require little structure to be efficient. However, as the organization grows, the increased number of individuals requires a larger amount of coordination and communication. In this study, our purpose is to increase understanding of why growing companies are experiencing challenges with coordination as well as to increase organizational control. To fulfill t...

  3. Not All Abdomens Are the Same: A Comparison of Damage Control Surgery for Intra-abdominal Sepsis versus Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason W; Nash, Nick; Procter, Levi; Benns, Matthew; Franklin, Glen A; Miller, Keith; Harbrecht, Brian G; Bernard, Andrew C

    2016-05-01

    Damage control surgery (DCS) was developed to manage exsanguinating trauma patients, but is increasingly applied to the management of peritoneal sepsis and abdominal catastrophes. Few manuscripts compare the outcomes of these surgeries on disparate patient populations. A multi-institutional three group propensity score matched case cohort study comparing penetrating trauma (PT-DCS), blunt trauma (BT-DCS), and intraperitoneal sepsis (IPS-DCS) was performed comparing patients treated with DSC between 2008 and 2013. Propensity scoring was performed using demographic and presenting physiologic data. Four hundred and twelve patients were treated with DCS across two institutions. Propensity matching for age, gender, and initial Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score 80 identified 80 patients per group for comparison. Rate of primary fascial closure was lowest in the IPS-DCS group, and highest in the penetrating trauma DCS group. Intra-abdominal complication rates were highest in the IPS-DCS group. IPS-DCS had increased time to definitive closure compared with the other two groups (RR 1.8; 1.3-2.2; P eight days were more than twice the risk of death at 90 days across all groups. (RR 2.15; 1.2-3.5; P managed via DCS.

  4. An outcome prediction model for exsanguinating patients with blunt abdominal trauma after damage control laparotomy: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang-Yu; Liao, Chien-Hung; Fu, Chih-Yuan; Kang, Shih-Ching; Ouyang, Chun-Hsiang; Kuo, I-Ming; Lin, Jr-Rung; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chen, Shao-Wei

    2014-04-28

    We present a series of patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent damage control laparotomy (DCL) and introduce a nomogram that we created to predict survival among these patients. This was a retrospective study. From January 2002 to June 2012, 91 patients underwent DCL for hemorrhagic shock. We excluded patients with the following characteristics: a penetrating abdominal injury, age younger than 18 or older than 65 years, a severe or life-threatening brain injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] ≥ 4), emergency department (ED) arrival more than 6 hours after injury, pregnancy, end-stage renal disease, or cirrhosis. In addition, we excluded patients who underwent DCL after ICU admission or later in the course of hospitalization. The overall mortality rate was 61.5%: 35 patients survived and 56 died. We identified independent survival predictors, which included a preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score blunt abdominal trauma with exsanguination. The nomogram presented here may provide ED physicians and trauma surgeons with a tool for early stratification and risk evaluation in critical, exsanguinating patients.

  5. Indications for Use of Damage Control Surgery in Civilian Trauma Patients: A Content Analysis and Expert Appropriateness Rating Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Derek J; Bobrovitz, Niklas; Zygun, David A; Ball, Chad G; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Faris, Peter D; Brohi, Karim; D'Amours, Scott; Fabian, Timothy C; Inaba, Kenji; Leppäniemi, Ari K; Moore, Ernest E; Navsaria, Pradeep H; Nicol, Andrew J; Parry, Neil; Stelfox, Henry T

    2016-05-01

    To characterize and evaluate indications for use of damage control (DC) surgery in civilian trauma patients. Although DC surgery may improve survival in select, severely injured patients, the procedure is associated with significant morbidity, suggesting that it should be used only when appropriately indicated. Two investigators used an abbreviated grounded theory method to synthesize indications for DC surgery reported in peer-reviewed articles between 1983 and 2014 into a reduced number of named, content-characteristic codes representing unique indications. An international panel of trauma surgery experts (n = 9) then rated the appropriateness (expected benefit-to-harm ratio) of the coded indications for use in surgical practice. The 1107 indications identified in the literature were synthesized into 123 unique pre- (n = 36) and intraoperative (n = 87) indications. The panel assessed 101 (82.1%) of these indications to be appropriate. The indications most commonly reported and assessed to be appropriate included pre- and intraoperative hypothermia (median temperature 10 units), inability to close the abdominal wall without tension, development of abdominal compartment syndrome during attempted abdominal wall closure, and need to reassess extent of bowel viability. This study identified a comprehensive list of candidate indications for use of DC surgery. These indications provide a practical foundation to guide surgical practice while studies are conducted to evaluate their impact on patient care and outcomes.

  6. Maneuver Planning for Conjunction Risk Mitigation with Ground-track Control Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, David

    2008-01-01

    The planning of conjunction Risk Mitigation Maneuvers (RMM) in the presence of ground-track control requirements is analyzed. Past RMM planning efforts on the Aqua, Aura, and Terra spacecraft have demonstrated that only small maneuvers are available when ground-track control requirements are maintained. Assuming small maneuvers, analytical expressions for the effect of a given maneuver on conjunction geometry are derived. The analytical expressions are used to generate a large trade space for initial RMM design. This trade space represents a significant improvement in initial maneuver planning over existing methods that employ high fidelity maneuver models and propagation.

  7. Switching to multiple daily injection therapy with glulisine improves glycaemic control, vascular damage and treatment satisfaction in basal insulin glargine-injected diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Katsuyuki; Ashihara, Junya; Obara, Shinji; Wada, Norio; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Nishino, Yuri; Maeda, Sayaka; Ishibashi, Yuji; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Basal and bolus insulin therapy is required for strict blood control in diabetic patients, which could lead to prevention of vascular complications in diabetes. However, the optimal combination regimen is not well established. Fifty-nine diabetic patients (49 type 1 and 10 type 2; 52.9 ± 13.3 years old) whose blood glucose levels were uncontrolled (HbA1c  > 6.2%) by combination treatment of basal insulin glargine with multiple daily pre-meal injections of bolus short-acting insulin [aspart (n = 19), lispro (n = 37) and regular human insulin (n = 3)] for at least 8 weeks were enrolled in this study. We examined whether glycaemic control and vascular injury were improved by replacement of short-acting insulin with glulisine. Patient satisfaction was assessed with Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. Although bolus and basal insulin doses were almost unchanged before and after replacement therapy, switching to glulisine insulin for 24 weeks significantly decreased level of HbA1c , advanced glycation end products (AGEs), soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and urinary albumin excretion. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, change in MCP-1 values from baseline (ΔMCP-1) was a sole determinant of log urinary albumin excretion. ΔAGEs and ΔsRAGE were independently correlated with each other. The relationship between ΔMCP-1 and ΔsRAGE was marginally significant (p = 0.05). Replacement of short-acting insulin by glulisine significantly increased Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire scores. Our present study suggests that combination therapy of glargine with multiple daily pre-meal injections of glulisine might show superior efficacy in controlling blood glucose, preventing vascular damage and improving treatment satisfaction in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Power Control and Monitoring Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the MAP Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The specific heater control requirements for the thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland are described. The testing was conducted in the 10m wide x 18.3m high Space Environment Simulator (SES) Thermal Vacuum Facility. The MAP thermal testing required accurate quantification of spacecraft and fixture power levels while minimizing heater electrical emissions. The special requirements of the MAP test necessitated construction of five (5) new heater racks.

  9. SigG Does Not Control Gene Expression in Response to DNA Damage in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ▿ §

    OpenAIRE

    Smollett, Katherine L.; Dawson, Lisa F.; Davis, Elaine O.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis sigG sigma factor was induced by a variety of DNA-damaging agents, but inactivation of sigG did not affect induction of gene expression or bacterial survival under these conditions. Therefore, SigG does not control the DNA repair response of M. tuberculosis H37Rv.

  10. Quantification and localisation of damage in rat muscles after controlled loading; a new approach to study the aetiology of pressure sores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosboom, E.M.H.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Straaten, van H.W.M.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Kuipers, H.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain more insight in the aetiology of deep pressure sores, an animal model was developed to relate controlled externalloading to local muscle damage. The tibialis anterior muscle (TA) and overlying skin of a rat were compressed between indentorand tibia. Loads of 10, 70 and 250 kPa at skin

  11. Development Requirements for the Exploration PLSS (xPLSS) Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control Unit (CDHCU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2017-01-01

    Functional Requirements for the Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control Unit (CDHCU): The CDHCU is a component of the Exploration Portable Life Support System (xPLSS) to provide carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control within the spacesuit for a crewmember to perform extravehicular activities (EVA) in vacuum (micro-g), lunar, and Mars environments for up to 8 hours continuous, and during EVA preparation in airlocks or support vehicles for an additional 2 hours (TBR) continuous.

  12. AZALEP a randomized controlled trial of azathioprine to treat leprosy nerve damage and Type 1 reactions in India: Main findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Diana N J; Darlong, Joydeepa; Govindharaj, Pitchaimani; Kurian, Royce; Sundarrao, Pamidipani; John, Annamma S

    2017-03-01

    Leprosy Type 1 reactions are difficult to treat and only 70% of patients respond to steroid treatment. Azathioprine has been used as an immune-suppressant and we tested its efficacy in treating leprosy T1R. Randomised controlled trial adding azathioprine to steroid treatment for leprosy reactions. This trial was conducted in four leprosy hospitals in India. Patients with a new leprosy Type 1 reaction affecting either skin or nerve were recruited. They were given a 20 week course of oral prednisolone either with placebo or azathioprine 50mg for 24, 36 or 48 weeks. Outcomes were measured using a verified combined clinical reaction severity score (CCS) and the score difference between baseline and end of study calculated. An intention to treat analysis was done on the 279 patients who had an outcome. 345 patients were recruited, 145 were lost due to adverse events, loss to follow up or death. 36% needed extra steroids due to a recurrence of their skin and/or nerve reaction. 76% of patients had improvements in their CCS the end of the study, 22% had no change and 1.1% deteriorated. Adding azathioprine to steroid treatment did not improve CCS. So the improvements were attributable to treatment with steroids. We analysed the skin, sensory and motor scores separately and found that skin improvement contributed most with 78.9% of patients having skin improvement, azathioprine treatment for 48 weeks improved sensory scores it also improved motor scores but so did treatment with prednisolone alone. We identified significant adverse effects attributable to steroid treatment. When azathioprine and Dapsone were given together significant numbers of patients developed significant anaemia. Azathioprine is not recommended for the treatment of leprosy reactions and does not improve steroid treatment. Recurrent reactions are a major challenge. We have also identified that 65% of patients with sensory and 50% with motor nerve damage do not improve. Future studies should test giving

  13. Marine Diesel Engine Control to meet Emission Requirements and Maintain Maneuverability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kræn Vodder; Blanke, Mogens; Eriksson, Lars

    2018-01-01

    International shipping has been reported to account for 13% of global NOx emissions and 2.1% of global green house gas emissions. Recent restrictions of NOx emissions from marine vessels have led to the development of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for large two-stroke diesel engines. Meanwhile......, the same engines have been downsized and derated to optimize fuel efficiency. The smaller engines reduce the possible vessel acceleration, and to counteract this, the engine controller must be improved to fully utilize the physical potential of the engine. A fuel index limiter based on air/fuel ratio...... was recently developed [1], but as it does not account for EGR, accelerations lead to excessive exhaust smoke formation which could damage the engine when recirculated. This paper presents two methods for extending a fuel index limiter function to EGR engines. The methods are validated through simulations...

  14. Animal damage to birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Jordan; Francis M. Rushmore

    1969-01-01

    A relatively few animal species are responsible for most of the reported damage to the birches. White-tailed deer, yellow-bellied sapsuckers, porcupines, moose, and hares are the major animals involved. We will review reports of damage, discuss the underlying causes, and describe possible methods of control. For example, heavy deer browsing that eliminates birch...

  15. Præhospital behandling af svært tilskadekomne patienter med fokus på damage control-kirurgi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Marie; Larsen, Claus Falck; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The majority of patients undergoing damage control surgery initially receive prehospital treatment. Bleeding causes 40% of trauma deaths, half of which happen in the prehospital setting. Future research and improved treatment before hospital admission should focus on control of the bleeding, avoi......, avoidance of hypothermia, minimising the time to definitive surgery, and a restrictive and goal directed therapy with regard to the intake of fluids. On occasion, lifesaving procedures could be performed during transport to the hospital....

  16. Evaluation of Requirements for Volt/Var Control and Optimization Function in Distribution Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Saaed; Marinelli, Mattia; Silvestro, Federico

    2012-01-01

    To meet the requirement from new visions within “smart grid” and to provide solutions for many challenges that DSOs (Distribution System Operators) are facing today, we need to develop advanced DMS (Distribution Management System) applications. A centralized Volt/Var Control (VVC) is one of the m...

  17. 76 FR 23615 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Quality Control Requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Quality Control Requirements for Direct Endorsement Lenders AGENCY... proposal. This information is collected from Direct Endorsement lenders in order to meet FHA's quality... Lenders. OMB Approval Number: 2502-Pending. Form Numbers: None. Description of the Need for the...

  18. An overview of exhaust emissions regulatory requirements and control technology for stationary natural gas engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, H.N.; Hay, S.C.; Shade, W.N. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a practical overview of stationary natural gas engine exhaust emissions control technology and trends in emissions regulatory requirements is presented. Selective and non-selective catalytic reduction and lean burn technologies are compared. Particular emphasis is focussed on implications of the Clean Air Act of 1990. Recent emissions reduction conversion kit developments and a practical approach to continuous monitoring are discussed

  19. Analysis of Timing Requirements for Data Aggregation and Control in Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein

    2014-01-01

    Modern communication mechanisms are at the heart of a smart grid system to ensure that the required information is transmitted within various components of the grid. Throughout this paper, we have studied how communication performance delays and smart grid controller delays effects the overall co...

  20. 78 FR 51078 - Reporting Requirements for Positive Train Control Expenses and Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ...] Reporting Requirements for Positive Train Control Expenses and Investments AGENCY: Surface Transportation... investments and expenses. PTC is an automated system designed to prevent train-to-train collisions and other..., PTC expenditures are incorporated into the R-1 under the category of ``capital investments and...

  1. A comparison of the difference of requirements between functional safety and nuclear safety controllers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.K.; Lee, C.L.; Shyu, S.S. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    In order to establish self-reliant capabilities of nuclear I&C systems in Taiwan, Taiwan's Nuclear I&C System (TNICS) project had been established by Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). A Triple Modular Redundant (TMR) safety controller (SCS-2000) has been completed and gone through the IEC 61508 Safety Integrity Level 3 (SIL3) certification of Functional Safety for industries. Based on the certification processes, the difference of requirements between Functional Safety and Nuclear Safety controllers in term of hardware and software are addressed in this study. Besides, the measures used to determine and verify the reliability of the safety control system design are presented. (author)

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway required for immune homeostasis is neurally controlled by arrestin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varsha; Aballay, Alejandro

    2012-09-28

    In response to pathogen infection, the host innate immune system activates microbial killing pathways and cellular stress pathways that need to be balanced because insufficient or excessive immune responses have deleterious consequences. Recent studies demonstrate that two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans control immune homeostasis. To investigate further how GPCR signaling controls immune homeostasis at the organismal level, we studied arrestin-1 (ARR-1), which is the only GPCR adaptor protein in C. elegans. The results indicate that ARR-1 is required for GPCR signaling in ASH, ASI, AQR, PQR, and URX neurons, which control the unfolded protein response and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway required for innate immunity. ARR-1 activity also controlled immunity through ADF chemosensory and AFD thermosensory neurons that regulate longevity. Furthermore, we found that although ARR-1 played a key role in the control of immunity by AFD thermosensory neurons, it did not control longevity through these cells. However, ARR-1 partially controlled longevity through ADF neurons.

  3. Framework for establishing records control in hospitals as an ISO 9001 requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qatawneh, Lina

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present the process followed to control records in a Jordanian private community hospital as an ISO 9001:2008 standard requirement. Design/methodology/approach Under the hospital quality council's supervision, the quality management and development office staff were responsible for designing, planning and implementing the quality management system (QMS) using the ISO 9001:2008 standard. A policy for records control was established. An action plan for establishing the records control was developed and implemented. On completion, a coding system for records was specified to be used by hospital staff. Finally, an internal audit was performed to verify conformity to the ISO 9001:2008 standard requirements. Findings Successful certification by a neutral body ascertained that the hospital's QMS conformed to the ISO 9001:2008 requirements. A framework was developed that describes the records controlling process, which can be used by staff in any healthcare organization wanting to achieve ISO 9001:2008 accreditation. Originality/value Given the increased interest among healthcare organizations to achieve the ISO 9001 certification, the proposed framework for establishing records control is developed and is expected to be a valuable management tool to improve and sustain healthcare quality.

  4. NRC Information Notice No. 92-01: Cable damage caused by inadequate cable installation procedures and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    In June 1989, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) removed the cables from a conduit in the reactor protection system of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2, to inspect for damage. TVA selected this conduit in response to an employee's concern that a welding arc that struck the conduit in response to an employee's concern that a welding arc that struck the conduit during construction may have damaged cables in the conduit. When the cables were removed, TVA found significant damage in the insulation of some cables. This damage was not attributed to heat generated by the alleged welding arc. The damage was principally attributed to the pulling stresses exerted during the initial installation of the cables. Some of the cables had insulation removed down to the conductors. To assess the extent of cable damage and determine the scope of its investigation, TVA removed more cables from conduits that constituted the most difficult pulls (worst case) and found varying degrees of damage that it attributed to pulling stresses. To fill a conduit at Watts Bar, personnel used pull cords to pull more cables through the conduits over the top of existing cables. This practice is called ''pull-by.'' This practice can cause damage to the existing cables from the sawing action of the pull cords and the friction of cables as they are pulled over existing cables. TVA instituted programs to assess the adequacy of cable installation at all its nuclear facilities and take appropriate corrective actions. At Watts Bar, TVA replaced cables in conduits which exceeded a calculated threshold value of side wall bearing pressure (SWBP) and performed a high-potential (hi-pot) tests on a number of other cables in conduits with SWBP below the calculated threshold value

  5. Radiation Damage Mechanism in PbWO4 Crystal and Radiation Hardness Quality Control of PWO Scintillators for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Baccaro, Stefania; Borgia, Bruno; Cavallari, Francesca; Cecilia, Angelica; Dafinei, Ioan; Diemoz, Marcella; Lecoq, Paul; Longo, Egidio; Montecchi, Marco; Organtini, Giovanni; Salvatori, S

    1997-01-01

    The optical damage induced by UV light in PbWO4 crystals is found to be similar to that induced by g radiation. Due to the peculiarities of optical absorption in PbWO4, the damage induced by UV light is a bulk process. This fact has important consequences for the approach to be adopted both for the use of the crystal as scintillator and for the qualification methods foreseen in the Regional Centres of the ECAL CMS Collaboration.

  6. Requirements Engineering for Reactive Systems: Coloured Petri Nets for an Elevator Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens Bæk; Fernandes, Joao Miguel; Tjell, Simon

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach to requirements engineering for reactive systems; we use an elevator controller as case study. We identify and justify two key properties that a model which we construct must have, namely: (1) controller-and-environment-partitioned, which means...... constituting a description of both the controller and the environment, and distinguishing between these two domains and between desired and assumed behaviour; (2) use case-based, which means constructed on the basis of a given use case diagram and reproducing the behaviour described in accompanying scenario...... descriptions. For the case study, we build an executable model in the formal modelling language Coloured Petri Nets. We demonstrate how this model is useful for requirements engineering, since it provides a solid basis for addressing behavioural issues early in the development process, for example regarding...

  7. Requirements for quality control of analytical data for the Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, J.

    1992-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was established for the investigation and remediation of inactive US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities that have been declared surplus in terms of their previous uses. The purpose of this document is to Specify ER requirements for quality control (QC) of analytical data. Activities throughout all phases of the investigation may affect the quality of the final data product, thus are subject to control specifications. Laboratory control is emphasized in this document, and field concerns will be addressed in a companion document Energy Systems, in its role of technical coordinator and at the request of DOE-OR, extends the application of these requirements to all participants in ER activities. Because every instance and concern may not be addressed in this document, participants are encouraged to discuss any questions with the ER Quality Assurance (QA) Office, the Analytical Environmental Support Group (AESG), or the Analytical Project Office (APO)

  8. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Damage and Fracture Mechanisms Controlling the Performance of Full Aperture Easy Open Ends for Food Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D. L. P.; Nagy, G. T.; Owen, D. R. J.

    2011-05-01

    Can manufacturers produce hundreds of millions of cans annually, increasingly, food cans are being opened by lifting a tab on the can end that initiates a fracture, which then propagates around a circumferential score. The damage and fracture mechanisms that lead to crack initiation and propagation in the opening process, however, are not fully understood, therefore optimisation of easy open end scores is largely based on trial and error. This paper presents an experimental analysis that concentrates on the combined shear and bending forces as applied to the particular industrial method concerning full aperture easy open ends. The influence of a gradually increasing gap measured between the score and shear force location on traditional groove geometries and depths are examined for two different packaging steels. Earlier studies have shown that the complete opening cycle depends on fracture modes I, II & III as well as their combination. Experimental results for Modes I, II & III will be presented, however attention will focus on the behaviour of the initial fracture point, whereby prior investigations have shown it to be influenced primarily by mode II shearing. After initial specimen manufacture, where the score is formed by pressing a punch into a thin steel sheet the predeformed scored specimens are loaded in shear to simulate the local stress field found during the initial opening phase. Experiments have been completed using a novel Mode II experimental technique that has been designed for use in the majority of commercially available tensile test machines. Experimental results indicate that opening forces can change radically with different gap sizes and that there is considerable potential for the industrialised process of can end manufacture to be optimised through the efficient management and control of the can ends dimensional parameters.

  10. Practice Patterns for the Use of Antibiotic Agents in Damage Control Laparotomy and Its Impact on Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Stephanie R; Henning, Jennifer; Wolfe, Luke G; Duane, Therese M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify practice patterns associated with the use of antimicrobial agents with damage control laparotomy (DCL) and the relationship with post-operative intra-abdominal infection (IAI) rates. The study was a retrospective review of trauma patients undergoing laparotomy at a Level 1 trauma center in 2010. Patients undergoing DCL versus those primarily closed (PCL) were compared for antimicrobial use (ABX) and its correlation with IAI rates (p 1 d; DCL: 21.4% none, 25.0% one day, 53.6% long term >1 day, p = 0.0130) were significant. Regression analyses demonstrated that neither ISS nor DCL was an independent predictor of infection, but pre-operative ABX was a negative predictor (odds ratio [OR] 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05-0.91, p = 0.037), while post-operative ABX (OR 6.7, 95%CI 1.33-33.8, p = 0.044) and SLBI (OR 3.45, CI 1.03-11.5, p = 0.02) were positive predictors of infection with an receiver operating characteristic of 0.81. Significant variations exist in the use of ABX in DCL and PCL. These variations may lead to deleterious results from both lack of initial pre-operative coverage and prolonged ABX use. The decrease in infection rates with pre-operative ABX yet significant increase with continued post-operative use even in the presence of SLBI suggests the need for a more standardized approach. With the increase in DCL and the open abdomen, more research is needed to clearly establish ABX protocols in this patient population.

  11. Spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control requirements for an intelligent plug-n-play avionics (PAPA) architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh; Krishnakumar, Kalmaje

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research is to design an intelligent plug-n-play avionics system that provides a reconfigurable platform for supporting the guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) requirements for different elements of the space exploration mission. The focus of this study is to look at the specific requirements for a spacecraft that needs to go from earth to moon and back. In this regard we will identify the different GN&C problems in various phases of flight that need to be addressed for designing such a plug-n-play avionics system. The Apollo and the Space Shuttle programs provide rich literature in terms of understanding some of the general GN&C requirements for a space vehicle. The relevant literature is reviewed which helps in narrowing down the different GN&C algorithms that need to be supported along with their individual requirements.

  12. Real time MHD mode control using ECCD in KSTAR: Plan and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, M.; Woo, M. H.; Jeong, J. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Yun, S. W.; Lee, W. R.; Bae, Y. S.; Oh, Y. K.; Kwak, J. G.; Yang, H. L. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, W.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H. [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongangbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M. H.; Kim, K. J.; Na, Y. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Daehak-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hosea, J.; Ellis, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (United States)

    2014-02-12

    For a high-performance, advanced tokamak mode in KSTAR, we have been developing a real-time control system of MHD modes such as sawtooth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode (NTM) by ECH/ECCD. The active feedback control loop will be also added to the mirror position and the real-time detection of the mode position. In this year, for the stabilization of NTM that is crucial to plasma performance we have implemented open-loop ECH antenna control system in KSTAR Plasma Control System (PCS) for ECH mirror movement during a single plasma discharge. KSTAR 170 GHz ECH launcher which was designed and fabricated by collaboration with PPPL and POSTECH has a final mirror of a poloidally and toroidally steerable mirror. The poloidal steering motion is only controlled in the real-time NTM control system and its maximum steering speed is 10 degree/sec by DC motor. However, the latency of the mirror control system and the return period of ECH antenna mirror angle are not fast because the existing launcher mirror control system is based on PLC which is connected to the KSTAR machine network through serial to LAN converter. In this paper, we present the design of real time NTM control system, ECH requirements, and the upgrade plan.

  13. Safety requirements laid down in the Atomic Energy Law and in the Law on Immission Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, K.

    1981-01-01

    The paper deals with safety requirements relating to installations, laid down in the Atomic Energy Law and in the Law on Immission Control. Actually it is a matter of how the safety requirements of sect. 7 of the Atomic Energy Law can be compared with those laid down in the sections 5 and 6 of the Federal Act for the Protection Against Nuisances. In the process, three comparative levels are examined: 1. The normative conditions concerning the licencability of hazardous installations, 2. those demands that go way beyond that in order to reduce residual risks, and 3. the licensing authorities' scope of discretion. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program requirements for quality control of analytical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.S.; Zolyniak, J.W.

    1988-08-01

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Action Program (HAZWRAP) is involved in performing field investigations and sample analysis pursuant to the NCP for the Department of Energy and other federal agencies. The purpose of this document is to specify the requirements for the control of the accuracy, precision and completeness of the samples, and data from the point of collection through analysis. The requirements include data reduction and reporting of the resulting environmentally related data. Because every instance and concern may not be addressed in this document, HAZWRAP subcontractors are encouraged to discuss any questions with the HAZWRAP Project Manager hereafter identified as the Project Manager

  15. Experimental approach to IGF-1 therapy in CCl4-induced acute liver damage in healthy controls and mice with partial IGF-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Garza, Luis A; Puche, Juan E; Aguirre, Gabriel A; Muñoz, Úrsula; García-Magariño, Mariano; De la Garza, Rocío G; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma

    2017-05-04

    Cell necrosis, oxidative damage, and fibrogenesis are involved in cirrhosis development, a condition in which insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels are diminished. This study evaluates whether the exogenous administration of low doses of IGF-1 can induce hepatoprotection in acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )-induced liver damage compared to healthy controls (Wt Igf +/+ ). Additionally, the impact of IGF-1 deficiency on a damaged liver was investigated in mice with a partial deficit of this hormone (Hz Igf1 +/- ). Three groups of 25 ± 5-week-old healthy male mice (Wt Igf +/+ ) were included in the protocol: untreated controls (Wt). Controls that received CCl 4 (Wt + CCl 4 ) and Wt + CCl 4 were treated subcutaneously with IGF-1 (2 µg/100 g body weight/day) for 10 days (Wt + CCl 4  + IGF1). In parallel, three IGF-1-deficient mice (Hz Igf1 +/- ) groups were studied: untreated Hz, Hz + CCl 4 , and Hz + CCl 4  + IGF-1. Microarray and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analyses, serum aminotransferases levels, liver histology, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were assessed at the end of the treatment in all groups. All data represent mean ± SEM. An altered gene coding expression pattern for proteins of the extracellular matrix, fibrosis, and cellular protection were found, as compared to healthy controls, in which IGF-1 therapy normalized in the series including healthy mice. Liver histology showed that Wt + CCl 4  + IGF1 mice had less oxidative damage, fibrosis, lymphocytic infiltrate, and cellular changes when compared to the Wt + CCl 4 . Moreover, there was a correlation between MDA levels and the histological damage score (Pearson's r = 0.858). In the IGF-1-deficient mice series, similar findings were identified, denoting a much more vulnerable hepatic parenchyma. IGF1 treatment improved the biochemistry, histology, and genetic expression of pro-regenerative and cytoprotective factors in both series

  16. ATM Is Required for the Prolactin-Induced HSP90-Mediated Increase in Cellular Viability and Clonogenic Growth After DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayazi Atici, Ödül; Urbanska, Anna; Gopinathan, Sesha Gopal; Boutillon, Florence; Goffin, Vincent; Shemanko, Carrie S

    2018-02-01

    Prolactin (PRL) acts as a survival factor for breast cancer cells, but the PRL signaling pathway and the mechanism are unknown. Previously, we identified the master chaperone, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) α, as a prolactin-Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) target gene involved in survival, and here we investigated the role of HSP90 in the mechanism of PRL-induced viability in response to DNA damage. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) protein plays a critical role in the cellular response to double-strand DNA damage. We observed that PRL increased viability of breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin or etoposide. The increase in cellular resistance is specific to the PRL receptor, because the PRL receptor antagonist, Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL, prevented the increase in viability. Two different HSP90 inhibitors, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin and BIIB021, reduced the PRL-mediated increase in cell viability of doxorubicin-treated cells and led to a decrease in JAK2, ATM, and phosphorylated ATM protein levels. Inhibitors of JAK2 (G6) and ATM (KU55933) abolished the PRL-mediated increase in cell viability of DNA-damaged cells, supporting the involvement of each, as well as the crosstalk of ATM with the PRL pathway in the context of DNA damage. Drug synergism was detected between the ATM inhibitor (KU55933) and doxorubicin and between the HSP90 inhibitor (BIIB021) and doxorubicin. Short interfering RNA directed against ATM prevented the PRL-mediated increase in cell survival in two-dimensional cell culture, three-dimensional collagen gel cultures, and clonogenic cell survival, after doxorubicin treatment. Our results indicate that ATM contributes to the PRL-JAK2-STAT5-HSP90 pathway in mediating cellular resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  17. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  18. The influence of selenium status on body composition, oxidative DNA damage and total antioxidant capacity in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Fatimah Binti; Mohamed, Hamid Jan Bin Jan; Sirajudeen, K N S; Noh, Mohd Fairulnizal B Md; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2017-09-01

    Selenium is involved in the complex system of defense against oxidative stress in diabetes through its biological function of selenoproteins and the antioxidant enzyme. A case-control study was carried out to determine the association of plasma selenium with oxidative stress and body composition status presented in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patient and healthy control. This study involved 82 newly diagnosed T2DM patients and 82 healthy controls. Plasma selenium status was determined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Body Mass Index, total body fat and visceral fat was assessed for body composition using Body Composition Analyzer (TANITA). Oxidative DNA damage and total antioxidant capacity were determined for oxidative stress biomarker status. In age, gender and BMI adjustment, no significant difference of plasma selenium level between T2DM and healthy controls was observed. There was as a significant difference of Oxidative DNA damage and total antioxidant capacity between T2DM patients and healthy controls with tail DNA% 20.62 [95% CI: 19.71,21.49] (T2DM), 17.67 [95% CI: 16.87,18.56] (control); log tail moment 0.41[95% CI: 0.30,0.52] (T2DM), 0.41[95% CI: 0.30,0.52] (control); total antioxidant capacity 0.56 [95% CI: 0.54,0.58] (T2DM), 0.60 [95% CI: 0.57,0.62] (control). Waist circumference, BMI, visceral fat, body fat and oxidative DNA damage in the T2DM group were significantly lower in the first plasma selenium tertile (38.65-80.90μg/L) compared to the second (80.91-98.20μg/L) and the third selenium tertiles (98.21-158.20μg/L). A similar trend, but not statistically significant, was observed in the control group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost account in agriculture with particular accordance to requirements of decision making process and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kondraszuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents cost account applicability in the agricultural companies regarding the general theory of economic and organisation of enterprises. The main focus was laid down to analyse the unit total cost account with variable costs and their applicability in three spheres: stock valuation and profit, requirements of planning and decision making processes and controlling. It was concluded that cost calculation at the level of agricultural enterprise should be an inherent element of integrated information system at the level of registry, planning, decision making and control.

  20. Flood control design requirements and flood evaluation methods of inland nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ailing; Wang Ping; Zhu Jingxing

    2011-01-01

    Effect of flooding is one of the key safety factors and environmental factors in inland nuclear power plant sitting. Up to now, the rule of law and standard systems are established for the selection of nuclear power plant location and flood control requirements in China. In this paper flood control standards of China and other countries are introduced. Several inland nuclear power plants are taken as examples to thoroughly discuss the related flood evaluation methods. The suggestions are also put forward in the paper. (authors)

  1. [Prevention and control of air pollution needs to strengthen further study on health damage caused by air pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T C

    2016-08-06

    Heath issues caused by air pollution such as particulate matter (PM) are much concerned and focused among air, water and soil pollutions because human breathe air for whole life span. Present comments will review physical and chemical characteristics of PM2.5 and PM10; Dose-response associations of PM10, PM2.5 and their components with mortality and risk of cardiopulmonary diseases, early health damages such as the decrease of lung functions and heart rate variability, DNA damage; And the roles of genetic variations and epigenetic changes in lung functions and heart rate variability, DNA damage related to PMs and their components. This comments list some limitations and perspectives about the associations of air pollution with health.

  2. Investigation of high-alpha lateral-directional control power requirements for high-performance aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John V.; Ross, Holly M.; Ashley, Patrick A.

    1993-01-01

    Designers of the next-generation fighter and attack airplanes are faced with the requirements of good high angle-of-attack maneuverability as well as efficient high speed cruise capability with low radar cross section (RCS) characteristics. As a result, they are challenged with the task of making critical design trades to achieve the desired levels of maneuverability and performance. This task has highlighted the need for comprehensive, flight-validated lateral-directional control power design guidelines for high angles of attack. A joint NASA/U.S. Navy study has been initiated to address this need and to investigate the complex flight dynamics characteristics and controls requirements for high angle-of-attack lateral-directional maneuvering. A multi-year research program is underway which includes groundbased piloted simulation and flight validation. This paper will give a status update of this program that will include a program overview, description of test methodology and preliminary results.

  3. High-Level software requirements specification for the TWRS controlled baseline database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, S.G.

    1998-01-01

    This Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is an as-built document that presents the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Controlled Baseline Database (TCBD) in its current state. It was originally known as the Performance Measurement Control System (PMCS). Conversion to the new system name has not occurred within the current production system. Therefore, for simplicity, all references to TCBD are equivalent to PMCS references. This SRS will reference the PMCS designator from this point forward to capture the as-built SRS. This SRS is written at a high-level and is intended to provide the design basis for the PMCS. The PMCS was first released as the electronic data repository for cost, schedule, and technical administrative baseline information for the TAAS Program. During its initial development, the PMCS was accepted by the customer, TARS Business Management, with no formal documentation to capture the initial requirements

  4. 40 CFR 63.1583 - What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant? 63.1583 Section 63.1583 Protection of... Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works Industrial Potw Treatment Plant Description and Requirements § 63.1583 What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant? (a...

  5. Basic Principles for Elaboration of Technical Requirements to Control and Protective TRB Turbine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Panteley

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers and provides methodology for calculation of maximum over speeding value of a turbine rotor in the case when we face the failure of all its protective systems. It is presented a derivation of main equations required for making the calculation and the paper also cites results of their practical application at an industrial TRB (Turbine of the Republic of Belarus turbine while constructing its protective control systems.

  6. The effect of regulatory requirements on the control and instrumentation system designer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golder, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The difficulties encountered by the designer of control and protection systems for nuclear plant in attempting to satisfy the large number of imprecise regulations and recommendations which exist are described. The absence of fundamental quantitative safety requirements of international acceptability is deplored and the adoption of a major incident criteria expressed in quantitative terms as the basis for the derivation of target design criteria for protection systems and plant components is suggested. (author)

  7. Timing and control requirements for a 32-channel AMU-ADC ASIC for the PHENIX detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, M.S.; Ericson, M.N.; Britton, C.L. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A custom CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) has been developed consisting of an analog memory unit (AMU) has been developed consisting of an analog memory unit (AMU) and analog to digital converter (ADC), both of which have been designed for applications in the PHENIX experiment. This IC consists of 32 pipes of analog memory with 64 cells per pipe. Each pipe also has its own ADC channel. Timing and control signal requirements for optimum performance are discussed in this paper

  8. Cell-specific differences in the requirements for translation quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Noah M; Ling, Jiqiang; Roy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    Protein synthesis has an overall error rate of approximately 10(-4) for each mRNA codon translated. The fidelity of translation is mainly determined by two events: synthesis of cognate amino acid:tRNA pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and accurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs)...... divergent requirements for quality control in different cell compartments and suggest that the limits of translational accuracy may be largely determined by cellular physiology....

  9. Regulatory philosophy and requirements for radiation control in Canadian uranium mine-mill facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-10-01

    The approach the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board takes in licensing uranium mine/mill facilities is based on a minimum of rigidly set regulatory requirements. The regulations state only the basic objectives: the obligation to acquire a licence, some administrative and reporting requirements, and exposure limits. The regulations are supported by a set of regulatory guides. The operator always has the option of following different procedures if he can demonstrate that they will produce the same or better results. Good relationships exist between the AECB and mine management as well as trade unions. Under this approach, however, it is difficult to take action against uncooperative parties. The Board has decided that a somewhat more formalized system is necessary. New regulations are being drafted, giving more detailed licensing and administrative requirements and covering the areas of ventilation and worker and supervisor education more thoroughly

  10. Compliance of SLAC's Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.

    2009-01-01

    SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance

  11. Trajectory Orientation: A Technology-Enabled Concept Requiring a Shift in Controller Roles and Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiden, Ken; Green, Steven

    2000-01-01

    The development of a decision support tool (DST) for the en-route domain with accurate conflict prediction time horizons of 20 minutes has introduced an interesting problem. A 20 minute time horizon for conflict prediction often results in the predicted conflict occurring one or more sectors downstream from the sector controller who "owns" (i-e., is responsible for the safe separation of aircraft) one or both of the aircraft in the conflict pair. Based on current roles and responsibilities of today's en route controllers, the upstream controller would not resolve this conflict. In most cases, the downstream controller would wait until the conflicting aircraft entered higher sector before resolving the conflict. This results in a delay of several minutes from the time when the conflict was initially predicted. This delay is inefficient from both a controller workload and user's cost of operations perspective. Trajectory orientation, a new concept for facilitating an efficient, conflict-free flight path across several sectors while conforming to metering or miles-in-trail spacing, is proposed as an alternative to today's sector-oriented method. This concept necessitates a fundamental shift in thinking about inter-sector coordination. Instead of operating independently, with the main focus on protecting their internal airspace, controllers would work cooperatively, depending on each other for well-planned, conflict-free flow of aircraft. To support the trajectory orientation concept, a long time horizon (15 to 20 minutes) for conflict prediction and resolution would most likely be a primary requirement. In addition, new tools, such as controller-pilot data link will be identified to determine their necessity and applicability for trajectory orientation. Finally, with significant controller participation from selected Air Route Traffic Control Centers, potential shifts in R-side/D-side roles and responsibilities as well as the creation of a new controller position for

  12. Energy Storage Requirements for PV Power Ramp Rate Control in Northern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Schnabel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV generators suffer from fluctuating output power due to the highly fluctuating primary energy source. With significant PV penetration, these fluctuations can lead to power system instability and power quality problems. The use of energy storage systems as fluctuation compensators has been proposed as means to mitigate these problems. In this paper, the behavior of PV power fluctuations in Northern European climatic conditions and requirements for sizing the energy storage systems to compensate them have been investigated and compared to similar studies done in Southern European climate. These investigations have been performed through simulations that utilize measurements from the Tampere University of Technology solar PV power station research plant in Finland. An enhanced energy storage charging control strategy has been developed and tested. Energy storage capacity, power, and cycling requirements have been derived for different PV generator sizes and power ramp rate requirements. The developed control strategy leads to lesser performance requirements for the energy storage systems compared to the methods presented earlier. Further, some differences on the operation of PV generators in Northern and Southern European climates have been detected.

  13. Biology and thermal requirements to Trichogramma spp. selection for Ecdytolopha aurantiana control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Rosa M.S.; Parra, Jose R.P.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the potential of Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman and Platner, 1983 and T. pretiosum Riley, 1879 as agents of control of Ecdytolopha aurantiana (Lima, 1927) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), an important Citrus pest in Sao Paulo State (South-East Brazil). In order to provide subsidies to programs of biological control with these parasitoids, studies of biology in different temperatures, thermal requirements and parasitism capacity were carried out. The temperatures (18, 20, 22, 25, 28, 30, and 32 deg C) did not affect the sex ratio, however, female longevity of both species was higher at 22 and 25 deg C. The temperature of 25 deg C tended to be more suitable to both emergency rate and female longevity. The egg-adult period for both Trichogramma species was inversely proportional to temperature. The thermal requirements of the two species were very close, about 108 DD (degree days). Neither the natural rearing host, E. aurantiana, nor the alternative host Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller, 1879) (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae), affected the number of parasitized eggs per Trichogramma female. The parasitism rate and the number of emerged adults per egg on E. aurantiana eggs were higher than on A. kuehniella eggs. However, the emergency rate was higher when the parasitoids were reared on A. kuehniella eggs. Both Trichogramma species could be tested in the field for citrus fruit borer control. The thermal requirements and the parasitism capacity also could be good parameters for selection of Trichogramma species/strains. (author)

  14. 40 CFR 141.521 - What updated watershed control requirements must my unfiltered system implement to continue to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What updated watershed control... People Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.521 What updated watershed control requirements must my unfiltered system implement to continue to avoid filtration? Your system must...

  15. 21 CFR 111.110 - What quality control operations are required for laboratory operations associated with the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for laboratory operations associated with the production and process control system? 111.110 Section 111.110 Food... § 111.110 What quality control operations are required for laboratory operations associated with the...

  16. Use of neurosurgical decision-making and damage-control neurosurgery courses in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts: a surgeon's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teff, Richard J

    2010-05-01

    A shortage of Coalition neurological surgeons in the Iraq conflict prompted a creative approach to standardized neurosurgical care in 2007. After formulation of theater-wide clinical pathway guidelines, a need for standardized triage and neurological resuscitation was identified. The object was to establish a simple, reproducible course for medics, forward surgical and emergency room personnel, and other critical care providers to quickly standardize the ability of all deployed health care personnel to provide state-of-the-art neurosurgical triage and damage-control interventions. The methods applied were Microsoft PowerPoint presentations and hands-on learning. The year-long project resulted in more than 100 individuals being trained in neurosurgical decision making and in more than 15 surgeons being trained in damage-control neurosurgery. At the year's conclusion, hundreds of individuals received exceptional neurosurgical care from nonneurosurgical providers and a legacy course was left for future deployed providers to receive ongoing education at their own pace.

  17. Damaged Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  18. Oxidative Damage, Inflammation, and Toll-Like Receptor 4 Pathway Are Increased in Preeclamptic Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana C. B. Bernardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem. There was no direct correlation between plasma and placental oxidative damage parameters and inflammation and evidence of TLR4 pathway activation in the placenta in preeclamptic (PE patients. Method of Study. 33 PE patients and 33 normotensive pregnant women were included. The maternal section of the placenta and blood were collected to the determination of oxidative damage markers (thiobarbituric acid reactive species and protein carbonyls, inflammatory response (interleukin-6 and myeloperoxidase activity, and activation of the TLR-4-NF-kB pathway. Results. An increase of IL-6 levels in both plasma and placenta was observed, but myeloperoxidase activity was not significantly different comparing the groups. Oxidative damage parameters were increased in plasma and placenta in PE patients. A significant increase of the protein levels of TLR-4 and NF-kB was observed in the placenta. Conclusion. The TLR4-NF-kB pathway is upregulated in PE, probably generating local and systemic inflammatory response that is followed by local and systemic oxidative damage.

  19. Control of communicable disease; foreign--requirements for importers of nonhuman primates (NHP). Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), located within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is amending regulations for the importation of live nonhuman primates (NHPs) by extending existing requirements for the importation of Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus), Chlorocebus aethiops (African green), and Macaca mulatta (rhesus) monkeys to all NHPs with the exception of the filovirus testing requirement. Filovirus testing will only be required for Old World NHPs in quarantine that have illness consistent with filovirus infection or that die for any reason other than trauma during quarantine. HHS/CDC is also finalizing a provision to reduce the frequency at which importers of cynomolgus, African green, and rhesus monkeys are required to renew their special permits (from every 180 days to every 2 years). HHS/CDC is incorporating existing guidelines into the regulations and adding new provisions to address the following: NHPs imported as part of an animal act; NHPs imported or transferred by zoological societies; the transfer of NHPs from approved laboratories; and non-live imported NHP products. Finally, HHS/CDC is also requiring that all NHPs be imported only through ports of entry where a HHS/CDC quarantine station is located.

  20. Warm-up Optimizes Postural Control but Requires Some Minutes of Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry; Kadri, Mohamed Abdelhafid; Nouar, Merbouha Boulahbel; Noé, Frederic

    2018-05-02

    Paillard, T, Kadri, MA, Nouar, MB, and Noé, F. Warm-up optimizes postural control but requires some minutes of recovery. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-The aim was to compare monopedal postural control between the dominant leg (D-Leg) and the nondominant leg (ND-Leg) in pre- and post-warm-up conditions. Thirty healthy male sports science students were evaluated before and after a warm-up exercise (12 minutes of pedaling with an incremental effort on a cycle ergometer with a controlled workload). Monopodal postural control was assessed for the D- and ND-Legs before and immediately, 2, 5, 10, and 15 minutes after the warm-up exercise, using a force platform and calculating the displacement velocity of the center of foot pressure on the mediolateral (COPML velocity) and anteroposterior (COPAP velocity) axes. No significant difference was observed between the D-Leg and ND-Leg for both COPML and COPAP velocity in all the periods. In comparison with pre-warm-up, COPML decreased after 15-minute and 10-minute recovery periods for the D-Leg and the ND-Leg, respectively (p warm-up optimized monopedal postural control but did not make it possible to distinguish a difference between the D-Leg and the ND-Leg. Some minutes of recovery are required between the end of the whole-body warm-up exercise and the beginning of the postural test to optimize postural control. The optimal duration of recovery turns out to be about 10-15 minutes.

  1. Assessment of Radiation-Attenuated Vaccine or Thyme Oil Treatment on Controlling DNA Damage and Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Brain of Rat Infected with Toxocara canis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, M.M.; Hafez, E.N.; Abd Raboo, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Toxocara canis is a worldwide zoonotic roundworm that infects a number of hosts including humans. It exhibits marked affinity to the nervous tissues. This study deals with the changes in the brain of Toxocara canis infected rats regarding parasitological, nitric oxide (NO) level and DNA damage compared to the effect of vaccination with gamma radiation-attenuated embryonated egg or thyme oil treatment. Eighty rats were classified into four groups (twenty each): GI (normal control); GII infected with 2500 T. canis infective eggs/ml/rat (infected control); GIII vaccinated with 800 Gy gamma-attenuated embryonated eggs (vaccinated group) and GIV infected with 2500 T. canis eggs and treated with thyme oil (thyme treated group). At the 14th day post-infection, ten rats from each group were sacrificed and the remaining were re-infected (challenged) with the same number of eggs. At the 14th days post challenge, brain tissues were taken for larval recovery, nitric oxide level evaluation and DNA damage using fragmentation and comet assay. The results exhibited a significant decrease in larval count and nitric oxide level with less damage in brain cells in thyme treated and gamma radiation-attenuated vaccinated groups compared to control infected group. It is also, concluded that vaccination using γ- rays is more effective in protection compared to using thyme oil.

  2. Studies for the requirements of automatic and remotely controlled shutoff valves on hazardous liquids and natural gas pipelines with respect to public and environmental safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oland, C. Barry [XCEL Engineering, Inc. (United States); Rose, Simon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering Science and Technology Div.; Grant, Herb L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fabrication, Hoisting and Rigging Div.; Lower, Mark D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fabrication, Hoisting and Rigging Div.; Spann, Mark A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Facility Management Div.; Kirkpatrick, John R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computational Sciences and Engineering Div.; Sulfredge, C. David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computational Sciences and Engineering Div.

    2012-12-01

    This study assesses the effectiveness of block valve closure swiftness in mitigating the consequences of natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline releases on public and environmental safety. It also evaluates the technical, operational, and economic feasibility and potential cost benefits of installing automatic shutoff valves (ASVs) and remote control valves (RCVs) in newly constructed and fully replaced transmission lines. Risk analyses of hypothetical pipeline release scenarios are used as the basis for assessing: (1) fire damage to buildings and property in Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, and Class 4 high consequence areas (HCAs) caused by natural gas pipeline releases and subsequent ignition of the released natural gas; (2) fire damage to buildings and property in HCAs designated as high population areas and other populated areas caused by hazardous liquid pipeline releases and subsequent ignition of the released propane; and (3) socioeconomic and environmental damage in HCAs caused by hazardous liquid pipeline releases of crude oil. These risk analyses use engineering principles and fire science practices to characterize thermal radiation effects on buildings and humans and to quantify the total damage cost of socioeconomic and environmental impacts. The risk analysis approach used for natural gas pipelines is consistent with risk assessment standards developed by industry and incorporated into Federal pipeline safety regulations. Feasibility evaluations for the hypothetical pipeline release scenarios considered in this study show that installation of ASVs and RCVs in newly constructed and fully replaced natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines is technically, operationally, and economically feasible with a positive cost benefit. However, these results may not apply to all newly constructed and fully replaced pipelines because site-specific parameters that influence risk analyses and feasibility evaluations often vary significantly from one pipeline segment to

  3. Control Systems Security Center Comparison Study of Industrial Control System Standards against the Control Systems Protection Framework Cyber-Security Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert P. Evans

    2005-09-01

    Cyber security standards, guidelines, and best practices for control systems are critical requirements that have been delineated and formally recognized by industry and government entities. Cyber security standards provide a common language within the industrial control system community, both national and international, to facilitate understanding of security awareness issues but, ultimately, they are intended to strengthen cyber security for control systems. This study and the preliminary findings outlined in this report are an initial attempt by the Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) Standard Awareness Team to better understand how existing and emerging industry standards, guidelines, and best practices address cyber security for industrial control systems. The Standard Awareness Team comprised subject matter experts in control systems and cyber security technologies and standards from several Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories, including Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. This study was conducted in two parts: a standard identification effort and a comparison analysis effort. During the standard identification effort, the Standard Awareness Team conducted a comprehensive open-source survey of existing control systems security standards, regulations, and guidelines in several of the critical infrastructure (CI) sectors, including the telecommunication, water, chemical, energy (electric power, petroleum and oil, natural gas), and transportation--rail sectors and sub-sectors. During the comparison analysis effort, the team compared the requirements contained in selected, identified, industry standards with the cyber security requirements in ''Cyber Security Protection Framework'', Version 0.9 (hereafter referred to as the ''Framework''). For each of the seven sector/sub-sectors listed above, one standard was

  4. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG). Volume 2, appendix A: Selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A consistent approach was sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. It appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

  5. Mining unstructured data to support requirements elicitation by using controlled vocabularies: A systematic mapping study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Barros-Justo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a work-in- progress that deals with the asse ssment of the use of controlled vocabularies during the process es of requirements engineering, as a m eans to mine data from differen t sources (interviews, contracts, schemas and diagrams. By doi ng this the requirements description, analy sis and comprehension is facilit ated for both developers and end users. As a research methodolo gy, we decided to use a systematic mapping study covering the last fou rteen years (2000 - 2014. As far as we know, such studies have not yet been done; however, the cost incurred from errors in the requir ements elicitation phase is one of the problems that is most co mmonly reported by the practitioners. Our study includes data on the p rocesses of building the controlled vocabulary and assesses the productivity and quality. We are also interes ted in tools and techniques to classify and retrieve information. Our first findings suggest t hat this is an under-research area.

  6. Nondestructive damage detection and evaluation technique for seismically damaged structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yukio; Unjoh, Shigeki; Kondoh, Masuo; Ohsumi, Michio

    1999-02-01

    The development of quantitative damage detection and evaluation technique, and damage detection technique for invisible damages of structures are required according to the lessons from the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In this study, two quantitative damage sensing techniques for highway bridge structures are proposed. One method is to measure the change of vibration characteristics of the bridge structure. According to the damage detection test for damaged bridge column by shaking table test, this method can successfully detect the vibration characteristic change caused by damage progress due to increment excitations. The other method is to use self-diagnosis intelligent materials. According to the reinforced concrete beam specimen test, the second method can detect the damage by rupture of intelligent sensors, such as optical fiber or carbon fiber reinforced plastic rod.

  7. Computer-aided design of control systems to meet many requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schy, A. A.; Adams, W. M., Jr.; Johnson, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for using nonlinear programing in the computer-aided design of airplane control systems. It is assumed that the quality of such systems depends on many criteria. These criteria are included in the constraints vector (instead of attempting to combine them into a single scalar criterion, as is usually done), and the design proceeds through a sequence of nonlinear programing solutions in which the designer varies the specification of sets of requirements levels. The method is applied to design of a lateral stability augmentation system (SAS) for a fighter airplane, in which the requirements vector is chosen from the official handling qualities specifications. Results are shown for several simple SAS configurations designed to obtain desirable handling qualities over all design flight conditions with minimum feedback gains. The choice of the final design for each case is not unique but depends on the designer's decision as to which achievable set of requirements levels represents the best for that system. Results indicate that it may be possible to design constant parameter SAS which can satisfy the most stringent handling qualities requirements for fighter airplanes in all flight conditions. The role of the designer as a decision maker, interacting with the computer program, is discussed. Advantages of this type of designer-computer interaction are emphasized. Desirable extensions of the method are indicated.

  8. BRCA1-associated exclusion of 53BP1 from DNA damage sites underlies temporal control of DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. Ross; Sossick, Alex J.; Boulton, Simon J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Following irradiation, numerous DNA-damage-responsive proteins rapidly redistribute into microscopically visible subnuclear aggregates, termed ionising-radiation-induced foci (IRIF). How the enrichment of proteins on damaged chromatin actually relates to DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we use super-resolution microscopy to examine the spatial distribution of BRCA1 and 53BP1 proteins within single IRIF at subdiffraction-limit resolution, yielding an unprecedented increase in detail that was not previously apparent by conventional microscopy. Consistent with a role for 53BP1 in promoting DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining, 53BP1 enrichment in IRIF is most prominent in the G0/G1 cell cycle phases, where it is enriched in dense globular structures. By contrast, as cells transition through S phase, the recruitment of BRCA1 into the core of IRIF is associated with an exclusion of 53BP1 to the focal periphery, leading to an overall reduction of 53BP1 occupancy at DNA damage sites. Our data suggest that the BRCA1-associated IRIF core corresponds to chromatin regions associated with repair by homologous recombination, and the enrichment of BRCA1 in IRIF represents a temporal switch in the DNA repair program. We propose that BRCA1 antagonises 53BP1-dependent DNA repair in S phase by inhibiting its interaction with chromatin proximal to damage sites. Furthermore, the genomic instability exhibited by BRCA1-deficient cells might result from a failure to efficiently exclude 53BP1 from such regions during S phase. PMID:22553214

  9. Identifying design parameters controlling damage behaviors of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites using micromechanics as a virtual testing tool

    KAUST Repository

    Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah; Lubineau, Gilles; Yudhanto, Arief; Yaldiz, Recep; Schijve, Warden

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a micromechanical approach to predict damage mechanisms and their interactions in glass fibers/polypropylene thermoplastic composites. First, a representative volume element (RVE) of such materials was rigorously determined using a geometrical two-point probability function and the eigenvalue stabilization of homogenized elastic tensor obtained by Hill-Mandel kinematic homogenization. Next, the 3D finite element models of the RVE were developed accordingly. The fibers were modeled with an isotropic linear elastic material. The matrix was modeled with an isotropic linear elastic, rate-independent hyperbolic Drucker-Prager plasticity coupled with a ductile damage model that is able to show pressure dependency of the yield and damage behavior often found in a thermoplastic material. In addition, cohesive elements were inserted into the fiber-matrix interfaces to simulate debonding. The RVE faces are imposed with periodical boundary conditions to minimize the edge effect. The RVE was then subjected to transverse tensile loading in accordance with experimental tensile tests on [90]8 laminates. The model prediction was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental results in terms of the global stress-strain curves, including the linear and nonlinear portion of the response and also the failure point, making it a useful virtual testing tool for composite material design. Furthermore, the effect of tailoring the main parameters of thermoplastic composites is investigated to provide guidelines for future improvements of these materials.

  10. Identifying design parameters controlling damage behaviors of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites using micromechanics as a virtual testing tool

    KAUST Repository

    Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah

    2017-03-31

    In this paper, we propose a micromechanical approach to predict damage mechanisms and their interactions in glass fibers/polypropylene thermoplastic composites. First, a representative volume element (RVE) of such materials was rigorously determined using a geometrical two-point probability function and the eigenvalue stabilization of homogenized elastic tensor obtained by Hill-Mandel kinematic homogenization. Next, the 3D finite element models of the RVE were developed accordingly. The fibers were modeled with an isotropic linear elastic material. The matrix was modeled with an isotropic linear elastic, rate-independent hyperbolic Drucker-Prager plasticity coupled with a ductile damage model that is able to show pressure dependency of the yield and damage behavior often found in a thermoplastic material. In addition, cohesive elements were inserted into the fiber-matrix interfaces to simulate debonding. The RVE faces are imposed with periodical boundary conditions to minimize the edge effect. The RVE was then subjected to transverse tensile loading in accordance with experimental tensile tests on [90]8 laminates. The model prediction was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental results in terms of the global stress-strain curves, including the linear and nonlinear portion of the response and also the failure point, making it a useful virtual testing tool for composite material design. Furthermore, the effect of tailoring the main parameters of thermoplastic composites is investigated to provide guidelines for future improvements of these materials.

  11. Feedback-regulated poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP-1 is required for rapid response to DNA damage in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortusewicz, Oliver; Amé, Jean-Christophe; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    Genome integrity is constantly threatened by DNA lesions arising from numerous exogenous and endogenous sources. Survival depends on immediate recognition of these lesions and rapid recruitment of repair factors. Using laser microirradiation and live cell microscopy we found that the DNA-damage dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) PARP-1 and PARP-2 are recruited to DNA damage sites, however, with different kinetics and roles. With specific PARP inhibitors and mutations, we could show that the initial recruitment of PARP-1 is mediated by the DNA-binding domain. PARP-1 activation and localized poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis then generates binding sites for a second wave of PARP-1 recruitment and for the rapid accumulation of the loading platform XRCC1 at repair sites. Further PARP-1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation eventually initiates the release of PARP-1. We conclude that feedback regulated recruitment of PARP-1 and concomitant local poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation at DNA lesions amplifies a signal for rapid recruitment of repair factors enabling efficient restoration of genome integrity. PMID:17982172

  12. No effect of short-term amino acid supplementation on variables related to skeletal muscle damage in 100 km ultra-runners - a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemann Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term supplementation of amino acids before and during a 100 km ultra-marathon on variables of skeletal muscle damage and muscle soreness. We hypothesized that the supplementation of amino acids before and during an ultra-marathon would lead to a reduction in the variables of skeletal muscle damage, a decrease in muscle soreness and an improved performance. Methods Twenty-eight experienced male ultra-runners were divided into two groups, one with amino acid supplementation and the other as a control group. The amino acid group was supplemented a total of 52.5 g of an amino acid concentrate before and during the 100 km ultra-marathon. Pre- and post-race, creatine kinase, urea and myoglobin were determined. At the same time, the athletes were asked for subjective feelings of muscle soreness. Results Race time was not different between the groups when controlled for personal best time in a 100 km ultra-marathon. The increases in creatine kinase, urea and myoglobin were not different in both groups. Subjective feelings of skeletal muscle soreness were not different between the groups. Conclusions We concluded that short-term supplementation of amino acids before and during a 100 km ultra-marathon had no effect on variables of skeletal muscle damage and muscle soreness.

  13. Distributed Control and Management of Renewable Electric Energy Resources for Future Grid Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokhtari, Ghassem; Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad; Nourbakhsh, Ghavameddin

    2016-01-01

    strategy is a promising approach to manage and utilise the resources in future distribution networks to effectively deal with grid electric quality issues and requirements. Jointly, utility and customers the owners of the resources in the network are considered as part of a practical coordination strategy......It is anticipated that both medium- and low-voltage distribution networks will include high level of distributed renewable energy resources, in the future. The high penetration of these resources inevitably can introduce various power quality issues, including; overvoltage and overloading....... This book chapter provides the current research state of the art concepts and techniques in dealing with these potential issues. The methods provided in this chapter are based on distributed control approach, tailored and suitable particularly for the future distribution composition. The distributed control...

  14. Diagnostics and required R and D for control of DEMO grade plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyeon K., E-mail: hyeonpark@unist.ac.kr [Fusion Plasma Stability and Confinement Research Center, UNIST, 50 Unist-gil, Ulju-gun, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-21

    Even if the diagnostics of ITER performs as expected, installation and operation of the diagnostic systems in Demo device will be much harsher than those of the present ITER device. In order to operate the Demo grade plasmas, which may have a higher beta limit, safely with very limited number of simple diagnostic system, it requires a well defined predictable plasma modelling in conjunction with the reliable control system for burn control and potential harmful instabilities. Development of such modelling in ITER is too risky and the logical choice would be utilization of the present day steady state capable devices such as KSTAR and EAST. In order to fulfill this mission, sophisticated diagnostic systems such as 2D/3D imaging systems can validate the physics in the theoretical modeling and challenge the predictable capability.

  15. Optimizing clinical trial supply requirements: simulation of computer-controlled supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Magnus; Byrom, Bill; Dowlman, Nikki; McEntegart, Damian

    2004-01-01

    Computer-controlled systems are commonly used in clinical trials to control dispensing and manage site inventories of trial supplies. Typically such systems are used with an interactive telephone or web system that provide an interface with the study site. Realizing the maximum savings in medication associated with this approach has, in the past, been problematic as it has been difficult to fully estimate medication requirements due to the complexities of these algorithms and the inherent variation in the clinical trial recruitment process. We describe the traditional and automated methods of supplying sites. We detail a simulation approach that models the automated system. We design a number of simulation experiments using this model to investigate the supply strategy properties that influence medication overage and other strategy performance metrics. The computer-controlled medication system gave superior performance to the traditional method. In one example, a 75% overage of wasted medication in the traditional system was associated with higher supply failure than an automated system strategy with an overage of 47%. In a further example, we demonstrate that the impact of using a country stratified as opposed to site stratified scheme affects the number of deliveries and probability of supply failures more than the amount of drug wasted with respective increases of 20, 2300 and 4%. Medication savings with automated systems are particularly significant in repeat dispensing designs. We show that the number of packs required can fall by as much as 50% if one uses a predictive medication algorithm. We conclude that a computer-controlled supply chain enables medication savings to be realized and that it is possible to quantify the distribution of these savings using a simulation model. The simulation model can be used to optimize the prestudy medication supply strategy and for midstudy monitoring using real-time data contained in the study database.

  16. Xenon Reduces Neuronal Hippocampal Damage and Alters the Pattern of Microglial Activation after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Randomized Controlled Animal Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Veldeman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe neuroprotective properties of the noble gas xenon have already been demonstrated using a variety of injury models. Here, we examine for the first time xenon’s possible effect in attenuating early brain injury (EBI and its influence on posthemorrhagic microglial neuroinflammation in an in vivo rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH.MethodsSprague-Dawley rats (n = 22 were randomly assigned to receive either Sham surgery (n = 9; divided into two groups or SAH induction via endovascular perforation (n = 13, divided into two groups. Of those randomized for SAH, 7 animals were postoperatively ventilated with 50 vol% oxygen/50 vol% xenon for 1 h and 6 received 50 vol% oxygen/50 vol% nitrogen (control. The animals were sacrificed 24 h after SAH. Of each animal, a cerebral coronal section (−3.60 mm from bregma was selected for assessment of histological damage 24 h after SAH. A 5-point neurohistopathological severity score was applied to assess neuronal cell damage in H&E and NeuN stained sections in a total of four predefined anatomical regions of interest. Microglial activation was evaluated by a software-assisted cell count of Iba-1 stained slices in three cortical regions of interest.ResultsA diffuse cellular damage was apparent in all regions of the ipsilateral hippocampus 24 h after SAH. Xenon-treated animals presented with a milder damage after SAH. This effect was found to be particularly pronounced in the medial regions of the hippocampus, CA3 (p = 0.040, and dentate gyrus (DG p = 0.040. However, for the CA1 and CA2 regions, there were no statistical differences in neuronal damage according to our histological scoring. A cell count of activated microglia was lower in the cortex of xenon-treated animals. This difference was especially apparent in the left piriform cortex (p = 0.017.ConclusionIn animals treated with 50 vol% xenon (for 1 h after SAH, a less pronounced neuronal damage was

  17. A translocated effector required for Bartonella dissemination from derma to blood safeguards migratory host cells from damage by co-translocated effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okujava, Rusudan; Guye, Patrick; Lu, Yun-Yueh; Mistl, Claudia; Polus, Florine; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Halin, Cornelia; Rolink, Antonius G; Dehio, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens secrete multiple effectors to modulate host cellular functions. These effectors may interfere with each other to efficiently control the infection process. Bartonellae are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria using a VirB type IV secretion system to translocate a cocktail of Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) into host cells. Based on in vitro infection models we demonstrate here that BepE protects infected migratory cells from injurious effects triggered by BepC and is required for in vivo dissemination of bacteria from the dermal site of inoculation to blood. Human endothelial cells (HUVECs) infected with a ΔbepE mutant of B. henselae (Bhe) displayed a cell fragmentation phenotype resulting from Bep-dependent disturbance of rear edge detachment during migration. A ΔbepCE mutant did not show cell fragmentation, indicating that BepC is critical for triggering this deleterious phenotype. Complementation of ΔbepE with BepEBhe or its homologues from other Bartonella species abolished cell fragmentation. This cyto-protective activity is confined to the C-terminal Bartonella intracellular delivery (BID) domain of BepEBhe (BID2.EBhe). Ectopic expression of BID2.EBhe impeded the disruption of actin stress fibers by Rho Inhibitor 1, indicating that BepE restores normal cell migration via the RhoA signaling pathway, a major regulator of rear edge retraction. An intradermal (i.d.) model for B. tribocorum (Btr) infection in the rat reservoir host mimicking the natural route of infection by blood sucking arthropods allowed demonstrating a vital role for BepE in bacterial dissemination from derma to blood. While the Btr mutant ΔbepDE was abacteremic following i.d. inoculation, complementation with BepEBtr, BepEBhe or BIDs.EBhe restored bacteremia. Given that we observed a similar protective effect of BepEBhe on infected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells migrating through a monolayer of lymphatic endothelial cells we propose that

  18. A translocated effector required for Bartonella dissemination from derma to blood safeguards migratory host cells from damage by co-translocated effectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusudan Okujava

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous bacterial pathogens secrete multiple effectors to modulate host cellular functions. These effectors may interfere with each other to efficiently control the infection process. Bartonellae are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria using a VirB type IV secretion system to translocate a cocktail of Bartonella effector proteins (Beps into host cells. Based on in vitro infection models we demonstrate here that BepE protects infected migratory cells from injurious effects triggered by BepC and is required for in vivo dissemination of bacteria from the dermal site of inoculation to blood. Human endothelial cells (HUVECs infected with a ΔbepE mutant of B. henselae (Bhe displayed a cell fragmentation phenotype resulting from Bep-dependent disturbance of rear edge detachment during migration. A ΔbepCE mutant did not show cell fragmentation, indicating that BepC is critical for triggering this deleterious phenotype. Complementation of ΔbepE with BepEBhe or its homologues from other Bartonella species abolished cell fragmentation. This cyto-protective activity is confined to the C-terminal Bartonella intracellular delivery (BID domain of BepEBhe (BID2.EBhe. Ectopic expression of BID2.EBhe impeded the disruption of actin stress fibers by Rho Inhibitor 1, indicating that BepE restores normal cell migration via the RhoA signaling pathway, a major regulator of rear edge retraction. An intradermal (i.d. model for B. tribocorum (Btr infection in the rat reservoir host mimicking the natural route of infection by blood sucking arthropods allowed demonstrating a vital role for BepE in bacterial dissemination from derma to blood. While the Btr mutant ΔbepDE was abacteremic following i.d. inoculation, complementation with BepEBtr, BepEBhe or BIDs.EBhe restored bacteremia. Given that we observed a similar protective effect of BepEBhe on infected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells migrating through a monolayer of lymphatic endothelial cells we

  19. 21 CFR 111.60 - What are the design requirements for the production and process control system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to Establish a Production and Process Control System § 111.60 What are the design requirements for... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the design requirements for the production and process control system? 111.60 Section 111.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...

  20. Gap analysis of Mycoplasma bovis disease, diagnosis and control: An aid to identify future development requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, M J; Lysnyansky, I; Sachse, K; Fox, L K; Nicholas, R A J; Ayling, R D

    2018-05-01

    There is a worldwide problem of disease caused by Mycoplasma (M.) bovis in cattle; it has a significant detrimental economic and animal welfare impact on cattle rearing. Infection can manifest as a plethora of clinical signs including mastitis, pneumonia, arthritis, keratoconjunctivitis, otitis media and genital disorders that may result in infertility and abortion. Current diagnosis and control information are reviewed and analysed to identify gaps in knowledge of the causative organism in respect of the disease pathology, diagnosis and control methods. The main considerations are as follows: no vaccines are commercially available; antimicrobial resistance is increasing; diagnostic and antimicrobial sensitivity testing needs to be improved; and a pen-side test would facilitate more rapid diagnosis and implementation of treatment with antimicrobials. More data on host susceptibility, stress factors, immune response and infectious dose levels are required. The impact of asymptomatic carriers, M. bovis survival in the environment and the role of wildlife in transmitting the disease also needs investigation. To facilitate development of vaccines, further analysis of more M. bovis genomes, its pathogenic mechanisms, including variable surface proteins, is required, along with reproducible disease models. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Evaluating Capability of Devils Lake Emergency Outlets in Lowering Lake Water Levels While Controlling flooding Damage to Downstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, A.; Zhang, X.

    2017-12-01

    a wicked problem solving Devils Lake flooding leads to extra discharge and water quality degradation in the Sheyenne River. Solving this problem requires trade of between Devils Lake flood control and the Sheyenne River water quality preservation.

  2. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  3. Simulation Modeling Requirements for Loss-of-Control Accident Prevention of Turboprop Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crider, Dennis; Foster, John V.

    2012-01-01

    . This paper addresses simulation modeling requirements that are unique to turboprop transport aircraft and highlights the growing need for aerodynamic models suitable for stall training for these configurations. A review of prominent accidents that involved aerodynamic stall is used to illustrate various modeling features unique to turboprop configurations and the impact of stall behavior on susceptibility to loss of control that has led to new training requirements. This is followed by an overview of stability and control behavior of straight-wing turboprops, the related aerodynamic characteristics, and a summary of recent experimental studies on icing effects. In addition, differences in flight dynamics behavior between swept-wing jets and straight-wing turboprop configurations are discussed to compare and contrast modeling requirements. Specific recommendations for aerodynamic models along with further research needs and data measurements are also provided. 1

  4. C/EBPα regulates CRL4Cdt2-mediated degradation of p21 in response to UVB-induced DNA damage to control the G1/S checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jonathan R; Bereman, Michael S; Nepomuceno, Angelito I; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Muddiman, David C; Smart, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    The bZIP transcription factor, C/EBPα is highly inducible by UVB and other DNA damaging agents in keratinocytes. C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes fail to undergo cell cycle arrest in G1 in response to UVB-induced DNA damage and mice lacking epidermal C/EBPα are highly susceptible to UVB-induced skin cancer. The mechanism through which C/EBPα regulates the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage is unknown. Here we report untreated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes have normal levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21, however, UVB-treated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes fail to up-regulate nuclear p21 protein levels despite normal up-regulation of Cdkn1a mRNA levels. UVB-treated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes displayed a 4-fold decrease in nuclear p21 protein half-life due to the increased proteasomal degradation of p21 via the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2. Cdt2 is the substrate recognition subunit of CRL4Cdt2 and Cdt2 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in UVB-treated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes. Knockdown of Cdt2 restored p21 protein levels in UVB-treated C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes. Lastly, the failure to accumulate p21 in response to UVB in C/EBPα-deficient keratinocytes resulted in decreased p21 interactions with critical cell cycle regulatory proteins, increased CDK2 activity, and inappropriate entry into S-phase. These findings reveal C/EBPα regulates G1/S cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage via the control of CRL4Cdt2 mediated degradation of p21. PMID:25483090

  5. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased.

  6. Major upgrade of the articulated inspection arm control system to fulfill daily operation requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, P., E-mail: patrick.pastor@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion par confinement Magnétique (France); Villedieu, E.; Allegretti, L.; Vincent, B.; Barbuti, A.; Bruno, V.; Coquillat, P.; Dechelle, C.; Gargiulo, L.; Le, R.; Malard, P.; Martinez, A.; Nouailletas, R. [CEA, IRFM, Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion par confinement Magnétique (France); Yuntao, Song; Yong, Cheng; Chen, Liu; Hansheng, Feng; Shanshuang, Shi [ASIPP, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We propose an overview of the work which has been done to upgrade the control system of the AIA robot (articulated inspection arm) to fulfill daily operation requirements for tokamak inspection. • The control system is based on the use of new position sensors, new electronics design and new supervisor software. • Final tests are ongoing in the EAST scale 1 tokamak mock-up. Routine operation of the robot at EAST will start in the beginning of 2015. - Abstract: An articulated inspection arm (AIA) has been developed by CEA for visual inspection between pulses inside the Tore Supra tokamak vacuum vessel without breaking temperature and vacuum conditions. The eight meters length robot is composed of a shuttle and six articulated segments with a video camera at its end. A demonstration prototype has been achieved in 2008 at Tore Supra (Gargiulo, 2007; Houry, 2008; Perrot, 2003). A project to upgrade the AIA into a fully operational robot has been undertaken by IRFM and ASIPP in an Associated Laboratory. It will be in operation first in the EAST machine and afterwards in Tore Supra in its WEST (W/Tungsten Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) configuration where it is of paramount importance to survey possible degradation of W component surface. The control system of the robot has been extensively upgraded. The effort has been focused on three areas: (1) improvement of the arm position accuracy, (2) increase of the operational robustness, (3) use of a powerful graphical user interface including simulation of trajectories and robot deployment capabilities in a 3D viewer environment. The aim of this paper is to detail the architecture of the AIA control system.

  7. Responses of genes involved in cell cycle control to diverse DNA damaging chemicals in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooderham Nigel J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many anticancer agents and carcinogens are DNA damaging chemicals and exposure to such chemicals results in the deregulation of cell cycle progression. The molecular mechanisms of DNA damage-induced cell cycle alteration are not well understood. We have studied the effects of etoposide (an anticancer agent, cryptolepine (CLP, a cytotoxic alkaloid, benzo [a]pyrene (BaP, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, a cooked-meat derived carcinogen on the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes to understand the molecular mechanisms of the cell cycle disturbance. Results A549 cells were treated with DMSO or chemicals for up to 72 h and periodically sampled for cell cycle analysis, mRNA and protein expression. DMSO treated cells showed a dominant G1 peak in cell cycle at all times examined. Etoposide and CLP both induced G2/M phase arrest yet the former altered the expression of genes functioning at multiple phases, whilst the latter was more effective in inhibiting the expression of genes in G2-M transition. Both etoposide and CLP induced an accumulation of p53 protein and upregulation of p53 transcriptional target genes. Neither BaP nor PhIP had substantial phase-specific cell cycle effect, however, they induced distinctive changes in gene expression. BaP upregulated the expression of CYP1B1 at 6–24 h and downregulated many cell cycle regulatory genes at 48–72 h. By contrast, PhIP increased the expression of many cell cycle regulatory genes. Changes in the expression of key mRNAs were confirmed at protein level. Conclusion Our experiments show that DNA damaging agents with different mechanisms of action induced distinctive changes in the expression pattern of a panel of cell cycle regulatory genes. We suggest that examining the genomic response to chemical exposure provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism involved in cellular

  8. 21 CFR 111.55 - What are the requirements to implement a production and process control system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... production and process control system? 111.55 Section 111.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... to Establish a Production and Process Control System § 111.55 What are the requirements to implement a production and process control system? You must implement a system of production and process...

  9. Tort Damages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. Visscher (Louis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In this Chapter, I provide an overview of Law and Economics literature regarding tort damages. Where necessary, attention is also spent to rules of tort liability. Both types of rules provide behavioral incentives to both injurers and victims, with respect to their level of

  10. New Requirements of the Voltage/VAR Function for Smart Inverter in Distributed Generation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Su Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available International Electronical Committee (IEC 61850-90-7 is a part of the IEC 61850 series which specifies the advanced functions and object models for power converter based Distributed Energy Resources (DERs. One of its functions, the Voltage/VAR (V/V control function, is used to enhance the stability and the reliability of the voltage in the distribution system. The conventional V/V function acts mainly for flattening the voltage profile as for a basic grid support function. Currently, other objectives such as the minimization of line loss and the operational costs reduction are coming into the spotlight. In order to attain these objectives, the V/V function and hence the DER units shall actively respond to the change of distribution system conditions. In this paper, the modification of V/V function and new requirements are proposed. To derive new requirements of V/V function, loss minimization is applied to a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm where the condition of voltage constraint is considered not to deteriorate the voltage stability of the distribution system.

  11. Quality control of brachytherapy equipment in the Netherlands and Belgium: current practice and minimum requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfrink, Robert J.M.; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Kleffens, Herman J. van; Rijnders, Alex; Schaeken, Bob; Aalbers, Tony H.L.; Dries, Wim J.F.; Venselaar, Jack L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is applied in 39 radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and Belgium. Each institution has its own quality control (QC) programme to ensure safe and accurate dose delivery to the patient. The main goal of this work is to gain insight into the current practice of QC of brachytherapy in The Netherlands and Belgium and to reduce possible variations in test frequencies and tolerances by formulating a set of minimum QC-requirements. Materials and methods: An extensive questionnaire about QC of brachytherapy was distributed to and completed by the 39 radiotherapy institutions. A separate smaller questionnaire was sent to nine institutions performing intracoronary brachytherapy. The questions were related to safety systems, physical irradiation parameters and total time spent on QC. The results of the questionnaires were compared with recommendations given in international brachytherapy QC reports. Results: The answers to the questionnaires showed large variations in test frequencies and test methods. Furthermore, large variations in time spent on QC exist, which is mainly due to differences in QC-philosophy and differences in the available resources. Conclusions: Based on the results of the questionnaires and the comparison with the international recommendations, a set of minimum requirements for QC of brachytherapy has been formulated. These guidelines will be implemented in the radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and Belgium

  12. Modelling of radon control and air cleaning requirements in underground uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Fawal, M.; Gadalla, A.

    2014-01-01

    As a part of a comprehensive study concerned with control workplace short-lived radon daughter concentration in underground uranium mines to safe levels, a computer program has been developed and verified, to calculate ventilation parameters e.g. local pressures, flow rates and radon daughter concentration levels. The computer program is composed of two parts, one part for mine ventilation and the other part for radon daughter levels calculations. This program has been validated in an actual case study to calculate radon concentration levels, pressure and flow rates required to maintain acceptable levels of radon concentrations in each point of the mine. The required fan static pressure and the approximate energy consumption were also estimated. The results of the calculations have been evaluated and compared with similar investigation. It was found that the calculated values are in good agreement with the corresponding values obtained using ''REDES'' standard ventilation modelling software. The developed computer model can be used as an available tool to help in the evaluation of ventilation systems proposed by mining authority, to assist the uranium mining industry in maintaining the health and safety of the workers underground while efficiently achieving economic production targets. It could be used also for regulatory inspection and radiation protection assessments of workers in the underground mining. Also with using this model, one can effectively design, assess and manage underground mine ventilation systems. Values of radon decay products concentration in units of working level, pressures drop and flow rates required to reach the acceptable radon concentration relative to the recommended levels, at different extraction points in the mine and fan static pressure could be estimated which are not available using other software. (author)

  13. Space shuttle orbiter guidance, naviagation and control software functional requirements: Horizontal flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The shuttle GN&C software functions for horizontal flight operations are defined. Software functional requirements are grouped into two categories: first horizontal flight requirements and full mission horizontal flight requirements. The document privides the intial step in the shuttle GN&C software design process. It also serves as a management tool to identify analyses which are required to define requirements.

  14. Testing to fulfill HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points) requirements: principles and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, I A

    1997-12-01

    On-farm HACCP (hazard analysis critical control points) monitoring requires cost-effective, yet accurate and reproducible tests that can determine the status of cows, milk, and the dairy environment. Tests need to be field-validated, and their limitations need to be established so that appropriate screening strategies can be initiated and test results can be rationally interpreted. For infections and residues of low prevalence, tests or testing strategies that are highly specific help to minimize false-positive results and excessive costs to the dairy industry. The determination of the numbers of samples to be tested in HACCP monitoring programs depends on the specific purpose of the test and the likely prevalence of the agent or residue at the critical control point. The absence of positive samples from a herd test should not be interpreted as freedom from a particular agent or residue unless the entire herd has been tested with a test that is 100% sensitive. The current lack of field-validated tests for most of the chemical and infectious agents of concern makes it difficult to ensure that the stated goals of HACCP programs are consistently achieved.

  15. Export Control Requirements for Tritium Processing Design and R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, William Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maynard, Sarah-Jane Wadsworth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-05

    This document will address requirements of export control associated with tritium plant design and processes. Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working in the area of tritium plant system design and research and development (R&D) since the early 1970’s at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). This work has continued to the current date with projects associated with the ITER project and other Office of Science Fusion Energy Science (OS-FES) funded programs. ITER is currently the highest funding area for the DOE OS-FES. Although export control issues have been integrated into these projects in the past a general guidance document has not been available for reference in this area. To address concerns with currently funded tritium plant programs and assist future projects for FES, this document will identify the key reference documents and specific sections within related to tritium research. Guidance as to the application of these sections will be discussed with specific detail to publications and work with foreign nationals.

  16. Export Control Requirements for Tritium Processing Design and R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, William Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maynard, Sarah-Jane Wadsworth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-30

    This document will address requirements of export control associated with tritium plant design and processes. Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working in the area of tritium plant system design and research and development (R&D) since the early 1970’s at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). This work has continued to the current date with projects associated with the ITER project and other Office of Science Fusion Energy Science (OS-FES) funded programs. ITER is currently the highest funding area for the DOE OS-FES. Although export control issues have been integrated into these projects in the past a general guidance document has not been available for reference in this area. To address concerns with currently funded tritium plant programs and assist future projects for FES, this document will identify the key reference documents and specific sections within related to tritium research. Guidance as to the application of these sections will be discussed with specific detail to publications and work with foreign nationals.

  17. An overview of plant volatile metabolomics, sample treatment and reporting considerations with emphasis on mechanical damage and biological control of weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, John J; Smith, Lincoln; Baig, Nausheena

    2014-01-01

    The technology for the collection and analysis of plant-emitted volatiles for understanding chemical cues of plant-plant, plant-insect or plant-microbe interactions has increased over the years. Consequently, the in situ collection, analysis and identification of volatiles are considered integral to elucidation of complex plant communications. Due to the complexity and range of emissions the conditions for consistent emission of volatiles are difficult to standardise. To discuss: evaluation of emitted volatile metabolites as a means of screening potential target- and non-target weeds/plants for insect biological control agents; plant volatile metabolomics to analyse resultant data; importance of considering volatiles from damaged plants; and use of a database for reporting experimental conditions and results. Recent literature relating to plant volatiles and plant volatile metabolomics are summarised to provide a basic understanding of how metabolomics can be applied to the study of plant volatiles. An overview of plant secondary metabolites, plant volatile metabolomics, analysis of plant volatile metabolomics data and the subsequent input into a database, the roles of plant volatiles, volatile emission as a function of treatment, and the application of plant volatile metabolomics to biological control of invasive weeds. It is recommended that in addition to a non-damaged treatment, plants be damaged prior to collecting volatiles to provide the greatest diversity of odours. For the model system provided, optimal volatile emission occurred when the leaf was punctured with a needle. Results stored in a database should include basic environmental conditions or treatments. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Control of slug damage to oilseed rape and wheat with imidacloprid seed dressings in laboratory and field experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simms, L.C.; Ester, A.; Wilson, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Slugs are common pests of oilseed and cereal crops in Europe and are currently controlled using bait pellets that often fail to give adequate protection: Here we investigate the potential of the broad-spectrum insecticide imidacloprid, previously suggested to have activity against slugs, to control

  19. Energy Monitoring and Control Systems Operator Training - Recommended Qualifications, Staffing, Job Description, and Training Requirements for EMCS Operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    start/stop chiller optimization , and demand limiting were added. The system monitors a 7,000 ton chiller plant and controls 74 air handlers. The EMCS does...Modify analog limits. g. Adjust setpoints of selected controllers. h. Select manual or automatic control modes. i. Enable and disable individual points...or event schedules and controller setpoints ; make nonscheduled starts and stops of equipment or disable field panels when required for routine

  20. An analysis of Technical Security Control Requirements For Digital I and C Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jaegu; Lee, Jungwoon; Park, Geeyong; Kwon, Keechoon; Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Cheolkwon

    2013-01-01

    Instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants have been digitalized for the purpose of maintenance and precise operation. This digitalization, however, brings out issues related to cyber security. In the most recent past, international standard organizations, regulatory institutes, and research institutes have performed a number of studies addressing these systems cyber security. In order to provide information helpful to the system designers in their application of cyber security for the systems, this paper presents methods and considerations to define attack vectors in a target system, to review and select the requirements in the Regulatory Guide 5.71, and to integrate the results to identify applicable technical security control requirements. In this study, attack vectors are analyzed through the vulnerability analyses and penetration tests with a simplified safety system, and the elements of critical digital assets acting as attack vectors are identified. Among the security control requirements listed in Appendices B and C to Regulatory Guide 5.71, those that should be implemented into the systems are selected and classified in groups of technical security control requirements using the results of the attack vector analysis. For the attack vector elements of critical digital assets, all the technical security control requirements are evaluated to determine whether they are applicable and effective, and considerations in this evaluation are also discussed. The technical security control requirements in three important categories of access control, monitoring and logging, and encryption are derived and grouped according to the elements of attack vectors as results for the sample safety system

  1. An analysis of Technical Security Control Requirements For Digital I and C Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jaegu; Lee, Jungwoon; Park, Geeyong; Kwon, Keechoon; Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Cheolkwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants have been digitalized for the purpose of maintenance and precise operation. This digitalization, however, brings out issues related to cyber security. In the most recent past, international standard organizations, regulatory institutes, and research institutes have performed a number of studies addressing these systems cyber security. In order to provide information helpful to the system designers in their application of cyber security for the systems, this paper presents methods and considerations to define attack vectors in a target system, to review and select the requirements in the Regulatory Guide 5.71, and to integrate the results to identify applicable technical security control requirements. In this study, attack vectors are analyzed through the vulnerability analyses and penetration tests with a simplified safety system, and the elements of critical digital assets acting as attack vectors are identified. Among the security control requirements listed in Appendices B and C to Regulatory Guide 5.71, those that should be implemented into the systems are selected and classified in groups of technical security control requirements using the results of the attack vector analysis. For the attack vector elements of critical digital assets, all the technical security control requirements are evaluated to determine whether they are applicable and effective, and considerations in this evaluation are also discussed. The technical security control requirements in three important categories of access control, monitoring and logging, and encryption are derived and grouped according to the elements of attack vectors as results for the sample safety system.

  2. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Didier J; Hain, Karolina O; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies.

  3. Activated RecA protein may induce expression of a gene that is not controlled by the LexA repressor and whose function is required for mutagenesis and repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calsou, P.; Villaverde, A.; Defais, M.

    1987-01-01

    The activated form of the RecA protein (RecA) is known to be involved in the reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda and in the expression of the SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12. The expression of the SOS response requires cleavage of the LexA repressor by RecA and the subsequent expression of LexA-controlled genes. The evidence presented here suggests that RecA induces the expression of a gene(s) that is not under LexA control and that is also necessary for maximal repair and mutagenesis of damaged phage. This conclusion is based on the chloramphenicol sensitivity of RecA -dependent repair and mutagenesis of damaged bacteriophage lambda in lexA(Def) hosts

  4. Step 1: Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Command, Control, and Communications (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The document provides the Human System Integration(HSI) high-level functional C3 HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot. Description includes (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge C3 system status, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain C3 information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate C3 technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how C3 operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary C3 functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for C3 are partitioned into three categories: (1) Pilot-Air Traffic Control (ATC) Voice Communications (2) Pilot-ATC Data Communications, and (3) command and control of the unmanned aircraft (UA). Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  5. REBOA at Role 2 Afloat: resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta as a bridge to damage control surgery in the military maritime setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Paul; Waller, B; Buckley, A M; Doran, C; Bland, S; Scott, T; Matthews, J

    2018-05-01

    Role 2 Afloat provides a damage control resuscitation and surgery facility in support of maritime, littoral and aviation operations. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) offers a rapid, effective solution to exsanguinating haemorrhage from pelvic and non-compressible torso haemorrhage. It should be considered when the patient presents in a peri-arrest state, if surgery is likely to be delayed, or where the single operating table is occupied by another case. This paper will outline the data in support of endovascular haemorrhage control, describe the technique and explore how REBOA could be delivered using equipment currently available in the Royal Navy Role 2 Afloat equipment module. Also discussed are potential future directions in endovascular resuscitation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Effectiveness of two conventional methods for seismic retrofit of steel and RC moment resisting frames based on damage control criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti Aval, Seyed Bahram; Kouhestani, Hamed Sadegh; Mottaghi, Lida

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of two types of rehabilitation methods based on economic justification that can lead to logical decision making between the retrofitting schemes. Among various rehabilitation methods, concentric chevron bracing (CCB) and cylindrical friction damper (CFD) were selected. The performance assessment procedure of the frames is divided into two distinct phases. First, the limit state probabilities of the structures before and after rehabilitation are investigated. In the second phase, the seismic risk of structures in terms of life safety and financial losses (decision variables) using the recently published FEMA P58 methodology is evaluated. The results show that the proposed retrofitting methods improve the serviceability and life safety performance levels of steel and RC structures at different rates when subjected to earthquake loads. Moreover, these procedures reveal that financial losses are greatly decreased, and were more tangible by the application of CFD rather than using CCB. Although using both retrofitting methods reduced damage state probabilities, incorporation of a site-specific seismic hazard curve to evaluate mean annual occurrence frequency at the collapse prevention limit state caused unexpected results to be obtained. Contrary to CFD, the collapse probability of the structures retrofitted with CCB increased when compared with the primary structures.

  7. Controle de danos: uma opção tática no tratamento dos traumatizados com hemorragia grave Damage control: a tactical alternative for the management of exanguinating trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gustavo Parreira

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: O choque hemorrágico persistente cursa com alta mortalidade. Grande importância tem sido dada para o "controle de danos" como opção terapêutica nestes casos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a definição, indicações, técnicas e resultados do controle de danos no tratamento dos traumatizados com hemorragia grave. MÉTODO: Revisão bibliográfica. RESULTADOS: Como "controle de danos" entende-se a interrupção da operação antes que o choque hemorrágico alcance a sua fase irreversível, mesmo que as lesões encontradas não tenham o tratamento definitivo neste primeiro momento. Esta alternativa envolve três tempos: a operação abreviada, a recuperação na unidade de terapia intensiva e a reoperação programada. Desta forma, frente à acidose metabólica, hipotermia e coagulopatia, a operação é abreviada através do controle temporário da hemorragia e contaminação. São empregadas técnicas como o tamponamento hepático com compressas e ligadura de eventuais cotos intestinais. Na unidade de terapia intensiva são realizados o aquecimento do doente, restauração da volemia e débito cardíaco, e adequada oferta de oxigênio, além da reposição dos fatores de coagulação. Somente após a estabilização, o traumatizado é levado novamente ao centro cirúrgico para o tratamento definitivo das lesões. Trata-se de uma tática com bons resultados, mas que deve ser restrita a centros especializados, com supervisão cirúrgica contínua e recursos disponíveis para o tratamento de doentes graves. CONCLUSÃO: O controle de danos é opção prática nos casos de hemorragia grave, contudo deve ser empregado com julgamento crítico devido a complicações que podem decorrer da sua indicação.BACKGROUND: Despite the advances in the treatment of exanguinating patients, hemorrhage remains as the leading cause of early deaths. A great deal of attention has been given to "damage control" as a therapeutic alternative in this scenario. AIM: To

  8. 21 CFR 111.525 - What requirements apply to a returned dietary supplement that quality control personnel approve...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to a returned dietary supplement that quality control personnel approve for reprocessing? 111.525 Section 111.525 Food and Drugs... FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Returned Dietary Supplements § 111.525 What requirements apply to a returned...

  9. 12 CFR 208.71 - What are the requirements to invest in or control a financial subsidiary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements to invest in or control a financial subsidiary? 208.71 Section 208.71 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF... SYSTEM (REGULATION H) Financial Subsidiaries of State Member Banks § 208.71 What are the requirements to...

  10. Flight path control strategies and preliminary deltaV requirements for the 2007 Mars Phoenix (PHX) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raofi, Behzad

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to estimate the statistical deltaV requirements for the propulsive maneuvers that will deliver the spacecraft to its target landing site while satisfying planetary protection requirements. the paper presents flight path control analysis results for three different trajectories, open, middle, and close of launch period for the mission.

  11. Coal transportation road damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtraw, D.; Harrison, K.; Pawlowski, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy trucks are primarily responsible for pavement damage to the nation's highways. In this paper we evaluate the pavement damage caused by coal trucks. We analyze the chief source of pavement damage (vehicle weight per axle, not total vehicle weight) and the chief cost involved (the periodic overlay that is required when a road's surface becomes worn). This analysis is presented in two stages. In the first section we present a synopsis of current economic theory including simple versions of the formulas that can be: used to calculate costs of pavement wear. In the second section we apply this theory to a specific example proximate to the reference environment for the Fuel Cycle Study in New Mexico in order to provide a numerical measure of the magnitude of the costs

  12. Damage scenarios and an onboard support system for damaged ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a safety assessment of damaged ships, which considers environmental conditions such as waves and wind, is important in both the design and operation phases of ships, in Korea, rules or guidelines to conduct such assessments are not yet developed. However, NATO and European maritime societies have developed guidelines for a safety assessment. Therefore, it is required to develop rules or guidelines for safety assessments such as the Naval Ship Code (NSC of NATO. Before the safety assessment of a damaged ship can be performed, the available damage scenarios must be developed and the safety assessment criteria must be established. In this paper, the parameters related to damage by accidents are identified and categorized when developing damage scenarios. The need for damage safety assessment criteria is discussed, and an example is presented. In addition, a concept and specifications for the DB-based supporting system, which is used in the operation phases, are proposed.

  13. Increased urine semaphorin-3A is associated with renal damage in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viazzi, Francesca; Ramesh, Ganesan; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Leoncini, Giovanna; Garneri, Debora; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Semaphorins are guidance proteins implicated in several processes such as angiogenesis, organogenesis, cell migration, and cytokine release. Experimental studies showed that semaphorin-3a (SEMA3A) administration induces transient massive proteinuria, podocyte foot process effacement and endothelial cell damage in healthy animals. While SEMA3A signaling has been demonstrated to be mechanistically involved in experimental diabetic glomerulopathy and in acute kidney injury, to date its role in human chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been investigated. To test the hypothesis that SEMA3A may play a role in human CKD, we performed a cross-sectional, nested, case-control study on 151 matched hypertensive patients with and without CKD. SEMA3A was quantified in the urine (USEMA) by ELISA. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR) by the CKD-EPI formula and albuminuria was measured as albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). USEMA levels were positively correlated with urine ACR (p = 0.001) and serum creatinine (p < 0.001). USEMA was higher in patients with both components of renal damage as compared to those with only one and those with normal renal function (p < 0.007 and <0.001, respectively). The presence of increased USEMA levels (i.e. top quartile) entailed a fourfold higher risk of combined renal damage (p < 0.001) and an almost twofold higher risk of macroalbuminuria (p = 0.005) or of reduced eGFR, even adjusting for confounding factors (p = 0.002). USEMA is independently associated with CKD in both diabetic and non diabetic hypertensive patients. Further studies may help clarify the mechanisms underlying this association and possibly the pathogenic changes leading to the development of CKD.

  14. System requirements for one-time-use ENRAF control panel software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUBER, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    An Enraf Densitometer is installed on tank 241-AY-102. The Densitometer will frequently be tasked to obtain and log density profiles. The activity can be effected a number of ways. Enraf Incorporated provides a software package called ''Logger18'' to its customers for the purpose of in-shop testing of their gauges. Logger18 is capable of accepting an input file which can direct the gauge to obtain a density profile for a given tank level and bottom limit. Logger18 is a complex, DOS based program which will require trained technicians and/or tank farm entries to obtain the data. ALARA considerations have prompted the development of a more user-friendly, computer-based interface to the Enraf densitometers. This document records the plan by which this new Enraf data acquisition software will be developed, reviewed, verified, and released. This plan applies to the development and implementation of a one-time-use software program, which will be called ''Enraf Control Panel.'' The software will be primarily used for remote operation of Enraf Densitometers for the purpose of obtaining and logging tank product density profiles

  15. Glutaredoxin-2 is required to control oxidative phosphorylation in cardiac muscle by mediating deglutathionylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Xuan, Jian Ying; McBride, Skye; Maharsy, Wael; Thorn, Stephanie; Holterman, Chet E; Kennedy, Christopher R J; Rippstein, Peter; deKemp, Robert; da Silva, Jean; Nemer, Mona; Lou, Marjorie; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2014-05-23

    Glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) modulates the activity of several mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue by catalyzing deglutathionylation reactions. However, it remains uncertain whether Grx2 is required to control mitochondrial ATP output in heart. Here, we report that Grx2 plays a vital role modulating mitochondrial energetics and heart physiology by mediating the deglutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins. Deletion of Grx2 (Grx2(-/-)) decreased ATP production by complex I-linked substrates to half that in wild type (WT) mitochondria. Decreased respiration was associated with increased complex I glutathionylation diminishing its activity. Tissue glucose uptake was concomitantly increased. Mitochondrial ATP output and complex I activity could be recovered by restoring the redox environment to that favoring the deglutathionylated states of proteins. Grx2(-/-) hearts also developed left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, and mice became hypertensive. Mitochondrial energetics from Grx2 heterozygotes (Grx2(+/-)) were also dysfunctional, and hearts were hypertrophic. Intriguingly, Grx2(+/-) mice were far less hypertensive than Grx2(-/-) mice. Thus, Grx2 plays a vital role in modulating mitochondrial metabolism in cardiac muscle, and Grx2 deficiency leads to pathology. As mitochondrial ATP production was restored by the addition of reductants, these findings may be relevant to novel redox-related therapies in cardiac disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. 34 CFR 685.309 - Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting... Direct Loan Program Schools § 685.309 Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements... may provide the student status confirmation report in either paper or electronic format. (c) Record...

  17. THE EFFECTS OF CONTROLLED SKIDDING TECHNIQUE ON RESIDUAL STAND DAMAGE AND GROUND EXPOSURE IN SWAMP FOREST LOGGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Suhartana

    2004-11-01

    • The  average of ground  exposure  caused by controlled  skidding  technique  and conventionalskidding technique was respectively   16.06% and 18.4%.  The difference of 2.34%  was significant at 95%.

  18. Role of permissive hypotension, hypertonic resuscitation and the global increased permeability syndrome in patients with severe hemorrhage: adjuncts to damage control resuscitation to prevent intra-abdominal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Juan C; Kaplan, Lewis J; Balogh, Zsolt J; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    Secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are closely related to fluid resuscitation. IAH causes major deterioration of the cardiac function by affecting preload, contractility and afterload. The aim of this review is to discuss the different interactions between IAH, ACS and resuscitation, and to explore a new hypothesis with regard to damage control resuscitation, permissive hypotension and global increased permeability syndrome. Review of the relevant literature via PubMed search. The recognition of the association between the development of ACS and resuscitation urged the need for new approach in traumatic shock management. Over a decade after wide spread application of damage control surgery damage control resuscitation was developed. DCR differs from previous resuscitation approaches by attempting an earlier and more aggressive correction of coagulopathy, as well as metabolic derangements like acidosis and hypothermia, often referred to as the 'deadly triad' or the 'bloody vicious cycle'. Permissive hypotension involves keeping the blood pressure low enough to avoid exacerbating uncontrolled haemorrhage while maintaining perfusion to vital end organs. The potential detrimental mechanisms of early, aggressive crystalloid resuscitation have been described. Limitation of fluid intake by using colloids, hypertonic saline (HTS) or hyperoncotic albumin solutions have been associated with favourable effects. HTS allows not only for rapid restoration of circulating intravascular volume with less administered fluid, but also attenuates post-injury oedema at the microcirculatory level and may improve microvascular perfusion. Capillary leak represents the maladaptive, often excessive, and undesirable loss of fluid and electrolytes with or without protein into the interstitium that generates oedema. The global increased permeability syndrome (GIPS) has been articulated in patients with persistent systemic inflammation failing

  19. Manpower Requirements for Air Traffic Control and Flight Service Specialists in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Office of Manpower Studies.

    As of January 1, 1968 the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of the United States Department of Transportation employed 6,963 controllers in airport towers, 7,617 controllers in Air Route Traffic Control Centers, and 4,459 flight service specialists at airport locations. Projected needs are as follows: (1) Controllers in airport towers:…

  20. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  1. Effects of Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) on exercise-induced oxidative stress, muscle damage, and pain following a half-marathon: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withee, Eric D; Tippens, Kimberly M; Dehen, Regina; Tibbitts, Deanne; Hanes, Douglas; Zwickey, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress and muscle damage occur during exhaustive bouts of exercise, and many runners report pain and soreness as major influences on changes or breaks in training regimens, creating a barrier to training persistence. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a sulfur-based nutritional supplement that is purported to have pain and inflammation-reducing effects. To investigate the effects of MSM in attenuating damage associated with physical exertion, this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of MSM supplementation on exercise-induced pain, oxidative stress and muscle damage. Twenty-two healthy females ( n  = 17) and males ( n  = 5) (age 33.7 ± 6.9 yrs.) were recruited from the 2014 Portland Half-Marathon registrant pool. Participants were randomized to take either MSM (OptiMSM®) ( n  = 11), or a placebo ( n  = 11) at 3 g/day for 21 days prior to the race and for two days after (23 total). Participants provided blood samples for measurement of markers of oxidative stress, and completed VAS surveys for pain approximately one month prior to the race (T 0 ), and at 15 min (T 1 ), 90 min (T 2 ), 1 Day (T 3 ), and 2 days (T 4 ) after race finish. The primary outcome measure 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanine (8-OHdG) measured oxidative stress. Secondary outcomes included malondialdehyde (MDA) for oxidative stress, creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as measures of muscle damage, and muscle (MP) and joint pain (JP) recorded using a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Data were analyzed using repeated and multivariate ANOVAs, and simple contrasts compared post-race time points to baseline, presented as mean (SD) or mean change (95% CI) where appropriate. Running a half-marathon induced significant increases in all outcome measures ( p   0.05) and T 4 by -0.57 ng/mL (-1.27-0.13 CI, p  > 0.05). MDA increased significantly at T 1 by 7.3 μM (3.9-10.7 CI, p   10 mm) reductions in both muscle and joint pain

  2. Damage Control Strategy and aggressive resuscitation in polytraumatized patient with severe hypothermia. Importance of multidisciplinary management from the territory to the operating room. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanova, Giovanni; Motta, Alessandro; Mazzetti, Chiara; Motter, Michele; Fabris, Luca; DeVigili, Giorgio; Liguori, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Our objective is to describe a case of hypothermic politrauma management in our country. We report the case of a 29-year-old male who was a beating victim and fell off from 4 meters, and was afterwards found after an unknown time interval. The patient came to our DEA in cardiac arrest and underwent to a aggressive and prolonged resuscitation which included sternotomy and extracorporeal circulation. The patient was discharged in 40th postoperative day without neurologic complications and complete recovery. Even without a dedicated protocol for the hypothermic politrauma the correct multidisciplinary approach lead to the complete recovery of the patient. In literature many papers describe the aggressive resuscitation of hypothermic patients underlining that the politrauma management must be multidisciplinar. We want to underline the importance of the "Damage control strategy" in a politrauma team in the major hospitals in our country. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Extracorporeal circulation, Hypothermia, Polytrauma, Trauma team.

  3. Hydrodynamic rupture of liver in combat patient: a case of successful application of "damage control" tactic in area of the hybrid war in East Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomenko, Igor; Shapovalov, Vitalii; Tsema, Ievgen; Makarov, Georgii; Palytsia, Roman; Zavodovskyi, Ievgen; Ishchenko, Ivan; Dinets, Andrii; Mishalov, Vladimir

    2017-08-15

    The hybrid war of Russia against Ukraine has been started in certain districts of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts within the Donbas area in 2014. We report a clinical case of a combat patient who was injured after the multiple launcher rocket system "Grad" shelling, diagnosed with hydrodynamic liver rupture followed by medical management with application of damage control (DC) tactic in conditions of hybrid war. The patient underwent relaparatomy, liver resection, endoscopic papillosphincterotomy, endoscopic retrograde cholecystopancreatography, stenting of the common bile duct, and VAC-therapy. Applied treatment modalities were effective; the patient was discharged on the 49th day after injury. To our best knowledge, this is the first report describing a successful application of DC tactic in the hybrid war in East Ukraine. From this case, we suggest that application of DC tactic at all levels of combat medical care could save more lives.

  4. The role of genes controlling the replication and cell division in the repair of radiation damage in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhestyanikov, V D; Svetlova, M P; Tomilin, N V; Savel' eva, G E [AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Tsitologii

    1975-01-01

    Mutations in genes controlling the replication (dnaEsup(ts), dnaBsup(ts), dnaGsup(ts) and cell division (lon) in Escherichia coli prevent the rejoining of the gamma radiation-induced single-strand breaks (dnaE in combination with polA1 mutation and dnaG at the restrictive temperature) and effective postreplication DNA repair in UV-irradiated cells (dnaG at the non-permissive temperature and lon mutation) and decrease the survival of UV- and gamma-irradiated bacteria.

  5. Automated damage test facilities for materials development and production optic quality assurance at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battersby, C.; Dickson, R.; Jennings, R.; Kimmons, J.; Kozlowski, M. R.; Maricle, S.; Mouser, R.; Runkel, M.; Schwartz, S.; Sheehan, L. M.; Weinzapfel, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Program at LLNL has developed automated facilities for damage testing optics up to 1 meter in diameter. The systems were developed to characterize the statistical distribution of localized damage performance across large-aperture National Ignition Facility optics. Full aperture testing is a key component of the quality assurance program for several of the optical components. The primary damage testing methods used are R:1 mapping and raster scanning. Automation of these test methods was required to meet the optics manufacturing schedule. The automated activities include control and diagnosis of the damage-test laser beam as well as detection and characterization of damage events

  6. Glycemic Control and Muscle Damage in 3 Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes During a Successful Performance in a Relay Ultramarathon: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Taisa; de Macedo, Denise V; Scariot, Pedro P M; de Araújo, Gustavo G; Dos Reis, Ivan G M; Lazarim, Fernanda L; Nunes, Lázaro A S; Brenzikofer, René; Gobatto, Claudio A

    2017-09-01

    Ultramarathon races are fairly demanding and impose substantial physiological stress on healthy athletes. These competitions may thus be considerably more challenging for individuals with diabetes. This case study aims to describe glycemic control, muscle damage, inflammation, and renal function in 3 athletes with type 1 diabetes during a successful performance in a relay ultramarathon. The team completed the race in 29 hours and 28 minutes, earning third place. The total distance covered by each athlete was 68.7, 84.5, and 65.1 km. Most blood glucose levels showed that athletes were in a zone where it was safe to exercise (90-250 mg/dL or 5.0-13.9 mmol/L). Creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and aspartate aminotransferase serum levels increased 1.2- to 50.7-fold prerace to postrace, and were higher than the reference ranges for all the athletes postrace. Blood leukocytes, neutrophils, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) increased 1.6- to 52-fold prerace to postrace and were higher than the reference ranges for 2 athletes after the race. Serum creatinine increased 1.2-fold prerace to postrace for all the athletes but did not meet the risk criteria for acute kidney injury. In conclusion, our main findings show evidence of satisfactory glycemic control in athletes with type 1 diabetes during a relay ultramarathon. Moreover, elevation of muscle damage and inflammatory biomarkers occurred without affecting renal function and challenging the maintenance of blood glucose among athletes. These findings are novel and provide an initial understanding of the physiological responses in athletes with type 1 diabetes during ultramarathon races. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Immune response is required for the control of in vivo translocation and chronic toxicity of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuli; Zhao, Yunli; Fang, Jianpeng; Wang, Dayong

    2014-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) shows great promise as a nanomaterial for medical applications; however, the mechanism for its long-term adverse effects is still largely unclear. Here, we show that chronic GO exposure not only caused damage on the function of both primary and secondary targeted organs but also induced severe accumulation of pathogenic microbial food (OP50) in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, a non-mammalian alternative toxicity assay system. GO accumulated in the intestine could be largely co-localized with OP50 and induced decreased immune response of animals. In contrast, feeding with UV-treated OP50 suppressed GO toxicity and accumulation in the intestine and maintained the relatively normal immune response of animals. The severe accumulation of OP50 in the intestine might be partially due to the damage by GO on the development and function of AVL and DVB neurons controlling defecation behavior. Reduction of chronic GO toxicity by PEG surface modification largely resulted from the inhibition of OP50 accumulation in the intestine and the maintenance of normal immune response. Our results highlight the key role of innate immunity in regulating in vivo chronic GO toxicity, which will be helpful for our understanding of the interactions between nanomaterials and biological systems during the long-term development of animals.Graphene oxide (GO) shows great promise as a nanomaterial for medical applications; however, the mechanism for its long-term adverse effects is still largely unclear. Here, we show that chronic GO exposure not only caused damage on the function of both primary and secondary targeted organs but also induced severe accumulation of pathogenic microbial food (OP50) in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, a non-mammalian alternative toxicity assay system. GO accumulated in the intestine could be largely co-localized with OP50 and induced decreased immune response of animals. In contrast, feeding with UV-treated OP50 suppressed GO

  8. AN ANALYSIS OF TECHNICAL SECURITY CONTROL REQUIREMENTS FOR DIGITAL I&C SYSTEMS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAE-GU SONG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants have been digitalized for the purpose of maintenance and precise operation. This digitalization, however, brings out issues related to cyber security. In the most recent past, international standard organizations, regulatory institutes, and research institutes have performed a number of studies addressing these systems cyber security. In order to provide information helpful to the system designers in their application of cyber security for the systems, this paper presents methods and considerations to define attack vectors in a target system, to review and select the requirements in the Regulatory Guide 5.71, and to integrate the results to identify applicable technical security control requirements. In this study, attack vectors are analyzed through the vulnerability analyses and penetration tests with a simplified safety system, and the elements of critical digital assets acting as attack vectors are identified. Among the security control requirements listed in Appendices B and C to Regulatory Guide 5.71, those that should be implemented into the systems are selected and classified in groups of technical security control requirements using the results of the attack vector analysis. For the attack vector elements of critical digital assets, all the technical security control requirements are evaluated to determine whether they are applicable and effective, and considerations in this evaluation are also discussed. The technical security control requirements in three important categories of access control, monitoring and logging, and encryption are derived and grouped according to the elements of attack vectors as results for the sample safety system.

  9. Controlling crystallization damage by the use of salt inhibitors on Malta’s limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscat, M.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The main building stone in the Maltese Islands is the Globigerina Limestone, of which the Lower member is commonly used. This occurs in two types, the durable franka and the more easily weathered soll. Two types of fresh franka (bajda -white- and safra -yellow-, as well as fresh soll stone blocks, were obtained, based on the identification by quarry owners. Their designation was confirmed by geochemistry. Physical and mechanical properties of the three were investigated, including uniaxial compressive strength, water absorption by capillarity, permeability and porosimetry. Porosimetry results confirmed outcomes of previous research work. Soll was found to have a lower overall porosity, but a high percentage of small pores with practically no large pores. Some of the tested stones were then treated with a non-toxic phospho-organic compound containing carboxylic moieties as a salt inhibitor and the corresponding non-phosphorylated compound, as aqueous solutions at different concentrations. Both treated and untreated stones were then subject to salt crystallization tests, using sodium sulphate in different concentrations. For the untreated stones, even after only one salt cycle, faster and more pronounced deterioration was observed for the soll samples as opposed to the franka ones. In the case of the treated stones, less deterioration with almost no damage was observed as opposed to non-treated ones. The presence of even very low concentrations of the inhibitor thus helps crystallization to occur on the stone surface and not within the pores. These encouraging results led to the conclusion that salt inhibitors can be used to treat salt-infested stone. Further research in this respect, also using NaCl/NaHCO3, is continuing.El principal tipo de piedra para construcción existente en las islas maltesas es la caliza globigerina, de la cual suele utilizarse la capa inferior, existiendo dos tipos: la duradera franka y la soll, de meteorización más f

  10. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  11. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  12. 10 CFR 60.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... either acquired lands under the jurisdiction and control of DOE, or lands permanently withdrawn and..., such as: (i) Rights arising under the general mining laws; (ii) easements for right-of-way; and (iii... postclosure controlled area. DOE shall exercise any jurisdiction and control over surface and subsurface...

  13. 49 CFR 236.1005 - Requirements for Positive Train Control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (4) The control circuit or electronic equivalent for all movement authorities over any switches... device operated directly by the switch points, derail, or by switch locking mechanism, or through relay or electronic device controlled by such circuit controller or functionally equivalent device, for...

  14. Aircraft Loss-of-Control: Analysis and Requirements for Future Safety-Critical Systems and Their Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to fatal aircraft accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are complex, resulting from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or more often in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents. This paper summarizes recent analysis results in identifying worst-case combinations of loss-of-control accident precursors and their time sequences, a holistic approach to preventing loss-of-control accidents in the future, and key requirements for validating the associated technologies.

  15. Requirements for a modern process control system (PLS); Anforderungen an ein modernes Prozessleitsystem (PLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Michael [SAR Elektronic GmbH, Dingolfing (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The process control system is of crucial importance for the process management of process engineering systems. The process control system has to enable the operation and surveillance of processes, to register critical process conditions and to provide process data for the evaluation of processes. The process control system delivers real time process data to superior process engineering systems (MES, ERP) and implements control commands of superior systems on the plant. The market of process control engineering systems is characterized by a variety of different systems, most different project specific and customer specific configurations as well as different releases. Control systems are in competition to programmable logic controllers and black boxes. The satisfaction of the user with his process control system depends significantly on the attained quality of execution of the supplying company and the used power plant library. It does not depend on the chosen brand of process control system. The availability of process control systems depends on the chosen system architecture and the chosen components, but not from the brand of process control system.

  16. Parvovirus Capsid Structures Required for Infection: Mutations Controlling Receptor Recognition and Protease Cleavages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Heather M; Feng, Kurtis H; Lee, Donald W; Allison, Andrew B; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Hafenstein, Susan; Parrish, Colin R

    2017-01-15

    Parvovirus capsids are small but complex molecular machines responsible for undertaking many of the steps of cell infection, genome packing, and cell-to-cell as well as host-to-host transfer. The details of parvovirus infection of cells are still not fully understood, but the processes must involve small changes in the capsid structure that allow the endocytosed virus to escape from the endosome, pass through the cell cytoplasm, and deliver the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome to the nucleus, where viral replication occurs. Here, we examine capsid substitutions that eliminate canine parvovirus (CPV) infectivity and identify how those mutations changed the capsid structure or altered interactions with the infectious pathway. Amino acid substitutions on the exterior surface of the capsid (Gly299Lys/Ala300Lys) altered the binding of the capsid to transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR), particularly during virus dissociation from the receptor, but still allowed efficient entry into both feline and canine cells without successful infection. These substitutions likely control specific capsid structural changes resulting from TfR binding required for infection. A second set of changes on the interior surface of the capsid reduced viral infectivity by >100-fold and included two cysteine residues and neighboring residues. One of these substitutions, Cys270Ser, modulates a VP2 cleavage event found in ∼10% of the capsid proteins that also was shown to alter capsid stability. A neighboring substitution, Pro272Lys, significantly reduced capsid assembly, while a Cys273Ser change appeared to alter capsid transport from the nucleus. These mutants reveal additional structural details that explain cell infection processes of parvovirus capsids. Parvoviruses are commonly found in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals and cause widespread disease. They are also being developed as oncolytic therapeutics and as gene therapy vectors. Most functions involved in infection or transduction

  17. Parvovirus Capsid Structures Required for Infection: Mutations Controlling Receptor Recognition and Protease Cleavages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Heather M.; Feng, Kurtis H.; Lee, Donald W.; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Hafenstein, Susan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Parvovirus capsids are small but complex molecular machines responsible for undertaking many of the steps of cell infection, genome packing, and cell-to-cell as well as host-to-host transfer. The details of parvovirus infection of cells are still not fully understood, but the processes must involve small changes in the capsid structure that allow the endocytosed virus to escape from the endosome, pass through the cell cytoplasm, and deliver the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome to the nucleus, where viral replication occurs. Here, we examine capsid substitutions that eliminate canine parvovirus (CPV) infectivity and identify how those mutations changed the capsid structure or altered interactions with the infectious pathway. Amino acid substitutions on the exterior surface of the capsid (Gly299Lys/Ala300Lys) altered the binding of the capsid to transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR), particularly during virus dissociation from the receptor, but still allowed efficient entry into both feline and canine cells without successful infection. These substitutions likely control specific capsid structural changes resulting from TfR binding required for infection. A second set of changes on the interior surface of the capsid reduced viral infectivity by >100-fold and included two cysteine residues and neighboring residues. One of these substitutions, Cys270Ser, modulates a VP2 cleavage event found in ∼10% of the capsid proteins that also was shown to alter capsid stability. A neighboring substitution, Pro272Lys, significantly reduced capsid assembly, while a Cys273Ser change appeared to alter capsid transport from the nucleus. These mutants reveal additional structural details that explain cell infection processes of parvovirus capsids. IMPORTANCE Parvoviruses are commonly found in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals and cause widespread disease. They are also being developed as oncolytic therapeutics and as gene therapy vectors. Most functions involved in

  18. Damages of electrical insulation of cable products used at NPP`s and technique of their detection and operative control; Povrezhdeniya v ehlektricheskoj izolyatsii kabel`nykh izdulij, ehkspluatirue mykh na atomnykh ehlektrostantsiyakh i metody ikh obnaruzheniya i operativnogo kontro lya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valeev, R S; Filatov, N I

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of possible damages in electrical insulation of cable products under their application at NPP`s is conducted. Basic methods for detecting such damages and rapid control of technical condition of cable products during the operation are considered.

  19. A Study on a Control Method with a Ventilation Requirement of a VAV System in Multi-Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jun Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to propose a control method with a ventilation requirement of variable air volume (VAV system in multi-zone. In order to control the VAV system inmulti-zone, it is essential to control the terminal unit installed in each zone. A VAV terminal unit with conventional control method using a fixed minimum air flow can cause indoor air quality (IAQ issues depending on the variation in the number of occupants. This research proposes a control method with a ventilation requirement of the VAV terminal unit and AHU inmulti-zone. The integrated control method with an air flow increase model in the VAV terminal unit, AHU, and outdoor air intake rate increase model in the AHU was based on the indoor CO2 concentration. The conventional and proposed control algorithms were compared through a TRNSYS simulation program. The proposed VAV terminal unit control method satisfies all the conditions of indoor temperature, IAQ, and stratification. An energy comparison with the conventional control method showed that the method satisfies not only the indoor thermal comfort, IAQ, and stratification issue, but also reduces the energy consumption.

  20. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1978-11-01

    The potential seismic risk for an underground nuclear waste repository will be one of the considerations in evaluating its ultimate location. However, the risk to subsurface facilities cannot be judged by applying intensity ratings derived from the surface effects of an earthquake. A literature review and analysis were performed to document the damage and non-damage due to earthquakes to underground facilities. Damage from earthquakes to tunnels, s, and wells and damage (rock bursts) from mining operations were investigated. Damage from documented nuclear events was also included in the study where applicable. There are very few data on damage in the subsurface due to earthquakes. This fact itself attests to the lessened effect of earthquakes in the subsurface because mines exist in areas where strong earthquakes have done extensive surface damage. More damage is reported in shallow tunnels near the surface than in deep mines. In mines and tunnels, large displacements occur primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures or at the surface entrance to these facilities.Data indicate vertical structures such as wells and shafts are less susceptible to damage than surface facilities. More analysis is required before seismic criteria can be formulated for the siting of a nuclear waste repository

  1. Specification of requirements for upgrades using digital instrument and control systems. Report prepared within the framework of the international working group on nuclear power plant control and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The need to develop good specifications of requirements for instrument and control (I and C) systems applies throughout the world and is becoming more and more important as more upgrades are planned. Better guidance on how to develop good requirements specifications would support safer, more effective and more economical refits and upgrades. The need for this was pointed out by the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (IWG-NPPCI). This report is the result of a series of advisory and consultants meetings held by the IAEA in 1997 and 1998 in Vienna. The scope of the activities described covers a methodology for the determination of requirements and the development of the necessary specifications and plans needed through the life-cycle of digital instrumentation and control systems. It is restricted to technical aspects and indicates subjects which should be included in specifications and plans at different phases

  2. Age-related postoperative morphine requirements in children following major surgery--an assessment using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Henneberg, Steen Winther; Hole, P

    1996-01-01

    To investigate if small children require less morphine for postoperative analgesia than do older children and adolescents we analysed the morphine consumption pattern of 28 consecutive children on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following major surgery. The median age-specific morp......To investigate if small children require less morphine for postoperative analgesia than do older children and adolescents we analysed the morphine consumption pattern of 28 consecutive children on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following major surgery. The median age...

  3. Parametric Synthesis of Automatic Control System of Industrial Robot Manipulator in Compliance with Requirements of Robust Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Nesenchuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an application of a root-locus method for synthesis of dynamic systems with uncertainty that meet the requirements of pre-set quality. This method is used for parametric synthesis of automatic control system of industrial robot manipulator that is used for transportation of engineering products. The synthesis takes place under conditions of substantial changes in inertia moment of robot load. As a result of investigations it is possible to determine range of values of variable parameter that ensures the required quality of control system operation. A system of computer programs has been developed in order to solve the problem.

  4. When Optimal Feedback Control Is Not Enough: Feedforward Strategies Are Required for Optimal Control with Active Sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Hoon Yeo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Movement planning is thought to be primarily determined by motor costs such as inaccuracy and effort. Solving for the optimal plan that minimizes these costs typically leads to specifying a time-varying feedback controller which both generates the movement and can optimally correct for errors that arise within a movement. However, the quality of the sensory feedback during a movement can depend substantially on the generated movement. We show that by incorporating such state-dependent sensory feedback, the optimal solution incorporates active sensing and is no longer a pure feedback process but includes a significant feedforward component. To examine whether people take into account such state-dependency in sensory feedback we asked people to make movements in which we controlled the reliability of sensory feedback. We made the visibility of the hand state-dependent, such that the visibility was proportional to the component of hand velocity in a particular direction. Subjects gradually adapted to such a sensory perturbation by making curved hand movements. In particular, they appeared to control the late visibility of the movement matching predictions of the optimal controller with state-dependent sensory noise. Our results show that trajectory planning is not only sensitive to motor costs but takes sensory costs into account and argues for optimal control of movement in which feedforward commands can play a significant role.

  5. When Optimal Feedback Control Is Not Enough: Feedforward Strategies Are Required for Optimal Control with Active Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sang-Hoon; Franklin, David W; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2016-12-01

    Movement planning is thought to be primarily determined by motor costs such as inaccuracy and effort. Solving for the optimal plan that minimizes these costs typically leads to specifying a time-varying feedback controller which both generates the movement and can optimally correct for errors that arise within a movement. However, the quality of the sensory feedback during a movement can depend substantially on the generated movement. We show that by incorporating such state-dependent sensory feedback, the optimal solution incorporates active sensing and is no longer a pure feedback process but includes a significant feedforward component. To examine whether people take into account such state-dependency in sensory feedback we asked people to make movements in which we controlled the reliability of sensory feedback. We made the visibility of the hand state-dependent, such that the visibility was proportional to the component of hand velocity in a particular direction. Subjects gradually adapted to such a sensory perturbation by making curved hand movements. In particular, they appeared to control the late visibility of the movement matching predictions of the optimal controller with state-dependent sensory noise. Our results show that trajectory planning is not only sensitive to motor costs but takes sensory costs into account and argues for optimal control of movement in which feedforward commands can play a significant role.

  6. HALE UAS Command and Control Communications: Step 1 - Functional Requirements Document. Version 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned aircraft system (UAS) communicates with an off-board pilot-in-command in all flight phases via the C2 data link, making it a critical component for the UA to fly in the NAS safely and routinely. This is a new requirement in current FAA communications planning and monitoring processes. This document provides a set of comprehensive C2 communications functional requirements and performance guidelines to help facilitate the future FAA certification process for civil UAS to operate in the NAS. The objective of the guidelines is to provide the ability to validate the functional requirements and in future be used to develop performance-level requirements.

  7. Navy Requirements for Controlling Multiple Off-Board Robots Using the Autonomous Unmanned Vehicle Workbench

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monroe, Dennis W

    2007-01-01

    ... after a mission. This thesis examines a variety of strategic authoritative plans for autonomous vehicles to determine functional mission requirements that autonomous vehicles are expected to be performing in the near future...

  8. Development of equipment qualification requirements for NPP instrumentation and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siora, A. A.; Reshetitskij, S. V.; Harybin, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    The main stages of equipment qualification are presented. The aim of the work is to ensure compatibility between Ukrainian and international requirements. A comparison with US NRC requirements has been done. The approach in equipment qualification is presented for the resistance to: irradiation; dust; seismic motion, vibrations and mechanical impact; environmental impact (temperature, humidity, pressure); power supply parameters etc., as well as the technological testing

  9. Determining required valve performance for discrete control of PTO cylinders for wave energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rico Hjerm; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2012-01-01

    investigates the required valve performance to achieve this energy efficient operation, while meeting basic dynamic requirements. The components making up the total energy loss during shifting is identified by analytically expressing the losses from the governing differential equations. From the analysis...... a framework for evaluating the adequacy of a valve’s response is established, and the analysis shows the results may be normalised for a wider range of systems. Finally, the framework is successfully applied to the Wavestar converter....

  10. Effects of low-level laser therapy applied before or after plyometric exercise on muscle damage markers: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Carolina Gassen; Dornelles, Maurício Pinto; Severo-Silveira, Lucas; Marques, Vanessa Bernardes; Rosso, Isabele de Albuquerque; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini

    2016-12-01

    Promising effects of phototherapy on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage has been already demonstrated in constant load or isokinetic protocols. However, its effects on more functional situations, such as plyometric exercises, and when is the best moment to apply this treatment (pre- or post-exercise) remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) before or after plyometric exercise on quadriceps muscle damage markers. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was conducted with 24 healthy men, 12 at pre-exercise treatment group and 12 at post-exercise treatment group. Placebo and LLLT (810 nm, 200 mW per diode, 6 J per diode, 240 J per leg) were randomly applied on right/left knee extensor muscles of each volunteer before/after a plyometric exercise protocol. Muscular echo intensity (ultrasonography images), soreness (visual analogue scale - VAS), and strength impairment (maximal voluntary contraction - MVC) were assessed at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. Legs treated with LLLT before or after exercise presented significantly smaller increments of echo intensity (values up to 1 %) compared to placebo treatments (increased up to ∼7 %). No significant treatment effect was found for VAS and MVC, although a trend toward better results on LLLT legs have been found for VAS (mean values up to 30 % lesser than placebo leg). In conclusion, LLLT applied before or after plyometric exercise reduces the muscle echo intensity response and possibly attenuates the muscle soreness. However, these positive results were not observed on strength impairment.

  11. Lesiones torácicas graves y el enfoque del control de daños Severe thoracic lesions and the damage control approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Miguel Morales Wong; Mario Michel Gómez Hernández; Alexander Ramos Godines; Rolando González Folch

    2008-01-01

    En los últimos años se han desarrollado nuevas estrategias para el tratamiento del trauma grave con lesiones exanguinantes o sin ellas, pero son estas últimas las que más requieren un cambio de la forma de actuar en aras de mejorar la supervivencia. Tales estrategias quirúrgicas se han denominado cirugía de control de daños, que en esencia evita complicaciones como la tríada letal de acidosis, hipotermia y coagulopatía. A diferencia del control de daños en el abdomen, existen lesiones torácic...

  12. [Prospects in getting accordance between chemical analytic control means and medical technical requirements to safety system concerning chemical weapons destruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembovskiĭ, V R; Mogilenkova, L A; Savel'eva, E I

    2005-01-01

    The major unit monitoring chemical weapons destruction objects is a system of chemical analyticcontrol over the technologic process procedures and possibility of environment and workplace pollution withtoxicchemicals and their destruction products. At the same time, physical and chemical control means meet sanitary and hygienic requirements incompletely. To provide efficient control, internationally recognized approaches should be adapted to features of Russian system monitoring pollution of chemical weapons destruction objects with toxic chemicals.

  13. Requirements and analysis of electromagnetic compatibility of safety-related instrumentation and control system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Sujuan

    2002-01-01

    The state-of-the-art instrumentation and control system and the influence of their application to the electromagnetic compatibility is analyzed. Based on the present situation of nuclear safety in China and relevant experiences from other countries, the author tries to probe into the requirements and test methods about how safety-related instrument and control system to accommodate electromagnetic interference, radio-frequency interference and power surges in the environments of nuclear power plant so as to develop Chinese safety standards

  14. 10 CFR 63.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under the jurisdiction and control of DOE, or lands permanently withdrawn and reserved for its use. (2... under the general mining laws; (ii) Easements for right-of-way; and (iii) All other rights arising under... repository operations area. DOE shall exercise any jurisdiction and control over surface and subsurface...

  15. Structural damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.E.; Bruhn, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Virtually all structures show some signs of distress due to deterioration of the building components, to changed loads, or to changed support conditions. Changed support conditions result from ground movements. In mining regions many cases of structural distress are attributed to mining without considering alternative causes. This is particularly true of coal mining since it occurs under extensive areas. Coal mining is estimated to have already undermined more than eight million acres and may eventually undermine 40 million acres in the United States. Other nonmetal and metal underground mines impact much smaller areas. Although it is sometimes difficult, even with careful study, to identify the actual cause of damage, persons responsible for underground coal mining should at least be aware of possible causes of building stress other than mine subsidence. This paper presents information on distress to structures and briefly reviews a number of causes of ground movements other than subsidence: Mass movements, dissolution, erosion, frost action, shrinking and swelling, yield into excavations and compressibility

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Aromatherapy in Decreasing Salivary Gland Damage following Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Michihiro; Okizaki, Atsutaka; Takahashi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of aromatherapy in decreasing salivary gland damage for patients undergoing radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Materials and Methods. The subjects were 71 patients with DTC. They were divided into aromatherapy group (group A, n = 35) and a control group (group B, n = 36). We blended 1.0 mL of lemon and 0.5 mL of ginger essential oils. The patients in the inhalation aromatherapy group inhaled this blend oil and those in the control group inhaled distilled water as placebo for 10 min during admission. We statistically compared salivary gland function before and after treatment between groups A and B. Results. In comparison with group B, the rate of change of the accumulation rate was significantly higher in the parotid glands and submandibular glands of group A ( P aromatherapy in the prevention of treatment-related salivary gland disorder. This trial is registered with UMIN Clinical Trial Registry: UMIN000013968.

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Aromatherapy in Decreasing Salivary Gland Damage following Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Nakayama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of aromatherapy in decreasing salivary gland damage for patients undergoing radioactive iodine (RAI therapy with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC. Materials and Methods. The subjects were 71 patients with DTC. They were divided into aromatherapy group (group A, n=35 and a control group (group B, n=36. We blended 1.0 mL of lemon and 0.5 mL of ginger essential oils. The patients in the inhalation aromatherapy group inhaled this blend oil and those in the control group inhaled distilled water as placebo for 10 min during admission. We statistically compared salivary gland function before and after treatment between groups A and B. Results. In comparison with group B, the rate of change of the accumulation rate was significantly higher in the parotid glands and submandibular glands of group A (P<0.05. In comparison with group B, a significant increase in rate of secretion change before and after treatment was noted in the bilateral parotid glands in group A (P<0.05. Conclusion. Because an amelioration of salivary gland function was observed in the present study, our results suggest the efficacy of aromatherapy in the prevention of treatment-related salivary gland disorder. This trial is registered with UMIN Clinical Trial Registry: UMIN000013968.

  18. 75 FR 41078 - Revisions to the Commerce Control List To Update and Clarify Crime Control License Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... equipment which serve different functions, namely analysis technologies, biometric technologies and penal... proposed rule; whether, and, if so, the extent to which biometric measuring devices, integrated data... to which software and technology related to commodities on the Commerce Control List should be listed...

  19. Radiation damage prediction system using damage function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Mori, Seiji

    1979-01-01

    The irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was investigated. This irradiation damage analysis system consists of the following three processes, the unfolding of a damage function, the calculation of the neutron flux spectrum of the object of damage analysis and the estimation of irradiation effect of the object of damage analysis. The damage function is calculated by applying the SAND-2 code. The ANISN and DOT3, 5 codes are used to calculate neutron flux. The neutron radiation and the allowable time of reactor operation can be estimated based on these calculations of the damage function and neutron flux. The flow diagram of the process of analyzing irradiation damage by a damage function and the flow diagram of SAND-2 code are presented, and the analytical code for estimating damage, which is determined with a damage function and a neutron spectrum, is explained. The application of the irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was carried out to the core support structure of a fast breeder reactor for the damage estimation and the uncertainty evaluation. The fundamental analytical conditions and the analytical model for this work are presented, then the irradiation data for SUS304, the initial estimated values of a damage function, the error analysis for a damage function and the analytical results are explained concerning the computation of a damage function for 10% total elongation. Concerning the damage estimation of FBR core support structure, the standard and lower limiting values of damage, the permissible neutron flux and the allowable years of reactor operation are presented and were evaluated. (Nakai, Y.)

  20. Steady State Shift Damage Localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekjær, Claus; Bull, Thomas; Markvart, Morten Kusk

    2017-01-01

    The steady state shift damage localization (S3DL) method localizes structural deterioration, manifested as either a mass or stiffness perturbation, by interrogating the damage-induced change in the steady state vibration response with damage patterns cast from a theoretical model. Damage is, thus...... the required accuracy when examining complex structures, an extensive amount of degrees of freedom (DOF) must often be utilized. Since the interrogation matrix for each damage pattern depends on the size of the system matrices constituting the FE-model, the computational time quickly becomes of first......-order importance. The present paper investigates two sub-structuring approaches, in which the idea is to employ Craig-Bampton super-elements to reduce the amount of interrogation distributions while still providing an acceptable localization resolution. The first approach operates on a strict super-element level...

  1. A Parametric Study of Actuator Requirements for Active Turbine Tip Clearance Control of a Modern High Bypass Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jonathan L.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency of aircraft gas turbine engines is sensitive to the distance between the tips of its turbine blades and its shroud, which serves as its containment structure. Maintaining tighter clearance between these components has been shown to increase turbine efficiency, increase fuel efficiency, and reduce the turbine inlet temperature, and this correlates to a longer time-on-wing for the engine. Therefore, there is a desire to maintain a tight clearance in the turbine, which requires fast response active clearance control. Fast response active tip clearance control will require an actuator to modify the physical or effective tip clearance in the turbine. This paper evaluates the requirements of a generic active turbine tip clearance actuator for a modern commercial aircraft engine using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) software that has previously been integrated with a dynamic tip clearance model. A parametric study was performed in an attempt to evaluate requirements for control actuators in terms of bandwidth, rate limits, saturation limits, and deadband. Constraints on the weight of the actuation system and some considerations as to the force which the actuator must be capable of exerting and maintaining are also investigated. From the results, the relevant range of the evaluated actuator parameters can be extracted. Some additional discussion is provided on the challenges posed by the tip clearance control problem and the implications for future small core aircraft engines.

  2. Contamination control requirements implementation for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), part 2: spacecraft, sunshield, observatory, and launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Eve M.; Schweiss, Andrea; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly; Woronowicz, Michael; Patel, Jignasha; Macias, Matthew; McGregor, R. Daniel; Farmer, Greg; Schmeitzky, Olivier; Jensen, Peter; Rumler, Peter; Romero, Beatriz; Breton, Jacques

    2014-09-01

    This paper will continue from Part 1 of JWST contamination control implementation. In addition to optics, instruments, and thermal vacuum testing, JWST also requires contamination control for a spacecraft that must be vented carefully in order to maintain solar array and thermal radiator thermal properties; a tennis court-sized sunshield made with 1-2 mil Kapton™ layers that must be manufactured and maintained clean; an observatory that must be integrated, stowed and transported to South America; and a rocket that typically launches commercial payloads without contamination sensitivity. An overview of plans developed to implement contamination control for the JWST spacecraft, sunshield, observatory and launch vehicle will be presented.

  3. THE DUAL CONTROL – A REQUIREMENT OF THE CURRENT BANK MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA MATIȘ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Security is a major problem of the banking industry, which bases its whole system on the reputation the bank manages to establish and then maintain among its customers. With the manifestation of information security issues and in interdependence with them, the need for internal control also developed, both of them being associated with modern risk management practices. As the concept of internal control has been rising as a major concern of management and corporate governance, there are attempts to classify it and distinguish it in different categories, dual control being a result of this process. The authors of this study attempt to present the concept of dual control as it is currently applied in the banking system, trying to analyze contextually its capacities of fraud detection, its consequences in terms of risk and costs as well as its effects on bank performance.

  4. Congressional Award Foundation: Management Action Still Needed to Establish and Document Control Requirements and Related Procedures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calbom, Linda

    2000-01-01

    .... The purpose of this management letter is to reemphasize the continuing need for the Foundation's management to strengthen internal controls, especially in the five areas previously reported to you in our July 1999 management letter.

  5. Single Operator Control of Multiple Uninhabited Air Vehicles: Situational Awareness Requirement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sebalj, Derek

    2008-01-01

    ... > 1. The ultimate goal, and the object of much research, is the technology to lower, or even invert the control ratio from many people to one vehicle to one operator of several vehicles, e.g., 1...

  6. Requirements and Challenges of Location-Based Access Control in Healthcare Emergency Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Carmen Ruiz; Kirkpatrick, Michael; Ghinita, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in positioning and tracking technologies have led to the emergence of novel location-based applications that allow participants to access information relevant to their spatio-temporal context. Traditional access control models, such as role-based access control (RBAC), are not suf...... to such settings. We overview the main technical issues to be addressed, and we describe the architecture for policy decision and enforcement points....

  7. Planteose as a storage carbohydrate required for early stage of germination of Orobanche minor and its metabolism as a possible target for selective control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Takatoshi; Joseph, Benesh; Yasumoto, Shuhei; Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Aoki, Toshio; Harada, Kazuo; Muranaka, Satoru; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Takeuchi, Yasutomo; Yoneyama, Koichi; Muranaka, Toshiya; Sugimoto, Yukihiro; Okazawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Root parasitic weeds in Orobanchaceae cause serious damage to worldwide agriculture. Germination of the parasites requires host-derived germination stimulants, such as strigolactones, as indicators of host roots within reach of the parasite’s radicles. This unique germination process was focused on to identify metabolic pathways required for germination, and to design a selective control strategy. A metabolomic analysis of germinating seeds of clover broomrape, Orobanche minor, was conducted to identify its distinctive metabolites. Consequently, a galactosyl-sucrose trisaccharide, planteose (α-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-d-fructofuranosyl-(2→1)-α-d-glucopyranoside), was identified as a metabolite that decreased promptly after reception of the germination stimulant. To investigate the importance of planteose metabolism, the effects of several glycosidase inhibitors were examined, and nojirimycin bisulfite (NJ) was found to alter the sugar metabolism and to selectively inhibit the germination of O. minor. Planteose consumption was similar in NJ-treated seeds and non-treated germinating seeds; however, NJ-treated seeds showed lower consumption of sucrose, a possible intermediate of planteose metabolism, resulting in significantly less glucose and fructose. This inhibitory effect was recovered by adding glucose. These results suggest that planteose is a storage carbohydrate required for early stage of germination of O. minor, and NJ inhibits germination by blocking the supply of essential glucose from planteose and sucrose. Additionally, NJ selectively inhibited radicle elongation of germinated seeds of Orobanchaceae plants (Striga hermonthica and Phtheirospermum japonicum). Thus, NJ will be a promising tool to develop specific herbicides to the parasites, especially broomrapes, and to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this unique germination. PMID:25821071

  8. Planteose as a storage carbohydrate required for early stage of germination of Orobanche minor and its metabolism as a possible target for selective control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Takatoshi; Joseph, Benesh; Yasumoto, Shuhei; Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Aoki, Toshio; Harada, Kazuo; Muranaka, Satoru; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Takeuchi, Yasutomo; Yoneyama, Koichi; Muranaka, Toshiya; Sugimoto, Yukihiro; Okazawa, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    Root parasitic weeds in Orobanchaceae cause serious damage to worldwide agriculture. Germination of the parasites requires host-derived germination stimulants, such as strigolactones, as indicators of host roots within reach of the parasite's radicles. This unique germination process was focused on to identify metabolic pathways required for germination, and to design a selective control strategy. A metabolomic analysis of germinating seeds of clover broomrape, Orobanche minor, was conducted to identify its distinctive metabolites. Consequently, a galactosyl-sucrose trisaccharide, planteose (α-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-d-fructofuranosyl-(2→1)-α-d-glucopyranoside), was identified as a metabolite that decreased promptly after reception of the germination stimulant. To investigate the importance of planteose metabolism, the effects of several glycosidase inhibitors were examined, and nojirimycin bisulfite (NJ) was found to alter the sugar metabolism and to selectively inhibit the germination of O. minor. Planteose consumption was similar in NJ-treated seeds and non-treated germinating seeds; however, NJ-treated seeds showed lower consumption of sucrose, a possible intermediate of planteose metabolism, resulting in significantly less glucose and fructose. This inhibitory effect was recovered by adding glucose. These results suggest that planteose is a storage carbohydrate required for early stage of germination of O. minor, and NJ inhibits germination by blocking the supply of essential glucose from planteose and sucrose. Additionally, NJ selectively inhibited radicle elongation of germinated seeds of Orobanchaceae plants (Striga hermonthica and Phtheirospermum japonicum). Thus, NJ will be a promising tool to develop specific herbicides to the parasites, especially broomrapes, and to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this unique germination. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental

  9. Computer system requirements specification for 101-SY hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeece, S.G.; Truitt, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    The system requirements specification for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project (HMTP) data acquisition and control system (DACS-1) documents the system requirements for the DACS-1 project. The purpose of the DACS is to provide data acquisition and control capabilities for the hydrogen mitigation testing of Tank SY-101. Mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste, directed at varying angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. Tank and supporting instrumentation is brought into the DACS to monitor the status of the tank and to provide information on the effectiveness of the mitigation test. Instrumentation is also provided for closed loop control of the pump operation. DACS is also capable for being expanded to control and monitor other mitigation testing. The intended audience for the computer system requirements specification includes the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test data acquisition and control system designers: analysts, programmers, instrument engineers, operators, maintainers. It is intended for the data users: tank farm operations, mitigation test engineers, the Test Review Group (TRG), data management support staff, data analysis, Hanford data stewards, and external reviewers

  10. 40 CFR 112.11 - Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan requirements for offshore oil drilling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION PREVENTION Requirements for Petroleum Oils and Non-Petroleum Oils, Except Animal Fats and Oils and Greases, and Fish and Marine Mammal Oils; and Vegetable Oils (Including Oils from Seeds, Nuts, Fruits, and... equipped with dump valves which predominantly fail in the closed position and where pollution risk is high...

  11. 40 CFR 112.9 - Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan Requirements for onshore oil production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... measures required under § 112.7(c)(1), except when draining uncontaminated rainwater. Prior to drainage... with legally approved methods. (2) Inspect at regularly scheduled intervals field drainage systems... prevention and containment procedures listed under this section. (b) Oil production facility drainage. (1) At...

  12. Technical report of comparison in design control on R and D and industrial quality requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwan Hyun

    2000-06-01

    This technical report provides the methods on how to establish the requirements on nuclear R and D facilities. This report applies to the quality assurance(QA) programmes of the design, fabrication in research reactor. The organization having overall responsibility for the nuclear power item design, preservation, fabrication shall be described in this report in each stage of nuclear project

  13. Soil erosion and sediment control laws. A review of state laws and their natural resource data requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty states, the District of Columbia, and the Virgin Islands enacted erosion and sediment control legislation during the past decade to provide for the implementation or the strengthening of statewide erosion and sediment control plans for rural and/or urban lands. That legislation and the state programs developed to implement these laws are quoted and reviewed. The natural resource data requirements of each program are also extracted. The legislation includes amendments to conservation district laws, water quality laws, and erosion and sediment control laws. Laws which provides for legislative review of administrative regulations and LANDSAT applications and/or information systems that were involved in implementing or gathering data for a specific soil erosion and sediment control program are summarized as well as principal concerns affecting erosion and sediment control laws.

  14. Effect of BCAA supplement timing on exercise-induced muscle soreness and damage: a pilot placebo-controlled double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Miyazaki, Teruo; Kojima, Ryo; Komine, Shoichi; Ishikura, Keisuke; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Honda, Akira; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Ohmori, Hajime

    2017-09-22

    The aim of present study was to compare the effects of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation taken before or after exercise on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Fifteen young men (aged 21.5 ± 0.4 years) were given either BCAA (9.6 g·day-1) or placebo before and after exercise (and for 3 days prior to and following the exercise day) in three independent groups: the Control group (placebo before and after exercise), the PRE group (BCAA before exercise and placebo after exercise), and the POST group (placebo before exercise and BCAA after exercise). Participants performed 30 repetitions of eccentric exercise with the non-dominant arm. DOMS, upper arm circumference (CIR), elbow range of motion (ROM), serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and aldolase, BCAA, and Beta-hydroxy-Beta-methylbutyrate (3HMB) were measured immediately before and after the exercise and on the following 4 days. Serum BCAA and 3HMB concentrations increased significantly in the PRE group immediately after the exercise, recovering to baseline over the following days. In the days following the exercise day, DOMS, CIR, and ROM were significantly improved in the PRE group compared to the Control group, with weaker effects in the POST group. Serum activities of CK, LDH, and aldolase in the days following the exercise day were significantly suppressed in the PRE group compared to Control group. Present study confirmed that repeated BCAA supplementation before exercise had a more beneficial effect in attenuating DOMS and EIMD induced by eccentric exercise than repeated supplementation after exercise.

  15. Virtual reality technology as a tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Silva, Antonio C.F.; Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Dutra, Marco A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Virtual Reality (VR) is an advanced computer interface technology that allows the user to internet or to explore a three-dimensional environment through the computer, as was part of the virtual world. This technology presents great applicability in the most diverse areas of the human knowledge. This paper presents a study on the use of the VR as tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks. Moreover, this paper presents a case study: a virtual model of the control desk, developed using virtual reality technology to be used in the human factors requirements evaluation. This case study was developed in the Virtual Reality Laboratory at IEN, and understands the stereo visualization of the Argonauta research nuclear reactor control desk for a static ergonomic evaluation using check-lists, in accordance to the standards and human factors nuclear international guides (IEC 1771, NUREG-0700). (author)

  16. Virtual reality technology as a tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Silva, Antonio C.F.; Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Dutra, Marco A.M. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: grecco@ien.gov.br; luquetti@ien.gov.br; mol@ien.gov.br; paulov@ien.gov.br; tonico@ien.gov.br; fferreira@ien.gov.br; dutra@ien.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The Virtual Reality (VR) is an advanced computer interface technology that allows the user to internet or to explore a three-dimensional environment through the computer, as was part of the virtual world. This technology presents great applicability in the most diverse areas of the human knowledge. This paper presents a study on the use of the VR as tool for human factors requirements evaluation in design of the nuclear reactors control desks. Moreover, this paper presents a case study: a virtual model of the control desk, developed using virtual reality technology to be used in the human factors requirements evaluation. This case study was developed in the Virtual Reality Laboratory at IEN, and understands the stereo visualization of the Argonauta research nuclear reactor control desk for a static ergonomic evaluation using check-lists, in accordance to the standards and human factors nuclear international guides (IEC 1771, NUREG-0700). (author)

  17. Self-repairing of material damage. Sonsho wo jiko shufuku yokushisuru zairyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, S [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1994-07-01

    In order to control the damage like crack or void formed during the use of structural material by the material itself, it is required to self-detect the damage, to self-judge the state of damage, and to self-control or self-repair the damage finally. Based on the parameter of length, the repair and control is classified into the 1mm-scale functional fine wire and thin film utilization type, 1[mu]m-scale microcapsule type, and 1nm-scale trace element utilization type. For the damage repair and control of functional fine wire and thin film utilization type, the damage is repaired and controlled by pasting thin film or by embedding fine wire of functional material, such as shape memory alloy, Ti-Ni, and piezoelectric ceramics PZT (lead zirconate titanate), on the material surface or inside the material. For the damage repair and control of microcapsule type, is illustrated the control mechanism of high temperature fatigue crack propagation by Y2O3 particles dispersed in the Fe-20Cr alloy. Furthermore, the formation mechanism of self-repairing film by the trace element is also illustrated. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Creep-fatigue life prediction for different heats of Type 304 stainless steel by linear-damage rule, strain-range partitioning method, and damage-rate approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiya, P.S.

    1978-07-01

    The creep-fatigue life results for five different heats of Type 304 stainless steel at 593 0 C (1100 0 F), generated under push-pull conditions in the axial strain-control mode, are presented. The life predictions for the various heats based on the linear-damage rule, strain-range partitioning method, and damage-rate approach are discussed. The appropriate material properties required for computation of fatigue life are also included

  19. Percutaneous penetration through slightly damaged skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper B

    2005-01-01

    with human skin. A slight damage to the barrier integrity was induced by pre-treatment of the skin with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) before pesticide exposure. The experimental model with 3 h pre-treatment with SLS (0.1% or 0.3%) assured a significant but controlled damage to the barrier integrity, a damage...

  20. Modulation of brain activity during a Stroop inhibitory task by the kind of cognitive control required.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Grandjean

    Full Text Available This study used a proportion congruency manipulation in the Stroop task in order to investigate, at the behavioral and brain substrate levels, the predictions derived from the Dual Mechanisms of Control (DMC account of two distinct modes of cognitive control depending on the task context. Three experimental conditions were created that varied the proportion congruency: mostly incongruent (MI, mostly congruent (MC, and mostly neutral (MN contexts. A reactive control strategy, which corresponds to transient interference resolution processes after conflict detection, was expected for the rare conflicting stimuli in the MC context, and a proactive strategy, characterized by a sustained task-relevant focus prior to the occurrence of conflict, was expected in the MI context. Results at the behavioral level supported the proactive/reactive distinction, with the replication of the classic proportion congruent effect (i.e., less interference and facilitation effects in the MI context. fMRI data only partially supported our predictions. Whereas reactive control for incongruent trials in the MC context engaged the expected fronto-parietal network including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex, proactive control in the MI context was not associated with any sustained lateral prefrontal cortex activations, contrary to our hypothesis. Surprisingly, incongruent trials in the MI context elicited transient activation in common with incongruent trials in the MC context, especially in DLPFC, superior parietal lobe, and insula. This lack of sustained activity in MI is discussed in reference to the possible involvement of item-specific rather than list-wide mechanisms of control in the implementation of a high task-relevant focus.

  1. Real-time simulation requirements for study and optimization of power system controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakra, Harbans; McCallum, David; Gagnon, Charles [Institut de Recherche d` Hydro-Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Venne, Andre; Gagnon, Julien [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    At the time of ordering for the multi-terminal dc system linking Hydro-Quebec with New England, Hydro-Quebec also ordered functionally duplicate controls of all the converters and installed these in its real time simulation laboratory. The Hydro-Quebec ac system was also simulated in detail and the testing of the controls as thus made possible in a realistic environment. Many field tests were duplicated and many additional tests were done for correction and optimization. This paper describes some of the features of the real-time simulation carried out for this purpose. (author) 3 figs.

  2. Hazard Analysis of Software Requirements Specification for Process Module of FPGA-based Controllers in NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung; Sejin; Kim, Eui-Sub; Yoo, Junbeom [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Keum, Jong Yong; Lee, Jang-Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Software in PLC, FPGA which are used to develop I and C system also should be analyzed to hazards and risks before used. NUREG/CR-6430 proposes the method for performing software hazard analysis. It suggests analysis technique for software affected hazards and it reveals that software hazard analysis should be performed with the aspects of software life cycle such as requirements analysis, design, detailed design, implements. It also provides the guide phrases for applying software hazard analysis. HAZOP (Hazard and operability analysis) is one of the analysis technique which is introduced in NUREG/CR-6430 and it is useful technique to use guide phrases. HAZOP is sometimes used to analyze the safety of software. Analysis method of NUREG/CR-6430 had been used in Korea nuclear power plant software for PLC development. Appropriate guide phrases and analysis process are selected to apply efficiently and NUREG/CR-6430 provides applicable methods for software hazard analysis is identified in these researches. We perform software hazard analysis of FPGA software requirements specification with two approaches which are NUREG/CR-6430 and HAZOP with using general GW. We also perform the comparative analysis with them. NUREG/CR-6430 approach has several pros and cons comparing with the HAZOP with general guide words and approach. It is enough applicable to analyze the software requirements specification of FPGA.

  3. Bacterial Cell Enlargement Requires Control of Cell Wall Stiffness Mediated by Peptidoglycan Hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard; Turner, Robert D; Bailey, Richard G; Salamaga, Bartłomiej; Mesnage, Stéphane; Mohamad, Sharifah A S; Hayhurst, Emma J; Horsburgh, Malcolm; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2015-07-28

    Most bacterial cells are enclosed in a single macromolecule of the cell wall polymer, peptidoglycan, which is required for shape determination and maintenance of viability, while peptidoglycan biosynthesis is an important antibiotic target. It is hypothesized that cellular enlargement requires regional expansion of the cell wall through coordinated insertion and hydrolysis of peptidoglycan. Here, a group of (apparent glucosaminidase) peptidoglycan hydrolases are identified that are together required for cell enlargement and correct cellular morphology of Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating the overall importance of this enzyme activity. These are Atl, SagA, ScaH, and SagB. The major advance here is the explanation of the observed morphological defects in terms of the mechanical and biochemical properties of peptidoglycan. It was shown that cells lacking groups of these hydrolases have increased surface stiffness and, in the absence of SagB, substantially increased glycan chain length. This indicates that, beyond their established roles (for example in cell separation), some hydrolases enable cellular enlargement by making peptidoglycan easier to stretch, providing the first direct evidence demonstrating that cellular enlargement occurs via modulation of the mechanical properties of peptidoglycan. Understanding bacterial growth and division is a fundamental problem, and knowledge in this area underlies the treatment of many infectious diseases. Almost all bacteria are surrounded by a macromolecule of peptidoglycan that encloses the cell and maintains shape, and bacterial cells must increase the size of this molecule in order to enlarge themselves. This requires not only the insertion of new peptidoglycan monomers, a process targeted by antibiotics, including penicillin, but also breakage of existing bonds, a potentially hazardous activity for the cell. Using Staphylococcus aureus, we have identified a set of enzymes that are critical for cellular enlargement. We

  4. Control of antioxidant supplementation through interview is not appropriate in oxidative-stress sport studies: Analytical confirmation should be required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira; Aragón-Vela, Jeronimo; Casals, Cristina; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Casuso, Rafael A; Huertas, Jesus R

    2017-01-01

    Controlling antioxidant supplementation in athletes involved in studies related to oxidative stress and muscle damage is the key to ensure results. The aim of this study was to confirm through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis whether well-trained individuals lied during a personal interview when asked if they were taking supplements with antioxidants, and how this could affect oxidative stress, muscle damage, and antioxidant response. A total of 94 men, well trained in endurance sports, volunteered in this study. They denied taking any antioxidant supplementation at initial interview. After a HPLC analysis, abnormal α-tocopherol concentrations were detected, probably due to a hidden antioxidant supplementation. Participants were classified into two groups: no evidence of antioxidant supplementation (NS group = α-tocopherol values antioxidant supplementation (S group = α-tocopherol values >80 nmol/mL; n = 19). Lipid peroxidation, muscle damage, antioxidant enzyme activity, and nonenzymatic antioxidant content were analyzed according to this classification. Statistical comparisons were performed using Student's t test. The α-tocopherol concentrations were significantly higher in the S group than in the NS group (MD = 725.01 ± 39.01 nmol/mL; P = 0.001). The S group showed a trend toward lower hydroperoxides than the NS group (MD = 1.19 ± 0.72 nmol/mL; P = 0.071). The S group showed significantly lower catalase activity than the NS group (MD = 0.10 ± 0.02-seg-1 mg-1; P antioxidant supplementation in a personal interview, as they showed high plasmatic α-tocopherol concentrations after HPLC verification. Catalase activity seems to be affected by high α-tocopherol plasma levels. Therefore, we strongly recommend the HPLC analysis as a necessary tool to verify the antioxidant intake and preserve results in studies linking oxidative stress and sport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 14 CFR 21.143 - Quality control data requirements; prime manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... with a chart indicating the functional relationship of the quality control organization to management..., purchased items, and parts and assemblies produced by manufacturers' suppliers including methods used to... delegation of authority to suppliers to make major inspections of parts or assemblies for which the prime...

  6. 40 CFR 141.82 - Description of corrosion control treatment requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... adversely affected other water treatment processes when used by another water system with comparable water... the effect of the chemicals used for corrosion control treatment on other water quality treatment... compound is used); (viii) Silicate (when an inhibitor containing a silicate compound is used); (ix) Water...

  7. Generic Planning and Control of Automated Material Handling Systems: Practical Requirements Versus Existing Theroy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneyah, S.W.A.; Zijm, Willem H.M.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.; Schuur, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of generic planning and control of Automated Material Handling Systems (AMHSs). The paper illustrates the relevance of this research direction, and then addresses three different market sectors where AMHSs are used. These market sectors are: baggage handling,

  8. 40 CFR 82.13 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements for class I controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart) and will not be resold or used in manufacturing. (xiii) The amount of class I, Group VI... class II controlled substances; (xii) The U.S. Customs entry form; (xiii) Dated records documenting the..., an annual list of the amount of critical use methyl bromide bought; (ii) For critical uses of class I...

  9. Lateral control required for satisfactory flying qualities based on flight tests of numerous airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilruth, R R; Turner, W N

    1941-01-01

    Report presents the results of an analysis made of the aileron control characteristics of numerous airplanes tested in flight by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. By the use of previously developed theory, the observed values of pb/2v for the various wing-aileron arrangements were examined to determine the effective section characteristics of the various aileron types.

  10. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures? 73.11 Section 73.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Signatures § 73.11...

  11. 78 FR 48683 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Million Hearts® Hypertension Control Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... and integrating team-based approaches to care, as well as community approaches, such as strengthening... control hypertension may be shared in documents or other communication products that describe generally... marketing. Winners are permitted to cite that they won this challenge. The names, cities, and states of...

  12. 46 CFR 62.35-50 - Tabulated monitoring and safety control requirements for specific systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Status Main (Propulsion steam) turbine (2) (2) (2) (4, 5) Manual trip Main propulsion, diesel (1) (1) (1... lubrication Pressure Low Main propulsion, controllable pitch propeller Hydraulic oil Pressure High, Low...) Gas turbine (8) (8) (8) (8) (5) Engines and turbines Jacking/turning gear Engaged (8) Fuel oil (9) (9...

  13. Generic planning and control of automated material handling systems : practical requirements versus existing theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneyah, S.W.A.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.; Schuur, Peter; Zijm, Willem H.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem to design a generic planning and control architecture for utomated material handling systems (AMHSs). We illustrate the relevance of this research direction, and then address three different market sectors where AMHSs are used, i.e., baggage handling, distribution,

  14. The increased use of radiation requires enhanced activities regarding radiation safety control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Jong; Lee, Jin Woo; Jeong, Gyo Seong

    2015-01-01

    More recently, companies that have obtained permission to use radioactive materials or radiation device and registered radiation workers have increased by 10% and 4% respectively. The increased use of radiation could have an effect on radiation safety control. However, there is not nearly enough manpower and budget compared to the number of workers and facilities. This paper will suggest a counteroffer thought analyzing pending issues. The results of this paper indicate that there are 47 and 31.3 workers per radiation protection officer in educational and research institutes, respectively. There are 20.1 persons per RPO in hospitals, even though there are 2 RPOs appointed. Those with a special license as a radioisotope handler were ruled out as possible managers because medical doctors who have a special license for radioisotope handling normally have no experience with radiation safety. The number of staff members and budget have been insufficient for safety control at most educational and research institutes. It is necessary to build an optimized safety control system for effective Radiation Safety Control. This will reduce the risk factor of safety, and a few RPOs can be supplied for efficiency and convenience

  15. Use of plasma waves to create in Tokamaks quasi-stationary conditions required for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    1993-04-01

    In this thesis are studied the coupling of hybrid waves to the plasma, multijunction antennas, hybrid wave stochastic propagation, fast wave current drive and lower-hybrid current drive experiments in Tore Supra and Jet. The possibility of decoupling current density profile and temperature give one more degree of freedom for the control of plasma in a configuration which is not very flexible

  16. Anterior Cingulate Cortex Input to the Claustrum Is Required for Top-Down Action Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. White

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cognitive abilities, such as volitional attention, operate under top-down, executive frontal cortical control of hierarchically lower structures. The circuit mechanisms underlying this process are unresolved. The claustrum possesses interconnectivity with many cortical areas and, thus, is hypothesized to orchestrate the cortical mantle for top-down control. Whether the claustrum receives top-down input and how this input may be processed by the claustrum have yet to be formally tested, however. We reveal that a rich anterior cingulate cortex (ACC input to the claustrum encodes a preparatory top-down information signal on a five-choice response assay that is necessary for optimal task performance. We further show that ACC input monosynaptically targets claustrum inhibitory interneurons and spiny glutamatergic projection neurons, the latter of which amplify ACC input in a manner that is powerfully constrained by claustrum inhibitory microcircuitry. These results demonstrate ACC input to the claustrum is critical for top-down control guiding action. : White et al. show that anterior cingulate cortex (ACC input to the claustrum encodes a top-down preparatory signal on a 5-choice response assay that is critical for task performance. Claustrum microcircuitry amplifies top-down ACC input in a frequency-dependent manner for eventual propagation to the cortex for cognitive control of action. Keywords: 5CSRTT, optogenetics, fiber photometry, microcircuit, attention, bottom-up, sensory cortices, motor cortices

  17. The increased use of radiation requires enhanced activities regarding radiation safety control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Jong; Lee, Jin Woo; Jeong, Gyo Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    More recently, companies that have obtained permission to use radioactive materials or radiation device and registered radiation workers have increased by 10% and 4% respectively. The increased use of radiation could have an effect on radiation safety control. However, there is not nearly enough manpower and budget compared to the number of workers and facilities. This paper will suggest a counteroffer thought analyzing pending issues. The results of this paper indicate that there are 47 and 31.3 workers per radiation protection officer in educational and research institutes, respectively. There are 20.1 persons per RPO in hospitals, even though there are 2 RPOs appointed. Those with a special license as a radioisotope handler were ruled out as possible managers because medical doctors who have a special license for radioisotope handling normally have no experience with radiation safety. The number of staff members and budget have been insufficient for safety control at most educational and research institutes. It is necessary to build an optimized safety control system for effective Radiation Safety Control. This will reduce the risk factor of safety, and a few RPOs can be supplied for efficiency and convenience.

  18. Damage Control Orthopedics Management as Vital Procedure in Elderly Patients with Femoral Neck Fractures Complicated with Chronic Renal Failure: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenhui; Wang, Yunjiao; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Yu; Wu, Siyu; Du, Quanyin; Wang, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure (CRF) predisposes to hip fractures in elderly patients, with high subsequent mortality. Selection and timing of the surgical procedure of such patients is a serious challenge. Many clinicians believe in earlier surgery as preferable and providing better outcomes. Damage control orthopedics (DCO) aids to adjust and optimize the overall condition of patients. Methods In 32 patients with femoral neck fractures complicated with CRF, we evaluated how the timing of the surgery determines the mortality rates if the DCO approach is applied. Preoperative ASA grading, POSSUM score, P-POSSUM score and DCO were carried out. Based on the assessment, timing of the surgery was ascertained. Results Of a total of 32 patients, twenty-nine patients were accepted for either early (failures and acute respiratory distress syndrome. There was no significant difference in complication rates and Harris hip score between both groups. Conclusion In patients with femoral neck fracture complicated with CRF, delaying the surgery for several days does not increase the incidence of postoperative adverse events. PMID:27149117

  19. Exercise-induced muscle damage is reduced in resistance-trained males by branched chain amino acids: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howatson Glyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well documented that exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD decreases muscle function and causes soreness and discomfort. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA supplementation has been shown to increase protein synthesis and decrease muscle protein breakdown, however, the effects of BCAAs on recovery from damaging resistance training are unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of a BCAA supplementation on markers of muscle damage elicited via a sport specific bout of damaging exercise in trained volunteers. Methods Twelve males (mean ± SD age, 23 ± 2 y; stature, 178.3 ± 3.6 cm and body mass, 79.6 ± 8.4 kg were randomly assigned to a supplement (n = 6 or placebo (n = 6 group. The damaging exercise consisted of 100 consecutive drop-jumps. Creatine kinase (CK, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC, muscle soreness (DOMS, vertical jump (VJ, thigh circumference (TC and calf circumference (CC were measured as markers of muscle damage. All variables were measured immediately before the damaging exercise and at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h post-exercise. Results A significant time effect was seen for all variables. There were significant group effects showing a reduction in CK efflux and muscle soreness in the BCAA group compared to the placebo (P Conclusion The present study has shown that BCAA administered before and following damaging resistance exercise reduces indices of muscle damage and accelerates recovery in resistance-trained males. It seems likely that BCAA provided greater bioavailablity of substrate to improve protein synthesis and thereby the extent of secondary muscle damage associated with strenuous resistance exercise. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT01529281.

  20. Technical basis for high-level waste repository land control requirements for Palo Duro Basin, Paradox Basin, and Richton Dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.P.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-02-01

    Three sites, the Palo Duro Basin in Texas, the Paradox Basin in Utah, and the Richton Dome in Mississippi, are being investigated by the US Department of Energy for high-level radioactive-waste disposal in mined, deep geologic repositories in salt. This report delineates the use of regulatory, engineering, and performance assessment information to establish the technical basis for controlled area requirements. Based on the size of the controlled area determined, plus that of the geologic repository operations area, recommendations of possible land control or ownership area requirements for each locale are provided. On a technical basis, the following minimum land control or ownership requirements are recommended, assuming repository operations area of 2240 ac (907 ha), or 3.5 mi 2 (9.1 km 2 ): Palo Duro Basin - 4060 ac (1643 ha), or 6.3 mi 2 (16.4 km 2 ); Paradox Basin - 4060 ac (1643 ha), or 6.3 mi 2 (16.4 km 2 ); and Richton Dome - 5000 ac (2024 ha), or 7.8 mi 2 (20.2 km 2 ). Of the factors used to determine the technically based recommendations, one was found to dominate each locale. For the Palo Duro and Paradox Basins, the dominant factor was the need to limit potential radionuclide release by ground-water flow to the accessible environment. For the Richton Dome, the dominant factor was the need to limit the potential effects of solution mining on dome and repository integrity

  1. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl R Krull

    Full Text Available Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control, with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation

  2. The Sputum Colour Chart as a predictor of lung inflammation, proteolysis and damage in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: a case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeminne, Pieter C; Vandooren, Jennifer; Moelants, Eva A; Decraene, Ann; Rabaey, Evelyn; Pauwels, Ans; Seys, Sven; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Proost, Paul; Dupont, Lieven J

    2014-02-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is characterized by a vicious cycle of airway infection, inflammation and structural damage with inappropriate mucus clearance. Our aim was to relate the value of proteolytic enzymes, proteolytic enzyme activity and inflammatory markers to disease severity and symptoms in patients with NCFB. Sputum induction in NCFB patients and healthy controls was performed. Sputum was analysed for total and differential cell count, markers of inflammation (CXCL8 (also known as interleukin-8) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) and proteolytic enzymes (neutrophil elastase (NE), gelatin zymography and total gelatinolytic activity (TGA)). Each patient was evaluated by spirometry, Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) and Sputum Colour Chart (SCC). Patient files were analysed to determine Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization status. The computed tomography (CT) closest to the date sputum induction was scored by a radiologist. NCFB patients showed significantly higher neutrophils, CXCL8, TNF-α, NE and TGA than healthy controls. TGA subanalysis showed that the majority of the activity was NE (82 ± 6.4%). Residual activity was mainly zinc ion-dependent matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity (18 ± 6.4%). Subanalysis showed that patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization had more activated MMP-9. Correlations were seen between proteolytic enzymes and inflammation and disease severity (spirometry and CT score), but not with the LCQ. SCC was associated with increased markers of inflammation, proteolytic enzymes and worse CT score. We show that sputum purulence assessment in daily clinical practice using the SCC is a quick and easy tool that reflects severity of inflammation, destruction and proteolytic enzymatic activity/presence. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  3. Minimum iron requirements of marine phytoplankton and the implications for the biogeochemical control of new production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Fe:PO 4 ratio at which nutrient limitation of final cell yield shifts from one nutrient to the other was determined for 22 species of marine phytoplankton. Among eucaryotic phytoplankton, coastal species have subsistence optimum Fe:P molar ratios of 10 -2 to 10 -3.1 , but most oceanic species have ratios of -4 , indicating that oceanic species have been able to adapt their biochemical composition to the low availability of Fe in the open ocean. In contrast, both coastal and oceanic species of cyanobacteria have relatively high Fe:P molar ratio requirements, ranging from 10 -1.4 to 10 -2.7 . A simple comparison of these requirement ratios with the ratios of the Fe and PO 4 fluxes to the photic zone from deep water and the atmosphere indicates that new production of cyanobacterial biomass is Fe limited, but new production of eucaryotic algal biomass is not. Because of the large differences among species in their Fe requirements, especially between procaryotes and eucaryotes, changes in the relative inputs of Fe and PO 4 to the photic zone are expected to lead to changes in the species composition of phytoplankton communities. Indeed, the ratio of atmospheric to deep-water inputs of nutrients and the resulting Fe:P input ratios appear to influence the relative abundance of unicellular cyanobacteria and Trichodesmium and their vertical and biogeographic distributions. Because some phytoplankton species have adaptations that reduce their dependence on combined N and Fe but not on P, it is concluded that PO 4 is the ultimate limiting nutrient of new production of organic C on a geochemical and evolutionary time scale, even though N and Fe are important growth rate-limiting nutrients on an ecological time scale

  4. Antenatal allopurinol for reduction of birth asphyxia induced brain damage (ALLO-Trial; a randomized double blind placebo controlled multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Lindern Jeannette

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is associated with development of cerebral palsy and cognitive disability later in life and is therefore one of the fundamental problems in perinatal medicine. The xanthine-oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduces the formation of free radicals, thereby limiting the amount of hypoxia-reperfusion damage. In case of suspected intra-uterine hypoxia, both animal and human studies suggest that maternal administration of allopurinol immediately prior to delivery reduces hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Methods/Design The proposed trial is a randomized double blind placebo controlled multicenter study in pregnant women at term in whom the foetus is suspected of intra-uterine hypoxia. Allopurinol 500 mg IV or placebo will be administered antenatally to the pregnant woman when foetal hypoxia is suspected. Foetal distress is being diagnosed by the clinician as an abnormal or non-reassuring foetal heart rate trace, preferably accompanied by either significant ST-wave abnormalities (as detected by the STAN-monitor or an abnormal foetal blood scalp sampling (pH Primary outcome measures are the amount of S100B (a marker for brain tissue damage and the severity of oxidative stress (measured by isoprostane, neuroprostane, non protein bound iron and hypoxanthine, both measured in umbilical cord blood. Secondary outcome measures are neonatal mortality, serious composite neonatal morbidity and long-term neurological outcome. Furthermore pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics will be investigated. We expect an inclusion of 220 patients (110 per group to be feasible in an inclusion period of two years. Given a suspected mean value of S100B of 1.05 ug/L (SD 0.37 ug/L in the placebo group this trial has a power of 90% (alpha 0.05 to detect a mean value of S100B of 0.89 ug/L (SD 0.37 ug/L in the 'allopurinol-treated' group (z-test2-sided. Analysis will be by intention to treat and it allows for one interim analysis

  5. Strong tobacco control program requirements and secure funding are not enough: lessons from Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Allison; Sullivan, Sarah; Hendlin, Yogi; Barnes, Richard; Glantz, Stanton

    2012-05-01

    Florida's Tobacco Pilot Program (TPP; 1998-2003), with its edgy Truth media campaign, achieved unprecedented youth smoking reductions and became a model for tobacco control programming. In 2006, 3 years after the TPP was defunded, public health groups restored funding for tobacco control programming by convincing Florida voters to amend their constitution. Despite the new program's strong legal structure, Governor Charlie Crist's Department of Health implemented a low-impact program. Although they secured the program's strong structure and funding, Florida's nongovernmental public health organizations did not mobilize to demand a high-impact program. Implementation of Florida's Amendment 4 demonstrates that a strong programmatic structure and secure funding are insufficient to ensure a successful public health program, without external pressure from nongovernmental groups.

  6. Report of the Census Task Force on beamline control system requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsotti, E.J.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bogert, V.D.; Borcherding, F.O.; Butler, J.; Czarapata, P.C.; Spalding, W.J.; Thomas, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    A special task force was appointed to study the experience with the present beamline control system at Fermilab and to make recommendations in this area. The charge of the committee and the list of its members are appended. In order to carry out its assignment, the committee conducted a series of meetings in which it discussed the controls situation in general and the best way to approach the user community. The various groups of users were identified, and a letter was written to representatives of these groups asking questions concerning the present system and future needs. The committee met with each group to discuss the response to these questions. Written summaries of the discussions are appended. Conclusions are drawn regarding current problems, systematic upgrades and specific recommendations

  7. Ebola: a holistic approach is required to achieve effective management and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Anna; Afolabi, Muhammed O; Saidu, Yauba; Kampmann, Beate

    2015-04-01

    The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has already caused substantial mortality and dire human and economic consequences. It continues to represent an alarming public health threat in the region and beyond and jeopardizes the provision of health care and other services in the affected countries. The scale of the epidemic has accelerated research efforts for diagnostics, treatment, and prevention galvanized through increased availability of funding. Our knowledge relating to the virus, disease pathogenesis, risk factors, dynamics of transmission, and epidemic control is increasing, and sociocultural factors have emerged as critical determinants for the success and failure of control efforts. However, there is a long way to go. In this review we summarize the current knowledge, examine the sociocultural context in West Africa, and outline priority areas for future research. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pitch control margin at high angle of attack - Quantitative requirements (flight test correlation with simulation predictions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, J.; Hadfield, C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent mishaps and incidents on Class IV aircraft have shown a need for establishing quantitative longitudinal high angle of attack (AOA) pitch control margin design guidelines for future aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center has conducted a series of simulation tests to define these design guidelines. Flight test results have confirmed the simulation studies in that pilot rating of high AOA nose-down recoveries were based on the short-term response interval in the forms of pitch acceleration and rate.

  9. Controlled initiation of chromosomal replication in Escherichia coli requires functional Hda protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Johanna Eltz; Skarstad, Kirsten; Crooke, Elliott

    2003-05-01

    Regulatory inactivation of DnaA helps ensure that the Escherichia coli chromosome is replicated only once per cell cycle, through accelerated hydrolysis of active replication initiator ATP-DnaA to inactive ADP-DnaA. Analysis of deltahda strains revealed that the regulatory inactivation of DnaA component Hda is necessary for maintaining controlled initiation but not for cell growth or viability.

  10. The Atomic Energy Control Board requirements for the radioisotope licensing of a radiopharmaceutical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, P.

    1980-01-01

    Items that must be addressed by an applicant for a radioisotope license in Canada are described. Site, design and operating conditions, safety assessment, organization, emergency procedures and operating policies and procedures must be described to the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), in support of any license application. All information submitted in support of the application is subject to AECB's policy on public access to that information. (OT)

  11. Modern requirements to quality assurance and control in nuclear fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    This lecture have shown a new type of quality assurance management has already successfully introduced in various industries and now starts to be used increasingly in the nuclear fuel industry. Static authority regulations and a tendency to bureaucratic understanding and handling of these regulations lead to a delayed start and a relatively slow progress of these quality strategies in the nuclear fuel technology. However, the economic pressure of strong competition and increasing demands of the utilities as the user of nuclear fuel result in a more determined introduction also to this area. The different use of statistical methods of two different fuel vendors are shown. Vendor A uses old fashioned methods. The focus is on the expensive final product control and few emphasis is on design of experiments and process control. Consequently, this vendor will have high costs, not only for QC and rejection but also for repair and replace actions after delivery. To the contrary, vendor B invests primarily in the design of experiments and process control. This vendor will profit only from lower direct costs but also from being at the front line of technical development and from enjoying a satisfied and happy customer. Many well examined quality management tools are available today which help not only to improve the quality but also decrease the costs. Still, the progress in using these techniques in nuclear fuel technology is limited and not comparable to the progress in other industries like automobile production or the electronic industry. (author)

  12. Full impact of laboratory information system requires direct use by clinical staff: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Joaquín A; Shin, Sonya; Contreras, Carmen; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Asencios, Luis; Kim, Jihoon; Rodriguez, Pablo; Cegielski, Peter; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the time to communicate laboratory results to health centers (HCs) between the e-Chasqui web-based information system and the pre-existing paper-based system. Cluster randomized controlled trial in 78 HCs in Peru. In the intervention group, 12 HCs had web access to results via e-Chasqui (point-of-care HCs) and forwarded results to 17 peripheral HCs. In the control group, 22 point-of-care HCs received paper results directly and forwarded them to 27 peripheral HCs. Baseline data were collected for 15 months. Post-randomization data were collected for at least 2 years. Comparisons were made between intervention and control groups, stratified by point-of-care versus peripheral HCs. For point-of-care HCs, the intervention group took less time to receive drug susceptibility tests (DSTs) (median 9 vs 16 days, p60 days to arrive (pChasqui information system had reduced communication times and fewer results with delays of >2 months. Peripheral HCs had no benefits from the system. This suggests that health establishments should have point-of-care access to reap the benefits of electronic laboratory reporting.

  13. Risk of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl, K.

    1997-01-01

    Following the opening and words of welcome by Mr. Fritz Unterpertinger (unit director at the Austrian Federal Ministry for the Environment, Youth and Family; BMUJF) Mrs Helga Kromp-Kolb (professor at the Institute for Meteorology and Physics of the University of Natural Resources Science Vienna) illustrated the risks of nuclear damage in Europe by means of a nuclear risk map. She explained that even from a scientific or technical point of view the assessment of risks arising from nuclear power stations was fraught with great uncertainties. Estimates about in how far MCAs (maximum credible accident) could still be controlled by safety systems vary widely and so do assessments of the probability of a core melt. But there is wide agreement in all risk assessments conducted so far that MCAs might occur within a - from a human point of view - conceivable number of years. In this connection one has to bear in mind that the occurrence of such a major accident - whatever its probability may be - could entail immense damage and the question arises whether or not it is at all justifiable to expose the general public to such a risk. Klaus Rennings (Centre for European Economic Research, Mannheim, Germany) dealt with the economic aspects of nuclear risk assessment. He explained that there are already a number of studies available aiming to assess the risk of damage resulting from a core melt accident in economic terms. As to the probability of occurrence estimates vary widely between one incident in 3,333 and 250,000 year of reactor operation. It is assumed, however, that a nuclear accident involving a core melt in Germany would probably exceed the damage caused by the Chernobyl accident. The following speakers addressed the legal aspects of risks associated with nuclear installations. Mrs Monika Gimpel-Hinteregger (professor at the Institute for Civil Law in Graz) gave an overview on the applicable Austrian law concerning third party liability in the field of nuclear energy

  14. Cognitive requirements in the redesign of a TRIGA RC-1 control room: The role of the operators' evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visciola, M.; Bagnara, S.; Ruggeri, R.

    1986-01-01

    When a control room undergoes to a redesign process it is of crucial importance to analyze how operators critically review it and which improvements they suggest. This is even more critical when presumably the same people will operate in the new 'redesigned' control room: Consistency in the mental models possessed by the operators of the plant functions and of their control should be emphasized. Consistency in the mental models can be assumed when redesign follows well-established guidelines drawn from experiences and studies carried out in very similar situations. However, this condition is not fulfilled when a nuclear research control room has to be redesigned, since available guidelines (e.g.; NUREG-0700) are based on studies conducted on nuclear power plant control rooms. These two types of facilities are of much difference as for activities performed in the control room, goals to be aimed at, costs and risks. As a consequence, the available guidelines cannot be safely applied to such a situation as the redesign of a TRIGA RC-1 control room. So, data have to be collected in order to allow the operators to efficiently and easily adapt to the new control room by consistently 'updating' their mental models. In the present study, these data have been collected through structured interviews, which consisted of a modified version of EPRI. The results can be summarized as follows: 1) The operators critically reviewed the present control room and underlined the lack of 'transparency' of the control system as for the plant's conditions and for the feedbacks about their own activities. 2) The operators' work analysis showed that they spend much of their time out of the control room. This means that, if the operators have to stay in the control room, they should be allowed to perform more and higher-level activities than those presently required, to prevent understimulation. So, the redesign should or allow and support the central control and maintenance, and other

  15. 40 CFR 63.1586 - What are the emission points and control requirements for a non-industrial POTW treatment plant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control requirements for a non-industrial POTW treatment plant? 63.1586 Section 63.1586 Protection of... Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works Non-Industrial Potw Treatment Plant Requirements § 63.1586 What are the emission points and control requirements for a non-industrial POTW treatment plant? There are...

  16. No control genes required: Bayesian analysis of qRT-PCR data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V Matz

    Full Text Available Model-based analysis of data from quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is potentially more powerful and versatile than traditional methods. Yet existing model-based approaches cannot properly deal with the higher sampling variances associated with low-abundant targets, nor do they provide a natural way to incorporate assumptions about the stability of control genes directly into the model-fitting process.In our method, raw qPCR data are represented as molecule counts, and described using generalized linear mixed models under Poisson-lognormal error. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is used to sample from the joint posterior distribution over all model parameters, thereby estimating the effects of all experimental factors on the expression of every gene. The Poisson-based model allows for the correct specification of the mean-variance relationship of the PCR amplification process, and can also glean information from instances of no amplification (zero counts. Our method is very flexible with respect to control genes: any prior knowledge about the expected degree of their stability can be directly incorporated into the model. Yet the method provides sensible answers without such assumptions, or even in the complete absence of control genes. We also present a natural Bayesian analogue of the "classic" analysis, which uses standard data pre-processing steps (logarithmic transformation and multi-gene normalization but estimates all gene expression changes jointly within a single model. The new methods are considerably more flexible and powerful than the standard delta-delta Ct analysis based on pairwise t-tests.Our methodology expands the applicability of the relative-quantification analysis protocol all the way to the lowest-abundance targets, and provides a novel opportunity to analyze qRT-PCR data without making any assumptions concerning target stability. These procedures have been implemented as the MCMC.qpcr package in R.

  17. No control genes required: Bayesian analysis of qRT-PCR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Mikhail V; Wright, Rachel M; Scott, James G

    2013-01-01

    Model-based analysis of data from quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is potentially more powerful and versatile than traditional methods. Yet existing model-based approaches cannot properly deal with the higher sampling variances associated with low-abundant targets, nor do they provide a natural way to incorporate assumptions about the stability of control genes directly into the model-fitting process. In our method, raw qPCR data are represented as molecule counts, and described using generalized linear mixed models under Poisson-lognormal error. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is used to sample from the joint posterior distribution over all model parameters, thereby estimating the effects of all experimental factors on the expression of every gene. The Poisson-based model allows for the correct specification of the mean-variance relationship of the PCR amplification process, and can also glean information from instances of no amplification (zero counts). Our method is very flexible with respect to control genes: any prior knowledge about the expected degree of their stability can be directly incorporated into the model. Yet the method provides sensible answers without such assumptions, or even in the complete absence of control genes. We also present a natural Bayesian analogue of the "classic" analysis, which uses standard data pre-processing steps (logarithmic transformation and multi-gene normalization) but estimates all gene expression changes jointly within a single model. The new methods are considerably more flexible and powerful than the standard delta-delta Ct analysis based on pairwise t-tests. Our methodology expands the applicability of the relative-quantification analysis protocol all the way to the lowest-abundance targets, and provides a novel opportunity to analyze qRT-PCR data without making any assumptions concerning target stability. These procedures have been implemented as the MCMC.qpcr package in R.

  18. Regulatory philosophy and requirements for radiation control in Canadian uranium mine-mill facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-10-01

    With the point made that radiation exposure is one of the health hazards of uranium mining and accordingly has to be controlled, the Canadian regulatory philosophy is outlined as it pertains to the uranium mining industry. Two extremes in regulatory approach are examined, and the joint regulatory process is explained. Two examples of poor management performance are given, and the role of mine unions in the regulatory process is touched upon. The development of new regulations to cover ventilation and employee training is sketched briefly. The author concludes with a general expression of objectives for the eighties which include improved personal dosimetry

  19. Formulation of advanced consumables management models: Environmental control and electrical power system performance models requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J. K.; Torian, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Software design specifications for developing environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) and electrical power system (EPS) programs into interactive computer programs are presented. Specifications for the ECLSS program are at the detail design level with respect to modification of an existing batch mode program. The FORTRAN environmental analysis routines (FEAR) are the subject batch mode program. The characteristics of the FEAR program are included for use in modifying batch mode programs to form interactive programs. The EPS program specifications are at the preliminary design level. Emphasis is on top-down structuring in the development of an interactive program.

  20. Renewable energy resources of the marine environment and its control requirements

    OpenAIRE

    García Moreno, Emilio; Correcher Salvador, Antonio; Quiles Cucarella, Eduardo; Morant Anglada, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    [ES] En este artículo se presentan una serie de dispositivos generadores de energía renovable procedente del entorno marino, que en los últimos años han despertado creciente interés. En especial se describen los tipos principales de Generadores Eólicos Flotantes, las Turbinas de Corriente Marina y diversos dispositivos basados en Energía Undimotriz. Se destacan los principales requerimientos a considerar bajo el punto de vista de la ingeniería de control, considerando los objetivos d...