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Sample records for repository licensing process

  1. PROCESS FOR LICENSE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT FOR THE GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS M. FRANKS AND NORMAN C. HENDERSON

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), specifically the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has been charged by the U.S. Congress, through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), with the responsibility for obtaining a license to develop a geologic repository. The NRC is the licensing authority for geologic disposal, and its regulations pertinent to construction authorization and license application are specified in 10 CFR Part 60, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories, (section)60.21ff and (section)60.31ff. This paper discusses the process the Yucca Mountain Site Site Characterization Project (YMP) will use to identify and apply regulatory and industry guidance to development of the license application (LA) for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This guidance will be implemented by the ''Technical Guidance Document for Preparation of the License Application'' (TGD), currently in development

  2. Process for license application development for the geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, D.M.; Henderson, N.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), specifically the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has been charged by the US Congress, through the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), with the responsibility for obtaining a license to develop a geologic repository. The NRC is the licensing authority for geologic disposal, and its regulations pertinent to construction authorization and license application are specified in 10 CFR Part 60, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories, section 60.21ff and section 60.31ff. This paper discusses the process the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) will use to identify and apply regulatory and industry guidance to development of the license application (LA) for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This guidance will be implemented by the Technical Guidance Document for Preparation of the License Application (TGD), currently in development

  3. Compliance with NRC subsystem requirements in the repository licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minwalla, H.

    1994-01-01

    Section 121 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Commission) to issue technical requirements and criteria, for the use of a system of multiple barriers in the design of the repository, that are not inconsistent with any comparable standard promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Administrator of the EPA is required to promulgate generally applicable standards for protection of the general environment from offsite releases from radioactive material in repositories. The Commission's regulations pertaining to geologic repositories are provided in 10 CFR part 60. The Commission has provided in 10 CFR 60.112 the overall post-closure system performance objective which is used to demonstrate compliance with the EPA high-level waste (HLW) disposal standard. In addition, the Commission has provided, in 10 CFR 60.113, subsystem performance requirements for substantially complete containment, fractional release rate, and groundwater travel time; however, none of these subsystem performance requirements have a causal technical nexus with the EPA HLW disposal standard. This paper examines the issue of compliance with the conflicting dual regulatory role of subsystem performance requirements in the repository licensing process and recommends several approaches that would appropriately define the role of subsystem performance requirements in the repository licensing process

  4. Licensing process characteristics of Small Modular Reactors and spent nuclear fuel repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Söderholm, Kristiina, E-mail: kristiina.soderholm@fortum.com [Fortum Power (Finland); Tuunanen, Jari, E-mail: jari.tuunanen@fortum.com [Fortum Power (Finland); Amaba, Ben, E-mail: baamaba@us.ibm.com [IBM Complex Systems (United States); Bergqvist, Sofia, E-mail: sofia.bergqvist@se.ibm.com [IBM Rational Software (Sweden); Lusardi, Paul, E-mail: plusardi@nuscalepower.com [NuScale Power (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We examine the licensing process challenges of modular nuclear facilities. • We compare the features of Small Modular Reactors and spent nuclear fuel repository. • We present the need of nuclear licensing simplification. • Part of the licensing is proposed to be internationally applicable. • Systems engineering and requirements engineering benefits are presented. - Abstract: This paper aims to increase the understanding of the licensing processes characteristics of Small Modular Reactors (SMR) compared with licensing of spent nuclear fuel repository. The basis of the SMR licensing process development lies in licensing processes used in Finland, France, the UK, Canada and the USA. These countries have been selected for this study because of their various licensing processes and recent actions in the new NPP construction. Certain aspects of the aviation industry licensing process have also been studied and selected practices have been investigated as possibly suitable for use in nuclear licensing. Suitable features for SMR licensing are emphasized and suggested. The licensing features of the spent nuclear fuel deep repository along with similar features of SMR licensing are discussed. Since there are similar types of challenges of lengthy licensing time frames, as well as modular features to be taken into account in licensing, these two different nuclear industry fields can be compared. The main SMR features to take into account in licensing are: • Standardization of the design. • Modularity. • Mass production. • Serial construction. Modularity can be divided into two different categories: the first category is simply a single power plant unit constructed of independently engineered modules (e.g. construction process for Westinghouse AP-1000 NPP) and the second one a power plant composed of many reactor modules, which are manufactured in factories and installed as needed (e.g. NuScale Power SMR design). The deep underground repository

  5. The role of natural analogs in the repository licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of a permanent geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste (NLW) is implicitly based on analogy to natural systems that have been stable for millions or billions of years. The time of radioactive and chemical toxicity of HLW exceeds the duration of human civilization, and it is impossible to demonstrate the accuracy of predictions of the behavior of engineered or social systems over such long periods

  6. Use of modeling in repository licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, J.M. III; Echols, F.S.

    1995-01-01

    A review of the regulatory history of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations applicable to the licensing of a geologic repository, as well as a review of NRC administrative (licensing) decisions and federal case law, support the NRC's use of simplified models, in appropriate circumstances, which provide well-documented and reasonably conservative bounding assumptions, together with the use of expert judgement, natural analogues, and other aids to supplement available information, in reaching its reasonable assurance determination whether the public health and safety will be adequately protected if the Yucca Mountain, Nevada site should be licensed for development as a geologic repository. Specific examples are provided to assist the reader to better understand how such qualitative concepts as open-quote reasonable assurance close-quote, open-quote reasonably conservative close-quote, and open-quote adequate close-quote protection are used in an administrative context to resolve technical issues

  7. Recommendations: Procedure to develop a preliminary safety report as part of the radioactive waste repository construction licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The structure of a preliminary safety report for the title purpose should be as follows: A. Textual part: 1. General (Introduction, Basic information about the construction, Timetable); 2. Site information (Siting, Geography and demography, Meteorology and climatic situation, Hydrology, Geology and hydrogeology); 3. Repository design description (Basic function and performance requirements, Design, Auxiliary systems, Fire prevention/protection, Emergency plans); 4. Operation of the repository (Waste acceptance and inspection, Waste handling and interim storage, Waste disposal, Operating monitoring), 5. Health and environmental impact assessment (Radionuclide inventory, Radionuclide transport paths and mechanisms of release into the environment, Radionuclide release in normal and emergency situations, Radiation protection - health impact assessment and regulatory compliance, Draft operating limits and conditions, Proposed ways of assuring physical protection, Uncertainty assessment), 6. Safe repository shutdown/decommissioning concept, 7 Quality assurance assessment, 8. List of selected equipment. B. Annexes: Maps, Drawings, Diagrams, Miscellaneous; C. Documentation: Previous safety report amendments, Protocols, Miscellaneous. (P.A.)

  8. Licensing information needs for a high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.J.; Greeves, J.T.; Logsdon, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The information needs for licensing findings during the development of a repository for high-level waste (HLW) are described. In particular, attention is given to the information and needs to demonstrate, for construction authorization purposes: repository constructibility, waste retrievability, waste containment, and waste isolation

  9. Process model repositories and PNML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hee, van K.M.; Post, R.D.J.; Somers, L.J.A.M.; Werf, van der J.M.E.M.; Kindler, E.

    2004-01-01

    Bringing system and process models together in repositories facilitates the interchange of model information between modelling tools, and allows the combination and interlinking of complementary models. Petriweb is a web application for managing such repositories. It supports hierarchical process

  10. Process mining software repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poncin, W.; Serebrenik, A.; Brand, van den M.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Software developers' activities are in general recorded in software repositories such as version control systems, bug trackers and mail archives. While abundant information is usually present in such repositories, successful information extraction is often challenged by the necessity to

  11. Licensing process in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiippana, Petteri

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act, the use of nuclear energy constitutes operations subject to license. The licensing process and conditions for granting a license is defined in the legislation. The licenses are applied from and granted by the Government. This paper discusses briefly the licensing process in Finland and also the roles and responsibilities of main stakeholders in licensing. Licensing of a nuclear power plant in Finland has three steps. The first step is the Decision in Principle (DiP). Goal of DiP is to decide whether using nuclear power is for the overall good for the Finnish society. The second step is Construction License (CL) and the goal of CL phase is to determine whether the design of the proposed plant is safe and that the participating organisations are capable of constructing the plant to meet safety goals. The third step is the Operating License (OL) and the goal of the OL phase is to determine whether the plant operates safely and licensee is capable to operate the plant safely. Main stakeholders in the licensing process in Finland are the utility (licensee) interested in using nuclear power in Finland, Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), Government, Parliament, STUK, the municipality siting the plant and the general public. Government grants all licenses, and Parliament has to ratify Government's Decision in Principle. STUK has to assess the safety of the license applications in each step and give statement to the Ministry. Municipality has to agree to site the plant. Both STUK and the municipality have a veto right in the licensing process

  12. Overview of the Yucca Mountain Licensing Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Wisenburg

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the licensing process for a Yucca Mountain repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The paper discusses the steps in the licensing proceeding, the roles of the participants, the licensing and hearing requirements contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. A description of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff acceptance and compliance reviews of the Department of Energy (DOE) application for a construction authorization and a license to receive and possess high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel is provided. The paper also includes a detailed description of the hearing process

  13. License renewal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fable, D.; Prah, M.; Vrankic, K.; Lebegner, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about license renewal process, as defined by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Atomic Energy Act and NRC regulations limit commercial power reactor licenses to an initial 40 years but also permit such licenses to be renewed. This original 40-year term for reactor licenses was based on economic and antitrust considerations not on limitations of nuclear technology. Due to this selected time period; however, some structures and components may have been engineered on the basis of an expected 40-year service life. The NRC has established a timely license renewal process and clear requirements codified in 10 CFR Part 51 and 10 CFR Part 54, that are needed to assure safe plant operation for extended plant life. The timely renewal of licenses for an additional 20 years, where appropriate to renew them, may be important to ensuring an adequate energy supply during the first half of the 21st Century. License renewal rests on the determination that currently operating plants continue to maintain adequate levels of safety, and over the plant's life, this level has been enhanced through maintenance of the licensing bases, with appropriate adjustments to address new information from industry operating experience. Additionally, NRC activities have provided ongoing assurance that the licensing bases will continue to provide an acceptable level of safety. This paper provides additional discussion of license renewal costs, as one of key elements in evaluation of license renewal justifiability. Including structure of costs, approximately value and two different approaches, conservative and typical. Current status and position of Nuclear Power Plant Krsko, related to license renewal process, will be briefly presented in this paper. NPP Krsko is designed based on NRC Regulations, so requirements from 10 CFR 51, and 10 CFR 54, are applicable to NPP Krsko, as well. Finally, this paper will give an overview of current status of

  14. SKB's safety case for a final repository license application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, Allan; Andersson, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The safety assessment SR-Site is a main component in SKB's license application, submitted in March 2011, to construct and operate a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in the municipality of Oesthammar, Sweden. Its role in the application is to demonstrate long-term safety for a repository at Forsmark. The assessment relates to the KBS-3 disposal concept in which copper canisters with a cast iron insert containing spent nuclear fuel are surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at approximately 500 m depth in saturated, granitic rock. The principal regulatory acceptance criterion, issued by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), requires that the annual risk of harmful effects after closure not exceed 10 -6 for a representative individual in the group exposed to the greatest risk. SSM's regulations also imply that the assessment time for a repository of this type is one million years after closure. The licence applied for is one in a stepwise series of permits, each requiring a safety report. The next step concerns a permit to start excavation of the repository and requires a preliminary safety assessment report (PSAR) covering both operational and post-closure safety. Later steps include permission to commence trial operation, to commence regular operation and to close the final repository. (authors)

  15. SSM's licensing review of a spent nuclear fuel repository in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dverstorpand, Bjoern; Stroemberg, Bo

    2014-01-01

    On 16 March 2011 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) submitted license applications for a general license to construct, possess and operate a KBS-3 type spent nuclear fuel repository at the Forsmark site, in Oesthammar municipality, and an encapsulation plant in Oskarshamn municipality. The KBS-3 method, which has been developed by SKB over a period of more than 30 years, entails disposing of the spent fuel in copper canisters, surrounded by a swelling bentonite clay, at about 500 m depth in crystalline basement rock. SKB's applications are being evaluated in parallel by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) according to the Act on Nuclear Activities and by the Land and Environmental Court according to the Environmental Code. During the review SSM will act as an expert review body to the Land and Environmental Court in the areas of radiation protection, safety and security/non-proliferation. Both SSM and the court will produce a statement with a recommendation regarding a licensing decision and licensing conditions to the government. The government will make the final decision after consulting the municipalities concerned by SKB's facilities (municipal veto applies). The current licensing decision is just one of several licensing decisions that will be required for the repository. However it is arguably the most important one, because it is the last licensing stage with a broad societal involvement including an environmental impact assessment (EIA) process, national consultations and municipal veto for the concerned municipalities. The licensing steps to follow, should SKB be granted a license by the government, only require approval by SSM. These steps include application for start of actual construction work, test operation and routine operation. (authors)

  16. Strategic Basis for License Application Planning for a Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberry, C. M.; Brocoum, S. J.; Gamble, R. P.; Murray, R. C.; Cline, M.

    2002-01-01

    If Yucca Mountain, Nevada is designated as the site for development of a geologic repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) must obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval first for repository construction, then for an operating license, and, eventually, for repository closure and decommissioning. The licensing criteria defined in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 63 (10 CFR Part 63) establish the basis for these NRC decisions. Submittal of a license application (LA) to the NRC for authorization to construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain site is, at this point, only a potential future action by the DOE. The policy process defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), as amended, for recommendation and designation of Yucca Mountain as a repository site makes it difficult to predict whether or when the site might be designated. The DOE may only submit a LA to the NRC if the site designation takes effect. In spite of this uncertainty, the DOE must take prudent and appropriate action now, and over the next several years, to prepare for development and timely submittal of a LA. This is particularly true given the need for the DOE to develop, load, and certify the operation of its electronic information system to provide access to its relevant records as part of the licensing support network (LSN) in compliance with NRC requirements six months prior to LA submittal. The DOE must also develop a LA, which is a substantially different document from those developed to support a Site Recommendation (SR) decision. The LA must satisfy NRC licensing criteria and content requirements, and address the acceptance criteria defined by the NRC in its forthcoming Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP). The content of the LA must be adequate to facilitate NRC acceptance and docketing for review, and the LA and its supporting documents must provide the documented basis for the NR C findings required

  17. Integration of MGDS design into the licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of how the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) design for a potential repository is integrated into the licensing process. The integration process employs a two-told approach: (1) ensure that the MGDS design complies with applicable Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements, and (2) ensure that the MGDS design is appropriately reflected in a license application that is acceptable to the NRC for performing acceptance and compliance reviews

  18. Identifying Tensions in the Use of Open Licenses in OER Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Tel; Soares, Tiago Chagas

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of 50 repositories for educational content conducted through an "audit system" that helped us classify these repositories, their software systems, promoters, and how they communicated their licensing practices. We randomly accessed five resources from each repository to investigate the alignment of licensing…

  19. Siting Process for HLW Repository in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, S.; Kitayama, K.; Umeki, H.; Naito, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the year 2000, the geological disposal program for high-level radioactive waste in Japan moved from the phase of generic research and development (R and D) into the phase of implementation. Following legislation entitled the ''Specified Radioactive Waste Final Disposal Act'', the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) was established as the implementing organization. The assigned activities of NUMO include selection of the repository site, demonstration of disposal technology at the site, developing relevant licensing applications and construction, operation and closure of the repository. As the first milestone of siting process, NUMO announced to the public an overall procedure for selection of preliminary investigation areas for potential candidate sites on October 29, 2001. The procedure specifies that NUMO will solicit volunteer municipalities for preliminary investigation areas with publishing four documents as an information package. These documents are tentatively entitled ''Instructions for Application'', ''Siting Factors for the Preliminary Investigation Areas'', a ''Repository Concepts'' as well as an ''Site Investigation Community Outreach Scheme''

  20. Coupled processes in repository sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, J.B.; Kelsall, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The significance of coupled processes in repository sealing is evaluated. In most repository designs, shaft seals will be located in areas of relatively low temperature perturbation, in which case the coupling of temperature with stress and permeability may be less significant than the coupling between stress and permeability that occurs during excavation. Constitutive relationships between stress and permeability are reviewed for crystalline rock and rocksalt. These provide a basis for predicting the development of disturbed zones near excavations. Field case histories of the degree of disturbance are presented for two contrasting rock types - Stripa granite and Southeastern New Mexico rocksalt. The results of field investigations in both rock types confirm that hydraulic conductivity or permeability is stress dependent, and that shaft seal performance may be related to the degree that stresses are perturbed and restored near the seal

  1. Use of limited information in a license application to construct a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, J.M. III; Echols, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a rationale for the proposition that the Department of Energy's (DOE's) submittal of a license application (LA) for the construction of a geologic repository to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) may be, and arguably must be, based on statutorily-limited site characterization data and design information. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, is the controlling statute for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a licensed geologic repository. Applicable NRC regulations for the licensing of such a repository are found for the most part in 10 C.F.R. Part 60

  2. The USNCR license renewal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Pao-Tsin

    2002-01-01

    The US Congress promulgated a law in 1954, entitled 'Atomic Energy Act'. This Act states that operating licenses for commercial nuclear power plants are limited to a fixed term of 40 years, but they may be renewed for a period not to exceed 20 years. The terms were established mainly for economic considerations, not based on technical limitations. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the license renewal rule, Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 54 (10 CFR Part 54), in December, 1991. The rule has since been amended in May, 1995. The underlying principle of the rule is that the regulatory process is adequate for ensuring safety of operating plants. The regulatory process includes NRC's issuance of Orders, Bulletins, Generic Letters, and Information Notices, as well as a number of special inspections in addition to the continuous oversight and routine inspection activities performed by on-site inspectors. Because of this comprehensive regulatory process, compilation of the current license basis or re-verification of the current licensing basis is not considered necessary for a license renewal review. The USNRC also determined on the basis of the findings of its research programs that active structures and components are well maintained by the existing programs. Therefore, the focus of the license renewal review is on passive, long-lived structures and components and on time-limited ageing analyses. The time-limited ageing analyses are for those structures and components which were originally designed to a 40 year service life

  3. Licensing Process for International Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzke, Christan

    2014-01-01

    Christan Raetzke, lawyer, then outlined why nuclear constructions were always international projects and in which cases it would make sense to also make the licensing process be international. His law consulting firm CONLAR focuses specifically on design review so he could adequately present why an international process would make a lot of sense without being a loss of sovereignty

  4. Experience from developed and licensing an underground repository for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebel, K.; Richter, D.

    1988-01-01

    In the German Democratic Republic an abandoned salt mine was selected and reconstructed to serve as a central repository for low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants and radioisotope production and application from all over the country. The decision to establish such a repository was based on safety and technical-economic studies performed in the 1960s. The repository is owned by the main waste producer, the nuclear plant utility. It was designed, constructed and commissioned during 1972-1978. The licensing steps included a site licence (1972), a construction licence (1974), a comissioning licence and a continuous operation licence (1979). The paper reviews the overall choice of the disposal option, the responsibilities in radioactive waste management, the licensing and surveillance activities, the methods for transport and disposal, and the waste acceptance criteria established for the repository. (author)

  5. Workshop on Regulatory Review and Safety Assessment Issues in Repository Licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, Roger D.

    2011-02-01

    The workshop described here was organised to address more general issues regarding regulatory review of SKB's safety assessment and overall review strategy. The objectives of the workshop were: - to learn from other programmes' experiences on planning and review of a license application for a nuclear waste repository, - to offer newly employed SSM staff an opportunity to learn more about selected safety assessment issues, and - to identify and document recommendations and ideas for SSM's further planning of the licensing review

  6. Initial design process of the repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmanlioglu, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the final disposal of high level wastes is to isolate the waste from the biosphere for extremely long periods of time by emplacement of wastes into deep stable geological formations. Several geological formations have been considered as candidate host environments for high level waste disposal and several techniques have been developed for repository design. In this study, interrelationships of main parameters of a general repository design have been defined and effective parameters are shown at each step. Initial design process is based on the long term stability of underground openings as disposal galleries. For this reason, this design process includes two main analyses: mechanical analysis and thermal analysis. Each of the analysis systems is directly related to each other by technical precautions. As a result of this design process, general information about the acceptable depth of the repository, layout and emplacement pattern can be taken. Final design study can be established on the result of initial design process. (author)

  7. Environmental issues of repository licensing: an evaluation of a hypothetical high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.L.; McGinnis, J.T.; Harper, C.M.; Battelle Columbus Labs., OH)

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents results of an environmental assessment conducted under the direction of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage program. The study defined a range of potential environmental effects of constructing, operating, decommissioning, and long-term isolation of a nuclear waste repository. The analytical methodology used to determine potential environmental effects required definition of a hypothetical environmental setting and repository. Potentially applicable regulatory requirements were identified and were used as guidelines to evaluate permitting feasibility. The environmental effects of repository development were analyzed for the two major time periods of concern: short term (the period of construction, operation, and decommissioning) and long term (the isolation period after decommissioning). As a result of this analysis, major environmental uncertainties and issues were identified. 11 references, 5 figures

  8. Business process model repositories : framework and survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Dijkman, R.M.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Large organizations often run hundreds or even thousands of business processes. Managing such large collections of business processes is a challenging task. Intelligent software can assist in that task by providing common repository functions such as storage, search and version management. They can

  9. A framework for business process model repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Muehlen, zur M.; Su, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large organizations often run hundreds or even thousands of business processes. Managing such large collections of business processes is a challenging task. Intelligent software can assist in that task by providing common repository functions such as storage, search and version management. They can

  10. The Finnish Experience with the Construction of Onkalo. Licensing of a repository for nuclear waste in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avolahti, Jaana

    2014-01-01

    lack of sufficient prerequisites for constructing and using a nuclear facility in a safe manner without causing injury to people, or damage to the environment or property, have arisen in the statement from Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK or elsewhere during the processing of the application. The Government's decision-in-principle shall be forwarded, without delay, to Parliament for perusal. Parliament may reject the decision-in-principle or decide that it shall remain in force as it stands. In 2000, the Government made a DiP on the disposal of spent fuel from Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants in Olkiluoto bedrock. The DiP also stated that the project is allowed to proceed to the construction of the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility in Olkiluoto. From a legal standpoint, the DiP thus included a permit to start a limited construction of the repository. ONKALO may be later used as a part of the actual repository and therefore the regulatory approach to ONKALO construction is the same as is for the rest of the repository. The activities of Posiva, the implementing organisation, to fulfill the DiP are regulated by the Ministry of Employment and Economy (MEE) and Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). The regulatory oversight of Posiva's spent fuel disposal project (including the construction of ONKALO), consists of review and assessment and inspection. Other functions, such as establishing, updating or adopting safety principles, regulations and regulatory guides, are developed in parallel with the RD and D work. Pursuant to the Nuclear Energy Act, the decision-making and licensing system of nuclear facilities is based on a principle whereby safety is continuously reviewed, the assessments being further defined throughout the procedure so that the final safety assessments are only performed at the operating licensing stage. The actual licensing procedure starts after the Government's decision-in-principle. The

  11. Workshop on Regulatory Review and Safety Assessment Issues in Repository Licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, Roger D. (Galson Sciences Limited (United Kingdom))

    2011-02-15

    The workshop described here was organised to address more general issues regarding regulatory review of SKB's safety assessment and overall review strategy. The objectives of the workshop were: - to learn from other programmes' experiences on planning and review of a license application for a nuclear waste repository, - to offer newly employed SSM staff an opportunity to learn more about selected safety assessment issues, and - to identify and document recommendations and ideas for SSM's further planning of the licensing review

  12. Safety case for license application for a final repository: The French example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissier, Fabrice; Voinis, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The reversible repository in a deep geological formation is the French reference solution for the long-term management of high-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste (HLW and ILW). Twenty years of R and D work and conceptual and basic studies since the first French Act of 1991 led, in particular, to a feasibility demonstration in 2005. According to the French Act on Radioactive Waste of 28 of June 2006, Andra shall design a reversible repository in order to apply for license in 2015. In response to this demand, Andra developed the industrial project known as 'Cigeo', a reversible geological disposal facility for HLW and ILW located in Meuse/Haute-Marne. Two years before applying for authorisation, Andra's project is now focusing on three main targets: developing Cigeo's industrial design, preparing the authorisation process through increased exchanges with stakeholders and the preparation of a safety case to support authorisation application. The latter draws on the previous safety cases of 2005 and 2009, which give a sound basis to assess Cigeo's safety, both for the operational and post-closure periods. In this new stage of the project, the challenging issues for the preparation of the safety case are the following: - to identify the various regulatory frameworks (nuclear and non-nuclear) and guides applicable to the facility; - to ensure that the industrial design complies in particular with the safety requirements as presented in the safety case and its supporting safety assessment; - to identify crucial inputs (R and D, tests,...) needed to support the authorisation application, in particular, to bring convincing arguments to assess the technical feasibility of the design and when appropriate its ability to meet the safety requirements; - to ensure that all the requirements from previous regulatory and peer reviews (national and international?) are taken into account. (authors)

  13. TURVA-2012 safety case for licensing a spent fuel repository at Olkiluoto, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vira, Juhani; Snellman, Margit

    2014-01-01

    In 2001, the Finnish Parliament endorsed a decision-in-principle (DiP) whereby the spent nuclear fuel produced by the operating nuclear reactors at Olkiluoto and Loviisa will be disposed of in a geological repository at Olkiluoto, on the south-western coast of Finland. Subsequently, additional DiPs were issued allowing the extension of the repository to accommodate spent nuclear fuel from additional reactors that are under construction or in planning at Olkiluoto, which means a total of 9 000 tU of spent nuclear fuel to be disposed of. In accordance with the decision of the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) in 2003, Posiva submitted an application for a license to construct a disposal facility at Olkiluoto in 2012, consisting of an encapsulation facility and an underground deep geological repository. The application included a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and a long-term safety case, TURVA-2012. Assuming a positive outcome of the current licensing review, the next step would be the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) in support of an operational licence application around 2020. The disposal method is based on the same KBS-3 concept that the Swedish SKB has used as basis for their license application in 2010. Accordingly, the spent nuclear fuel will be encapsulated in water- and gas-tight copper canisters equipped with a load-bearing insert and emplaced in a deep geological repository constructed in the bedrock. The canisters will be surrounded by a swelling clay buffer material that isolates them from the bedrock. The deposition tunnels and the central tunnels and the other underground openings will be backfilled with materials of low permeability. The repository will be at a depth of about 400-450 m below ground. The primary role of the bedrock is to provide sufficiently stable conditions for the engineered barrier system and to make inadvertent human intrusion unlikely. In case of EBS failure, the bedrock shall also retain and retard the possible

  14. Independent modelling in SSM's licensing review of a spent nuclear fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shulan; Dverstorp, Bjoern; Norden, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) submitted a license application for construction of a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark. SKB's disposal method, the KBS-3 method, involves disposing of the spent nuclear fuel in cast iron canisters with an outer layer of 5 cm copper. The canisters will be placed in vertical deposition holes at approximately 500 m depths in crystalline bedrock. Each canister is surrounded by a buffer of swelling bentonite clay. The repository is designed to accommodate 6 000 canisters, corresponding to 12 000 tonnes of spent nuclear fuel. The license application is supported by a post-closure safety assessment, SR-Site. Along with other parts of the application, SR-Site is currently being reviewed by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). The main method for review of SKB's licensing documentation is document review carried out by SSM, supported by SSM's external experts. However, SSM's document review is also supported by regulatory modelling, technical reviews of SKB's quality assurance programme and consideration of external review comments partly from two broad national consultations and an international peer review organised by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA, 2012). SSM's review is divided into three main phases: the initial review phase, the main review phase and the reporting phase. The overall goal of the initial review phase is to achieve a broad coverage of SR-Site and its supporting references and in particular to identify the need for complementary information and clarifications to be provided by SKB, as well as to identify critical review issues that require a more comprehensive treatment in the main review phase. SSM completed the initial review phase at the end of 2012. During the initial review phase SSM has identified a number of issues requiring either clarifications, complementary information from SKB or further in-depth review by SSM. Important issues include the

  15. Streamlining the license renewal review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozier, J.; Lee, S.; Kuo, P.T.

    2001-01-01

    The staff of the NRC has been developing three regulatory guidance documents for license renewal: the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report, Standard Review Plan for License Renewal (SRP-LR), and Regulatory Guide (RG) for Standard Format and Content for Applications to Renew Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses. These documents are designed to streamline the license renewal review process by providing clear guidance for license renewal applicants and the NRC staff in preparing and reviewing license renewal applications. The GALL report systematically catalogs aging effects on structures and components; identifies the relevant existing plant programs; and evaluates the existing programs against the attributes considered necessary for an aging management program to be acceptable for license renewal. The GALL report also provides guidance for the augmentation of existing plant programs for license renewal. The revised SRP-LR allows an applicant to reference the GALL report to preclude further NRC staff evaluation if the plant's existing programs meet the criteria described in the GALL report. During the review process, the NRC staff will focus primarily on existing programs that should be augmented or new programs developed specifically for license renewal. The Regulatory Guide is expected to endorse the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) guideline, NEI 95-10, Revision 2, entitled 'Industry Guideline for Implementing the Requirements of 10 CFR Part 54 - The License Renewal Rule', which provides guidance for preparing a license renewal application. This paper will provide an introduction to the GALL report, SRP-LR, Regulatory Guide, and NEI 95-10 to show how these documents are interrelated and how they will be used to streamline the license renewal review process. This topic will be of interest to domestic power utilities considering license renewal and international ICONE participants seeking state-of-the-art information about license renewal in the United States

  16. Approach to resolution of geologic uncertainty in the licensing of a high-level-waste repository in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neal, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Resolution of uncertainty in geological information is an essential element in the licensing process for a geologic repository. Evaluation of these uncertainties within the licensing framework established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is required. The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI), in focusing its site characterization program on unsaturated tuff, has developed a logic hierarchy of technical issues, including key issues, issues, and information needs. Key issues are statements of major requirements whose lack could be disqualifying. An example of a key issue is the demonstration of radionuclide containment and isolation within the required release limits and transport time set by the EPA and NRC. Key issues are broken down into issues, such as the groundwater flow time to the accessible environment. Resolving uncertainty ultimately comes back to satisfying individual information needs that collectively form issues. Hydraulic conductivity is an example of an information need required to determine groundwater flow rate. Sources of uncertainty often arise in either amount, quality, or other limitations in geological data. The hierarchical structuring of geological information needs provides a perspective that allows proportionate attention to be placed on various site characterization activities, and to view them within the whole range of licensing issues that must be satisfied to ensure public health and safety. However, it may not prevent an issue from being contentious, as some geological questions are known to be emotion-laden. The mitigation of uncertainty in geological information ultimately will depend on the validity and credibility of the information presented during the licensing process

  17. Microbial processes in a clay repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canniere, Pierre de [Federal Agency of Nuclear Control (FANC), Brussels (Belgium); Meleshyn, Artur [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The safety of a deep geologic repository (DGR) for nuclear waste must be ensured for geological times exceeding human imagination taking into account large uncertainties. The long-term effects of complex biogeochemical processes potentially affecting the integrity and the long-term safety of engineered barriers might still be unknown. The aim of this presentation is to give a general overview of some microbial processes which have contributed to shape the Earth since probably billions of years and whose unexpected consequences for nuclear waste disposal should be appropriately tackled. (orig.)

  18. The licensing processes influence on nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locatelli, Giorgio; Mancini, Mauro; Sainati, Tristano; Sallinen, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the licensing nuclear power plants; it focuses primarily on the licensing process implications into the international nuclear market. Nowadays there are twenty-six countries that are planning to build new nuclear facilities, and thirty-seven where nuclear reactors are proposed; on the other hand, there are mainly ten international reactor vendors. At international level, there are few vendors that have sufficient resources, capabilities and experience to carry out the design and delivering of a nuclear power plant in the international market; On the other hand, the licensing processes are strictly dependent on national law frameworks, and on the nuclear policies. The paper proposes a comparison of six licensing processes (the ones established in Finland, France, Italy, South Korea, USA and UK), and analyzes its main features and implications; the IAEA licensing process is taken as reference point. The objective of the paper is to propose a systemic approach for considering the licensing procedures. The framework proposed enables facilitating the licensing management and inferring the main features of licensing contexts. The paper concludes with a forecast of the nuclear licensing context, especially with respect to the fourth generation of nuclear reactors. (author)

  19. Some inspirations drawn from the SKB license-application report for the construction of the final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    The following problems are described in this paper: the current state of nuclear energy and spent fuel in Sweden, the brief process of repository site selection and the concise geological settings of candidate site Forsmark, the option of repository design, the data presented in license-application report on repository, construction, the review work presented by OECD/NEA international peer review team (IRT) and some considerations noted by the author: 1) Why the design of underground engineering, also known as 5 shafts + l ramp, is adopted? 2) Why the timescale for the assessment is one million years? 3) Why the computer codes used in performance assessment at Forsmark candidate repository site are different from those used at Yucca Mountain candidate repository site? 4) How to carry out the public involvement, support from local government and volumtary siting in China? 5) What is the most important in the R and D program of HLW disposal? 6) What shall we do for the future license-application report for the construction of the final repository in China? (author)

  20. THE DECISION TO RECOMMEND YUCCA MOUNTAIN AND THE NEXT STEPS TOWARD LICENSED REPOSITORY DEVELOPMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    After more than 20 years of carefully planned and reviewed scientific field work by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey, and numerous other organizations, Secretary of Energy Abraham concluded in January that the Yucca Mountain site is suitable, within the meaning of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, for development as a permanent nuclear waste and spent fuel repository. In February, the Secretary recommended to the President that the site be developed for licensed disposal of these wastes, and the President transmitted this recommendation to Congress. This paper summarizes key technical and national interest considerations that provided the basis for the recommendation. It also discusses the program's near-term plans for repository development if Congress designates the site

  1. Review process for license renewal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, John W.; Kuo, P.T.

    1991-01-01

    In preparation for license renewal reviews, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has recently published for public review and comment a proposed rule for license renewal and a draft Standard Review Plan as well as a draft Regulatory Guide relating to the implementation of the proposed rule. In support of future license renewal applications, the nuclear industry has also submitted 11 industry reports for NRC review and approval. This paper briefly describe how these parallel regulatory and industry activities will be factored into the NRC review process for license renewal. (author)

  2. Multiscale Model Simulations of Temperature and Relative Humidity for the License Application of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscheck, T.; Glascoe, L.; Sun, Y.; Gansemer, J.; Lee, K.

    2003-12-01

    For the proposed Yucca Mountain geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste, the planned method of disposal involves the emplacement of cylindrical packages containing the waste inside horizontal tunnels, called emplacement drifts, bored several hundred meters below the ground surface. The emplacement drifts reside in highly fractured, partially saturated volcanic tuff. An important phenomenological consideration for the licensing of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is the generation of decay heat by the emplaced waste and the consequences of this decay heat. Changes in temperature will affect the hydrologic and chemical environment at Yucca Mountain. A thermohydrologic-modeling tool is necessary to support the performance assessment of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) of the proposed repository. This modeling tool must simultaneously account for processes occurring at a scale of a few tens of centimeters around individual waste packages, for processes occurring around the emplacement drifts themselves, and for processes occurring at the multi-kilometer scale of the mountain. Additionally, many other features must be considered including non-isothermal, multiphase-flow in fractured porous rock of variable liquid-phase saturation and thermal radiation and convection in open cavities. The Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model (MSTHM) calculates the following thermohydrologic (TH) variables: temperature, relative humidity, liquid-phase saturation, evaporation rate, air-mass fraction, gas-phase pressure, capillary pressure, and liquid- and gas-phase fluxes. The TH variables are determined as a function of position along each of the emplacement drifts in the repository and as a function of waste-package (WP) type. These variables are determined at various generic locations within the emplacement drifts, including the waste package and drip-shield surfaces and in the invert; they are also determined at various generic locations in the adjoining host rock

  3. Limitations on scientific prediction and how they could affect repository licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The best possibility for gaining an understanding of the likely future behavior of a high level nuclear waste disposal system is to use the scientific method. However, the scientific approach has inherent limitations when it comes to making long-term predictions with confidence. This paper examines some of these limiting factors as well as the criteria for admissibility of scientific evidence in the legal arena, and concludes that the prospects are doubtful for successful licensing of a potential repository under the regulations that are now being reconsidered. Suggestions am made for remedying this situation

  4. Limitations on scientific prediction and how they could affect repository licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The best possibility for gaining an understanding of the likely future behavior of a high level nuclear waste disposal system is to use the scientific method. However, the scientific approach has inherent limitations when it comes to making long-term predictions with confidence. This paper examines some of these limiting factors as well as the criteria for admissibility of scientific evidence in the legal arena, and concludes that the prospects are doubtful for successful licensing of a potential repository under the regulations that are now being reconsidered. Suggestions am made for remedying this situation.

  5. Limitations on scientific prediction and how they could affect repository licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The best possibility for gaining an understanding of the likely future behavior of a high level nuclear waste disposal system is to use the scientific method. However, the scientific approach has inherent limitations when it comes to making long-term predictions with confidence. This paper examines some of these limiting factors as well as the criteria for admissibility of scientific evidence in the legal arena, and concludes that the prospects are doubtful for successful licensing of a potential repository under the regulations that are now being reconsidered. Suggestions are made for remedying this situation

  6. A process insight repository supporting process optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Vetlugin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    Existing solutions for analysis and optimization of manufacturing processes, such as online analysis processing or statistical calculations, have shortcomings that limit continuous process improvements. In particular, they lack means of storing and integrating the results of analysis. This makes the valuable information that can be used for process optimizations used only once and then disposed. The goal of the Advanced Manufacturing Analytics (AdMA) research project is to design an integrate...

  7. Business process model repositories : efficient process retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    As organizations increasingly work in process-oriented manner, the number of business process models that they develop and have to maintain increases. As a consequence, it has become common for organizations to have collections of hundreds or even thousands of business process models. When a

  8. Regulations and the licensing process in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matulla, Herbert U.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the licensing process which took place from 1971 to 1978 shows which laws, regulations and standards were used in checking the safety aspects of the nuclear power plant and which organisations participated in the licensing process. The internal organisation of the Austrian main-expert in the procedure is illustrated. Examples of detail-work are explained. The importance of intensive co-operation of the different technical groups and the problems of comparable examination depth are underlined. (author)

  9. Push and pull models to manage patient consent and licensing of multimedia resources in digital repositories for case-based reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononowicz, Andrzej A; Zary, Nabil; Davies, David; Heid, Jörn; Woodham, Luke; Hege, Inga

    2011-01-01

    Patient consents for distribution of multimedia constitute a significant element of medical case-based repositories in medicine. A technical challenge is posed by the right of patients to withdraw permission to disseminate their images or videos. A technical mechanism for spreading information about changes in multimedia usage licenses is sought. The authors gained their experience by developing and managing a large (>340 cases) repository of virtual patients within the European project eViP. The solution for dissemination of license status should reuse and extend existing metadata standards in medical education. Two methods: PUSH and PULL are described differing in the moment of update and the division of responsibilities between parties in the learning object exchange process. The authors recommend usage of the PUSH scenario because it is better adapted to legal requirements in many countries. It needs to be stressed that the solution is based on mutual trust of the exchange partners and therefore is most appropriate for use in educational alliances and consortia. It is hoped that the proposed models for exchanging consents and licensing information will become a crucial part of the technical frameworks for building case-based repositories.

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff development of the license application review plan for a high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.; Holonich, J.J.; Lee, M.P.; Delligatti, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has recently started a new initiative to develop the License Application Review Plan (LARP) which the staff will use in its reviews of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) license application (LA) for a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This paper describes the staff's approach for developing the LARP, the development schedule and current status, the organization and content of the LARP, and the staff's LA review strategy. Therefore, it gives a preview of the draft LARP which will be made available in late 1993. It also describes how the LARP will be used as guidance to the staff in conducting reviews of regulatory and technical issues important to the licensing of a geologic repository. Finally, the benefits to the NRC staff, DOE, and other parties are discussed

  11. Research and development tasks of the basalt waste isolation program, and their relationship to the licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkel, W.P.

    1978-06-01

    This document presents a preliminary licensing program and outlines the research and development strategy by which a license will be obtained for the repository. It addresses the base data covering the major areas of investigation and technology which will provide input to the licensing process. Basically, each facet of the program, as described in the plan, will be used as part of the documentation required for the Preliminary and Final Safety Analysis Report (PSAR and FSAR), as well as the Environmental Report

  12. Estimation of expenses for low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository project in Croatia up to site license acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, A.; Lokner, V.; Subasic, D.

    2003-01-01

    The expenses needed for development of low- and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository project in Croatia include: (a) preliminary activities, (b) preparatory activities, and (c) preparing of environmental impact study. The first group of expenses are referring to the project leading activities, project plan updating, build-up of required infrastructure, preparing of licensing documentation, site investigations, data acquisition programme, pre-operational radio-ecological monitoring, modelling, safety analysis (first iteration) and public related activities. Preparatory activities are referring to purchasing of land for repository and preparatory activities for carrying out of on-site investigations, while third group of expenses are related to preparation and validation of Environmental impact study. It was found out that about 50 % of total expenses refer to build-up of infrastructure. Additional 25 % finances are related to radio-ecological monitoring, site investigations and development of calculations and models, while remaining 25 % of total estimated sum is expected to be spent for repository safety assessment, public relations, purchasing and preparing the on-site terrain for construction, etc. It was calculated 607 EUR per m3 of LILW to be needed up to site license acquisition. According to the world-wide practice, by extrapolating of additional expenses necessary for construction of the repository and acquisition of operational license, it comes out the cost of 1.723 EUR per m3 of LILW for shallow-ground and 2.412 EUR per m3 of LILW for tunnel repository. The estimated expenses for Croatia are within the span of expenses for the same purpose in the countries considered. Expected duration of the project performance up to acquisition of the site license is 4 years and 3 months. (author)

  13. Dealing with the current permissibility application for constructing a spent fuel DGR in Sweden. SKB's license applications for a spent fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Olle

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear power utilities in Sweden were in 1976 obliged to demonstrate a safe method for final disposal of spent fuel in order to start operation of new reactors. This initiated a comprehensive research, development and demonstration programme and the development of the KBS-method for final disposal. A new Nuclear Activities Act in 1984 gave the reactor owners full technical and financial responsibility for the waste. They gave in turn SKB the responsibility for all nuclear waste management. Reprocessing was no longer required and direct disposal of the spent fuel has, since then, been the main alternative. Alternative methods for final disposal have been evaluated and compared to the KBS-3-method but it has remained the preferred alternative. A comprehensive research, development and demonstration programme to strengthen the scientific basis and to refine the KBS-3-method has been operated by SKB since then. The site selection process for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel was initiated in 1992. The work included general siting studies at the national and the municipal level and in 2002, SKB initiated site investigations for siting of a final repository on two sites: the Simpevarp and Laxemar areas and the Forsmark area. At the same time, the work on preparing license applications to construct and operate an encapsulation plant and a final repository for spent fuel was started. In June 2009, SKB announced Forsmark as the selected site for the final repository. This paper reviews the applicable legislation and describes the license application, the licensing review and the preparations for implementation

  14. Process mining software repositories: do developers work as expected?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poncin, W.; Serebrenik, A.; Brand, van den M.G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Modern software development commonly makes use of a multitude of software repositories. How can these help us to understand the on-going development process? Researchers of Eindhoven University of Technology design new methods revealing how software has been developed.

  15. Towards a Comprehensive and Up-To-Date Institutional Repository: Development of a Publications Tracking Process

    KAUST Repository

    Baessa, Mohamed

    2016-06-15

    As our repository matured we found that a concerted effort was needed to establish it as a resource that institutional stakeholders knew they could turn to for reliable information about the research outputs produced by researchers affiliated with or funded by our institution. The initial impetus for this project was the adoption of an institutional open access policy, which necessitated a process to track the publications of institutional authors, deposit items with applicable open access licenses, and notify authors when an accepted manuscript was needed. To support this process we developed a local publications tracking system independent of our hosted DSpace repository that regularly queries publisher and indexer APIs for new publications, checks for relevant permissions policies, identifies institutional authors and helps us send manuscript request emails. We also harvested records for past items and modified our repository to accommodate metadata-only records. The success of these tracking and harvesting services in making our repository comprehensive and up-to-date has allowed us to rely on our repository as the key source of publications information for additional integrations that update ORCID records with publication information, populate a PlumX metrics dashboard and, most recently, support the implementation of a current research information system (CRIS).

  16. Towards a Comprehensive and Up-To-Date Institutional Repository: Development of a Publications Tracking Process

    KAUST Repository

    Baessa, Mohamed A.; Grenz, Daryl M.; Wang, Han

    2016-01-01

    As our repository matured we found that a concerted effort was needed to establish it as a resource that institutional stakeholders knew they could turn to for reliable information about the research outputs produced by researchers affiliated with or funded by our institution. The initial impetus for this project was the adoption of an institutional open access policy, which necessitated a process to track the publications of institutional authors, deposit items with applicable open access licenses, and notify authors when an accepted manuscript was needed. To support this process we developed a local publications tracking system independent of our hosted DSpace repository that regularly queries publisher and indexer APIs for new publications, checks for relevant permissions policies, identifies institutional authors and helps us send manuscript request emails. We also harvested records for past items and modified our repository to accommodate metadata-only records. The success of these tracking and harvesting services in making our repository comprehensive and up-to-date has allowed us to rely on our repository as the key source of publications information for additional integrations that update ORCID records with publication information, populate a PlumX metrics dashboard and, most recently, support the implementation of a current research information system (CRIS).

  17. New nuclear plant design and licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luangdilok, W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes latest developments in the nuclear power reactor technology with emphasis on three areas: (1) the US technology of advanced passive light water reactors (AP600 and S BWR), (2) regulatory processes that certify their safety, and (3) current engineering concerns. The goal is to provide and insight of how the government's regulatory agency guarantees public safety by looking into how new passive safety features were designed and tested by vendors and how they were re-evaluated and retested by the US NRC. The paper then discusses the US 1989 nuclear licensing reform (10 CFR Part 52) whose objectives are to promote the standardization of nuclear power plants and provide for the early and definitive resolution of site and design issues before plants are built. The new licensing process avoids the unpredictability nd escalated construction cost under the old licensing process. Finally, the paper summarizes engineering concerns found in current light water reactors that may not go away in the new design. The concerns are related the material and water chemistry technology in dealing with corrosion problems in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems (PWRs and BWRs). These engineering concerns include core shroud cracking (BWRs), jet pump hold-down beam cracking (BWRs), steam generator tube stress corrosion cracking (PWR)

  18. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 4: License Application Plan and Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a

  19. Licensing process for the power increase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez P, R.; Mamani A, Y.R.; Salgado G, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The licensing process for the power increase of a nuclear power station is presented, this includes the description of the effective normative framework, the attributions of the one Mexican regulator organism in nuclear matter, the definition and importance of the power level of a nuclear reactor for the safety studies. Also, the types of power increase according to its magnitude, and the regulator process that it includes the scope and the detail of the required information that it should be evaluated by the one regulator organism are discussed. Finally it offers a summary of the experience that one has in Mexico for this type of processes. (Author)

  20. Reactor licensing process: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), in its review of applications for licenses to construct and operate nuclear power plants, is required to consider those measures necessary to ensure the protection of the health and safety of the public and the environment. The article discusses the NRC staff procedures and policies for conducting the detailed safety, environmental, and antitrust reviews that provide the basis for these assurances. Included is a discussion of the improvements to the licensing process currently being proposed or implemented to enhance its stability and predictability for the benefit of all involved with the regulation of nuclear power. The views and opinions expressed in the article are those of the author alone and do not represent positions of the NRC

  1. The safety case in support of the license application of the surface repository of low-level waste in Dessel, Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacquier, William; Cool, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The modern concept of the safety case, developed by the OECD/NEA for geological repositories of high- and medium-level waste has been successfully applied by ONDRAF/ NIRAS for a surface repository for Category A waste (i.e. low-level waste) in Belgium in the current project phase 2006-2012. This resulted in the submission on 31 January 2013 by ONDRAF/NIRAS of an application for a 'construction and operation license' to the safety authorities. The benefits of using the notion of the safety case have been that: i) safety has been incorporated in an integrated manner within all assessment basis, design and safety assessment activities; ii) the process of development of the license application has gained in clarity and traceability; iii) the documentation of the license application contains multiple lines of argumentation for safety rather than argumentation based only on quantitative radiological impact calculations. To offer a comprehensive view on the safety argumentation and its development, it has been found useful to develop the argumentation not only along a safety statements structure but also along the safety report structure. (authors)

  2. Managing the high level waste nuclear regulatory commission licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, K.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the process for obtaining Nuclear Regulatory Commission permits for the high level waste storage facility is basically the same process commercial nuclear power plants followed to obtain construction permits and operating licenses for their facilities. Therefore, the experience from licensing commercial reactors can be applied to the high level waste facility. Proper management of the licensing process will be the key to the successful project. The management of the licensing process was categorized into four areas as follows: responsibility, organization, communication and documentation. Drawing on experience from nuclear power plant licensing and basic management principles, the management requirement for successfully accomplishing the project goals are discussed

  3. Different Mass Processing Services in a Bit Repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurik, Bolette; Zierau, Eld

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates how a general bit repository mass processing service using different programming models and platforms can be specified. Such a service is needed in large data archives, especially libraries, where different ways of doing mass processing is needed for different digital...

  4. Methodology and findings of the NRC's materials licensing process redesign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, P.A.; Brown, K.D.; Madera, J.R.; Moriarty, M.; Pelchat, J.M.; Usilton, W.K.; Whitten, J.E.; Vacca, P.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the work and vision of the team chartered to redesign the process for licensing users of nuclear materials. The Business Process Redesign team was chartered to improve the speed of the existing licensing process while maintaining or improving public safety and to achieve required resource levels. The report describes the team's methods for acquiring and analyzing information about the existing materials licensing process and the steps necessary to radically change this process to the envisioned future process

  5. Design process for a repository - KBS-3 case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svemar, C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the design process for the Swedish (generic) repository design KBS-3. The repository may have a spiral access ramp, access shafts, or straight access ramps. Galleries lead from a central service area to a small spent fuel storage area, a larger main spent fuel storage area, and a disposal area for other nuclear waste. This, or any, design has to be planned through three stages of layout and design, viz. feasibility study, preliminary planning, and architectural design, followed by detailed planning, and then planning of excavation and construction. Decisions on final design have to wait until construction is imminent, and all the rock data are available. This means that different sections of the repository may be at different planning stages at any one time. In the last stage, the plan of the disposal holes depends on detailed coring results, because a hole will not be bored where there is a fracture. 3 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  6. APROMORE : an advanced process model repository

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Rosa, M.; Reijers, H.A.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Dijkman, R.M.; Mendling, J.; Dumas, M.; García-Bañuelos, L.

    2011-01-01

    Business process models are becoming available in large numbers due to their widespread use in many industrial applications such as enterprise and quality engineering projects. On the one hand, this raises a challenge as to their proper management: how can it be ensured that the proper process model

  7. Efficient querying of large process model repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Tao; Wang, Jianmin; La Rosa, M.; Hofstede, ter A.H.M.; Wen, Lijie

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increased uptake of business process management technology in industries. This has resulted in organizations trying to manage large collections of business process models. One of the challenges facing these organizations concerns the retrieval of models from large business

  8. Microbial processes in radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazso, L.; Farkas-Galgoczi, G.; Diosi, G.

    2002-01-01

    Microbial processes could potentially affect the performance of a radioactive waste disposal system and related factors that could have an influence on the mobility of radionuclides are outlined. Analytical methods, including sampling of water, rock and surface swabs from a potential disposal site, are described and the quantitative as well as qualitative experimental results obtained are given. Although the results contribute to an understanding of the impact of microbial processes on deep geological disposal of nuclear waste, there is not yet sufficient information for a model which will predict the consequences of these processes. (author)

  9. The procedure of alternative site selection within the report of the study group on the radioactive waste final repository selection process (AKEnd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses the results of the report of the study group on the radioactive waste final repository selection process with respect to the alternative site selection procedure. Key points of the report are the long-term safety, the alternativity of sites and the concept of one repository. The critique on this report is focussed on the topics site selection and licensing procedures, civil participation, the factor time and the question of cost

  10. Law no. 10.308 of 20th November, 2001 on radioactive waste repositories siting, construction, licensing, operation, inspection, costs, indemnity, civil liability and guarantees concerning to the radioactive wastes repositories and other provisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This Act was published on November 20, 2001 and set forth regulations on the final disposal of radioactive wastes produced in Brazil, including siting, construction, licensing, operation, inspection, costs, indemnities, civil liability and guarantees concerning to the radioactive wastes repositories. This act allows for installation and operation of initial, intermediary and final repositories in accordance with the criteria established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy National Commission - CNEN. The person or organization granted with CNEN authorization for operation of the initial repositories shall be liable for personal, patrimony and environmental radiological damages. The civil liability of CNEN is concerned to the radioactive waste intermediary and final disposals and transportation

  11. Audit and Certification Process for Science Data Digital Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. S.; Giaretta, D.; Ambacher, B.; Ashley, K.; Conrad, M.; Downs, R. R.; Garrett, J.; Guercio, M.; Lambert, S.; Longstreth, T.; Sawyer, D. M.; Sierman, B.; Tibbo, H.; Waltz, M.

    2011-12-01

    Science data digital repositories are entrusted to ensure that a science community's data are available and useful to users both today and in the future. Part of the challenge in meeting this responsibility is identifying the standards, policies and procedures required to accomplish effective data preservation. Subsequently a repository should be evaluated on whether or not they are effective in their data preservation efforts. This poster will outline the process by which digital repositories are being formally evaluated in terms of their ability to preserve the digitally encoded information with which they have been entrusted. The ISO standards on which this is based will be identified and the relationship of these standards to the Open Archive Information System (OAIS) reference model will be shown. Six test audits have been conducted with three repositories in Europe and three in the USA. Some of the major lessons learned from these test audits will be briefly described. An assessment of the possible impact of this type of audit and certification on the practice of preserving digital information will also be provided.

  12. System engineering in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing process: Program architecture process and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romine, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    In October 1987, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. The overall mission of the center is to provide a sustained level of high-quality research and technical assistance in support of NRC regulatory responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). A key part of that mission is to assist the NRC in the development of the program architecture - the systems approach to regulatory analysis for the NRC high-level waste repository licensing process - and the development and implementation of the computer-based Program Architecture Support System (PASS). This paper describes the concept of program architecture, summarizes the process and basic structure of the PASS relational data base, and describes the applications of the system

  13. Proposed format and content of license applications for deep geologic terminal repositories for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Chapters are devoted to the following: introduction and general description; summary safety analysis; site characteristics; principal design criteria; repository design; operations systems; management of onsite generated waste; radiation protection; accident safety analysis; conduct of operations; operating controls and limits; and quality assurance

  14. The Peer Review Process: An Expanded Role for Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Richardson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Peer review has been regarded as a cornerstone of scientific research for a considerable time. Journals seeking to attract high quality scholarship rely on peer review to maintain their credentials in the publishing industry. However, over a period of time—and especially given the advent of the Internet—complaints have arisen from authors, reviewers and even editors as to the efficacy of the system. The authors outline a range of models which have evolved that either complement or replace evaluation processes which characterise traditional peer review. Research data is presented in the context of quality assessment. The authors introduce several approaches which are utilising repositories to support the process. Consideration is given as to how this might change the current institutional repository environment.

  15. Environmental impact assessments and geological repositories: A model process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, S.

    2000-01-01

    In a recent study carried out for the European Commission, the scope and application of environmental impact assessment (EIA) legislation and current EIA practice in European Union Member States and applicant countries of Central and Eastern Europe was investigated, specifically in relation to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. This paper reports the study's investigations into a model approach to EIA in the context of geological repositories, including the role of the assessment in the overall decision processes and public involvement. (author)

  16. Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model Supporting the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.A. Buscheck; Y. Sun; Y. Hao

    2006-01-01

    The MultiScale ThermoHydrologic Model (MSTHM) predicts thermal-hydrologic (TH) conditions within emplacement tunnels (drifts) and in the adjoining host rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is the proposed site for a radioactive waste repository in the US. Because these predictions are used in the performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain repository, they must address the influence of variability and uncertainty of the engineered- and natural-system parameters that significantly influence those predictions. Parameter-sensitivity studies show that the MSTHM predictions adequately propagate the influence of parametric variability and uncertainty. Model-validation studies show that the influence of conceptual-model uncertainty on the MSTHM predictions is insignificant compared to that of parametric uncertainty, which is propagated through the MSTHM

  17. The United States nuclear regulatory commission license renewal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holian, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license renewal process establishes the technical and administrative requirements for the renewal of operating power plant licenses. Reactor ope-rating licenses were originally issued for 40 years and are allowed to be renewed. The review process for license renewal applications (L.R.A.) provides continued assurance that the level of safety provided by an applicant's current licensing basis is maintained for the period of extended operation. The license renewal review focuses on passive, long-lived structures and components of the plant that are subject to the effects of aging. The applicant must demonstrate that programs are in place to manage those aging effects. The review also verifies that analyses based on the current operating term have been evaluated and shown to be valid for the period of extended operation. The NRC has renewed the licenses for 52 reactors at 30 plant sites. Each applicant requested, and was granted, an extension of 20 years. Applications to renew the licenses of 20 additional reactors at 13 plant sites are under review. As license renewal is voluntary, the decision to seek license renewal and the timing of the application is made by the licensee. However, the NRC expects that, over time, essentially all U.S. operating reactors will request license renewal. In 2009, the U.S. has 4 plants that enter their 41. year of ope-ration. The U.S. Nuclear Industry has expressed interest in 'life beyond 60', that is, requesting approval of a second renewal period. U.S. regulations allow for subsequent license renewals. The NRC is working with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on research related to light water reactor sustainability. (author)

  18. U.S. licensing process and ABWR certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, J.F.; Williams, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) establishes a two-step licensing process by which the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Committee (NRC) authorizes nuclear reactor plant construction through issuance of a construction permit and authorizes operation by issuance of an operating license. At each stage, the NRC Staff conducts technical reviews and there is potential for public hearings. In 1989, the NRC issued a new, simplified licensing process: Part 52. The purpose of the Part 52 licensing process is to provide a regulatory framework that brings about earlier resolution of licensing issues. Because issues are not resolved early in the Part 50 licensing process, approval of an operating license is not assured until after a significant investment has been made in the plant. Part 52 increases the stability and certainty of the licensing process by providing for the early resolution of safety and environmental issues. The Part 52 licensing process features (1) early site permits, (2) design certification, and (3) combined construction permit and operating licenses. As part of the U.S. Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Program to revitalize the nuclear option through the integration of government/utility/industry efforts, GE undertook the role of applying for certification for its latest product line, the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), under the U.S. ABWR certification program. The ABWR design is an essentially complete plant. Initial application for design certification was in 1987 under Part 50. GE reapplied in late 1991 under the newly promulgated Part 52. Following seven years of intensive interactions with the NRC and ACRS, GE was awarded the first Final Design Approval (FDA) under Part 52. The Commission initiated rulemaking by publishing the proposed ABWR Certification Rule in the Federal Register in early 1995. Certification is anticipated mid-1996. (J.P.N.)

  19. 77 FR 51551 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: Alternatives Process in Hydropower Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ...: Alternatives Process in Hydropower Licensing AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Office of Environmental Policy... approval for the collection of information for Alternatives Process in Hydropower Licensing. This... comments should reference Alternatives Process in Hydropower Licensing. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To...

  20. National waste terminal storage repository in a bedded salt formation for spent unreprocessed fuel. Quality assurance program for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    A National Waste Terminal Storage Repository, in bedded salt, for spent unreprocessed fuel is the subject of a conceptual design project which began in January 1977. This volume presents a preliminary quality assurance program to guide the license applicant in developing a detailed program that will be compatible with anticipated National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTSR2) contracting arrangements and provide the documentation required by regulatory bodies. This QA program is designed to provide confidence that the quality-related activities pertaining to safety-related structures, systems, and components will be identified and controlled. Specific responsibilities for quality-related activities are documented and assigned to personnel and organizations for the major phases of facility design and construction. These responsibilities encompass a broad range of activities and are addressed in this preliminary program. The quality assurance program elements are organized and discussed herein as follows: (1) quality assurance during design and construction; (2) the applicant (DOE); (3) siting contractor; (4) architect/engineer; (5) project field management; and (6) operations contractor

  1. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, M.A., E-mail: talaricomarco@hotmail.com [Marinha do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao do Porgrama de Submarino com Propulsao Nuclear; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  2. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarico, M.A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  3. Licensing process for safety-critical software-based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haapanen, P. [VTT Automation, Espoo (Finland); Korhonen, J. [VTT Electronics, Espoo (Finland); Pulkkinen, U. [VTT Automation, Espoo (Finland)

    2000-12-01

    System vendors nowadays propose software-based technology even for the most critical safety functions in nuclear power plants. Due to the nature of software faults and the way they cause system failures new methods are needed for the safety and reliability evaluation of these systems. In the research project 'Programmable automation systems in nuclear power plants (OHA)', financed together by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), various safety assessment methods and tools for software based systems are developed and evaluated. As a part of the OHA-work a reference model for the licensing process for software-based safety automation systems is defined. The licensing process is defined as the set of interrelated activities whose purpose is to produce and assess evidence concerning the safety and reliability of the system/application to be licensed and to make the decision about the granting the construction and operation permissions based on this evidence. The parties of the licensing process are the authority, the licensee (the utility company), system vendors and their subcontractors and possible external independent assessors. The responsibility about the production of the evidence in first place lies at the licensee who in most cases rests heavily on the vendor expertise. The evaluation and gauging of the evidence is carried out by the authority (possibly using external experts), who also can acquire additional evidence by using their own (independent) methods and tools. Central issue in the licensing process is to combine the quality evidence about the system development process with the information acquired through tests, analyses and operational experience. The purpose of the licensing process described in this report is to act as a reference model both for the authority and the licensee when planning the licensing of individual applications

  4. Licensing process for safety-critical software-based systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Korhonen, J.; Pulkkinen, U.

    2000-12-01

    System vendors nowadays propose software-based technology even for the most critical safety functions in nuclear power plants. Due to the nature of software faults and the way they cause system failures new methods are needed for the safety and reliability evaluation of these systems. In the research project 'Programmable automation systems in nuclear power plants (OHA)', financed together by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), various safety assessment methods and tools for software based systems are developed and evaluated. As a part of the OHA-work a reference model for the licensing process for software-based safety automation systems is defined. The licensing process is defined as the set of interrelated activities whose purpose is to produce and assess evidence concerning the safety and reliability of the system/application to be licensed and to make the decision about the granting the construction and operation permissions based on this evidence. The parties of the licensing process are the authority, the licensee (the utility company), system vendors and their subcontractors and possible external independent assessors. The responsibility about the production of the evidence in first place lies at the licensee who in most cases rests heavily on the vendor expertise. The evaluation and gauging of the evidence is carried out by the authority (possibly using external experts), who also can acquire additional evidence by using their own (independent) methods and tools. Central issue in the licensing process is to combine the quality evidence about the system development process with the information acquired through tests, analyses and operational experience. The purpose of the licensing process described in this report is to act as a reference model both for the authority and the licensee when planning the licensing of individual applications. Many of the

  5. Construction of quality-assured infant feeding process of care data repositories: Construction of the perinatal repository (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de-León-Chocano, Ricardo; Muñoz-Soler, Verónica; Sáez, Carlos; García-de-León-González, Ricardo; García-Gómez, Juan M

    2016-04-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers regarding the construction of data quality (DQ) assured repositories, based on population data from Electronic Health Records (EHR), for the reuse of information on infant feeding from birth until the age of two. This second paper describes the application of the computational process of constructing the first quality-assured repository for the reuse of information on infant feeding in the perinatal period, with the aim of studying relevant questions from the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and monitoring its deployment in our hospital. The construction of the repository was carried out using 13 semi-automated procedures to assess, recover or discard clinical data. The initial information consisted of perinatal forms from EHR related to 2048 births (Facts of Study, FoS) between 2009 and 2011, with a total of 433,308 observations of 223 variables. DQ was measured before and after the procedures using metrics related to eight quality dimensions: predictive value, correctness, duplication, consistency, completeness, contextualization, temporal-stability, and spatial-stability. Once the predictive variables were selected and DQ was assured, the final repository consisted of 1925 births, 107,529 observations and 73 quality-assured variables. The amount of discarded observations mainly corresponds to observations of non-predictive variables (52.90%) and the impact of the de-duplication process (20.58%) with respect to the total input data. Seven out of thirteen procedures achieved 100% of valid births, observations and variables. Moreover, 89% of births and ~98% of observations were consistent according to the experts׳ criteria. A multidisciplinary approach along with the quantification of DQ has allowed us to construct the first repository about infant feeding in the perinatal period based on EHR population data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Expert evaluation in NPP safety important systems licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhail, A Yastrebenetsky; Vasilchenko, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    Expert evaluation of nuclear power plant safety important systems modernization is an integral part of these systems licensing process. The paper contains some aspects of this evaluation which are based on Ukrainian experience of VVER-1000 and VVER-440 modernization. (authors)

  7. 47 CFR 22.949 - Unserved area licensing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., the licensee in the adjacent market (on the requested channel block) has the right to enter into such... sets forth the process for licensing unserved areas in cellular markets on channel blocks for which the... file competing applications for authority to operate a new cellular system in or to expand an existing...

  8. Expert evaluation in NPP safety important systems licensing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhail, A Yastrebenetsky; Vasilchenko, V.N. [Ukrainian State Scientific Technical Center of Nuclear and Radiation Safety (Ukraine)

    2001-07-01

    Expert evaluation of nuclear power plant safety important systems modernization is an integral part of these systems licensing process. The paper contains some aspects of this evaluation which are based on Ukrainian experience of VVER-1000 and VVER-440 modernization. (authors)

  9. The procedure of alternative site selection within the report of the study group on the radioactive waste final repository selection process (AKEnd); Das Verfahren der alternativen Standortsuche im Bericht des Arbeitskreises Auswahlverfahren Endlagerstandorte (AKEnd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, M. [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The paper discusses the results of the report of the study group on the radioactive waste final repository selection process with respect to the alternative site selection procedure. Key points of the report are the long-term safety, the alternativity of sites and the concept of one repository. The critique on this report is focussed on the topics site selection and licensing procedures, civil participation, the factor time and the question of cost.

  10. Exploitation of BEPU Approach for the Licensing Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Petruzzi, A.; Muellner, A.N.; Mazzantini, O.

    2011-01-01

    Within the licensing process of the Atucha II PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) the BEPU (Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty) approach has been selected for issuing of the Chapter 15 on FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report). The key steps of the entire process are basically two: a) the selection of PIE (Postulated Initiating Events) and, b) the analysis by best estimate models supported by uncertainty evaluation. The key elements of the approach are: 1) availability of qualified computational tools including suitable uncertainty method; 2) demonstration of quality; 3) acceptability and endorsement by the licensing authority. The effort of issuing Chapter 15 is terminated at the time of issuing of the present paper and the safety margins available for the operation of the concerned NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) have been quantified. (authors)

  11. Decommissioning Licensing Process of Nuclear Installations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Sainz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Enresa experience related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities includes the decommissioning of the Vandellos I and Jose Cabrera NPPs. The Vandellos I gas-graphite reactor was decommissioned in about five years (from 1998 to 2003) to what is known as level 2. In February 2010, the decommissioning of Jose Cabrera power plant has been initiated and it is scheduled to be finished by 2018. The decommissioning of a nuclear power plant is a complex administrative process, the procedure for changing from operation to decommissioning is established in the Spanish law. This paper summarizes the legal framework defining the strategies, the main activities and the basic roles of the various agents involved in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Spain. It also describes briefly the Licensing documents required to obtain the decommissioning authorization and the Enresa point of view, as licensee, on the licensing decommissioning process. (author)

  12. Risk-assessment techniques and the reactor licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400), concentrating on the engineering aspects of the contribution to reactor accident risks is followed by some comments on how we have applied the insights and techniques developed in this study to prepare a program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. Some new work we are just beginning on the application of risk-assessment techniques to stablize the reactor licensing process is also discussed

  13. Electronic repository and standardization of processes and electronic documents in transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz DĘBICKI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the idea of the use of electronic repository to store standardised scheme of processes between a Logistics Service Provider and its business partners. Application of repository for automatic or semi-automatic configuration of interoperability in electronic data interchange between information systems of differentcompanies based on transport (road, rail, sea and combined related processes. Standardisation includes processes, scheme of cooperation and related to them, electronic messages.

  14. Future extension of the Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The existing Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR) is licensed for disposal of short-lived waste originated from operation and maintenance of Swedish nuclear power plants. The repository is foreseen to be extended to accommodate short-lived waste from the future decommissioning of the Nuclear Power Plants. Long-lived waste from operation, maintenance and eventually decommissioning will be stored some years before disposal in a geological repository. This repository can be build either as a further extension of the SFR facility or as a separate repository. This paper discusses the strategy of a step-wise extended repository where the extensions are performed during operation of the existing parts of the repository. It describes the process for licensing new parts of the repository (and re-license of the existing parts). (author)

  15. CEQ regulations called peril to nuclear licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, J.V.

    1979-01-01

    Court challenges are expected over regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) that were designed to improve nuclear-licensing decisions, but that have actually changed the meanings of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations. The legal implications of these changes could, unless resolved, make the licensing process for nuclear facilities even more uncertain. Agency comments are thought to be critical, although the CEQ has declined to release them, and some question the Council's legality. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission faults the CEQ regulations for revising existing law, being inconsistent with the responsibilities of an independent regulatory body, and extending the CEQ's authority beyond the role assigned by NEPA and the President's Executive Order

  16. Fragment-based version management for repositories of business process models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekanayake, C.C.; La Rosa, M.; Hofstede, ter A.H.M.; Fauvet, M.C.; Meersman, R.; Dillon, T.; Herrero, P.; et al., xx

    2011-01-01

    As organizations reach higher levels of Business Process Management maturity, they tend to accumulate large collections of processmodels. These repositories may contain thousands of activities and be managed by different stakeholders with varying skills and responsibilities. However, while being of

  17. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100 0 C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced

  18. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100{sup 0}C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced.

  19. EEI/UWASTE oversight of the DOE Repository Program by the Repository Information Exchange Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, C.J.; Supko, E.M.; Schwartz, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The Utility Nuclear Waste and Transportation Program of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI/UWASTE) has conducted reviews of the US DOE's repository program through its Repository Information Exchange Team (RIET or Team). Eight such reviews have been conducted since 1985 covering topics that include repository program management and control; repository schedule; repository budget; quality assurance; site characterization; repository licensing; environmental issues; and institutional and public information activities. The utility industry has used these repository program reviews as a forum for providing DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with comments on the direction of the repository program, advice for future actions regarding quality assurance activities and repository licensing, and suggestions for management and control of the Repository Program. The most significant recommendations made by the utility industry through the RIET are discussed along with any subsequent action by OCRWM in response to or subsequent to utility industry recommendations. The process used by the RIET to develop its recommendations to OCRWM regarding the repository program is also discussed

  20. Repository exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentz, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses exploration objectives and requirements for a nuclear repository in the U.S.A. The importance of designing the exploration program to meet the system performance objectives is emphasized and some examples of the extent of exploration required before the License Application for Construction Authorization is granted are also discussed

  1. Coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    The performance assessment of a nuclear waste geologic repository presents a scientific and technical problem of a scope far beyond the evaluation of most civil and geologic constructions. First performance prediction must be made for tens of thousands of years, and a secondly, in calculating potential leakage rates from a repository to the biosphere the authors must determine not only the mean or average travel time but also the shorter travel times of low concentrations. These two criteria demand an understanding of all significant physical and chemical processes likely to occur around a nuclear waste repository. In particular, processes coupling thermal transfer fluid flow, mechanical deformation and chemical reactors, which may be slow in a laboratory time scale, may become very important. This paper gives a general survey on the subject, with specific examples of a number of relevant coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with nuclear waste repository

  2. Analysis of the processes defining radionuclide migration from deep geological repositories in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazauskaite, A.; Poskas, P.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the danger of exposure arising from long-lived radionuclides to humans and environment, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) are not allowed to be disposed of in near surface repositories. There exists an international consensus that such high level and long-lived radioactive wastes are best disposed of in geological repositories using a system of engineered and natural barriers. At present, the geological repository of SNF and HLW has not been realized yet in any country but there is a lot of experience in the assessment of radionuclide migration from deep repositories, investigations of different processes related to the safety of a disposal system. The aim of this study was to analyze the processes related to the radionuclide migration from deep geological repositories in porous medium such as SNF matrix dissolution, release mechanism of radionuclides from SNF matrix, radionuclide solubility, sorption, diffusive, advective transport of radionuclides from the canister and through the engineered and natural barriers. It has been indicated that SNF matrix dissolution, radionuclide solubility and sorption are sensitive to ambient conditions prevailing in the repository. The approaches that could be used for modeling the radionuclide migration from deep repositories in porous medium are also presented. (author)

  3. Licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.P.; Desell, L.J.; Birch, M.L.; Berkowitz, L.; Bader, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    To provide guidance for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a draft regulatory guide on the Format and Content for the License Application for the High-Level Waste Repository (FCRG). To facilitate the development of the FCRG, NRC suggested that DOE use the draft guide as the basis for preparing an annotated outline for a license application. DOE is doing so using an iterative process called the Annotated Outline Initiative. DOE;s use of the Initiative will assist in achieving the desired incorporation of actual experience in the FCRG, contribute to the development of shared interpretation and understanding of NRC regulations, and provide other important programmatic benefits described in this paper

  4. The post-closure radiological safety case for a spent fuel repository in Sweden - An international peer review of the SKB license-application study of March 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Sweden is at the forefront among countries developing plans for a deep geological repository of highly radioactive waste. There is no such repository in operation yet worldwide, but Sweden, Finland and France are approaching the licensing stage. At the request of the Swedish government, the NEA organised an international peer review of the post-closure radiological safety case produced by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) in support of the application for a general licence to construct and operate a spent nuclear fuel geological repository in the municipality of Oesthammar. The purpose of the review was to help the Swedish government, the public and relevant organisations by providing an international reference regarding the maturity of SKB's spent fuel disposal programme vis-a-vis best practices in long-term disposal safety and radiological protection. The International Review Team (IRT) consisted of ten international specialists, who were free of conflict of interest with the SKB and brought complementary expertise to the review. This report provides the background and findings of the international peer review. The review's findings are presented at several levels of detail in order to be accessible to both specialist and non-specialist readers

  5. The role of weapons production and military waste in the repository selection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.; Hope, J.; Power, W.; Hunter, T.

    1987-01-01

    The decision to commingle defense waste with commercial waste in the nuclear waste repository program has many impacts on that program. There will be more waste to place in the two repositories authorized under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, more transport miles to get the waste to a repository, and more costs associated with environmental and socio-economic impact mitigation. This paper explores the links between weapons production and military waste, and the repository selection process. The paper first describes the importance of state, tribe and public participation to the acceptance of a repository site selection. The paper then examines the various estimates of amounts of existing and future military nuclear wastes, and how these estimates affect repository siting decisions. The final section addresses the public policy questions which surround this issue. Repository siting may be jeopardized unless there is open public discussion about existing radioactive contamination at military production sites and about future nuclear weapons production. Cost-sharing is considered within this context

  6. Waste Disposal: Processes Taking Place (on the way) from the Repository to the Biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put, M.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the processes taking place on the way from the repository to the biosphere is to provide reliable and defensible models and parameters on the migration of dissolved radionuclides and gases through the host formation (Boom Clay) and the backfill materials of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste. The programme and main achievements in this topical area in 1999 are summarised

  7. Standardization of the licensing process in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a major problem with the design review process for light water reactors. Major confusion exists over the design-basis requirements for a future nuclear power plant in the US. It is not at all clear how the conclusions of a severe accident review are to be integrated into the design approval process. The separation between a design-basis review and a severe accident review makes absolutely no sense if the severe accident review is to have an influence on the design. If an acceptable design is defined during the deterministic review, it is destructive to allow new design-basis requirements to appear during the probabilistic review. Clearly, the review process has too many undefined steps. It is believed that once all of the requirements are defined for a future design, and once the licensing process is exactly defined, the industry can begin a productive and successful standardization program

  8. Fuel licensing process for an industrial use. ATF licensing process for an industrial use - Utility's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waeckel, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    To develop and license a breakthrough nuclear fuel technology for commercial use is becoming challenging. All the former safety analysis design limits (SAFDLs) defined in the 1970's for the standard UO 2 -Zr fuels, might no longer be applicable. Identification of the appropriate safety analysis design limits For each type of innovative fuel, the developers will have to identify and investigate all the possible failure/ruins scenarios (not only those related to severe accidents but also those related to normal operation). In order to save time and to focus on the best options, those failure scenarios (which could be 'killers' for the ATF concept) have to be determined early enough in the development process. Based on the above failure scenarios, the developers will have to propose the licensing limits (and the experimental protocol to determine and to justify them). As mentioned earlier, the licensing limits should not be defined against the accidental conditions only. For the operators, the (good) in-reactor fuel behaviour is crucial. As an example, in the case of the new fuel concepts coming with an outer coating, it is important to include the analysis of the consequences of the loss of this protective outer layer in the licensing process due to a manufacturing defect or an inevitable in-reactor fretting wear. Obviously, the new/specific SAFDLs will have to be endorsed by the regulators (which could be a long process by itself). Identification of a commercial reactor to irradiate the first ATF A commercial NPP is not a material test reactor (MTR); irradiating lead test fuel rods (LTFRs) or lead test assemblies (LTAs) implies strict requirements regarding the manufacturing processes [which should not include chemicals (additives or solvents) potentially incompatible with the nuclear technical specifications], the compatibility with the hosting fuel core (in terms of geometry, enrichment, thermal hydraulic performances, etc.) and the robustness and

  9. 76 FR 60941 - Policy Regarding Submittal of Amendments for Processing of Equivalent Feed at Licensed Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Processing of Equivalent Feed at Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... State-licensed uranium recovery site, either conventional, heap leach, or in situ recovery. DATES... Regarding Submittal of Amendments for Processing of Equivalent Feed at Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities...

  10. 77 FR 30308 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: Alternatives Process in Hydropower Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ...: Alternatives Process in Hydropower Licensing AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Office of Environmental Policy... the Alternatives Process in Hydropower Licensing, OMB Control Number 1094-0001. FOR FURTHER... more of the Departments develop for inclusion in a hydropower license issued by the Federal Energy...

  11. Important processes affecting the release and migration of radionuclides from a deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barátová, Dana; Nečas, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    The processes that affect significantly the transport of contaminants through the near field and far field of a deep geological repository of spent nuclear fuel were studied. The processes can be generally divided into (i) processes related to the release of radionuclides from the spent nuclear fuel; (ii) processes related to the radionuclide transport mechanisms (such as advection and diffusion); and (iii) processes affecting the rate of radionuclide migration through the multi-barrier repository system. A near-field and geosphere model of an unspecified geological repository sited in a crystalline rock is also described. Focus of the treatment is on the effects of the different processes on the activity flow of the major safety-relevant radionuclides. The activity flow was simulated for one spent fuel cask by using the GoldSim simulation tool. (orig.)

  12. SKI's engagement in the process for siting a spent nuclear fuel repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paeivioe Jonsson, Josefin; Westerlind, Magnus [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-09-15

    preferred location for the encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel was in the municipality of Oskarshamn (in connection to the central interim storage for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB). This led the municipality to initiate a forum for consultations between the municipality, County Administration Board, SKI and SSI (the so-called MKB-Forum in Kalmar County). They emphasised that active regulators, with clear roles and positions, were a prerequisite for the municipality's involvement in the siting process. In 1996 a feasibility study for a repository was launched by SKB and was included in the MKB-Forum's work. SKI's RandD in the field of nuclear waste management aims at maintaining and developing the competence needed for independent assessments of safety. In recent years the research also includes risk communication and decision-making processes. The co-ordination of EIA and decision making processes according to different acts, in particular the Act on Nuclear Activities and the Environmental Code is one big challenge for all actors involved in process for siting a repository for spent nuclear fuel. Many actors will be involved in the parallel licensing process and it requires good planning and good cooperation. The application for construction of an encapsulation plant will be submitted already in 2006 (addressing mainly technical basis and operational safety), but will be updated in 2008 (e.g. coverage of long-term safety for the sealed waste canisters produced in the plant). These applications must be approved according to the Environmental Code and the Act of Nuclear Activities before construction licenses can be given. A final decision from the Swedish Government will most probably address the whole concept of disposal, simultaneously covering both facilities. With an estimated period covering at least two years for technical review by SKI, SSI and the Swedish Environmental Court (for approval according to Environmental Code) and at least one year for

  13. Methodology and findings of the NRC`s materials licensing process redesign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbun, P.A.; Brown, K.D.; Madera, J.R.; Moriarty, M.; Pelchat, J.M.; Usilton, W.K.; Whitten, J.E.; Vacca, P.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the work and vision of the team chartered to redesign the process for licensing users of nuclear materials. The Business Process Redesign team was chartered to improve the speed of the existing licensing process while maintaining or improving public safety and to achieve required resource levels. The report describes the team`s methods for acquiring and analyzing information about the existing materials licensing process and the steps necessary to radically change this process to the envisioned future process.

  14. Comparative assessment of licensing processes of uranium mines in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, K.M.; Menezes, R.M.; Mezrahi, A.

    2002-01-01

    Commercial operation of uranium mining and milling started in Brazil, at the Pocos de Caldas Unit, State of Minas Gerais, in 1982. The Pocos de Caldas Unit was licensed by the Brazilian Regulatory Body (CNEN) and its is now in the decommissioning process. In 2000, a new mining and milling installation, the Caetite Unit, located in State of Bahia, started operation. This paper will discuss how Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission is licensing the Caetite Unit based on the lessons learned from the Pocos de Caldas Unit. The objective is to draw attention to the importance of the safety assessment for a new unit, specially considering that some wrong decisions were taken for the Pocos de Caldas unit. These decisions lead to less effective long term solutions to protect the environment. Notwithstanding the differences between the two units, it is of great value to use the acquired experience to avoid or minimize the short, medium and long term impacts to the environment and population in the new operation. (author)

  15. Digitizing Dissertations for an Institutional Repository: A Process and Cost Analysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorun, Mary; Palmer, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This paper describes the Lamar Soutter Library's process and costs associated with digitizing 300 doctoral dissertations for a newly implemented institutional repository at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Methodology: Project tasks included identifying metadata elements, obtaining and tracking permissions, converting the dissertations to an electronic format, and coordinating workflow between library departments. Each dissertation was scanned, reviewed for quality control, enhanced with a table of contents, processed through an optical character recognition function, and added to the institutional repository. Results: Three hundred and twenty dissertations were digitized and added to the repository for a cost of $23,562, or $0.28 per page. Seventy-four percent of the authors who were contacted (n = 282) granted permission to digitize their dissertations. Processing time per title was 170 minutes, for a total processing time of 906 hours. In the first 17 months, full-text dissertations in the collection were downloaded 17,555 times. Conclusion: Locally digitizing dissertations or other scholarly works for inclusion in institutional repositories can be cost effective, especially if small, defined projects are chosen. A successful project serves as an excellent recruitment strategy for the institutional repository and helps libraries build new relationships. Challenges include workflow, cost, policy development, and copyright permissions. PMID:18654648

  16. Digitizing dissertations for an institutional repository: a process and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorun, Mary; Palmer, Lisa A

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the Lamar Soutter Library's process and costs associated with digitizing 300 doctoral dissertations for a newly implemented institutional repository at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Project tasks included identifying metadata elements, obtaining and tracking permissions, converting the dissertations to an electronic format, and coordinating workflow between library departments. Each dissertation was scanned, reviewed for quality control, enhanced with a table of contents, processed through an optical character recognition function, and added to the institutional repository. Three hundred and twenty dissertations were digitized and added to the repository for a cost of $23,562, or $0.28 per page. Seventy-four percent of the authors who were contacted (n = 282) granted permission to digitize their dissertations. Processing time per title was 170 minutes, for a total processing time of 906 hours. In the first 17 months, full-text dissertations in the collection were downloaded 17,555 times. Locally digitizing dissertations or other scholarly works for inclusion in institutional repositories can be cost effective, especially if small, defined projects are chosen. A successful project serves as an excellent recruitment strategy for the institutional repository and helps libraries build new relationships. Challenges include workflow, cost, policy development, and copyright permissions.

  17. 76 FR 63330 - Policy Regarding Submittal of Amendments for Processing of Equivalent Feed at Licensed Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... Processing of Equivalent Feed at Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... NRC and Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery site. This action is necessary to correct several... read ``(see Page A2 of SECY-99-011, ``Draft Rulemaking Plan: Domestic Licensing of Uranium and Thorium...

  18. Scenarios constructed for the effects of tectonic processes on the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, G.E.; Borns, D.J.; Fridrich, C.

    1996-10-01

    A comprehensive collection of scenarios is presented that connect initiating tectonic events with radionuclide releases by logical and physically possible combinations or sequences of features, events and processes. The initiating tectonic events include both discrete faulting and distributed rock deformation developed through the repository and adjacent to it, as well as earthquake-induced ground motion and changes in tectonic stress at the site. The effects of these tectonic events include impacts on the engineered-barrier system, such as container rupture and failure of repository tunnels. These effects also include a wide range of hydrologic effects such as changes in pathways and flow rates in the unsaturated and saturated zones, changes in the water-table configuration, and in the development of perched-water systems. These scenarios are intended go guide performance-assessment analyses and to assist principal investigators in how essential field, laboratory, and calculational studies are used. This suite of scenarios will help ensure that all important aspects of the system disturbance related to a tectonic scenario are captured in numerical analyses. It also provides a record of all options considered by project analysts to provide documentation required for licensing agreement. The final portion of this report discusses issues remaining to be addressed with respect to tectonic activity. 105 refs

  19. Department of Energy licensing strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frei, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is authorized by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Act) to site, design, construct, and operate mined geologic repositories for high-level radioactive wastes and is required to obtain licenses from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to achieve that mandate. To this end the DOE has developed a licensing approach which defines program strategies and which will facilitate and ease the licensing process. This paper will discuss the regulatory framework within which the repository program is conducted, the DOE licensing strategy, and the interactions between DOE and NRC in implementing the strategy. A licensing strategy is made necessary by the unique technical nature of the repository. Such a facility has never before been licensed; furthermore, the duration of isolation of waste demanded by the proposed EPA standard will require a degree of reliance on probabilistic performance assessment as proof of compliance that is a first of a kind for any industry. The licensing strategy is also made necessary by the complex interrelationships among the many involved governmental agencies and even within DOE itself, and because these relationships will change with time. Program activities which recognize these relationships are essential for implementing the Act. The guiding principle in this strategy is an overriding commitment to safeguarding public health and safety and to protecting the environment

  20. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Asahina, Daisuke [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Fei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the EDZ, and (3) development of a THM model for the FE tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the purpose of model validation. The overall objective of these activities is to provide an improved understanding of EDZ evolution in clay repositories and the associated coupled processes, and to develop advanced relevant modeling capabilities.

  1. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-10-08

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

  2. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood

  3. A Deterministic Safety Assessment of a Pyro-processed Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae; Choi, Jong Won

    2012-01-01

    A GoldSim template program for a safety assessment of a hybrid-typed repository system, called 'A-KRS', in which two kinds of pyro-processed radioactive wastes, low-level metal wastes and ceramic high-level wastes that arise from the pyro-processing of PWR nuclear spent fuels are disposed of, has been developed. This program is ready both for a deterministic and probabilistic total system performance assessment which is able to evaluate nuclide release from the repository and farther transport into the geosphere and biosphere under various normal, disruptive natural and manmade events, and scenarios. The A-KRS has been deterministically assessed with 5 various normal and abnormal scenarios associated with nuclide release and transport in and around the repository. Dose exposure rates to the farming exposure group have been evaluated in accordance with all the scenarios and then compared among other.

  4. Automation of the DoD Export License Application Review Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Shelton

    2002-01-01

    .... The overall audit objective was to determine whether Federal automation programs supporting the export license and review process could be used to establish a common electronic interface creating...

  5. Licensing process for future applications of advanced-design nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    The existing 10CFR50 two-step licensing process in the Code of Federal Regulations can continue to be a viable licensing vehicle for future applications, at least for the near future. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Commissioners and staff, the public, and the utilities (along with supporting architect/engineers and nuclear steam supply system vendors) have a vast body of experience and knowledge of the existing part 50 licensing process. All these participants are familiar with their respective roles in this process, and history shows this process to be a workable licensing vehicle. Nevertheless, the use of 10CFR52 should be encouraged for future applications. This proposed new rule is intended to achieve the early resolution of licensing issues, to reduce the complexity and uncertainty of the licensing process, and enhance the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. Part 52's overall purpose is to improve reactor safety and streamline the licensing process by encouraging the use of standard reactor designs and by allowing the early resolution of site environmental and reactor safety issues. The public should be afforded an earlier entry into the licensing process as a result of design certification rulemaking process and combined construction permit/operating license hearings

  6. Development of site selection process for an LILW repository in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Kralj, M.; Mele, I.; Veselic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The activities regarding the LILW repository site selection in Slovenia are planned to meet the requirements of the Act on Ionising Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, especially the requirement that the site for a repository should be selected by 2008 and the repository should be in operation by 2013. In November 2004, the official administrative procedure for the siting of the repository started with the first spatial public conference on spatial planning procedure. It was carried out by the Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning and ARAO. Immediately after the conference the Program for the preparation of the detailed plan of national importance for the LILW repository was accepted by the Ministry. At the beginning of December 2004, ARAO invited all Slovenian local communities to participate in the site selection process and volunteer a site or area in their local community for further investigation. At the beginning of April 2005 the first phase of the bidding process was concluded. ARAO received applications from eight local communities. A pre-feasibility study to define three of the most promising locations was conducted because only three locations are foreseen by the Program for the preparation of the detailed plan of national importance. Methodologies were prepared for assessment of different parameters of technical, financial, environmental and spatial suitability as well as public acceptability. Comparative, preferential and also exclusion criteria for the respective parameters were defined. The results of the cabinet and fieldwork research were compared and further assessed in order to obtain maximum three local communities with three potential sites in which the probability of siting the LILW repository seems to be the highest. Detailed plans of national importance will be prepared for these sites. (author)

  7. Model and Analytic Processes for Export License Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sandra E.; Whitney, Paul D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Daly, Don S.; Brothers, Alan J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cook, Diane; Holder, Larry

    2011-09-29

    This paper represents the Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Simulations, Algorithms and Modeling (SAM) Program's first effort to identify and frame analytical methods and tools to aid export control professionals in effectively predicting proliferation intent; a complex, multi-step and multi-agency process. The report focuses on analytical modeling methodologies that alone, or combined, may improve the proliferation export control license approval process. It is a follow-up to an earlier paper describing information sources and environments related to international nuclear technology transfer. This report describes the decision criteria used to evaluate modeling techniques and tools to determine which approaches will be investigated during the final 2 years of the project. The report also details the motivation for why new modeling techniques and tools are needed. The analytical modeling methodologies will enable analysts to evaluate the information environment for relevance to detecting proliferation intent, with specific focus on assessing risks associated with transferring dual-use technologies. Dual-use technologies can be used in both weapons and commercial enterprises. A decision-framework was developed to evaluate which of the different analytical modeling methodologies would be most appropriate conditional on the uniqueness of the approach, data availability, laboratory capabilities, relevance to NA-22 and Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (NA-24) research needs and the impact if successful. Modeling methodologies were divided into whether they could help micro-level assessments (e.g., help improve individual license assessments) or macro-level assessment. Macro-level assessment focuses on suppliers, technology, consumers, economies, and proliferation context. Macro-level assessment technologies scored higher in the area of uniqueness because less work has been done at the macro level. An

  8. Business process model repositories – framework and survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Dijkman, R.M.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Large organizations often run hundreds or even thousands of different business processes. Managing such large collections of business process models is a challenging task. Software can assist in performing that task, by supporting common management functions such as storage, search and

  9. The Swedish radiological environmental protection regulations applied in a review of a license application for a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Pål; Stark, Karolina; Xu, Shulan; Nordén, Maria; Dverstorp, Björn

    2017-11-01

    For the first time, a system for specific consideration of radiological environmental protection has been applied in a major license application in Sweden. In 2011 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel & Waste Management Co. (SKB) submitted a license application for construction of a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel at the Forsmark site. The license application is supported by a post-closure safety assessment, which in accordance with regulatory requirements includes an assessment of environmental consequences. SKB's environmental risk assessment uses the freely available ERICA Tool. Environmental media activity concentrations needed as input to the tool are calculated by means of complex biosphere modelling based on site-specific information gathered from site investigations, as well as from supporting modelling studies and projections of future biosphere conditions in response to climate change and land rise due to glacial rebound. SKB's application is currently being reviewed by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). In addition to a traditional document review with an aim to determine whether SKB's models are relevant, correctly implemented and adequately parametrized, SSM has performed independent modelling in order to gain confidence in the robustness of SKB's assessment. Thus, SSM has used alternative stylized reference biosphere models to calculate environmental activity concentrations for use in subsequent exposure calculations. Secondly, an alternative dose model (RESRAD-BIOTA) is used to calculate doses to biota that are compared with SKB's calculations with the ERICA tool. SSM's experience from this review is that existing tools for environmental dose assessment are possible to use in order to show compliance with Swedish legislation. However, care is needed when site representative species are assessed with the aim to contrast them to generic reference organism. The alternative modelling of environmental concentrations resulted in much lower

  10. Transient boundary conditions in the frame of THM-processes at nuclear waste repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanz Tom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear waste repositories, initially unsaturated buffer is subjected to constant heat emitted by waste canister in conjunction with peripheral hydration through water from host rock. The transient hydration process can be potraied as transformation of initial heterogeneity towards homogeneity as final stage. In this context, this paper addresses the key issue of hydro mechanical behaviour of compacted buffer in context of clay microstructure and its evolution under repository relevant loading paths and material heterogeneity. This paper also introduces a unique column experiment facility available at Ruhr Universität Bochum, Germany. The facility has been designed as a forerunner of field scale testing program to simulate the transient hydration process of compacted buffer as per German reference disposal concept. The device is unique in terms of having proficiency to capture the transient material response under various possible repository relevant loading paths with higher precision level by monitor the key parameters like temperature, total suction, water content and axial & radial swelling pressure at three different sections along the length of compacted soil sample. In general, a larger spectrum of loading paths/scenarios, which may arise in the nuclear repository, can be covered precisely with existing device.

  11. Identifying significant uncertainties in thermally dependent processes for repository performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.D.; Lamont, A.

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the performance of the potential Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, scientific investigations are being conducted to reduce the uncertainty about process models and system parameters. This paper is intended to demonstrate a method for determining a strategy for the cost effective management of these investigations. It is not meant to be a complete study of all processes and interactions, but does outline a method which can be applied to more in-depth investigations

  12. USNRC licensing process as related to nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzlach, N.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations establishes procedures and criteria for the issuance of licenses to receive title to, own, acquire, deliver, receive, possess, use, and initially transfer special nuclear material; and establishes and provides for the terms and conditions upon which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will issue such licenses. Section 70.22 of the regulations, ''Contents of Applications'', requires that applications for licenses contain proposed procedures to avoid accidental conditions of criticality. These procedures are elements of a nuclear criticality safety program for operations with fissionable materials at fuels and materials facilities (i.e., fuel cycle facilities other than nuclear reactors) in which there exists a potential for criticality accidents. To assist the applicant in providing specific information needed for a nuclear criticality safety program in a license application, the NRC has issued regulatory guides. The NRC requirements for nuclear criticality safety include organizational, administrative, and technical requirements. For purely technical matters on nuclear criticality safety these guides endorse national standards. Others provide guidance on the standard format and content of license applications, guidance on evaluating radiological consequences of criticality accidents, or guidance for dealing with other radiation safety issues. (author)

  13. Assessment of Public Acceptability in LILW Repository Site Selection Process in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Kralj, M.; Polic, M.; Kos, D.

    2006-01-01

    Slovenian national agency for radioactive waste management ARAO has after longer period of preparation activities started with the more direct work on the site selection process for low and intermediate level waste (LILW) repository. In November 2004, the official administrative procedure for the siting of the repository started with the First public conference on spatial planning issues carried out by the Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning together with ARAO. Just after the conference the Program for the preparation of the Detailed plan of national importance for the LILW repository was accepted by the Ministry. ARAO invited in the beginning of December 2004 all local communities in Slovenia (except 3 of them which have already refused to cooperate) to participate and volunteer a site or area in their local community for further investigation. The invitation for the application of local communities provided clear instructions on how to participate in further determination of potentially suitable sites and under what conditions. By the beginning of April 2005 ARAO finished the bidding process with 8 applications of local communities which decided to participate in the further site selection for LILW repository. Due to the financial and other limitations (human resources, spatial planning procedure, etc.) only in maximum three local communities further characterization could be performed. Therefore prefeasibility study of all volunteer local communities was conducted in which besides technical, environmental and spatial availability also public acceptability should be assessed. For assessment of public acceptability the methodology has been prepared which includes objective parameters of local environment (such as demographic data, economy, infrastructure and social issues in relation to the repository) as well as subjective values (attitudes of individual groups - opinion makers, politicians and all residents - to the sitting and construction of LILW

  14. Commitment tracking in the licensing renewal process: A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurican, Gregory M.; Breslauer, Stephen K.

    1991-01-01

    The NRC's proposed 10 CFR 54 defines 'Current licensing basis' as inclusive of all licensee commitments. During the last five years, the regulatory commitment tracking group (RCTG) has been developing guidance for member utilities to track such commitments. The RCTG guidance for commitment tracking assists utilities in developing a system to store and maintain commitments related to the CLB. But a majority believe it unlikely that any one commitment tracking system will capture all commitments contained in the proposed definition of a 'Current Licencing Basis'. For future renewal applications the NRC proposes that utilities must identify and compile all licensing basis commitments. In addition, utilities 'shall maintain...(them) in an auditable and retrievable form'. Some utilities are already compiling and tracking licensing basis commitments; others are not. (author)

  15. Repository performance confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the

  16. 24 CFR 3286.207 - Process for obtaining installation license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... installation license must submit verification of the experience required in § 3286.205(a). This verification may be in the form of statements by past or present employers or a self-certification that the applicant meets those experience requirements, but HUD may contact the applicant for additional verification...

  17. The Texas concurrent characterization, licensing, and development process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avant, R.V. Jr. [Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, Austin, TX (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The 72nd Texas Legislature specifically delineated a 400-square-mile area in southeast Hudspeth County where siting activities would be limited. The Authority was given unprecedented powers of property access and eminent domain and expanded budget authority to conduct site selection, characterization, and licensing. In the summer of 1991, the Authority identified five general siting areas in the prescribed region, and in the fall of 1991, the Authority narrowed the siting area to one large ranch composed of about 16,000 acres--called the Faskin Ranch. Site characterization began in 1991 and will be complete by September 1993. In September 1991, Authority staff began preparing the license application and included all available information on the Faskin Ranch. At its February meeting, the Authority`s board directed staff to submit the license application to the Texas Water Commission (the new Texas radiation control agency). The license application was submitted on March 2, 1992, and on April 15, 1992, the Commission determined that the application was sufficiently complete to begin review. Discrete technical packages such as groundwater hydrology, surface water hydrology, design, etc., will be submitted to the agency for review on the completion of each package. A schedule has been developed to allow the regulators the maximum time possible to review critical technical areas while minimizing the total review period.

  18. SR 97. Processes in the repository evolution. Background report to SR 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, A.

    1999-11-01

    This report describes, in a comprehensive and coherent fashion, all identified internal processes of importance for the post-closure evolution and safety of a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel. The report has been written to be used in the SR 97 project, which has limited the time available for its preparation. Differences in the level of detail in descriptions of different processes do not always reflect differences in the significance of the processes. Discussions of different types of uncertainties could in many cases be broadened and deepened, and the stylistic quality could sometimes be improved. Like other background material for the safety assessments, the process report is also expected to require revision as site-specific conditions are progressively clarified. Today's version of the process report is therefore the first version of a report that will be revised prior to every safety report. The intention is to perform the first revision of the report after scrutiny of SR 97. The report describes the internal processes which over time lead to changes in a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel. The context of the material in the report is described in SR 97 Main Report and briefly entails the following: The repository has been divided into four subsystems: fuel/cavity, cast iron insert/copper canister, buffer/backfill and geosphere. A number of processes of importance for the post-closure evolution of the repository have been identified within each subsystem. This has been done with the aid of material in the so-called interaction matrices previously developed by SKB. The processes have been divided into the categories thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical. Furthermore, there are processes related to radiation and radionuclide transport. The identified processes are documented in this report. Each subsystem has its own chapter, and each chapter is divided into radiation related, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes as well as

  19. SR 97. Processes in the repository evolution. Background report to SR 97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedin, A. [ed.

    1999-11-01

    This report describes, in a comprehensive and coherent fashion, all identified internal processes of importance for the post-closure evolution and safety of a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel. The report has been written to be used in the SR 97 project, which has limited the time available for its preparation. Differences in the level of detail in descriptions of different processes do not always reflect differences in the significance of the processes. Discussions of different types of uncertainties could in many cases be broadened and deepened, and the stylistic quality could sometimes be improved. Like other background material for the safety assessments, the process report is also expected to require revision as site-specific conditions are progressively clarified. Today's version of the process report is therefore the firstversion of a report that will be revised prior to every safety report. The intention is to perform the first revision of the report after scrutiny of SR 97. The report describes the internal processes which over time lead to changes in a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel. The context of the material in the report is described in SR 97 Main Report and briefly entails the following: The repository has been divided into four subsystems: fuel/cavity, cast iron insert/copper canister, buffer/backfill and geosphere. A number of processes of importance for the post-closure evolution of the repository have been identified within each subsystem. This has been done with the aid of material in the so-called interaction matrices previously developed by SKB. The processes have been divided into the categories thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical. Furthermore, there are processes related to radiation and radionuclide transport. The identified processes are documented in this report. Each subsystem has its own chapter, and each chapter is divided into radiation related, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes as well

  20. SR 97. Processes in the repository evolution. Background report to SR 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, A.

    1999-11-01

    This report describes, in a comprehensive and coherent fashion, all identified internal processes of importance for the post-closure evolution and safety of a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel. The report has been written to be used in the SR 97 project, which has limited the time available for its preparation. Differences in the level of detail in descriptions of different processes do not always reflect differences in the significance of the processes. Discussions of different types of uncertainties could in many cases be broadened and deepened, and the stylistic quality could sometimes be improved. Like other background material for the safety assessments, the process report is also expected to require revision as site-specific conditions are progressively clarified. Today's version of the process report is therefore the first version of a report that will be revised prior to every safety report. The intention is to perform the first revision of the report after scrutiny of SR 97. The report describes the internal processes which over time lead to changes in a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel. The context of the material in the report is described in SR 97 Main Report and briefly entails the following: The repository has been divided into four subsystems: fuel/cavity, cast iron insert/copper canister, buffer/backfill and geosphere. A number of processes of importance for the post-closure evolution of the repository have been identified within each subsystem. This has been done with the aid of material in the so-called interaction matrices previously developed by SKB. The processes have been divided into the categories thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical. Furthermore, there are processes related to radiation and radionuclide transport. The identified processes are documented in this report. Each subsystem has its own chapter, and each chapter is divided into radiation related, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes as well as

  1. Physical processes of magmatism and effects on the potential repository: Synthesis of technical work through Fiscal Year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    This chapter summarizes data collection and model calculations through FY 95 under Study Plan 8.3.1.8.1.2 Physical Processes of Magmatism and Effects on the Potential Repository. The focus of this study plan is to gather information that ultimately constrains the consequences of small-volume, basaltic magmatic activity at or near a potential repository. This is then combined with event probability estimates, described elsewhere in this synthesis report, to yield a magmatic risk assessment. Tere are two basic classes of effects of magmatisms that are considered here: (1) Eruptive effects, whereby rising magma intersects a potential repository, entrains radioactive waste, and erupts it onto the earth's surface. (2) Subsurface effects, which includes a wide range of processes such as hydrothermal flow, alteration of mineral assemblages in the potential repository system, and alteration of hydrologic flow properties of the rocks surrounding a potential repository

  2. Physical processes of magmatism and effects on the potential repository: Synthesis of technical work through Fiscal Year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This chapter summarizes data collection and model calculations through FY 95 under Study Plan 8.3.1.8.1.2 Physical Processes of Magmatism and Effects on the Potential Repository. The focus of this study plan is to gather information that ultimately constrains the consequences of small-volume, basaltic magmatic activity at or near a potential repository. This is then combined with event probability estimates, described elsewhere in this synthesis report, to yield a magmatic risk assessment. Tere are two basic classes of effects of magmatisms that are considered here: (1) Eruptive effects, whereby rising magma intersects a potential repository, entrains radioactive waste, and erupts it onto the earth`s surface. (2) Subsurface effects, which includes a wide range of processes such as hydrothermal flow, alteration of mineral assemblages in the potential repository system, and alteration of hydrologic flow properties of the rocks surrounding a potential repository.

  3. Integrating rock mechanics issues with repository design through design process principles and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1996-01-01

    A good designer needs not only knowledge for designing (technical know-how that is used to generate alternative design solutions) but also must have knowledge about designing (appropriate principles and systematic methodology to follow). Concepts such as open-quotes design for manufactureclose quotes or open-quotes concurrent engineeringclose quotes are widely used in the industry. In the field of rock engineering, only limited attention has been paid to the design process because design of structures in rock masses presents unique challenges to the designers as a result of the uncertainties inherent in characterization of geologic media. However, a stage has now been reached where we are be able to sufficiently characterize rock masses for engineering purposes and identify the rock mechanics issues involved but are still lacking engineering design principles and methodology to maximize our design performance. This paper discusses the principles and methodology of the engineering design process directed to integrating site characterization activities with design, construction and performance of an underground repository. Using the latest information from the Yucca Mountain Project on geology, rock mechanics and starter tunnel design, the current lack of integration is pointed out and it is shown how rock mechanics issues can be effectively interwoven with repository design through a systematic design process methodology leading to improved repository performance. In essence, the design process is seen as the use of design principles within an integrating design methodology, leading to innovative problem solving. In particular, a new concept of open-quotes Design for Constructibility and Performanceclose quotes is introduced. This is discussed with respect to ten rock mechanics issues identified for repository design and performance

  4. Lessons learned from the licensing process for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, P.W.; Clare, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the experience of licensing a specific liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), the Clinch River Breader Reactor Plant (CRBRP). It was a success story in that the licensing process was accomplished in a very short time span. The actions of the applicant and the actions of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in response are presented and discussed to provide guidance to future efforts to license unconventional reactors. The history is told from the perspective of the authors. As such, some of the reasons given for success or lack of success are subjective interpretations. Nevertheless, the authors' positions provided them an excellent viewpoint to make these judgements. During the second phase of the licensing process, they were the CRBRP Technical Director and the Licensing Manager, respectively, for the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, the prime contractor for the reactor plant

  5. The Poco de Caldas project: Natural analogues of processes in a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.A.; McKinley, I.G.; Shea, M.E.; Smellie, J.A.T.

    1993-01-01

    The safe disposal of radioactive wastes by burial in deep geologic formations requires long-term predictions of the future behavior of the wastes nd their engineered repository. Such predictions can be tested by evaluating processes analogous to those which will occur in a repository, which have been long active in the natural geochemical environment. The title project is a comprehensive study of two ore deposits in Minas Gerais, Brasil, aimed at looking at uranium and thorium series radionuclide and rare earth element mobility, the development and movement of redox fronts, and the nature of natural groundwater colloids. A multidisciplinary team of experts from 27 laboratories carried out a fully integrated study of the geology, geomorphology, hydrogeology, geochemistry, hydrochemistry and geomicrobiology of the two sited for nearly four years. This book contains 20 papers covering the detailed findings, with particular emphasis on their significance for radioactive waste disposal, especially on the use of the data in testing models of radionuclide movement

  6. Assessment of crushed salt consolidation and fracture healing processes in a nuclear waste repository in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    For a nuclear waste repository in salt, two aspects of salt behavior are expected to contribute to favorable conditions for waste isolation. First, consolidation of crushed salt backfill due to creep closure of the underground openings may result in a backfill barrier with low permeability. Second, fractures created in the salt by excavation may heal under the influence of stress and temperature following sealing. This report reviews the status of knowledge regarding crushed salt consolidation and fracture healing, provides analyses which predict the rates at which the processes will occur under repository conditions, and develops requirements for future study. Analyses of the rate at which crushed salt will consolidate are found to be uncertain because of unexplained wide variation in the creep properties of crushed salt obtained from laboratory testing, and because of uncertainties in predictions of long term closure rates of openings in salt. This uncertainty could be resolved to a large degree by additional laboratory testing of crushed salt. Similarly, additional testing of fracture healing processes is required to confirm that healing will be effective under repository conditions. Extensive references, 27 figures, 5 tables

  7. A Probabilistic Safety Assessment of a Pyro-processed Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2012-01-01

    A GoldSim template program for a safety assessment of a hybrid-typed repository system, called A-KRS, in which two kinds of pyro-processed radioactive wastes, low-level metal wastes and ceramic high-level wastes that arise from the pyro-processing of PWR nuclear spent fuels are disposed of, has been developed. This program is ready both for a deterministic and probabilistic total system performance assessment which is able to evaluate nuclide release from the repository and farther transport into the geosphere and biosphere under various normal, disruptive natural and manmade events, and scenarios. The A-KRS has been probabilistically assessed with 9 selected input parameters, each of which has its own statistical distribution for a normal release and transport scenario associated with nuclide release and transport in and around the repository. Probabilistic dose exposure rates to the farming exposure group have been evaluated. A sensitivity of 9 selected parameters to the result has also been investigated to see which parameter is more sensitive and important to the exposure rates.

  8. Qualified public involvement in the decision making process of siting a waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Danielle Monegalha; Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to identify the most important characteristics required for the qualification of local communities for participating in the process of defining a specific site for a radioactive waste repository. It also compares the strategies used by Hungary, United Kingdom and Belgium to stimulate the public participation in the decision-making process of building and operating a radioactive waste repository, considering both the stepwise process and the spontaneous candidacy. Two main aspects are discussed as prerequisites to constitute a qualified public. The first aspect is how well the person or entity can be considered an effective representative of the community affected by the repository. This means the conditions the representative has to speak on behalf of the community and participate in the decision making process as its voice. The second characteristic is the level and quality of the information that the community and its representatives must have to participate actively in the decision-making process and what can be done to improve this status. Referring to the strategy to public involvement, this paper discusses the importance of transparency in the process, aiming the credibility of the entrepreneur as the first pace to gaining the confidence of the public affected by the project. Implementing an open dialog and listening to the needs and claims of the population are the first steps to being accepted as a true partner of the community. Preliminary discussions and explanations are important to introduce the subject and to reduce beliefs of false threats in the affected community. The constitution of a local committee is suggested, to act as a legal and formal channel to facilitate the partnership between local community, neighbors and the entrepreneur in order to achieve a positive result in the whole process. (author)

  9. Process improvement methods increase the efficiency, accuracy, and utility of a neurocritical care research repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sydney; Ayres, Alison; Cortellini, Lynelle; Rosand, Jonathan; Rosenthal, Eric; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2012-08-01

    Reliable and efficient data repositories are essential for the advancement of research in Neurocritical care. Various factors, such as the large volume of patients treated within the neuro ICU, their differing length and complexity of hospital stay, and the substantial amount of desired information can complicate the process of data collection. We adapted the tools of process improvement to the data collection and database design of a research repository for a Neuroscience intensive care unit. By the Shewhart-Deming method, we implemented an iterative approach to improve the process of data collection for each element. After an initial design phase, we re-evaluated all data fields that were challenging or time-consuming to collect. We then applied root-cause analysis to optimize the accuracy and ease of collection, and to determine the most efficient manner of collecting the maximal amount of data. During a 6-month period, we iteratively analyzed the process of data collection for various data elements. For example, the pre-admission medications were found to contain numerous inaccuracies after comparison with a gold standard (sensitivity 71% and specificity 94%). Also, our first method of tracking patient admissions and discharges contained higher than expected errors (sensitivity 94% and specificity 93%). In addition to increasing accuracy, we focused on improving efficiency. Through repeated incremental improvements, we reduced the number of subject records that required daily monitoring from 40 to 6 per day, and decreased daily effort from 4.5 to 1.5 h/day. By applying process improvement methods to the design of a Neuroscience ICU data repository, we achieved a threefold improvement in efficiency and increased accuracy. Although individual barriers to data collection will vary from institution to institution, a focus on process improvement is critical to overcoming these barriers.

  10. Site selection process for radioactive waste repository (radioactive facility) in Cuba as a fundamental safety criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vital, Jose Luis Peralta; Castillo, Reinaldo Gil; Chales Suarez, Gustavo; Rodriguez Reyes, Aymee

    1999-01-01

    The paper show the process of search carried out for the selection of the safest site in the National territory, in order to sitting the Facility (Repository) that will disposal the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes, as well as the possible Storage Facility for nuclear spent Fuel (radioactive wastes of high activity). We summarize the obtained Methodology and the Criterions of exclusion adopted for the development of the Process of site selection, as well as the current condition of the researches that will permit the obtaining of the nominative objectives. (author)

  11. Export Controls: Controls Over the Export Licensing Process for Chemical and Biological Items

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    .... foreign policy should read this report. The report discusses the effectiveness of the DoD review process for export license applications and updates to Federal export regulations to prevent the proliferation of items that could pose...

  12. Licensing aspects regarding the RBMN project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuccia, Valeria; Sacramento, Arivaldo M.; Aleixo, Bruna L.; Ferreira, Vinicius V.M.

    2013-01-01

    The licensing process of a waste disposal facility is a complex and demanding undertaking. It proceeds in phases, starting with the site selection and ending many decades later, when the radionuclides decayed and no longer offer possible hazard. That is one of the reasons why the licensing process for the Brazilian repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (RBMN Project) is a challenge for all the technicians involved. Besides that, the only national experience associated to this subject arose after a radiological accident in the State of Goias, in 1987. Two different institutions are involved in this licensing process: IBAMA, for environmental licensing, and CNEN, for nuclear licensing. Both of them will evaluate the possible impacts caused by the waste disposal, so it is essential to avoid conflicts and duplications of activities. The RBMN project has different teams for each main activity, and one of them is the Licensing group. This team has been planning the licensing activities for the repository, studying the legal framework and estimating costs and execution time for each step. This paper presents the status of the licensing activities regarding to the RBMN project done by the CNEN staff. (author)

  13. Ignalina plant licensing process, international co-operation and assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystedt, P.

    1999-01-01

    The challenge for Lithuania as a country with regained independence was to perform a licensing review in a way never done before in the country and in a time schedule that was extremely short. The work included establishing of the licensing base, strengthening the regulatory authority and organising the technical support, establish and implement a safety improvement program, production of the safety case and review of the safety case, and to derive a conclusion regarding whether to issue a licence or not. This was to be done together with other tasks, such as implementation of modifications included in the safety improvement programme at Ignalina, implementation of a new storage for spent fuel and, most important of all, to manage the operational safety at the plant. The achievements are impressive seen in view of the point of start and in view of the time and resources that have been available. Lithuania has put forward a unique safety documentation of an RBMK reactor and presented an in-depth safety evaluation in full openness to Western experts, giving the unique possibility to compare the safety of the Ignalina reactors to Western standards. The co-operation that has been established between Lithuania and Western experts through different assistance programmes is of outmost value, for all involved parties. Co-operation should continue as one element of the challenges for the future

  14. Assessment and Measurements of Degradation Processes in the Engineering Barriers of LILW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Sajna, A.; Petkovsek, B.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 the Slovenian national agency for radwaste management (ARAO) adopted the national spatial plan for the low and intermediate level waste (LILW) repository to be located in Krsko municipality near NPP Krsko. The selected option for disposal was based on a silo type structure for the near surface disposal facility that will be situated close to a saturated aquifer. The soil in the region can be described as silt that extends a few hundred meters deep. The silt also contains sections of sand or clay. As the possibility exists that the natural geological barrier system will not be able to contain radionuclide migration it is a pre requisite that the proposed LILW repository must install engineered barriers. Research on different cementation materials are currently underway in order to find sustainable materials for the manufacturing of engineered barriers for the repository (silo, backfilling, concrete containers). The research also includes the assessment of possible site specific degradation processes in order to provide a methodology for the selection of appropriate locally available materials that will minimize the degradation processes. The research methodology was based on studying the characteristics (workability, compressive strength), durability (resistance to penetration of water, freeze/thaw resistance, resistance to groundwater), rheology (heat of hydration, autogenous and concrete shrinkage) and reinforcement corrosion of different concrete compositions. The characterization results were used to develop a numerical model for degradation processes to be found in the current concrete compositions. Although initial results indicated that the current concrete compositions are satisfactory, the research must be extended to the addition of binder materials to improve the characteristics of the manufactures concrete before degradation processes can be studied. (author)

  15. Sharing environmental models: An Approach using GitHub repositories and Web Processing Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasch, Christoph; Nuest, Daniel; Pross, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The GLUES (Global Assessment of Land Use Dynamics, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Ecosystem Services) project established a spatial data infrastructure for scientific geospatial data and metadata (http://geoportal-glues.ufz.de), where different regional collaborative projects researching the impacts of climate and socio-economic changes on sustainable land management can share their underlying base scenarios and datasets. One goal of the project is to ease the sharing of computational models between institutions and to make them easily executable in Web-based infrastructures. In this work, we present such an approach for sharing computational models relying on GitHub repositories (http://github.com) and Web Processing Services. At first, model providers upload their model implementations to GitHub repositories in order to share them with others. The GitHub platform allows users to submit changes to the model code. The changes can be discussed and reviewed before merging them. However, while GitHub allows sharing and collaborating of model source code, it does not actually allow running these models, which requires efforts to transfer the implementation to a model execution framework. We thus have extended an existing implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service standard (http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/wps), the 52°North Web Processing Service (http://52north.org/wps) platform to retrieve all model implementations from a git (http://git-scm.com) repository and add them to the collection of published geoprocesses. The current implementation is restricted to models implemented as R scripts using WPS4R annotations (Hinz et al.) and to Java algorithms using the 52°North WPS Java API. The models hence become executable through a standardized Web API by multiple clients such as desktop or browser GIS and modelling frameworks. If the model code is changed on the GitHub platform, the changes are retrieved by the service and the processes will be updated

  16. Strategies for the decision process of siting radioactive waste repositories concerning communication and interaction with the society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the strategies to be followed in the siting and construction process of radioactive waste repositories considering the communication and relationship with the society. The paper analyzes the prospective advantages and disadvantages of each type of strategy. The strategies can be classified under three different types: 'define, announce and defend' strategy (also called DAD), participative strategy and spontaneous candidacy of host community. Up to the 90s the most common way of construct repositories was the DAD strategy. This type of strategy, despite of some cases of success, is gradually facing opposition in democratic regimes. Examples of failure are the first attempt to construct the Hungarian repository from 1982 to 1990; the French attempt of the construction of high and intermediate waste repository from 1987 to 1989 (both cancelled and substituted by the participative approach) and even the recent discussion to freeze the implantation of the Yucca Mountain repository in United States. The participative strategy has been preferred currently by most of the new repositories projects. Examples are the second attempt in Hungary, the construction of a repository in Slovenia and in the United Kingdom. The participative strategy has the disadvantage of greater expenses at the beginning of the process until the site of the repository is defined. This occurs because the body responsible for the construction has to deal with several potential candidates and spend time and money in the communication and participation process until the definition of the site by technical, economical and social criteria. On the other hand, this process decreases the risk of rejection by the local population. The spontaneous candidacy strategy was also analyzed and it is shown it has some similarities with the participative strategy but hides new risks in the process. (author)

  17. Processes and parameters involved in modeling radionuclide transport from bedded salt repositories. Final report. Technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, D.E.; Prickett, T.A.; Showalter, P.A.

    1979-07-01

    The parameters necessary to model radionuclide transport in salt beds are identified and described. A proposed plan for disposal of the radioactive wastes generated by nuclear power plants is to store waste canisters in repository sites contained in stable salt formations approximately 600 meters below the ground surface. Among the principal radioactive wastes contained in these canisters will be radioactive isotopes of neptunium, americium, uranium, and plutonium along with many highly radioactive fission products. A concern with this form of waste disposal is the possibility of ground-water flow occurring in the salt beds and endangering water supplies and the public health. Specifically, the research investigated the processes involved in the movement of radioactive wastes from the repository site by groundwater flow. Since the radioactive waste canisters also generate heat, temperature is an important factor. Among the processes affecting movement of radioactive wastes from a repository site in a salt bed are thermal conduction, groundwater movement, ion exchange, radioactive decay, dissolution and precipitation of salt, dispersion and diffusion, adsorption, and thermomigration. In addition, structural changes in the salt beds as a result of temperature changes are important. Based upon the half-lives of the radioactive wastes, he period of concern is on the order of a million years. As a result, major geologic phenomena that could affect both the salt bed and groundwater flow in the salt beds was considered. These phenomena include items such as volcanism, faulting, erosion, glaciation, and the impact of meteorites. CDM reviewed all of the critical processes involved in regional groundwater movement of radioactive wastes and identified and described the parameters that must be included to mathematically model their behavior. In addition, CDM briefly reviewed available echniques to measure these parameters

  18. Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel - Geo-scientific Site Evaluation Process - 13117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, Alec; Ben Belfadhel, Mahrez; Hirschorn, Sarah; Hamilton, Duncan; McKelvie, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 meters (m) (1,640 feet [ft]). In May 2010, the NWMO published a nine-step site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. The safety and appropriateness of any potential site will be assessed against a number of factors, both technical and social in nature. The selected site will be one that can be demonstrated to be able to safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel, protecting humans and the environment over the very long term. The geo-scientific suitability of potential candidate sites will be assessed in a stepwise manner following a progressive and thorough site evaluation process that addresses a series of geo-scientific factors revolving around five safety functions. The geo-scientific site evaluation process includes: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Evaluations. As of November 2012, 22 communities have entered the site selection process (three in northern Saskatchewan and 18 in northwestern and southwestern Ontario). (authors)

  19. Canada's deep geological repository for used nuclear fuel - site selection process update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facella, J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the Government of Canada selected Adaptive Phased Management as Canada's plan for the long-term management of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a deep geological repository, located in an informed and willing host. The process of site selection is an important milestone in this program. The NWMO describes its approach to working collaboratively with communities which expressed interest in exploring the project, as well as Aboriginal communities in the area and other surrounding communities. The project is designed to be implemented through a long-term partnership involving the interested community, Aboriginal communities and surrounding communities working with the NWMO. (author)

  20. Implementation of hearings in the Swedish process for siting a spent nuclear fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerlind, Magnus; Wiklund, Aasa

    2001-01-01

    The problem of bringing all stakeholders on the scene to penetrate an issue of great complexity is not unique for nuclear waste management. There are an increasing number of site selection processes for disposal of nuclear waste around the world. During the 90's many of these siting processes have gone into a more decisive phase where public participation and transparency get more and more attention. Municipalities, NGOs and the public do no longer accept ready-made solutions but have legitimate claims to be part of the decision making and siting processes at an early stage. The attempts to increase the level of transparency and public involvement differ from country to country and depend e.g. on culture, history and societal conditions as well as on the precise phase in the siting process. However, many processes include public hearings as one tool to enhance transparency. In general, Sweden has not a long history of using hearings in decision making. In the area of nuclear waste management and disposal hearings have so far been rarely used. In 1997 and 1998 two public hearings were arranged by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, in conjunction with the licensing of the enlargement of the Central Interim Storage for Spent Nuclear Fuel, CLAB. These hearings showed that hearings could improve the decision making process. SKI and SSI strongly believe the effort was worthwhile and that hearings will continue to be used in the nuclear waste programme. The hearings provided a forum for local stakeholders to pose questions and stretch both the implementer and to some extent also the authorities. The hearings managed to focus on relevant issues at this stage of the siting process and gave the audience a chance to evaluate and challenge the trustworthiness of the implementer and authorities. In this respect the hearings contributed to transparent and democratic decision making. Some of the keys to the success were: Unbiased and skilled moderators with capacity to

  1. ITER licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, C.W.

    2005-01-01

    ITER was fortunate to have four countries interested in ITER siting to the point where licensing discussions were initiated. This experience uncovered the challenges of licensing a first of a kind, fusion machine under different licensing regimes and helped prepare the way for the site specific licensing process. These initial steps in licensing ITER have allowed for refining the safety case and provide confidence that the design and safety approach will be licensable. With site-specific licensing underway, the necessary regulatory submissions have been defined and are well on the way to being completed. Of course, there is still work to be done and details to be sorted out. However, the informal international discussions to bring both the proponent and regulatory authority up to a common level of understanding have laid the foundation for a licensing process that should proceed smoothly. This paper provides observations from the perspective of the International Team. (author)

  2. Application of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, Jonatas F.C. da; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: jonatasfmata@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi, occurred in Japan in 2011, brought reflections, worldwide, on the management of nuclear and environmental licensing processes of existing nuclear reactors. One of the key lessons learned in this matter, is that the studies of Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Severe Accidents are becoming essential, even in the early stage of a nuclear development project. In Brazil, Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, conducts the nuclear licensing. The organism responsible for the environmental licensing is Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, IBAMA. In the scope of the licensing processes of these two institutions, the safety analysis is essentially deterministic, complemented by probabilistic studies. The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is the study performed to evaluate the behavior of the nuclear reactor in a sequence of events that may lead to the melting of its core. It includes both probability and consequence estimation of these events, which are called Severe Accidents, allowing to obtain the risk assessment of the plant. Thus, the possible shortcomings in the design of systems are identified, providing basis for safety assessment and improving safety. During the environmental licensing, a Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA), including probabilistic evaluations, is required in order to support the development of the Risk Analysis Study, the Risk Management Program and the Emergency Plan. This article aims to provide an overview of probabilistic risk assessment methodologies and their applications in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil. (author)

  3. Application of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, Jonatas F.C. da; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi, occurred in Japan in 2011, brought reflections, worldwide, on the management of nuclear and environmental licensing processes of existing nuclear reactors. One of the key lessons learned in this matter, is that the studies of Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Severe Accidents are becoming essential, even in the early stage of a nuclear development project. In Brazil, Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, conducts the nuclear licensing. The organism responsible for the environmental licensing is Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, IBAMA. In the scope of the licensing processes of these two institutions, the safety analysis is essentially deterministic, complemented by probabilistic studies. The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is the study performed to evaluate the behavior of the nuclear reactor in a sequence of events that may lead to the melting of its core. It includes both probability and consequence estimation of these events, which are called Severe Accidents, allowing to obtain the risk assessment of the plant. Thus, the possible shortcomings in the design of systems are identified, providing basis for safety assessment and improving safety. During the environmental licensing, a Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA), including probabilistic evaluations, is required in order to support the development of the Risk Analysis Study, the Risk Management Program and the Emergency Plan. This article aims to provide an overview of probabilistic risk assessment methodologies and their applications in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil. (author)

  4. Modelling Coupled Processes in the Evolution of Repository Engineered Barrier Systems using QPAC-EBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maul, Philip; Benbow, Steven; Bond, Alex; Robinson, Peter (Quintessa Limited, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom))

    2010-08-15

    A satisfactory understanding of the evolution of repository engineered barrier systems (EBS) is an essential part of the safety case for the repository. This involves consideration of coupled Thermal (T), Hydro (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes. Quintessa's general-purpose modelling code QPAC is capable of representing strongly coupled non-linear processes and has been used in a wide range of applications. This code is the basis for software used by Quintessa in studies of the evolution of the EBS in a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel undertaken for SKI and then SSM since 2007. The collection of software components employed has been referred to collectively as QPAC-EBS, consisting of the core QPAC code together with relevant modules for T, H, M and C processes. QPAC-EBS employs a fundamentally different approach from dedicated codes that model such processes (although few codes can represent each type of process), enabling the specification of new processes and the associated governing equations in code input. Studies undertaken to date have demonstrated that QPAC-EBS can be used effectively to investigate both the early evolution of the EBS and important scenarios for the later evolution of the system when buffer erosion and canister corrosion may occur. A key issue for modelling EBS evolution is the satisfactory modelling of the behaviour of the bentonite buffer. Bentonite is a difficult material to model, partly because of the complex coupled mechanical, hydro and chemical processes involved in swelling during resaturation. Models employed to date have generally taken an empirical approach, but a new model developed during the EU THERESA project could be further developed to provide a better representation of these processes. QPAC-EBS could play an important role in supporting SSM.s review of the forthcoming SR-Site assessment by SKB if used by Quintessa in independent supporting calculations. To date radionuclide transport calculations

  5. Assuring the Quality of Agricultural Learning Repositories: Issues for the Learning Object Metadata Creation Process of the CGIAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Thomas; Beniest, Jan

    The Consultative Group on International Agricultural Re- search (CGIAR) has established a digital repository to share its teaching and learning resources along with descriptive educational information based on the IEEE Learning Object Metadata (LOM) standard. As a critical component of any digital repository, quality metadata are critical not only to enable users to find more easily the resources they require, but also for the operation and interoperability of the repository itself. Studies show that repositories have difficulties in obtaining good quality metadata from their contributors, especially when this process involves many different stakeholders as is the case with the CGIAR as an international organization. To address this issue the CGIAR began investigating the Open ECBCheck as well as the ISO/IEC 19796-1 standard to establish quality protocols for its training. The paper highlights the implications and challenges posed by strengthening the metadata creation workflow for disseminating learning objects of the CGIAR.

  6. On risk analysis for repositories in northern Switzerland: extent and probability of geological processes and events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buergisser, H.M.; Herrnberger, V.

    1981-01-01

    The literature study assesses, in the form of expert analysis, geological processes and events for a 1200 km 2 -area of northern Switzerland, with regard to repositories for medium- and high-active waste (depth 100 to 600 m and 600 to 2500 m, respectively) over the next 10 6 years. The area, which comprises parts of the Tabular Jura, the folded Jura and the Molasse Basin, the latter two being parts of the Alpine Orogene, has undergone a non-uniform geologic development since the Oligocene. Within the next 10 4 to 10 5 years a maximum earthquake intensity of VIII-IX (MSK-scale) has been predicted. After this period, particularly in the southern and eastern parts of the area, glaciations will probably occur, with associated erosion of possibly 200 to 300 m. Fluvial erosion as a reponse to an uplift could reach similar values after 10 5 to 10 6 years; however, there are no data on the recent relative vertical crustal movements of the area. The risk of a meteorite impact is considered small as compared to that of these factors. Seismic activity and the position and extent of faults are so poorly known within the area that the faulting probability cannot be derived at present. Flooding by the sea, intrusion of magma, diapirism, metamorphism and volcanic eruptions are not considered to be risk factors for final repositories in northern Switzerland. For the shallow-type repositories, the risk of denudation and landslides have to be judged when locality-bound projects have been proposed. (Auth.)

  7. Risk analysis for repositories in north Switzerland. Extent and probability of geologic processes and events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buergisser, H M; Herrnberger, V

    1981-07-01

    The literature study assesses, in the form of expert analysis, geological processes and events for a 1200 km/sup 2/-area of northern Switzerland, with regard to repositories for medium- and high-active waste (depth 100 to 600 m and 600 to 2500 m, respectively) over the next 10/sup 6/ years. The area, which comprises parts of the Tabular Jura, the folded Jura and the Molasse Basin, the latter two being parts of the Alpine Orogene, has undergone a non-uniform geologic development since the Oligocene. Within the next 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/ years a maximum earthquake intensity of VIII-IX (MSK-scale) has been predicted. After this period, particularly in the southern and eastern parts of the area, glaciations will probably occur, with asociated erosion of possibly 200 to 300 m. Fluvial erosion as a response to an uplift could reach similar values after 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 6/ years; however, there are no data on the recent relative vertical crustal movements of the area. The risk of a meteorite impact is considered small as compared to that of these factors. Seismic activity and the position and extent of faults are so poorly known within the area that the faulting probability cannot be derived at present. Flooding by the sea, intrusion of magma, diapirism, metamorphism and volcanic eruptions are not considered to be risk factors for final repositories in northern Switzerland. For the shallow-type repositories, the risk of denudation and landslides have to be judged when locality-bound projects have been proposed.

  8. MAJOR REPOSITORY DESIGN ISSUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JACK N. BAILEY, DWAYNE CHESTNUT, JAMES COMPTON AND RICHARD D. SNELL

    1997-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is focused on producing a four-part viability assessment in late FY98. Its four components (design, performance assessment, cost estimate, and licensing development plan) must be consistent. As a tool to compare design and performance assessment options, a series of repository pictures were developed for the sequential time phases of a repository. The boundaries of the time phases correspond to evolution in the engineered barrier system (EBS)

  9. Development of technical design for waste processing and storage facilities for Novi Han repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizares, J.; Benitez, J.C.; Asuar, O.; Yordanova, O.; Demireva, E.; Stefanova, I.

    2005-01-01

    Empresarion Agrupados Internacional S.A. (Spain) and ENPRO Consult Ltd. (Bulgaria) were awarded a contract by the Central Finance and Contracts Unit to develop the technical design of the waste processing and storage facilities at the Novi Han repository. At present conceptual design phase is finished. This conceptual design covers the definition of the basic design requirements to be applied to the installations defined above, following both European and Bulgarian legislation. In this paper the following items are considered: 1) Basic criteria for the layout and sizing of buildings; 2) Processing of radioactive waste, including: treatment and conditioning of disused sealed sources; treatment of liquid radioactive wastes; treatment of solid radioactive waste; conditioning of liquid and solid radioactive waste; 3) Control of waste packages and 4) Storage of radioactive waste, including storage facility and waste packages. An analysis of inventories of stored and estimated future wastes and its subsequent processes is also presented and the waste streams are illustrated

  10. The site selection process for a spent fuel repository in Finland. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, T. [EnvirosQuantiSci (United Kingdom); Aeikaes, T. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-12-01

    This Summary Report describes the Finnish programme for the selection and characterisation of potential sites for the deep disposal of spent nuclear fuel and explains the process by which Olkiluoto has been selected as the single site proposed for the development of a spent fuel disposal facility. Its aim is to provide an overview of this process, initiated almost twenty years ago, which has entered its final phase. It provides information in three areas: a review of the early site selection criteria, a description of the site selection process, including all the associated site characterisation work, up to the point at which a single site was selected and an outline of the proposed work, in particular that proposed underground, to characterise further the Olkiluoto site. In 1983 the Finnish Government made a policy decision on the management of nuclear waste in which the main goals and milestones for the site selection programme for the deep disposal of spent fuel were presented. According to this decision several site candidates, whose selection was to be based on careful studies of the whole country, should be characterised and the site for the repository selected by the end of the year 2000. This report describes the process by which this policy decision has been achieved. The report begins with a discussion of the definition of the geological and environmental site selection criteria and how they were applied in order to select a small number of sites, five in all, that were to be the subject of the preliminary investigations. The methods used to investigate these sites and the results of these investigations are described, as is the evaluation of the results of these investigations and the process used to discard two of the sites and continue more detailed investigations at the remaining three. The detailed site investigations that commenced in 1993 are described with respect to the overall strategy followed and the investigation techniques applied. The

  11. Specificity in the licensing process of reduced enrichment in the Bulgarian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitkova, Marietta; Gorinov, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The presented paper considers some specific questions of the licensing process regarding the reconstruction of the Bulgarian IRT-2000 research reactor, which includes conversion to the low enriched fuel. This specificity has risen as a result of two facts. The design of the reactor reconstruction was made on the basis of the existing fresh 36% highly enriched fuel. But after finishing of the design process, this fresh highly enriched fuel was shipped back to Russia in the framework of the RERTR program. These facts have involved some changes in both - in the licensing and the design processes. Re-analysis of the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations is required to be made on the base of the technical specifications of the new LEU fuel. To facilitate the licensing process the NRA has adopted regulatory acceptance criteria for approval of the reactor core design with LEU fuel. (author)

  12. Integral Public Activities as a Support to the Site Selection Process for LILW Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Kralj, M.

    2008-01-01

    The first site selection process for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository took place between 1990 and 1993 in Slovenia was stopped unsuccessfully with very strong public opposition at local level, followed by political withdrawal on national level. As one of the consequences ARAO started to develop new approach to the site selection based also on the findings from sociology, psychology and other human sciences. The recommendations on public involvement and transparency were so strong that ARAO started with first limited public relation (PR) activities which later grew to the PR process which supports all technical activities in ARAO. Presently the PR process covers communication, information and research activities and assures careful planning, prompt responds and involvement of the highest responsible persons at ARAO. Integral public relation activities are divided in several parts. Majority of activities support the on-going site selection process where activities are presently focused on functioning of local partnerships developed as a basic communication tool to involve as much citizens and public as possible on local level. Presently two local partnerships are working in Krsko and Brezice community with clear role to enhance public involvement according to Aarchus convention. Each of the partnerships is organized in a specific way adjusted to the local needs. Communication activities are organized also for different other projects and are preparing the necessary basis for the work with different groups of stake holders and in different situations. As a foundation very broad information material, such as books, leaflets, reports, magazines, video cassettes, CD and DVD on the radioactive waste management is prepared and used for different purposes. We also try to be proactive with web pages and have a well organized visitors' center. Improvement of public relation process is achieved through constant survey and feed-back information

  13. Societal and Political Issues of Site Selection Process Development for the LILW Repository in Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polic, Marko; KoS, Drago [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zeleznik, Nadja [ARAO, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-09-15

    The siting of the radioactive waste repository, even the low and intermediate level radioactivity waste (LILW), presents a great problem in almost every country that produces these materials. Attempts to locate a disposal facility in Slovenia have until now proven unsuccessful. After the failure of the first 'technocratic' approach it became evident that the main problem was not a technical one, but socio-psychological, namely the public acceptability of any radioactive waste disposal facility (RWD). In general people strongly oppose to any kind of such a facility in their vicinity and exhibit a 'Not in my Backyard' (NIMBY) attitude even if they are aware of its necessity. However there are slight signs of changes especially in argumentation supporting the public denial of LIL RWD. The main LILW producer in Slovenia is nuclear power plant in Krsko (NEK). The project for the construction of this plant did not include consideration of the LIL RWD while at that time plans for new NPP's in Yugoslavia with a centralized LILW repository were present. The search for possible locations of LILW repository started only after the beginning of its commercial operation in 1983. The general development of radioactive waste management (RWM) issue in Slovenia was similar to the development in other developed countries, while its details and context differ in smaller or greater degree due to different cultural, political, social and economic backgrounds. The RWM process was following the same general course: technological approach neglecting public issues - public reactance - move toward public involvement. All this was accompanied by the relevant public attitudes: neutrality - rejection - eventual conditional public acceptance. The procedure to find a LILW repository is proposed and established, but the processes leading to final solution are going on without being completely foreseen yet. The general underlying view is connected to the fear of

  14. Societal and Political Issues of Site Selection Process Development for the LILW Repository in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polic, Marko; KoS, Drago; Zeleznik, Nadja

    2006-01-01

    The siting of the radioactive waste repository, even the low and intermediate level radioactivity waste (LILW), presents a great problem in almost every country that produces these materials. Attempts to locate a disposal facility in Slovenia have until now proven unsuccessful. After the failure of the first 'technocratic' approach it became evident that the main problem was not a technical one, but socio-psychological, namely the public acceptability of any radioactive waste disposal facility (RWD). In general people strongly oppose to any kind of such a facility in their vicinity and exhibit a 'Not in my Backyard' (NIMBY) attitude even if they are aware of its necessity. However there are slight signs of changes especially in argumentation supporting the public denial of LIL RWD. The main LILW producer in Slovenia is nuclear power plant in Krsko (NEK). The project for the construction of this plant did not include consideration of the LIL RWD while at that time plans for new NPP's in Yugoslavia with a centralized LILW repository were present. The search for possible locations of LILW repository started only after the beginning of its commercial operation in 1983. The general development of radioactive waste management (RWM) issue in Slovenia was similar to the development in other developed countries, while its details and context differ in smaller or greater degree due to different cultural, political, social and economic backgrounds. The RWM process was following the same general course: technological approach neglecting public issues - public reactance - move toward public involvement. All this was accompanied by the relevant public attitudes: neutrality - rejection - eventual conditional public acceptance. The procedure to find a LILW repository is proposed and established, but the processes leading to final solution are going on without being completely foreseen yet. The general underlying view is connected to the fear of radioactivity and general negative

  15. The convention planning process: Potential impact of a high-level Nuclear Waste Repository in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunreuther, H.; Easterling, D.; Kleindorfer, P.

    1988-09-01

    This report presents results from two studies that test whether a high level nuclear waste repository sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada will diminish the willingness of meeting planners to schedule conventions, trade shows, and other meetings in Las Vegas. The first study, a focus group interview with nine meeting planners from the Philadelphia area, found little evidence that planners' selection decisions would be influenced by environmental hazards (e.g., earthquakes, pollution), unless planners were led to believe that these hazards would have a direct impact on convention delegates and the planner could conceivably be held personally responsible for any such impacts. Participants did point out that they would be sensitive to continued media coverage of a negative event, as this might stigmatize the city in the eyes of delegates. The results from the focus group guided the development of a larger and more formal questionnaire survey of meeting planners who were known to have selected Las Vegas for a meeting. Of the 153 planners recruited, 114 had a future meeting scheduled and 39 had arranged a meeting that was recently held in the city. Subjects first answered a number of questions that described the process by which they chose Las Vegas among the possible convention cities. They were then instructed to reconsider their decision in light of seven different scenarios pertaining to the repository at Yucca Mountain

  16. License renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberry, S.

    1993-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the process of license renewal for nuclear power plants. It explains what is meant by license renewal, the significance of license renewal, and goes over key elements involved in the process of license renewal. Those key elements are NRC requirements embodied in 10 CFR Part 54 (Reactor Safety) and 10 CFR Part 51 (Environmental Issues). In addition Industry Reports must be developed and reviewed. License renewal is essentially the process of applying for a 20 year extension to the original 40 year operating license granted for the plant. This is a very long term process, which involves a lot of preparation, and compliance with regulatory rules and guidelines. In general it is a process which is expected to begin when plants reach an operating lifetime of 20 years. It has provisions for allowing the public to become involved in the review process

  17. Microbiologically mediated processes in a repository sited in a clay host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwyn, B.; Leupin, O. X.; Bagnoud, A.; Bernier-Latmani, R.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Because of their favourable retention properties for radionuclides, clay-rich sediments are being considered in Switzerland as host rocks for the geological disposal of high, intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste. Compacted bentonite is foreseen as backfill material in the high level waste repository whereas for intermediate- and low-level waste the near field will mainly consist of cementitious material. The evolution of both types of repositories, which includes re-saturation, heat generation (only high level waste), near field degradation, gas production and radionuclide release may be impacted by microbial activity and vice versa. In this respect questions arise such as: - Are microorganisms present in a repository and its host rock? - Under which condition are microorganisms active in and around a repository? - In which processes are microorganisms involved? Various in situ experiments in a wide range of geological environments have evidenced the presence of microorganisms. Whether the microorganisms found in these in situ experiments are indigenous or introduced by drilling or/and excavation activities is still controversial. However, recent findings suggest the presence of indigenous microorganisms in Opalinus Clay. To conclusively answer the question about the origin of microorganisms, an international investigation programme has been launched to probe rock samples from the Underground Rock Laboratory at Mont Terri. So far, no metabolic activity has been observed in undisturbed clay rocks. Such activity may have ceased during diagenetic compaction of the sediment as suggested by the pore water composition measured in the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey formation of Bure (France). For the safety case of a repository the origin of microorganisms is of minor importance compared to the understanding of the conditions under which they might be metabolically active. Pore size distribution and connectivity can

  18. Canada's deep geological repository for used nuclear fuel - the geoscientific site evaluation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belfadhel, M.B.; Blyth, A.; Desroches, A.; Hirschorn, S.; Mckelvie, J.; Sanchez-Rico Castejon, M.; Parmenter, A.; Urrutia-Bustos, A.; Vorauer, A., E-mail: mbenbelfadhel@nwmo.ca [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable crystalline or sedimentary rock formation. In May 2010, the NWMO initiated a nine-step site selection process to find an informed and willing community to host the project. This paper describes the approach, methods and criteria being used to assess the geoscientific suitability of communities currently involved in the site selection process. The social, cultural and economic aspects of the assessment are discussed in a companion paper. (author)

  19. Standard format and content of license applications for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The standard format suggested for use in applications for licenses to possess and use special nuclear materials in Pu processing and fuel fabrication plants is presented. It covers general description of the plant, summary safety assessment, site characteristics, principal design criteria, plant design, process systems, waste confinement and management, radiation protection, accident safety analysis, conduct of operations, operating controls and limits, and quality assurance

  20. A Natural Analogue for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Coupled Processes at the Proposed Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bill Carey; Gordon Keating; Peter C. Lichtner

    1999-01-01

    Dike and sill complexes that intruded tuffaceous host rocks above the water table are suggested as natural analogues for thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Scoping thermal-hydrologic calculations of temperature and saturation profiles surrounding a 30-50 m wide intrusion suggest that boiling conditions could be sustained at distances of tens of meters from the intrusion for several thousand years. This time scale for persistence of boiling is similar to that expected for the Yucca Mountain repository with moderate heat loading. By studying the hydrothermal alteration of the tuff host rocks surrounding the intrusions, insight and relevant data can be obtained that apply directly to the Yucca Mountain repository and can shed light on the extent and type of alteration that should be expected. Such data are needed to bound and constrain model parameters used in THC simulations of the effect of heat produced by the waste on the host rock and to provide a firm foundation for assessing overall repository performance. One example of a possible natural analogue for the repository is the Paiute Ridge intrusive complex located on the northeastern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The complex consists of dikes and sills intruded into a partially saturated tuffaceous host rock that has stratigraphic sequences that correlate with those found at Yucca Mountain. The intrusions were emplaced at a depth of several hundred meters below the surface, similar to the depth of the proposed repository. The tuffaceous host rock surrounding the intrusions is hydrothermally altered to varying extents depending on the distance from the intrusions. The Paiute Ridge intrusive complex thus appears to be an ideal natural analogue of THC coupled processes associated with the Yucca Mountain repository. It could provide much needed physical and chemical data for understanding the influence of heat

  1. Results From an International Simulation Study on Coupled Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes Near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Rutqvist; D. Barr; J.T. Birkholzer; M. Chijimatsu; O. Kolditz; Q. Liu; Y. Oda; W. Wang; C. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near waste emplacement drifts of geological nuclear waste repositories. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower postclosure temperatures, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses is currently being resolved. In particular, good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglected complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level

  2. Organization and practices on regulatory review in the licensing process of nuclear power plants in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, P.

    1979-01-01

    The actual organisation, practices and experience of the JEN Nuclear Safety Department on the regulatory review in the licensing process of nuclear power plants in Spain, are presented. Topics to be covered are: The structure, organisation, staff and principal functional areas of the NSD, the academic qualifications and work experience of the NSD personnel, recruiting and training, the conduct of the regulatory review during the licensing process and working procedures, the manpower and coverage of the different technical areas, the principal problems and conclusions. (author)

  3. Importance of the licensing process on the safety culture in the Brazilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, E.S.; Sousa, A.L.B. de; Paiva, R.L.C. de; Mezrahi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities licensing processes is to ensure the safety of these installations in their entire life cycle (in the installation site selection, designing, construction, pre-operational tests, operational and decommissioning phases). The Brazilian licensing process requires from the operator, among others, before the operating license: (I) a Site Report and a Final Safety Analysis Report, ensuring that all safety related issues are adequately analyzed and understood; (II) a formal structured Management System focused on the installation safety; and (III) dissemination of safety related information to all involved operator employees and subcontractors. Therefore, these requirements reflect in an adequate operator actions and practices, ensuring a working environment with a high level of safety culture. (author)

  4. The Brazilian Audit Tribunal's role in improving the federal environmental licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Luiz Henrique; Magrini, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the role played by the Brazilian Audit Tribunal (Tribunal de Contas da Uniao - TCU) in the external auditing of environmental management in Brazil, highlighting the findings of an operational audit conducted in 2007 of the federal environmental licensing process. Initially, it records the constitutional and legal framework of Brazilian environmental licensing, describing the powers and duties granted to federal, state and municipal institutions. In addition, it presents the responsibilities of the TCU in the environmental area, comparing these with those of other Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI) that are members of the International Organization of Supreme Audit Institutions (INTOSAI). It also describes the work carried out in the operational audit of the Brazilian environmental licensing process and its main conclusions and recommendations. Finally, it draws a parallel between the findings and recommendations made in Brazil with those of academic studies and audits conducted in other countries.

  5. Importance of the licensing process on the safety culture in the Brazilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, E.S.; Sousa, A.L.B. de; Paiva, R.L.C. de; Mezrahi, A., E-mail: emotta@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities licensing processes is to ensure the safety of these installations in their entire life cycle (in the installation site selection, designing, construction, pre-operational tests, operational and decommissioning phases). The Brazilian licensing process requires from the operator, among others, before the operating license: (I) a Site Report and a Final Safety Analysis Report, ensuring that all safety related issues are adequately analyzed and understood; (II) a formal structured Management System focused on the installation safety; and (III) dissemination of safety related information to all involved operator employees and subcontractors. Therefore, these requirements reflect in an adequate operator actions and practices, ensuring a working environment with a high level of safety culture. (author)

  6. Gas generation in deep radioactive waste repositories: a review of processes, controls and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    Gas generation within radioactive waste repositories may produce two general problems: 1) breaching of engineered and natural barriers due to high gas pressures; 2) enhanced radiological risk due to reduced groundwater travel times and/or greater aqueous or gaseous activities reaching the biosphere. As a result of these concerns, HMIP must be aware of the current status of relevant research, together with any associated deficiencies. This report addresses the current status of published research on near-field gas generation from worldwide sources and documents the important gas generating processes, the factors controlling them and models available to simulate them. In the absence of suitable models, outline technical specifications for corrosion and microbial degradation gas generation models are defined and the deficiencies in the current understanding of gas generation are highlighted; a conceptual research programme to correct these deficiencies is presented. (author)

  7. Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    1993-09-01

    Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term ( 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation

  8. System studies in PA: Development of process influence diagram (PID) for SFR-1 repository near-field + far-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenhouse, M.J.; Miller, W.M.; Chapman, N.A.

    2001-05-01

    Scenario development is a key component of the performance assessment (PA) process for radioactive waste disposal, the primary objective being to ensure that all relevant factors associated with the future evolution of the repository system are properly considered in PA. As part of scenario development, a list of features, events and processes (FEPs) are identified and assembled, representing the Process System, with interactions/influences between FEPs incorporated in a Process Influence Diagram (PID). This report documents the technical work conducted between 1997 and the end of 1999 under the Systems Studies Project. The overall objective of this project has been the construction of a PID for the SFR-1 repository (final repository for reactor waste), this PID being the first stage in the identification of scenarios to describe future evolution of this repository. The PIDs discussed in this report have been created using two software applications: existing commercial software (Business Modeller, Infotool AB. Stockholm, Sweden) and, more recently, a newly developed software tool SPARTA (Enviros QuantiSci, Henley, U.K.). Although the focus of this report is on the application of SPARTA to PID development, it is important to document the work carried out prior to SPARTA being available, in order to provide a complete record of the entire SFR-1 PID development effort as well as preserving the context of the multi-year project. Following a description of the different disposal sections of the SFR-1 and the various near-field barriers, the sequential development (i.e. near-field of Silo, BMA, BLA, BTF sections; far-field; integrated near-field + far-field) of the PID for SFR-1 repository system using Business Modeller is described. Owing to the complexity of the repository, in terms of number of both different disposal sections (Silo, BLA, BMA, BTF) and barriers associated with each section, the two-dimensional (2D) PID created for SFR-1 using Business Modeller is

  9. System studies in PA: Development of process influence diagram (PID) for SFR-1 repository near-field + far-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenhouse, M.J. [Monitor Scientific, LLC, Denver, CO (United States); Miller, W.M.; Chapman, N.A. [QuantiSci Ltd., Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom)

    2001-05-01

    Scenario development is a key component of the performance assessment (PA) process for radioactive waste disposal, the primary objective being to ensure that all relevant factors associated with the future evolution of the repository system are properly considered in PA. As part of scenario development, a list of features, events and processes (FEPs) are identified and assembled, representing the Process System, with interactions/influences between FEPs incorporated in a Process Influence Diagram (PID). This report documents the technical work conducted between 1997 and the end of 1999 under the Systems Studies Project. The overall objective of this project has been the construction of a PID for the SFR-1 repository (final repository for reactor waste), this PID being the first stage in the identification of scenarios to describe future evolution of this repository. The PIDs discussed in this report have been created using two software applications: existing commercial software (Business Modeller, Infotool AB. Stockholm, Sweden) and, more recently, a newly developed software tool SPARTA (Enviros QuantiSci, Henley, U.K.). Although the focus of this report is on the application of SPARTA to PID development, it is important to document the work carried out prior to SPARTA being available, in order to provide a complete record of the entire SFR-1 PID development effort as well as preserving the context of the multi-year project. Following a description of the different disposal sections of the SFR-1 and the various near-field barriers, the sequential development (i.e. near-field of Silo, BMA, BLA, BTF sections; far-field; integrated near-field + far-field) of the PID for SFR-1 repository system using Business Modeller is described. Owing to the complexity of the repository, in terms of number of both different disposal sections (Silo, BLA, BMA, BTF) and barriers associated with each section, the two-dimensional (2D) PID created for SFR-1 using Business Modeller is

  10. Siting Practices and Site Licensing Process for New Reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, Marcel de

    2011-01-01

    'Siting' in Canada is composed of Site Evaluation and Site Selection. As outlined in CNSC Regulatory Document RD-346 Site Evaluation for New Nuclear Power Plants (based on IAEA NS-R-3), prior to the triggering of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and licensing processes, the proponent is expected to use a robust process to characterize proposed sites over the full life cycle of the facility, and then develop a fully documented defense of the site selection case. This case forms the backbone for submissions in support of the EA and the application for a License to Prepare Site which will be reviewed by the CNSC and other applicable federal authorities. The Environmental Assessment process and License to Prepare Site in Canada do not require a proponent to select a specific design; however, CNSC does not accept a 'black box' approach to siting. CNSC balances the level of design information required with the extent of safety assurance desired for any designs being contemplated for the proposed site. Nevertheless, the design information submitted must be sufficient to justify the site as suitable for all future licensing stages. The depth of plant design information contributes significantly to the credibility of the applicant's case for both the EA and application for License to Prepare Site. The review process utilizes an assessment plan with defined review stages and timelines. The outcome of these reviews is a series of recommendations to a federal government appointed Joint Review Panel (which also serves as a panel of the 'Commission') which, following public hearings, renders a decision regarding the EA, and subsequently, the application for a License to Prepare Site. (author)

  11. GENESI-DR: Discovery, Access and on-Demand Processing in Federated Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Roberto; Pacini, Fabrizio; Parrini, Andrea; Santi, Eliana Li; Fusco, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, …) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. In fact, a common dedicated infrastructure such as the GENESI-DR one permits the Earth Science communities to derive objective information and to share knowledge in all environmental sensitive domains over a continuum of time and a variety of geographical scales so addressing urgent challenges such as Global Change. GENESI-DR federates data, information and knowledge for the management of our fragile planet in line with one of the major goals of the many international environmental programmes such as GMES, GEO/GEOSS. As of today, 12 different Digital Repositories hosting more than 60 heterogeneous dataset series are federated in GENESI-DR. Series include satellite data, in situ data, images acquired by airborne sensors, digital elevation models and model outputs. ESA has started providing access to: Category-1 data systematically available on Internet; level 3 data (e.g., GlobCover map, MERIS Global Vegetation Index); ASAR products available in ESA Virtual Archive and related to the Supersites initiatives. In all cases, existing data policies and security constraints are fully respected. GENESI-DR also gives access to Grid and Cloud computing resources allowing authorized users to run a number of different processing services on the available data. The GENESI

  12. Management of radioactive waste at Novi Han Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, I.G.; Mateeva, M.D.; Milanov, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    The Novi Han Repository is the only existing repository in Bulgaria for the disposal of radioactive waste from nuclear applications in industry, medicine and research. The repository was constructed in the early sixties according to the existing requirements. It was operated by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy for more than thirty years without any accident or release of radioactivity to the environment, but without any investment for upgrading. As a consequence, the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority temporarily stopped the operation of the repository in 1994. The measures for upgrading the Novi Han Repository, supported by the IAEA under TC Project BUL/4/005 'Increasing Safety of Novi Han Repository', are presented in this paper. They comprise: assessment of radionuclide inventory and future waste arisings, characterisation of disposal vaults, characterisation of the site, safety assessment, upgrading of the monitoring system, option study for the selection of treatment and conditioning processes and the development of a conceptual design for low and intermediate level waste processing and storage facility, immediate measures for improvement of the existing disposal vaults and infrastructure, construction of above-ground temporary storage structures, and resuming the operation of the Novi Han Repository. The necessary activities for re-licensing of the Novi Han Repository, construction of a waste processing and storage facility and a disposal facility for spent sealed sources are discussed. (author)

  13. Microarray Data Processing Techniques for Genome-Scale Network Inference from Large Public Repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chockalingam, Sriram; Aluru, Maneesha; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-09-19

    Pre-processing of microarray data is a well-studied problem. Furthermore, all popular platforms come with their own recommended best practices for differential analysis of genes. However, for genome-scale network inference using microarray data collected from large public repositories, these methods filter out a considerable number of genes. This is primarily due to the effects of aggregating a diverse array of experiments with different technical and biological scenarios. Here we introduce a pre-processing pipeline suitable for inferring genome-scale gene networks from large microarray datasets. We show that partitioning of the available microarray datasets according to biological relevance into tissue- and process-specific categories significantly extends the limits of downstream network construction. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our pre-processing pipeline by inferring genome-scale networks for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using two different construction methods and a collection of 11,760 Affymetrix ATH1 microarray chips. Our pre-processing pipeline and the datasets used in this paper are made available at http://alurulab.cc.gatech.edu/microarray-pp.

  14. Encyclopaedia of Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) for the Swedish SFR and Spent Fuel Repositories. Preliminary Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Bill; Savage, Dave; McEwen, Tim; White, Matt

    2002-08-01

    This is an 'Encyclopaedia' providing descriptions of Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) that are relevant to the Swedish repository for low and intermediate-level wastes (the SFR) and the proposed Swedish repository for spent fuel. Although the FEPs and their descriptions found in this encyclopaedia are specific to these two repository concepts, many of the descriptions will also be relevant to other repository designs and concepts, although they have not been written to be inclusive of the features of other repositories. As such, this encyclopaedia may be of interest to a wide range of individuals and organisations involved in repository safety assessment around the world. The purpose of this encyclopaedia is to describe, in qualitative terms, the various FEPs which have been identified as being relevant to the two Swedish repository designs. These descriptions may be used in a variety of ways. One important role will be to support quantitative performance assessments (PAs) by describing the conceptual understanding of the various components of the repository (e.g. the barriers, the rock and the groundwater) and their evolution: this conceptual understanding is crucial because it is the foundation upon which the mathematical analysis is based. The descriptions have been written at a level of detail appropriate for a scientifically literate reader without specialist knowledge of radioactive waste disposal technology or assessment procedures. As such, the descriptions avoid the use of specialist terms, acronyms and equations. Many of the FEP descriptions relate to issues which are the focus of ongoing research and, thus, they reflect the current state of knowledge and may require updating at regular intervals, either to include more recent technical information or procedures for treating the FEP in mathematical safety assessment. When attempting to predict the future behaviour of a repository for radioactive wastes, it is sensible to use a systematic approach to

  15. Encyclopaedia of Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) for the Swedish SFR and Spent Fuel Repositories. Preliminary Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bill; Savage, Dave; McEwen, Tim; White, Matt [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom)

    2002-08-01

    This is an 'Encyclopaedia' providing descriptions of Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) that are relevant to the Swedish repository for low and intermediate-level wastes (the SFR) and the proposed Swedish repository for spent fuel. Although the FEPs and their descriptions found in this encyclopaedia are specific to these two repository concepts, many of the descriptions will also be relevant to other repository designs and concepts, although they have not been written to be inclusive of the features of other repositories. As such, this encyclopaedia may be of interest to a wide range of individuals and organisations involved in repository safety assessment around the world. The purpose of this encyclopaedia is to describe, in qualitative terms, the various FEPs which have been identified as being relevant to the two Swedish repository designs. These descriptions may be used in a variety of ways. One important role will be to support quantitative performance assessments (PAs) by describing the conceptual understanding of the various components of the repository (e.g. the barriers, the rock and the groundwater) and their evolution: this conceptual understanding is crucial because it is the foundation upon which the mathematical analysis is based. The descriptions have been written at a level of detail appropriate for a scientifically literate reader without specialist knowledge of radioactive waste disposal technology or assessment procedures. As such, the descriptions avoid the use of specialist terms, acronyms and equations. Many of the FEP descriptions relate to issues which are the focus of ongoing research and, thus, they reflect the current state of knowledge and may require updating at regular intervals, either to include more recent technical information or procedures for treating the FEP in mathematical safety assessment. When attempting to predict the future behaviour of a repository for radioactive wastes, it is sensible to use a systematic

  16. 75 FR 35510 - License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance Process, Revision 2 Notice of Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... Related Regulatory Functions.'' An electronic copy of the revised LR-ISG process is available in the NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) under Accession No. ML100920158. The revised LR-ISG... interim changes to certain NRC license renewal guidance documents. These guidance documents facilitate the...

  17. Institutional Power: Identity, Politics, and Lived Experiences in the Dance License via Portfolio Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    In this research study, I examined how institutional power affected the experiences of two dance educators attempting to gain their K-12 dance teaching license in Minnesota. My research analyzed the ways in which candidates applying for the portfolio review process constructed, amended, or abandoned their identities as teachers/artists/individuals…

  18. Redox processes in the safety case of deep geological repositories of radioactive wastes. Contribution of the European RECOSY Collaborative Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Grivé, M.; Montoya, V.; Kienzler, B.; Altmaier, M.; Buckau, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The RECOSY project produced results relevant for the Safety Case of nuclear disposal. • We classify the safety related features where RECOSY has contributed. • Redox processes effect the retention of radionuclides in all repository subsystems. - Abstract: Redox processes influence key geochemical characteristics controlling radionuclide behaviour in the near and far field of a nuclear waste repository. A sound understanding of redox related processes is therefore of high importance for developing a Safety Case, the collection of scientific, technical, administrative and managerial arguments and evidence in support of the safety of a disposal facility. This manuscript presents the contribution of the specific research on redox processes achieved within the EURATOM Collaborative Project RECOSY (REdox phenomena COntrolling SYstems) to the Safety Case of nuclear waste disposal facilities. Main objectives of RECOSY were related to the improved understanding of redox phenomena controlling the long-term release or retention of radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal and providing tools to apply the results to Performance Assessment and the Safety Case. The research developed during the project covered aspects of the near-field and the far-field aspects of the repository, including studies relevant for the rock formations considered in Europe as suitable for hosting an underground repository for radioactive wastes. It is the intention of this paper to highlight in which way the results obtained from RECOSY can feed the scientific process understanding needed for the stepwise development of the Safety Case associated with deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes

  19. Change of roles and attitudes in the Swedish localisation process for a final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedberg, Bjoern

    2001-01-01

    Since the early research activities in the mid seventies related to a final repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, much has changed in a direction that allows a more open and transparent decision-making process. Important changes have been noted in the legal framework - including EIA and financing - and in the roles of the Swedish authorities, local politicians, NGO's, and media. Trust and credibility is of course crucial for all actors in the decision-making process, but the ways to gain trust is different depending on which role to play in the process. A higher degree of trust in the different actors, and in the process itself, could be gained from a better distinction between facts and value judgements, but also if the roles of different actors are better clarified. To understand the roles of the different actors, it is important to define each actor's 'arena' in terms of responsibilities, goals, standpoints etc. in several dimensions. These dimensions could for example be geographic or the base for decisions (scientific - political)

  20. Change of roles and attitudes in the Swedish localisation process for a final repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedberg, Bjoern [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    Since the early research activities in the mid seventies related to a final repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, much has changed in a direction that allows a more open and transparent decision-making process. Important changes have been noted in the legal framework - including EIA and financing - and in the roles of the Swedish authorities, local politicians, NGO's, and media. Trust and credibility is of course crucial for all actors in the decision-making process, but the ways to gain trust is different depending on which role to play in the process. A higher degree of trust in the different actors, and in the process itself, could be gained from a better distinction between facts and value judgements, but also if the roles of different actors are better clarified. To understand the roles of the different actors, it is important to define each actor's 'arena' in terms of responsibilities, goals, standpoints etc. in several dimensions. These dimensions could for example be geographic or the base for decisions (scientific - political)

  1. Microbial processes relevant for the long-term performance of radioactive waste repositories in clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meleshyn, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A number of investigations on occurrence and viability of microbes in compacted clays have been aimed at studying possible microbial effects on long-term performance of a deep geological repository (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SF). Compacted clays are considered in current DGR designs either as a buffer material or as a host rock. The primary purpose of the present work was to qualitatively evaluate the relevance of microbial activity for the long-term performance of a DGR and to identify which safety-relevant processes and properties can be potentially influenced by this activity. The present analysis identified eight clay properties essential for maintaining safety functions of containment and retardation of the disposal system - swelling pressure, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, anion sorption capacity, porosity, permeability, fluid pressure, plasticity - which can potentially be influenced by microbial processes in clay buffer and Clay-stone within a DGR for HLW/SF. Iron(III)- and sulphate-reducing, fermentative, methane-producing and oxidizing microbes can be considered to be present in any clay formation. Each habitat includes a massive number of microbial niches with perhaps only a small proportion of the species being metabolically active at the habitat's conditions, the remainder becoming not extinct. Moreover, clays contain electron donors and electron acceptors in amounts sufficient for these microbes to remain active during very long periods of time. Additional sources of electron donors or electron acceptors will inevitably be added to the repository system as a result of DGR excavation, placement of radioactive waste as well as backfilling and sealing of the DGR. In no case should the potential impact of microbes be underestimated based on a possible argument of comparably low biomass of the microbes in contact with metal surfaces or dissolved

  2. Results from an International Simulation Study on Couples Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes Near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Rutqvist; J.T. Birkholzer; M. Chijimatsu; O. Kolditz; Q.S. Liu; Y. Oda; W. Wang; C.Y. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    As part of the ongoing international code comparison project DECOVALEX, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near underground waste emplacement drifts. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types with open or back-filled repository drifts under higher and lower post-closure temperature, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses are currently being resolved. Good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even with some teams using relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglect complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified (and well-known) process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level. The research teams have now moved on to the second phase of the project, the analysis of THM-induced permanent (irreversible) changes and the impact of those changes on the fluid flow field near an emplacement drift

  3. Initialization of Safety Assessment Process for the Croatian Radioactive Waste repository on Trgovska gora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokner, V.; Levanat, I.; Subasic, D.

    2000-01-01

    An iterative process of safety assessment, presently focusing on the site-specific evaluation of the post-closure phase for the prospective LILW repository on Trgovska gora in Croatia, has recently been initiated. The primary aim of the first assessment iterations is to provide the experts involved, the regulators and the general public with a reasonable assurance that the applicable long term performance and safety objectives can be met. Another goal is to develop a sufficient understanding of the system behavior to support decisions about the site investigation, the facility design, the waste acceptance criteria and the closure conditions. In this initial phase, the safety assessment is structured in a manner following closely methodology of the ISAM. The International Programme for Improving Long Term Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities the IAEA coordinated research program started in 1997. Results of the safety assessment first iteration will be organized and presented in the form of a preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR), expected to be completed in the second part of the year 2000. As the first report on the initiated safety assessment activities, the PSAR will describe the concept and aims of the assessment process. Particular emphasis will be placed on description of the key elements of a safety assessment approach by: a) defining the assessment context; b) providing description of the disposal system; c) developing and justifying assessment scenarios; d) formulating and implementing models; and e) interpreting the scoping calculations. (author)

  4. Effects of magmatic processes on the potential Yucca Mountain repository: Field and computational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, G.A.; Groves, K.R.; Gable, C.W.; Perry, F.V.; Crowe, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    Assessing the risk of future magmatic activity at a potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository requires, in addition to event probabilities, some knowledge of the consequences of such activity. Magmatic consequences are divided into an eruptive component, which pertains to the possibility of radioactive waste being erupted onto the surface of Yucca Mountain, and a subsurface component, which occurs whether there is an accompanying eruption or not. The subsurface component pertains to a suite of processes such as hydrothermal activity, changes in country rock properties, and long term alteration of the hydrologic flow field which change the waste isolation system. This paper is the second in a series describing progress on studies of the effects of magmatic activity. We describe initial results of field analog studies at small volume basaltic centers where detailed measurements are being conducted of the amount of wall rock debris that can be erupted as a function of depth in the volcanic plumbing system. Constraints from field evidence of wall rock entrainment mechanisms are also discussed. Evidence is described for a mechanism of producing subhorizontal sills versus subvertical dikes, an issue that is important for assessing subsurface effects. Finally, new modeling techniques, which are being developed in order to capture the three dimensional complexities of real geologic situations in subsurface effects, are described

  5. Industrial Qualification Process for Optical Fibers Distributed Strain and Temperature Sensing in Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Delepine-Lesoille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and strain monitoring will be implemented in the envisioned French geological repository for high- and intermediate-level long-lived nuclear wastes. Raman and Brillouin scatterings in optical fibers are efficient industrial methods to provide distributed temperature and strain measurements. Gamma radiation and hydrogen release from nuclear wastes can however affect the measurements. An industrial qualification process is successfully proposed and implemented. Induced measurement uncertainties and their physical origins are quantified. The optical fiber composition influence is assessed. Based on radiation-hard fibers and carbon-primary coatings, we showed that the proposed system can provide accurate temperature and strain measurements up to 0.5 MGy and 100% hydrogen concentration in the atmosphere, over 200 m distance range. The selected system was successfully implemented in the Andra underground laboratory, in one-to-one scale mockup of future cells, into concrete liners. We demonstrated the efficiency of simultaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering measurements to provide both strain and temperature distributed measurements. We showed that 1.3 μm working wavelength is in favor of hazardous environment monitoring.

  6. Analogues to features and processes of a high-level radioactive waste repository proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Stuckless, John S.; with a Foreword by Abraham Van Luik, U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-01-01

    Natural analogues are defined for this report as naturally occurring or anthropogenic systems in which processes similar to those expected to occur in a nuclear waste repository are thought to have taken place over time periods of decades to millennia and on spatial scales as much as tens of kilometers. Analogues provide an important temporal and spatial dimension that cannot be tested by laboratory or field-scale experiments. Analogues provide one of the multiple lines of evidence intended to increase confidence in the safe geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Although the work in this report was completed specifically for Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste under the U.S. Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the applicability of the science, analyses, and interpretations is not limited to a specific site. Natural and anthropogenic analogues have provided and can continue to provide value in understanding features and processes of importance across a wide variety of topics in addressing the challenges of geologic isolation of radioactive waste and also as a contribution to scientific investigations unrelated to waste disposal. Isolation of radioactive waste at a mined geologic repository would be through a combination of natural features and engineered barriers. In this report we examine analogues to many of the various components of the Yucca Mountain system, including the preservation of materials in unsaturated environments, flow of water through unsaturated volcanic tuff, seepage into repository drifts, repository drift stability, stability and alteration of waste forms and components of the engineered barrier system, and transport of radionuclides through unsaturated and saturated rock zones.

  7. Safety assessment for a KBS-3H spent nuclear fuel repository at Olkiluoto. Process report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribi, Peter; Johnson, Lawrence; Suter, Daniel; Smith, Paul; Pastina, Barbara; Snellman, Margit

    2008-01-01

    The KBS-3 method, based on multiple barriers, is the proposed spent fuel disposal method both in Sweden and Finland. KBS-3H and KBS-3V are the two design alternatives of the KBS-3 spent fuel disposal method. Posiva and SKB have conducted a joint research, demonstration and development (RDandD) programme in 2002-2007 with the overall aim of establishing whether KBS-3H represents a feasible alternative to the reference alternative KBS-3V. The overall objectives of the present phase covering the period 2004-2007 have been to demonstrate that the horizontal deposition alternative is technically feasible and to demonstrate that it fulfils the same long-term safety requirements as KBS-3V. The safety studies conducted as part of this programme include a safety assessment of a preliminary design of a KBS-3H repository for spent nuclear fuel located about 400 m underground at the Olkiluoto site, which is the proposed site for a spent fuel repository in Finland. In the KBS-3H design alternative, each canister, with a surrounding layer of bentonite clay, is placed in a perforated steel cylinder prior to emplacement; the entire assembly is called the supercontainer. Several supercontainers are positioned along parallel, 100-300 m long deposition drifts, which are sealed following waste emplacement using drift end plugs. Bentonite distance blocks separate the supercontainers, one from another, along the drift. Steel compartment plugs can be used to seal off drift sections with higher inflow, thus isolating the different compartments within the drift. The present report describes the main processes potentially affecting the long-term safety of the system, covering radiation-related, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical (including microbiological) and radionuclide transport-related processes. The process descriptions deal sequentially with the main sub-systems: fuel/cavity in canister, cast iron insert and copper canister, buffer and other bentonite components, supercontainer

  8. Safety assessment for a KBS-3H spent nuclear fuel repository at Olkiluoto. Process report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gribi, Peter; Johnson, Lawrence; Suter, Daniel; Smith, Paul; Pastina, Barbara; Snellman, Margit

    2008-01-15

    The KBS-3 method, based on multiple barriers, is the proposed spent fuel disposal method both in Sweden and Finland. KBS-3H and KBS-3V are the two design alternatives of the KBS-3 spent fuel disposal method. Posiva and SKB have conducted a joint research, demonstration and development (RDandD) programme in 2002-2007 with the overall aim of establishing whether KBS-3H represents a feasible alternative to the reference alternative KBS-3V. The overall objectives of the present phase covering the period 2004-2007 have been to demonstrate that the horizontal deposition alternative is technically feasible and to demonstrate that it fulfils the same long-term safety requirements as KBS-3V. The safety studies conducted as part of this programme include a safety assessment of a preliminary design of a KBS-3H repository for spent nuclear fuel located about 400 m underground at the Olkiluoto site, which is the proposed site for a spent fuel repository in Finland. In the KBS-3H design alternative, each canister, with a surrounding layer of bentonite clay, is placed in a perforated steel cylinder prior to emplacement; the entire assembly is called the supercontainer. Several supercontainers are positioned along parallel, 100-300 m long deposition drifts, which are sealed following waste emplacement using drift end plugs. Bentonite distance blocks separate the supercontainers, one from another, along the drift. Steel compartment plugs can be used to seal off drift sections with higher inflow, thus isolating the different compartments within the drift. The present report describes the main processes potentially affecting the long-term safety of the system, covering radiation-related, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical (including microbiological) and radionuclide transport-related processes. The process descriptions deal sequentially with the main sub-systems: fuel/cavity in canister, cast iron insert and copper canister, buffer and other bentonite components, supercontainer

  9. The importance of environmental education in the process of nuclear and environmental licensing of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jefferson Borges; Ribeiro, Katia Maria Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Today, there is a thread with regard to the global environment. To reduce the environmental impact due to spending supplies to meet the basic needs of the global population. Can be considered as the power of these needs and in this context, the environmental impact occurs by the use of fossil fuels and loss of land for use of water resources. To minimize these impacts, governments are establishing appropriate laws towards the use of renewable energy. However it appears that there is still a great distance between the established law and implementation in practice. In this context nuclear energy is an attractive option, both economic and environmental. The facilities that are somehow associated with nuclear power plants are classified as radioactive or nuclear. These facilities are subject to two licensing procedures: Environmental (by IBAMA) and Nuclear (by CNEN). Nuclear installations such as nuclear power plants Angra 1 and 2, deposits and tailings facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle in Rezende that are more the attention of the population. As part of these processes are reports of analysis of safety and environmental impacts and socio-economic (EIA/RIMA RFAS), which are available to the public and then discussed at public hearings, where there is the opportunity for questions on these reports. These questions are mainly related with the social-environmental and economic due to construction and operation of these facilities. This work is a research, discussing the law, identifying the difficulties in the licensing process and presents a discussion on the importance of environmental education at all school levels, for adult audiences and is a connection between the environmental education and process of environmental licensing and nuclear, showing how the popular consciousness more informed can better discuss issues associated with these licenses, understand the advantages and disadvantages and obtain benefits. (author)

  10. Natural analogues: studies of geological processes relevant to radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russel, A.W. [Bedrock Geosciences, Auenstein (Switzerland); Reijonen, H.M. [Saanio and Rickkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); McKinley, I.G. [MCM Consulting, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    The geological disposal of radioactive wastes is generally accepted to be the most practicable approach to handling the waste inventory built up from over 70 years accumulation of power production, research-medical-industrial and military wastes. Here, a brief overview of the approach to geological disposal is presented along with some information on repository design and the assessment of repository post-closure safety. One of the significant challenges for repository safety assessment is how to extrapolate the likely long-term (i.e. ten thousand to a million years) behaviour of the repository from the necessarily short term data from analytical laboratories and underground rock laboratories currently available. One approach, common to all fields of the geosciences, but also in such diverse fields as philosophy, biology, linguistics, law, etc., is to utilise the analogue argumentation methodology. For the specific case of radioactive waste management, the term 'natural analogue' has taken on a particular meaning associated with providing supporting arguments for a repository safety assessment. This approach is discussed here with a brief overview of how the study of natural (and, in particular, geological) systems can provide supporting information on the likely long-term evolution of a deep geological waste repository. The overall approach is discussed and some relevant examples are presented, including the use of uranium ore bodies to assess waste form stability, the investigation of native metals to define the longevity of waste containers and how natural clays can provide information on the stability of waste tunnel backfill material. (authors)

  11. Natural analogues: studies of geological processes relevant to radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russel, A.W.; Reijonen, H.M.; McKinley, I.G.

    2015-01-01

    The geological disposal of radioactive wastes is generally accepted to be the most practicable approach to handling the waste inventory built up from over 70 years accumulation of power production, research-medical-industrial and military wastes. Here, a brief overview of the approach to geological disposal is presented along with some information on repository design and the assessment of repository post-closure safety. One of the significant challenges for repository safety assessment is how to extrapolate the likely long-term (i.e. ten thousand to a million years) behaviour of the repository from the necessarily short term data from analytical laboratories and underground rock laboratories currently available. One approach, common to all fields of the geosciences, but also in such diverse fields as philosophy, biology, linguistics, law, etc., is to utilise the analogue argumentation methodology. For the specific case of radioactive waste management, the term 'natural analogue' has taken on a particular meaning associated with providing supporting arguments for a repository safety assessment. This approach is discussed here with a brief overview of how the study of natural (and, in particular, geological) systems can provide supporting information on the likely long-term evolution of a deep geological waste repository. The overall approach is discussed and some relevant examples are presented, including the use of uranium ore bodies to assess waste form stability, the investigation of native metals to define the longevity of waste containers and how natural clays can provide information on the stability of waste tunnel backfill material. (authors)

  12. Influence of Groundwater Flow Rate on Nuclide Releases from Pyro-processed Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2011-01-01

    Since the early 2000s several template programs for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste repository as well as a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste repository systems have been developed by utilizing GoldSim and AMBER at KAERI. Very recently, another template program for a conceptual hybrid-typed repository system, called 'A-KRS' in which two kinds of pyroprocessed radioactive wastes, low-level metal wastes and ceramic high-level wastes that arise from pyroprocessing of PWR nuclear spent fuels has been developed and are to be disposed of by separate disposal strategies. The A-KRS is considered to be constructed at two different depths in geological media: 200m depth, at which a possible human intrusion is considered to be limited after closure, for the pyroprocessed metal wastes with lower or no decay heat producing nuclides, and 500m depth, believed to be in the reducing condition for nuclides with a rather higher radioactivity and heat generation rate. This program is ready for total system performance assessment which is able to evaluate nuclide release from the repository and farther transport into the geosphere and biosphere under various normal, disruptive natural and manmade events, and scenarios that can occur after a failure of waste package and canister. To quantify a nuclide release and transport through the possible various pathways especially in the near-fields of the A-KRS repository system, some illustrative evaluations have been made through the study. Even though all parameter values associated with the A-KRS were assumed for the time being, the illustrative results should be informative since the evaluation of such releases is very important not only in view of the safety assessment of the repository, but also for design feedback of its performance

  13. Canada's deep geological repository for used nuclear fuel - update on the site evaluation process and interweaving of aboriginal traditional knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, B.; Belfadhel, M.B.; Facella, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository (DGR) in a suitable crystalline or sedimentary rock formation. In May 2010, the NWMO initiated a nine-step site selection process to seek an informed and willing community to host Canada's deep geological repository. As of April 2015, twenty-two communities expressed interest in learning more about the project. This paper provides an update on the site evaluation process and describes the approach, methods and criteria used in the assessments, focusing on geological and community well-being studies. Engagement and field activities to interweave Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge with western science are also discussed. (author)

  14. Accident consequence analysis models applied to licensing process of nuclear installations, radioactive and conventional industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senne Junior, Murillo; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Jordao, Elizabete

    2002-01-01

    The industrial accidents happened in the last years, particularly in the eighty's decade, had contributed in a significant way to call the attention to government authorities, industry and society as a whole, demanding mechanisms for preventing episodes that could affect people's safety and environment quality. Techniques and methods already thoroughly used in the nuclear, aeronautic and war industries were then adapted for performing analysis and evaluation of the risks associated to other industrial activities, especially in the petroleum, chemistry and petrochemical areas. Some models for analyzing the consequences of accidents involving fire and explosion, used in the licensing processes of nuclear and radioactive facilities, are presented in this paper. These models have also application in the licensing of conventional industrial facilities. (author)

  15. Construction of quality-assured infant feeding process of care data repositories: definition and design (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcí A-de-León-Chocano, Ricardo; Sáez, Carlos; Muñoz-Soler, Verónica; Garcí A-de-León-González, Ricardo; García-Gómez, Juan M

    2015-12-01

    This is the first paper of a series of two regarding the construction of data quality (DQ) assured repositories for the reuse of information on infant feeding from birth until two years old. This first paper justifies the need for such repositories and describes the design of a process to construct them from Electronic Health Records (EHR). As a result, Part 1 proposes a computational process to obtain quality-assured datasets represented by a canonical structure extracted from raw data from multiple EHR. For this, 13 steps were defined to ensure the harmonization, standardization, completion, de-duplication, and consistency of the dataset content. Moreover, the quality of the input and output data for each of these steps is controlled according to eight DQ dimensions: predictive value, correctness, duplication, consistency, completeness, contextualization, temporal-stability and spatial-stability. The second paper of the series will describe the application of this computational process to construct the first quality-assured repository for the reuse of information on infant feeding in the perinatal period aimed at the monitoring of clinical activities and research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparative analysis of the domestic and foreign licensing processes for power and non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, J. C.; Youn, Y. K.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    The System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART), a small to medium sized integral type Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been developed in Korea. Now, SMART-P, a 1/5 scaled-down of the SMART, is being developed for the purpose of demonstrating the safety and performance of SMART design. The SMART-P is a first-of-a-kind reactor which is utilized for the research and development of a power reactor. Since the licensing process of such a reactor is not clearly specified in the current Atomic Energy Act, a comparative survey and analysis of domestic and foreign licensing processes for power and non-power reactors has been carried out to develop the rationale and technical basis for establishing the licensing process of such a reactor. The domestic and foreign licensing processes of power and non-power reactors have been surveyed and compared, including those of the U.S.A., Japan, France, U.K., Canada, and IAEA. The general trends in nuclear reactor classification, licensing procedures, regulatory technical requirements, and other licensing requirements and regulations have been investigated. The results of this study will be used as the rationale and technical basis for establishing the licensing process of reactors at development stage such as SMART-P

  17. Overview of NORM and activities by a NORM licensed permanent decontamination and waste processing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirro, G.A. [Growth Resources, Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of issues related to handling NORM materials, and provides a description of a facility designed for the processing of NORM contaminated equipment. With regard to handling NORM materials the author discusses sources of NORM, problems, regulations and disposal options, potential hazards, safety equipment, and issues related to personnel protection. For the facility, the author discusses: description of the permanent facility; the operations of the facility; the license it has for handling specific radioactive material; operating and safety procedures; decontamination facilities on site; NORM waste processing capabilities; and offsite NORM services which are available.

  18. Coupled thermo–hydro–mechanical processes for the Dutch radioactive waste repository

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buragohain, P.; Vardon, P.J.; Hicks, M.A.; Vardon, P.J.; Bykov, D.

    2016-01-01

    Disposal of spent nuclear fuel and long lived radioactive waste in deep clay geological formations is one of the promising options worldwide. In this concept of the geological disposal system, the Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock when designing a generic waste repository in the

  19. Licensing Process for Nuclear Power Plants in Pakistan and its comparison with other Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2012-01-01

    Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) was established in January 2001 with the promulgation of the Ordinance, No-III of 2001. Pakistan is one of the countries in the world who intend to expand its nuclear power program for energy generation upto 8800 MWe by 2030. Presently, there are two research reactors and three nuclear power plants in operation and two power plants are under various stages of construction which are expected to be in commercial operation in 2016. It is obvious that the primary responsibility of ensuring safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) operation rests with the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). However, PNRA's prime mission is to ensure the safe operation of nuclear and radiation facilities, safe use of radioactive sources and protection of the radiation workers, general public and the environment from the harmful hazards of radiation by formulating and implementing effective regulations. Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority issues authorizations for nuclear power plants in three stages i.e. site permit, construction license and operation license after detailed safety review. This paper presents the licensing process for NPPs in Pakistan and its comparison with SSG-12, USA and Finland

  20. Repository simulation model: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report documents the application of computer simulation for the design analysis of the nuclear waste repository's waste handling and packaging operations. The Salt Repository Simulation Model was used to evaluate design alternatives during the conceptual design phase of the Salt Repository Project. Code development and verification was performed by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWL). The focus of this report is to relate the experience gained during the development and application of the Salt Repository Simulation Model to future repository design phases. Design of the repository's waste handling and packaging systems will require sophisticated analysis tools to evaluate complex operational and logistical design alternatives. Selection of these design alternatives in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) and License Application Design (LAD) phases must be supported by analysis to demonstrate that the repository design will cost effectively meet DOE's mandated emplacement schedule and that uncertainties in the performance of the repository's systems have been objectively evaluated. Computer simulation of repository operations will provide future repository designers with data and insights that no other analytical form of analysis can provide. 6 refs., 10 figs

  1. Nuclear waste repository siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloman, B.D.; Cameron, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the geopolitics of nuclear waste disposal in the USA. Constitutional choice and social equity perspectives are used to argue for a more open and just repository siting program. The authors assert that every potential repository site inevitably contains geologic, environmental or other imperfections and that the political process is the correct one for determining sites selected

  2. Process for selecting a site for Canada's deep geological repository for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facella, J.; Belfadhel, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management, the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel waste generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of Adaptive Phased Management is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable crystalline or sedimentary rock formation at a depth of about 500m. The repository will consist of a series of access and service shafts and a series of tunnels leading to placement rooms where used fuel will be placed and sealed in competent rock using a multi-barrier system which includes long lived specially designed containers, sealing materials such as bentonite and the rock itself. The used fuel will be monitored throughout all phases of implementation and will also remain retrievable for an extended period of time. In May 2010, the NWMO published the site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. NWMO initiated the process with a first stage that invites communities to learn more about the project and the site selection process. NWMO is actively building awareness of the project and, on request of communities, is delivering briefings, supporting community capacity building and undertaking high-level screenings of site suitability. The paper provides a brief description of: Adaptive Phased Management including the deep geological repository which is its ultimate goal, and the design of the site selection process, and importantly the approach to assessing the suitability of sites from both a social and technical perspective. The paper will outline how NWMO sought to develop a socially-acceptable site selection process as a firm foundation for future decisions on siting. Through a two-year collaborative process, NWMO sought to understand the expectations of

  3. Modelling of processes occurring in deep geological repository - development of new modules in the GoldSim environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vopalka, D.; Lukin, D.; Vokal, A.

    2006-01-01

    Three new modules modelling the processes that occur in a deep geological repository have been prepared in the GoldSim computer code environment (using its Transport Module). These modules help to understand the role of selected parameters in the near-field region of the final repository and to prepare an own complex model of the repository behaviour. The source term module includes radioactive decay and ingrowth in the canister, first order degradation of fuel matrix, solubility limitation of the concentration of the studied nuclides, and diffusive migration through the surrounding bentonite layer controlled by the output boundary condition formulated with respect to the rate of water flow in the rock. The corrosion module describes corrosion of canisters made of carbon steel and transport of corrosion products in the near-field region. This module computes balance equations between dissolving species and species transported by diffusion and/or advection from the surface of a solid material. The diffusion module that includes also non-linear form of the interaction isotherm can be used for an evaluation of small-scale diffusion experiments. (author)

  4. Modelling of processes occurring in deep geological repository - Development of new modules in the GoldSim environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vopálka, D.; Lukin, D.; Vokál, A.

    2006-01-01

    Three new modules modelling the processes that occur in a deep geological repository have been prepared in the GoldSim computer code environment (using its Transport Module). These modules help to understand the role of selected parameters in the near-field region of the final repository and to prepare an own complex model of the repository behaviour. The source term module includes radioactive decay and ingrowth in the canister, first order degradation of fuel matrix, solubility limitation of the concentration of the studied nuclides, and diffusive migration through the surrounding bentonite layer controlled by the output boundary condition formulated with respect to the rate of water flow in the rock. The corrosion module describes corrosion of canisters made of carbon steel and transport of corrosion products in the near-field region. This module computes balance equations between dissolving species and species transported by diffusion and/or advection from the surface of a solid material. The diffusion module that includes also non-linear form of the interaction isotherm can be used for an evaluation of small-scale diffusion experiments.

  5. Technical, normative and social aspects of the site selection process for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branco, Otavio E.A.; Rodrigues, Paulo C.H.; Carvalho Filho, Carlos A.; Cota, Stela D.S.; Ferreira, Vinicius V.M.; Peres, Sueli S.; Hiromoto, Goro

    2009-01-01

    In force since 2001, the Federal Law 10.308 states, in article 37, that the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN should start studies for the implementation of a final radioactive waste repository, 'in the shortest timeframe technically feasible'. Nevertheless, not only technical aspects have to be taken into account to accomplish with this schedule, but, also factors of political, economic and social nature. In this paper, the importance and impact of public acceptance aspects are discussed, as well as the methodology of site selection for radioactive wastes repositories, and proposals to accommodate the emanated criteria from the existing legislation. Additionally, practical results from the international experience in the implementation of such deposits are presented. (author)

  6. Integration of a central protein repository into a standard data processing application for mining proteomics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzemeier, Kai; Kristensen, Jakob; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    efficient data mining and categorizing of large data sets. Methods All samples were analyzed on an Orbitrap mass Spectrometer coupled to a nano Easy LC. The proteomics repository database is built using the Sun Java technology and the Microsoft mySQL database technology for optimal performance. Proteome......Novel Aspect All major protein repositories integrated into a central domain for direct analyses and interpretation in a standard proteomics data analysis software. Introduction Modern proteomics must face the challenge of performing bioinformatics analysis and comparison of large datasets....... It is a time consuming and at times nearly impossible task to distinguish known proteins from novel proteins in these data sets without proper annotation and comparison with literature sources. Tools are needed that can handle the complexity of these data including: redundancy (same protein but different...

  7. A Probabilistic Consideration on Nuclide Releases from a Pyro-processed Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Very recently, a GoldSim template program, GSTSPA, for a safety assessment of a conceptual hybrid-typed repository system, called 'A-KRS,' in which two kinds of pyroprocessed radioactive wastes, low-level metal wastes and ceramic high-level wastes that arise from the pyroprocessing of PWR nuclear spent fuels, has been developed and is to be disposed of by 'separate disposal' strategies. The A-KRS is considered to be constructed at two different depths in geological media: at a 200m depth, at which a possible human intrusion is considered to be limited after closure, for the pyroprocessed metal wastes with lower or no decay heat producing nuclides, and at a 500m depth, believed to be the reducing condition for nuclides with a rather higher radioactivity and heat generation rate. This program is ready for a probabilistic total system performance assessment (TSPA) which is able to evaluate nuclide release from the repository and farther transport into the geosphere and biosphere under various normal, disruptive natural and manmade events, and scenarios that can occur after a failure of a waste package and canister with associated uncertainty. To quantify the nuclide release and transport through the various possible pathways in the near- and far-fields of the A-KRS repository system under a normal groundwater flow scenario, some illustrative evaluations have been made through this study. Even though all parameter values associated with the A-KRS were assumed for the time being, the illustrative results should be informative since the evaluation of such releases is very important not only in view of the safety assessment of the repository, but also for design feedback of its performance

  8. A Probabilistic Consideration on Nuclide Releases from a Pyro-processed Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2012-01-01

    Very recently, a GoldSim template program, GSTSPA, for a safety assessment of a conceptual hybrid-typed repository system, called 'A-KRS,' in which two kinds of pyroprocessed radioactive wastes, low-level metal wastes and ceramic high-level wastes that arise from the pyroprocessing of PWR nuclear spent fuels, has been developed and is to be disposed of by 'separate disposal' strategies. The A-KRS is considered to be constructed at two different depths in geological media: at a 200m depth, at which a possible human intrusion is considered to be limited after closure, for the pyroprocessed metal wastes with lower or no decay heat producing nuclides, and at a 500m depth, believed to be the reducing condition for nuclides with a rather higher radioactivity and heat generation rate. This program is ready for a probabilistic total system performance assessment (TSPA) which is able to evaluate nuclide release from the repository and farther transport into the geosphere and biosphere under various normal, disruptive natural and manmade events, and scenarios that can occur after a failure of a waste package and canister with associated uncertainty. To quantify the nuclide release and transport through the various possible pathways in the near- and far-fields of the A-KRS repository system under a normal groundwater flow scenario, some illustrative evaluations have been made through this study. Even though all parameter values associated with the A-KRS were assumed for the time being, the illustrative results should be informative since the evaluation of such releases is very important not only in view of the safety assessment of the repository, but also for design feedback of its performance

  9. General information on licensing process in Bulgaria and disused sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizamska, M.

    2003-01-01

    The basic legal framework for radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources is given in the report. The authorisation process is described. Actual data for the system of authorisation about SIR during 2002/2003 are given. The planned activities related to RAW management are:commissioning of the complex for treatment, conditioning and storage of RAW in Kozloduy NPP - by the end of 2003; investigation of Gabra site for construction of institutional waste disposal facility - by the end of 2004; implementation of program for reconstruction and modernisation of Novi Han Repository - by the end of 2007; site selection for the national RAW disposal facility - by the end of 2008. The Nuclear Energy Act defines the following future activities: establishment of the State Enterprise 'RAW' in 2004; development of new secondary legislation for safe management of SF and RAW until July 2004; update of the National Strategy for Safe Management of SF and RAW until the end of 2003

  10. Comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes near back-filled and open-drift nuclear waste repositories in Task D of the International DECOVALEX Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Chijimatsu, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liu, Quan-Sheng; Oda, Y.; Wang, Wenqing; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near underground waste emplacement drifts. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower post-closure temperature, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses are currently being resolved. Good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was also achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglect complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level

  11. Continuing Science and Technology at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was designated in 2002 to be the site for the nation's first permanent geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The process of selecting a site for the repository began nearly 25 years ago with passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1982. The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for submitting a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for constructing and operating the repository, and DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is charged with carrying out this action. The use of multiple natural and engineered barriers in the current repository design are considered by OCRWM to be sufficiently robust to warrant license approval; however, potential design enhancements and increased understanding of both natural and engineered barriers, especially over the long time frames during which the waste is to remain isolated from human contact continue to be examined. The Office of Science and Technology and International (OST andI) was created within OCRWM to help explore novel technologies that might lower overall costs and to develop a greater understanding of processes relevant to the long-term performance of the repository. A brief overview of Yucca Mountain, and the role that OST andI has in identifying technological or scientific advances that could make repository operations more efficient or performance more robust, will be presented. It is important to note, however, that adopting any of OST andI's technological or scientific developments will be at the discretion of OCRWM's Office of Repository Development (ORD)

  12. Rock support for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, L.W.; Schmidt, B.

    1984-01-01

    The design of rock support for underground nuclear waste repositories requires consideration of special construction and operation requirements, and of the adverse environmental conditions in which some of the support is placed. While repository layouts resemble mines, design, construction and operation are subject to quality assurance and public scrutiny similar to what is experienced for nuclear power plants. Exploration, design, construction and operation go through phases of review and licensing by government agencies as repositories evolve. This paper discusses (1) the various stages of repository development; (2) the environment that supports must be designed for; (3) the environmental effects on support materials; and (4) alternative types of repository rock support

  13. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Mathematical Models of Coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes for Nuclear Waste Repositories. Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology; Tsang, C.F. [Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Science Div.; Mayor, J.C. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain); Kautzky, F. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)] (eds.)

    2005-02-15

    DECOVALEX is an international consortium of governmental agencies associated with the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a number of countries. The consortium's mission is the DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments. Hence the acronym/name DECOVALEX. Currently, agencies from Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States are in DECOVALEX. Emplacement of nuclear waste in a repository in geologic media causes a number of physical processes to be intensified in the surrounding rock mass due to the decay heat from the waste. The four main processes of concern are thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical. Interactions or coupling between these heat-driven processes must be taken into account in modeling the performance of the repository for such modeling to be meaningful and reliable. DECOVALEX III is organized around four tasks. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barriers EXperiment) in situ experiment being conducted at the Grimsel site in Switzerland is to be simulated and analyzed in Task 1. Task 2, centered around the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, USA, has several sub-tasks (Task 2A, Task 2B, Task 2C and Task 2D) to investigate a number of the coupled processes in the DST. Task 3 studies three benchmark problems: a) the effects of thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) coupling on the performance of the near-field of a nuclear waste repository (BMT1); b) the effect of upscaling THM processes on the results of performance assessment (BMT2); and c) the effect of glaciation on rock mass behavior (BMT3). Task 4 is on the direct application of THM coupled process modeling in the performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories in geologic media. This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, approaches, and the highlights of the main achievements and outstanding issues of the tasks studied in the DECOVALEX III project

  14. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Mathematical Models of Coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes for Nuclear Waste Repositories. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O.; Kautzky, F.

    2005-02-01

    DECOVALEX is an international consortium of governmental agencies associated with the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a number of countries. The consortium's mission is the DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments. Hence the acronym/name DECOVALEX. Currently, agencies from Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States are in DECOVALEX. Emplacement of nuclear waste in a repository in geologic media causes a number of physical processes to be intensified in the surrounding rock mass due to the decay heat from the waste. The four main processes of concern are thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical. Interactions or coupling between these heat-driven processes must be taken into account in modeling the performance of the repository for such modeling to be meaningful and reliable. DECOVALEX III is organized around four tasks. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barriers EXperiment) in situ experiment being conducted at the Grimsel site in Switzerland is to be simulated and analyzed in Task 1. Task 2, centered around the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, USA, has several sub-tasks (Task 2A, Task 2B, Task 2C and Task 2D) to investigate a number of the coupled processes in the DST. Task 3 studies three benchmark problems: a) the effects of thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) coupling on the performance of the near-field of a nuclear waste repository (BMT1); b) the effect of upscaling THM processes on the results of performance assessment (BMT2); and c) the effect of glaciation on rock mass behavior (BMT3). Task 4 is on the direct application of THM coupled process modeling in the performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories in geologic media. This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, approaches, and the highlights of the main achievements and outstanding issues of the tasks studied in the DECOVALEX III project. The

  15. Regulatory status on the safety assessment of a HLW repository in other countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2008-12-01

    To construct a HLW repository, it is essential to meet the requirements on the regulation for a deep geological disposal. Even if the construction of a HLW repository is determined positively, technical standards which assert the performance of a repository will be needed. Among various technical standards, safety assessment based on the repository evolution in the future will play an important role in the licensing process. The foreign countries' technical standards on the safety assessment of a HLW repository may be an indicator to carry out the R and D activities on geological disposal effectively. In this report, assessment period, limit of radiation dose and uncertainty related to the safety assessment are investigated and analyzed in detail. Especially, the technical reviews of USA regulation bodies seems to be reasonable in the point of the intrinsic attribute of safety assessment

  16. Categorisation of Practices and Sources- A Key Issue in Licensing Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.; Vokal, B.; Petrovic, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of a radioactive sources inventory in countries with a nuclear programme usually comprises nearly all possible man-made sources available today, from sources related to nuclear power plants to calibration sources used for educational purposes. The risk based licensing process of radiation sources and exposures is a demanding task which could be internationally harmonised by introducing sources and practice related categorisation. The detailed categorisation of radioisotopes, replacing [1], was recently published [2]. The activity ratio (A/D ratio) is used as a basic parameter which is proportional to a risk involved in a use of a radioisotope. Radioisotopes as well as related practices are categorised. No categorisation of ionising sources related to electrical apparatus producing ionising radiation without radioisotopes has been given in literature. In addition, licensees usually perform many different activities with a specific source, so the categorisation of practice should be done, based on a risk involved with a specific practice. The risk is related to the probability of a specific event as well as to the consequences of that event. It is strongly related to the categorisation of source. The main issues related to a licensing process of sources and practices are presented. The review of possible categorisation of radioisotopes and related practices is given and a proposal of a combined harmonised approach of categorisation of sources and practices, based on risk, is given. (Author) 19 refs

  17. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Erosion and sealing processes in tunnel backfill materials investigated in laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanden, Torbjoern; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Goudarzi, Reza; Loennqvist, Margareta (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    SKB in Sweden and Posiva in Finland are developing and plan to implement similar disposal concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Co-operation and joint development work between Posiva and SKB with the overall objective to develop backfill concepts and techniques for sealing and closure of the repository have been going on for several years. The investigation described in this report is intended to acquire more knowledge regarding the behavior of some of the candidate backfilling materials. Blocks made of three different materials (Friedland clay, Asha 230 or a bentonite/ballast 30/70 mixture) as well as different bentonite pellets have been examined. The backfill materials will be exposed to an environment simulating that in a tunnel, with high relative humidity and water inflow from the rock. The processes and properties investigated are: 1. Erosion properties of blocks and pellets (Friedland blocks, MX-80 pellets, Cebogel QSE pellets, Minelco and Friedland granules). 2. Displacements of blocks after emplacement in a deposition drift (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 and Mixture 30/70). 3. The ability of these materials to seal a leaking in-situ cast plug cement/rock but also other fractures in the rock (MX-80 pellets). 4. The self healing ability after a piping scenario (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 Mixture 30/70 and also MX-80 pellets). 5. Swelling and cracking of the compacted backfill blocks caused by relative humidity. The erosion properties of Friedland blocks were also investigated in Phase 2 of the joint SKBPosiva project 'Backfilling and Closure of the Deep Repository, BACLO, which included laboratory scale experiments. In this phase of the project (3) some completing tests were performed with new blocks produced for different field tests. These blocks had a lower density than intended and this has an influence on the erosion properties measured. The erosion properties of MX-80 pellets were also investigated earlier in the project but

  18. Gas generation in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.; McGahan, D.; Rushbrook, P.E.

    1987-09-01

    The nature and quantities of gases likely to be produced by various processes in repositories for low level and intermediate level radioactive wastes are examined in this preliminary study. Many simplifying assumptions are made where published or experimental data is unavailable. The corrosion of the canisters and metallic components in wastes is likely to be the major gas production process in both types of repository. A significant contribution from microbiological activity is expected to occur in low level repositories, predominantly where no cement grouting of the cans has been carried out. A number of areas for further research, required before a more comprehensive study could be carried out, have been identified. (author)

  19. Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel - Geo-scientific Site Evaluation Process - 13117

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyth, Alec; Ben Belfadhel, Mahrez; Hirschorn, Sarah; Hamilton, Duncan; McKelvie, Jennifer [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2S3 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 meters (m) (1,640 feet [ft]). In May 2010, the NWMO published a nine-step site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. The safety and appropriateness of any potential site will be assessed against a number of factors, both technical and social in nature. The selected site will be one that can be demonstrated to be able to safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel, protecting humans and the environment over the very long term. The geo-scientific suitability of potential candidate sites will be assessed in a stepwise manner following a progressive and thorough site evaluation process that addresses a series of geo-scientific factors revolving around five safety functions. The geo-scientific site evaluation process includes: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Evaluations. As of November 2012, 22 communities have entered the site selection process (three in northern Saskatchewan and 18 in northwestern and southwestern Ontario). (authors)

  20. INTERNAL HAZARDS ANALYSIS FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Garrett

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this internal hazards analysis is to identify and document the internal hazards and potential initiating events associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain. Internal hazards are those hazards presented by the operation of the facility and by its associated processes that can potentially lead to a radioactive release or cause a radiological hazard. In contrast to external hazards, internal hazards do not involve natural phenomena and external man-made hazards. This internal hazards analysis was performed in support of the preclosure safety analysis and the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. The methodology for this analysis provides a systematic means to identify internal hazards and potential initiating events that may result in a radiological hazard or radiological release during the repository preclosure period. These hazards are documented in tables of potential internal hazards and potential initiating events (Section 6.6) for input to the repository event sequence categorization process. The results of this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply to the performance of event sequence analyses for the repository preclosure period. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that internal hazards that have not been previously evaluated are identified.

  1. INTERNAL HAZARDS ANALYSIS FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this internal hazards analysis is to identify and document the internal hazards and potential initiating events associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain. Internal hazards are those hazards presented by the operation of the facility and by its associated processes that can potentially lead to a radioactive release or cause a radiological hazard. In contrast to external hazards, internal hazards do not involve natural phenomena and external man-made hazards. This internal hazards analysis was performed in support of the preclosure safety analysis and the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. The methodology for this analysis provides a systematic means to identify internal hazards and potential initiating events that may result in a radiological hazard or radiological release during the repository preclosure period. These hazards are documented in tables of potential internal hazards and potential initiating events (Section 6.6) for input to the repository event sequence categorization process. The results of this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply to the performance of event sequence analyses for the repository preclosure period. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that internal hazards that have not been previously evaluated are identified

  2. Further development of public participation in the site-selection and approval process of a final repository in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Regine; Kallenbach-Herbert, Beate [OeEo-Institute e.V., Inst. for Applied Ecology, Darmstadt (Germany); Arens, Georg [Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    This paper reflects the first findings of a current research project funded by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection and conducted by an interdisciplinary working group of the OEko-Institute. One focus of this project is the systematic analysis of past and existing participatory processes in different nuclear and non-nuclear projects. On the basis of this analysis and a literature review a specific concept for public participation in the site-selection and approval process of a repository for high radioactive waste (HAW repository) in Germany will be derived. The concept shall foster transparency and acceptance. The working group of the OEko-Institute combines long standing research experience and an intimate knowledge of radioactive waste management including political, technical, management and social problems of final disposal on the one hand. On the other hand members play an active role in stakeholder processes of different non-nuclear projects as well as experience with a wide range of participative measures and their impact. This allows an approach which integrates the specific features of radioactive waste disposal with a wider perspective on the demands and opportunities of stakeholder processes. The procedure of site selection for a HAW repository in Germany still has to be specified. The procedure introduced by the 'Committee on a Site Selection Procedure for Repository Sites' (Arbeitskreis Auswahlverfahren Endlagerstandorte - AkEnd) has not been adopted. The Committee had suggested installing a negotiation group to discuss the AkEnd proposals in the so called 'Phase II'. This suggestion could not be followed because not all relevant stakeholders were willing to participate. An internal draft for a federal law implementing main elements of the AkEnd findings was developed by the Ministry for Environment in 2005, but has never been brought to the cabinet. Due to the change of Government in Germany, the next steps still are

  3. Further development of public participation in the site-selection and approval process of a final repository in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, Regine; Kallenbach-Herbert, Beate; Arens, Georg

    2006-01-01

    This paper reflects the first findings of a current research project funded by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection and conducted by an interdisciplinary working group of the OEko-Institute. One focus of this project is the systematic analysis of past and existing participatory processes in different nuclear and non-nuclear projects. On the basis of this analysis and a literature review a specific concept for public participation in the site-selection and approval process of a repository for high radioactive waste (HAW repository) in Germany will be derived. The concept shall foster transparency and acceptance. The working group of the OEko-Institute combines long standing research experience and an intimate knowledge of radioactive waste management including political, technical, management and social problems of final disposal on the one hand. On the other hand members play an active role in stakeholder processes of different non-nuclear projects as well as experience with a wide range of participative measures and their impact. This allows an approach which integrates the specific features of radioactive waste disposal with a wider perspective on the demands and opportunities of stakeholder processes. The procedure of site selection for a HAW repository in Germany still has to be specified. The procedure introduced by the 'Committee on a Site Selection Procedure for Repository Sites' (Arbeitskreis Auswahlverfahren Endlagerstandorte - AkEnd) has not been adopted. The Committee had suggested installing a negotiation group to discuss the AkEnd proposals in the so called 'Phase II'. This suggestion could not be followed because not all relevant stakeholders were willing to participate. An internal draft for a federal law implementing main elements of the AkEnd findings was developed by the Ministry for Environment in 2005, but has never been brought to the cabinet. Due to the change of Government in Germany, the next steps still are under consideration

  4. Screening Analysis of Criticality Features, Events, and Processes for License Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.A. McClure

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the screening analysis of postclosure criticality features, events, and processes. It addresses the probability of criticality events resulting from degradation processes as well as disruptive events (i.e., seismic, rock fall, and igneous). Probability evaluations are performed utilizing the configuration generator described in ''Configuration Generator Model'', a component of the methodology from ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report''. The total probability per package of criticality is compared against the regulatory probability criterion for inclusion of events established in 10 CFR 63.114(d) (consider only events that have at least one chance in 10,000 of occurring over 10,000 years). The total probability of criticality accounts for the evaluation of identified potential critical configurations of all baselined commercial and U.S. Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel waste form and waste package combinations, both internal and external to the waste packages. This criticality screening analysis utilizes available information for the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor Absorber Plate, 12-Pressurized Water Reactor Absorber Plate, 44-Boiling Water Reactor Absorber Plate, 24-Boiling Water Reactor Absorber Plate, and the 5-Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste/U.S. Department of Energy Short waste package types. Where defensible, assumptions have been made for the evaluation of the following waste package types in order to perform a complete criticality screening analysis: 21-Pressurized Water Reactor Control Rod, 5-Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste/U.S. Department of Energy Long, and 2-Multi-Canister Overpack/2-Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste package types. The inputs used to establish probabilities for this analysis report are based on information and data generated for the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application, where available. This analysis report determines whether criticality is to be

  5. P19-S Managing Proteomics Data from Data Generation and Data Warehousing to Central Data Repository and Journal Reviewing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, H.; Glandorf, J.; Koerting, G.; Reidegeld, K.; Blüggel, M.; Meyer, H.; Stephan, C.

    2007-01-01

    In today’s proteomics research, various techniques and instrumentation bioinformatics tools are necessary to manage the large amount of heterogeneous data with an automatic quality control to produce reliable and comparable results. Therefore a data-processing pipeline is mandatory for data validation and comparison in a data-warehousing system. The proteome bioinformatics platform ProteinScape has been proven to cover these needs. The reprocessing of HUPO BPP participants’ MS data was done within ProteinScape. The reprocessed information was transferred into the global data repository PRIDE. ProteinScape as a data-warehousing system covers two main aspects: archiving relevant data of the proteomics workflow and information extraction functionality (protein identification, quantification and generation of biological knowledge). As a strategy for automatic data validation, different protein search engines are integrated. Result analysis is performed using a decoy database search strategy, which allows the measurement of the false-positive identification rate. Peptide identifications across different workflows, different MS techniques, and different search engines are merged to obtain a quality-controlled protein list. The proteomics identifications database (PRIDE), as a public data repository, is an archiving system where data are finally stored and no longer changed by further processing steps. Data submission to PRIDE is open to proteomics laboratories generating protein and peptide identifications. An export tool has been developed for transferring all relevant HUPO BPP data from ProteinScape into PRIDE using the PRIDE.xml format. The EU-funded ProDac project will coordinate the development of software tools covering international standards for the representation of proteomics data. The implementation of data submission pipelines and systematic data collection in public standards–compliant repositories will cover all aspects, from the generation of MS data

  6. Asset Reuse of Images from a Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    According to Markus's theory of reuse, when digital repositories are deployed to collect and distribute organizational assets, they supposedly help ensure accountability, extend information exchange, and improve productivity. Such repositories require a large investment due to the continuing costs of hardware, software, user licenses, training,…

  7. Conduct of regulatory review and assessment during the licensing process for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. It supplements the Code of Practice on Governmental Organization for the Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-C-G) and is concerned with the review and assessment by the regulatory body of all information submitted in support of licence applications, in the various phases of the licensing process. The purpose of the Guide is to provide information, recommendations and guidance for the conduct of these activities. The scope of the review and assessment will encompass the safety aspects of siting, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of each nuclear power plant

  8. Improving regulatory effectiveness in federal/state siting actions: water supplies and the nuclear licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davenport, F.S.

    1977-07-01

    The Interstate Conference on Water Problems (ICWP) is a national association of State, intrastate, and interstate officials concerned with water resources administration and related matters. The Conference was established in 1959 as an outgrowth of regional conferences on water problems as recognized in the same year by action of the General Assembly of the States. This report was produced by the Interstate Conference on Water Problems in an effort to provide a compilation and summary of the views of selected States regarding relationships of water supplies to the nuclear power plant licensing process. This publication does not represent the official position of the U.S Water Resources Council, or the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor does it represent the position of any single state or the ICWP

  9. Developing a workable public input process for aesthetics and recreational needs during hydropower licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, D.; Stimac, M.

    1993-01-01

    Aesthetics and recreation are becoming increasingly important issues during hydropower licensing. A variety of regulations and legislation mandate the protection of instream flows for aesthetic and recreational resources. These have provided impetus for determining the effects of instream flows on recreation and aesthetic resources. A public survey designed for a proposed small hydropower project, located in a heavily used recreation area, attempts to determine the aesthetic and recreational preferences for instream flows. The major components in designing the survey are discussed. The public input process is still underway, however, preliminary results indicate lower flows in the river are generally preferable by visitors of the area. This is likely because of the types of users and the recreation activities performed

  10. Process for selecting a site for Canada's deep geological repository for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facella, J.; Ben Belfadhel, M.; Patton, P.

    2012-01-01

    'Full Text:' The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management, the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel waste generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of Adaptive Phased Management is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable crystalline or sedimentary rock formation at a depth of about 500m. The repository will consist of a series of access and service shafts and a series of tunnels leading to placement rooms where used fuel will be placed and sealed in competent rock using a multi-barrier system which includes long lived specially designed containers, sealing materials such as bentonite and the rock itself. The used fuel will be monitored throughout all phases of implementation and will also remain retrievable for an extended period of time. In May 2010, the NWMO published the site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. NWMO initiated the process with a first stage that invites communities to learn more about the project and the site selection process. NWMO is actively building awareness of the project and, on request of communities, is delivering briefings, supporting community capacity building and undertaking screenings of site suitability. This panel presentation provides a brief description of: Adaptive Phased Management including the deep geological repository which is its ultimate goal, and the design of the site selection process, and importantly the approach to assessing the suitability of sites from both a social and technical perspective. The panel presentation will be conducted in three parts: site selection process and engagement, Aboriginal engagement and Technical evaluations, followed by a discussion. The presentation will outline how NWMO sought

  11. Understanding the evolution of the repository and the olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, K.; Pastina, B.

    2008-01-01

    Posiva Safety Case is organised in a portfolio including ten main reports: Site, Spent Fuel Characteristics and Inventories, Canister Design, Repository Design, Process, Evolution of the Repository and the Site, Biosphere Assessment, Radionuclide Transport, Complementary Evaluations of Safety, and Summary. This portfolio constitutes the basis of the Preliminary Safety Assessment Report, which will be presented to the authorities in 2012 as part of the repository construction license application. The Evolution report [1], which is the focus of this paper, is the main advance in the Safety Case portfolio since the implementation of the Safety Case plan [2] in 2005. The report provides the status of current knowledge with respect to the evolution of the site and the engineered barrier system and highlights areas where better understanding is needed. (authors)

  12. Safety analysis methodologies for radioactive waste repositories in shallow ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The report is part of the IAEA Safety Series and is addressed to authorities and specialists responsible for or involved in planning, performing and/or reviewing safety assessments of shallow ground radioactive waste repositories. It discusses approaches that are applicable for safety analysis of a shallow ground repository. The methodologies, analysis techniques and models described are pertinent to the task of predicting the long-term performance of a shallow ground disposal system. They may be used during the processes of selection, confirmation and licensing of new sites and disposal systems or to evaluate the long-term consequences in the post-sealing phase of existing operating or inactive sites. The analysis may point out need for remedial action, or provide information to be used in deciding on the duration of surveillance. Safety analysis both general in nature and specific to a certain repository, site or design concept, are discussed, with emphasis on deterministic and probabilistic studies

  13. Conformation of an evaluation process for a license renovation solicitude of a nuclear power plant in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano R, M. L.

    2012-10-01

    So that the construction stages, of operation, closing, dismantlement and the radioactive waste disposal of a nuclear power plant (NPP) are carried out in Mexico, is necessary that the operator has a license, permission or authorization for each stage. In Mexico, these licenses, permissions or authorizations are granted by the Energy Secretariat with base in the verdict of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The operation licenses ar the moment effective for the reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) they will expire respectively in the year 2020 and 2025 for the Unit 1 and Unit 2, for what the CNSNS has begun its preparation before a potential solicitude of the licensee to continue the operation of the NPP-L V. Defining the process to continue and to generate the documents that would help in this phase as normalization, guides, procedures, regulations, controls, etc., is the task that intends to be carried out the regulator body so that the evaluation process is effective and efficient, so much for the same regulator body as for the licensee. This work exposes the advance that the CNSNS has in this aspect and is centered specifically in the conformation of an evaluation process of license renovation solicitude, taking as base what the regulator body of the United States of North America (US NRC) established and following to the IAEA. Also, this work includes statistical of electric power production in Mexico, licensing antecedents for the NPP-L V, a world perspective of the license renovations and the regulation of the US NRC related to the license renovation of a NPP. (Author)

  14. A literature review of coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes pertinent to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manteufel, R.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Turner, D.R.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    A literature review has been conducted to determine the state of knowledge available in the modeling of coupled thermal (T), hydrologic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes relevant to the design and/or performance of the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The review focuses on identifying coupling mechanisms between individual processes and assessing their importance (i.e., if the coupling is either important, potentially important, or negligible). The significance of considering THMC-coupled processes lies in whether or not the processes impact the design and/or performance objectives of the repository. A review, such as reported here, is useful in identifying which coupled effects will be important, hence which coupled effects will need to be investigated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to assess the assumptions, data, analyses, and conclusions in the design and performance assessment of a geologic reposit''. Although this work stems from regulatory interest in the design of the geologic repository, it should be emphasized that the repository design implicitly considers all of the repository performance objectives, including those associated with the time after permanent closure. The scope of this review is considered beyond previous assessments in that it attempts with the current state-of-knowledge) to determine which couplings are important, and identify which computer codes are currently available to model coupled processes

  15. A literature review of coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes pertinent to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manteufel, R.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Turner, D.R.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1993-07-01

    A literature review has been conducted to determine the state of knowledge available in the modeling of coupled thermal (T), hydrologic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes relevant to the design and/or performance of the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The review focuses on identifying coupling mechanisms between individual processes and assessing their importance (i.e., if the coupling is either important, potentially important, or negligible). The significance of considering THMC-coupled processes lies in whether or not the processes impact the design and/or performance objectives of the repository. A review, such as reported here, is useful in identifying which coupled effects will be important, hence which coupled effects will need to be investigated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in order to assess the assumptions, data, analyses, and conclusions in the design and performance assessment of a geologic reposit``. Although this work stems from regulatory interest in the design of the geologic repository, it should be emphasized that the repository design implicitly considers all of the repository performance objectives, including those associated with the time after permanent closure. The scope of this review is considered beyond previous assessments in that it attempts with the current state-of-knowledge) to determine which couplings are important, and identify which computer codes are currently available to model coupled processes.

  16. Repositories; Repositorios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Carolina Braccini; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: cbf@cdtn.br; tellocc@cdtn.br

    2007-11-15

    The use of the nuclear energy is increasing in all areas. Then the radioactive waste management is in continuous development to comply the national and international established requirements. The final objective is to assure that it will not have any contamination of the public or the environmental, and that the exposition doses will be lower than the radiological protection limits. The multi barrier concept for the repository is internationally recognized. Among the repository types, the most used are: near surface, geological formations and of deposition in rock cavities. This article explains the concept and the types of repository and gives some examples of them. (author)

  17. Building the safety case for a hypothetical underground repository in crystalline rock. Final report. Vol. 2. Safety file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Engelmann, H.J.; Jobmann, M.; Lommerzheim, A.; Popp, W.; Frentz, R.R. v.; Wahl, A.

    1996-10-01

    The study was intended as a desk simulation of the process of preparing a licensing application for a deep repository for spent fuel and high level waste in crystalline rock. After clarifying of organizational aspects of table of contents specifying all aspects in a safety life for license application were considered. The volume II is subdivided in two parts. Part A describes the general information, waste description, site characteristics, disposal facility design, reporitory construction and operation, quality assurance, operational safety, repository closure, organization and financial aspects, and long-term safety assessment. Part B deals with the impact of retrievability. (DG)

  18. Regulator process for the authorization of an amendment to the operation license of a nuclear power plant in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, R.; Espinosa V, J.M.; Salgado, J.R.; Mamani, Y.R.

    2005-01-01

    The regulator process by which an authorization is granted from an amendment to the License of Operation of a nuclear power station in Mexico is described. It makes an appointment the effective legal mark, the technical characteristics of the modification, the evaluation process and deposition upon oath of tests and finally the elaboration of the Safety report and the Technical Verdict that is a correspondent for the regulator organism to the Secretary of Energy, the one that in turn is the responsible of granting the amendment the License just as it establishes it the Law. (Author)

  19. Process of licensing nuclear facilities (resume from the Spanish National Report for the Joint Convention, 2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, N.

    2007-01-01

    The process of licensing both nuclear and radioactive facilities is governed by the Regulation on Nuclear and Radioactive Facilities (Span. Reglamento de Instalaciones Nucleares y Radiactivas, RINR), approved by Royal Decree 1836/1999, of 3 December. According to the RINR, these authorizations are granted by the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (Span. Ministerio de Industria, Turismo y Comercio, MITYC), to which the corresponding requests should be addressed, along with the documentation required in each case, The MITYC sends a copy of each request and accompanying documentation to the Nuclear Safety Council (Span. Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, CSN) for its mandatory report.) The CSN reports are mandatory and binding, both were negative or withholding in nature with respect to the request and, when positive, as regards the conditions established. On receiving the report from the CSN, and following whatever decisions or further reports might be required in each case, the MITYC will adopt the appropriate resolution. System for the licensing of nuclear facilities. According to the definitions included in the RINR, the following are nuclear facilities: - Nuclear power plants. - Nuclear reactors. - Manufacturing facilities using nuclear fuels to produce nuclear substances and those at which nuclear substances are treated. - Facilities for the permanent storage of nuclear substances. In compliance with the RINR, the nuclear facilities require different permits or administrative authorizations for their operation, these being the preliminary or site authorization, the construction permit, the operating permit, the authorization for modification and the dismantling permit. The procedure for the awarding of each of these authorizations is regulated by the Regulation itself and is briefly described below. (author)

  20. License Application Design Selection Report, REV 01. August 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    In December 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the ''Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain'' (DOE 1998b). The Viability Assessment described a preliminary design of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, and assessed the probable behavior of that repository design in the Yucca Mountain geologic setting. The report concluded that 'Yucca Mountain remains a promising site for a geologic repository and that work should proceed to support a decision in 2001 on whether to recommend the site to the President for development as a repository'. It also concluded that 'uncertainties remain about key natural processes, the preliminary design, and how the site and design would interact'. Recognizing that the design that was evaluated will be refined before a license application could be submitted, the Viability Aassesment notes that 'DOE is evaluating several design options and alternatives that could reduce existing uncertainty and improve the performance of the repository system'. During the preparation of the Viability Assessment, DOE asked the contractor for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program to study alternative design concepts for a potential geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The License Application Design Selection (LADS) project was initiated to conduct that study. The goal of the project was to develop and evaluate a diverse range of conceptual repository designs that work well in concert with the Yucca Mountain site and to recommend an initial design concept for the possible Site Recommendation and License Apllication. This report presents the results of the LADS project. The design process consisted of two phases. In Phase I, a series of basic design concepts (design alternatives) and components (design features) were analyzed for their potential value as elements of a repository design. In Phase II

  1. Biogeochemical processes in a clay formation in situ experiment: Part G - Key interpretations and conclusions. Implications for repository safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P., E-mail: paul.wersin@gruner.ch [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)] [Gruner Ltd., Gellertstrasse 55, 4020 Basel (Switzerland); Stroes-Gascoyne, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada R0E 1L0 (Canada); Pearson, F.J. [Ground-Water Geochemistry, 5108 Trent Woods Drive, New Bern, NC 28562 (United States); Tournassat, C. [BRGM, French Geological Survey, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, B.P. 36009, 45060 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Leupin, O.X.; Schwyn, B. [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > From the results of the PC experiment it can be inferred that degradation of organic compounds may induce. > Changes in pH and Eh which may affect the mobility of radionuclides eventually released from the waste. > Such changes will be limited in space and time because of large buffering capacity and low permeability of clay. > Nevertheless, amount of organic material in high level waste repositories should be kept small. > This will ensure achievement of background concentrations within short time period after repository closure. - Abstract: The in situ porewater chemistry (PC) experiment carried out in the Opalinus Clay formation at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Switzerland for a period of 5 a allowed the identification and quantification of the biogeochemical processes resulting from and affected by an anaerobic microbial disturbance. The unintentional release of degradable organic compounds (mainly glycerol) induced microbially-mediated SO{sub 4} reduction in the borehole with concomitant significant geochemical changes in the circulating water and the adjacent porewater. These changes included a decrease in SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentration and pH and an increase in pCO{sub 2} and alkalinity relative to the non-affected formation water. However, the cation composition of the water and the mineralogy of the clay close to the borehole wall showed very little change. This is explained by (1) the strong chemical buffering processes in the clay and (2) by the diffusion-limited flux of solutes. With the aid of a reactive transport model with a minimum set of kinetic parameters for the hypothesised degradation reactions, the evolution of solutes in the borehole could be modelled adequately. The model was also applied to the prediction of restoration times upon depletion of the C source and results indicated restoration times to undisturbed conditions of about 15 a, but also highlighted the rather large uncertainties inherent in the geochemical model

  2. An open data repository and a data processing software toolset of an equivalent Nordic grid model matched to historical electricity market data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfretti, Luigi; Olsen, Svein H; Arava, V S Narasimham; Laera, Giuseppe; Bidadfar, Ali; Rabuzin, Tin; Jakobsen, Sigurd H; Lavenius, Jan; Baudette, Maxime; Gómez-López, Francisco J

    2017-04-01

    This article presents an open data repository, the methodology to generate it and the associated data processing software developed to consolidate an hourly snapshot historical data set for the year 2015 to an equivalent Nordic power grid model (aka Nordic 44), the consolidation was achieved by matching the model׳s physical response w.r.t historical power flow records in the bidding regions of the Nordic grid that are available from the Nordic electricity market agent, Nord Pool. The model is made available in the form of CIM v14, Modelica and PSS/E (Siemens PTI) files. The Nordic 44 model in Modelica and PSS/E were first presented in the paper titled "iTesla Power Systems Library (iPSL): A Modelica library for phasor time-domain simulations" (Vanfretti et al., 2016) [1] for a single snapshot. In the digital repository being made available with the submission of this paper (SmarTSLab_Nordic44 Repository at Github, 2016) [2], a total of 8760 snapshots (for the year 2015) that can be used to initialize and execute dynamic simulations using tools compatible with CIM v14, the Modelica language and the proprietary PSS/E tool are provided. The Python scripts to generate the snapshots (processed data) are also available with all the data in the GitHub repository (SmarTSLab_Nordic44 Repository at Github, 2016) [2]. This Nordic 44 equivalent model was also used in iTesla project (iTesla) [3] to carry out simulations within a dynamic security assessment toolset (iTesla, 2016) [4], and has been further enhanced during the ITEA3 OpenCPS project (iTEA3) [5]. The raw, processed data and output models utilized within the iTesla platform (iTesla, 2016) [4] are also available in the repository. The CIM and Modelica snapshots of the "Nordic 44" model for the year 2015 are available in a Zenodo repository.

  3. Flexible licensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Jansen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The case is presented for a more flexible approach to licensing online library resources. Today's distributed education environment creates pressure for UK higher and further education institutions (HEI/FEIs to form partnerships and to develop educational products and roll them out across the globe. Online library resources are a key component of distributed education and yet existing licensing agreements struggle to keep pace with the increasing range of users and purposes for which they are required. This article describes the process of developing a flexible approach to licensing and proposes a new model licence for online library resources which has the adaptability needed in this new global educational landscape. These ideas have been presented and discussed at various workshops across Eduserv's and JISC Collections' higher education and publisher communities, and further consultation is ongoing.

  4. Thermo-Hydro Mechanical Characteristics and Processes in the Clay Barrier of a High Level Radioactive Waste Repository. State of the Art Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.

    2004-07-01

    This document is a summary of the available information on the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of the bentonite barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository and of the processes taking place in it during the successive repository operation phases. Mainly the thermal properties, the volume change processes (swelling and consolidation), the permeability and the water retention capacity are analysed. A review is made of the existing experimental knowledge on the modification of the these properties by the effect of temperature, water salinity, humidity and density of the bentonite, and their foreseen evolution as a consequence of the processes expected in the repository. The compiled evolution refers mostly to the FEBEX (Spain), the MX-80 (US) and the FoCa (France) bentonite, considered as reference barrier materials in several European disposal concepts. (Author) 102 refs.

  5. Thermo-Hydro Mechanical Characteristics and Processes in the Clay Barrier of a High Level Radioactive Waste Repository. State of the Art Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, M. V.

    2004-01-01

    This document is a summary of the available information on the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of the bentonite barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository and of the processes taking place in it during the successive repository operation phases. Mainly the thermal properties, the volume change processes (swelling and consolidation), the permeability and the water retention capacity are analysed. A review is made of the existing experimental knowledge on the modification of the these properties by the effect of temperature, water salinity, humidity and density of the bentonite, and their foreseen evolution as a consequence of the processes expected in the repository. The compiled evolution refers mostly to the FEBEX (Spain), the MX-80 (USA) and the FoCa (France) bentonite, considered as reference barrier materials in several European disposal concepts. (Author) 102 refs

  6. Project SAFE. Modelling of long-term concrete degradation processes in the Swedish SFR repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeglund, L.O. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-04-01

    This study concerns the leaching of concrete barriers, in particular the silo construction, in the Swedish SFR repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. A conceptual model for the leaching of concrete in a saline groundwater has been proposed based on the increased understanding achieved from research studies presented in the literature. The conceptual model has been used to set up a numerical model for the complex chemical interactions between the cement minerals of the concrete with the groundwater. The calculations show that various chemical reactions are expected to occur in the concrete over time. Different cases have been calculated. The results show that the chemical conditions in the concrete barriers will maintain alkaline for long time. In the most exposed parts of the concrete a high degree of leaching can be expected during the considered 10,000 years, whereas only for the most unfavourable assumptions (initially fractured concrete with groundwater flow-through) the inner parts of the concrete will be degraded to any significant degree.

  7. Project SAFE. Modelling of long-term concrete degradation processes in the Swedish SFR repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeglund, L.O.

    2001-04-01

    This study concerns the leaching of concrete barriers, in particular the silo construction, in the Swedish SFR repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. A conceptual model for the leaching of concrete in a saline groundwater has been proposed based on the increased understanding achieved from research studies presented in the literature. The conceptual model has been used to set up a numerical model for the complex chemical interactions between the cement minerals of the concrete with the groundwater. The calculations show that various chemical reactions are expected to occur in the concrete over time. Different cases have been calculated. The results show that the chemical conditions in the concrete barriers will maintain alkaline for long time. In the most exposed parts of the concrete a high degree of leaching can be expected during the considered 10,000 years, whereas only for the most unfavourable assumptions (initially fractured concrete with groundwater flow-through) the inner parts of the concrete will be degraded to any significant degree

  8. The activities of the Technical Independent Supervision Organization (OSTI) on the licensing process of the nucleoelectric installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The basic responsibility for licensing nuclear facilities belongs to the government to urban is up to take care of the safety and public health as well as for the installations environment impact. In practicing such responsibility the government should be assured that the operational safety and nucleoelectric installation construction has to be subjected to checks and controls by an independent organism apart from the owners organization responsible for the construction and operation. This paper presents the main activities of the technical independent supervision organization in conformity with the regulations for the licensing process of nuclear facilities as one of the safety principles adopted for Angra 2 nuclear power plant. (B.C.A.)

  9. 78 FR 62322 - Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013; Notice of Rescheduled Two-Year Licensing Process...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD13-9-000] Hydropower... recommendations on the feasibility of a two-year process for the issuance of a license for hydropower development... Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013. The workshop will be held in the Commission Meeting Room at 888...

  10. INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY: EMPLOYMENT IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl P. Oleksyuk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article investigated the concept of «institutional repository» and determined the aspects of institutional repositories in higher education. Institutional Repositories are information systems that allow preserving, storing and disseminating scientific knowledge produced in higher education and scientific research institutions. This study presented the main aspects using institutional repositories in educational process (such as storage of scientific and educational information, means of organization activity of students, object of studying. This article produced the structure of communities and collections of the institutional. It is described the experience of implementing of DSpace in the learning process.

  11. Medical review practices for driver licensing volume 3: guidelines and processes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    This is the third of three reports examining driver medical review practices in the United States and how : they fulfill the basic functions of identifying, assessing, and rendering licensing decisions on medically or : functionally at-risk drivers. ...

  12. Reformed and reforming: Adapting the licensing process to meet new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Stephen G.

    2017-01-01

    The NRC has engaged in a steady, albeit modest, examination of its preparedness for advanced designs over the past few years. These efforts have included examination of its own guidance and processes as well as co-operation with the US Department of Energy (US DOE) in identifying key issues and potential strategies. But the NRC is constrained in some respects from devoting substantial resources to the development of new or revised regulatory approaches due to statutory requirements that the NRC recover most of its appropriated funds through user fees imposed on the industry. Unless designers are prepared to put up the funds necessary to cover the fees for review of the new designs, the NRC is not able to review them, and licensees of operating facilities paying annual fees may not all be supportive of the NRC expending resources to develop infrastructure for the review of advanced reactor designs. Given the current context, this article will attempt to reflect on the NRC's current framework for licensing, the lessons from NRC's regulations in 10 CFR Part 52 and strategies for adapting to the new demands that may be made on the agency

  13. Repository design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C M

    1982-01-01

    Various technical issues of radioactive waste design are addressed in this paper. Two approaches to repository design considered herein are: (1) design to minimize the disturbance of the hot rock; and (2) designs that intentionally modify the hot rock to insure better containment of the wastes. The latter designs range from construction of a highly impermeable barrier around a spherical cavern to creating a matrix of tunnels and boreholes to form a cage within which the hydraulic pressure is nearly constant. Examples of these design alternatives are described in some detail. It is concluded that proposed designs for repositories illustrate that performance criteria considered acceptable for such facilities can be met by appropriate site selection and repository engineering. With these technically feasible design concepts, it is also felt that socioeconomic and institutional issues can be better resolved. (BLM)

  14. Conformation of an evaluation process for a license renovation solicitude of a nuclear power plant in Mexico. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano R, M. de L.

    2013-10-01

    At the present time the operation licenses in force for the reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) will expire in the year 2020 and 2025 for the Unit-1 and Unit-2, respectively, for which the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) has begun its preparation to assist a solicitude of the licensee to continue the operation of the NPP-L V. The present work has the purpose of defining the steps to continue and to generate the documents that would help in this process, as the normative, guides, procedures, regulations, controls, etc. so that the evaluation process will be effective and efficient, as much for the regulator organ as for the licensee. The advance carried out in the continuation of the conformation of an evaluation process of license renovation solicitude is also exposed, taking like base the requirements established by the CNSNS, the regulator organ of the United States (US NRC), and the IAEA for license renovation solicitude of this type. A summary of the licenses granted from the beginning of commercial operation of the NPP-L V is included, both units and the amendments to these licenses, explaining the reason of the amendment shortly and in the dates they were granted. A brief exposition of the nuclear power plants to world level that have received extension of its operation is included. The normative that can be applied in a life extension evaluation is presented, the evaluation process to continue with the guides of the US NRC, the reach of the evaluation and the minimum information required to the licensee that should accompany to their solicitude. (author)

  15. Status of the implementation of Brazilian National Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, the use of nuclear energy and radioisotopes is increasing and it already justifies the construction of a national repository for radioactive wastes of low and intermediate-level. The Brazilian National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN) is legally responsible for designing and constructing intermediate and final storages for radioactive wastes generated in all Country, in accordance to Federal Law No. 10308. Additionally, the Brazilian Environmental Regulator (IBAMA) lately is imposing to the implementation of new nuclear installations (e.g. Angra 3 NPP and Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) that the National Repository should be in construction, before the start-up of those ones. In November 2009, the RBMN Project Charter was signed. The RBMN Project aims at the implantation of a National Repository to dispose the radioactive wastes of low- and intermediate-level. Some aspects about the Repository construction are very challenging, mainly due to the licensing process, which will be made for two different regulatory bodies, nuclear and environmental. The main achievements obtained till now are the establishment of the current Brazilian radioactive waste inventory, the conceptual design and the selection of candidate sites for the repository. The current status of the Project is summarized. (author)

  16. Towards Interoperable Preservation Repositories: TIPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Caplan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Towards Interoperable Preservation Repositories (TIPR is a project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to create and test a Repository eXchange Package (RXP. The package will make it possible to transfer complex digital objects between dissimilar preservation repositories.  For reasons of redundancy, succession planning and software migration, repositories must be able to exchange copies of archival information packages with each other. Every different repository application, however, describes and structures its archival packages differently. Therefore each system produces dissemination packages that are rarely understandable or usable as submission packages by other repositories. The RXP is an answer to that mismatch. Other solutions for transferring packages between repositories focus either on transfers between repositories of the same type, such as DSpace-to-DSpace transfers, or on processes that rely on central translation services.  Rather than build translators between many dissimilar repository types, the TIPR project has defined a standards-based package of metadata files that can act as an intermediary information package, the RXP, a lingua franca all repositories can read and write.

  17. Preliminary estimate of the costs involved in the implantation of a low and medium level radioactive waste repository in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branco, Otavio E.A.; Carvalho Filho, Carlos A.; Ferreira, Vinicius V.M.; Alves, Paulo R.R.

    2009-01-01

    One relevant subject in the decision making process linked to the implantation of a low and intermediate level waste (LILW) repository in Brazil is regarding to the project expected costs. It is important to estimate in a solid way the total and partial costs expected, considering each one of the enterprise implantation phases. This work shows an initial estimative of these costs, based on reports and papers that evaluate the implantation, operation, closure and post closure costs of radioactive LILW waste repositories. In the development of this research only the costs regarding to near surface repositories, or similar ones, were considered. The total cost was estimated as approximately 115 million dollars, considering the whole project lifetime as 300 years. Considering the repository start-up costs (site selection, licensing, project and construction), the total value is estimated as 48 million dollars (1600 dollars/m 3 ). It is important to emphasize that some cares should be taken when costs obtained from the acquired experience by another countries in the repositories development are analyzed. As example, the costs for disposal 1 m 3 of low and medium level radioactive waste vary significantly from one country to another, even when repositories with similar projects are compared. Also the total costs of construction and licensing are significantly higher when compared those ones from 'conventional' facilities with similar technological characteristics. Finally, although about a dozen low and medium level radioactive waste repository are operating in Europe, new projects should be faced, as the international practice demonstrate, as original developments. (author)

  18. An open data repository and a data processing software toolset of an equivalent Nordic grid model matched to historical electricity market data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Vanfretti

    2017-04-01

    This Nordic 44 equivalent model was also used in iTesla project (iTesla [3] to carry out simulations within a dynamic security assessment toolset (iTesla, 2016 [4], and has been further enhanced during the ITEA3 OpenCPS project (iTEA3 [5]. The raw, processed data and output models utilized within the iTesla platform (iTesla, 2016 [4] are also available in the repository. The CIM and Modelica snapshots of the “Nordic 44” model for the year 2015 are available in a Zenodo repository.

  19. Nuclide Release Behavior from a Repository for a Pyro-process HLW and SF due to Variation of the MWCF Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    An assessment program for an optional evaluation of a repository both for disposal of such high-level wastes (HLWs) from various steps of pyro-processes of PWR spent nuclear fuel (SF) and for direct disposal of PWR and CANDU SFs has been developed by utilizing general purpose GoldSim developing tool, by which nuclide transports in the near- and far-field of a repository as well as a transport through a biosphere under various natural and manmade disruptive events affecting a nuclide release could be modeled and evaluated. KAERI has been in charge of modeling and developing assessment tools by which the above mentioned repository system could be assessed in accordance with various features, events, and processes (FEPs) that could happen in and around the repository system. To cope with such various natural and manmade disruptive FEPs as well as normal release scenarios, all the possible cases in view of the Korean circumstances should be modeled and have been evaluated even though we have not yet have any repository. A possible case, among many others, with the variation of such physical properties as the fracture width and the rock matrix diffusion depth, associated with the natural fractures in the geological rock media, along which nuclide could be transported preferentially with the flow of groundwater is considered in the current study. Due to whatever the reason, such as e,g., the earthquake or human intrusion, it is assumed that the physical properties of the major water conducting fault (MWCF) is changed resulting in the size of fracture width and the matrix diffusion depth. For such case another illustration is made for probabilistic evaluation of a hypothetical Korean HLW repository, as similarly done in the previous studies

  20. Trust in Digital Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Yakel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ISO 16363:2012, Space Data and Information Transfer Systems - Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories (ISO TRAC, outlines actions a repository can take to be considered trustworthy, but research examining whether the repository’s designated community of users associates such actions with trustworthiness has been limited. Drawing from this ISO document and the management and information systems literatures, this paper discusses findings from interviews with 66 archaeologists and quantitative social scientists. We found similarities and differences across the disciplines and among the social scientists. Both disciplinary communities associated trust with a repository’s transparency. However, archaeologists mentioned guarantees of preservation and sustainability more frequently than the social scientists, who talked about institutional reputation. Repository processes were also linked to trust, with archaeologists more frequently citing metadata issues and social scientists discussing data selection and cleaning processes. Among the social scientists, novices mentioned the influence of colleagues on their trust in repositories almost twice as much as the experts. We discuss the implications our findings have for identifying trustworthy repositories and how they extend the models presented in the management and information systems literatures.

  1. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Metcalfe, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Murakami, Y.; Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T.; Hayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure

  2. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, H. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: dora@num.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Metcalfe, R. [Quintessa Japan, Queen' s Tower A7-707, Minatomirai, Yokohama 220-6007 (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Murakami, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tono Geoscience Centre (Japan); Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T. [Hiroshima University, Higashi Hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-4-4 (Japan); Hayashi, T. [Asahi University, Department of Dental Pharmacology, Hozumi, Gifu (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure.

  3. Coupled processes affecting the performance of a nuclear waste repository. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.

    1985-09-01

    Contributed papers were in the following subject areas: geochemistry, geohydrology, and geomechanics. In addition to the contributed papers, current field projects were reviewed. Individual papers were processed separately. (LM)

  4. Safety analysis in subsurface repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The development of mathematical models to represent the repository-geosphere-biosphere system, and the development of a structure for data acquisition, processing, and use to analyse the safety of subsurface repositories, are presented. To study the behavior of radionuclides in geosphere a laboratory to determine the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient was constructed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Harmonisation of licensing processes for decommissioning. Options and limitations; Genehmigungsverfahren fuer die Stilllegung der deutschen Kernkraftwerke. Konvoi oder Kakophonie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetzke, Christian

    2016-03-15

    The shutdown of eight reactors in Germany in the wake of Fukushima 2011 and the scheduled phase-out of the remaining units in several steps ending 2022 has obviously triggered a wave of applications for decommissioning and dismantling licences. It would seem natural to strive for a harmonised handling of these processes, analogous to the 'convoi' concept which was successfully employed for licensing and construction of the three most recent German NPPs in the 1980s. However, a comparative analysis shows that the motivation of all players is much different from that of earlier times and that harmonisation of licensing processes for dismantling is not as crucial for operators, authorities and technical support organisations as it was for construction.

  6. Repository waste-handling operations, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottam, A.E.; Connell, L.

    1986-04-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Mission Plan and the Generic Requirements for a Mined Geologic Disposal System state that beginning in 1998, commercial spent fuel not exceeding 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal, or a quantity of solidified high-level radioactive waste resulting from the reprocessing of such a quantity of spent fuel, will be shipped to a deep geologic repository for permanent storage. The development of a waste-handling system that can process 3000 metric tons of heavy metal annually will require the adoption of a fully automated approach. The safety and minimum exposure of personnel will be the prime goals of the repository waste handling system. A man-out-of-the-loop approach will be used in all operations including the receipt of spent fuel in shipping casks, the inspection and unloading of the spent fuel into automated hot-cell facilities, the disassembly of spent fuel assemblies, the consolidation of fuel rods, and the packaging of fuel rods into heavy-walled site-specific containers. These containers are designed to contain the radionuclides for up to 1000 years. The ability of a repository to handle more than 6000 pressurized water reactor spent-fuel rods per day on a production basis for approximately a 23-year period will require that a systems approach be adopted that combines space-age technology, robotics, and sophisticated automated computerized equipment. New advanced inspection techniques, maintenance by robots, and safety will be key factors in the design, construction, and licensing of a repository waste-handling facility for 1998

  7. NUPLEX Licensing Subcommittee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.W.; Allen, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The NUPLEX Licensing Subcommittee was organized to seek a formal license renewal mechanism that institutionalizes the current licensing basis and consequent level of safety of a plant as the legitimate standard for acceptance and approval of an application for extended operation. Along with defining the most workable approach to and scope of review for license renewal, this paper explains the reasons why a regulatory framework is needed by the early 1990s. The initial results of development work on two key issues, licensing criteria and hearing process, are also presented. at this point six potential license renewal criteria have emerged: evaluation of existing monitoring/maintenance programs, revalidation of current licensing basis, conformance to special regulations, evaluation to a safety goal, plant performance history, and environmental assessment. The work on a hearing process has led to the development of two models for future consideration: hybrid legislative and hybrid adjudicatory

  8. 76 FR 13973 - United States Warehouse Act; Processed Agricultural Products Licensing Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... security of goods in the care and custody of the licensee. The personnel conducting the examinations will..., Warehouse Operations Program Manager, FSA, United States Department of Agriculture, Mail Stop 0553, 1400... continuing compliance with the standards of approval and operation. FSA will conduct examinations of licensed...

  9. Discovering Software License Constraints : Identifying a Binary’s Sources by Tracing Build Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Burg, S.; Davies, J.; Dolstra, E.; German, D.M.; Hemel, A.

    2012-01-01

    With the current proliferation of open source software components, intellectual property in general, and copyright law in particular, has become a critical non-functional requirement for software systems. A key problem in license compliance engineering is that the legal constraints on a product

  10. Sellafield repository design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Between 1989 and 1997, UK Nirex Ltd carried out a programme of investigations to evaluate the potential of a site adjacent to the BNFL Sellafield works to host a deep repository for the United Kingdom's intermediate-level and certain low-level radioactive waste. The programme of investigations was wound down following the decision in March 1997 to uphold the rejection of the Company's planning application for the Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF), an underground laboratory which would have allowed further investigations to confirm whether or not the site would be suitable. Since that time, the Company's efforts in relation to the Sellafield site have been directed towards documenting and publishing the work carried out. The design concept for a repository at Sellafield was developed in parallel with the site investigations through an iterative process as knowledge of the site and understanding of the repository system performance increased. This report documents the Sellafield repository design concept as it had been developed, from initial design considerations in 1991 up to the point when the RCF planning application was rejected. It shows, from the context of a project at that particular site, how much information and experience has been gained that will be applicable to the development of a deep waste repository at other potential sites

  11. Technical and logistic provisions for the delivery of radioactive wastes in the final repository Konrad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppinghaus, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The beginning of radioactive waste delivery to the final repository Konrad is planned for 2019. The main issue for the technical and logistic provisions is the development of a concept for the transport of the licensed radioactive waste containers to the site, including a turning concept for cylindrical waste forms and planning, construction and manufacture of transport equipment. Further issues include a logistic concept considering specific boundary conditions as administrative processes, priorities, special features of the delivering institutions and technical requirements of the repository.

  12. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes

  13. Microbial degradation processes in radioactive waste repository and in nuclear fuel storage areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D.; Gazso, L.G.

    1997-01-01

    The intent of the workshop organizers was to convene experts in the fields of corrosion and spent nuclear fuels. The major points which evolved from the interaction of microbiologists, material scientists, and fuel storage experts are as follows: Corrosion of basin components as well as fuel containers or cladding is occurring; Water chemistry monitoring, if done in the storage facility does not take into account the microbial component; Microbial influenced corrosion is an area that many have not considered to be an important contributor in the aging of metallurgical materials especially those exposed to a radiation field; Many observations indicate that there is a microbial or biological presence in the storage facilities but these observations have not been correlated with any deterioration or aging phenomena taking place in the storage facility; The sessions on the fundamentals of microbial influenced corrosion and biofilm pointed out that these phenomena are real, occurring on similar materials in other industries and probably are occurring in the wet storage of spent fuel; All agreed that more monitoring, testing, and education in the field of biological mediate processes be performed and financially supported; Loosing the integrity of fuel assemblies can only cause problems, relating to the future disposition of the fuel, safety concerns, and environmental issues; In other rad waste scenarios, biological processes may be playing a role, for instance in the mobility of radionuclides in soil, decomposition of organic materials of the rad waste, gas production, etc. The fundamental scientific presentations discussed the full gamut of microbial processes that relate to biological mediated effects on metallic and non-metallic materials used in the storage and containment of radioactive materials

  14. The status of radioactive waste repository development in the United States - December 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The current state of affairs concerning development in the United States of a permanent repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is, in a word, uncertain. The President of the United States has asserted that he believes licensing and development of the Yucca Mountain repository should be abandoned, while other important parties believe licensing and development should continue. And not surprisingly, there is a disagreement as to what the law requires and whether the licensing process for the Yucca Mountain repository can be terminated at this point, even if the President would like for that to happen. The future of Yucca Mountain, and the future of radioactive waste disposal in the United States generally, currently are pending before the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and eventually the Supreme Court of the United States may decide some of the important legal issues concerning Yucca Mountain's future. The November 2012 US elections also likely will have a significant impact on future radioactive waste repository development

  15. Development of radioactive waste management licensing review assistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei-Whua Loa; Suan Chen; Wei-Chu Yu

    1992-01-01

    Regulations on radioactive waste disposal are now in urgent need due to our increasing consumption of electric power from nuclear origin. It is set forth that actually applying the regulations to evaluate the license application of new repositories for interim storage and final disposal of High-Level Waste and Low-Level Waste before the year of 2000. In the mean time, it is expected to establish the basis for the decision on issuing the license. The license review procedure can be very complicated, because too many factors must be taken into consideration. For the time being, licensing review is as much an art as it is a science. The authority usually faces three major problems; (1) the availability of domain expert, (2) maintaining of high quality and consistent reviews, and (3) the documentation of the review process. However, to maintain a more efficient, accurate, and systematic review procedure, and at the same time to reduce costs, the Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques may be used. An expert system is designed as a radioactive waste management licensing review aid for the staff those are in charge of the license application. Tasks such as completeness checking, functional areas of review distribution, participation confirmation, knowledge acquisition, review comment collection, weighting calculation, and degree of satisfaction are considered. In this paper we will discuss the development of the radioactive waste management licensing review assistant

  16. Evaluating the Long-Term Safety of a Repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luik, Abe Van

    2002-01-01

    Regulations require that the repository be evaluated for its health and safety effects for 10,000 years for the Site Recommendation process. Regulations also require potential impacts to be evaluated for up to a million years in an Environmental Impact Statement. The Yucca Mountain Project is in the midst of the Site Recommendation process. The Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) that supports the Site Recommendation evaluated safety for these required periods of time. Results showed it likely that a repository at this site could meet the licensing requirements promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The TSPA is the tool that integrates the results of many years of scientific investigations with design information to allow evaluations of potential far-future impacts of building a Yucca Mountain repository. Knowledge created in several branches of physics is part of the scientific basis of the TSPA that supports the Site Recommendation process.

  17. Geoprospective study of a nuclear waste repository. Process of erosion and denudation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laville, P.; Lajoinie, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Within the frame of a contract with the CEC dealing with storage and disposal of radioactive wastes in geological formations, the B.R.G.M. has been involved in a research on process of erosion and denudation. The study is based on a literature survey. It shows that the amplitude of relief is the dominant factor to be considered for ranking erosion rates. Extreme figures of 50 and 500mm per 1,000 years are therefore proposed as mean values of erosion rates, respectively for plains-hills and mountains, for indurated rocks and for non-periglacial climates. Coefficients must correct these values when dealing with softer rocks or periglacial climates. All these factors are liable to change as functions of the surface areas of the morphological units considered

  18. Congressional-executive interaction and the nuclear waste repository site selection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurber, J.A.; Evanson, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) (P.L. 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (NWPAA) (Title V of P.L. 100-203) provide the framework for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to find a permanent means for disposing of high-level nuclear waste in the US. The focus of this study is the congressional decision-making process associated with passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The passage of NWPAA was a direct result of the failure of the policy adopted in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. This study analyzes the nature of congressional nuclear waste policy-making through the lens of subsystems theory. The data analysis is primarily based on confidential interviews with over fifty key actors in the nuclear waste policy subsystem as well as an analysis of primary source documents

  19. Quality assurance records system for research and development activities in support of geologic repository programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.W.; Ryder, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Department of Energy, is conducting site-specific research for all three candidate sites for the first geologic high-level waste repository, as well as generic research for the second repository. In conjunction with this effort, PNL has developed a quality assurance (QA) program that is applicable to all organizations that are performing research and development (R and D) activities in support of the repository programs. This QA program meets the basic and supplemental requirements of ANSI/ASME NQA-1-1983 and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Review Plan for QA Programs for Site Characterization of High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A key part of this program is the handling of QA records that may ultimately support the licensing process for the repository. This paper describes a QA records system that is flexible enough to accommodate several types of research, such as paper studies, test method development, site characterization studies, software development, and hardware design. In addition, the QA records system is acceptable to a variety of sponsors who have licensing concerns. The QA procedures and their relation to the requirements are described. Most important is the discussion on the approaches used to assure that the records are organized such that the user can readily recreate or defend data, conclusions, and recommendations resulting from the research

  20. BioModels Database: a repository of mathematical models of biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelliah, Vijayalakshmi; Laibe, Camille; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    BioModels Database is a public online resource that allows storing and sharing of published, peer-reviewed quantitative, dynamic models of biological processes. The model components and behaviour are thoroughly checked to correspond the original publication and manually curated to ensure reliability. Furthermore, the model elements are annotated with terms from controlled vocabularies as well as linked to relevant external data resources. This greatly helps in model interpretation and reuse. Models are stored in SBML format, accepted in SBML and CellML formats, and are available for download in various other common formats such as BioPAX, Octave, SciLab, VCML, XPP and PDF, in addition to SBML. The reaction network diagram of the models is also available in several formats. BioModels Database features a search engine, which provides simple and more advanced searches. Features such as online simulation and creation of smaller models (submodels) from the selected model elements of a larger one are provided. BioModels Database can be accessed both via a web interface and programmatically via web services. New models are available in BioModels Database at regular releases, about every 4 months.

  1. Licensing review process of the European Spallation Source (ESS) research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewitz, Erica

    2014-01-01

    On 3 January 2012 a license application under the Radiation Protection Act (SFS, 1988b) for the European Spallation Source research facility was submitted to the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority. The European Spallation Source research facility will be the site of a new and quite unusual kind of neutron source, based on a large proton accelerator that bombards a heavy material with protons. The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority is now reviewing the application. (authors)

  2. Public involvement in the siting of contentious facilities; Lessons from the radioactive waste repository siting programmes in Canada and the United States, with special reference to the Swedish repository siting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, P.J.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the conclusion of a two-part programme, begun in 1994 with the overall aim of assisting in the development of an acceptable public participation strategy for use in Sweden for the siting of contentious facilities, with particular reference to the ongoing siting programme for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The first part of the work programme, a global review of siting practice, was reported as SSI Rapport 94-15, in November 1994. This recommended further detailed studies of at least two individual programmes, which have now been carried out in Canada and the United States, and are reported on here. They involved face to face meetings with many of the main stake holders in the two programmes and enabled valuable insight to be gained into the potential problems associated with increased public participation, as well as identifying good practice where it exists. The lessons learned have then been applied to the evolving repository siting process in Sweden. 35 refs

  3. Public involvement in the siting of contentious facilities; Lessons from the radioactive waste repository siting programmes in Canada and the United States, with special reference to the Swedish repository siting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, P J [Geosciences for Development and the Environment (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the conclusion of a two-part programme, begun in 1994 with the overall aim of assisting in the development of an acceptable public participation strategy for use in Sweden for the siting of contentious facilities, with particular reference to the ongoing siting programme for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The first part of the work programme, a global review of siting practice, was reported as SSI Rapport 94-15, in November 1994. This recommended further detailed studies of at least two individual programmes, which have now been carried out in Canada and the United States, and are reported on here. They involved face to face meetings with many of the main stake holders in the two programmes and enabled valuable insight to be gained into the potential problems associated with increased public participation, as well as identifying good practice where it exists. The lessons learned have then been applied to the evolving repository siting process in Sweden. 35 refs.

  4. Staged Repository Development Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T

    2003-01-01

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to maximize the

  5. Regulatory systems-based licensing guidance documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delligatti, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed a series of licensing guidance documents based on the regulatory requirements in Part 60 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 60). This regulatory systems-based approach to licensing guidance documentation relies on the definition of the high-level waste repository in 10 CFR Part 60. A document which is important for the frame-work it gives to other programmatic licensing guidance is the Draft Regulatory Guide open-quotes Format and Content for the License Application for the High-Level Waste Repositoryclose quotes (FCRG). The FCRG describes a format and content acceptable to NRC for a high-level waste repository license application pursuant to the requirements of 10 CFR Part 60. Other licensing guidance documents will be compatible with the FCRG

  6. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the nearfield around a HLW repository in argillaceous formations. Vol. I. Laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Czaikowski, Oliver; Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2013-06-15

    All over the world, clay formations are being investigated as host medium for geologic disposal of radioactive waste because of their favourable properties, such as very low hydraulic conductivity against fluid transport, good sorption capacity for retardation of radionuclides, and high potential of self-sealing of fractures. The construction of a repository, the disposal of heat-emitting high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the backfilling and sealing of the remaining voids, however, will inevitably induce mechanical (M), hydraulic (H), thermal (T) and chemical (C) disturbances to the host formation and the engineered barrier system (EBS) over very long periods of time during the operation and post-closure phases of the repository. The responses and resulting property changes of the clay host rock and engineered barriers are to be well understood, characterized, and predicted for assessing the long-term performance and safety of the repository.

  7. Stability of underground openings in the Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blejwas, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    The licensing of a repository for high level radioactive waste will require assurances that underground openings do not experience frequent major instabilities, which are defined here as sudden movements of blocks of rock that limit the functions of the openings. Although the design of nuclear power plant structure is controlled by strict adherence to building or professional- engineering codes, this approach is not practical for the structural design of underground facilities because the design must accommodate a varied and partially defined geologic setting. However, regulations require the reduction of the potential for deleterious rock movement and the design of openings to maintain the option to retrieve waste. The present plans for meeting these requirements for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, include a program of state-of-the- art analyses and modified forms of existing empirically based design methods. An extensive experimental program is required to provide confidence in the results of the design- analysis process

  8. Canada's deep geological repository for used nuclear fuel - update on the site evaluation process and interweaving of aboriginal traditional knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, B.; Belfadhel, M.B.; Facella, J., E-mail: bwatt@nwmo.ca, E-mail: mbenbelfadhel@nwmo.ca, E-mail: jfacella@nwmo.ca [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository (DGR) in a suitable crystalline or sedimentary rock formation. In May 2010, the NWMO initiated a nine-step site selection process to seek an informed and willing community to host Canada's deep geological repository. As of April 2015, twenty-two communities expressed interest in learning more about the project. This paper provides an update on the site evaluation process and describes the approach, methods and criteria used in the assessments, focusing on geological and community well-being studies. Engagement and field activities to interweave Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge with western science are also discussed. (author)

  9. Effects of radiation on the chemical environment surrounding waste canisters in proposed repository sites and possible effects on the corrosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.S.

    1981-12-01

    This report explores the interaction of ionizing radiation with various environments. In particular, worst case (aqueous) environments for the proposed nuclear waste repository sites are considered. Emphasis is on the fundamental chemical and physical processes involved. The identities of possible radiolysis products (both transient and stable) have been sought through a literature search. The effect of radiation on corrosion processes is discussed. The radiation-induced chemical environment in the worst case repository sites is not well defined. Attention should therefore be given to fundamental studies exploring the interaction of such environments with components of the nuclear waste package, including the canister materials and backfills. Identification and quantification of radiolysis products would be helpful in this regard

  10. Discrete and continuum approaches for the analysis of coupled thermal-mechanical processes in the near field of a HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Tomoo; Nakama, Shigeo; Koyama, Tomofumi; Chijimatsu, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the numerical simulations for the analysis of coupled thermal-mechanical processes in the near field of a HLW repository using Finite Element Method (FEM) and Distinct Element Method (DEM). The FEM approach provides quantitative information of the change of stress during excavation and heating process. On the other hand, the DEM approach shows the crack propagation process at the borehole surface, and this result agrees qualitatively well with the experimental observation. By comparing these results obtained from both approaches, quantitative and qualitative insights into various aspects of the processes occurred in the near field can be obtained. (author)

  11. Dual process theory and intermediate effect: are faculty and residents' performance on multiple-choice, licensing exam questions different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting; Durning, Steven J; Artino, Anthony R; van der Vleuten, Cees; Holmboe, Eric; Lipner, Rebecca; Schuwirth, Lambert

    2015-04-01

    Clinical reasoning is essential for the practice of medicine. Dual process theory conceptualizes reasoning as falling into two general categories: nonanalytic reasoning (pattern recognition) and analytic reasoning (active comparing and contrasting of alternatives). The debate continues regarding how expert performance develops and how individuals make the best use of analytic and nonanalytic processes. Several investigators have identified the unexpected finding that intermediates tend to perform better on licensing examination items than experts, which has been termed the "intermediate effect." We explored differences between faculty and residents on multiple-choice questions (MCQs) using dual process measures (both reading and answering times) to inform this ongoing debate. Faculty (board-certified internists; experts) and residents (internal medicine interns; intermediates) answered live licensing examination MCQs (U.S. Medical Licensing Examination Step 2 Clinical Knowledge and American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination) while being timed. We conducted repeated analysis of variance to compare the 2 groups on average reading time, answering time, and accuracy on various types of items. Faculty and residents did not differ significantly in reading time [F (1,35) = 0.01, p = 0.93], answering time [F (1,35) = 0.60, p = 0.44], or accuracy [F (1,35) = 0.24, p = 0.63] regardless of easy or hard items. Dual process theory was not evidenced in this study. However, this lack of difference between faculty and residents may have been affected by the small sample size of participants and MCQs may not reflect how physicians made decisions in actual practice setting. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. Learning Object Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    This chapter looks at the development and nature of learning objects, meta-tagging standards and taxonomies, learning object repositories, learning object repository characteristics, and types of learning object repositories, with type examples. (Contains 1 table.)

  13. Licensing Support Network: An Electronic Discovery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, A. V.; Jensen, D.; McKinnon, B.

    2002-01-01

    The necessary authorization for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to submit a License Application (LA) is contingent upon the policy process defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended (NWPA), with some steps yet to occur. In spite of this uncertainty, the DOE must take prudent and appropriate action now, and over the next several years, to prepare for submittal of an application and to facilitate the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review of this application, if the Yucca Mountain site is recommended and approved for repository development. One of these steps the DOE has taken involves working with the NRC's Advisory Review Panel to develop Licensing Support Network (LSN) requirements and guidelines. The NRC has made a prototype of the LSN web page available at www.LSNNET.gov. The OCRWM part of the LSN currently has an indefinite life cycle and may need to remain in existence until the repository is closed, which could be as long as 325 years

  14. Peer review for high-level nuclear waste repositories: Generic technical position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, W.D.; Donnelly, J.P.; Kennedy, J.E.

    1988-02-01

    This document provides guidance on the use of the peer review process in the high-level nuclear waste repository program. The applicant must demonstrate in the license application that the applicable health, safety, and environmental regulations in 10 CFR Part 60 have been met. Confidence in the data used to support the license application is obtained through a quality assurance (AQ) program. Peer reviews may be used as part of the QA actions necessary to provide adequate confidence in the work being reviewed. Because of several unique conditions inherent to the geologic repository program, expert judgment will need to be utilized in assessing the adequacy of work. Peer reviews are a mechanism by which these judgments may be made. This document provides guidance on areas where a peer review is appropriate, the acceptability of peers, and the conduct and documentation of a peer review

  15. Reference Design Description for a Geologic Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    of the waste materials will result in fission products that pose a minimal radiological hazard to the public afterward. For example, after 100 years, the relative hazard from the waste fission products will have diminished approximately 90 percent. After 1,000 years, the hazard will have diminished 99 percent, and after 10,000 years it will have diminished 99.9 percent. The resulting radiological hazard after 10,000 years is minimal, being of the same order of magnitude as that posed by 0.2 percent uranium ore, which is equivalent to that which was used to originally produce the nuclear fuel. Because developing such a repository is extremely complex, the design will move forward in three stages: Site Recommendation, License Application, and Construction. This document presents the design as it will be submitted in the Site Recommendation Consideration Report; the design will be updated as the design process moves forward. As more cost-effective solutions, technical advancements, or changes to requirements occur, the design may evolve. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is developing a system that includes this potential repository. This waste management system integrates acceptance, transportation, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Acceptance and transportation will be handled by regional servicing contractors under contract to the DOE. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission will conduct an in-depth and thorough licensing review to determine the acceptability of the proposed waste management system. Eight sections of this document follow. Section 2 discusses the design requirements for the proposed repository. Section 3 describes the physical layout of the proposed repository. Section 4 describes the evolutionary phases of the development of the proposed repository. Section 5 describes the receipt of waste. Section 6 details the various systems that will package the waste

  16. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXPERIENCE IN CREATING AND COMMUNICATING THE CASE FOR THE SAFETY OF A POTENTIAL YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W.J. Boyle; A.E. Van Luik

    2005-01-01

    Experience gained by the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) in making the recommendation for the development of the Yucca Mountain site as the nation's first high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel repository is useful for creating documents to support the next phase in the repository program, the licensing phase. The experience that supported the successful site-recommendation process involved a three-tiered approach. First, was making a highly technical case for regulatory compliance. Second, was making a broader case for safety in an Environmental Impact Statement. And third, producing plain language brochures, made available to the public in hard copy and on the Internet, to explain the Department's action and its legal and scientific bases. This paper reviews lessons learned from this process, and makes suggestions for the next stage of the repository program: licensing

  17. NRC's license renewal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akstulewicz, Francis

    1991-01-01

    In order to provide for the continuity of the current generation of nuclear power plant operating licenses and at the same time ensure the health and safety of the public, and the quality of the environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a goal of developing and issuing regulations and regulatory guidance for license renewal in the early 1990s. This paper will discuss some of those activities underway to achieve this goal. More specifically, this paper will discuss the Commission's regulatory philosophy for license renewal and the two major license renewal rule makings currently underway. The first is the development of a new Part 54 to address procedural and technical requirements for license renewal; the second is a revision to existing Part 51 to exclude environmental issues and impacts from consideration during the license renewal process. (author)

  18. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes

  19. Libraries and licensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Žumer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the mid 90s, the abundance of various electronic publications exposed libraries to the problems of licensing electronic content. Various licensing principles have been prepared recently to help libraries in the process; it can be said that in general, the knowledge of licensing issues has improved in libraries of all types. Libraries form consortia in order to gain stronger negotiating positions and obtain better conditions.In the article, new licensing principles are presented in more detail, as well as some domestic and foreign experiences with consortia forming.

  20. Project SAFE. Microbial features, events and processes in the Swedish final repository for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    The waste disposed of in the Swedish final repository for low and intermediate radioactive waste (SFR) typically contains large amounts of organic substances. This waste thus constitutes a possible source of energy and nutrients for microorganisms. Microbes can degrade the waste to degradation products, which to a varying degree may create problems if the process is significant. The environment for microbial life in the SFR is, however, unique since it cannot be compared to any environment to which microbes have adapted naturally over millions of years. Most similar to the SFR are waste dumps and landfills. In those, microbes degrade the waste and form degradation products. The experience from such 'analogues' and from research performed under repository-like conditions may provide useful clues about the microbial processes which may occur in the repository. Microbes have the ability to degrade bitumen, used to solidify some wastes, but this degradation is very slow under anaerobic conditions. Bitumen degradation will, therefore, not influence the safety of the SFR. However, some microbes can produce acids that could influence concrete stability, particularly in the presence of oxygen. The future SFR environment is anaerobic, which suggests that acid production is a very unlikely problem. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the ability to produce sulphide, which may act as a corrosive on metals. Under specific conditions, with the local groundwater flow close to a metal surface and with dissolved organic material from the repository, pitting corrosion of metal canisters is a potential threat. This process appears to require conditions fairly atypical of the SFR, however. Large groups of microorganisms can use hydrogen as a source of energy, thereby contributing to the decrease of this gas mainly formed from water during the anaerobic corrosion of metals. Cellulose is an excellent substrate for many microorganisms and it will be the dominating carbon and energy

  1. Project SAFE. Microbial features, events and processes in the Swedish final repository for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Karsten [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    The waste disposed of in the Swedish final repository for low and intermediate radioactive waste (SFR) typically contains large amounts of organic substances. This waste thus constitutes a possible source of energy and nutrients for microorganisms. Microbes can degrade the waste to degradation products, which to a varying degree may create problems if the process is significant. The environment for microbial life in the SFR is, however, unique since it cannot be compared to any environment to which microbes have adapted naturally over millions of years. Most similar to the SFR are waste dumps and landfills. In those, microbes degrade the waste and form degradation products. The experience from such 'analogues' and from research performed under repository-like conditions may provide useful clues about the microbial processes which may occur in the repository. Microbes have the ability to degrade bitumen, used to solidify some wastes, but this degradation is very slow under anaerobic conditions. Bitumen degradation will, therefore, not influence the safety of the SFR. However, some microbes can produce acids that could influence concrete stability, particularly in the presence of oxygen. The future SFR environment is anaerobic, which suggests that acid production is a very unlikely problem. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the ability to produce sulphide, which may act as a corrosive on metals. Under specific conditions, with the local groundwater flow close to a metal surface and with dissolved organic material from the repository, pitting corrosion of metal canisters is a potential threat. This process appears to require conditions fairly atypical of the SFR, however. Large groups of microorganisms can use hydrogen as a source of energy, thereby contributing to the decrease of this gas mainly formed from water during the anaerobic corrosion of metals. Cellulose is an excellent substrate for many microorganisms and it will be the dominating carbon and

  2. Commercial nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, M.P.; Patricio, J.G.; Heley, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) is an ongoing research and engineering effort being conducted by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell), which is under contract to the US Department of Energy. The objectives of this program are to assess the feasibility of and to provide the technology needed to design and construct a licensed commercial nuclear waste repository in the deep basalt formations underlying the Hanford Site. An extensive preconceptual design effort was undertaken during 1979 to develop a feasible concept that could serve as a reference design for both surface and underground facilities. The preconceptual design utilized existing technology to the greatest extent possible to offer a system design that could be utilized in establishing schedule and cost baseline data, recommend alternatives that require additional study, and develop basic design requirements that would allow evolution of the design process prior to the existence of legislated criteria. This paper provides a description of the concept developed for the subsurface aspects of this nuclear waste repository

  3. Dry spent fuel storage licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturz, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    In the US, at-reactor-site dry spent fuel storage in independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSI) has become the principal option for utilities needing storage capacity outside of the reactor spent fuel pools. Delays in the geologic repository operational date at or beyond 2010, and the increasing uncertainty of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) being able to site and license a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility by 1998 make at-reactor-site dry storage of spent nuclear fuel increasingly desirable to utilities and DOE to meet the need for additional spent fuel storage capacity until disposal, in a repository, is available. The past year has been another busy year for dry spent fuel storage licensing. The licensing staff has been reviewing 7 applications and 12 amendment requests, as well as participating in inspection-related activities. The authors have licensed, on a site-specific basis, a variety of dry technologies (cask, module, and vault). By using certified designs, site-specific licensing is no longer required. Another new cask has been certified. They have received one new application for cask certification and two amendments to a certified cask design. As they stand on the brink of receiving multiple applications from DOE for the MPC, they are preparing to meet the needs of this national program. With the range of technical and licensing options available to utilities, the authors believe that utilities can meet their need for additional spent fuel storage capacity for essentially all reactor sites through the next decade

  4. Experiments relating to hydrogen generated by corrosion processes associated with repositories for intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, R.

    1983-12-01

    Organic components in an intermediate level waste repository decompose under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce carbon dioxide, which may lead to acid corrosion of metallic containers and hence to hydrogen production. The possibility of hydrogen production within the repository must be considered in determining the long term safety. Thermodynamic calculations show that only pure water is required to produce hydrogen with iron in a repository. The hydrogen evolution rate is thus the important parameter. However, the available kinetic data is insufficient and needs to be supplemented experimentally. Carbon steel specimens were immersed in water over which several gas mixtures containing nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide were passed; the amount of hydrogen picked up by the gas stream was measured. 1.4 - 28 ml hydrogen per square meter per hour was evolved when the gas mixture contained 1 and 20 volume per cent carbon dioxide respectively. Hydrogen was also detected in natural CO 2 -free water when oxygen concentration cells are present. No hydrogen could be detected at pH 8.5 and above. The experiments were all carried out at 25 degrees C and atmospheric pressure and restricted to the carbonate system. Natural waters contain a mixture of salts; this may increase or reduce the hydrogen evolution rate. Higher temperatures and pressures, in particular a higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide, will probably lead to an increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. (author)

  5. Making the post-closure safety case for the proposed yucca mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, P.; Van Luik, A.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation provided an overview of the Yucca Mountain repository post-closure safety case. The safety case concept is being integrated into the license application being prepared for Yucca Mountain, by giving particularly close attention to the treatment of uncertainties, thereby bringing available lines of evidence into the supporting information, as appropriate, to build a comprehensive argument for safety and regulatory compliance. For Yucca Mountain, it is expected that there will be open questions in the safety case to be presented to the regulator and a programme will be outlined on what information is to be gathered (and how) prior to the next iteration in the licensing process to address such open issues. A one-hundred year operational phase is foreseen and planned, and the changes in knowledge and approaches that occur over time will have to be accommodated through the formal licensing process. (authors)

  6. The SLOWPOKE licensing model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, V. G.; Takats, F.; Szivos, K.

    1989-08-15

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System (SES-10) is a 10 MW heating reactor that has been developed in Canada. It will be capable of running without a licensed operator in continuous attendance, and will be sited in urban areas. It has forgiving safety characteristics, including transient time-scales of the order of hours. A process called `up-front` licensing has been evolved in Canada to identify, and resolve, regulatory concerns early in the process. Because of the potential market in Hungary for nuclear district heating, a licensing plan has been developed that incorporates Canadian licensing experience, identifies specific Hungarian requirements, and reduces the risk of licensing delays by seeking agreement of all parties at an early stage in the program.

  7. Federal/State cooperation in the licensing of a nuclear power project. A joint licensing process between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This report summarizes and documents a joint environmental review and licensing process established between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) in 1980-1983 for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear Project (S/HNP). It documents the agreements made between the agencies to prepare a joint environmental impact statement responsive to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act. These agreements also established protocol to conduct joint public evidentiary hearings on matters of mutual jurisdiction, thereby reducing the duplication of effort and increasing the efficiency of the use of resources of federal and state governments and other entities involved in the process. This report may provide guidance and rationale to licensing bodies that may wish to adopt some of the procedures discussed in the report in the event that they become involved in the licensing of a nuclear power plant project. The history of the S/HNP and of the agreement processes are discussed. Discussions are provided on implementing the joint review process. A separate section is included which presents independent evaluations of the process by the applicant, NRC, and EFSEC

  8. Plan for safety case of spent fuel repository at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.; Ikonen, A.T.K.

    2005-02-01

    Posiva aims to present the Safety Case supporting the construction license application of the spent fuel repository at Olkiluoto by 2012. An outline and preliminary assessments will be presented in 2009. Interim reporting and an update of the Safety Case plan will be presented in 2006, as required by the authorities. The KBS-3 disposal concept aims at long-term isolation and containment of spent fuel assemblies in durable copper-iron canisters emplaced in a repository to be constructed at a depth between 400 and 600 metres in crystalline bedrock. By 2012, studies on the KBS-3 disposal concept and site investigations at Olkiluoto will have been continued over about thirty years. The construction of an underground rock characterisation facility (called ONKALO) was started in June 2004. The investigations are carried out in close cooperation with the Swedish SKB developing and assessing the same disposal concept at candidate sites, resembling Olkiluoto, at the other side of the Baltic Sea. A safety case is the synthesis of evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety, and the level of expert confidence in the safety, of a planned repository. Posiva's Safety Case will be organised in a portfolio including ten main reports, which will be periodically updated according the overall schedule presented in the plan. The Site report describing the present state and past evolution of the Olkiluoto site, as well as the disturbances caused by the construction of ONKALO and the first stage of the repository, forms the geoscientific basis of the Safety Case. The engineering basis is provided by the reports on the Characteristics of spent fuel, Canister design, and Repository design. The Process report containing descriptions and analyses of features, events and processes potentially affecting the disposal system, and the report on the Evolution of site and repository form the scientific basis of the Safety Case. The latter report will describe and

  9. Need for improving the federal and state siting and licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    The environmental, health, and safety regulatory process has slowly evolved into a vast number of complex and uncoordinated institutional processes. These processes add unnecessary project costs, in addition to stifling and deterring government and industry from meeting their full responsibilities. The regulatory process is weighted down with inflexibility, staff bureaucracies, duplication of effort, and confusing court cases. The process has become so complex and bureaucratic that it appears incapable of being patched up or reformed from within. Thus, a whole new regulatory process, more integrated, simplified, and expeditious is needed

  10. Product Licenses Database Application

    CERN Document Server

    Tonkovikj, Petar

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to organize and centralize the data about software tools available to CERN employees, as well as provide a system that would simplify the license management process by providing information about the available licenses and their expiry dates. The project development process is consisted of two steps: modeling the products (software tools), product licenses, legal agreements and other data related to these entities in a relational database and developing the front-end user interface so that the user can interact with the database. The result is an ASP.NET MVC web application with interactive views for displaying and managing the data in the underlying database.

  11. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  12. Contestable Licensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zvika Neeman; Gerhard O. Orosel

    2000-01-01

    We analyze a model of repeated franchise bidding for natural monopoly with contestable licensing - a franchisee halds an (exclusive) license to operate a franchise until another rm offers to pay more for it. In a world where quality is observable but not veri able, the simple regulatory scheme we describe combines market-like incentives with regulatory oversight to generate efficient outcomes.

  13. Radiopharmaceutical licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent health service legislation, and especially the loss of crown immunity has once again focussed attention on the arrangements for licensing of radiopharmaceuticals. The aim of the article is to describe in general terms the UK licensing system and in particular to provide guidance to those responsible for the supply of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals. (author)

  14. Reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses reactor licensing and includes the legislative basis for licensing, other relevant legislation , the purpose of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, important regulations, regulatory document, policies, and standards. It also discusses the role of the CNSC, its mandate and safety philosophy

  15. Analysis of Academic Attitudes and Existing Processes to Inform the Design of Teaching and Learning Material Repositories: A User-Centred Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Melanie; Loddington, Steve; Manuel, Sue; Oppenheim, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The last couple of years have brought a rise in the number of institutional repositories throughout the world and within UK Higher Education institutions, with the majority of these repositories being devoted to research output. Repositories containing teaching and learning material are less common and the workflows and business processes…

  16. A Study on the regulation improvement through the analysis of domestic and international categorization and licensing process for large particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwon, Da-Yeong; Jeon, Yeo-Ryeong; Kim, Yong-Min [Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Hee-Seock [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Many foreign countries use separate criteria and regulation procedure according to the categorization of accelerators. In Korea, nuclear and radiation related facilities are divided into 4 groups: 1) Nuclear Reactor and related facilities, 2) Nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear material facilities, 3) Disposal and transport, 4) Radioisotope and radiation generating devices related facilities. All accelerator facilities are categorized as group 4 regardless of their size and type. For facilities that belong to group 1 and 2, Radiation Environmental Impact Assessment Report(REIR) and Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Report(PDPR) should be submitted in construction licensing stage, but there are no rules about above documents for large particle accelerator facilities. Facilities that belong to 4) RI and RG, only two documents of Radiation Safety Report(RSR) and Safety Control Regulation(SCR) are submitted in licensing stage. Because there is no detailed guidelines according to facilities type, properties of each facility are not considered in preparation and licensing process. If we set up the categorization of accelerator facilities, we can expect the effective and safe construction and operation of the large accelerator facilities on the licensing and operation process. Similarly to other counties' criteria, 50 MeV of particle energy could be used as energy band of large particle accelerator. According to categorization, it is necessary to adopt graded licensing stages and separated safety documents. In case of large particle accelerators, it is appropriate to divide the licensing stages to construction and operation. We currently submit PDPR in case of reactor and related facilities, nuclear fuel cycle, and nuclear material facilities. Depending on the energy of particle accelerators, it is necessary to prepare the decontamination and decommissioning for the decrease of current and future burden from radioactive waste. From the arrangement of separated guidelines on

  17. A Study on the regulation improvement through the analysis of domestic and international categorization and licensing process for large particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwon, Da-Yeong; Jeon, Yeo-Ryeong; Kim, Yong-Min; Jung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Hee-Seock

    2016-01-01

    Many foreign countries use separate criteria and regulation procedure according to the categorization of accelerators. In Korea, nuclear and radiation related facilities are divided into 4 groups: 1) Nuclear Reactor and related facilities, 2) Nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear material facilities, 3) Disposal and transport, 4) Radioisotope and radiation generating devices related facilities. All accelerator facilities are categorized as group 4 regardless of their size and type. For facilities that belong to group 1 and 2, Radiation Environmental Impact Assessment Report(REIR) and Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Report(PDPR) should be submitted in construction licensing stage, but there are no rules about above documents for large particle accelerator facilities. Facilities that belong to 4) RI and RG, only two documents of Radiation Safety Report(RSR) and Safety Control Regulation(SCR) are submitted in licensing stage. Because there is no detailed guidelines according to facilities type, properties of each facility are not considered in preparation and licensing process. If we set up the categorization of accelerator facilities, we can expect the effective and safe construction and operation of the large accelerator facilities on the licensing and operation process. Similarly to other counties' criteria, 50 MeV of particle energy could be used as energy band of large particle accelerator. According to categorization, it is necessary to adopt graded licensing stages and separated safety documents. In case of large particle accelerators, it is appropriate to divide the licensing stages to construction and operation. We currently submit PDPR in case of reactor and related facilities, nuclear fuel cycle, and nuclear material facilities. Depending on the energy of particle accelerators, it is necessary to prepare the decontamination and decommissioning for the decrease of current and future burden from radioactive waste. From the arrangement of separated guidelines on

  18. Modern licensing approaches for analysis of important to safety processes in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, M.; Groudev, P.; Pavlova, M.; Stoyanov, S.

    2008-01-01

    It is presented within the paper the modern approaches for analysis of important to safety assessment processes in Nuclear Power Plants, included Bulgarian Regulatory Agency's requirements for quantity assessment of these processes applying deterministic and probabilistic approaches for establishing and confirming the design basis and defence-in-depth effectiveness. (authors)

  19. IAEA safeguards for geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    In September. 1988, the IAEA held its first formal meeting on the safeguards requirements for the final disposal of spent fuel and nuclear material-bearing waste. The consensus recommendation of the 43 participants from 18 countries at this Advisory Group Meeting was that safeguards should not terminate of spent fuel even after emplacement in, and closure of, a geologic repository.' As a result of this recommendation, the IAEA initiated a series of consultants' meetings and the SAGOR Programme (Programme for the Development of Safeguards for the Final Disposal of Spent Fuel in Geologic Repositories) to develop an approach that would permit IAEA safeguards to verify the non-diversion of spent fuel from a geologic repository. At the end of this process, in December 1997, a second Advisory Group Meeting, endorsed the generic safeguards approach developed by the SAGOR Programme. Using the SAGOR Programme results and consultants' meeting recommendations, the IAEA Department of Safeguards issued a safeguards policy paper stating the requirements for IAEA safeguards at geologic repositories. Following approval of the safeguards policy and the generic safeguards approach, the Geologic Repository Safeguards Experts Group was established to make recommendations on implementing the safeguards approach. This experts' group is currently making recommendations to the IAEA regarding the safeguards activities to be conducted with respect to Finland's repository programme. (author)

  20. Office of Geologic Repositories issues hierarchy for a mined geologic disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has indicated that the identification of the issues that must be resolved to complete licensing assessments of site and design suitability is an important step in the licensing process. The issues hierarchy developed by the Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR) for the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) are based on the issues-hierarchy concept presented in the Mission Plan. Specific questions are encompassed by the general issue statements in the OGR issues hierarchy. The OGR issues hierarchy is limited to the issues related to the siting and licensing requirements of applicable federal regulations and does not address the requirements of other regulations, functional or operating requirements for the MGDS, or requirements for the integration and the design/operational efficiency of the MGDS. 4 figs

  1. Evaluation of SKB's report 'Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel: SR 97 - Post-closure safety', Focusing on the assessment of transport processes in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerman, A.; Shulan Xu

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a critical review of the safety assessment performed on the final repository for nuclear waste in Sweden that is proposed by SKB in 'Deep Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel: SR 97 - Post-closure Safety'. The review was requested by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). The waste repository consists of several barriers that work together with the purpose of delaying radionuclide migration and reducing the activity that eventually affects the biosphere. A main criticism is the lack of a formal risk analysis and uncertainties in several analyses that make it difficult to comprehend the overall risk of the repository. A formal risk analysis should comprise a probabilistic treatment of all components included in the system. This is not the case in the SKB's report since the probabilistic analyses are limited only to certain aspects. The use of conservative model parameters are not a substitute for risk analysis nor can they compensate for possible model biases. Bias can be expected in most of the existing models of radionuclide migration in fractured bedrock. SKB should present a clear comparison on the importance of the different barrier components (uranium-dioxide matrix, copper canister, buffer and bedrock) on the retardation of radionuclides. It is unclear as to what extent the capacity of the bedrock to retain migrating radionuclides is critical to the capacity of the repository. A large part of the SR 97 report is focused on retardation processes in bedrock and a reader can interpret this as the technical weight given on retardation in the bedrock. However, with the present state of knowledge, it is our opinion that we cannot with an acceptable degree of accuracy predict the radionuclide transport in bedrock or quantify risk levels associated with radioactivity in the biosphere. There are large uncertainties concerning the way by which sorption processes should be formulated and the impact of colloids on the transport that can be

  2. Local decision-making facing issues of national interest experiences from the swedish siting process for a spent nuclear fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soderberg, O.

    1998-01-01

    It is common knowledge that there are difficulties in convincing the general public and their democratically elected representatives that final disposal of spent nuclear fuel can be made in safe way. Special problems for the decision-makers are created by the demands put on today's generations to make a responsible risk assessment in a area with genuine uncertainties and characterised by any expressions of lack of confidence in social institutions. The current Swedish process for siting a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel has evolved during a period of many years, through inputs by the industry, Government, regulatory authorities and concerned municipalities. It is clear that the nuclear industry, represented by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management CO (SKB), has the full responsibility to find a solution to the waste management problem and to implement the solution - and to for this under the supervision of Government and regulating authorities. But, given the strong tradition of local self-government, the concerned municipalities, the local population in this process. this is simply the following fact: For people who have engaged themselves in local politics - and are prepared to take their responsibility for the well-being and development of their local community - the issue of a possible nuclear repository in the neighbourhood is difficult to handle. A relevant question is: Why should the nation as a whole expect these locally elected representatives to feel a responsibility for an issue of national importance? (author)

  3. Training courses on integrated safety assessment modelling for waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallants, D.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface or deep repositories of radioactive waste are being developed and evaluated all over the world. Also, existing repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste often need to be re-evaluated to extend their license or to obtain permission for final closure. The evaluation encompasses both a technical feasibility as well as a safety analysis. The long term safety is usually demonstrated by means of performance or safety assessment. For this purpose computer models are used that calculate the migration of radionuclides from the conditioned radioactive waste, through engineered barriers to the environment (groundwater, surface water, and biosphere). Integrated safety assessment modelling addresses all relevant radionuclide pathways from source to receptor (man), using in combination various computer codes in which the most relevant physical, chemical, mechanical, or even microbiological processes are mathematically described. SCK-CEN organizes training courses in Integrated safety assessment modelling that are intended for individuals who have either a controlling or supervising role within the national radwaste agencies or regulating authorities, or for technical experts that carry out the actual post-closure safety assessment for an existing or new repository. Courses are organised by the Department of Waste and Disposal

  4. Evaluation of repository safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, B.; Patrick, W.; Dasgupta, B.; Mohanty, S. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The United States high-level waste program requires evaluation of radiological safety during two distinct time intervals. The first interval, commonly referred to as the preclosure period, deals with receipt of waste at the site, transfer into disposal containers, if needed, emplacement in the underground openings, monitoring and maintenance activities, backfill and closure of the underground openings, and decontamination and decommissioning of the surface facilities of the geologic repository. The preclosure period may extend from a few tens of years to as long as a few hundred of years, depending on repository design and societal norms regarding a final decision to permanently seal the repository. During the preclosure or operational period, performance confirmation studies are conducted to provide a basis for updating and reevaluating estimates of postclosure performance and, finally, to provide a basis for a closure decision. The postclosure period during which expected repository performance must meet certain standards may range from ten thousands years, as it does in the United States, to millions of years, as it does in some European nations. Waste handling operations in the preclosure period are to be evaluated in relation to their potential effect on workers, members of general public, and the general environment. During this period, releases of radioactivity are to be monitored and appropriate actions taken whenever established limits are approached or exceeded. Preclosure safety is highly dependent on facility design, operational hardware and automated systems, operational sequences, and reliability of humans involved in operations. Preclosure safety analyses conducted before operations begin play a major role in the design process, selection of equipment, and development of operational procedures. Because of the complexity, duration, and spatial scales of the operations, analyses are conducted using mathematical models implemented in computer codes

  5. Evaluation of repository safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, B.; Patrick, W.; Dasgupta, B.; Mohanty, S.

    2002-01-01

    The United States high-level waste program requires evaluation of radiological safety during two distinct time intervals. The first interval, commonly referred to as the preclosure period, deals with receipt of waste at the site, transfer into disposal containers, if needed, emplacement in the underground openings, monitoring and maintenance activities, backfill and closure of the underground openings, and decontamination and decommissioning of the surface facilities of the geologic repository. The preclosure period may extend from a few tens of years to as long as a few hundred of years, depending on repository design and societal norms regarding a final decision to permanently seal the repository. During the preclosure or operational period, performance confirmation studies are conducted to provide a basis for updating and reevaluating estimates of postclosure performance and, finally, to provide a basis for a closure decision. The postclosure period during which expected repository performance must meet certain standards may range from ten thousands years, as it does in the United States, to millions of years, as it does in some European nations. Waste handling operations in the preclosure period are to be evaluated in relation to their potential effect on workers, members of general public, and the general environment. During this period, releases of radioactivity are to be monitored and appropriate actions taken whenever established limits are approached or exceeded. Preclosure safety is highly dependent on facility design, operational hardware and automated systems, operational sequences, and reliability of humans involved in operations. Preclosure safety analyses conducted before operations begin play a major role in the design process, selection of equipment, and development of operational procedures. Because of the complexity, duration, and spatial scales of the operations, analyses are conducted using mathematical models implemented in computer codes

  6. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  7. Public debates - key issue in the environmental licensing process for the completion of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ioan; Jelev, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    SN 'NUCLEARELECTRICA' S.A., the owner of Cernavoda NPP, organized, in 2001, several public consultations related to environmental impact of the completion of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2, as required by the Romanian environmental law, part of project approval. Public consultations on the environmental assessment for the completion of the Cernavoda NPP - Unit 2 took place in 2001 between August 15 and September 21 in accordance with the provisions of Law No. 137/95 and Order No. 125/96. Romanian environmental legislation, harmonization of national environmental legislation with European Union, Romanian legislative requirements, information distributed to the public, issues raised and follow-up, they all are topics highlighted by this paper and they are addressing the environmental licensing process of the Cernavoda 2 NPP. The public consultation process described fulfils all the Romanian requirements for carrying out meaningful consultation with its relevant shareholders. The process also satisfies EDC (Export Development Corporation - Canada) requirements for public consultation and disclosure with relevant shareholders in the host country. SNN is fully committed to consulting as necessary with relevant shareholders throughout the construction and operation of the Project. Concerns of the public have been taken into account with the operations of Unit 1 and will continue to be addressed during the Unit 2 Project

  8. Process evaluation of an environmental health risk audit and action plan intervention to reduce alcohol related violence in licensed premises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Williams

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol-related violence is associated with licensed premise environments and their management. There is a lack of evidence for effective interventions to address these, and there are significant barriers to implementation. This study aims to understand how development and implementation processes can facilitate intervention reach, fidelity and receipt and therefore provides key process data necessary to interpret the results of the randomised controlled trial conducted in parallel. Methods A process evaluation, embedded within a randomised controlled trial. Intervention development and implementation were assessed via focus groups (n = 2 and semi-structured interviews (n = 22 with Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs. Reach and fidelity were assessed via routinely collected intervention data, which was was collected from 276 licenced premises across Wales, UK. Case study semi-structured interviews with licensed premises proprietors (n = 30 explored intervention receipt. Results Intervention co-production with senior EHPs facilitated organisational adoption and implementation. Training events for EHPs played an important role in addressing wider organisational concerns regarding partnership working and the contextual integration of the intervention. EHPs delivered the intervention to 98 % of intervention premises; 35 % of premises should have received a follow up enforcement visit, however EHP confidence in dealing with alcohol risk factors meant only 7 % of premises received one. Premises therefore received a similar intervention dose regardless of baseline risk. Intervention receipt appeared to be greatest in premises with an existing commitment to prevention and those in urban environments. Conclusions The study suggests that a collaborative approach to the development and diffusion of interventions is associated with high levels of organisational adoption, implementation and reach. However, the lack

  9. Workshop: Creating Your Institutional Research Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Grenz, Daryl M.

    2016-11-08

    In 2002, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) proposed the concept of an institutional repository to simultaneously disrupt and enhance the state of scholarly communications in the academic world. Thirteen years later, thousands of universities and other institutions have answered this call, but many more have not due to gaps in budgets, awareness and, most of all, practical guidance on creating an institutional repository. This workshop provides you with an essential primer on what it takes to establish a fully-functioning institutional repository. Every aspect of the process will be covered, including policies, procedures, staffing guidelines, workflows and repository technologies.

  10. Microbial processes in the final repository, the silo part. Theoretical approach and preliminary experiments on the biodegradation of bitumen. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roffey, R.; Hjalmarsson, K.

    1984-01-01

    On Commission of SKBF/KBS the microbial processes that are likely to occur in the silo part of SFR, the final repository for medium- and low-level nuclear wastes, have been put together. The experimental studies concerning microbial degradation of bitumen are described. From a microbial point of view it is the biodegradation of bitumen that constitutes the greatest risk in the silo part of SFR. The degradation, aerobic as well as anaerobic, leads to production of carbon dioxide which might cause a decrease in pH to such an extent that hydrogen-gas producing corrosion of metal could occur. This production of gas can cause an increase in internal pressure of the repository. A culture of bacteria able to degrade bitumen aerobically has been enriched. Uptil now no culture degrading bitumen under anaerobic conditions have been obtained. When making a risk assessment of the SFR at the present time it is not possible to completely disregard the microbial activity. An account is also given for some international contacts in this area. 11 references

  11. Breast Cancer Tissue Repository

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iglehart, J

    1997-01-01

    The Breast Tissue Repository at Duke enters its fourth year of finding. The purpose of the Repository at Duke is to provide substantial quantities of frozen tissue for explorative molecular studies...

  12. Nuclear facilities licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A.J.M. de.

    1978-01-01

    The need for the adoption of a legal and normative system, defining objectives, pescriptions and the process of nuclear licensing and building of nuclear power plants in Brazil is enphasized. General rules for the development of this system are presented. The Brazilian rules on the matter are discussed. A general view of the German legal system for nuclear power plant licensing and the IAEA recommendations on the subject are finally presented. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  13. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 2: Preliminary Design Concept for the Repository and Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in

  14. Formulation and evaluation of gas release scenarios for the silo in Swedish Final Repository for Radioactive Waste (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.; Moreno, L.

    1992-01-01

    The Swedish Final Repository for Radioactive Waste (SFR) has been in operation since 1988 and is located in the crystalline rock, 60 m below the Baltic Sea. In the licensing procedure for the SFR the safety assessment has been complemented with a detailed scenario analysis of the performance of the repository. The scenarios include the influence on radionuclide release by gas formation and gas transport processes in the silo. The overall conclusion is that the release of most radionuclides from the silo is only marginally affected by the formation and release of gas, even for scenarios considering unexpected events. The largest effects were found for short-lived radionuclides and radionuclides that have no or low sorption ability. Except for very extreme scenarios for the silo the overall impact from repository on the environment is by far dominated by the release of radionuclides from the rock vaults. 10 refs., 6 figs

  15. Exploring counter-theoretical instances of graduate learners’ self-regulatory processes when using an online repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Shaikh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic self-regulation theories have proposed that learning involves a complex set of cognitive and metacognitive mechanisms that are enacted in phases. These phases include task understanding, strategy adoption, monitoring, and reflection. Whereas classical approaches to self-regulation contend that these phases work together to influence academic performance, the empirical research reported herein reveals that, for essay writing in an online learning environment, improved self-regulation is not necessarily associated with improved learning outcomes. We begin by reviewing frameworks for academic self-regulation, specifically in the context of learners’ experiences in online repositories equipped with Topic Maps (ISO 13250 indexes. We then offer explanations for counter-theoretical interactions found between task understanding (a frontline phase of self-regulation and academic performance in 38 graduate learners who used Topic Maps to tackle ill-structured essay tasks. Our investigation sheds light not only on how learners’ perceptions of feedback facilitate task understanding, but also on the complex relationship between task understanding and monitoring proficiencies.

  16. Conceptual modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical processes in bentonite buffer for high-level nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byoung Young; Park, Jin Young [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ji Hun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, thermal-hydrological-chemical modeling for the alteration of a bentonite buffer is carried out using a simulation code TOUGHREACT. The modeling results show that the water saturation of bentonite steadily increases and finally the bentonite is fully saturated after 10 years. In addition, the temperature rapidly increases and stabilizes after 0.5 year, exhibiting a constant thermal gradient as a function of distance from the copper tube. The change of thermal-hydrological conditions mainly results in the alteration of anhydrite and calcite. Anhydrite and calcite are dissolved along with the inflow of groundwater. They then tend to precipitate in the vicinity of the copper tube due to its high temperature. This behavior induces a slight decrease in porosity and permeability of bentonite near the copper tube. Furthermore, this study finds that the diffusion coefficient can significantly affect the alteration of anhydrite and calcite, which causes changes in the hydrological properties of bentonite such as porosity and permeability. This study may facilitate the safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste repositories.

  17. Nuclear licensing in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prah, M.; Spiler, J.; Vojnovic, D.; Pristavec, M.

    1998-01-01

    The article presents the approach to nuclear licensing in Slovenia. The paper describes, the initialization, internal authorization and review process in the Krsko NPP. The overall process includes preparation, internal independent evaluation, the Krsko Operating Committee and the Krsko Safety Committee review and internal approval. In addition, the continuation of the licensing process is discussed which includes independent evaluation by an authorized institution and a regulatory body approval process. This regulatory body approval process includes official hearing of the licensee, communication with the licensee, and final issuance of a license amendment. The internal evaluation, which follows the methodology of US NRC (defined in 10 CFR 50.59 and NUMARC 125) is described. This concept is partially implemented in domestic legislation.(author)

  18. Review process for low-level radioactive waste disposal license application under Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittiglio, C.L. Jr.

    1987-08-01

    This document estimates the level of effort and expertise that is needed to review a license application within the required time. It is intended to be used by the NRC staff as well as States and interested parties to provide a better understanding of what the NRC envisions will be involved in licensing a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes. Revision 7 was published in January 1993 and became effective in August 1993. Supplement 1 is being issued primarily to implement administrative changes to the requalification examination program resulting from the amendment to 10 CFR 55 that eliminated the requirement for every licensed operator to pass an NRC-conducted requalification examination as a condition for license renewal. The supplement does not substantially alter either the initial or requalification examination processes and will become effective 30 days after its publication is noticed in the Federal Register. The corporate notification letters issued after the effective date will provide facility licensees with at least 90 days notice that the examinations will be administered in accordance with the revised procedures

  20. 10 CFR 60.43 - License specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses...) Restrictions as to the physical and chemical form and radioisotopic content of radioactive waste. (2) Restrictions as to size, shape, and materials and methods of construction of radioactive waste packaging. (3...

  1. Management strategy for site characterization at candidate HLW repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a management strategy for HLW repository site characterization which is aimed at producing an optimal characterization trajectory for site suitability and licensing evaluations. The core feature of the strategy is a matrix of alternative performance targets and alternative information-level targets which can be used to allocate and justify program effort. Strategies for work concerning evaluation of expected and disrupted repository performance are distinguished, and the need for issue closure criteria is discussed

  2. NRC overview: Repository QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is on the threshold of an extensive program for characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada to determine if it is a suitable site for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Earlier this year, the DOE published the Consultation Draft Site Characterization Plan for the Nevada site, which describes in some detail the studies that need to be performed to determine if the site is acceptable. In the near future, the final site characterization plan (SCP) is expected to be issued and large-scale site characterization activities to begin. The data and analyses that will result from the execution of that plan are expected to be the primary basis for the license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of the importance of these data and analyses in the assessment of the suitability of the site and in the demonstration of that suitability in the NRC licensing process, the NRC requires in 10CFR60 that site characterization be performed under a quality assurance (QA) program. The QA program is designed to provide confidence that data are valid, retrievable, and reproducible. The documentation produced by the program will form an important part of the record on which the suitability of the site is judged in licensing. In addition, because the NRC staff can review only a selected portion of the data collected, the staff will need to rely on the system of controls in the DOE QA program

  3. Evaluation of Terminated Nuclear Material Licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, K.M.; Zeighami, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of a six-year project that reviewed material licenses that had been terminated during the period from inception of licensing until approximately late-1994. The material licenses covered in the review project were Part 30, byproduct material licenses; Part 40, source material licenses; and Part 70, special nuclear material licenses. This report describes the methodology developed for the project, summarizes the findings of the license file inventory process, and describes the findings of the reviews or evaluations of the license files. The evaluation identified nuclear material use sites that need review of the licensing material or more direct follow-up of some type. The review process also identified licenses authorized to possess sealed sources for which there was incomplete or missing documentation of the fate of the sources

  4. Preparing as an organization to review a construction license application for a DGR for HLW and SF in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Brittain

    2014-01-01

    Although formally opposed by the State of Nevada, the Yucca Mountain site (Nevada) recommendation was approved by the U.S. Congress and the President, which authorized DOE to prepare and submit a license application for a deep geologic repository for the nation's spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. In June of 2008, DOE submitted this application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for its review and formal adjudication of contested issues during a 3-4 year period. Although subsequent actions by the Administration and Congress have changed the direction for geologic disposal in the U.S., the NRC staff was able to conduct a thorough technical review of the DOE license application and issue technical evaluation reports before the review and hearings were suspended in September 2011. This paper provides the author's perspective on how the NRC prepared for, and conducted, this first-of-a-kind licensing review: planning framework, key preparations for staff and for processes, events after the receipt of a license application, retrospective on staff preparations and on processes. By the end of September 2011, the NRC staff had issued three Technical Evaluation Reports using a risk-informed, performance-based approach to review the DOE license application for this deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, Jon C.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Sallaberry, Cédric J.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of this development, a detailed performance assessment (PA) for the YM repository was completed in 2008 and supported a license application by the DOE to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of the YM repository. The following aspects of the 2008 YM PA are described in this presentation: (i) conceptual structure and computational organization, (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques in use, (iii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for physical processes, and (iv) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified the NRC’s regulations for the YM repository. - Highlights: ► An overview of performance assessment for the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository is presented. ► Conceptual structure and computational organization are described. ► Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques are described. ► Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for physical processes are presented. ► Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for expected dose are presented.

  6. Challenges of SMR licensing practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderholm, K., E-mail: kristiina.soderholm@fortum.com [Fortum Power, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    This paper aims to increase the understanding of high level Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) licensing processes in Finland, France, the UK, Canada and the USA. These countries have been selected for this study because of their different licensing processes and recent actions in new NPP construction. After discussing their similarities and differences, suitable features for Small Modular Reactor licensing can be emphasized and suggested. Some of the studied licensing processes have elements that are already quite well suited for application to SMRs, but all of these different national processes can benefit from studying and implementing lessons learned from SMR specific licensing needs. The main SMR features to take into account in licensing are standardization of the design, modularity, mass production and serial construction. Modularity can be divided into two different categories: the first category is simply a single unit facility constructed of independently engineered modules (e.g., construction process for Westinghouse AP-1000 NPP) and the second is a facility structure composed of many reactor modules where modules are manufactured in factories and installed into the facility as needed (e.g., NuScale Power SMR design). Short construction schedules will not be fully benefited from if the long licensing process prolongs the commissioning and approach to full-power operation. The focus area of this study is to better understand the possibility of SMR deployment in small nuclear countries, such as Finland, which currently has four operating NPPs. The licensing process needs to be simple and clear to make SMR deployment feasible from an economical point of view. This paper uses public information and interviews with experts to establish the overview of the different licensing processes and their main steps. A high-level comparison of the licensing steps has been carried out. Certain aspects of the aviation industry licensing process have also been studied and certain

  7. Special feature of the facilities for final disposal of radioactive waste and its potential impact on the licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Gonzales, Horacio M.; Medici, Marcela A.; Alvarez, Daniela E.; Biaggio, Alfredo L.

    2009-01-01

    During the lifetime of a radioactive waste disposal facility it is possible to identify five stages: design, construction, operation, closure and post-closure. While the design, and pre-operation stages are, to some extent, similar to other kind of nuclear or radioactive facilities; construction, operation, closure and post-closure have quite special meanings in the case of radioactive waste disposal systems. For instance, the 'closure' stage of a final disposal facility seems to be equivalent to the commissioning stage of a conventional nuclear or radioactive facility. This paper describes the unique characteristics of these stages of final disposal systems, that lead to concluded that their licensing procedure can not be assimilated to the standard licensing procedures in use for other nuclear or radioactive facilities, making it necessary to develop a tailored license system. (author)

  8. Repository Rodeo Redux

    CERN Document Server

    Anez, Melissa; Donohue, Tim; Fyson, Will; Simko, Tibor; Wilcox, David

    2017-01-01

    You’ve got more repository questions and we’ve got more answers! Last year’s Repository Rodeo panel was a huge success, so we’re taking the show on the road to Brisbane for OR2017. Join representatives from the DSpace, Eprints, Fedora, Hydra, and Islandora communities as we (briefly) explain what each of our repositories actually does. We'll also talk about the directions of our respective technical and community developments, and related to the conference theme of Open: Innovation Knowledge Repositories, offer brief observations about the latest, most promising and/or most surprising innovations in our space. This panel will be a great opportunity for newcomers to Open Repositories to get a crash course on the major repository options and meet representatives from each of their communities. After a brief presentation from each representative, we'll open the session up for questions from the audience.

  9. Swiss underground L/ILW repository at Wellenberg: How to proceed following the negative vote of the Canton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, E.; Fritschi, M.

    1996-01-01

    In Switzerland, the process of implementing a low- and intermediate-level waste repository is entering a crucial phase. Progress has been made in the technical and partly also in the political field. After extended investigations, the site of Wellenberg in Canton Nidwalden was selected in June 1993, followed by the submission of an application for a general license to the Swiss Federal Government in June 1994. The general license is only the first step in a comprehensive licensing procedure which consists of federal, cantonal and community licenses. In addition to the > licenses, a special mining concession must be applied for to the Canton, since the repository is considered as a facility which may interfere with hypothetical future mining projects and this falls within the jurisdiction of the Canton. In Canton Nidwalden, the mining concession can only be granted by a vote of the population. The people of the siting community of Wolfenschiessen previously agreed to host the company responsible for constructing and operating the repository (Nuclear Waste Management Cooperative Wellenberg - GNW) by a 63 % affirmative vote. Equally, the necessary community zone planning has been adapted by a 70 % affirmative vote. Unfortunately, the decisive cantonal vote on 25th June 1995 regarding the mining concession was negative by 52.5 %. This created a politically difficult situation, especially with regard to the Federal Government which does not believe that a geologically suitable site should be rejected for political reasons. This paper briefly covers the results of the site selection procedure and the characteristics of the selected site of Wellenberg, as well as the procedure applied to enhance project acceptance. It analyses the reasons for the negative cantonal vote and describes the measures taken to cope with the new situation

  10. Considerations for developing seismic design criteria for nuclear waste storage repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, G.N.; Yanev, P.I.; Scholl, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    The function of seismic design criteria is to reduce the potential for hazards that may arise during various stages of the repository life. During the operational phase, the major concern is with the possible effects of earthquakes on surface facilities, underground facilities, and equipment. During the decommissioned phase, the major concern is with the potential effects of earthquakes on the geologic formation, which may result in a reduction in isolation capacity. Existing standards and guides or criteria used for the static and seismic design of licensed nuclear facilities were reviewed and evaluated for their applicability to repository design. This report is directed mainly toward the development of seismic design criteria for the underground structures of repositories. An initial step in the development of seismic design criteria for the underground structures of repositories is the development of performance criteria, or minimum standards of acceptable behavior. A number of possible damage modes are identified for the operating phase of the repository; however, no damage modes are foreseen that would perturb the long-term function of the repository, except for the possibility of increased permeability within the rock mass. Subsequent steps in formulating acceptable seismic design criteria for the underground structures involve the quantification of the design process. The report discusses the necessity of specifying the form of ground motion that would be needed for seismic analysis and the procedures that may be used for making ground motion predictions. Further discussions outline what is needed for analysis, including rock properties, failure criteria, modeling techniques, seismic hardening criteria for the host rock mass, and probabilistic considerations

  11. CAED Document Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Compliance Assurance and Enforcement Division Document Repository (CAEDDOCRESP) provides internal and external access of Inspection Records, Enforcement Actions, and...

  12. Administrative Data Repository (ADR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Administrative Data Repository (ADR) was established to provide support for the administrative data elements relative to multiple categories of a person entity...

  13. Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model Analyses of Heterogeneity and Thermal-Loading Factors for the Proposed Repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glascoe, L.G.; Buscheck, T.A.; Gansemer, J.; Sun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2002-01-01

    The MultiScale ThermoHydrologic Model (MSTHM) predicts thermohydrologic (TH) conditions in emplacement drifts and the adjoining host rock throughout the proposed nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The MSTHM is a computationally efficient approach that accounts for TH processes occurring at a scale of a few tens of centimeters around individual waste packages and emplacement drifts, and for heat flow at the multi-kilometer scale at Yucca Mountain. The modeling effort presented here is an early investigation of the repository and is simulated at a lower temperature mode and with a different panel loading than the repository currently being considered for license application. We present these recent lower temperature mode MSTHM simulations that address the influence of repository-scale thermal-conductivity heterogeneity and the influence of preclosure operational factors affecting thermal-loading conditions. We can now accommodate a complex repository layout with emplacement drifts lying in non-parallel planes using a superposition process that combines results from multiple mountain-scale submodels. This development, along with other improvements to the MSTHM, enables more rigorous analyses of preclosure operational factors. These improvements include the ability to (1) predict TH conditions on a drift-by-drift basis, (2) represent sequential emplacement of waste packages along the drifts, and (3) incorporate distance- and time-dependent heat-removal efficiency associated with drift ventilation. Alternative approaches to addressing repository-scale thermal-conductivity heterogeneity are investigated. We find that only one of the four MSTHM submodel types needs to incorporate thermal-conductivity heterogeneity. For a particular repository design, we find that the most influential parameters are (1) percolation-flux distribution, (2) thermal-conductivity heterogeneity within the host-rock units, (3) the sequencing of waste-package emplacement, and (4) the

  14. Application of geostatistical methods to long-term safety analyses for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehlig, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    Long-term safety analyses are an important part of the design and optimisation process as well as of the licensing procedure for final repositories for radioactive waste in deep geological formations. For selected scenarios describing possible evolutions of the repository system in the post-closure phase, quantitative consequence analyses are performed. Due to the complexity of the phenomena of concern and the large timeframes under consideration, several types of uncertainties have to be taken into account. The modelling work for the far-field (geosphere) surrounding or overlaying the repository is based on model calculations concerning the groundwater movement and the resulting migration of radionuclides which possibly will be released from the repository. In contrast to engineered systems, the geosphere shows a strong spatial variability of facies, materials and material properties. The paper presented here describes the first steps towards a quantitative approach for an uncertainty assessment taking into account this variability. Due to the availability of a large amount of data and information of several types, the Gorleben site (Germany) has been used for a case study in order to demonstrate the method. (orig.)

  15. Second generation waste package design and storage concept for the Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, Joseph Sam; Kar, Piyush; Misra, Manoranjan

    2006-01-01

    The reference waste package design and operating mode to be used in the Yucca Mountain Repository is reviewed. An alternate (second generation) operating concept and waste package design is proposed to reduce the risk of localized corrosion of waste packages and to reduce repository costs. The second generation waste package design and storage concept is proposed for implementation after the initial licensing and operation of the reference repository design. Implementation of the second generation concept at Yucca Mountain would follow regulatory processes analogous to those used successfully to extend the design life and uprate the power of commercial light water nuclear reactors in the United States. The second generation concept utilizes the benefits of hot dry storage to minimize the potential for localized corrosion of the waste package by liquid electrolytes. The second generation concept permits major reductions in repository costs by increasing the number of fuel assemblies stored in each waste package, by eliminating the need for titanium drip shields and by fabricating the outer container from corrosion resistant low alloy carbon steel

  16. Social Workers' Orientations toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Comparison with Psychologists and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Rubin, Allen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results from a large, cross-sectional survey of social workers, psychologists, and licensed marriage and family therapists (LMFTs) in Texas (N = 865) regarding their orientation toward and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). All social workers were recruited by e-mail using the state NASW Listserv (analysis…

  17. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow processes at a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Two complementary numerical models for analyzing high-level nuclear waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain have been developed. A vertical cross-sectional (X-Z) model permits a realistic representation of hydrogeologic features, such as alternating tilting layers of welded and non-welded tuffs. fault zones, and surface topography. An alternative radially symmetric (R-Z) model is more limited in its ability to describe the hydrogeology of the site, but is better suited to model heat transfer in the host rock. Our models include a comprehensive description of multiphase fluid and heat flow processes, including strong enhancements of vapor diffusion from pore-level phase change effects. The neighborhood of the repository is found to partially dry out from the waste heat. A condensation halo of large liquid saturation forms around the drying zone, from which liquid flows downward at large rates. System response to infiltration from the surface and to ventilation of mined openings is evaluated. The impact of the various flow processes on the waste isolation capabilities of the site is discussed

  18. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow processes at a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Two complementary numerical models for analyzing high-level nuclear waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain have been developed. A vertical cross-sectional (X-Z) model permits a realistic representation of hydrogeologic features, such as alternating tilting layers of welded and non-welded tuffs, fault zones, and surface topography. An alternative radially symmetric (R-Z) model is more limited in its ability to describe the hydrogeology of the site, but is better suited to model heat transfer in the host rock. Our models include a comprehensive description of multiphase fluid and heat flow processes, including strong enhancements of vapor diffusion from pore-level phase change effects. The neighborhood of the repository is found to partially dry out from the waste heat. A condensation halo of large liquid saturation forms around the drying zone, from which liquid flows downward at large rates. System response to infiltration from the surface and to ventilation of mined openings is evaluated. The impact of the various flow processes on the waste isolation capabilities of the site is discussed

  19. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 1: Introduction and Site Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    This first volume contains an introduction to the viability assessment, including the purpose, scope, waste forms, technical challenges, an historical perspective, regulatory framework, management of the repository, technical components, preparations for the license application, and repository milestones after the assessment. The second part of this first volume addresses characteristics of the Yucca Mountain site.

  20. Multi-physical process and system analysis for geological underground repositories in clay formations in the post closure phase; Multiphysikalische Prozess- und Systemanalyse fuer geologische Tiefenlager im Tonsteingebirge in der Nachverschlussphase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Juan

    2017-09-21

    In the framework of a safety case for repository systems in deep geological formations used for the disposal of high-level radioactive heat-generating waste, the THM-coupled long-term behaviour of such systems has to be analysed with consideration of 2-phase flow processes. These analyses are carried out for the repository near field and the isolating rock mass zone by performing numerical simulations, which require a sufficient process and system understanding with regard to the coupled physical processes involved and their interaction in the respective rock mass formation. The topic of this Ph.D. work is the analysis of the long-term system behaviour of a reference repository system built in clay stone rock mass. Therefore, numerical simulations have been carried out using the FTK-simulation tool which has been developed at the Chair in Waste Disposal and Geomechanics at the Clausthal University of Technology, in order to improve the process and system understanding for repository systems in the clay stone rock mass. In this context, the FTK-simulation tool is at first validated further by performing retrospective analyses of selected field and laboratory tests documented in the national and international literature, as well as of numerical simulation examples regarding the thermohydromechanical load-bearing behaviour of emplacement drifts. Besides, the FTK-simulation tool is used to perform a prognostic analysis concerning the laboratory investigations, which have been planned to qualitatively as well as quantitatively characterise the 2-phase flow properties of clay stone. In addition, a functional model approach is presented, which allows an abstract modeling of the secondary permeability development in the near field of drifts or shafts excavated and backfilled in clay stone rock mass as a function of the swelling pressure development in the bentonite backfill material. Finally, a comprehensive variation analysis is presented, which has been carried out for a

  1. Radioactive waste repository study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This is the second part of a report of a preliminary study for AECL. It considers the requirements for an underground waste repository for the disposal of wastes produced by the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Program. The following topics are discussed with reference to the repository: 1) geotechnical assessment, 2) hydrogeology and waste containment, 3) thermal loading and 4) rock mechanics. (author)

  2. Public Involvement in Repository Site Selection for Nuclear Waste: Towards a more Dynamic View in Decision-Making Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruetli, Pius; Stauffacher, Michael; Flueeler, Thomas; Scholz, Roland W. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). lnst. for Human-Environment Systems (HES)

    2006-09-15

    This paper discusses possibilities of public involvement in radioactive waste management. A general overview of the radioactive waste issue is presented referring to a proposed model of the respective decision-making process. Based on the well known participation ladder by Arnstein, we differentiate various intensities of public involvement. A matrix with public involvement and the decision-making process is introduced and three prototypical patterns are discussed. We conclude that time frame, the level of public involvement and the mission have to be considered as well as techniques and the overarching context - all in all, a systematic and dynamic approach for public involvement is needed.

  3. Public Involvement in Repository Site Selection for Nuclear Waste: Towards a more Dynamic View in Decision-Making Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruetli, Pius; Stauffacher, Michael; Flueeler, Thomas; Scholz, Roland W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses possibilities of public involvement in radioactive waste management. A general overview of the radioactive waste issue is presented referring to a proposed model of the respective decision-making process. Based on the well known participation ladder by Arnstein, we differentiate various intensities of public involvement. A matrix with public involvement and the decision-making process is introduced and three prototypical patterns are discussed. We conclude that time frame, the level of public involvement and the mission have to be considered as well as techniques and the overarching context - all in all, a systematic and dynamic approach for public involvement is needed

  4. Application of up-front licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, S.D.; Snell, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    AECL has been pioneering 'up-front' licensing of new reactor designs. The CANDU 3 design has been formally reviewed by AECB staff for a number of years. The CANDU 9 design has just started the up-front licensing process. The process gives designers, regulators and potential customers early confidence in the licensability of future plants. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Application of up-front licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, S D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Snell, V G [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    AECL has been pioneering `up-front` licensing of new reactor designs. The CANDU 3 design has been formally reviewed by AECB staff for a number of years. The CANDU 9 design has just started the up-front licensing process. The process gives designers, regulators and potential customers early confidence in the licensability of future plants. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Processes give selection location like fundamental approach gives the security for the repositories radioactive waste (radioactive installation) in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta Vidal, J.L.; Gil Castillo, R.O.; Chales Suarez, G.; Rodriguez Reyes, A.

    1998-01-01

    On the base for the best international practice, the requirements given by the IAEA, specialized national experience, the technician economic conditions and social matters give Cuba, it has been documented in the country the process the documented location for evacuation and storage the worn-out fuel lingeringly

  7. Lessons learned from the licensing process and the operational performance of the important to safety digital application implemented at the Mexican nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledesma-Carrion, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the main concerns detected during the licensing processes performed by the Mexican Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CNSNS) for the NUMAC-PRNM, the Integrated Computer Systems at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station (LVNPS) and for the Digital Control Console of the Triga Mark III Research Reactor (TMRR). The review and approval process was performed following the guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC); the regulatory frame applied includes the Code of Federal Regulation (10CFR50), some Regulatory Guides, such as: RG 1.152, RG 1.153, some Industrial Standards, for example: IEEE-279, IEEE-603, IEEE-7.4.3-2. Also, based on the operational experience taken from the LVNPS License Event Report (LER) reported under the 10CFR50.72 and 10CFR50.73 USNRC rules, and from the Report of Events to be Analyzed (REA) issued for a CNSNS agreement with the utility stated by the necessity to determine failure rates of digital equipment, some case studies and a preliminary failure cause classification is shown. The Event Report evaluation covered topics related to the software, hardware and firmware issues. Finally, the lessons learned from the licensing assessments and from the operational experience of the digital applications implemented are presented. It will also give the regulatory activities related to an IAEA international cooperation project on I and C digital upgrade concerns. (author)

  8. Stability of underground openings in the Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blejwas, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    The licensing of a repository for high-level radioactive waste will require assurances that underground openings do not experience frequent major instabilities, which are defined here as sudden movements of blocks of rock that limit the functions of the openings. Although the design of nuclear power plant structures is controlled by strict adherence to building or professional-engineering codes, this approach is not practical for the structural design of underground facilities because the design must accommodate a varied and partially defined geologic setting. However, regulations require the reduction of the potential for deleterious rock movement and the design of openings to maintain the option to retrieve waste. The present plans for meeting these requirements for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, include a program of state-of-the-art analyses and modified forms of existing empirically based design methods. An extensive experimental program is required to provide confidence in the results of the design-analysis process. 7 refs., 1 fig

  9. Making the Postclosure Safety Case for the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Swift; A.V. Luik

    2006-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in its advisory standard for geological repositories promulgated jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, explicitly distinguishes between the concepts of a safety case and a safety assessment. As defined in the advisory standard, the safety case is a broader set of arguments that provide confidence and substantiate the formal analyses of system safety made through the process of safety assessment. Although the IAEAYs definitions include both preclosure (i.e., operational) safety and post-closure performance in the overall safety assessment and safety case, the emphasis in here is on long-term performance after waste has been emplaced and the repository has been closed. This distinction between pre- and postclosure aspects of the repository is consistent with the U.S. regulatory framework defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Chapter 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 197, or 40 CFR 197) [2] and implemented by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Chapter 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63, or 10 CFR 63) [3]. The separation of the pre- and postclosure safety cases is also consistent with the way in which the U.S. Department of Energy has assigned responsibilities for developing the safety case. Bechtel SAIC Company is the Management and Operating contractor responsible for the design and operation of the Yucca Mountain facility and is therefore responsible for the preparation of the preclosure aspects of the safety case. Sandia National Laboratories has lead responsibility for scientific work evaluating post-closure performance, and therefore is responsible for developing the post-closure aspects of the safety case. In the context of the IAEA definitions, both preclosure and postclosure safety, including safety assessment and the safety case, will be documented in the license application being prepared for the

  10. Making the Postclosure Safety Case for the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Swift; A.V. Luik

    2006-08-28

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in its advisory standard for geological repositories promulgated jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, explicitly distinguishes between the concepts of a safety case and a safety assessment. As defined in the advisory standard, the safety case is a broader set of arguments that provide confidence and substantiate the formal analyses of system safety made through the process of safety assessment. Although the IAEAYs definitions include both preclosure (i.e., operational) safety and post-closure performance in the overall safety assessment and safety case, the emphasis in here is on long-term performance after waste has been emplaced and the repository has been closed. This distinction between pre- and postclosure aspects of the repository is consistent with the U.S. regulatory framework defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Chapter 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 197, or 40 CFR 197) [2] and implemented by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Chapter 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63, or 10 CFR 63) [3]. The separation of the pre- and postclosure safety cases is also consistent with the way in which the U.S. Department of Energy has assigned responsibilities for developing the safety case. Bechtel SAIC Company is the Management and Operating contractor responsible for the design and operation of the Yucca Mountain facility and is therefore responsible for the preparation of the preclosure aspects of the safety case. Sandia National Laboratories has lead responsibility for scientific work evaluating post-closure performance, and therefore is responsible for developing the post-closure aspects of the safety case. In the context of the IAEA definitions, both preclosure and postclosure safety, including safety assessment and the safety case, will be documented in the license application being prepared for the

  11. Search for a final repository. Final repository commission and the public. Questions concerning cooperation and progress of the process at half time of the commission; Endlagersuche. Endlager-Kommission und Oeffentlichkeit(en). Fragen nach Zusammenarbeit und Fortschritten im Prozess zur Halbzeit der Kommission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Monika C.M. (ed.) [Evangelische Akademie Loccum (Germany). Arbeitsbereich Naturwissenschaften, Oekologie und Umweltpolitik

    2016-08-01

    The volume includes the following contributions: Presumptions and success of public participation. Refusal as legitimate and necessary mean. Experiences form the participation process in Switzerland. Cooperation of the final repository commission and the public. Regional participation: the view of a process attendant in the Swiss procedure. Synergies or friction losses? Who is coordinating the institutions/activities and is bringing them together? Players in the nuclear waste conflict - rights and duties in the frame of the search for waste storage as safe as possible. Transparency and Participation - what is the role of online media in the site search process?.

  12. Public participation in the process of decision making related to site selection of low and intermediate radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerskov Klika, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the work with public related to the acceptance of low and intermediate radioactive waste disposal facility in the Republic of Croatia. Activities performing in the field of public relations in the Hazardous Waste Management Agency - APO have been described. The fact that all the important decisions on site selections and constructions of different facilities, frequently controversial, were made in the former system without involvement of the public, makes them more significant. Therefore, the public is afraid of being cheated and manipulated again. In order to represent APO not only as the expert ecologically interested actor in the decision-making process on site selection, the study on forming the ecological image of the agency, has been done. In accordance with the results of the study, the activities related to the permanent informing and educating of the public, are being performed. In the end, it has been concluded that it is not enough to inform the public properly, accurately and timely, but it is necessary to educate the public too, because only in the way the public can be thoroughly involved in the decision-making process on site selection of radioactive waste disposal

  13. Consolidated guidance about materials licenses: Program-specific guidance about portable gauge licenses. Final report; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacca, P.C.; Whitten, J.E.; Pelchat, J.M.; Arredondo, S.A.; Matson, E.R.; Lewis, S.H.; Collins, D.J.; Santiago, P.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Industrial and Medical Nuclear Safety; Tingle, W. [Dept. of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, Raleigh, NC (United States). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1997-05-01

    As part of its redesign of the materials licensing process, NRC is consolidating and updating numerous guidance documents into a single comprehensive repository as described in NUREG-1539 and draft NUREG-1541. NUREG-1556, Vol. 1, is the first program-specific guidance developed for the new process and will serve as a template for subsequent program-specific guidance. This document is intended for use by applicants, licensees, and NRC staff and will also be available to Agreement States. This document supersedes the guidance previously found in draft Regulatory Guide DG-0008, ``Applications for the Use of Sealed Sources in Portable Gauging Devices,`` and in NMSs Policy and guidance Directive 2-07, ``Standard Review Plan for Applications for Use of Sealed Sources in Portable Gauging Devices.`` This final report takes a more risk-informed, performance-based approach to licensing portable gauges, and reduces the information(amount and level of detail) needed to support an application to use these devices. It incorporates many suggests submitted during the comment period on draft NUREG-1556, Volume 1. When published, this final report should be used in preparing portable gauge license applications. NRC staff will use this final report in reviewing these applications.

  14. Consolidated guidance about materials licenses: Program-specific guidance about portable gauge licenses. Final report; Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacca, P.C.; Whitten, J.E.; Pelchat, J.M.; Arredondo, S.A.; Matson, E.R.; Lewis, S.H.; Collins, D.J.; Santiago, P.A.; Tingle, W.

    1997-05-01

    As part of its redesign of the materials licensing process, NRC is consolidating and updating numerous guidance documents into a single comprehensive repository as described in NUREG-1539 and draft NUREG-1541. NUREG-1556, Vol. 1, is the first program-specific guidance developed for the new process and will serve as a template for subsequent program-specific guidance. This document is intended for use by applicants, licensees, and NRC staff and will also be available to Agreement States. This document supersedes the guidance previously found in draft Regulatory Guide DG-0008, ''Applications for the Use of Sealed Sources in Portable Gauging Devices,'' and in NMSs Policy and guidance Directive 2-07, ''Standard Review Plan for Applications for Use of Sealed Sources in Portable Gauging Devices.'' This final report takes a more risk-informed, performance-based approach to licensing portable gauges, and reduces the information(amount and level of detail) needed to support an application to use these devices. It incorporates many suggests submitted during the comment period on draft NUREG-1556, Volume 1. When published, this final report should be used in preparing portable gauge license applications. NRC staff will use this final report in reviewing these applications

  15. Greenpeace and the EIA process with special reference to the siting of a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksson, A.

    1995-01-01

    The author argues as follows: The legislation which currently regulates EIS, does not give any party other than the proponent the possibility of exercising influence over the EIA. Therefore, an extensive review and amendment of the existing legislation is necessary if the general public is to participate in the process. This should be regarded as necessary, if SKB is to gain general acceptance of its work. Work on developing a suitable method and identifying a suitable site is going on, but is not conducted in such a manner that it gives the general public an adequate possibility of participating. Furthermore, decision-makers in the candidate municipalities are not being given insight into the work. A specially established EIA authority, charged with the task of supervising the EIA, may lead to that the problems will be investigated in a better way, that can lead to the selection of the best method as well as the best site

  16. Greenpeace and the EIA process with special reference to the siting of a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredriksson, A. [Greenpeace (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    The author argues as follows: The legislation which currently regulates EIS, does not give any party other than the proponent the possibility of exercising influence over the EIA. Therefore, an extensive review and amendment of the existing legislation is necessary if the general public is to participate in the process. This should be regarded as necessary, if SKB is to gain general acceptance of its work. Work on developing a suitable method and identifying a suitable site is going on, but is not conducted in such a manner that it gives the general public an adequate possibility of participating. Furthermore, decision-makers in the candidate municipalities are not being given insight into the work. A specially established EIA authority, charged with the task of supervising the EIA, may lead to that the problems will be investigated in a better way, that can lead to the selection of the best method as well as the best site.

  17. Modeling and Analysis on Radiological Safety Assessment of Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jung, Jong Tae; Kang, Chul Hyung (and others)

    2008-04-15

    Modeling study and analysis for technical support for the safety and performance assessment of the low- and intermediate level (LILW) repository partially needed for radiological environmental impact reporting which is essential for the licenses for construction and operation of LILW has been fulfilled. Throughout this study such essential area for technical support for safety and performance assessment of the LILW repository and its licensing as gas generation and migration in and around the repository, risk analysis and environmental impact during transportation of LILW, biosphere modeling and assessment for the flux-to-dose conversion factors for human exposure as well as regional and global groundwater modeling and analysis has been carried out.

  18. Modeling and Analysis on Radiological Safety Assessment of Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jung, Jong Tae; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2008-04-01

    Modeling study and analysis for technical support for the safety and performance assessment of the low- and intermediate level (LILW) repository partially needed for radiological environmental impact reporting which is essential for the licenses for construction and operation of LILW has been fulfilled. Throughout this study such essential area for technical support for safety and performance assessment of the LILW repository and its licensing as gas generation and migration in and around the repository, risk analysis and environmental impact during transportation of LILW, biosphere modeling and assessment for the flux-to-dose conversion factors for human exposure as well as regional and global groundwater modeling and analysis has been carried out

  19. Centralized mouse repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  20. Modeling of Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Processes for Bentonite in a Clay-rock Repository for Heat-generating Nuclear Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Rutqvist, J.; Zheng, L.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) that include a bentonite-based buffer are designed to isolate the high-level radioactive waste emplaced in tunnels in deep geological formations. The heat emanated from the waste can drive the moisture flow transport and induce strongly coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes within the bentonite buffer and may also impact the evolution of the excavation disturbed zone and the sealing between the buffer and walls of an emplacement tunnel The flow and contaminant transport potential along the disturbed zone can be minimized by backfilling the tunnels with bentonite, if it provides enough swelling stress when hydrated by the host rock. The swelling capability of clay minerals within the bentonite is important for sealing gaps between bentonite block, and between the EBS and the surrounding host rock. However, a high temperature could result in chemical alteration of bentonite-based buffer and backfill materials through illitization, which may compromise the function of these EBS components by reducing their plasticity and capability to swell under wetting. Therefore, an adequate THMC coupling scheme is required to understand and to predict the changes of bentonite for identifying whether EBS bentonite can sustain higher temperatures. More comprehensive links between chemistry and mechanics, taking advantage of the framework provided by a dual-structure model, named Barcelona Expansive Model (BExM), was implemented in TOUGHREACT-FLAC3D and is used to simulate the response of EBS bentonite in in clay formation for a generic case. The current work is to evaluate the chemical changes in EBS bentonite and the effects on the bentonite swelling stress under high temperature. This work sheds light on the interaction between THMC processes, evaluates the potential deterioration of EBS bentonite and supports the decision making in the design of a nuclear waste repository in light of the maximum allowance

  1. The licensing process of the design modifications of Cernavoda 2 NPP resulting from the operating experience of CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, L.

    2005-01-01

    The CANDU 6 plant now under construction in Cernavoda include over two hundred significant improvements made in order to comply with current codes and standards and licensing requirements relative to the operating CANDU 6 in Romania. These evolutionary improvements are incorporated in CANDU 6 design taking advance of CANDU operating experience, of the designer company research and development and technical advances worldwide in order to further enhance safety, reliability and economics. This paper gives a general idea of the evaluation of the modifications of the Cernavoda 2 nuclear power plant against the design of Cernavoda 1 and states the safety principles and requirements which are the basis for this evaluation. (author)

  2. A real-time material control concept for safeguarding special nuclear material in United States licensed processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes general safeguards research being undertaken by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Efforts to improve the ability of United States licensed plants to contend with the perceived threat of covert material theft are emphasized. The framework for this improvement is to break down the internal control and accounting system into subsystems to achieve material isolation, inventory control, inventory characterization, and inventory containment analysis. A general programme is outlined to develop and evaluate appropriate mechanisms, integrate selected mechanisms into subsystems, and evaluate the subsystems in the context of policy requirements. (author)

  3. National Radwaste Repository Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce (Repository) is described. The Mochovce National Radioactive Waste Repository is a surface multi-barrier type storage facility for solid and treated solidified radioactive wastes generated from the Slovak Republic nuclear power plants operation and decommissioning, research institutes, laboratories and hospitals. The Repository comprises a system of single- and double-row storage boxes. The first double-row is enclosed by a steel-structure building. The 18 x 6 x 5.5 m storage boxes are made of reinforced concrete. The wall thickness is 600 mm. Two-double-rows, i.e. 80 storage boxes were built as part of Stage I (1 row = 20 storage boxes). Each storage box has a storage capacity of 90 fibre concrete containers of 3.1 m 3 volume. The total storage capacity is 7200 containers with the overall storage volume of 22320 m 3

  4. NIA Aging Cell Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To facilitate aging research on cells in culture, the NIA provides support for the NIA Aging Cell Repository, located at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research...

  5. NIDDK Central Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIDDK Central Repository stores biosamples, genetic and other data collected in designated NIDDK-funded clinical studies. The purpose of the NIDDK Central...

  6. Current status of construction license of PEFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Cho, J. S.; Min, Y. S.; Nam, J. M.; Jeon, G. P.; Park, S. S.; Jo, J. H.; Song, I. T.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2010 August, PEFP(Proton Engineering Frontier Project)'s Proton Accelerator Research Center has been under construction so far. Generally, in advance of construction startup, many kinds of licenses should be acquired along with the types of construction works. To acquire a license in time, each item should meet the standard by the related regulation, including not only procedural but also content aspect. In the advent of internet era, electronic government system has been adopted in many governmental functions: So is the national construction license acquisition system. Owing to the system, both approval and documentation functions in licensing are integrated in online computer network which provide us simplification in process and easy accessibility to license data. However, aside from these construction licenses, other types of licenses still remain separately managed: Machinery, electric facilities, and so on. Moreover, all the licenses have the priority order and take legal term in processing. So, to avoid any time delay in license acquisition, we organized license hierarchy and found out the priority among them. Thereafter, according to their legal term in approval and acquisition, whole license acquisition schedule was arranged and we completed all the necessary licenses acquisition in time In this study, we summarize the current status of license acquisition on Proton Accelerator Research Center Construction, and manifest how they have been and will be managed systematically

  7. Current status of construction license of PEFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. Y.; Cho, J. S.; Min, Y. S.; Nam, J. M.; Jeon, G. P.; Park, S. S.; Jo, J. H.; Song, I. T. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Since 2010 August, PEFP(Proton Engineering Frontier Project)'s Proton Accelerator Research Center has been under construction so far. Generally, in advance of construction startup, many kinds of licenses should be acquired along with the types of construction works. To acquire a license in time, each item should meet the standard by the related regulation, including not only procedural but also content aspect. In the advent of internet era, electronic government system has been adopted in many governmental functions: So is the national construction license acquisition system. Owing to the system, both approval and documentation functions in licensing are integrated in online computer network which provide us simplification in process and easy accessibility to license data. However, aside from these construction licenses, other types of licenses still remain separately managed: Machinery, electric facilities, and so on. Moreover, all the licenses have the priority order and take legal term in processing. So, to avoid any time delay in license acquisition, we organized license hierarchy and found out the priority among them. Thereafter, according to their legal term in approval and acquisition, whole license acquisition schedule was arranged and we completed all the necessary licenses acquisition in time In this study, we summarize the current status of license acquisition on Proton Accelerator Research Center Construction, and manifest how they have been and will be managed systematically.

  8. Managing and Evaluating Digital Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccala, Alesia; Oppenheim, Charles; Dhiensa, Rajveen

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: We examine the role of the digital repository manager, discuss the future of repository management and evaluation and suggest that library and information science schools develop new repository management curricula. Method: Face-to-face interviews were carried out with managers of five different types of repositories and a Web-based…

  9. Radioactive waste repository study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This is the first part of a report of a preliminary study for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. It considers the requirements for an underground waste repository for the disposal of wastes produced by the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Program. The following topics are discussed with reference to the repository: 1) underground layout, 2) cost estimates, 3) waste handling, 4) retrievability, decommissioning, sealing and monitoring, and 5) research and design engineering requirements. (author)

  10. Repository simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The repository simulation experiments described in this paper are designed to assess the performance of SRP waste glass under the most realistic repository conditions that can be obtained in the laboratory. These tests simulate the repository environment as closely as possible and introduce systematically the variability of the geology, groundwater chemistry, and waste package components during the leaching of the waste glass. The tests evaluate waste form performance under site-specific conditions, which differ for each of the geologic repositories under consideration. Data from these experiments will aid in the development of a realistic source term that can describe the release of radionuclides from SRP waste glass as a component of proposed waste packages. Hence, this information can be useful to optimize waste package design for SRP waste glass and to provide data for predicting long-term performance and subsequent conformance to regulations. The repository simulation tests also help to bridge the gap in interpreting results derived from tests performed under the control of the laboratory to the uncertainity and variability of field tests. In these experiments, site-specific repository components and conditions are emphasized and only the site specific materials contact the waste forms. An important feature of these tests is that both actual and simulated waste glasses are tested identically. 7 figures, 2 tables

  11. Repository operational criteria analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the ''Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies'' (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations, considering the interfaces and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The study addresses regulatory criteria related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. The study task developed regulatory concepts or potential repository operational criteria (PROC) based on analysis of a repository's safety functions and other regulations for similar facilities. These regulatory concepts or PROC were used as a basis to assess the sufficiency and adequacy of the current criteria in 10 CFR Part 60. Where the regulatory concepts were same as current operational criteria, these criteria were referenced. The operations criteria referenced or the PROC developed are given in this report. Detailed analyses used to develop the regulatory concepts and any necessary PROC for those regulations that may require a minor change are also presented. The results of the ROC task showed a need for further analysis and possible major rule change related to the design bases of a geologic repository operations area, siting, and radiological emergency planning

  12. Overall review strategy for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's High-Level Waste Repository Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.

    1994-11-01

    The Overall Review Strategy gives general guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for conducting it's license application and pre-license application reviews. These reviews are in support of the Commission's construction authorization decision for a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Objectives and strategies are defined that focus the staff's reviews on determining compliance with requirements of 10 CFR Part 60. These strategies define how the staff prioritizes its reviews on those key technical uncertainties considered to be most important to repository performance. Strategies also give guidance for developing, in an integrated way, the License Application Review Plan together with supporting performance assessments, analyses, and research

  13. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Javier B; Gimeno, María J; Auqué, Luis F; Acero, Patricia

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water-rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulation of hygric and thermal processes at ventilated tunnel surfaces of a deep geological repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppei, J.; Mayer, G.; Hubschwerlen, N.; Pepin, G.; Wendling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The calculation of vapour and heat exchange in drifts is a fundamental task when designing the ventilation system for a deep geological repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay. In general, it requires a complex numerical modelling of transient (forced) convective and conductive heat and fluid transport in both the ventilated drifts and the adjacent rock mass. The humidity of the air in the drifts depends - along with the meteorological conditions at the entrance - mostly on the thermal-hygric transitional conditions on the exposed rock surface of the drift walls. Some portions receive water influx while others receive heat influx from the wastes which have already been emplaced in the host rock beyond the drifts. The coupling between the transport processes in the host rock and the transfer processes along drift wall is treated in a simplified manner: The processes described by coefficients for heat (Nusselt number) and vapour (Sherwood number) both depend on the ventilation velocity (Reynolds number). In Poppei et al., 2009, we discuss an approach involving supportive TOUGH2 computations for coupling the complex transport problems in the host rock with the air flow in a simplified manner. The results obtained with TOUGH2 were processed and applied for the transient analysis of temperature and humidity changes of the ventilation air in a 1D approach along the ventilation path. Furthermore, the analysis of the evaporation along the drift wall was supported by a one-dimensional radial-symmetric EOS9 model. The results of the TOUGH2 computations with different Sherwood numbers were parameterized accordingly. The prevailing humidity along the drift wall was then determined with an iterative approach whereby the humidity was controlled either by the ventilation (i.e. through the Sherwood number) or the leakage capacity of the host rock. Finally, the humidity changes in the ventilation air were derived from the computed

  15. Groundwater flow modelling of an abandoned partially open repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockgaard, Niclas (Golder Associates AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    As a part of the license application, according to the nuclear activities act, for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken a series of groundwater flow modelling studies. These represent time periods with different hydraulic conditions and the simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. The modelling study presented here serves as an input for analyses of so-called future human actions that may affect the repository. The objective of the work was to investigate the hydraulic influence of an abandoned partially open repository. The intention was to illustrate a pessimistic scenario of the effect of open tunnels in comparison to the reference closure of the repository. The effects of open tunnels were studied for two situations with different boundary conditions: A 'temperate' case with present-day boundary conditions and a generic future 'glacial' case with an ice sheet covering the repository. The results were summarized in the form of analyses of flow in and out from open tunnels, the effect on hydraulic head and flow in the surrounding rock volume, and transport performance measures of flow paths from the repository to surface

  16. Groundwater flow modelling of an abandoned partially open repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockgaard, Niclas

    2010-12-01

    As a part of the license application, according to the nuclear activities act, for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken a series of groundwater flow modelling studies. These represent time periods with different hydraulic conditions and the simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. The modelling study presented here serves as an input for analyses of so-called future human actions that may affect the repository. The objective of the work was to investigate the hydraulic influence of an abandoned partially open repository. The intention was to illustrate a pessimistic scenario of the effect of open tunnels in comparison to the reference closure of the repository. The effects of open tunnels were studied for two situations with different boundary conditions: A 'temperate' case with present-day boundary conditions and a generic future 'glacial' case with an ice sheet covering the repository. The results were summarized in the form of analyses of flow in and out from open tunnels, the effect on hydraulic head and flow in the surrounding rock volume, and transport performance measures of flow paths from the repository to surface

  17. Study of nuclear waste storage capacity at Yucca mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Apted, M.; Kessler, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain repository is applying license for storing 70000 MTHM nuclear waste including commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The 70000 MTHM is a legal not the technical limit. To study the technical limit, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) carried out a systematic study to explore the potential impact if the repository will accept more waste. This paper describes the model and results for evaluating the spent-fuel disposal capacity for a repository at Yucca Mountain from the thermal and hydrological point of view. Two proposed alternative repository designs are analyzed, both of which would fit into the currently well-characterized site and, therefore, not necessitating any additional site characterization at Yucca Mountain. The two- and three-dimensional models for coupled thermo-hydrological analysis extends from the surface to the water table, covering all the major and subgroup rock layers of the planned repository, as well as formations above and below the repository horizon. A dual-porosity and dual-permeability approach is used to model coupled heat and mass transfer through fracture formations. The waste package heating and ventilation are all assumed to follow those of the current design. The results show that the repository is able to accommodate three times the amount of spent fuel compared to the current design, without extra spatial expansion or exceeding current thermal and hydrological constraints. (authors)

  18. Repository development status in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Beceiro, Alvaro; Zuloaga, Pablo [ENRESA (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    The paper describes the status of repository development for the different waste categories. Low and Intermediate Waste Disposal facility of El Cabril was commissioned in 1992 and is in normal operation. The major modifications and activities during the last years are the adaptation to waste streams not initially foreseen such as some decommissioning waste or waste from steel industry, and the improvement of its performance assessment, supported by a R and D and refined models. As part of this facility, a new disposal facility specifically intended for very low activity waste has been constructed and commissioned in July 2008. Its design is based on the European Directive for hazardous waste disposal. National policy for Nuclear Spent Fuel and High-Level waste is focused on the development of a centralized storage facility of the vault type, whose site location would be selected through a volunteering process. Meanwhile, with the aim of solving specific problems, three individual storage facilities are in different status at reactor sites. Research on final solution, including some repository aspects as well as separation and transmutation are being carried out in accordance to ENRESA's R and D program. ENRESA has developed conceptual designs for non site specific repositories, both in granite and clay, and has carried out their corresponding performance assessment exercises. (authors)

  19. The probabilistic approach in the licensing process and the development of probabilistic risk assessment methodology in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togo, Y.; Sato, K.

    1981-01-01

    The probabilistic approach has long seemed to be one of the most comprehensive methods for evaluating the safety of nuclear plants. So far, most of the guidelines and criteria for licensing are based on the deterministic concept. However, there have been a few examples to which the probabilistic approach was directly applied, such as the evaluation of aircraft crashes and turbine missiles. One may find other examples of such applications. However, a much more important role is now to be played by this concept, in implementing the 52 recommendations from the lessons learned from the TMI accident. To develop the probabilistic risk assessment methodology most relevant to Japanese situations, a five-year programme plan has been adopted and is to be conducted by the Japan Atomic Research Institute from fiscal 1980. Various problems have been identified and are to be solved through this programme plan. The current status of developments is described together with activities outside the government programme. (author)

  20. Comparing the co-evolution of production and test code in open source and industrial developer test processes through repository mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rompaey, B.; Zaidman, A.E.; Van Deursen, A.; Demeyer, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper represents an extension to our previous work: Mining software repositories to study coevolution of production & test code. Proceedings of the International Conference on Software Testing, Verification, and Validation (ICST), IEEE Computer Society, 2008; doi:10.1109/ICST.2008.47

  1. The procedure of alternative site selection within the report of the study group on the radioactive waste final repository selection process (AKEnd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nies, A.

    2005-01-01

    The study group on the selection procedures of radioactive waste final repository sites has presented the report in December 2002. The author dicusses the consequences of this report with respect to the site selection focussing on two topics: the serach for the best possible site and the prevention of prejudices

  2. Licensing plan for UMTRA project disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office developed a plan to define UMTRA Project licensing program objectives and establish a process enabling the DOE to document completion of remedial actions in compliance with 40 CFR 1 92 and the requirements of the NRC general license. This document supersedes the January 1987 Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1987). The plan summarizes the legislative and regulatory basis for licensing, identifies participating agencies and their roles and responsibilities, defines key activities and milestones in the licensing process, and details the coordination of these activities. This plan provides an overview of the UMTRA Project from the end of remedial actions through the NRC's acceptance of a disposal site under the general license. The licensing process integrates large phases of the UMTRA Project. Other programmatic UMTRA Project documents listed in Section 6.0 provide supporting information

  3. Preparing for Construction and Operation of Geological Repositories - Challenges to the Regulator and the Implementer. Proceedings of the Joint RF/IGSC Workshop, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, 25-27 January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    diverse reflection of the various developmental levels of the different geological disposal programmes, ranging from general information on organisations and their licensing regimes, to specific information on technical, regulatory, managerial, administrative and procedural issues. This joint workshop was attended by a balanced mix of implementers and regulators from 14 countries and international organisations (e.g. IAEA, EU). Following the introductory session (Session 1), implementers and regulators from various national programmes (e.g. Finland, Sweden, Canada, Switzerland, etc.) presented their experiences and viewpoints on issues related to construction and operation of geological disposal facilities in Session 2. Session 3 of the workshop focused on industrial feasibility of construction in which key safety issues that must be addressed were presented and discussed. Session 4 continued to explore the issue of industrial feasibility but with the focus switched to the operation of geological repositories. Main operational issues and how to address accidents and disturbances in the design of the various disposal systems were presented. The impact of retrievability on the design and operation of a repository was also examined. The last session of the workshop, Session 5, evaluated various licensing aspects during repository development. Specifically, this session looked into how a licensing process affects the implementation of a repository and also the effect of optimization on late design modifications. To engage participants in more in-depth discussions on the presented topics and also to encourage professional exchange, 3 round table discussions were carried out in Sessions 3-5, to discuss the targeted questions. Results of the group discussions were reported by the rapporteurs. A synthesis of all presentations and conclusions of each session is provided in this document

  4. The Monticello license renewal project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, J.M.; Harrison, D.L.; Pickens, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    Today, 111 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the United States. The operating license of the oldest operating plant will expire in 2003, one-third of the existing operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the newest plant's operating license will expire in 2033. The National Energy Strategy (NES) prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) assumes that 70 percent of the current operating plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration. Power from current operating plants can assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth and improved U.S. competitiveness. In order to preserve this energy resource, three major tasks must be successfully completed: (1) establishment of regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of License Renewal Applications (LRAs); (2) development of technical criteria and bases for monitoring, refurbishing or replacing plant equipment; and (3) demonstration of the regulatory process by a plant obtaining a renewed license. Since 1986, the DOE has been working with the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of a nuclear power plant by renewing the operating license. The Monticello Lead Plant demonstration project was initiated in September 1988, following the Pilot Plant studies. This paper is primarily focused on the status and insights gained from the Northern States Power Company (NSP) Monticello Lead Plant demonstration project. The following information is included: (1) Current Status - Monticello License Renewal Application; (2) Economic Analysis; (3) License Renewal Regulatory Uncertainty Issues; (4) Key Decisions; (5) Management Structure; (6) Technical and Licensing Perspective; (7) NRC Interactions; (8) Summary

  5. Oceanographic Data Repositories: An Analysis of the International Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Couto Corrêa da Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The preservation and organization of oceanographic research data enables the scientific community to consult and reuse information of different kinds, and this is made possible by the repositories, meaning the services that facilitate data storage and dissemination. This paper reviews the current situation of oceanographic data repositories across different countries and evaluates them according to a series of indicators. The writers propose that although interest in storing and reusing oceanographic data has increased in recent years, the repositories are still in the process of developing their systems for processing, disseminating and reusing data. The repositories also differ in terms of architecture and the organizational level of the content they offer.

  6. Evaluation Of Groundwater Pathways And Travel Times From The Nevada Test Site To The Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.F. Pohlman; J. Zhu; M. Ye; J. Chapman; C. Russell; D.S. Shafer

    2006-01-01

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been recommended as a deep geological repository for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If YM is licensed as a repository by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, it will be important to identify the potential for radionuclides to migrate from underground nuclear testing areas located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the hydraulically downgradient repository area to ensure that monitoring does not incorrectly attribute repository failure to radionuclides originating from other sources. In this study, we use the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to investigate potential groundwater migration pathways and associated travel times from the NTS to the proposed YM repository area. Using results from the calibrated DVRFS model and the particle tracking post-processing package MODPATH, we modeled three-dimensional groundwater advective pathways in the NTS and YM region. Our study focuses on evaluating the potential for groundwater pathways between the NTS and YM withdrawal area and whether travel times for advective flow along these pathways coincide with the prospective monitoring timeframe at the proposed repository. We include uncertainty in effective porosity, as this is a critical variable in the determination of time for radionuclides to travel from the NTS region to the YM withdrawal area. Uncertainty in porosity is quantified through evaluation of existing site data and expert judgment and is incorporated in the model through Monte Carlo simulation. Since porosity information is limited for this region, the uncertainty is quite large and this is reflected in the results as a large range in simulated groundwater travel times

  7. Developments and studies on the (T)HMC processes in a final repository for heat generating radioactive wastes. Synthesis and final report; Entwicklungen und Untersuchungen zu (T)HMC-Prozessen eines Endlagers fuer Waerme entwickelnde radioaktive Abfaelle. Synthese und Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyand, Torben [Bonn Univ. (Germany); Bracke, Guido; Fischer, Heidemarie; Frieling, Gerd; Hansmeier, Christina; Hotzel, Stephan; Kock, Ingo; Seher, Holger

    2014-10-15

    The report on developments and studies on the (T)HMC (thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical) processes in a final repository for heat generating radioactive wastes covers the following topics: description of the projects, applied codes: TOUGH2, FLAC3D, TOUGH2 and FLAC3D, TOUHREACT/PetraSim, MARNIE, PHREEQC, geochemists workbench, SUSA; safety relevant singular processes in the transition phase, uncertainties due to process interactions, coupling of mass transport and geochemical equilibria, further developments and application of numerical simulations in the transition phase.

  8. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, Javier B.; Gimeno, María J.; Auqué, Luis F.; Acero, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water–rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations. - Highlights: • Laxemar (Sweden) groundwater is the combined result

  9. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Javier B., E-mail: jgomez@unizar.es; Gimeno, María J., E-mail: mjgimeno@unizar.es; Auqué, Luis F., E-mail: lauque@unizar.es; Acero, Patricia, E-mail: patriace@unizar.es

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water–rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations. - Highlights: • Laxemar (Sweden) groundwater is the combined result

  10. Regulatory guidance for license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed 10 CFR Part 54 rule proceduralizes the process for license renewal by identifying both the administrative and technical requirements for a renewal application. To amplify and support this regulation, written guidance has been provided in the form of a draft Regulatory Guide (DG 1009) and a draft Standard Review Plan for License Renewal (NUREG 1299). This guidance is scheduled to be finalized in 1992. Similar guidance will be provided for the proposed revisions to 10 CFR Part 51 concerning the environmental aspects of license renewal. (author)

  11. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  12. 2015 Business Licenses

    Data.gov (United States)

    City of Jackson, Mississippi — This data displays all business license information for the year of 2015. This information details license classifications and status. This information will updated...

  13. Threats and benefits updated information on local opinions regarding the spent nuclear fuel repository in Finland - 16128

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, Matti; Kari, Mika; Litmanen, Tapio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to provide updated information on local opinion regarding the siting of a spent nuclear fuel repository in Finland. The main question is how the residents of the municipality perceive the threats and benefits of the repository. In accordance with the Decision in Principle by the Council of State passed in 2000, the Olkiluoto area in Municipality of Eurajoki was chosen as the location for the repository to accommodate spent nuclear fuel produced in Finland. Updated information on local opinions is needed as the siting process is approaching the next phase, the application for a construction license by 2012. The nuclear waste management company Posiva, owned by the utilities Teollisuuden Voima and Fortum Power and Heat, has also applied for a new Decision in Principle (DiP) for expansion of the repository. The data provided in this paper is based on a survey carried out in June 2008. The respondents were selected from the residents of the municipality of Eurajoki and the neighbouring municipalities using stratified random sampling (N=3000). The response rate of the survey was 20% (N=606). The paper is part of a joint research project between the University of Jyvaeskylae and the University of Tampere. The research project 'Follow-up research regarding socio-economic effects and communication of final disposal facility of spent nuclear fuel in Eurajoki and its neighbouring municipalities' is funded by the Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (KYT2010). (authors)

  14. Developing design premises for a KBS-3V repository based on results from the safety assessment - 16027

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Hedin, Allan

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the planned license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), has developed design premises from a long term safety aspect of a KBS-3V repository for spent nuclear fuel. The purpose is to provide requirements from a long term safety aspect, to form the basis for the development of the reference design of the repository and to justify that design. Design premises typically concern specification on what mechanical loads the barriers must withstand, restrictions on the composition of barrier materials or acceptance criteria for the various underground excavations. These design constraints, if all fulfilled by the actual design, should form a good basis for demonstrating repository safety. The justification for these design premises is derived from SKB's most recent safety assessment SR-Can complemented by a few additional analyses. Some of the design premises may be modified in future stages of SKB's program, as a result of analyses based on more detailed site data and a more developed understanding of processes of importance for long-term safety. (authors)

  15. Types of safety assessments of near surface repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateeva, M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to presents the classification of different types safety assessments of near surface repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste substantiated with results of safety assessments generated in Bulgaria. The different approach of safety assessments applied for old existing repository as well as for site selection for construction new repository is outlined. The regulatory requirements in Bulgaria define three main types of assessments: Safety assessment; Technical substation of repository safety; Assessment of repository influence on environment that is in form of report prepared from the Ministry of environment and waters on the base of results obtained in two first types of assessments. Additionally first type is subdivided in three categories - preliminary safety assessment, safety assessment and post closure safety assessment, which are generated using deterministic approach. The technical substation of repository safety is generated using probabilistic approach. Safety assessment results that are presented here are based on evaluation of existing old repository type 'Radon' in Novi Han and real site selection procedure for new near surface repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste from nuclear power station in Kozloduy. The important role of safety assessment for improvement the repository safety as well as for repository licensing, correct site selection and right choice of engineer barriers and repository design is discussed using generated results. (author)

  16. United States Crystalline Repository Project - key research areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patera, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Crystalline Repository Project is responsible for siting the second high-level nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock for the US Department of Energy. A methodology is being developed to define data and information needs and a way to evaluate that information. The areas of research the Crystalline Repository Project is involved in include fluid flow in a fractured network, coupled thermal, chemical and flow processes and cooperation in other nations and OECD research programs

  17. New Roles, New Responsibilities: Examining Training Needs of Repository Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Simons

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Institutional repositories play a critical role in the research lifecycle. Funding agencies are increasingly seeking an improved return on their investment in research. Repositories facilitate this process by providing storage of, and access to, institutional research outputs and, more recently, research data. While repositories are generally managed within the academic library, repository staff require different skills and knowledge compared with traditional library roles. This study reports on a survey of Australasian institutional repository staff to identify skills and knowledge sets. METHODS Institutional repository staff working at universities in Australia and New Zealand were invited to participate in an online survey which incorporated both open and closed-ended question types. RESULTS The survey found significant gaps in the current provision of formal training and coursework related to institutional repositories, which echoed findings in the United Kingdom, Italy, and the United States. DISCUSSION There is clearly a need for more and varied training opportunities for repository professionals. Repository work requires a specific set of skills that can be difficult to find and institutions will benefit from investing in training and ongoing development opportunities for repository staff. CONCLUSION The data from this study could be used to facilitate staff recruitment, development, training, and retention strategies.

  18. NUMARC view of license renewal criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act and the implementing regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) permit the renewal of nuclear plant operating licenses upon expiration of their 40-year license term. However, the regulatory process by which license renewal may be accomplished and the requirements for the scope and content of renewal applications are yet to be established. On August 29, 1988, the NRC published an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding the subject of license renewal. This Advanced Notice and the NUREG which it references, NUREG-1317, Regulatory Options for Nuclear Plant License Renewal, provide the most recent regulatory thought on this issue. The basic issue addressed by NUREG-1317 is the definition of an adequate licensing basis for the renewal of a plant license. The report contemplates three alternatives in this regard. This paper discusses each of these three proposals. The NUMARC NUPLEX Working Group endorses a license renewal process based on a plant's current licensing basis along with an evaluation of the pertinent components, systems, and structures affected by age-related degradation. The NUMARC NUPLEX Working group believes that an appropriate scope for NRC review of the license renewal application should focus on those safety-significant structures systems, and components subject to significant age-related degradation that are not subject to existing recognized effective replacement, refurbishment, or inspection programs. The paper also briefly discusses NUMARC's view of the role of the Backfit Rule in the license renewal process

  19. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Haas; E.M. Fortsch

    1997-01-01

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data

  20. REPOSITORY RADIATION SHIELDING DESIGN GUIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Haas; E.M. Fortsch

    1997-09-12

    The scope of this document includes radiation safety considerations used in the design of facilities for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of the Repository Radiation Shielding Design Guide is to document the approach used in the radiological design of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) surface and subsurface facilities for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. This document is intended to ensure that a common methodology is used by all groups that may be involved with Radiological Design. This document will also assist in ensuring the long term survivability of the information basis used for radiological safety design and will assist in satisfying the documentation requirements of the licensing body, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This design guide provides referenceable information that is current and maintained under the YMP Quality Assurance (QA) Program. Furthermore, this approach is consistent with maintaining continuity in spite of a changing design environment. This approach also serves to ensure common inter-disciplinary interpretation and application of data.

  1. Socioeconomic impacts of repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.K.; Hamm, R.R.; Murdock, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Federal and state decision makers, community leaders, and residents must know how communities will be changed by the impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository. This chapter identifies the factors affecting an assessment of socioeconomic impacts and the types of impacts (economic, demographic, fiscal, community service, and social) likely to occur as a result of repository development. Each of these types can be divided into standard (those which typically results from any large-scale development) and special impact categories (those which result from the fact that radioactive materials will be handled). 3 tables

  2. Safeguards for geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattah, A.

    2000-01-01

    Direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in geological repositories is a recognised option for closing nuclear fuel cycles. Geological repositories are at present in stages of development in a number of countries and are expected to be built and operated early next century. A State usually has an obligation to safely store any nuclear material, which is considered unsuitable to re-enter the nuclear fuel cycle, isolated from the biosphere. In conjunction with this, physical protection has to be accounted for to prevent inadvertent access to such material. In addition to these two criteria - which are fully under the State's jurisdiction - a third criterion reflecting international non-proliferation commitments needs to be addressed. Under comprehensive safeguards agreements a State concedes verification of nuclear material for safeguards purposes to the IAEA. The Agency can thus provide assurance to the international community that such nuclear material has been used for peaceful purposes only as declared by the State. It must be emphasised that all three criteria mentioned constitute a 'unit'. None can be sacrificed for the sake of the other, but compromises may have to be sought in order to make their combination as effective as possible. Based on comprehensive safeguards agreements signed and ratified by the State, safeguards can be terminated only when the material has been consumed or diluted in such a way that it can no longer be utilised for any nuclear activities or has become practicably irrecoverable. As such safeguards for nuclear material in geological repositories have to be continued even after the repository has been back-filled and sealed. The effective application of safeguards must assure continuity-of-knowledge that the nuclear material in the repository has not been diverted for an unknown purpose. The nuclear material disposed in a geological repository may eventually have a higher and long term proliferation risk because the inventory is

  3. The role of local authorities in the process of siting the Spanish repository for low and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, M.

    1996-01-01

    ENRESA is the owner and operator of El Cabril, he Spanish centre for the storage of low medium activity, short-life, radioactive waste. Specific communications activities were carried out in the area of the site during the licensing period in order for ENRESA to get to know the local inhabitants and inform them of the characteristics of the plant. Several institutions and organisations were involved, but particularly the local Town Council, that played an important role in this process, and a smooth and continuing relationship with these authorities turned out to be one of the key factors for acceptance of El Cabril Major actions developed between ENRESA and the local authorities to improve social and economic co-operation, as well as their results, are described in this paper. Among the major actions taken, the following stand out: the opening of an information bureau in the nearby town to supply information not only about the site, but also regarding the qualifications required and conditions offered for workers and contractors who wished to ser vic the facility. The use of local human resources for the realisation of the El Cabril project necessitated training programmes, and these were effectively carried out by the local authorities and ENRESA. Local companies were given priority for service contracts, and local infrastructure was vastly improved to allow the implementation of the El Cabril project. Public support for local authorities has grown, since there is common agreement among the local populations that the role they played has served to increase the economic levels and possibilities of the area. Furthermore, the implication of local workers helped to disseminate the characteristics, performance and safety measures adopted, among the local communities. (author)

  4. “Terms and conditions of use” for journal articles and scholarly journals : A survey on the licensing processes associated with electronic scholarly materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Masako

    Copyright policies and terms directly affect the approach taken by journal editors, authors and readers regarding dealing with of articles and/or copyrighted materials. However Japanese academic society publishers have some trouble in licensing processes for copyrighted materials as previous studies pointed out. In 2011 we conducted a survey on “terms and conditions of use” of electronic journal and the licensing practices associated with electronic scholarly materials. The survey showed commercial publishers have enough announcements on reuse of copyrighted materials for readers. On the other hand Japanese academic societies' cares for readers tend to not enough. They publish journals both in Japanese and in English. Subsequently, English and Japanese templates of “terms and conditions of use” for Japanese academic society publishers were proposed. The templates were developed based on an understanding of the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers' “STM Permissions Guidelines,” which were designed to establish a standard and reasonable approach to granting permission for republication to all signatory publishers.The survey showed that Japanese academic society publishers and commercial publishers are facing the same issues regarding acceptable use of electronic supplemental materials for journal articles. This issue remains to be solved.

  5. Site selection process for radioactive waste repository (radioactive facility) in Cuba as a fundamental safety criteria; Proceso de seleccion de emplazamiento como criterio fundamental de la seguridad para el repositorio de desechos radiactivos (instalacion radiactiva) en Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vital, Jose Luis Peralta; Castillo, Reinaldo Gil; Chales Suarez, Gustavo; Rodriguez Reyes, Aymee [Centro de Tecnologia Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba)

    1999-11-01

    The paper show the process of search carried out for the selection of the safest site in the National territory, in order to sitting the Facility (Repository) that will disposal the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes, as well as the possible Storage Facility for nuclear spent Fuel (radioactive wastes of high activity). We summarize the obtained Methodology and the Criterions of exclusion adopted for the development of the Process of site selection, as well as the current condition of the researches that will permit the obtaining of the nominative objectives. (author) 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Assessment of the licensing aspects of HTGR in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varazdinec, Z.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals not only with the licensing procedure in Yugoslavia, but also reflects the Utility/Owner approach to the assessment of the licensability of the HTGR during the site selection process and especially during bid evaluation process. Besides the description of the existing procedure which was implemented on licensing of LWR program, the assessment of some licensing aspects of HTGR has been presented to describe possible implementation on licensing procedure. (author)

  7. Assessment of the licensing aspects of HTGR in Yugoslavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varazdinec, Z [Institut za Elektroprivredu-Zagreb, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)

    1990-07-01

    This paper deals not only with the licensing procedure in Yugoslavia, but also reflects the Utility/Owner approach to the assessment of the licensability of the HTGR during the site selection process and especially during bid evaluation process. Besides the description of the existing procedure which was implemented on licensing of LWR program, the assessment of some licensing aspects of HTGR has been presented to describe possible implementation on licensing procedure. (author)

  8. Validation, acceptance and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wene, C.O.

    1992-01-01

    The licensing process requires communication of complex scientific and technical information. In this paper transfer of such information is discussed using concepts and ideas from systems analysis, cybernetics and argumentation theory. A simple model for the decision process is developed. The analysis stresses the need for careful design of the communication channels between the three systems involved: the political system, the judicial-regulatory system and the scientific-technical community. The Dialogue - Scenario project initiated by the Swedish nuclear Inspectorate is briefly presented

  9. Low level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.R.H.; Wilson, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    Factors in selecting a site for low-level radioactive waste disposal are discussed. South Australia has used a former tailings dam in a remote, arid location as a llw repository. There are also low-level waste disposal procedures at the Olympic Dam copper/uranium project

  10. CRIS and Institutional Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Asserson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available CRIS (Current Research Information Systems provide researchers, research managers, innovators, and others with a view over the research activity of a domain. IRs (institutional repositories provide a mechanism for an organisation to showcase through OA (open access its intellectual property. Increasingly, organizations are mandating that their employed researchers deposit peer-reviewed published material in the IR. Research funders are increasingly mandating that publications be deposited in an open access repository: some mandate a central (or subject-based repository, some an IR. In parallel, publishers are offering OA but replacing subscription-based access with author (or author institution payment for publishing. However, many OA repositories have metadata based on DC (Dublin Core which is inadequate; a CERIF (Common-European Research Information Format CRIS provides metadata describing publications with formal syntax and declared semantics thus facilitating interoperation or homogeneous access over heterogeneous sources. The formality is essential for research output metrics, which are increasingly being used to determine future funding for research organizations.

  11. Salt repository design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a summary discussion of the approaches that have been and will be taken in design of repository facilities for use with disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations. Since specific sites have yet to be identified, the discussion is at a general level, supplemented with illustrative examples where appropriate. 5 references, 1 figure

  12. Repository site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, J.W.; Pentz, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The characterization of candidate repository sites has a number of programmatic objectives. Principal among these is the acquisition of data: a) to determine the suitability of a site relative to the DOE repository siting guidelines, b) to support model development and calculations to determine the suitability of a site relative to the post closure criteria of the NRC and EPA, c) to support the design of a disposal system, including the waste package and the engineered barrier system, as well as the shafts and underground openings of the repository. In meeting the gaols of site characterization, the authors have an obligation to conduct their investigations within an appropriate budget and schedule. This mandates that a well-constructed and systematic plan for field investigations be developed. Such a plan must fully account for the mechanisms which will control the radiologic performance in the repository. The plan must also flexibly and dynamically respond to the results of each step of field investigation, responding to the spatial variability of earth as well as to enhanced understandings of the performance of the disposal system. Such a plan must ensure that sufficient data are available to support the necessary probabilistic calculations of performance. This paper explores the planning for field data acquisition with specific reference to requirements for demonstrations of the acceptable performance for disposal systems

  13. Radioactive waste repository study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This is the third part of a report of a preliminary study for AECL. It summarizes the topics considered in reports AECL-6188-1 and AECL-6188-2 as requirements for an undergpound repository for disposal of wastes produced by the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Program. (author)

  14. Computational Materials Repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landis, David

    , different abstraction levels and enables users to analyze their own results, and allows to share data with collaborators. The approach of the Computational Materials Repository (CMR) is to convert data to an internal format that maintains the original variable names without insisting on any semantics...

  15. The Computational Materials Repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landis, David D.; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Nestorov, Svetlozar

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities for designing new materials based on quantum physics calculations are rapidly growing, but these design efforts lead to a significant increase in the amount of computational data created. The Computational Materials Repository (CMR) addresses this data challenge and provides...

  16. Consortial routes to effective repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Moyle, M.; Proudfoot, R.

    2009-01-01

    A consortial approach to the establishment of repository services can help a group of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to share costs, share technology and share expertise. Consortial repository work can tap into existing structures, or it can involve new groupings of institutions with a common interest in exploring repository development. This Briefing Paper outlines some of the potential benefits of collaborative repository activity, and highlights some of the technical and organisation...

  17. Licensing and advanced fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, S.L.; Novendstern, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    For the past 15 years, Westinghouse has been actively involved in the development and licensing of fuel designs that contain major advanced features. These designs include the optimized fuel assembly, The VANTAGE 5 fuel assembly, the VANTAGE 5H, and most recently the VANTAGE+ fuel assembly. Each of these designs was supported by extensive experimental data, safety evaluations, and design efforts and required intensive interaction with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) during the review and approval process. This paper presents a description of the licensing approach and how it was utilized by the utilities to facilitate the licensing applications of the advanced fuel designs for their plants. The licensing approach described in this paper has been successfully applied to four major advanced fuel design changes ∼40 plant-specific applications, and >350 cycle-specific reloads in the past 15 years

  18. Modelling gas generation in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.

    1993-02-01

    In a repository containing low- and intermediate-level waste, gas generation will occur principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. This Paper describes a mathematical model design to address gas generation by these mechanisms. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing both aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. Gas concentrations have been measured over a period of three years in large-scale drum experiments designed to simulate repository conditions. Model predictions are confirmed against the experimental measurements, and a prediction is then made of gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of one million years in a radioactive waste repository. (author)

  19. Modelling gas generation in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.

    1992-07-01

    In a repository containing low- and intermediate-level waste, gas generation will occur principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. This paper describes a mathematical model designed to address gas generation by these mechanisms. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing both aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. Gas concentrations have been measured over a period of three years in large-scale drum experiments designed to simulate repository conditions. Model predictions are confirmed against the experimental measurements, and a prediction is then made of gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of one million years in a radioactive waste repository. (Author)

  20. People's perception of LILW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Polic, Marko

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Social acceptability of the radioactive waste repository presents a great problem in every country with such a waste. Even if people agree with the need for its construction, the chosen location should be far from their homes (NIMBY). The reasons for such attitudes were attributed to different causes: uneducated public, differences in understanding of radioactivity and risk by experts and lay public, risk communication problems, lack of credibility and social trust, etc. While in earlier days public was blamed for its irrationality, and need for education and information was emphasized, today it is realized that public trust is extremely important if effective risk communication is to be achieved. It is also recognized that it is not so much the content of the risk message itself, as the lack of trust to those responsible for provision of information that is behind this opposition. Perhaps we could apply here Petty and Caciopo's elaboration likelihood model of persuasion, with credibility as a factor in peripheral route of persuasion. Nevertheless also general lowering of social trust should explain social non-agreement. This lack of trust in experts and political institutions is perhaps caused by outwitting public in earlier years, its bad experiences with responsible officials, dangerous accidents (e.g. TMI, Chernobyl), increased influence that professions have over people's welfare, a greater value placed on equality and better educated public, etc. In 1996 the ARAO re-initiated the search for a LILW repository location with a new, so-called combined approach to the site selection, where the technical, geologically led process is combined with participation of local community. In order to get information on people's perception of the LILW repository construction, their willingness to accept it and factors that influence the acceptability, several surveys have been conducted. Groups of experts and lay persons answered the questionnaires. The results of

  1. Approach to geologic repository post closure system performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahwa, S.B.; Felton, W.; Duguid, J.O.

    1992-01-01

    An essential part of the license application for a geologic repository will be the demonstration of compliance with the standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency. The performance assessments that produce the demonstration must rely on models of various levels of detail. The most detailed of these models are needed for understanding thoroughly the complex physical and chemical processes affecting the behavior of the system. For studying the behavior of major components of the system, less detailed models are often useful. For predicting the behavior of the total system, models of a third kind may be needed. These models must cover all the important processes that contribute to the behavior of the system, because they must estimate the behavior under all significant conditions for 10,000 years. In addition, however, computer codes that embody these models must calculate very rapidly because of the EPA standard's requirement for probabilistic estimates, which will be produced by sampling thousands of times from probability distributions of parameters. For this reason, the total-system models must be less complex than the detailed-process and subsystem models. The total-system performance is evaluated through modeling of the following components: Radionuclide release from the engineered-barrier system. Fluid flow in the geologic units. Radionuclide transport to the accessible environment. Radionuclide release to the accessible environment and dose to man

  2. Staged licensing: An essential element of the NRC's revised regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echols, F.S.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past several years, Congress has directed the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to abandon their efforts to assess an array of potential candidate geologic repository sites for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear reactor fuel and high level radioactive waste, to develop generally applicable requirements for licensing geologic repositories, and to develop generally applicable radiation protection standards for geologic repositories, and instead to focus their efforts to determine whether a single site located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada can be developed as a geologic repository which providing reasonable assurance that public health and safety and the environment will be adequately protected. If the Yucca Mountain site is found to be suitable for development as a geologic repository, then at each stage of development DOE will have to provide the NRC with progressively more detailed information regarding repository design and long-term performance. NRC regulations reflect the fact that it will not be until the repository has been operated for a number of years that the NRC will be able to make a final determination as to long-term repository performance. Nevertheless, the NRC will be able to allow DOE to construct and operate a repository, provided that the NRC believes that the documented results of existing studies, together with the anticipated results from continuing and future studies, will enable the NRC to make a final determination that it has reasonable assurance that the repository system's long-term performance will not cause undue risk to the public. Thus, in its efforts to revise its current regulations to assure that the technical criteria are specifically applicable to the Yucca Mountain site, the NRC should also make sure that it preserves and clarifies the concept of staged repository development

  3. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of this document is to develop a preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architecture for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines an overall control system concept that encompasses and integrates the many diverse process and communication systems being developed for the subsurface repository design. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The Subsurface Repository Integrated Control System design will be composed of a series of diverse process systems and communication networks. The subsurface repository design contains many systems related to instrumentation and control (I andC) for both repository development and waste emplacement operations. These systems include waste emplacement, waste retrieval, ventilation, radiological and air monitoring, rail transportation, construction development, utility systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire protection, backfill emplacement, and performance confirmation. Each of these systems involves some level of I andC and will typically be integrated over a data communications network throughout the subsurface facility. The subsurface I andC systems will also interface with multiple surface-based systems such as site operations, rail transportation, security and safeguards, and electrical/piped utilities. In addition to the I andC systems, the subsurface repository design also contains systems related to voice and video communications. The components for each of these systems will be distributed and linked over voice and video communication networks throughout the subsurface facility. The scope and primary objectives of this design analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system-level functions and interfaces (Section 6.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels the engineered process systems will be monitored

  4. Preparing to Submit a License Application for Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W.J. Arthur; M.D. Voegele

    2005-01-01

    In 1982, the U.S. Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, a Federal law that established U.S. policy for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Congress amended the Act in 1987, directing the Department of Energy to study only Yucca Mountain, Nevada as the site for a permanent geologic repository. As the law mandated, the Department evaluated Yucca Mountain to determine its suitability as the site for a permanent geologic repository. Decades of scientific studies demonstrated that Yucca Mountain would protect workers, the public, and the environment during the time that a repository would be operating and for tens of thousands of years after closure of the repository. A repository at this remote site would also: preserve the quality of the environment; allow the environmental cleanup of Cold War weapons facilities; provide the nation with additional protection from acts of terrorism; and support a sound energy policy. Throughout the scientific evaluation of Yucca Mountain, there has been no evidence to disqualify Yucca Mountain as a suitable site for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Upon completion of site characterization, the Secretary of Energy considered the results and concluded that a repository at Yucca Mountain would perform in a manner that protects public health and safety. The Secretary recommended the site to the President in February 2002; the President agreed and recommended to Congress that the site be approved. The Governor of Nevada submitted a notice of disapproval, and both houses of Congress acted to override the disapproval. In July 2002, the President's approval allowed the Department to begin the process of submittal of a license application for Yucca Mountain as the site for the nation's first repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Yucca Mountain is located on federal land in Nye County in southern Nevada, an arid region

  5. Conformation of an evaluation process for a license renovation solicitude of a nuclear power plant in Mexico; Conformacion de un proceso de evaluacion para una solicitud de renovacion de licencia de una central nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano R, M. L., E-mail: mlserrano@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    So that the construction stages, of operation, closing, dismantlement and the radioactive waste disposal of a nuclear power plant (NPP) are carried out in Mexico, is necessary that the operator has a license, permission or authorization for each stage. In Mexico, these licenses, permissions or authorizations are granted by the Energy Secretariat with base in the verdict of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The operation licenses ar the moment effective for the reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) they will expire respectively in the year 2020 and 2025 for the Unit 1 and Unit 2, for what the CNSNS has begun its preparation before a potential solicitude of the licensee to continue the operation of the NPP-L V. Defining the process to continue and to generate the documents that would help in this phase as normalization, guides, procedures, regulations, controls, etc., is the task that intends to be carried out the regulator body so that the evaluation process is effective and efficient, so much for the same regulator body as for the licensee. This work exposes the advance that the CNSNS has in this aspect and is centered specifically in the conformation of an evaluation process of license renovation solicitude, taking as base what the regulator body of the United States of North America (US NRC) established and following to the IAEA. Also, this work includes statistical of electric power production in Mexico, licensing antecedents for the NPP-L V, a world perspective of the license renovations and the regulation of the US NRC related to the license renovation of a NPP. (Author)

  6. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    The BWIP Engineered Barrier Program has been developed to provide an integrated approach to the development of site-specific Engineered Barrier assemblages for a repository located in basalt. The goal of this program is to specify engineered and natural barriers which will ensure that nuclear and non-radioactive hazardous materials emplaced in a repository in basalt do not exceed acceptable rates of release to the biosphere. A wide range of analytical and experimental activities related to the basalt repository environment, waste package environment, waste/barrier/rock interactions, and barrier performance assessment provide the basis for selection of systems capable of meeting licensing requirements. Work has concentrated on specifying and testing natural and man-made materials which can be used to plug boreholes in basalt and which can be used as multiple barriers to surround nuclear waste forms and containers. The Engineered Barriers Program is divided into two major activities: multiple barrier studies and borehole plugging. 8 figures, 4 tables

  7. Overview of the United States' nuclear waste repository programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surles, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Regardless of the future of civilian or defense-based nuclear materials, the United States will be responsible for a vast array of these materials for generations to come. The cornerstone programme for the disposal of waste materials is the Yucca Mountain Programme. Based on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended in 1987, it has been the United States' policy to develop a geological repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste materials. This presentation will discuss the process and strategy leading to the present and will include the scientific and management activities required to support the recent Viability Assessment. Also to be discussed are the timeline and milestones leading to the opening of the repository. The focus will be on the scientific and engineering studies required for a successful Site Recommendation, and then for a similarly successful License Application. Both of these activities will require considerable management efforts in addressing legal and regulatory issues. Finally, the presentation will discuss projections for the future operation of the facility, including emplacement projections, coupled with the required locations of nuclear materials. Additional scientific research and engineering studies will also be conducted to determine the longer-term viability of the facility, which is designed, by policy, for permanent storage. Retrievability is currently not an option, although access to the facility will be maintained for several decades. The focus of the discussion will be on the scientific and engineering advances made on understanding the natural systems for preventing migration of radionuclides, coupled with new developments in engineered systems in areas such as cask cladding, drip shields, and related materials engineering developments. The coupling of engineered and natural systems is designed to offer safety factors that are several orders of magnitude greater than what is estimated to be necessary

  8. Researching radioactive waste disposal. [Underground repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feates, F; Keen, N [UKAEA Research Group, Harwell. Atomic Energy Research Establishment

    1976-02-16

    At present it is planned to use the vitrification process to convert highly radioactive liquid wastes, arising from nuclear power programme, into glass which will be contained in steel cylinders for storage. The UKAEA in collaboration with other European countries is currently assessing the relative suitability of various natural geological structures as final repositories for the vitrified material. The Institute of Geological Sciences has been commissioned to specify the geological criteria that should be met by a rock structure if it is to be used for the construction of a repository though at this stage disposal sites are not being sought. The current research programme aims to obtain basic geological data about the structure of the rocks well below the surface and is expected to continue for at least three years. The results in all the European countries will then be considered so that the United Kingdom can choose a preferred method for isolating their wastes. It is only at that stage that a firm commitment may be made to select a site for a potential repository, when a far more detailed scientific research study will be instituted. Heat transfer problems and chemical effects which may occur within and around repositories are being investigated and a conceptual design study for an underground repository is being prepared.

  9. License to Learn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leone, Maria Isabella; Boccardelli, Paolo; Reichstein, Toke

    2016-01-01

    the technology. Drawing on a sample of 133 licensees and an equal number of matched nonlicensees, we present empirical evidence that thick contracts propel the licensees' likelihood of introducing new inventions. It is also found that thick contracts act as a substitute for licensees' absorptive capacity....... Licensees that are more familiar with the licensed technology are in less need of assistance from the licensors to assimilate and integrate the knowledge. However, this substitution effect is neutralized once the hurdle of invention has been overcome, meaning that the licensees have succeeded to ignite...... the invention process, suggesting the exploitation of the learning curve, triggered by their mutual understanding....

  10. Dual process theory and intermediate effect: are faculty and residents' performance on multiple-choice, licensing exam questions different?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, T.; Durning, S.J.; Artino, A.R.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Holmboe, E.; Lipner, R.; Schuwirth, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical reasoning is essential for the practice of medicine. Dual process theory conceptualizes reasoning as falling into two general categories: nonanalytic reasoning (pattern recognition) and analytic reasoning (active comparing and contrasting of alternatives). The debate continues

  11. NRC licensing requirements: DOD options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, W.J.; O'Reilly, P.D.

    1982-09-01

    This report describes the licensing process (both safety and environmental) that would apply if the Department of Defense (DOD) chooses to obtain licenses from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for using nuclear energy for power and luminous sources. The specific nuclear energy sources being considered include: small or medium-size nuclear power reactors; radioisotopic thermoelectric generators with 90 Sr or 238 Pu; radioisotopic dynamic electric generators with 90 Sr or 238 Pu; and applications of radioisotopes for luminous sources (lights) with 3 H, 85 Kr, or 147 Pm. The steps of the licensing process are summarized in the following sections, with particular attention given to the schedule and level of effort necessary to support the process

  12. Developing criteria to establish Trusted Digital Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundeen, John L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper details the drivers, methods, and outcomes of the U.S. Geological Survey’s quest to establish criteria by which to judge its own digital preservation resources as Trusted Digital Repositories. Drivers included recent U.S. legislation focused on data and asset management conducted by federal agencies spending $100M USD or more annually on research activities. The methods entailed seeking existing evaluation criteria from national and international organizations such as International Standards Organization (ISO), U.S. Library of Congress, and Data Seal of Approval upon which to model USGS repository evaluations. Certification, complexity, cost, and usability of existing evaluation models were key considerations. The selected evaluation method was derived to allow the repository evaluation process to be transparent, understandable, and defensible; factors that are critical for judging competing, internal units. Implementing the chosen evaluation criteria involved establishing a cross-agency, multi-disciplinary team that interfaced across the organization. 

  13. Regulator process for the authorization of an amendment to the operation license of a nuclear power plant in Mexico; Proceso regulador para la autorizacion de una enmienda a la licencia de operacion de una central nuclear en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.; Espinosa V, J.M.; Salgado, J.R.; Mamani, Y.R. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The regulator process by which an authorization is granted from an amendment to the License of Operation of a nuclear power station in Mexico is described. It makes an appointment the effective legal mark, the technical characteristics of the modification, the evaluation process and deposition upon oath of tests and finally the elaboration of the Safety report and the Technical Verdict that is a correspondent for the regulator organism to the Secretary of Energy, the one that in turn is the responsible of granting the amendment the License just as it establishes it the Law. (Author)

  14. Publishers and repositories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The impact of self-archiving on journals and publishers is an important topic for all those involved in scholarly communication. There is some evidence that the physics arXiv has had no impact on physics journals, while 'economic common sense' suggests that some impact is inevitable. I shall review recent studies of librarian attitudes towards repositories and journals, and place this in the context of IOP Publishing's experiences with arXiv. I shall offer some possible reasons for the mis-match between these perspectives and then discuss how IOP has linked with arXiv and experimented with OA publishing. As well as launching OA journals we have co-operated with Cornell and the arXiv on Eprintweb.org, a platform that offers new features to repository users. View Andrew Wray's biography

  15. Distributed Web Service Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Nawrocki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability and popularity of computer systems has resulted in a demand for new, language- and platform-independent ways of data exchange. That demand has in turn led to a significant growth in the importance of systems based on Web services. Alongside the growing number of systems accessible via Web services came the need for specialized data repositories that could offer effective means of searching of available services. The development of mobile systems and wireless data transmission technologies has allowed the use of distributed devices and computer systems on a greater scale. The accelerating growth of distributed systems might be a good reason to consider the development of distributed Web service repositories with built-in mechanisms for data migration and synchronization.

  16. Shared Medical Imaging Repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebre, Rui; Bastião, Luís; Costa, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a solution for the integration of ownership concept and access control over medical imaging resources, making possible the centralization of multiple instances of repositories. The proposed architecture allows the association of permissions to repository resources and delegation of rights to third entities. It includes a programmatic interface for management of proposed services, made available through web services, with the ability to create, read, update and remove all components resulting from the architecture. The resulting work is a role-based access control mechanism that was integrated with Dicoogle Open-Source Project. The solution has several application scenarios like, for instance, collaborative platforms for research and tele-radiology services deployed at Cloud.

  17. License plate recognition using DTCNNs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Brugge, M.H; Stevens, J.H; Nijhuis, J.A G; Spaanenburg, L; Tavsanonoglu, V

    1998-01-01

    Automatic license plate recognition requires a series of complex image processing steps. For practical use, the amount of data to he processed must be minimized early on. This paper shows that the computationally most intensive steps can be realized by DTCNNs. Moreover; high-level operations like

  18. Czech Republic. Dukovany repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The repository at the Dukovany site is a structure located above the land surface. It consists of two double-rows of reinforced concrete vaults. Each double-row has dimensions 38x160x6 meters and contains 2x28 vaults. The internal dimensions of each vault are 18x6x5.4 meters. The repository serves for reactor wastes from the Dukovany and Temelin nuclear power plants (NPPs). Its capacity is 55,000 m 3 or 130,000 drums. The repository is a fully engineered facility with multiple barriers. The first engineered barrier is the waste form (in the case of waste from the Dukovany NPP, the waste form is mainly bitumen, but concrete and glass are also considered as suitable solidification products). The second barrier is the container (a 200 litre steel drum or a HIC container), whereas the third consists of cut-off reinforced concrete walls with asphalt-based hydro-insulation. The fourth barrier is a cap which should protect the vaults against infiltration of rainwater and should serve also as an intrusion and erosion barrier. The fifth barrier is a drainage system around the repository which is composed of layers of gravel and sand. The void space in drums around the waste is filled with specially composed grout. Such waste packages are emplaced into the disposal vault, which is covered by pre-fabricated panels. Thereafter, joints between the panels are sealed and a provisional coverage added; the final cover, however, will be constructed only over the whole row of 28 vaults, until all vaults are filled with waste. The final cover will encompass the following components: reinforced concrete pre-fabricated panels (500 mm); cement overcoat (30 mm); insulation foil; concrete layer for cap levelling (5-150 mm); layer of asphalto-propylene concrete (150 mm); soil (450 mm); geotextile foil with topsoil (top surface vegetation). (author)

  19. Grey Guide Repository: presentation and demo

    OpenAIRE

    Biagioni, Stefania; Carlesi, Carlo; Schopfel, Joachim; Farace, Dominic; Frantzen, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an open source repository of good practices in the field of grey literature. That which originated in monographic form will now open and expand to include content from the global grey literature community. Such practices will range from the production and processing of grey literature through to its distribution, uses, and preservation.

  20. The evolving image and role of the regulator for implementing repositories for nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, J.

    2005-01-01

    A country introducing nuclear power in their energy strategy has a life long obligation. The obligation is not mainly a question of energy production. It is an obligation to maintain safety during the phase of construction, energy production and decommissioning as well as to take care of all the waste streams from nuclear installations. I believe that one of the most controversial siting projects in the society is a waste repository for spent nuclear fuel. Competence, available funds and a clear responsibility between the stakeholders as well as the trust of the public is indispensable to obtain a good result. The Swedish programme for managing nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel has been in progress for more than 25 years. The pre-licensing process of a repository for spent nuclear fuel is much alike a pre-licensing process for the first nuclear power plant in a country. You need a clear political will, you have to involve the nuclear regulator without jeopardizing his integrity and you need the money to perform research and make the investments. The enthusiasm of politicians and industry may however differ between these two projects. (author)

  1. Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration - SURAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerka, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Atomic Act specifies, among other things, responsibilities of the government in the field of safe disposal of radioactive wastes. To satisfy this responsibility, the Ministry of Industry and Trade has established the Radioactive Waste Repositories Administration (SURAO). SURAO's major responsibilities include: (a) the preparation, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of radioactive waste repositories and the monitoring of their environmental impacts; (b) radioactive waste management; (c) spent or irradiated nuclear fuel processing into a form suitable for storage/disposal or reuse; (d) record-keeping of received radioactive wastes and their producers; (e) administration of fund transfers as stipulated by the Atomic Act, Article 27; (f) development of proposals for specification of fees to be paid to the Nuclear Account; (g) responsibility for and coordination of research and development in the field of radioactive waste handling and management; (h) supervision of licensees' margin earmarked for the decommissioning of their facilities; (i) providing services in radioactive waste handling and management; (j) handling and management of radioactive wastes that have been transferred to the Czech Republic from abroad and cannot be sent back; (k) interim administration of radioactive wastes that have become state property. The Statute of the Administration is reproduced in full. (P.A.)

  2. In-situ test programs related to design and construction of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) deep geologic repositories. Final report (Task 2), June 1981-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberds, W.; Bauhof, F.; Gonano, L.

    1983-03-01

    The media and sites considered include (1) basalt at Hanford, Washington; (2) tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site; (3) domal salt at specific Gulf Coast sites; (4) bedded salt at an unspecified site; and (5) granite at an unspecified site. A licensing perspective is outlined and a defensible rationale developed and utilized for the test selection process. This rationale essentially consists of: establishing the information needs for construction authorization; assessing the relevant capabilities of available tests; and matching the capabilities of specific tests to the perceived information needs. The information needs at any time consist of the additional information (if any) needed in order to predict satisfactory repository system performance with the required level of confidence, and thus are a function of: the significance of the repository engineered components and site characteristics to system performance; the currently available information, which may be supplemented with time; and the acceptable level of confidence in satisfactory performance for each licensing step. Determination of the acceptable levels of confidence and the significance of repository system components is outside the scope of this report. Suitable assumptions have thus been made regarding the development of information needs for construction authorization by the time of initial site submittals. Tests which are available and respond to the perceived media/site specific information needs, either by simulation or assessment of site characteristics, are identified and their capabilities assessed. Specific in situ tests are investigated and described in detail. Research and development which might be effective in improving test capabilities have been recommended

  3. Technology licensing in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yuandi; Li-Ying, Jason; Chen, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We explore the landscape of technology licensing among Chinese entities in the period 2000–12, using a unique database on technological licensing from the State Intellectual Property Office of China. We find that: first, among Chinese licensee organizations, firms have dominated in terms...... of the number of licensed technologies; second, the geographical distribution of licensed technologies among the provinces has gradually reached a new quantitative balance; third, utility models are the most popular technologies to be licensed and the majority of technology licensing in China has been between...... Chinese entities, and most transactions have been local within provinces; and finally, Chinese firms have gradually in-licensed newer and newer technologies, but the technologies in-licensed from foreign sources are by no means state-of-the-art. We make several suggestions for innovation policy...

  4. State Licenses & Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Starting a business? Confused about whether you need a business license or permit? Virtually every business needs some form of license or permit to operate legally....

  5. Online driver's license renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Kentucky Department of Vehicle Regulation is exploring the possibility of developing and implementing online : drivers license renewal. The objective of this project was to: 1) evaluate online drivers license and REAL ID renewal : programs ...

  6. Evaluation of SKB's report 'Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel: SR 97 - Post-closure safety', Focusing on the assessment of transport processes in the geosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerman, A.; Shulan Xu [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Geoscience

    2000-12-01

    This report describes a critical review of the safety assessment performed on the final repository for nuclear waste in Sweden that is proposed by SKB in 'Deep Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel: SR 97 - Post-closure Safety'. The review was requested by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). The waste repository consists of several barriers that work together with the purpose of delaying radionuclide migration and reducing the activity that eventually affects the biosphere. A main criticism is the lack of a formal risk analysis and uncertainties in several analyses that make it difficult to comprehend the overall risk of the repository. A formal risk analysis should comprise a probabilistic treatment of all components included in the system. This is not the case in the SKB's report since the probabilistic analyses are limited only to certain aspects. The use of conservative model parameters are not a substitute for risk analysis nor can they compensate for possible model biases. Bias can be expected in most of the existing models of radionuclide migration in fractured bedrock. SKB should present a clear comparison on the importance of the different barrier components (uranium-dioxide matrix, copper canister, buffer and bedrock) on the retardation of radionuclides. It is unclear as to what extent the capacity of the bedrock to retain migrating radionuclides is critical to the capacity of the repository. A large part of the SR 97 report is focused on retardation processes in bedrock and a reader can interpret this as the technical weight given on retardation in the bedrock. However, with the present state of knowledge, it is our opinion that we cannot with an acceptable degree of accuracy predict the radionuclide transport in bedrock or quantify risk levels associated with radioactivity in the biosphere. There are large uncertainties concerning the way by which sorption processes should be formulated and the impact of colloids on the transport

  7. Licensing of simple digital devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T. W.

    2008-01-01

    The inability to guarantee error-free software gave rise to the potential for common-cause failure of digital safety systems in nuclear power plants. To address this vulnerability, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) required a quality software development process and a defense-in-depth and diversity analysis for digital safety systems. As a result of recent interim [NRC] staff guidance in the digital instrumentation and control (I and C) area, licensing of simple digital devices decreases some regulatory burden with respect to demonstrating a quality software development process and defense-in-depth and diversity analysis. This paper defines simple digital devices and addresses the interim staff guidance that applies to such devices. The paper also highlights the technical aspects that affect the licensing of such devices and incorporates licensing experience in the U.S. to date. (authors)

  8. Licensing reform in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The licensing process for nuclear power plants in the USA is currently in two distinct stages: the issuance of a construction permit followed later by the issuance of an operation license. The ''two-step'' process has come under heavy criticism from the U.S. nuclear industry on the grounds that it causes uncertainty and delays and therefore inhibits new commitments to nuclear power plants. In 1989 the NRC published new regulations for the licensing of nuclear power plants which provide for the issuance of early site permits, safety certifications of standard designs, and combined construction permits and operating licences. The new rule was challenged by intervenors representing antinuclear groups who filed a legal challenge seeking to have the rule set aside on the grounds that it violates the Atomic Energy Act which they allege makes two-step licensing mandatory. In November 1990 the US Court of Appeals upheld the NRC's authority to issue combined licenses. An appeal for a rehearing has been filed. The paper analyses the events and the possible consequences of an adverse court decision. It reviews the options open to the NRC and industry if the court decision is upheld. The possibility of congressional action to amend the Atomic Energy Act is discussed. (author)

  9. Nuclear power stations licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solito, J.

    1978-04-01

    The judicial aspects of nuclear stations licensing are presented. The licensing systems of the United States, Spain, France and Federal Republic of Germany are focused. The decree n 0 60.824 from July 7 sup(th), 1967 and the following legislation which define the systematic and area of competence in nuclear stations licensing are analysed [pt

  10. Reference design description for a geologic repository: Revision 01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This document describes the current design expectations for a potential geologic repository that could be located at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This Reference Design Description (RDD) looks at the surface and subsurface repository and disposal container design. Additionally, it reviews the expected long-term performance of the potential repository. In accordance with current legislation, the reference design for the potential repository does not include an interim storage option. The reference design presented allows the disposal of highly radioactive material received from government-owned spent fuel custodian sites; produces high-level waste sites, and commercial spent fuel sites. All design elements meet current federal, state, and local regulations governing the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and protection of the public and the environment. Due to the complex nature of developing a repository, the design will be created in three phases to support Viability Assessment, License Application, and construction. This document presents the current reference design. It will be updated periodically as the design progresses. Some of the details presented here may change significantly as more cost-effective solutions, technical advancements, or changes to requirements are identified

  11. Canister transfer into repository in shaft alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raiko, H.; Kukkola, T.; Autio, J.

    2005-09-01

    In this report, a study of lift transportation of a massive canister for spent nuclear fuel is considered. The canister is transferred from ground level to repository, which lies in the depth of 400 to 500 m in the bedrock. The canister is a massive metal vessel, whose weight is 19 to 29 tons, and which is strongly irradiant (gamma and neutrons), and which contains 1.4 to 2.2 tons of very strongly radio-active material, the activity of the fuel should not be spread in the environment even during postulated accidents. The study observes that the lift alternative is possible to be built and through good design practices and good maintenance procedures its safety, reliability and usability can be kept on such high level that canister transport is estimated to be licensable. (orig.)

  12. Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Application Repository Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Application Repository Design and Analysis document describes the STRS application repository for software-defined radio (SDR) applications intended to be compliant to the STRS Architecture Standard. The document provides information about the submission of artifacts to the STRS application repository, to provide information to the potential users of that information, and for the systems engineer to understand the requirements, concepts, and approach to the STRS application repository. The STRS application repository is intended to capture knowledge, documents, and other artifacts for each waveform application or other application outside of its project so that when the project ends, the knowledge is retained. The document describes the transmission of technology from mission to mission capturing lessons learned that are used for continuous improvement across projects and supporting NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs) for performing software engineering projects and NASAs release process.

  13. Creation of Data Repositories to Advance Nursing Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzo, Joseph; Rodriguez, Margaret; Currie, Jackson; Salata, Robert; Webel, Allison R

    2017-12-01

    Data repositories are a strategy in line with precision medicine and big data initiatives, and are an efficient way to maximize data utility and form collaborative research relationships. Nurse researchers are uniquely positioned to make a valuable contribution using this strategy. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the benefits and challenges associated with developing data repositories, and to describe the process we used to develop and maintain a data repository in HIV research. Systematic planning, data collection, synthesis, and data sharing have enabled us to conduct robust cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses with more than 200 people living with HIV. Our repository building has also led to collaboration and training, both in and out of our organization. We present a pragmatic and affordable way that nurse scientists can build and maintain a data repository, helping us continue to make to our understanding of health phenomena.

  14. Nuclear reactor operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, which was amended in 1974 by the Energy Reorganization Act, established the requirement that individuals who had the responsibility of operating the reactors in nuclear power plants must be licensed. Section 107 of the act states ''the Commission shall (1) prescribe uniform conditions for licensing individuals; (2) determine the qualifications of such individuals; and (3) issue licenses to such individuals in such form as the Commission may prescribe.'' The article discusses the types of licenses, the selection and training of individuals, and the administration of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing examinations

  15. An analysis of the dispute process regarding high-level nuclear waste repository siting in Toyo-cho, Japan: Decisive factors in the dispute and roles of the governments and experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsuzaki, Shunsaku; Horii, Hideyuki (Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Saigo, Takahiro (Mitsubishi Research Institute, Inc. (Japan))

    2010-09-15

    The siting policy of HLW repository in Japan was 'application-based' until 2007 and Toyo-cho is the only municipality which applied for the Literature Survey. In Toyo-cho, however, a serious antagonism among citizens occurred and the application was withdrawn after the mayor was replaced by election. Our detailed analysis of the process based on the methods of political science and psychology shows five decisive factors: 1) opposing activists both in the town and from outside successfully changed citizens' perceptions of HLW by rhetorical expressions, 2) the mayor lacks careful actions and effective policy adviser, 3) NUMO, an organization which runs HLW projects, didn't effectively coordinate Toyo-cho and stakeholders, 4) the municipal government and council exercised very limited influences on the dispute despite their political authority, and 5) the existence of grant adversely influenced the citizens since it causes criticism that Toyo-cho applies a repository for grant. We finally conclude that the substantial problems, caused by the five decisive factors, were the propagation of enthusiastic opposition and the lack of peaceful deliberation based on local governance. In order to avoid enthusiastic opposition and to realize responsible decision making, or negotiation, we suggest that A) active and prompt response of experts, especially political/administrative ones, to radical opposing activities, B) solution to the adverse influence of the grant by the government's agenda

  16. An analysis of the dispute process regarding high-level nuclear waste repository siting in Toyo-cho, Japan: Decisive factors in the dispute and roles of the governments and experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsuzaki, Shunsaku; Horii, Hideyuki; Saigo, Takahiro

    2010-09-01

    The siting policy of HLW repository in Japan was 'application-based' until 2007 and Toyo-cho is the only municipality which applied for the Literature Survey. In Toyo-cho, however, a serious antagonism among citizens occurred and the application was withdrawn after the mayor was replaced by election. Our detailed analysis of the process based on the methods of political science and psychology shows five decisive factors: 1) opposing activists both in the town and from outside successfully changed citizens' perceptions of HLW by rhetorical expressions, 2) the mayor lacks careful actions and effective policy adviser, 3) NUMO, an organization which runs HLW projects, didn't effectively coordinate Toyo-cho and stakeholders, 4) the municipal government and council exercised very limited influences on the dispute despite their political authority, and 5) the existence of grant adversely influenced the citizens since it causes criticism that Toyo-cho applies a repository for grant. We finally conclude that the substantial problems, caused by the five decisive factors, were the propagation of enthusiastic opposition and the lack of peaceful deliberation based on local governance. In order to avoid enthusiastic opposition and to realize responsible decision making, or negotiation, we suggest that A) active and prompt response of experts, especially political/administrative ones, to radical opposing activities, B) solution to the adverse influence of the grant by the government's agenda

  17. IRIS Licensing Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, Charles L.; Carelli, Mario D.

    2006-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) nuclear power plant is well into the pre-application review process with the US NRC and has accomplished its first near term goal of obtaining US NRC feedback on the long term testing program. To date, the IRIS team has submitted to the US NRC a number of documents patterned after the Evaluation Model Development and Assessment Process (EMDAP) outlined in Regulatory Guide 1,203. They have covered a detailed description of IRIS, initial safety analysis results, PIRT development for limiting transients, scaling analysis and a description of the test program. The IRIS Safety-by-Desing TM intrinsically eliminates and/or significantly reduces the consequences of traditional LWR accidents. In addition, the fewer passive safety systems are similar in principle to those of the US NRC approved AP1000 design. For these reasons, the IRIS testing program only needs to include those features unique to the IRIS design. NRC feedback was that the planned test program appeared to be complete and could generate sufficient information to support a Design Certification (DC) submittal. The US NRC has also stated that a DC application must include complete information regarding the test program. On this basis the IRIS team has initiated an aggressive program to conduct IRIS testing to support a DC submittal by the end of 2008. Subsequent US NRC review should be expeditious because of the AP1000 precedent, allowing IRIS to obtain its Final Design Approval (FDA) in 2012; thereby, maintaining its goal of deployment in the 2015-2017 time frame. The next steps in the pre-application review process will be to provide the US NRC with a road map of the anticipated IRIS licensing process, a review of current licensing requirements showing that IRIS meets or exceeds all current criteria and information to support the long term goal of redefining the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ)

  18. Progress in licensing ITER in Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rodrigo, Lina; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Uzan-Elbez, Joelle; Marbach, Gabriel; Garin, Pascal; Rosanvallon, Sandrine

    2005-01-01

    The licensing procedure for ITER in Europe in the framework of the French regulations is a non-prescriptive approach based on a continuous dialogue between the nuclear installation owner (or its representative) and the safety authority. In this paper, the licensing</