WorldWideScience

Sample records for repository host rock

  1. Gabbro as a host rock for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbom, K.; Leijon, B.; Smellie, J.; Liedholm, M.

    1992-09-01

    As an alternative to granitic rocks, gabbro and other basic rock types have been investigated with respect to their suitability to host a nuclear waste repository. The present report summarizes and examines existing geoscientific knowledge of relevance in assessing the potential merits of gabbro as a repository host rock. Implications in terms of site selection, repository construction and post-closure repository performance are also discussed. The objective of the study is to provide a basis for decisions as regards future consideration of the gabbro alternative. It is found that there are rather few gabbro bodies in Sweden, that are potentially of sufficient size to host a repository. Thus, gabbro offers little latitude as regards site selection. In comparison to siting a repository in granitic rocks, this is a major disadvantage, and it may in fact remove gabbro from further consideration. The potential advantages of gabbro refer to repository performance, and include low hydraulic conductivity and a chemical environment promoting efficient radionuclide retardation. However, results from field investigations show that groundwater flow in gabbro bodies is largely controlled by intersecting heterogeneities, in particular granitic dykes, that are significantly more conductive to water than the gabbro. In the far-field scale significant to repository performance, this may reduce or eliminate the potential effects of favourable hydraulic and chemical characteristics of the gabbro itself. In conclusion, there are apparent difficulties associated with siting a repository in gabbro, due to lack of sufficiently large gabbro bodies. On the basis of the present state of knowledge, no decisive differences can be demonstrated when comparing gabbro with granitic rocks, neither with respects to repository construction, nor as regards repository performance. (au)

  2. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Rigby

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components)

  3. Selection of the host rock for high level radioactive waste repository in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuanxin; Wang Wenguang; Chen Zhangru

    2001-01-01

    The authors has briefly introduced the experiences of the host rock selection and the host rock types in other countries for high level radioactive waste repository. The potential host rocks in China are investigated. They include granite, tuff, clay, basalt, salt, and loess. The report has expounded the distributions, scale, thickness, mineral and chemical composition, construction, petrogenesis and the ages of the rock. The possibility of these rocks as the host rock has been studied. The six pieces of distribution map of potential rocks have been made up. Through the synthetical study, it is considered that granite as the host rock of high level radioactive waste repository is possible

  4. Thermal Analysis of a Nuclear Waste Repository in Argillite Host Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgu, T.; Gomez, S. P.; Matteo, E. N.

    2017-12-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geological repository requires analysis of heat distribution as a result of decay heat. Such an analysis supports design of repository layout to define repository footprint as well as provide information of importance to overall design. The analysis is also used in the study of potential migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. In this study, thermal analysis for high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel in a generic repository in argillite host rock is presented. The thermal analysis utilized both semi-analytical and numerical modeling in the near field of a repository. The semi-analytical method looks at heat transport by conduction in the repository and surroundings. The results of the simulation method are temperature histories at selected radial distances from the waste package. A 3-D thermal-hydrologic numerical model was also conducted to study fluid and heat distribution in the near field. The thermal analysis assumed a generic geological repository at 500 m depth. For the semi-analytical method, a backfilled closed repository was assumed with basic design and material properties. For the thermal-hydrologic numerical method, a repository layout with disposal in horizontal boreholes was assumed. The 3-D modeling domain covers a limited portion of the repository footprint to enable a detailed thermal analysis. A highly refined unstructured mesh was used with increased discretization near heat sources and at intersections of different materials. All simulations considered different parameter values for properties of components of the engineered barrier system (i.e. buffer, disturbed rock zone and the host rock), and different surface storage times. Results of the different modeling cases are presented and include temperature and fluid flow profiles in the near field at different simulation times. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and

  5. Damage-plasticity model of the host rock in a nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Kruis, Jaroslav, E-mail: kruis@fsv.cvut.cz [Department of Mechanics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Thákurova 7, 166 29 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-08

    The paper describes damage-plasticity model for the modelling of the host rock environment of a nuclear waste repository. Radioactive Waste Repository Authority in Czech Republic assumes the repository to be in a granite rock mass which exhibit anisotropic behaviour where the strength in tension is lower than in compression. In order to describe this phenomenon, the damage-plasticity model is formulated with the help of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion which can be set to capture the compression behaviour while the tensile stress states is described with the help of scalar isotropic damage model. The concept of damage-plasticity model was implemented in the SIFEL finite element code and consequently, the code was used for the simulation of the Äspö Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) which was performed in order to determine yielding strength under various conditions in similar granite rocks as in Czech Republic. The results from the performed analysis are presented and discussed in the paper.

  6. Modeling gas migration experiments in repository host rocks for the MEGAS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worgan, K.; Impey, M.; Volckaert, G.; DePreter, P.

    1993-01-01

    In response to concerns over the possibility of hydrogen gas generation within an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste, and its implications for repository safety, a joint European research study (MEGAS) is underway. Its aims are to understand and characterize the behavior of gas migration within an argillacious, host-rock. Laboratory experiments are being carried out by SCK/CEN, BGS and ISMES. SCK/CEN are also conducting in situ experiments at the underground laboratory at Mol, Belgium. Modeling of gas migration is being done in parallel with the experiments, by Intera Information Technologies. A two-phase flow code, TOPAZ, has been developed specifically for this work. In this paper the authors report on the results of some preliminary calculations performed with TOPAZ, in advance of the in situ experiments

  7. Microbiologically mediated processes in a repository sited in a clay host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwyn, B.; Leupin, O. X.; Bagnoud, A.; Bernier-Latmani, R.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Because of their favourable retention properties for radionuclides, clay-rich sediments are being considered in Switzerland as host rocks for the geological disposal of high, intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste. Compacted bentonite is foreseen as backfill material in the high level waste repository whereas for intermediate- and low-level waste the near field will mainly consist of cementitious material. The evolution of both types of repositories, which includes re-saturation, heat generation (only high level waste), near field degradation, gas production and radionuclide release may be impacted by microbial activity and vice versa. In this respect questions arise such as: - Are microorganisms present in a repository and its host rock? - Under which condition are microorganisms active in and around a repository? - In which processes are microorganisms involved? Various in situ experiments in a wide range of geological environments have evidenced the presence of microorganisms. Whether the microorganisms found in these in situ experiments are indigenous or introduced by drilling or/and excavation activities is still controversial. However, recent findings suggest the presence of indigenous microorganisms in Opalinus Clay. To conclusively answer the question about the origin of microorganisms, an international investigation programme has been launched to probe rock samples from the Underground Rock Laboratory at Mont Terri. So far, no metabolic activity has been observed in undisturbed clay rocks. Such activity may have ceased during diagenetic compaction of the sediment as suggested by the pore water composition measured in the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey formation of Bure (France). For the safety case of a repository the origin of microorganisms is of minor importance compared to the understanding of the conditions under which they might be metabolically active. Pore size distribution and connectivity can

  8. Alteration of national glass in radioactive waste repository host rocks: A conceptional review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apps, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The storage of high-level radioactive wastes in host rocks containing natural glass has potential chemical advantages, especially if the initial waste temperatures are as high as 250 0 C. However, it is not certain how natural glasses will decompose when exposed to an aqueous phase in a repository environment. The hydration and devitrification of both rhyolitic and natural basaltic natural glasses are reviewed in the context of hypothetical thermodynamic phase relations, infrared spectroscopic data and laboratory studies of synthetic glasses exposed to steam. The findings are compared with field observations and laboratory studies of hydrating and devitrifying natural glasses. The peculiarities of the dependence of hydration and devitrification behavior on compositional variation is noted. There is substantial circumstantial evidence to support the belief that rhyolitic glasses differ from basaltic glasses in their thermodynamic stability and their lattice structure, and that this is manifested by a tendency of the former to hydrate rather than devitrify when exposed to water. Further research remains to be done to confirm the differences in glass structure, and to determine both physically and chemically dependent properties of natural glasses as a function of composition

  9. Reactive transport simulations of the evolution of a cementitious repository in clay-rich host rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosakowski, Georg; Berner, Urs; Kulik, Dmitrii A.

    2010-05-01

    In Switzerland, the deep geological disposal in clay-rich rocks is foreseen not only for high-level radioactive waste, but also for intermediate-level (ILW) and low-level (LLW) radioactive waste. Typically, ILW and LLW repositories contain huge amounts of cementitious materials used for waste conditioning, confinement, and as backfill for the emplacement caverns. We are investigating the interactions of such a repository with the surrounding clay rocks and with other clay-rich materials such as sand/bentonite mixtures that are foreseen for backfilling the access tunnels. With the help of a numerical reactive transport model, we are comparing the evolution of cement/clay interfaces for different geochemical and transport conditions. In this work, the reactive transport of chemical components is simulated with the multi-component reactive transport code OpenGeoSys-GEM. It employs the sequential non-iterative approach to couple the mass transport code OpenGeoSys (http://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=18345) with the GEMIPM2K (http://gems.web.psi.ch/) code for thermodynamic modeling of aquatic geochemical systems which is using the Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) method. Details regarding code development and verification can be found in Shao et al. (2009). The mineral composition and the pore solution of a CEM I 52.5 N HTS hydrated cement as described by Lothenbach & Wieland (2006) are used as an initial state of the cement compartment. The setup is based on the most recent CEMDATA07 thermodynamic database which includes several ideal solid solutions for hydrated cement minerals and is consistent with the Nagra/PSI thermodynamic database 01/01. The smectite/montmorillonite model includes cation exchange processes and amphotheric≡SOH sites and was calibrated on the basis of data by Bradbury & Baeyens (2002). In other reactive transport codes based on the Law of Mass Action (LMA) for solving geochemical equilibria, cation exchange processes are usually calculated assuming

  10. Analysis of hydraulic gradients across the host rock at the proposed Texas Panhandle nuclear-waste repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of the direction of ground-water flow across the host rock at the proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas, is complicated by vertical and lateral changes in the density of formation fluids in the various hydrogeologic units that overlie and underlie the proposed host rock. Because the concept of hydraulic head is not valid when evaluating vertical hydraulic gradients in a variably-density flow system, other methods were used to determine the direction and magnitude of vertical hydraulic gradients at the proposed site where the specific gravity of formation fluids varies between 1.00 and 1.28. The direction of ground-water flow across the proposed host rock, an 80-foot-thick salt bed in the Lower San Andres Formation, was determined by calculating vertical hydraulic gradients based on formation pressure and fluid density data, and by analysis of pressure-depth diagrams. Based on data from the vicinity of the proposed site, both methods indicate the potential for downflow across the host rock. Downflow or predominantly horizontal flow is considered a favorable prewaste emplacement condition because it prolongs the travel time to the biosphere of any naturally or accidentally released radionuclides

  11. Repository for high level radioactive wastes in Brazil: the importance of geochemical (Micro thermometric) studies and fluid migration in potential host rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Francisco Javier; Fuzikawa, Kazuo; Alves, James Vieira; Neves, Jose Marques Correia

    2003-01-01

    A detailed fluid inclusion study of host rocks, is of fundamental importance in the selection of geologically suitable areas for high level nuclear waste repository constructions (HLRW). The LIFM-CDTN is enabled to develop studies that confirm: the presence or not, of corrosive fluid in minerals from host rocks of the repository and the possible presence of micro fractures (and fluid leakage) when these rocks are submitted to high temperatures. These fluid geochemistry studies, with permeability determinations by means of pressurized air injection must be carried out in rocks hosting nuclear waste. Micro fracture determination is of vital importance since many naturally corrosive solutions, present in the mineral rocks, could flow out through these plans affecting the walls of the repository. (author)

  12. Development of a method for the comparison of final repository sites in different host rock formations; Weiterentwicklung einer Methode zum Vergleich von Endlagerstandorten in unterschiedlichen Wirtsgesteinsformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer-Appelt, Klaus; Frieling, Gerd; Kock, Ingo; and others

    2017-10-15

    The report on the development of a method for the comparison of final repository sites in different host rock formations covers the following issues: influence of the requirement of retrievability on the methodology, study on the possible extension of the methodology for repository sites with crystalline host rocks: boundary conditions in Germany, final disposal concept for crystalline host rocks, generic extension of the VerSi method, identification, classification and relevance weighting of safety functions, relevance of the safety functions for the crystalline host rock formation, review of the methodological need for changes for crystalline rock sites under low-permeability covering; study on the applicability of the methodology for the determination of site regions for surface exploitation (phase 1).

  13. Evaluation of possible host rocks for China's high level radioactive waste repository and the progress in site characterization at the Beishan potential site in NW China's Gansu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ju; Jin Yuanxin; Chen Zhangru; Chen Weiming; Wang Wenguang

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of possible host rocks for China's high level radioactive waste repository is summarized in this paper. The distribution and characteristics of granite, tuff, clay stone, salt and loess in China are described, while maps showing the distribution of host rocks are presented. Because of the wide distribution, large scale, good heat conductivity and suitable mechanical properties, granite is considered as the most potential host rock. Some granite bodies distributed in NW China, SW China, South China and Inner Mongolia have been selected as potential areas. Detailed site characterization at Beishan area, Gansu Province NW China is in progress

  14. Programme for repository host rock characterisation in the ONKALO (ReRoC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalto, P.; Aaltonen, I.; Kemppainen, K.

    2009-04-01

    The excavation of the ONKALO is now entering the deep bedrock regime, where the ambient rock conditions are representative of those to be found in the vicinity of future deposition tunnels and deposition holes. It is proposed to study the properties of the rock under these conditions using specially-excavated rock rooms, investigation niches or stations and characterisation holes. This report provides an overview of these plans, which are designed to obtain the relevant site-specific knowledge. This report summarises the outstanding issues of the site modelling that are driving the deep rock investigations. It also lists the main long-term safety needs from the site characterisation and presents a short description of the data needs raised by the RSC (Rock Suitability Criteria) programme. The report presents the general characterisation programme of the ONKALO access tunnel. It includes geological mapping in the tunnel and the shafts and investigations in pilot, probe and characterisation hole. It also presents a programme for the pre-grouting hole studies in the shafts. The main aim of the report is to present the experimental studies that are to be carried out in the niches and studies that will be carried out below hydrogeological zone HZ20 at different locations in the tunnel, in order to obtain information on rock properties that are comparable to the rock at the disposal depth. This document provides a detailed discussion of the following experiments: (1) the sulphate reduction experiment at a depth of between 300-350 m to investigate the production, presence and effects of sulphide in the groundwater; (2) the hydrogeological interference experiment at tunnel chainage 3620 or 3748 for a detailed characterisation of connected fracture networks in the rock mass, representative of those in the near field of the deposition holes; (3) the rock matrix diffusion experiment(s) below chainage 4000 to determine the bedrock's essential retention properties for

  15. Requirements of actual final repository concepts for different host rock formations. Final report; Anforderungen an aktuelle Endlagerkonzepte fuer unterschiedliche Wirtsgesteinsformationen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, Thorsten; Hartwig-Thurat, Eva; Krischer, Angelika; Lambers, Ludger; Larue, Juergen; Uhlmann, Stephan; Weyand, Torben

    2017-08-15

    In the frame of the research project the basic requirements and technical safety specifications with respect to the retrievability of stored radioactive wastes for the different final repository concepts based on the host rock formations occurring in Germany are presented. Existing international disposal concepts for clay/claystone, granite and salt are described and compared to the actual German regulatory requirements. The safety engineering relations between stock piling and possible retrieval are described and evaluated.

  16. Application of Ga-Al discrimination plots in identification of high strength granitic host rocks for deep geological repository of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, R.K.; Narayan, P.K.; Trivedi, R.K.; Purohit, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    The permanent disposal of vitrified high level wastes and in some cases even spent fuel, is being planned in specifically designed and built deep geological repository located in the depth range of 500-600m in appropriate host rock at carefully selected sites. Such facilities are expected to provide very long term isolation and confinement to the disposed waste by means of long term mechanical stability of such structures that results from very high strength and homogeneity of the chosen rock, geochemical compatible environment around the disposed waste and general lack of groundwater. In Indian geological repository development programme, granites have been selected as target host rock and large scale characterization studies have been undertaken to develop database of mineralogy, petrology, geochemistry and rock mechanical characteristics. The paper proposes a new approach for demarcation of high strength homogeneous granite rocks from within an area of about 100 square kilometres wherein a cocktail of granites of different origins with varying rock mass characteristics co exists. The study area is characterised by the presence of A, S and I type granites toughly intermixed. The S type granites are derived from sedimentary parent material and therefore carry relics of parent fabric and at times undigested material with resultant reduction in their strength and increased inhomogeneity. On the other hand I type varieties are derived from igneous parents and are more homogeneous with sufficient strength. The A type granites are emplaced as molten mass in a complete non-tectonic setting with resultant homogeneous compositions, absence of tectonic fabric and very high strength. Besides they are silica rich with less vulnerability to alterations with time. Thus A type granites are most suited for construction of Deep Geological Repository. For developing a geochemical approach for establishing relation between chemical compositions and rock strength parameters, a

  17. Far-field sorption data bases for performance assessment of a L/ILW repository in an undisturbed Palfris marl host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1997-12-01

    A Palfris marl formation at Wellenberg (Gemeinde Wolfenschiessen, NW) has been chosen by NAGRA as a potential repository site for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste, L/ILW. In the coming years a series of performance assessment studies will be performed for this site. One set of key data required for such safety analysis calculations is sorption data bases (SDB) for safety relevant radionuclides in the far-field. The purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to generate sorption data bases appropriate for the in situ conditions existing along the different potential flow paths in an undisturbed marl host rock formation. An important aim was to document the sources of sorption data used and, in particular, the processes by which data selections were mad.e. The main guiding principles here were 'transparency' and 'traceability'. Inherent within this whole process is also the justification for, and defensibility of, the selected values. Much of the sorption data used to generate the SDB for marl came from the open literature. A major part of this report is concerned with describing the procedures whereby these initial literature values are modified so that they apply to the actual marl mineralogies and groundwater chemistries. The resulting 'reference R d values' are then further modified using so called Lab -> Field transfer factors to produce sorption values which are appropriate to the in situ bulk rock conditions. The Lab -> Field transfer factors attempt to correct for the differences in sorption site availability between the crushed rock state used in batch tests and the intact rock state existing in reality in the host rock. There are two main groundwater chemistries and five characteristic mineralogical compositions which cover the three broad types of flow paths which have been identified in the Palfris marl formation. In principle the methodology described here to construct sorption data bases for marl is applicable to any type of

  18. Far-field sorption data bases for performance assessment of a L/ILW repository in an undisturbed Palfris marl host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    A Palfris marl formation at Wellenberg (Gemeinde Wolfenschiessen, NW) has been chosen by NAGRA as a potential repository site for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste, L/ILW. In the coming years a series of performance assessment studies will be performed for this site. One set of key data required for such safety analysis calculations is sorption data bases (SDB) for safety relevant radionuclides in the far-field. The purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to generate sorption data bases appropriate for the in situ conditions existing along the different potential flow paths in an undisturbed marl host rock formation. An important aim was to document the sources of sorption data used and, in particular, the processes by which data selections were mad.e. The main guiding principles here were `transparency` and `traceability`. Inherent within this whole process is also the justification for, and defensibility of, the selected values. Much of the sorption data used to generate the SDB for marl came from the open literature. A major part of this report is concerned with describing the procedures whereby these initial literature values are modified so that they apply to the actual marl mineralogies and groundwater chemistries. The resulting `reference R{sub d} values` are then further modified using so called Lab -> Field transfer factors to produce sorption values which are appropriate to the in situ bulk rock conditions. The Lab -> Field transfer factors attempt to correct for the differences in sorption site availability between the crushed rock state used in batch tests and the intact rock state existing in reality in the host rock. There are two main groundwater chemistries and five characteristic mineralogical compositions which cover the three broad types of flow paths which have been identified in the Palfris marl formation. In principle the methodology described here to construct sorption data bases for marl is applicable to any

  19. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  20. Rock support for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, L.W.; Schmidt, B.

    1984-01-01

    The design of rock support for underground nuclear waste repositories requires consideration of special construction and operation requirements, and of the adverse environmental conditions in which some of the support is placed. While repository layouts resemble mines, design, construction and operation are subject to quality assurance and public scrutiny similar to what is experienced for nuclear power plants. Exploration, design, construction and operation go through phases of review and licensing by government agencies as repositories evolve. This paper discusses (1) the various stages of repository development; (2) the environment that supports must be designed for; (3) the environmental effects on support materials; and (4) alternative types of repository rock support

  1. Heat production / host rock compatibility; Waermeentwicklung / Gesteinsvertraeglichkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meleshyn, A.; Weyand, T.; Bracke, G.; Kull, H.; Wieczorek, K.

    2016-05-15

    For the final high-level radioactive waste repository potential host rock formations are either rock salt or clays (Kristallin). Heat generating waste (decay heat of the radioactive materials) can be absorbed by the host rock. The effect of temperature increase on the thermal conductivity, the thermal expansion and the mechanical properties of salt, Kristallin, clays and argilliferous geotechnical barriers are described. Further issues of the report are the mineralogical behavior, phase transformations, hydrochemistry, microbial processes, gas formation, thermochemical processes and gas ingress. Recommendations for further research are summarized.

  2. Shaft sealing concepts for high-level radioactive waste repositories based on the host-rock options rock salt and clay stone; Schachtverschlusskonzepte fuer zukuenftige Endlager fuer hochradioaktive Abfaelle fuer die Wirtsgesteinsoptionen Steinsalz und Ton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudla, Wolfram; Gruner, Matthias [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Erdbau und Spezialtiefbau; Herold, Philipp; Jobmann, Michael [DBE Technology GmbH, Peine (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Unlike the shaft barriers used for the dry preservation of former mine workings and underground storage sites, shaft seals designed for radioactive-waste repositories must also fulfil additional requirements associated with the design diversity of the sealing system. This diversity makes use of the simple redundancy principle in order to prevent the proliferation of defects. In practice this means combining several sealing elements made from different materials or from materials with different properties. The R and D project, Shaft sealing systems for final repositories for high-level radioactive waste (ELSA) - phase 2: concept design for shaft seals and testing of the functional elements of shaft seals', which was funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), set out to investigate potential sealing elements for the two host-rock options rock salt and mudstone. This paper combines the text that the authors presented at the First International Freiberg Shaft Colloquium held at the Freiberg University of Mining and Technology on 01.10.2014 with a presentation on the sealing elements that were investigated as part of the R and D project.

  3. What requirements does the KBS-3 repository make on the host rock? Geoscientific suitability indicators and criteria for siting and site evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Stroem, Anders; Svemar, Christer; Almen, Karl-Erik; Ericsson, Lars O.

    2000-04-01

    This report gives an account of what requirements are made on the rock, what conditions in the rock are advantageous and how the fulfilment of requirements and preferences is to be judged prior to the selection of sites for a site investigation and during a site investigation. The conclusions and results of the report are based on the knowledge and experience acquired by SKB over many years of research and development. The results, and particularly the stipulated criteria, apply to a repository for spent fuel of the KBS-3 type, i.e. a repository where the fuel is contained in copper canisters embedded in bentonite clay at a depth of 400 - 700 m in the Swedish crystalline basement. The report analyzes how the rock's different geological conditions, mechanical, thermal, hydrogeological, chemical and transport properties influence the functions of the deep repository, and whether it is possible to determine requirements and preferences regarding the influence of these properties. Where possible, these requirements or preferences have then been translated into requirements or preferences regarding the individual properties. Criteria are formulated that are based on the quantities that can be measured or estimated at the relevant stage of the investigation. The following requirements are made on the rock: The rock in the repository's deposition zone may not have any ore potential. Regional plastic shear zones shall be avoided if it cannot be demonstrated that the properties of the zone do not deviate from those of the rest of the rock. There may, however, be so-called 'tectonic lenses' near regional plastic shear zones where the bedrock is homogeneous and relatively unaffected. Deposition tunnels and deposition holes for canisters may not pass through or be positioned too close to major regional and major local fracture zones. Deposition holes may not intersect identified local minor fracture zones. The rock's strength, fracture geometry and initial stresses may not be

  4. Cs sorption to potential host rock of low-level radioactive waste repository in Taiwan: experiments and numerical fitting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Chen, Chin-Lung; Ou, Lu-Yen; Wei, Yuan-Yaw; Chang, Fu-Lin; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2011-09-15

    A reliable performance assessment of radioactive waste repository depends on better knowledge of interactions between nuclides and geological substances. Numerical fitting of acquired experimental results by the surface complexation model enables us to interpret sorption behavior at molecular scale and thus to build a solid basis for simulation study. A lack of consensus on a standard set of assessment criteria (such as determination of sorption site concentration, reaction formula) during numerical fitting, on the other hand, makes lower case comparison between various studies difficult. In this study we explored the sorption of cesium to argillite by conducting experiments under different pH and solid/liquid ratio (s/l) with two specific initial Cs concentrations (100mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-4)mol/L and 0.01 mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-8)mol/L). After this, numerical fitting was performed, focusing on assessment criteria and their consequences. It was found that both ion exchange and electrostatic interactions governed Cs sorption on argillite. At higher initial Cs concentration the Cs sorption showed an increasing dependence on pH as the solid/liquid ratio was lowered. In contrast at trace Cs levels, the Cs sorption was neither s/l dependent nor pH sensitive. It is therefore proposed that ion exchange mechanism dominates Cs sorption when the concentration of surface sorption site exceeds that of Cs, whereas surface complexation is attributed to Cs uptake under alkaline environments. Numerical fitting was conducted using two different strategies to determine concentration of surface sorption sites: the clay model (based on the cation exchange capacity plus surface titration results) and the iron oxide model (where the concentration of sorption sites is proportional to the surface area of argillite). It was found that the clay model led to better fitting than the iron oxide model, which is attributed to more amenable sorption sites (two specific sorption sites along with larger site

  5. What requirements does the KBS-3 repository make on the host rock? Geoscientific suitability indicators and criteria for siting and site evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [Golder Grundteknik AB (Sweden); Stroem, Anders; Svemar, Christer [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Almen, Karl-Erik [KEA Geo-Konsult AB, Naessjoe (Sweden); Ericsson, Lars O. [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    This report gives an account of what requirements are made on the rock, what conditions in the rock are advantageous and how the fulfilment of requirements and preferences is to be judged prior to the selection of sites for a site investigation and during a site investigation. The conclusions and results of the report are based on the knowledge and experience acquired by SKB over many years of research and development. The results, and particularly the stipulated criteria, apply to a repository for spent fuel of the KBS-3 type, i.e. a repository where the fuel is contained in copper canisters embedded in bentonite clay at a depth of 400 - 700 m in the Swedish crystalline basement. The report analyzes how the rock's different geological conditions, mechanical, thermal, hydrogeological, chemical and transport properties influence the functions of the deep repository, and whether it is possible to determine requirements and preferences regarding the influence of these properties. Where possible, these requirements or preferences have then been translated into requirements or preferences regarding the individual properties. Criteria are formulated that are based on the quantities that can be measured or estimated at the relevant stage of the investigation. The following requirements are made on the rock: The rock in the repository's deposition zone may not have any ore potential. Regional plastic shear zones shall be avoided if it cannot be demonstrated that the properties of the zone do not deviate from those of the rest of the rock. There may, however, be so-called 'tectonic lenses' near regional plastic shear zones where the bedrock is homogeneous and relatively unaffected. Deposition tunnels and deposition holes for canisters may not pass through or be positioned too close to major regional and major local fracture zones. Deposition holes may not intersect identified local minor fracture zones. The rock's strength, fracture geometry and

  6. Far Field Sorption Data Bases for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in an Undisturbed Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradburry, M.; Baeyens, B.

    2003-08-01

    An Opalinus Clay formation in the Zuercher Weinland is under consideration by Nagra as a potential location for a high-level and long-Iived intermediate-level radioactive waste repository. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and the purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop sorption data bases appropriate for an undisturbed Opalinus Clay host rock which are required for such safety analysis calculations. In tight, low water content argillaceous rock formations such as Opalinus Clay, there is uncertainty concerning the in situ pH/P CO 2 . In order to take this intrinsic uncertainty into account porewater chemistries were calculated for a reference case, pH = 7.24, and for two other pH values, 6.3 and 7.8. Sorption data bases are given for the three cases. The basis for the sorption data bases is 'in-house' sorption measurements for Cs(I), Sr(II), Ni(II), Eu(III), Sn(IV), Se(IV), Th(IV) and I(-I) carried out on Opalinus Clay samples from Mont Terri (Canton Jura) since at the time the experiments were performed no core samples from the Benken borehole (Zuercher Weinland) were available. The Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri and Benken are part of the same geological formation . Despite having directly measured data for the above key radionuclides, some of the required distribution ratios (Rd) used to generate the sorption data bases still came from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing the procedures whereby these selected literature Rd values were modified so as to apply to the Benken Opalinus Clay mineralogy and groundwater chemistries calculated at the three pH values given above. The resulting Rd values were then further modified using so-called Lab→Field transfer factors to produce sorption values which were appropriate to the in situ bulk rock for the selected range of water chemistry conditions. Finally, it is important to have some appreciation of the uncertainties

  7. Far Field Sorption Data Bases for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in an Undisturbed Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradburry, M.; Baeyens, B

    2003-08-01

    An Opalinus Clay formation in the Zuercher Weinland is under consideration by Nagra as a potential location for a high-level and long-Iived intermediate-level radioactive waste repository. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and the purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop sorption data bases appropriate for an undisturbed Opalinus Clay host rock which are required for such safety analysis calculations. In tight, low water content argillaceous rock formations such as Opalinus Clay, there is uncertainty concerning the in situ pH/P{sub CO{sub 2}}. In order to take this intrinsic uncertainty into account porewater chemistries were calculated for a reference case, pH = 7.24, and for two other pH values, 6.3 and 7.8. Sorption data bases are given for the three cases. The basis for the sorption data bases is 'in-house' sorption measurements for Cs(I), Sr(II), Ni(II), Eu(III), Sn(IV), Se(IV), Th(IV) and I(-I) carried out on Opalinus Clay samples from Mont Terri (Canton Jura) since at the time the experiments were performed no core samples from the Benken borehole (Zuercher Weinland) were available. The Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri and Benken are part of the same geological formation . Despite having directly measured data for the above key radionuclides, some of the required distribution ratios (Rd) used to generate the sorption data bases still came from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing the procedures whereby these selected literature Rd values were modified so as to apply to the Benken Opalinus Clay mineralogy and groundwater chemistries calculated at the three pH values given above. The resulting Rd values were then further modified using so-called Lab{yields}Field transfer factors to produce sorption values which were appropriate to the in situ bulk rock for the selected range of water chemistry conditions. Finally, it is important to have some

  8. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  9. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  10. Rock mechanics for hard rock nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-09-01

    The mined geologic burial of high level nuclear waste is now the favored option for disposal. The US National Waste Terminal Storage Program designed to achieve this disposal includes an extensive rock mechanics component related to the design of the wastes repositories. The plan currently considers five candidate rock types. This paper deals with the three hard rocks among them: basalt, granite, and tuff. Their behavior is governed by geological discontinuities. Salt and shale, which exhibit behavior closer to that of a continuum, are not considered here. This paper discusses both the generic rock mechanics R and D, which are required for repository design, as well as examples of projects related to hard rock waste storage. The examples include programs in basalt (Hanford/Washington), in granitic rocks (Climax/Nevada Test Site, Idaho Springs/Colorado, Pinawa/Canada, Oracle/Arizona, and Stripa/Sweden), and in tuff

  11. Repository for high level radioactive wastes in Brazil: the importance of geochemical (Micro thermometric) studies and fluid migration in potential host rocks; Repositorios para rejeitos radioativos de alto nivel (RANR) no Brasil: a importancia de estudos geoquimicos (microtermometricos) e de migracao de fluidos em rochas potenciamente hospedeiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Francisco Javier; Fuzikawa, Kazuo; Alves, James Vieira; Neves, Jose Marques Correia [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Inclusoes Fluidas e Metalogenese]. E-mail: javier@cdtn.br

    2003-04-15

    A detailed fluid inclusion study of host rocks, is of fundamental importance in the selection of geologically suitable areas for high level nuclear waste repository constructions (HLRW). The LIFM-CDTN is enabled to develop studies that confirm: the presence or not, of corrosive fluid in minerals from host rocks of the repository and the possible presence of micro fractures (and fluid leakage) when these rocks are submitted to high temperatures. These fluid geochemistry studies, with permeability determinations by means of pressurized air injection must be carried out in rocks hosting nuclear waste. Micro fracture determination is of vital importance since many naturally corrosive solutions, present in the mineral rocks, could flow out through these plans affecting the walls of the repository. (author)

  12. Redox front penetration in the fractured Toki Granite, central Japan: An analogue for redox reactions and redox buffering in fractured crystalline host rocks for repositories of long-lived radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Koshi; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Akagawa, Fuminori; Nishimoto, Shoji; Metcalfe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Deep redox front developed in orogenic granitic rock have been studied. • The process was controlled by the buffering capacity of minerals. • This is an analogue of redox front penetration into HLW repositories in Japan. - Abstract: Redox buffering is one important factor to be considered when assessing the barrier function of potential host rocks for a deep geological repository for long-lived radioactive waste. If such a repository is to be sited in fractured crystalline host rock it must be demonstrated that waste will be emplaced deeper than the maximum depth to which oxidizing waters can penetrate from the earth’s surface via fractures, during the assessment timeframe (typically 1 Ma). An analogue for penetration of such oxidizing water occurs in the Cretaceous Toki Granite of central Japan. Here, a deep redox front is developed along water-conducting fractures at a depth of 210 m below the ground surface. Detailed petrographical studies and geochemical analyses were carried out on drill core specimens of this redox front. The aim was to determine the buffering processes and behavior of major and minor elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), during redox front development. The results are compared with analytical data from an oxidized zone found along shallow fractures (up to 20 m from the surface) in the same granitic rock, in order to understand differences in elemental migration according to the depth below the ground surface of redox-front formation. Geochemical analyses by XRF and ICP-MS of the oxidized zone at 210 m depth reveal clear changes in Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratios and Ca depletion across the front, while Fe concentrations vary little. In contrast, the redox front identified along shallow fractures shows strong enrichments of Fe, Mn and trace elements in the oxidized zone compared with the fresh rock matrix. The difference can be ascribed to the changing Eh and pH of groundwater as it flows downwards in the granite, due to

  13. Near Field sorption Data Bases for Compacted MX-80 Bentonite for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.; Baeyens, B

    2003-08-01

    Bentonites of various types and compacted forms are being investigated in many countries as backfill materials in high-level radioactive waste disposal concepts. Nagra is currently considering an Opalinus clay (OPA) formation in the Zuercher Weinland as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. A compacted MX-80 bentonite is foreseen as a potential backfill material. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and one of the requirements for such an assessment are sorption data bases (SDB) for the bentonite near-field. The purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop the SDB. One of the pre-requisites for developing a SDB is a water chemistry for the compacted bentonite porewater. For a number of reasons mentioned in the report, and discussed in more detail elsewhere, this is not a straightforward task. There are considerable uncertainties associated with the major ion concentrations and in particular with the system pH and Eh. The MX-80 SDB was developed for a reference bentonite porewater (pH = 7.25) which was calculated using the reference OPA porewater. In addition, two further SDBs are presented for porewaters calculated at pH values of 6.9 and 7.9 corresponding to lower and upper bound values calculated for the range of groundwater compositions anticipated for the OPA host rock. 'In house' sorption isotherm data were measured for Cs(I), Ni(II), Eu(III), Th(IV), Se(IV) and 1(-1) on the 'as received' MX-80 material equilibrated with a simulated porewater composition. Complementary 'in house' sorption edge and isotherm measurements on conditioned Na/Ca montmorillonites were also available for many of these radionuclides. These data formed the core of the SDB. Nevertheless, some of the required sorption data still had to be obtained from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing selection procedures and the modifications

  14. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E.

    2000-01-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  15. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberid, J; Barcala, J M; Campos, R; Cuevas, A M; Fernandez, E [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  16. Waste-rock interactions in the immediate repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.

    1977-01-01

    The high level wastes (HLW's) to be placed underground in rock formations will contain significant amounts of radioactive decay heat for the first hundred-or-so years of isolation. Several physical-chemical changes analogous to natural geochemical processes can occur during this ''thermal period.'' The waste canister can act as a heat source and cause changes in the mineralogy and properties of the surrounding rocks. Geochemically, this is ''contact metamorphism.'' In the event that the canister is corroded and breached, chemical reactions can occur between the HLW, the surrounding rock and possibly the remains of the canister. In a dry repository which has not been backfilled (and thus pressurized) these interactions could be slow at best and with rates decreasing rapidly as the HLW cools. However, significant interactions can occur in years, months or even days under hydrothermal conditions. These conditions could be created by the combination of HLW heat, overburden pressure and water mobilized from the rocks or derived from groundwater intrusion. At the end of the thermal period these interaction products would constitute the actual HLW form (or ''source term'') subject to the low temperature leaching and migration processes under investigation in other laboratories. It is quite possible that these interaction product waste forms will have superior properties compared to the original HLW. Experimental programs initiated at Penn State during the last year aim at determining the nature of any chemical or mineralogical changes in, or interactions between, HLW solids and host rocks under various repository ambients. The accompanying figures describe the simulated HLW forms and the experimental approach and techniques. Studies with basalts as the repository rock are supported by Rockwell Hanford Operations and with shales by the Office of Waste Isolation

  17. Interim rock mass properties and conditions for analyses of a repository in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammemagi, H.Y.; Chieslar, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    A summary of rock properties for generic crystalline rock is compiled from literature sources to provide the input data for analyses of a conceptual repository in crystalline rock. Frequency histograms, mean values and ranges of physical, mechanical, thermal, and thermomechanical properties, and the dependence of these properties on temperature are described. A description of the hydrogeologic properties of a crystalline rock mass and their dependence on depth is provided. In addition, the temperature gradients, mean annual surface temperature, and in situ stress conditions are summarized for the three regions of the United States currently under consideration to host a crystalline repository; i.e., the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern. Brief descriptions of the regional geology are also presented. Large-scale underground experiments in crystalline rock at Stripa, Sweden, and in Climax Stock in Nevada, are reviewed to assess whether the rock properties presented in this report are representative of in situ conditions. The suitability of each rock property and the sufficiency of its data base are described. 110 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Investigations for the influence of geochemical parameters on the sorption and desorption of lanthanides and uranium onto opalinus clay as potential host rock for a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeser, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The development of a disposal in deep geological formations for radioactive waste is a very important task for the future. The safety assessment for more than a hundred thousand years needs a full understanding of all processes of interaction between the radioactive waste and the surrounded formations. This work contributes to this understanding. The interaction between lanthanides (homologues of the actinides americium, curium and berkelium) / uranium and the host rock opalinus clay under influence of organic substances (NOM) have been analyzed and discussed. The complex system was split into 3 binary basic systems with the following interactions - Interactions between lanthanides / uranium and NOM - Interactions between lanthanides / uranium and the opalinus clay - Interactions between NOM and opalinus clay All binary systems can be influenced by geological parameters like pH, ion strength and competing cations. The sorption / desorption of the lanthanides onto the opalinus clay is analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For the investigation of the complexation behavior of metals with NOM we used capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Under these conditions the chosen model organic humic acid affected the sorption of the lanthanides onto opalinus clay favorably. The smaller organic compounds, which dominate in the composition of the clay organics, remobilized the metals after sorption onto clay and the sorption can be inhibited by NOM. Due to the reduced metal sorption onto Opalinus clay by NOM, a migration through the clay may be possible.

  19. Release consequence analysis for a hypothetical geologic radioactive waste repository in hard rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    This report makes an evaluation of the long-term behaviour of the wastes placed in a hard rock repository. Impacts were analyzed for the seven reference fuel cycles of WG 7. The reference repository for this study is for granitic rock or gneiss as the host rock. The descriptions of waste packages and repository facilities used in this study represent only one of many possible designs based on the multiple barriers concept. The repository's size is based on a nuclear economy producing 100 gigawatts of electricity per year for 1 year. The objective of the modeling efforts presented in this study is to predict the rate of transport of radioactive contaminants from the repository through the geosphere to the biosphere and thus determine an estimate of the potential dose to humans so that the release consequence impacts of the various fuel cycles can be compared. Currently available hydrologic, leach, transport, and dose models were used in this study

  20. Cementitious near-field sorption data bases for performance assessment of a L/ILW repository in a Palfris marl host rock. CEM-94: update I, June 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Loon, L.R. van

    1998-01-01

    This report is an update on an earlier cementitious sorption data base (SDB) prepared by Bradbury and Sarott (1994). The aim is to review any new information or data which have become available in the intervening time and modify the existing SDB appropriately. Discussions will be confined predominantly to areas which have led to significant changes to or reappraisals of the data/values or procedures for obtaining/modifying them. From this point of view this update and the previous SDB are closely related and belong together. The complexation of radionuclides with organic ligands from the chemical degradation of cellulose, and the subsequent negative effects on sorption properties, were identified as being processes of great importance. Since 1994 significant progress has been made in this field and a major part of this work is devoted to a reassessment of the impact of 'organics' on near-field sorption. In particular, the very conservative assumptions which had been made previously because of the general lack of good quality data available at that time, could be replaced by realistic parameter estimates based on new knowledge. For example, maximum likely concentrations of cellulose degradation products and cement additives in the cement pore waters could be calculated allowing the potential effects of these organic ligands on sorption to be bounded. Sorption values for safety relevant radionuclides corresponding to the three broad stages of cement/concrete degradation during the lifetime of the repository are presented in tabulated form. The influence of the wide variety of organic ligands existing in the different waste categories, SMA-1 to SMA-4, is quantified in terms of sorption reduction factors. In the compilation of this cement SDB update, radionuclide uptake onto the vast quantities of aggregate materials and corrosion products from iron/steel was not taken into account. (author) 10 figs., 8 tabs., refs

  1. The rock mechanical stability of the VLJ repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuula, H.; Johansson, E.

    1991-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the rock mechanical stability around the VLJ repository based on the rock mechanical monitoring and rock mechanical modeling. Rock mechanical calculations were made in order to calculate the rock mass displacements and to analyze the stability around the VLJ repository The calculations were performed with three diiferent methods: continuum finite difference code FLAC, distinct element code UDEC and three dimensional distinct element code 3DEC. The first analyses were based on preliminary site investigations. The final modeling was based on investigations and rock mechanical monitoring done during the excavation. Some sensitive analyses were also performed. The modelled rock mass behaviour and the measured behaviour are generally close to each other. Both results show that the VLJ repository is rock mechanically stable. The modelled displacements and stresses were small enough to cause no instability around the rock caverns. The measured values do not indicate any discontinuous deformations like block movements or joint slip. The measured displacements in the extensometers during excavation indicates that the rock mass is even stiffer than anticipated

  2. Ground water movements around a repository. Rock mechanics analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1977-09-01

    The determination and rational assessment of groundwater flow around a repository depends upon the accurate analysis of several interdependent and coupled phenomenological events occuring within the rock mass. In particular, the groundwater flow pathways (joints) are affected by the excavation and thermomechanical stresses developed within the rock mass, and the properties, of the groundwater are altered by the temperature perturbations in the rock mass. The objective of this report is to present the results of the rock mechanics analysis for the repository excavation and the thermally-induced loadings. Qualitative analysis of the significance of the rock mechanics results upon the groundwater flow is provided in this report whenever such an analysis can be performed. Non-linear rock mechanics calculations have been completed for the repository storage tunnels and the global repository domain. The rock mass has been assumed to possess orthoganol joint sets or planes of weakness with finite strength characteristics. In the local analyses of the repository storage tunnels the effects of jointorientation and repository ventilation have been examined. The local analyses indicated that storage room support requirements and regions of strength failure are highly dependent upon joint orientation. The addition of storage tunnel ventilation was noted to reduce regions of strength failure, particularly during the 30 year operational phase of the repository. Examination of the local stresses around the storage tunnels indicated the potential for perturbed hydraulic permeabilities. The permeabilities can be expected to be altered to a greater degree by the stresses resulting from excavation than from stresses which are thermally induced. The thermal loading provided by the instantaneous waste emplacement resulted in stress states and displacements quite similar to those provided by the linear waste emplacement sequence

  3. Workshop on rock mechanics issues in repository design and performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses organized and hosted a workshop on ''Rock Mechanics Issues in Repository Design and Performance Assessment'' on behalf its sponsor the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This workshop was held on September 19- 20, 1994 at the Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza, Rockville, Maryland. The objectives of the workshop were to stimulate exchange of technical information among parties actively investigating rock mechanics issues relevant to the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain and identify/confirm rock mechanics issues important to repository design and performance assessment The workshop contained three technical sessions and two panel discussions. The participants included technical and research staffs representing the NRC and the Department of Energy and their contractors, as well as researchers from the academic, commercial, and international technical communities. These proceedings include most of the technical papers presented in the technical sessions and the transcripts for the two panel discussions

  4. Evaluation of radiological safety assessment of a repository in a clay rock formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program excavated in a clay host rock formation. In this report three scenarios have been analysed in detail. The first scenario represents the normal in detail. The first scenario represents the normal evolution of the repository (Reference Scenario); and includes a set of variants to investigate the relative importance of the various repository components and examine the sensitivity of the performance to parameters variations. Two altered scenarios have also been considered: deep well construction and poor sealing of the repository. This document contains a detailed description of the repository system, the methodology adopted for the scenarios generation, the process modelling approach and the results of the consequences analysis. (Author)

  5. Thermal characteristics of rocks for high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooka, Kenji; Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Okamoto, Masamichi; Kumata, Masahiro; Araki, Kunio; Amano, Hiroshi

    1980-12-01

    Heat released by the radioactive decay of high-level waste in an underground repository causes a long term thermal disturbance in the surrounding rock mass. Several rocks constituting geological formations in Japan were gathered and specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient and compressive strength were measured. Thermal analysis and chemical analysis were also carried out. It was found that volcanic rocks, i.e. Andesite and Basalt had the most favorable thermal characteristics up to around 1000 0 C and plutonic rock, i.e. Granite had also favorable characteristics under 573 0 C, transition temperature of quartz. Other igneous rocks, i.e. Rhyolite and Propylite had a problem of decomposition at around 500 0 C. Sedimentary rocks, i.e. Zeolite, Tuff, Sandstone and Diatomite were less favorable because of their decomposition, low thermal conductivity and large thermal expansion coefficient. (author)

  6. PRINCIPLE ROCK TYPES FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Borojević Šostarić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Underground geological storage of high- and intermediate/low radioactive waste is aimed to represent a barrier between the surface environment and potentially hazardous radioactive elements. Permeability, behavior against external stresses, chemical reacatibility and absorption are the key geological parameters for the geological storage of radioactive waste. Three principal rock types were discussed and applied to the Dinarides: (1 evaporites in general, (2 shale, and (3 crystalline basement rocks. (1 Within the Dinarides, evaporite formations are located within the central part of a Carbonate platform and are inappropriate for storage. Offshore evaporites are located within diapiric structures of the central and southern part of the Adriatic Sea and are covered by thick Mesozoic to Cenozoic clastic sediment. Under very specific circumstances they can be considered as potential site locations for further investigation for the storage of low/intermediate level radioactive wast e. (2 Thick flysch type formation of shale to phyllite rocks are exposed at the basement units of the Petrova and Trgovska gora regions whereas (3 crystalline magmatic to metamorphic basement is exposed at the Moslavačka Gora and Slavonian Mts. regions. For high-level radioactive waste, basement phyllites and granites may represent the only realistic potential option in the NW Dinarides.

  7. Potential host media for a high-level waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hustrulid, W

    1982-01-01

    Earlier studies of burial of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories had concentrated on salt formations for well-publicized reasons. However, under the Carter administration, significant changes were made in the US nuclear waste management program. Changes which were made were: (1) expansion of the number of rock types under consideration; (2) adoption of the multiple-barrier approach to waste containment; (3) additional requirements for waste retrieval; and (4) new criteria proposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the isolation of high-level waste in geologic repositories. Results of the studies of different types of rocks as repository sites are summarized herein. It is concluded that each generic rock type has certain advantages and disadvantages when considered from various aspects of the waste disposal problem and that characteristics of rocks are so varied that a most favorable or least favorable rock type cannot be easily identified. This lack of definitive characteristics of rocks makes site selection and good engineering barriers very important for containment of the wastes. (BLM)

  8. Calculations of the Temperature Evolution of a Repository for Spent Fuel in Crystalline and Sedimentary Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, R.; Sasaki, T.; Ando, K.; Smith, P.A.; Schneider, J.W.

    1998-08-01

    Thermal evolution is a factor influencing repository design, and must be considered in safety assessment, since many of the processes that affect the long-term safety are temperature dependent. This report presents calculations of the thermal evolution of a repository for spent nuclear fuel. The calculations are based on a provisional repository near-field design in which spent fuel is encapsulated in composite copper-steel canisters, which are emplaced centrally along the horizontal axes of repository tunnels, with the space around the canisters backfilled with bentonite. The temperature of these near-field components varies with time, due to the radiogenic heat produced by the spent fuel. The rate of heat production per canister depends on the initial composition of the fuel, its reactor history, the period of intermediate storage before final disposal and the loading of the canisters. The rate decreases with time, as shorter-lived radionuclides decay. The base-case calculation considers spent fuel that is assumed to generate 1000 W per canister, 40 years after unloading of the fuel from the reactor. The results of the base case calculation indicate that the temperatures at the bentonite/host rock interface, at the centre of the bentonite and at the bentonite/canister interface rise to 98 o C, 103 o C and 126 o C, respectively, before declining towards the ambient temperature of the host rock which, in the base case, is taken to be the crystalline basement of Northern Switzerland. In addition to the base case, parameter variations are examined that investigate the sensitivity of thermal evolution to alternative heat output, design specifications and to uncertainties in material properties. Key findings include (i), that an increase in heat generation to 1500 W per canister 40 years after unloading results in a significant increase of repository temperatures (e.g. at the bentonite/host rock interface, an increase of 22 o C is observed), (ii), that a decrease in

  9. Radioactive waste repositories in hard rock aquifers--hydrodynamic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunvik, R.; Braester, C.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical model for mass and heat flow and a computer program have been developed to demonstrate the effect of heat released from a hypothetical radioactive waste repository on the groundwater flow regime. The model, based on the continuum approach, conceptualizes the fracture pattern and the solid blocks as two overlapping continua and consists of a set of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. The general form of the model is three-dimensional and can treat the fluid and rock either as two separate media with a quasi-steady exchange of heat between them or as a single equivalent medium with instantaneous thermal equilibrium. Numerical solutions have been obtained by the Galerkin finite element method. Examples have been presented for topographically different locations of the repository: below a horizontal ground surface, below a hill crest, below a hillside, and close to major fractures. The effects of constant permeability and porosity or downward decreasing with depth as well as the effect of anisotropic permeability have been investigated. Solutions include the velocity field, path lines, and traveling times of water particles passing the repository and the temperature distribution. The examples have been worked out for a two-dimensional flow domain, assuming that instantaneous thermal equilibrium takes place. This assumption was found to be justified by the relatively low flow velocities that occurred in the examples. Except for the location close to a major draining fracture, heat released from the radioactive waste repository may have a significant influence on the flow regime around the repository

  10. Analysis on one underground nuclear waste repository rock mass in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Qiuling; Zhang Tiantian

    2012-01-01

    When analyzing the rock mass of a underground nuclear waste repository, the current studies are all based on the loading mechanical condition, and the unloading damage of rock mass is unconsidered. According to the different mechanical condition of actual engineering rock mass of loading and unloading, this paper implements a comprehensive analysis on the rock mass deformation of underground nuclear waste repository through the combination of present loading and unloading rock mass mechanics. It is found that the results of comprehensive analysis and actual measured data on the rock mass deformation of underground nuclear waste repository are basically the same, which provide supporting data for the underground nuclear waste repository. (authors)

  11. Natural analogue studies in crystalline rock: the influence of water-bearing fractures on radionuclide immobilisation in a granitic rock repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; MacKenzie, A.B.; Scott, R.D.; McKinley, I.G.

    1990-06-01

    Current Swiss concepts for the disposal of radioactive waste involve disposal in deep mined repositories to ensure that only insignificant quantities of radionuclides will ever reach the surface and so enter the biosphere. The rock formations presently considered as potential candidates for hosting radwaste repositories have thus been selected on the basis of their capacity to isolate radionuclides from the biosphere. An important factor in ensuring such containment is a very low solute transport rate through the host formation. However, it is considered likely that, in the formations of interest in the Swiss programme (eg. granites, argillaceous sediments, anhydrite), the rocks will be fractured to some extent even at repository depth. In the instance of the cumulative failure of near-field barriers in the repository, these hydraulically connected fractures in the host formation could be very important far-field routes of migration (and possible sites of retardation) of radionuclides dissolved in the groundwaters. In this context, the so-called 'matrix diffusion' mechanism is potentially very important for radionuclide retardation. This report is the culmination of a programme which has attempted to assess the potential influence of these water-bearing fractures on radionuclide transport in a crystalline rock radwaste repository. 162 refs., 36 figs., 16 tabs

  12. Host Rock Classification (HRC) system for nuclear waste disposal in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagros, A.

    2006-01-01

    A new rock mass classification scheme, the Host Rock Classification system (HRC-system) has been developed for evaluating the suitability of volumes of rock mass for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in Precambrian crystalline bedrock. To support the development of the system, the requirements of host rock to be used for disposal have been studied in detail and the significance of the various rock mass properties have been examined. The HRC-system considers both the long-term safety of the repository and the constructability in the rock mass. The system is specific to the KBS-3V disposal concept and can be used only at sites that have been evaluated to be suitable at the site scale. By using the HRC-system, it is possible to identify potentially suitable volumes within the site at several different scales (repository, tunnel and canister scales). The selection of the classification parameters to be included in the HRC-system is based on an extensive study on the rock mass properties and their various influences on the long-term safety, the constructability and the layout and location of the repository. The parameters proposed for the classification at the repository scale include fracture zones, strength/stress ratio, hydraulic conductivity and the Groundwater Chemistry Index. The parameters proposed for the classification at the tunnel scale include hydraulic conductivity, Q' and fracture zones and the parameters proposed for the classification at the canister scale include hydraulic conductivity, Q', fracture zones, fracture width (aperture + filling) and fracture trace length. The parameter values will be used to determine the suitability classes for the volumes of rock to be classified. The HRC-system includes four suitability classes at the repository and tunnel scales and three suitability classes at the canister scale and the classification process is linked to several important decisions regarding the location and acceptability of many components of

  13. Workshop on rock mechanics issues in repository design and performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses organized and hosted a workshop on ``Rock Mechanics Issues in Repository Design and Performance Assessment`` on behalf its sponsor the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This workshop was held on September 19- 20, 1994 at the Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza, Rockville, Maryland. The objectives of the workshop were to stimulate exchange of technical information among parties actively investigating rock mechanics issues relevant to the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain and identify/confirm rock mechanics issues important to repository design and performance assessment The workshop contained three technical sessions and two panel discussions. The participants included technical and research staffs representing the NRC and the Department of Energy and their contractors, as well as researchers from the academic, commercial, and international technical communities. These proceedings include most of the technical papers presented in the technical sessions and the transcripts for the two panel discussions. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. A probabilistic approach to rock mechanical property characterization for nuclear waste repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kunsoo; Gao, Hang

    1996-01-01

    A probabilistic approach is proposed for the characterization of host rock mechanical properties at the Yucca Mountain site. This approach helps define the probability distribution of rock properties by utilizing extreme value statistics and Monte Carlo simulation. We analyze mechanical property data of tuff obtained by the NNWSI Project to assess the utility of the methodology. The analysis indicates that laboratory measured strength and deformation data of Calico Hills and Bullfrog tuffs follow an extremal. probability distribution (the third type asymptotic distribution of the smallest values). Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to estimate rock mass deformation moduli using a one-dimensional tuff model proposed by Zimmermann and Finley. We suggest that the results of these analyses be incorporated into the repository design

  15. Solute transport in fractured rock - applications to radionuclide waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1990-12-01

    Flow and solute transport in fractured rocks has been intensively studied in the last decade. The increased interest is mainly due to the plans in many countries to site repositories for high level nuclear waste in deep geologic formations. All investigated crystalline rocks have been found to be fractured and most of the water flows in the fractures and fracture zones. The water transports dissolved species and radionuclides. It is thus of interest to be able to understand and to do predictive modelling of the flowrate of water, the flowpaths and the residence times of the water and of the nuclides. The dissolved species including the nuclides will interact with the surrounding rock in different ways and will in many cases be strongly retarded relative to the water velocity. Ionic species may be ion exchanged or sorbed in the mineral surfaces. Charges and neutral species may diffuse into the stagnant waters in the rock matrix and thus be withdrawn from the mobile water. These effects will be strongly dependent on how much rock surface is in contact with the flowing water. It has been found in a set of field experiments and by other observations that not all fractures conduct water. Furthermore it is found that conductive fractures only conduct the water in a small part of the fracture in what is called channels or preferential flowpaths. This report summarizes the present concepts of water flow and solute transport in fractured rocks. The data needs for predictive modelling are discussed and both field and laboratory measurement which have been used to obtain data are described. Several large scale field experiments which have been specially designed to study flow and tracer transport in crystalline rocks are described. In many of the field experients new techniques have been developed and used. (81 refs.) (author)

  16. Microorganisms in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste and their interactions with radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkouk, A.; Liebe, M.; Luetke, L.; Moll, H.; Stumpf, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2015-07-01

    The long-term safety of nuclear waste in a deep geological repository is an important issue in our society. Microorganisms indigenous to potential host rocks are able to influence the oxidation state, speciation and therefore the mobility of radionuclides as well as gas generation or canister corrosion. Therefore, for the safety assessment of such a repository it is necessary to know which microorganisms are present in the potential host rocks (e.g. clay, salt) and if these microorganisms can influence the performance of a repository. Microbial diversity in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste was analyzed by culture-independent molecular biological methods (e.g. 16S rRNA gene retrieval) as well as enrichment and isolation of indigenous microbes. Among other isolates, a Paenibacillus strain, as a representative of Firmicutes, was recovered in R2A media under anaerobic conditions from Opalinus clay from the Mont Terri in Switzerland. Accumulation experiments and potentiometric titrations showed a strong interaction of Paenibacillus sp. cells with U(VI) within a broad pH range (3-7). Additionally, the interactions of the halophilic archaeal strain Halobacterium noricense DSM 15987, a salt rock representative reference strain, with U(VI) at high ionic strength was investigated. After 48 h the cells were still alive at uranium concentrations up to 60 μM, which demonstrates that Halobacterium noricense can tolerate uranium concentrations up to this level. The formed uranium sorption species were examined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results about the microbial communities present in potential host rocks for nuclear waste repositories and their interactions with radionuclides contribute to the safety assessment of a prospective nuclear waste repository.

  17. Microorganisms in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste and their interactions with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkouk, A.; Liebe, M.; Luetke, L.; Moll, H.; Stumpf, T.

    2015-01-01

    The long-term safety of nuclear waste in a deep geological repository is an important issue in our society. Microorganisms indigenous to potential host rocks are able to influence the oxidation state, speciation and therefore the mobility of radionuclides as well as gas generation or canister corrosion. Therefore, for the safety assessment of such a repository it is necessary to know which microorganisms are present in the potential host rocks (e.g. clay, salt) and if these microorganisms can influence the performance of a repository. Microbial diversity in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste was analyzed by culture-independent molecular biological methods (e.g. 16S rRNA gene retrieval) as well as enrichment and isolation of indigenous microbes. Among other isolates, a Paenibacillus strain, as a representative of Firmicutes, was recovered in R2A media under anaerobic conditions from Opalinus clay from the Mont Terri in Switzerland. Accumulation experiments and potentiometric titrations showed a strong interaction of Paenibacillus sp. cells with U(VI) within a broad pH range (3-7). Additionally, the interactions of the halophilic archaeal strain Halobacterium noricense DSM 15987, a salt rock representative reference strain, with U(VI) at high ionic strength was investigated. After 48 h the cells were still alive at uranium concentrations up to 60 μM, which demonstrates that Halobacterium noricense can tolerate uranium concentrations up to this level. The formed uranium sorption species were examined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results about the microbial communities present in potential host rocks for nuclear waste repositories and their interactions with radionuclides contribute to the safety assessment of a prospective nuclear waste repository.

  18. The Polar Rock Repository: Rescuing Polar Collections for New Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, A.

    2016-12-01

    Geological field expeditions in polar regions are logistically difficult, financially expensive and can have a significant environmental impact on pristine regions. The scarcity of outcrop in Antarctica (98% ice-covered) makes previously collected rock samples very valuable to the science community. NSF recognized the need for preserving rock, dredge, and terrestrial core samples from polar areas and created the Polar Rock Repository (PRR). The PRR collection allows for full and open access to both samples and metadata via the PRR website. In addition to the physical samples and their basic metadata, the PRR archives supporting materials from the collector, field notebooks, images of the samples, field maps, air photos, thin sections and any associated bibliography/DOI's. Many of these supporting materials are unique. More than 40,000 samples are available from the PRR for scientific analysis to researchers around the globe. Most of the samples cataloged at the PRR were collected more than 30 years ago, some more than 100 years ago. The rock samples and metadata are made available online through an advanced search engine for the PRR website. This allows scientists to "drill down" into search results using categories and look-up object fields similar to websites like Amazon. Results can be viewed in a table, downloaded as a spreadsheet, or plotted on an interactive map that supports display of satellite imagery and bathymetry layers. Samples can be requested by placing them in the `shopping cart'. These old sample collections have been repeatedly used by scientists from around the world. One data request involved locating coal deposits in Antarctica for a global compilation and another for looking at the redox state of batholithic rocks from the Antarctic Peninsula using magnetic susceptibilities of PRR rocks. Sample usage has also included non-traditional geologic studies, such as a search for monopoles in Cenozoic volcanic samples, and remote sensing

  19. Radionuclide Transport in Fractured Rock: Numerical Assessment for High Level Waste Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Siqueira da Silveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep and stable geological formations with low permeability have been considered for high level waste definitive repository. A common problem is the modeling of radionuclide migration in a fractured medium. Initially, we considered a system consisting of a rock matrix with a single planar fracture in water saturated porous rock. Transport in the fracture is assumed to obey an advection-diffusion equation, while molecular diffusion is considered the dominant mechanism of transport in porous matrix. The partial differential equations describing the movement of radionuclides were discretized by finite difference methods, namely, fully explicit, fully implicit, and Crank-Nicolson schemes. The convective term was discretized by the following numerical schemes: backward differences, centered differences, and forward differences. The model was validated using an analytical solution found in the literature. Finally, we carried out a simulation with relevant spent fuel nuclide data with a system consisting of a horizontal fracture and a vertical fracture for assessing the performance of a hypothetical repository inserted into the host rock. We have analysed the bentonite expanded performance at the beginning of fracture, the quantified radionuclide released from a borehole, and an estimated effective dose to an adult, obtained from ingestion of well water during one year.

  20. Rock grouting. Current competence and development for the final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmelin, Ann; Brantberger, Martin; Eriksson, Magnus; Gustafson, Gunnar; St ille, Haakan

    2007-06-01

    The report aims at presenting the overall state of grouting competence and development relating to the final repository and at motivating and giving detail to the grouting sections presented in the 2007 version of the overall SKB report 'Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste' that is presented to the government every three years. The report offers suggestions for principles for planning, design and execution of grouting and describes the further work thought to be necessary in order to meet the requirements of the final repository, that are currently given as working premises. This report does not aim to, and cannot, describe the grouting processes in detail. For details of current concepts, experience and development work, a list of references is provided. In Chapter 2, the task of sealing the underground repository is examined and an overall approach presented. Although the requirements related to this task are preliminary, it is made evident that they concern both the actual grouting results and the process leading to the achievement of these results. Chapter 3 is a conceptual description of grouting and the factors that govern the spreading of grout in the rock mass. It is intended as an introduction to Chapters 4-6, which describe the state of grouting competence and the tools available for the sealing of the final repository facility. Both common practice and cutting-edge research are dealt with in these chapters, mainly relying on references where available. Chapters 4 and 5 focus on the system consisting of the fundamental components the rock mass, the grout materials and the grouting technology, and how these system components interact whilst, in Chapter 6, the rock/grout technical system is viewed in a brief organizational context. Based on the requirements on results and the overall grouting process on the one hand and the current competence in grouting theory and practice on the

  1. Rock grouting. Current competence and development for the final repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmelin, Ann (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE)); Brantberger, Martin (Ramboell (SE)); Eriksson, Magnus (Vattenfall Power Consultant (SE)); Gustafson, Gunnar (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (SE)); Stille, Haakan (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-06-15

    The report aims at presenting the overall state of grouting competence and development relating to the final repository and at motivating and giving detail to the grouting sections presented in the 2007 version of the overall SKB report 'Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste' that is presented to the government every three years. The report offers suggestions for principles for planning, design and execution of grouting and describes the further work thought to be necessary in order to meet the requirements of the final repository, that are currently given as working premises. This report does not aim to, and cannot, describe the grouting processes in detail. For details of current concepts, experience and development work, a list of references is provided. In Chapter 2, the task of sealing the underground repository is examined and an overall approach presented. Although the requirements related to this task are preliminary, it is made evident that they concern both the actual grouting results and the process leading to the achievement of these results. Chapter 3 is a conceptual description of grouting and the factors that govern the spreading of grout in the rock mass. It is intended as an introduction to Chapters 4-6, which describe the state of grouting competence and the tools available for the sealing of the final repository facility. Both common practice and cutting-edge research are dealt with in these chapters, mainly relying on references where available. Chapters 4 and 5 focus on the system consisting of the fundamental components the rock mass, the grout materials and the grouting technology, and how these system components interact whilst, in Chapter 6, the rock/grout technical system is viewed in a brief organizational context. Based on the requirements on results and the overall grouting process on the one hand and the current competence in grouting theory and

  2. A Rock Mechanics and Coupled Hydro mechanical Analysis of Geological Repository of High Level Nuclear Waste in Fractured Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Kibok

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a few case studies on fractured hard rock based on geological data from Sweden, Korea is one of a few countries where crystalline rock is the most promising rock formation as a candidate site of geological repository of high level nuclear waste. Despite the progress made in the area of rock mechanics and coupled hydro mechanics, extensive site specific study on multiple candidate sites is essential in order to choose the optimal site. For many countries concerned about the safe isolation of nuclear wastes from the biosphere, disposal in a deep geological formation is considered an attractive option. In geological repository, thermal loading continuously disturbs the repository system in addition to disturbances a recent development in rock mechanics and coupled hydro mechanical study using DFN(Discrete Fracture Network) - DEM(Discrete Element Method) approach mainly applied in hard, crystalline rock containing numerous fracture which are main sources of deformation and groundwater flow

  3. The RRP Project: investigating radionuclide retardation in the host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, W.R.; Frieg, B.; Ota, K.; Bossart, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Radionuclide Retardation Project (RRP), which is a joint Nagra/PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp.) project, has two components: the first (the Excavation Project, EP) looks at the behaviour of radionuclides which are so strongly retarded in the experimental shear zone that they cannot pass through the zones in experimentally reasonable times. In order to determine where radionuclide retardation has occurred in the pore space, as well as the flowpath geometry in the shear zone, the entire injection zone has to be excavated and taken back to the laboratory for analysis of the sites of retardation of the radionuclides. This approach has the advantage of allowing a detailed 3D description of the experimental shear zone. The aim of the second component of the project (Connected Porosities, CP) is to examine the fate of those radionuclides which diffuse out of the main water-conducting features in the shear zone and into the pore spaces of the rock matrix, where they become trapped. This represents a potentially significant retardation mechanism in a repository host rock. (author) 8 figs., refs

  4. Layout Optimization for the Repository within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Choi, Jong Won; Bae, Dae Seok

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the present study is a layout optimization of a single and double layer repositories within a repository site with special joint set arrangements. Single and double layer repository models, subjected to the variation of repository depth, cavern spacing, pitch, and layer spacing, are analyzed for the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior during the period of 2000 years from waste emplacement. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and groundwater are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  5. Depth optimization for the Korean HLW repository System within a discontinuous and saturated granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Seok; Choi, Jong Won

    2005-12-01

    The present study is to evaluate the material properties of the compacted bentonite, backfill material, canister cast iron insert, and the rock mass for the Korean HLW repository system. These material properties are either measured, or taken from other countries, through the evaluation of the thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical interaction behavior of a repository. After the evaluation of the material properties, the most appropriate and economical depth as well as the layout of a single layer repository is to be recommended. Material properties used for the granitic rock mass, rock joints, PWR spent fuel, disposal canister, compacted bentonite, backfill material, and ground water are the data collected domestically, and foreign data are used for some of the data not available domestically. The repository model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints, PWR spent fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and backfill material in the rest of the space within a repository cavern

  6. Sealing of rock fractures around HLW repositories, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigira, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    During the flow of a silica-saturated hydrothermal solution in rock with negative temperature gradients, the behavior of silica in such solution is controlled by temperature, temperature gradient, pH, flow velocity, and solid surface area/fluid mass ratio (A/M). Such behavior could not be analysed precisely and totally at present state, but 'threshold conditions' have been found experimentally, under which solution keeps in equilibrium with solid silica in a flow field with temperature gradients. Solution keeps in equilibrium with solid silica under the conditions of A/M ratios more than 700 m 2 /kg, temperatures 80 - 120degC, temperature gradients less than 50degC/m, and pH 6 - 9, if mean pore velocities are less than 100 m/y. Under the same A/M ratios, temperature gradients, and pH, mean pore velocities must be less than 5 m/y in order to keep solution in equilibrium with solid silica in a flow field with temperatures 80 - 25degC. These 'threshold conditions' are expected to be satisfied in a near field of a repository of high-level radioactive waste, which suggests that if a groundwater is once saturated with silica under a higher temperature in a near field it would flow with decreasing temperatures in equilibrium with solid silica. In this case, the precipitation rate of amorphous silica along the flow path can be estimated without kinetic consideration. (author) 54 refs

  7. Rock mass modification around a nuclear waste repository in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, M.G.; Brandshaug, T.; Brady, B.H.

    1989-08-01

    This report presents the results of numerical analyses to estimate the extent of rock mass modification resulting from the presence of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository. Changes in rock mass considered are stresses and joint deformations resulting from disposal room excavation and thermal efffects induced by the heat generated by nuclear waste. rock properties and site conditions are taken from the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analyses were conducted using boundary element and distinct element methods. Room-scale models and repository-scale models were investigated for up to 500 years after waste emplacement. Results of room-scale analyses based on the thermoelastic boundary element model indicate that a zone of modified rock develops around the disposal rooms for both vertical and horizontal waste emplacement. This zone is estimated to extend a distance of roughly two room diameters from the room surface. Results from the repository-scale model, which are based on the thermoelastic boundary element model and the distinct element model, indicate a zone with modified rock mass properties starting approximately 100 m above and below the repository, with a thickness of approximately 200 m above and 150 m below the repository. Slip-prone subhorizontal features are shown to have a substantial effect on rock mass response. The estimates of rock mass modification reflect uncertainties and simplifying assumptions in the models. 32 refs., 57 figs., 1 tab

  8. Evaluation of the damages in rocks caused by the construction of a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, C.; Escalier des Orres, P.

    1988-12-01

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (French Atomic Energy Commission) has conducted a bibliographic study of the damages in the rock caused by the construction of a repository, and several hydraulic simulations, to appreciate the influence of these damages on the safety of the repository. These studies have led to the proposal of construction techniques in accordance safety requirements and industrial feasibility [fr

  9. Importance of creep failure of hard rock in the near field of a nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacic, J D [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, (USA)

    1982-12-31

    Potential damage resulting from slow creep deformation intuitively seems unlikely for a high-level nuclear waste repository excavated in hard rock. However, recent experimental and modeling results indicate that the processes of time-dependent microcracking and water-induced stress corrosion can lead to significant reductions in strength and alteration of other key rock properties in the near-field region of a repository. We review the small data base supporting these conclusions and stress the need for an extensive laboratory program to obtain the new data that will be required for design of a repository.

  10. Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Conceptual repository design in hard rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, H.; Griffin, J.R.; Davies, J.W.; Burton, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper gives an interim report on UK studies on possible designs for a repository for vitrified high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock. The properties of the waste are described and general technical considerations of consequences of disposal in the rock. As an illustration, two basic designs are described associated with pre-cooling in an intermediate store. Firstly, a 'wet repository' is outlined wherein canisters are sealed up closely in boreholes in the rock in regions of low groundwater movement. Secondly, a 'dry repository' above sea level is described where emplacement in tunnels is followed by a loose backfill containing activity absorbers. A connection to deep permeable strata maintains water levels below emplacement positions. Variants on the two basic schemes (tunnel emplacement in a wet repository and in situ cooling) are also assessed. It is concluded that all designs discussed produce a size of repository feasible for construction in the UK. Further, (1) a working figure of 100 0 C per maximum rock temperature is not exceeded, (2) no insuperable engineering problems have so far been found, though rock mechanics studies are at an early stage; (3) it is not possible to discount the escape of a few long-lived 'man-made' isotopes. A minute increment to natural activity in the biosphere may occur from traces of uranium and its decay chains; (4) at this stage, all the designs are still possible candidates for the construction of a UK repository. (author)

  11. Information base for waste repository design. Volume 3. Waste/rock interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplick, C.M.; Pentz, D.L.; Oston, S.G.; Talbot, R.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes the important effects resulting from interaction between radioactive waste and the rock in a nuclear waste repository. The state of the art in predicting waste/rock interactions is summarized. Where possible, independent numerical calculations have been performed. Recommendations are made pointing out areas which require additional research

  12. Evaluation of radiological safety assessment of a repository in a clay rock formation. Evaluacion del comportamiento y de la seguridad de un almacenamiento profundo en arcilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-12-15

    This report presents a comprehensive description of the post-closure radiological safety assessment of a repository for the spent fuel arisings resulting from the Spanish nuclear program excavated in a clay host rock formation. In this report three scenarios have been analysed in detail. The first scenario represents the normal in detail. The first scenario represents the normal evolution of the repository (Reference Scenario); and includes a set of variants to investigate the relative importance of the various repository components and examine the sensitivity of the performance to parameters variations. Two altered scenarios have also been considered: deep well construction and poor sealing of the repository. This document contains a detailed description of the repository system, the methodology adopted for the scenarios generation, the process modelling approach and the results of the consequences analysis. (Author)

  13. Clay club initiative: self-healing of fractures in clay-rich host rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horseman, S.T.; Cuss, R.J.; Reeves, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    The capacity of fractures in argillaceous rocks to self-heal (or become, with the passage of time, less conductive to groundwater) is often cited as a primary factor favouring the choice of such materials as host rocks for deep disposal. The underlying processes which contribute to self-healing can be broadly subdivided into: (a) mechanical and hydro-mechanical processes linked to the change in the stress field, movement of pore water, swelling, softening, plastic deformation and creep, and (b) geochemical processes linked to chemical alterations, transport in aqueous solution and the precipitation of minerals. Since chemical alteration can cause profound changes to the mechanical properties of argillaceous rocks, it is often difficult to draw a firm line between these two subdivisions. Based on the deliberations of the recent Cluster Conference in Luxembourg, there would appear to be some support for the use of the term 'self-sealing' for processes affecting fracture conductivity in argillaceous rock that are largely mechanical or hydro-mechanical in their origin. There are four main areas in which the self-healing capacity of the host rock becomes relevant to repository design and performance assessment: - potential for radionuclide transport within the excavation damage zone (EDZ); - design and performance of repository sealing systems; - potential impact of gas migration; - long-term performance considering erosional unloading, seismicity and fault reactivation. The presence of an EDZ is acknowledged to be a particularly important issue in performance assessment. Interconnection of fractures in the EDZ could lead to the development of a preferential flow path extending along the emplacement holes, access tunnels and shafts of a repository towards overlying aquifers and the biosphere. In the preliminary French Safety Analyses, for example, the treatment of scenarios relating to early seal failure have highlighted the hydraulic role of the damaged zone as a

  14. Appraisal of hard rock for potential underground repositories of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1977-10-01

    The mechanical safety and stability of such an underground repository depends largely on the virgin state of stress in the rock, groundwater pressures, the strengths of the rocks, heating by the decay of the radioactive wastes, and the layout of the excavations and the disposition of waste cannisters within them. A large body of pertinent data exists in the literature, and each of these factors has been analyzed in the light of this information. The results indicate that there are no fundamental geological nor mechanical reasons why repositories capable of storing radioactive wastes should not be excavated at suitable sites in hard rock. However, specific tests to determine the mechanical and thermal properties of the rocks at a site would be needed to provide the data for the engineering design of a repository. Also, little experience exists of the effects on underground excavations of thermal loads, so that this aspect requires theoretical study and experimental validation. The depths of these potential repositories would lie in the range from 0.5 to 2.0 km below surface, depending upon the strength of the rock. Virgin states of stress have been measured at such depths which would retard the ingress of groundwater and obviate the incidence of faulting. A typical repository comprising three horizons each with a total area of 5 km 2 would have the capacity to store wastes with thermal output of 240 MW

  15. Nuclear waste. DOE has terminated research evaluating crystalline rock for a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fultz, Keith O.; Sprague, John W.; Weigel, Dwayne E.; Price, Vincent P.

    1989-05-01

    We found that DOE terminated funding of research projects specifically designed to evaluate the suitability of crystalline rock for a repository. DOE continued other research efforts involving crystalline rock because they will provide information that it considers useful for evaluating the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for a potential repository. Such research activities are not prohibited by the amendments. In January 1988, DOE began evaluating both its domestic and international research programs to ensure their compliance with the 1987 amendments. Several DOE offices and contractors were involved in the evaluation. DOE officials believe that the evaluation effectively brought the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management activities into compliance with the amendments while maintaining useful international relations of continuing benefit to the nuclear waste program in general and to DOE's investigation of the Yucca Mountain site in particular. (The 1987 amendments designated Yucca Mountain as the only site that DOE is to investigate for a potential repository.) The approach and results of DOE's evaluation are discussed. Our review of DOE documents indicates that, by June 22, 1988, DOE completed its evaluation of ongoing crystalline rock research projects to ensure compliance with the 1987 amendments, terminated those research activities it identified as being specifically designed to evaluate the suitability of crystalline rock for a repository, continued some research activities involving crystalline rock because these activities would benefit the investigation and development of the Yucca Mountain repository site, and redirected some research activities so that they would contribute to investigating and developing the Yucca Mountain site

  16. Basic rock properties for the thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis of a high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Kang, Chul Hyung

    1999-04-01

    Deep geological radioactive waste disposal is generally based on the isolation of the waste from the biosphere by multiple barriers. The host rock is one of these barriers which should provide a stable mechanical and chemical environment for the engineered barriers. In the evaluation of the safety of the high-level radioactive waste disposal systems, an important part of the safety analysis is an assessment of the coupling or interaction between thermal, hydrological, and mechanical effects. In order to do this assessment, adequate data on the characteristics of different host rocks are necessary. The properties of the rock and rock discontinuity are very complex and their values vary in a wide range. The accuracy of the result of the assessment depends on the values of these properties used. The present study is an attempt to bring together and condense data for the basic properties of various rock masses, which are needed in the thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis for the deep geological radioactive waste repository. The testing and measurement methods for these basic properties are also presented. Domestic data for deep geological media should be supplemented in the future, due to the insufficiency and the lack of accuracy of the data available at present. (author). 28 refs., 21 figs

  17. Basic rock properties for the thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis of a high-level radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Kang, Chul Hyung

    1999-04-01

    Deep geological radioactive waste disposal is generally based on the isolation of the waste from the biosphere by multiple barriers. The host rock is one of these barriers which should provide a stable mechanical and chemical environment for the engineered barriers. In the evaluation of the safety of the high-level radioactive waste disposal systems, an important part of the safety analysis is an assessment of the coupling or interaction between thermal, hydrological, and mechanical effects. In order to do this assessment, adequate data on the characteristics of different host rocks are necessary. The properties of the rock and rock discontinuity are very complex and their values vary in a wide range. The accuracy of the result of the assessment depends on the values of these properties used. The present study is an attempt to bring together and condense data for the basic properties of various rock masses, which are needed in the thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis for the deep geological radioactive waste repository. The testing and measurement methods for these basic properties are also presented. Domestic data for deep geological media should be supplemented in the future, due to the insufficiency and the lack of accuracy of the data available at present. (author). 28 refs., 21 figs.

  18. Review of important rock mechanics studies required for underground high level nuclear waste repository program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.; Cho, W. J

    2007-01-15

    Disposal concept adapting room and pillar method, which is a confirmed technique in mining and tunnel construction for long time, has advantages at cost, safety, technical feasibility, flexibility, and international cooperation point of views. Then the important rock mechanics principals and in situ and laboratory tests for understanding the behavior of rock, buffer, and backfill as well as their interactions will be reviewed. The accurate understanding of them is important for developing a safe disposal concept and successful operation of underground repository for permanent disposal of radioactive wastes. First of all, In this study, current status of rock mechanics studies for HLW disposal in foreign countries such as Sweden, USA, Canada, Finland, Japan, and France were reviewed. After then the in situ and laboratory tests for site characterization were summarized. Furthermore, rock mechanics studies required during the whole procedure for the disposal project from repository design to the final closure will be reviewed systematically. This study will help for developing a disposal system including site selection, repository design, operation, maintenance, and closure of a repository in deep underground rock. By introducing the required rock mechanics tests at different stages, it would be helpful from the planning stage to the operation stage of a radioactive waste disposal project.

  19. Review of important rock mechanics studies required for underground high level nuclear waste repository program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.; Cho, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    Disposal concept adapting room and pillar method, which is a confirmed technique in mining and tunnel construction for long time, has advantages at cost, safety, technical feasibility, flexibility, and international cooperation point of views. Then the important rock mechanics principals and in situ and laboratory tests for understanding the behavior of rock, buffer, and backfill as well as their interactions will be reviewed. The accurate understanding of them is important for developing a safe disposal concept and successful operation of underground repository for permanent disposal of radioactive wastes. First of all, In this study, current status of rock mechanics studies for HLW disposal in foreign countries such as Sweden, USA, Canada, Finland, Japan, and France were reviewed. After then the in situ and laboratory tests for site characterization were summarized. Furthermore, rock mechanics studies required during the whole procedure for the disposal project from repository design to the final closure will be reviewed systematically. This study will help for developing a disposal system including site selection, repository design, operation, maintenance, and closure of a repository in deep underground rock. By introducing the required rock mechanics tests at different stages, it would be helpful from the planning stage to the operation stage of a radioactive waste disposal project

  20. ENSI - Evaluation of NAGRA’s planned investigation of Brown Dogger host rock - Expert report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitterli-Dreher, P; Burkhalter, R.

    2011-06-01

    This report published by the Swiss National Safety Inspectorate ENSI discusses the reports published on the Brown Dogger host rock formations and the investigations planned as part of Phase 2 of the planning process for deep repositories for low and medium-active nuclear wastes. After a review of the tasks to be carried out, two expert reports are introduced. In the first report, Dr. Peter Bitterli-Dreher looks at the geological situation in central Europe and rock conditions in northern Switzerland. The situation in the Dogger formations with their calcium carbonate and clay-like components in various locations in northern Switzerland are discussed, including water flow in the rocks. The second report from Dr. Reto Burkhalter also discusses the Brown Dogger formations and comments on the investigations proposed by NAGRA in detail. Work yet to be planned is looked at

  1. Surrounding rock stress analysis of underground high level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wengang; Wang Ju; Wang Guangdi

    2006-01-01

    During decay of nuclear waste, enormous energy was released, which results in temperature change of surrounding rock of depository. Thermal stress was produced because thermal expansion of rock was controlled. Internal structure of surrounding rock was damaged and strength of rock was weakened. So, variation of stress was a dynamic process with the variation of temperature. BeiShan region of Gansu province was determined to be the depository field in the future, it is essential to make research on granite in this region. In the process of experiment, basic physical parameters of granite were analyzed preliminary with MTS. Long range temperature and stress filed was simulated considering the damage effect of surrounding rock, and rules of temperature and stress was achieved. (authors)

  2. Coupled modelling of convergence, steel corrosion, gas production and brine flow in a rock salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.A.; Hirsekorn, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    This poster presents the global simulation of the behaviour of thick-walled steel containers piled up in a borehole in a rock salt repository. The simulation takes into account: the convergence by the creeping of rock salt, the backfill and waste compaction, the porosity dependent flow resistance, the anaerobic corrosion (iron to magnetite transformation, gas production, brine consumption, water consumption and salt precipitation) and pressure development. Mechanical influence of corrosion has not yet been taken into account in the integrated code LOPOS

  3. Appraisal of hard rock for potential underground repositories of radioactive wastes. LBL-7004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1978-01-01

    Underground burial of radioactive wastes in hard rock may be an effective and safe means of isolating them from the environment and from man. The mechanical safety and stability of such an underground repository depends largely on the virgin state of stress in the rock, groundwater pressures, the strengths of the rocks, heating by the decay of the radioactive wastes, and the layout of the excavations and the disposition of waste cannisters within them. A large body of pertinent data exists in the literature, and each of these factors has been analyzed in the light of this information. The results indicate that there are no fundamental geological nor mechanical reasons why repositories capable of storing radioactive wastes should not be excavated at suitable sites in hard rock. However, specific tests to determine the mechanical and thermal properties of the rocks at a site would be needed to provide the data for the engineering design of a repository. Also, little experience exists of the effects on underground excavations of thermal loads, so that this aspect requires theoretical study and experimental validation. The depths of these potential repositories would lie in the range from 0.5 km to 2.0 km below surface, depending upon the strength of the rock. Virgin states of stress have been measured at such depths which would retard the ingress of groundwater and obviate the incidence of faulting. A typical repository comprising three horizons each with a total area of 5 km 2 would have the capacity to store wastes with thermal output of 240 MW

  4. Investigations on THM effects in buffer, EDZ and argillaceous host rock. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M.; Breustedt, M.; Li, S.; Polster, M.; Schirmer, S.

    2013-11-15

    especially valid for the most reactive rock components, which are the fine grained clay matrix and the organic components. A high amount of organic compounds is characteristic for clay formations. If the thermal maturation is advanced, an additional artificial heating over longer periods of time may have the effect that the limit where oil generation starts is exceeded. It is still to be clarified whether the heat input from the waste canisters is so high that this limit is exceeded and that oil in an amount worth extracting is generated. Depending on the pressure and temperature conditions, a mineral transformation or the formation of new minerals may occur, which would change the chemical and mineralogical conditions. Artificial heating could accelerate transformation processes and change the retardation properties of the host rock. Currently, there is no information available about the potential changes of the host rock properties due to the specific heat input of a repository in a clay formation in Germany. One important task to be performed with regard to the German safety requirements is the demonstration of the integrity of the geotechnical barriers and of the geological barrier. The only way to demonstrate the long-term integrity of the geological barrier is to carry out predictive calculations. These kinds of calculations must have a sound basis of rock-specific constitutive laws together with a well calibrated parameter set that represent the real physical host rock behaviour. To identify suitable constitutive laws and corresponding parameters, insitu experiments are being performed in the Mt. Terri and Meuse/Haute-Marne URLs in Switzerland and France. These experiments are well equipped with sensing systems that allow a comparison of measured and simulated results for rock parameter identification and corresponding model calibration.

  5. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Sensors data report (Period 010917-091201) Report No: 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik

    2009-12-01

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 010917-091201. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by AaF) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements

  6. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Sensors data report (Period 010917-090601) Report No: 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik

    2009-07-01

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 010917-090601. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by BBK) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements

  7. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Sensors data report (Period 010917-081201) Report No: 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik

    2009-03-01

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 010917-081201. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by BBK) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Sensors data report (Period 010917-090601) Report No: 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 010917-090601. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by BBK) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements.

  9. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Sensors data report (Period 010917-081201) Report No: 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 010917-081201. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by BBK) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements.

  10. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Sensors data report (Period 010917-091201) Report No: 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudarzi, Reza; Johannesson, Lars-Erik (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    The Prototype Repository Test consists of two sections. The installation of the first Section of Prototype Repository was made during summer and autumn 2001 and Section 2 was installed in spring and summer 2003. This report presents data from measurements in the Prototype Repository during the period 010917-091201. The report is organized so that the actual measured results are shown in Appendix 1-10, where Appendix 8 deals with measurements of canister displacements (by AITEMIN), Appendix 9 deals with geo-electric measurements in the backfill (by GRS), Appendix 10 deals with stress and strain measurement in the rock (by AaF) and Appendix 11 deals with measurement of water pressure in the rock (by VBB/VIAK). The main report and Appendix 1-7 deal with the rest of the measurements.

  11. Integrating rock mechanics issues with repository design through design process principles and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1996-01-01

    A good designer needs not only knowledge for designing (technical know-how that is used to generate alternative design solutions) but also must have knowledge about designing (appropriate principles and systematic methodology to follow). Concepts such as open-quotes design for manufactureclose quotes or open-quotes concurrent engineeringclose quotes are widely used in the industry. In the field of rock engineering, only limited attention has been paid to the design process because design of structures in rock masses presents unique challenges to the designers as a result of the uncertainties inherent in characterization of geologic media. However, a stage has now been reached where we are be able to sufficiently characterize rock masses for engineering purposes and identify the rock mechanics issues involved but are still lacking engineering design principles and methodology to maximize our design performance. This paper discusses the principles and methodology of the engineering design process directed to integrating site characterization activities with design, construction and performance of an underground repository. Using the latest information from the Yucca Mountain Project on geology, rock mechanics and starter tunnel design, the current lack of integration is pointed out and it is shown how rock mechanics issues can be effectively interwoven with repository design through a systematic design process methodology leading to improved repository performance. In essence, the design process is seen as the use of design principles within an integrating design methodology, leading to innovative problem solving. In particular, a new concept of open-quotes Design for Constructibility and Performanceclose quotes is introduced. This is discussed with respect to ten rock mechanics issues identified for repository design and performance

  12. Geochemical Characteristics of the Gyeongju LILW Repository II. Rock and Minera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Geon Young; Koh, Yong Kwon; Choi, Byoung Young; Shin, Seon Ho; Kim, Doo Haeng

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical study on the rocks and minerals of the Gyeongju low and intermediate level waste repository was carried out in order to provide geochemical data for the safety assessment and geochemical modeling. Polarized microscopy, X-ray diffraction method, chemical analysis for the major and trace elements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and stable isotope analysis were applied. Fracture zones are locally developed with various degrees of alteration in the study area. The study area is mainly composed of granodiorite and diorite and their relation is gradational in the field. However, they could be easily distinguished by their chemical property. The granodiorite showed higher Sig 2 content and lower MgO and Fe 2 O 3 contents than the diorite. Variation trends of the major elements of the granodiorite and diorite were plotted on the same line according to the increase of Sig 2 content suggesting that they were differentiated from the same magma. Spatial distribution of the various elements showed that the diorite region had lower Sig 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Na 2 O and K 2 O contents, and higher CaO, Fe 2 O 3 contents than the granodiorite region. Especially, because the differences in the CaO and Na 2 O distribution were most distinct and their trends were reciprocal, the chemical variation of the plagioclase of the granitic rocks was the main parameter of the chemical variation of the host rocks in the study area. Identified fracture-filling minerals from the drill core were montmorillonite, zeolite minerals, chlorite, illite, calcite and pyrite. Especially pyrite and laumontite, which are known as indicating minerals of hydrothermal alteration, were widely distributed in the study area indicating that the study area was affected by mineralization and/or hydrothermal alteration. Sulfur isotope analysis for the pyrite and oxygen-hydrogen stable isotope analysis for the clay minerals indicated that they were originated from the magma. Therefore, it is considered that

  13. Study on the locational criteria for submarine rock repositories of low and medium level radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G H; Kang, W J; Kim, T J. and others [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-01-15

    Submarine repositories have significant advantages over their land counterparts locating close to the areas of daily human activities. Consequently, the construction of submarine repositories on the vast continental shelves around Korean seas is considered to be highly positive. In this context, the development of locational criteria primarily targeting the safety of submarine rock repositories is very important.The contents of the present study are: analyzing characteristics of marine environment: Search of potential hazards to, and environmental impact by, the submarine repositories; Investigation of the oceanographic, geochemical, ecological and sedimentological characteristics of estuaries and coastal seas. Locating potential hazards to submarine repositories by: Bibliographical search of accidents leading to the destruction of submarine structures by turbidity currents and other potentials; Review of turbidity currents. Consideration of environmental impact caused by submarine repositories: Logistics to minimize the environmental impacts in site selection; Removal and dispersion processes of radionuclides in sea water. Analyses of oceanographical characteristics of, and hazard potentials in, the Korean seas. Evaluation of the MOST 91-7 criteria for applicability to submarine repositories and the subsequent proposition of additional criteria.

  14. Study on the locational criteria for submarine rock repositories of low and medium level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G. H.; Kang, W. J.; Kim, T. J. and others

    1992-01-01

    Submarine repositories have significant advantages over their land counterparts locating close to the areas of daily human activities. Consequently, the construction of submarine repositories on the vast continental shelves around Korean seas is considered to be highly positive. In this context, the development of locational criteria primarily targeting the safety of submarine rock repositories is very important.The contents of the present study are: analyzing characteristics of marine environment: Search of potential hazards to, and environmental impact by, the submarine repositories; Investigation of the oceanographic, geochemical, ecological and sedimentological characteristics of estuaries and coastal seas. Locating potential hazards to submarine repositories by: Bibliographical search of accidents leading to the destruction of submarine structures by turbidity currents and other potentials; Review of turbidity currents. Consideration of environmental impact caused by submarine repositories: Logistics to minimize the environmental impacts in site selection; Removal and dispersion processes of radionuclides in sea water. Analyses of oceanographical characteristics of, and hazard potentials in, the Korean seas. Evaluation of the MOST 91-7 criteria for applicability to submarine repositories and the subsequent proposition of additional criteria

  15. Panel discussion on rock mechanics issues in repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.; Kim, K.S.; Nataraja, M.

    1996-01-01

    The panel discussion was introduced by Mr. Z.T.(Richard) Bieniawski and then continued with five additional speakers. The topics covered in the discussion included rock mechanics pertaining to the design of underground facilities for the disposal of radioactive wastes and the safety of such facilities. The speakers included: Mr. Kun-Soo Kim who is a specialist in the area of rock mechanics testing during the Basalt Waste Isolation Project; Dr. Mysore Nataraja who is the senior project manager with the NRC; Dr. Michael Voegele who is the project manager for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on the Yucca Mountain Project; Dr. Edward Cording who is a member of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board; and Dr. Hemendra Kalia who is employed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and coordinates various activities of testing programs at the Yucca Mountain Site

  16. An innovative 3-D numerical modelling procedure for simulating repository-scale excavations in rock - SAFETI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, R. P.; Collins, D.; Hazzard, J.; Heath, A. [Department of Earth Sciences, Liverpool University, 4 Brownlow street, UK-0 L69 3GP Liverpool (United Kingdom); Pettitt, W.; Baker, C. [Applied Seismology Consultants LTD, 10 Belmont, Shropshire, UK-S41 ITE Shrewsbury (United Kingdom); Billaux, D.; Cundall, P.; Potyondy, D.; Dedecker, F. [Itasca Consultants S.A., Centre Scientifique A. Moiroux, 64, chemin des Mouilles, F69130 Ecully (France); Svemar, C. [Svensk Karnbranslemantering AB, SKB, Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory, PL 300, S-57295 Figeholm (Sweden); Lebon, P. [ANDRA, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 7, rue Jean Monnet, F-92298 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents current results from work performed within the European Commission project SAFETI. The main objective of SAFETI is to develop and test an innovative 3D numerical modelling procedure that will enable the 3-D simulation of nuclear waste repositories in rock. The modelling code is called AC/DC (Adaptive Continuum/ Dis-Continuum) and is partially based on Itasca Consulting Group's Particle Flow Code (PFC). Results are presented from the laboratory validation study where algorithms and procedures have been developed and tested to allow accurate 'Models for Rock' to be produced. Preliminary results are also presented on the use of AC/DC with parallel processors and adaptive logic. During the final year of the project a detailed model of the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory will be produced using up to 128 processors on the parallel super computing facility at Liverpool University. (authors)

  17. Creep in crystalline rock with application to high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eloranta, P.; Simonen, A.

    1992-06-01

    The time-dependent strength and deformation properties of hard crystalline rock are studied. Theoretical models defining the phenomena which can effect these properties are reviewed. The time- dependent deformation of the openings in the proposed nuclear waste repository is analysed. The most important factors affecting the subcritical crack growth in crystalline rock are the stress state, the chemical environment, temperature and microstructure of the rock. There are several theoretical models for the analysis of creep and cyclic fatigue: deformation diagrams, rheological models thermodynamic models, reaction rate models, stochastic models, damage models and time-dependent safety factor model. They are defective in describing the three-axial stress condition and strength criteria. In addition, the required parameters are often too difficult to determine with adequate accuracy. Therefore these models are seldom applied in practice. The effect of microcrack- driven creep on the stability of the work shaft, the emplacement tunnel and the capsulation hole of a proposed nuclear waste repository was studied using a numerical model developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. According to the model, the microcrack driven creep progresses very slowly in good quality rock. Poor rock quality may accelerate the creep rate. The model is very sensitive to the properties of the rock and secondary stress state. The results show that creep causes no stability problems on excavations in good rock. The results overestimate the effect of the creep, because the analysis omitted the effect of support structures and backfilling

  18. Characterization of nearfield rock - A basis for comparison of repository concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Hoekmark, H.

    1991-12-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of the nearfield rock controls the rate of wetting of adjacent buffer material as well as the rate of degradation of its smectite content and of the transport of radionuclides from the buffer/rock interface. Comparison of different repository concepts with respect to the function of the nearfield rock requires a common rock structure model, which is suggested in the report. Applying this model and 2D and 3D numerical calculations for evaluation of stress-induced structural changes, major differences between the three concepts VDH, KBS3 and VLH concerning the hydraulic conductivity of the nearfield have been identified. The importance of the orientation of the excavations turns out to be particularly obvious. Further development of the rock structure model is concluded to offer ways of quantifying more accurately the damaging effects of blasting and TBM-drilling. (au)

  19. Retrievability of high-level nuclear waste from geologic repositories - Regulatory and rock mechanics/design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanious, N.S.; Nataraja, M.S.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Retrievability of nuclear waste from high-level geologic repositories is one of the performance objectives identified in 10CFR60 (Code of Federal Regulations, 1985). 10CFR60.111 states that the geologic repository operations area shall be designed to preserve the option of waste retrieval. In designing the repository operations area, rock mechanics considerations play a major role especially in evaluating the feasibility of retrieval operations. This paper discusses generic considerations affecting retrievability as they relate to repository design, construction, and operation, with emphasis on regulatory and rock mechanics aspects

  20. Numerical modeling of the geomechanical response of a rock mass to a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, M.P.; St John, C.M.; Hocking, G.

    1979-06-01

    Geotechnical numerical models capable of predicting the thermomechanical response and groundwater movements around an underground radioactive waste repository are vital to the success of the nuclear waste disposal program. In the absence of directly related engineering experience, the design, risk assessment, and licensing procedures of a repository will be reliant on predictions made using such models. This paper reviews models being used to assist in repository design and summarizes the results of a recent parametric study of underground disposal in basaltic rocks. On the basis of preliminary site data, it is concluded that the allowable areal density of heat-generating waste will be controlled by the stability of placement rooms and the boreholes in which waste canisters are placed. Regional effects including thermally induced upward groundwater flow, appear to present less severe problems

  1. Postclosure safety assessment of a used fuel repository in sedimentary rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobien, M.; Garisto, F.; Hunt, N.; Kremer, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for the implementation of Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the federally-approved plan for safe long-term management of Canada's used nuclear fuel. Under the APM plan, used nuclear fuel will ultimately be placed within a deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation. This paper summarizes an illustrative case study of the current multi-barrier design and postclosure safety of a deep geological repository in a hypothetical sedimentary Michigan Basin setting. The purpose of this postclosure safety assessment is to determine potential effects of the repository on the health and safety of persons and the environment. Results are compared against acceptance criteria established for the protection of persons and the environment from potential radiological and non-radiological hazards. (author)

  2. Postclosure safety assessment of a used fuel repository in sedimentary rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobien, M.; Garisto, F.; Hunt, N.; Kremer, E. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for the implementation of Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the federally-approved plan for safe long-term management of Canada's used nuclear fuel. Under the APM plan, used nuclear fuel will ultimately be placed within a deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation. This paper summarizes an illustrative case study of the current multi-barrier design and postclosure safety of a deep geological repository in a hypothetical sedimentary Michigan Basin setting. The purpose of this postclosure safety assessment is to determine potential effects of the repository on the health and safety of persons and the environment. Results are compared against acceptance criteria established for the protection of persons and the environment from potential radiological and non-radiological hazards. (author)

  3. Stress, strain, and temperature induced permeability changes in potential repository rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, H.C.; Duba, A.

    1977-01-01

    Work is in progress to assess the permeability characteristics of coarse-grained igneous rocks as affected by pressure, deviatoric stress, and temperature. In order to predict the long-term behavior of these rocks, both virgin and fractured, permeability and all principal strains resulting from an imposed deviatoric stress under various simulated lithostatic pressures are being measured. In addition, compressional as well as shear velocities and electrical conductivity are being evaluated along these principal directions. These simultaneous measurements are being made initially at 25 0 C on a 15 cm diameter by 30 cm long sample in a pressure apparatus controlled by a mini-computer. Correlation of these data with similar field observations should then allow simplified exploration for a suitable repository site as well as the prediction of the response of a mined cavity with both distance and time at this site. After emplacement of the waste canisters, the mechanical stability and hydrologic integrity of this mined repository will be directly influenced by the fracturing of the surrounding rock which results from local temperature differences and the thermal expansion of that rock. Temperatures (and, hence, these differences) in the vicinity of the repository are expected to be affected by the presence of pore fluids (single- or two-phase) in the rock, the heat capacity and the thermal conductivity of this system. In turn, these are all dependent upon lithostatic pressure, pore pressure, and stress. Thermal expansion (and fracturing) will also be affected by the lithostatic (and effective) pressure, the deviatoric stress field, and the initial anisotropy of the rock

  4. Transport of gaseous C-14 from a repository in unsaturated rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, W.B.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W. L.; Pigford, T.H.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1990-09-01

    The authors predict the transport of gaseous 14 CO 2 from a nuclear waste repository in unsaturated rock using a porous-medium model. This model is justified if the appropriate modified Peclet number, which indicates equilibrium between gas in fractures and liquid in rock pores, is much less than unity. Numerical illustrations are given which are applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain which is 350 m underground. Maximum predicted concentrations of 14 CO 2 near the ground surface are comparable to the USNRC limit for unrestricted areas. Maximum predicted dose rates above ground are less than 1% of background. Travel times are predicted to be hundreds to thousands of years. For some cases, it is shown that the release rate from the source has negligible effect on concentrations at the ground surface. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  5. Technology needs for selecting and evaluating high-level waste repository sites in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This report describes properties and processes that govern the performance of the geological barrier in a nuclear waste isolation system in crystalline rock and the state-of-the-art in the understanding of these properties and processes. Areas and topics that require further research and development as well as technology needs for investigating and selecting repository sites are presented. Experiences from the Swedish site selection program are discussed, and a general investigation strategy is presented for an area characterization phase of an exploratory program in crystalline rocks. 255 refs., 65 figs., 10 tabs

  6. Host rock characteristics of uranium deposits of cataclastic-altered granite type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Mingyue

    1997-01-01

    The author expounds the host rock characteristics of uranium deposits of cataclastic-altered granite type, i.e., the high initial content of uranium, the high cataclasis of host rocks, the strong alteration of host rocks, the simple composition of host rocks favourable for the leaching of uranium, as well as the low content of harmful associated elements. These characteristics may be regarded as petrological criteria for recognition and prospecting for such type of uranium deposits

  7. Host rock characteristics of uranium deposits of cataclastic-altered granite type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyue, Feng [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology (China)

    1997-03-01

    The author expounds the host rock characteristics of uranium deposits of cataclastic-altered granite type, i.e., the high initial content of uranium, the high cataclasis of host rocks, the strong alteration of host rocks, the simple composition of host rocks favourable for the leaching of uranium, as well as the low content of harmful associated elements. These characteristics may be regarded as petrological criteria for recognition and prospecting for such type of uranium deposits.

  8. Far-field thermomechanical response of argillaceous rock to emplacement of a nuclear-waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, D.F.; Thomas, R.K.; Lappin, A.R.

    1980-08-01

    Before heat-producing wastes can be emplaced safely in any argillaceous rock, it will be necessary to understand the far-field thermal and thermomechanical response of this rock to waste emplacement. This report presents the results of a first series of calculations aimed at estimating the far-field response of argillite to waste emplacement. Because the thermal and mechanical properties of argillite are affected by its content of expandable clay, its behavior is briefly compared and contrasted with that of a shale having the same matrix thermal properties, but containing no expandable clay. Under this assumption, modeled temperatures are the same for the two rock types at equivalent power densities and reflect the large dependence of in-situ temperatures on both initial power density and waste type. Thermomechanical calculations indicate that inclusion of contraction behavior of expandable clays in the assumed argillite thermal expansion behavior results, in some cases, in generation of a large zone in and near the repository that has undergone volumetric contraction but is surrounded by uniformly compressive stresses. Information available to date indicates that this contraction would likely result in locally increased fluid permeability and decreased in-situ thermal conductivity, but might well be advantageous as regards radionuclide retention, because of the increased surface area within the contracted zone. Assumption of continuous and positive expansion behavior for the shale eliminates the near-repository contraction and tensional zones, but results in near-surface tensional zones directly above the repository

  9. Nagra technical report 14-02, Geological basics - Dossier VI - Barrier properties of proposed host rock sediments and neighbouring rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautschi, A.; Deplazes, G.; Traber, D.; Marschall, P.; Mazurek, M.; Gimmi, T.; Maeder, U.

    2014-01-01

    This dossier is the sixth of a series of eight reports concerning the safety and technical aspects of locations for the disposal of radioactive wastes in Switzerland. It discusses the barrier properties of the proposed host rock sediments and neighbouring rock layers. The mineralogical composition of the host rocks are discussed as are their pore densities and hydrological properties. Diffusion aspects are discussed. The aquifer systems in the proposed depository areas and their classification are looked at. The barrier properties of the host rocks and those of neighbouring sediments are discussed. Finally, modelling concepts and parameters for the transport of radionuclides in the rocks are discussed

  10. The United States Polar Rock Repository: A geological resource for the Earth science community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, Annie M.; Elliot, David H.; Codispoti, Julie E.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Polar Rock Repository (USPRR) is a U. S. national facility designed for the permanent curatorial preservation of rock samples, along with associated materials such as field notes, annotated air photos and maps, raw analytic data, paleomagnetic cores, ground rock and mineral residues, thin sections, and microfossil mounts, microslides and residues from Polar areas. This facility was established by the Office of Polar Programs at the U. S. National Science Foundation (NSF) to minimize redundant sample collecting, and also because the extreme cold and hazardous field conditions make fieldwork costly and difficult. The repository provides, along with an on-line database of sample information, an essential resource for proposal preparation, pilot studies and other sample based research that should make fieldwork more efficient and effective. This latter aspect should reduce the environmental impact of conducting research in sensitive Polar Regions. The USPRR also provides samples for educational outreach. Rock samples may be borrowed for research or educational purposes as well as for museum exhibits.

  11. Interaction between clay-based shaft seal components and crystalline host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priyanto, D.; Dixon, D.; Man, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Government of Canada has accepted the Nuclear Waste Management Organization's (NWMO) recommendation of Adaptive Phased Management (APM) as the long-term management approach for Canada's used nuclear fuel. APM ultimately involves the isolation and containment of used nuclear fuel deep in a Deep Geological Repository (DGR). On completion of waste emplacement operation and during repository closure, shaft seals, comprising clay-based shaft seal components, will be installed at strategic locations, such as where significant fracture zones (FZs) are located. The primary function of a shaft seal is to limit and prevent short-circuiting of the groundwater flow regime via the shaft. Currently, at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) a full-scale shaft seal is being constructed at the intersection of a low dipping thrust fault called FZ 2 as part of the overall URL decommissioning activities. Both crystalline rock and sedimentary rock are considered potentially suitable host rocks formations for a DGR. This paper presents the results of numerical simulation of a shaft seal installed in moderately to sparsely fractured crystalline rock (MFR). The shape and thickness of the shaft seal modelled for a DGR in this exercise are similar to the shaft seal at the URL, but in the modelling exercise it is given a larger diameter (i.e. 7.30 m) equal to the assumed diameter of a production shaft of a repository. The seal consists of a blended bentonite-sand (BS) component that is constrained between two massive concrete seals. Dense backfill (DBF) materials are installed above and below the concrete seals (CS). The concrete seals are keyed into the access shaft to better anchor the concrete units in place and in order to restrain the swelling of the bentonite-sand component of the seal as it hydrates. The reference geosphere in the proposed work is MFR similar to the rock conditions

  12. STAFAN, Fluid Flow, Mechanical Stress in Fractured Rock of Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: STAFAN (Stress And Flow Analysis) is a two-dimensional, finite-element code designed to model fluid flow and the interaction of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a fractured rock surrounding a nuclear waste repository. STAFAN considers flow behavior of a deformable fractured system with fracture-porous matrix interactions, the coupling effects of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a medium containing discrete joints, and the inelastic response of the individual joints of the rock mass subject to the combined fluid pressure and mechanical loading. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: STAFAN does not presently contain thermal coupling, and it is unable to simulate inelastic deformation of the rock mass and variably saturated or two-phase flow in the fractured porous medium system

  13. Importance of creep failure of hard rock in the near field of a nuclear-waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacic, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Potential damage resulting from slow creep deformation intuitively seems unlikely for a high-level nuclear waste repository excavated in hard rock. However, recent experimental and modeling results indicate that the processes of time-dependent microcracking and water-induced stress corrosion can lead to significant reductions in strength and alteration of other key rock properties in the near-field region of a repository. We review the small data base supporting these conclusions and stress the need for an extensive laboratory program to obtain the new data that will be required for design of a repository

  14. Hydrological and thermal issues concerning a nuclear waste repository in fractured rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of the ambient conditions of a potential site and the assessment of the perturbations induced by a nuclear waste repository require hydrological and thermal investigations of the geological formations at different spatial and temporal scales. For high-level wastes, the near-field impacts depend on the heat power of waste packages and the far-field long-term perturbations depend on the cumulative heat released by the emplaced wastes. Surface interim storage of wastes for several decades could lower the near-field impacts but would have relatively small long-term effects if spent fuels were the waste forms for the repository. One major uncertainty in the assessment of repository impacts is from the variation of hydrological properties in heterogeneous media, including the effects of fractures as high-permeability flow paths for containment migration. Under stress, a natural fracture cannot be represented by the parallel plate model. The rock surface roughness, the contact area, and the saturation state in the rock matrix could significantly change the fracture flow. In recent years, the concern of fast flow through fractures in saturated media has extended to the unsaturated zones. The interactions at different scales between fractures and matrix, between fractured matrix unites and porous units, and between formations and faults are discussed

  15. Transferability of geodata from European to Canadian (Ontario) sedimentary rocks to study gas transport from nuclear wastes repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fall, M.; Ghafari, H.; Evgin, E.; Nguyen, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    , most of these studies, especially the gas migration tests, were conducted in European sedimentary rocks (Opalinus Clay in Benken and Mont Terri, Callovo-Oxfordian Clay at Bure). At present, gas transport data specific for Ontario sedimentary rocks are not available; the input parameters for mathematical models have to be inferred from the European database. This paper presents a methodological approach and the results of a study to assess the usefulness and transferability of geo-data from European to Ontario sedimentary rocks to model the THMC processes associated with gas migration in Ontario. Furthermore, predictive models (based on advanced soft-computing methods) to estimate the gas transport parameters of the Ontario rocks from data on European sedimentary rocks are presented and discussed. The paper is divided into three main parts: - In the first part, the main similarities and differences between the thermal, hydraulic, geochemical and geomechanical properties of the host rocks of the proposed Ontario DGR and European DGRs are highlighted and discussed, based on a comparison of the collected technical information on sedimentary rocks in Ontario and Europe. - The second part includes an analysis of the quality (e.g., uncertainties), suitability and transferability of the data gathered with respect to the investigation of gas generation and migration in a potential repository in Ontario's sedimentary rocks. - In the third part, a quantitative analysis of the transferability of the data is conducted by using advanced soft computing methods (e.g., Self Organizing Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (SONFIS)). Predictive models are developed to predict the relevant parameters that are necessary to model and analyze gas transport in the study DGR in Ontario. The validation results show good agreement between the predicted and measured field values. In conclusion, this study has allowed us to identify the similarities and differences between the Ontario and European

  16. Representation and judgement of possible host rock formations and areas under consideration of geology and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    This comprehensive report issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at the representation and judgement of possible host rock formations and areas as far as safety and geological aspects are concerned. Nagra has to demonstrate the basic feasibility of the safe disposal of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate-level waste (ILW) in a deep geological repository, The report shows which possibilities for the disposal of SF, HLW and ILW exist in Switzerland and summarises the current state of general academic and applied geo-scientific research as well as the project-specific knowledge base that has been developed by Nagra over the past 30 years. The descriptions and assessments of the potential host rocks and areas are based on attributes that take into account experience gained both in Switzerland and abroad and are in agreement with international practice. An assessment of potential siting areas is looked at, in view of the preparation of a General Licence application, Nagra will also have to consider land-use planning and socio-economic aspects. This will be carried out in the next step according to the Sectoral Plan for Geological Disposal under the guidance of the relevant Swiss authorities

  17. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis applied to a repository in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polle, A.N.

    1996-12-01

    This document describes the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis with UNCSAM, as applied to a repository in rock salt for the EVEREST project. UNCSAM is a dedicated software package for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, which was already used within the preceding PROSA project. The use of UNCSAM provides a flexible interface to EMOS ECN by substituting the sampled values in the various input files to be used by EMOS ECN ; the model calculations for this repository were performed with the EMOS ECN code. Preceding the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, a number of preparations has been carried out to facilitate EMOS ECN with the probabilistic input data. For post-processing the EMOS ECN results, the characteristic output signals were processed. For the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis with UNCSAM the stochastic input, i.e. sampled values, and the output for the various EMOS ECN runs have been analyzed. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of disruptive scenarios of a Canadian used fuel repository in crystalline rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobien, M.; Garisto, F.; Hunt, N.; Kremer, E.P. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    The NWMO has recently extended its modelling capabilities by performing simulations for four disruptive scenarios that, to date, have not yet been examined in detail. These scenarios complement those considered in an existing postclosure safety assessment for a conceptual geological repository located in a hypothetical crystalline rock formation. The four new disruptive scenarios are: Shaft Seal Failure, Undetected Fault, Open or Poorly Sealed Borehole and Open Borehole Due to Inadvertent Human Intrusion. All simulations are based on the FRAC3DVS-OPG Site-Scale Model. The Site-Scale Model includes a simplified representation of the full repository and a portion of the surrounding sub-regional flow system. All transport simulations are performed with only the radionuclide I-129. Transport rates to the surface and a domestic water supply well are compared to the Reference Case results from an earlier case study documented in Reference. (author)

  19. Assessment of disruptive scenarios of a Canadian used fuel repository in crystalline rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobien, M.; Garisto, F.; Hunt, N.; Kremer, E.P., E-mail: mgobien@nwmo.ca [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The NWMO has recently extended its modelling capabilities by performing simulations for four disruptive scenarios that, to date, have not yet been examined in detail. These scenarios complement those considered in an existing postclosure safety assessment for a conceptual geological repository located in a hypothetical crystalline rock formation. The four new disruptive scenarios are: Shaft Seal Failure, Undetected Fault, Open or Poorly Sealed Borehole and Open Borehole Due to Inadvertent Human Intrusion. All simulations are based on the FRAC3DVS-OPG [1] Site-Scale Model [2]. The Site-Scale Model includes a simplified representation of the full repository and a portion of the surrounding sub-regional flow system. All transport simulations are performed with only the radionuclide I-129. Transport rates to the surface and a domestic water supply well are compared to the Reference Case results from an earlier case study documented in Reference [2]. (author)

  20. Assessment of disruptive scenarios of a Canadian used fuel repository in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobien, M.; Garisto, F.; Hunt, N.; Kremer, E.P.

    2015-01-01

    The NWMO has recently extended its modelling capabilities by performing simulations for four disruptive scenarios that, to date, have not yet been examined in detail. These scenarios complement those considered in an existing postclosure safety assessment for a conceptual geological repository located in a hypothetical crystalline rock formation. The four new disruptive scenarios are: Shaft Seal Failure, Undetected Fault, Open or Poorly Sealed Borehole and Open Borehole Due to Inadvertent Human Intrusion. All simulations are based on the FRAC3DVS-OPG [1] Site-Scale Model [2]. The Site-Scale Model includes a simplified representation of the full repository and a portion of the surrounding sub-regional flow system. All transport simulations are performed with only the radionuclide I-129. Transport rates to the surface and a domestic water supply well are compared to the Reference Case results from an earlier case study documented in Reference [2]. (author)

  1. Acoustic remote monitoring of rock and concrete structures for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    Excavation and thermally induced damage is of significance for many types of engineering structures but no more so than in the case of nuclear waste repository design. My research and that of my group, formally at Queen's University Canada and Keele University UK and now at the University of Liverpool UK, has focused on the development of acoustic techniques for the in situ detection and quantification of induced damage and fracturing. The application of earthquake seismology to this problem has provided the opportunity to study the micro mechanics of damage mechanisms in situ and provide validation data for predictive geomechanical models used for engineering design. Since 1987 I have been a principal investigator at Atomic Energy of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), responsible for the development of acoustic emission techniques (AE). In the last twelve years, the application of acoustic techniques to rock damage assessment has been pioneered by my group at the URL and successfully applied in several other major international projects including the ZEDEX, Retrieval and Prototype repository experiments at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) of SKB Sweden. In this paper I describe what information is available by remote acoustic monitoring of rock and concrete structures and demonstrate this with reference to two international scientific experiments carried out at the URL Canada and the HRL Sweden. (author)

  2. Thermomechanical repository and shaft response analyses using the CAVS [Cracking And Void Strain] jointed rock model: Draft final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dial, B.W.; Maxwell, D.E.

    1986-12-01

    Numerical studies of the far-field repository and near-field shaft response for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt have been performed with the STEALTH computer code using the CAVS model for jointed rock. CAVS is a constitutive model that can simulate the slip and dilatancy of fracture planes in a jointed rock mass. The initiation and/or propagation of fractures can also be modeled when stress intensity criteria are met. The CAVS models are based on the joint models proposed with appropriate modifications for numerical simulations. The STEALTH/CAVS model has been previously used to model (1) explosive fracturing of a wellbore, (2) earthquake effects on tunnels in a generic nuclear waste repository, (3) horizontal emplacement for a nuclear waste repository in jointed granite, and (4) tunnel response in jointed rock. The use of CAVS to model far-field repository and near-field shaft response was different from previous approaches because it represented a spatially oriented approach to rock response and failure, rather than the traditional stress invariant formulation for yielding. In addition, CAVS tracked the response of the joint apertures to the time-dependent stress changes in the far-field repository and near-field shaft regions. 28 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Fluid geochemistry associated associated to rocks: preliminary tests om minerals of granite rocks potentially hostess of radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Lucas E.D.; Rios, Francisco J.; Oliveira, Lucilia A.R. de; Alves, James V.; Fuzikawa, Kazuo; Garcia, Luiz; Ribeiro, Yuri; Matos, Evandro C. de

    2009-01-01

    Fluid inclusions (FI) are micro cavities present on crystals and imprison the mineralizer fluids, and are formed during or posterior to the mineral formation. Those kind of studies are very important for orientation of the engineer barrier projects for this purpose, in order to avoid that the solutions present in the mineral FI can affect the repository walls. This work proposes the development of FI micro compositional studies in the the hostess minerals viewing the contribution for a better understanding of the solution composition present in the metamorphosis granitoid rocks. So, micro thermometric, microchemical and characterization of the material confined in the FI, and the hostess minerals. Great part of the found FI are present in the quartz and plagioclase crystals. The obtained data on the mineral compositions and their inclusions will allow to formulate hypothesis on the process which could occurs at the repository walls, decurrens from of the corrosive character (or not) of the fluids present in the FI, and propose measurements to avoid them

  4. The TIMODAZ project: Thermal impact on the damaged zone around a radioactive waste disposal in clay host rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XiangLing, L.

    2009-01-01

    The management of spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived radio active waste is an important environmental issue today. Disposal in deep clay geological formations is one of the promising options to dispose of these wastes. In this context, the related research activities in the Euratom Framework Programme of European Commission are continually taking on an enhanced significance. The TIMODAZ is one of the STREP projects (Specific Targeted Research Project) in the Sixth EURATOM Framework Programme and contributes to the research related to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. The consortium is composed of a strong multidisciplinary team involving both European radioactive waste management organizations and nuclear research institutes, universities, industrial partners as well as consultancy companies (SME's). Totally, 15 partners coming from 8 countries are involved with a total budget of about 4000k EURO. Being the coordinator (through the EURIDICE expertise group), SCK-CEN plays the leading role in the project. Meanwhile, SCK-CEN participates the research in different work packages covering the laboratory tests, in-situ tests as well as the integration of TIMODAZ results within the safety case. An important item for the long-term safety of underground disposal is the proper evaluation of the DZ (damaged zone) in the clay host rock. The DZ is defined here as the zone of host rock that experiences THMC (Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical) modifications induced by the repository, with potential major changes in the transport properties for radionuclides. The DZ is first initiated during the repository construction. Its behaviour is dynamic, dependent on changing conditions that vary from the open-drift period, to initial closure period and to the entire heating-cooling cycle of the decaying waste. The early THMC disturbances created by the excavation, the operational phase and the thermal load might be the most severe transient that the repository will undergo

  5. Exploration of cystalline rocks for nuclear waste repositories: Some strategies for area characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trask, N.J.; Roseboom, E.H.; Watts, R.D.; Bedinger, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    A general strategy for the exploration of crystalline rock massed in the eastern United States for the identification of potential sites for high-level radioactive waste repositories has been generated by consideration of the Department of Energy (DOE) Siting Guidelines, available information on these crystalline rocks, and the capabilities and limitations of various exploration methods. The DOE has recently screened over 200 crystalline rock massed in 17 states by means of literature surveys and has recommended 12 rock masses for more intensive investigation including field investigations. The suggested strategy applies to the next stage of screen where the objective is to identify those potential sites that merit detailed site characterization including an exploratory shaft and underground study. This document discusses strategies for reconnaissance and field investigations, including the early phases of drilling, to provide geoscience information on the areas under construction. A complete Area Characterization Plan, to be developed by DOE with involvement of the states within which the areas to be studied are located, will outline all of the investigations to be carried out in the area phase including their cost and scheduling. Here, we provide input for the Area Characterization Plan by discussing what we believe to be the most important issues that need to be addressed in this phase and suggesting methods for their resolution. This report is not intended as a complete outline of area phase geoscience investigations, however. 79 refs., 4 figs

  6. THM-issues in repository rock. Thermal, mechanical, thermo-mechanical and hydro-mechanical evolution of the rock at the Forsmark and Laxemar sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Loennqvist, Margareta; Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-05-15

    The present report addresses aspects of the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) evolution of the repository host rock that are of potential importance to the SR-Site safety assessment of a KBS-3 type spent nuclear fuel repository. The report covers the evolution of rock temperatures, rock stresses, pore pressures and fracture transmissivities during the excavation and operational phase, the temperate phase and a glacial cycle on different scales. The glacial cycle is assumed to include a period of pre-glacial permafrost with lowered temperatures and with increased pore pressures in the rock beneath the impermeable permafrost layer. The report also addresses the question of the peak temperature reached during the early temperate phase in the bentonite buffer surrounding the spent fuel canisters. The main text is devoted exclusively to the projected THM evolution of the rock at the Forsmark site in central Sweden. The focus is on the potential for stress-induced failures, i.e. spalling, in the walls of the deposition holes and on changes in the transmissivity of fractures and deformation zones. All analyses are conducted by a combination of numerical tools (3DEC) and analytical solutions. All phases are treated separately and independently of each other, although in reality construction will overlap with heat generation because of the step-by-step excavation/deposition approach with some 50 years between deposition of the first and last canisters. It is demonstrated here that the thermal and thermo-mechanical evolution of the near-field will be independent of heat generated by canisters that were deposited in the past, provided that deposition is made in an orderly fashion, deposition area by deposition area. Peak temperatures and near-field stresses can, consequently, be calculated as if all canisters were deposited simultaneously. The canister and tunnel spacing is specified such that the peak buffer temperature will not exceed 100 deg C in any deposition hole, i.e. not

  7. Unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock related to high-level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.D.; Rasmussen, T.C.

    1991-01-01

    Research results are summarized for a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission contract with the University of Arizona focusing on field and laboratory methods for characterizing unsaturated fluid flow and solute transport related to high-level radioactive waste repositories. Characterization activities are presented for the Apache Leap Tuff field site. The field site is located in unsaturated, fractured tuff in central Arizona. Hydraulic, pneumatic, and thermal characteristics of the tuff are summarized, along with methodologies employed to monitor and sample hydrologic and geochemical processes at the field site. Thermohydrologic experiments are reported which provide laboratory and field data related to the effects conditions and flow and transport in unsaturated, fractured rock. 29 refs., 17 figs., 21 tabs

  8. GEOCHEMISTRY OF ROCK UNITS AT THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY LEVEL, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, Z.E.; Cloke, P.L.

    2000-01-01

    The compositional variability of the phenocryst-poor member of the 12.8-million-year Topopah Spring Tuff at the potential repository level was assessed by duplicate analysis of 20 core samples from the cross drift at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Previous analyses of outcrop and core samples of the Topopah Spring Tuff showed that the phenocryst-poor rhyolite, which includes both lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones, is relatively uniform in composition. Analyses of rock samples from the cross drift, the first from the actual potential repository block, also indicate the chemical homogeneity of this unit excluding localized deposits of vapor-phase minerals and low-temperature calcite and opal in fractures, cavities, and faults, The possible influence of vapor-phase minerals and calcite and opal coatings on rock composition at a scale sufficiently large to incorporate these heterogeneously distributed deposits was evaluated and is considered to be relatively minor. Therefore, the composition of the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff is considered to be adequately represented by the analyses of samples from the cross drift. The mean composition as represented by the 10 most abundant oxides in weight percent or grams per hundred grams is: SiO 2 , 76.29; Al 2 O 3 , 12.55; FeO, 0.14; Fe 2 O 3 , 0.97; MgO, 0.13; CaO, 0.50; Na 2 O, 3.52; K 2 O, 4.83; TiO 2 , 0.11; and MnO, 0.07

  9. The Ypresian clays as alternative host rock for radioactive waste disposal in Belgium. A transferability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Baelen, Herve; Wouters, Laurent; Brassinnes, Stephane; Van Geet, Maarten; Vandenberghe, Noel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. For the long-term management of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste, ONDRAF/NIRAS advises deep geological repository in a plastic clay host rock. Since the seventies, Oligocene Boom Clay has been extensively studied for this purpose and is, in the Belgian context, considered as the reference host rock with Mol as the reference site for the RD and D. The alternative host rock, the Ypresian clays, has been studied for their basic properties, from the late nineties onwards, with Doel as reference site. This study aims at determining to which extent methodologies, knowledge and know-how can be transferred from Boom Clay to the Ypresian clays, in order to enhance the knowledge of this alternative without excessive research efforts. It evaluates the present knowledge of the Ypresian clays and figures out which elements are sufficiently known and understood, which elements of the Boom Clay can be reused and which need additional research. The Ypresian clays refer to a nearly continuous sequence of non-indurated, clayey layers, deposited early in the Eocene, in an open marine basin. It has a total thickness of 100 m or more and, in the area of interest, it occurs at a few hundreds of meters depth. Apart from a very slight tilt to the north, no major structures are known to affect the Ypresian clays in the investigated area. The lateral continuity inside the Ypresian clays might, however, be compromised by the potential occurrence of small-scale intra-formational faults. Two drilling campaigns, carried out in the framework of potential radioactive waste disposal, allowed to collect new data and describe and compare the Ypresian clays relative to Boom Clay. The grain size distribution of both clays is comparable. Although the minerals they are composed of are the same, the relative proportions within the clay fraction are significantly different, the Ypresian clays containing more smectite and swelling mixed

  10. Conceptual and safety-related questions in the final storage of radioactive waste - a comparison of various types of host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleemann, U.

    2005-01-01

    The German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) in early November published the synthesis report (BfS 2005) about the conceptual and safety-related specific questions associated with the final storage of radioactive waste. In addition to a condensed version of twelve individual projects, the report contains a description of the results of the peer review and the workshops carried out, in particular an evaluation comparing different types of host rock in Germany. The whole project constitutes a comprehensive documentation of the current state of the art. Findings are expressed at a general level referring neither to the suitability of any specific repository site nor to that of salts as a repository formation, but covering all potential repository formations in deep geologic strata in Germany. The limits to and possibilities of, generic comparisons of various types of host rock are shown. It si seen that, in principle, none of the host rock varieties in Germany would be preferable to others. Numerous problems can be solved only for specific sites, thus requiring site comparisons. While some questions indicate a need for regulatory treatment, the need for basic research is considered to be low. The contribution presents the main findings made in each of the specific projects and the evaluations by the Office. (orig.)

  11. Interaction between clay-based sealing components and crystalline host rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanto, D. G.; Dixon, D. A.; Man, A. G.

    The results of hydraulic-mechanical (H-M) numerical simulation of a shaft seal installed at a fracture zone (FZ) in a crystalline host rock using the finite element method are presented. The primary function of a shaft seal is to limit short-circuiting of the groundwater flow regime via the shaft in a deep geological repository. Two different stages of system evolution were considered in this numerical modelling. Stage 1 simulates the groundwater flow into an open shaft, prior to seal installation. Stage 2 simulates the groundwater flow into the shaft seal after seal installation. Four different cases were completed to: (i) evaluate H-M response due to the interaction between clay-based sealing material and crystalline host rock in the shaft seal structure; (ii) quantify the effect of the different times between the completion of the shaft excavation and the completion of shaft seal installation on the H-M response; and (iii) define the potential effects of different sealing material configurations. Shaft sealing materials include the bentonite-sand mixture (BSM), dense backfill (DBF), and concrete plug (CP). The BSM has greater swelling capacity and lower hydraulic conductivity ( K) than the DBF. The results of these analyses show that the decrease of the pore water pressure is concentrated along the fracture zone (FZ), which has the greatest K. As the time increases, the greatest decrease in pore water pressure is found around the FZ. Following FZ isolation and the subsequent filling of the shaft with water as it floods, the pore water pressure profile tends to recover back to the initial conditions prior to shaft excavation. The majority of the fluids that ultimately saturate the centre of the shaft seal flow radially inwards from the FZ. The time between the completion of the shaft excavation and the completion of shaft seal installation has a significant effect on the saturation time. A shorter time can reduce the saturation time. Since most of the inflow

  12. Influence of convective-energy transfer on calculated temperature distributions in proposed hard-rock nuclear waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, R R; Reda, D C [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1982-06-01

    This study assesses the relative influence of convective-energy transfer on predicted temperature distributions for a nuclear-waste repository located in water-saturated rock. Using results for energy transfer by conduction only (no water motion) as a basis of comparison, it is shown that a considerable amount of energy can be removed from the repository by pumping out water that migrates into the drift from regions adjacent to the buried waste canisters. Furthermore, the results show that the influence of convective-energy transfer on mine drift cooling requirements can be significant for cases where the in-situ permeability of the rock is greater than one millidarcy (a regime potentially encountered in repository scenarios).

  13. Stabilities of nuclear waste forms and their geochemical interactions in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    The stabilities of high-level nuclear waste forms in a repository environment are briefly discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of such waste forms as borosilicate glass, supercalcine ceramics, and synthetic minerals are presented in context with the different rock types which have been proposed as possible host rocks for repositories. It is concluded that the growing geochemical evidence favors the use of a silicate rock repository because of the effectiveness of aluminosilicate rocks as chemical barriers for most radionuclides

  14. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive wasste disposal in the southeast United States: Triassic basin subregion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Based on an evaluation of existing information, areas were identified within the Triassic basins of the southeastern United States with geologic properties considered favorable for containment of radioactive waste. The study region included both exposed and buried Triassic basins from Maryland to Georgia. These basins are long, narrow northeast-trending troughs filled with continental deposits derived from Paleozoic and Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks bordering the basins. The rocks are predominantly red in color and consist mainly of fanglomerates, conglomerates, arkosic sandstones, siltstones, claystones, shales, and argillites. The investigation identified 14 exposed and 5 buried basins within the study region. Candidate areas for further investigation were identified which meet the broad general criteria for tectonic stability, slow ground water movement, and long flow paths to the biosphere. These include: the Danville Triassic Basin in Virginia; the Dan River, Durham, and Wadesboro Triassic Basins in North Carolina; and the buried Florence and Dunbarton Triassic Basins in South Carolina. Other rock types in the southeast may prove more or less suitable as host rocks for a repository, but the available data suggest that the argillaceous Triassic rocks offer sufficient promise to be considered for additional study

  15. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secor, D.T. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    This report reviews the geology of the Piedmont Province of South Carolina with the aim of designating rock units favorable for field exploration for a potential underground repository for the storage of radioactive waste. Most of the rocks in the South Carolina Piedmont are metamorphosed sedimentary volcanic or igneous rocks that have experienced at least one episode of strong deformation. As a consequence of this deformation, they have irregular shapes, making it difficult to predict their subsurface extent. In evaluating the suitability of the rock units for radioactive waste storage, certain criteria were found to be particularly useful. The requirements that the storage site be located in a large volume of homogeneous, impermeable, relatively unfractured rock was the most important criteria in eliminating most of the Piedmont rock units for consideration as field study areas. Six large late- to post-tectonic igneous plutons (Winnsboro, Liberty Hill, Ogden, Newberry, Lowrys, and Bald Rock) are recommended as field study areas

  16. Integrated Analytic Radionuclide Transport Model for a Spent Nuclear Fuel Repository in Saturated Fractured Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, Allan

    2002-01-01

    Simple analytic expressions are presented for radionuclide transport from a KBS 3-type repository, where spent nuclear fuel is placed in copper canisters surrounded by bentonite clay and deposited at a depth of 500 m in fractured granitic rock.Dissolution of readily accessible and fuel matrix embedded nuclides, chain decay, and nuclide precipitation is treated within the canister. Transport in the canister void and buffer is modeled with a dual stirred tank analogy, where transport resistances represent an assumed small initial damage in the canister and transport features of the buffer-geosphere interface. Initial, transient diffusion in the buffer is treated with a simple correction term. Chain decay is not included in the buffer.Geosphere transport expressions handle advection, longitudinal dispersion, matrix diffusion, sorption, and radioactive decay, but not chain decay. The treatment is based on earlier results for an instantaneous inlet and for a constant inlet to the geosphere in the nondispersive case. A correction is added so that longitudinal dispersion is taken approximately into account. The correction utilizes analytical expressions for the temporal moments of the geosphere release curve in the dispersive case.The near-field/geosphere integration is treated in a simplified manner avoiding numerical convolutions. The instantaneous inlet expression for the geosphere release is used when the near-field release decreases rapidly in comparison to a typical response time in the geosphere; the constant inlet expression is used in the opposite case.Twenty-seven calculation cases from a safety assessment of a KBS 3 repository using borehole data from three different field investigation sites were repeated with the analytic expressions. The agreement in both near-field and geosphere releases is in general well within an order of magnitude for the variety of long- and short-lived, sorbing, nonsorbing, solubility limited, immediately accessible, and fuel matrix

  17. Choice of rock excavation methods for the Swedish deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckblom, Goeran [Conrox, Stockholm (Sweden); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Lagerstedt, Leif [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    Choice of rock excavation methods will or may have implications for a number of issues like repository layout, long term and operational safety, environmental impact, design of and operation of transport vehicles and methodology for backfilling the repository before closure as well as effects on costs and schedules. To fully analyse the issues at hand related to selection of excavation methods, SKB organized a project with the objectives: To investigate and compare principal technical solutions for rock excavation, both methods that are used at present but also methods that may be feasible 10 years from now; To assess how the selection of excavation method influences the design and operation of the deep repository; To present a definition of the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone and practical methods for measurements of EDZ; To present advantages and disadvantages with different excavation methods for the various tunnels and underground openings as a basis for selection of preferred excavation methods; To present the Design Justification Statement for the selection of particular excavation methods for the different tunnels and openings in the deep repository to underpin a decision on excavation method; and To present background data that may be required for the evaluation of the long term safety of the deep repository. Main alternatives studied are very smooth blasting, excavation with a tunnel-boring machine (TBM) and excavation with horizontal pull-reaming using more or less conventional raise-boring equipment. The detailed studies were carried through in co-operation with major suppliers and end-users of the technology. An observation in this study is that all excavation technologies are mature; no major breakthroughs are foreseen within a 10 year period but it is likely that for any technology selected, SKB would specifically fine-tune the design of the equipment and work procedures in view of requirements and site specific conditions. Excavation methods have

  18. Choice of rock excavation methods for the Swedish deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, Goeran; Christiansson, Rolf; Lagerstedt, Leif

    2004-09-01

    Choice of rock excavation methods will or may have implications for a number of issues like repository layout, long term and operational safety, environmental impact, design of and operation of transport vehicles and methodology for backfilling the repository before closure as well as effects on costs and schedules. To fully analyse the issues at hand related to selection of excavation methods, SKB organized a project with the objectives: To investigate and compare principal technical solutions for rock excavation, both methods that are used at present but also methods that may be feasible 10 years from now; To assess how the selection of excavation method influences the design and operation of the deep repository; To present a definition of the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone and practical methods for measurements of EDZ; To present advantages and disadvantages with different excavation methods for the various tunnels and underground openings as a basis for selection of preferred excavation methods; To present the Design Justification Statement for the selection of particular excavation methods for the different tunnels and openings in the deep repository to underpin a decision on excavation method; and To present background data that may be required for the evaluation of the long term safety of the deep repository. Main alternatives studied are very smooth blasting, excavation with a tunnel-boring machine (TBM) and excavation with horizontal pull-reaming using more or less conventional raise-boring equipment. The detailed studies were carried through in co-operation with major suppliers and end-users of the technology. An observation in this study is that all excavation technologies are mature; no major breakthroughs are foreseen within a 10 year period but it is likely that for any technology selected, SKB would specifically fine-tune the design of the equipment and work procedures in view of requirements and site specific conditions. Excavation methods have

  19. Self-sealing of excavation induced fractures in clay host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Excavation of an underground repository for disposal of radioactive waste in clay formations generates fractures around the openings, which may act as pathways for water transport and radionuclides migration. Because of the favorable properties of the clay rocks such as the rheological deformability and swelling capability, a recovery process of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) can be expected due to the combined impact of rock compression, backfill resistance, and clay swelling during the post-closure phase. Another important issue is the impact of gases produced from anoxic corrosion of waste containers and other metallic components within the repository. The EDZ may act as a conduit for preferential gas flow, depending on the extent of the recovery process. For the safety assessment of a repository, the self-sealing behaviour and impact on water and gas transport through the EDZ have to be characterized, understood, and predicted. Recently, GRS has extensively investigated these important issues with various kinds of laboratory and in- situ experiments under relevant repository conditions. Test samples were taken from the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite at Bure in France and the Opalinus clay (shaly facies) at Mont Terri in Switzerland. Major findings are summarized as follows. As observed in laboratory and in-situ, the gas permeabilities of the claystones increase with stress-induced damage by several orders of magnitude from the impermeable state up to high levels of 10{sup -12}-10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. When hydrostatic confining stress is applied and increased, the fractures in the claystones tend to close up, leading to a decrease in gas permeability down to different levels of 10{sup -16}-10{sup -21} m{sup 2} at stresses in a range of 10 to 20 MPa. As water enters and flows through fractures, the clay matrix can take up a great amount of the water and expand into the interstices. Consequently, the hydraulic conductivity decreases dramatically by several orders of

  20. Characterisation of gas transport properties of the Opalinus clay, a potential host rock formation for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschall, P.; Horseman, S.; Gimmi, T.

    2005-01-01

    The Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland has been identified as a potential host rock formation for the disposal of radioactive waste. Comprehensive understanding of gas transport processes through this low-permeability formation forms a key issue in the assessment of repository performance. Field investigations and laboratory experiments suggest an intrinsic permeability of the Opalinus Clay in the order of 10 -20 to 10 -21 m 2 and a moderate anisotropy ratio ≤ 10. Porosity depends on clay content and burial depth; values of ∼ 0.12 are reported for the region of interest. Porosimetry indicates that about 10-30% of voids can be classed as macro-pores, corresponding to an equivalent pore radius > 25 nm. The determined entry pressures are in the range of 0.4-10 MPa and exhibit a marked dependence on intrinsic permeability. Both in situ gas tests and gas permeameter tests on drill-cores demonstrate that gas transport through the rock is accompanied by pore water displacement, suggesting that classical flow concepts of immiscible displacement in porous media can be applied when the gas entry pressure (i.e. capillary threshold pressure) is less than the minimum principal stress acting within the rock. Essentially, the pore space accessible to gas flow is restricted to the network of connected macro-pores, which implies a very low degree of desaturation of the rock during the gas imbibition process. At elevated gas pressures (i.e. when gas pressure approaches the level of total stress that acts on the rock body), evidence was seen for dilatancy controlled gas transport mechanisms. Further field experiments were aimed at creating extended tensile fractures with high fracture transmissivity (hydro- or gas-fractures). The test results lead to the conclusion that gas fracturing can be largely ruled out as a risk for post-closure repository performance. (authors)

  1. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, T. (ed.) [McEwen Consulting, Leicester (United Kingdom); Kapyaho, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hella, P. [Saanio and Riekkola, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-15

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel.

  2. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, T.; Kapyaho, A.; Hella, P.; Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-01

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel

  3. Rock quality designation of the hydraulic properties in the near field of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Hans; Carlsson, Leif; Pusch, Roland

    1989-06-01

    Quality assurance of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel requires detailed information on the characteristics of the rock, backfill, canisters and the waste itself. Furthermore, and of fundamental importance, is the knowledge of the behaviour of the integrated system of the waste and the different barriers. The in-situ characteristics of the rock must therefore be assessed and their influence on and interactions with the remaining barriers must be predicted and verified. A rock quality designation process of the hydraulic properties in the near-field is out-lined both for the KBS-3 system as well as for the WP-cave system. The process, once updated and approved, will be included in a Quality Assurance Program for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. Some of the available methods for the near-field designation process are presented as well as techniques that need further development or are not developed at all. Finally, a presentation is given of a generic designation process of the KBS-3 and WP-cave repository systems in the previously investigated area in Central Sweden, where the final repository for reactor waste, SFR, is located. Geological and hydrogeological data are here at hand and it is therefore possible to carry out a simulation of how the designation process would be accomplished. (authors) (72 figs., 12 tabs., 43 refs.)

  4. Rock mechanics methods and in situ heater tests for design of a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Board, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of integrating data from the Near-Surface Test Facility into the overall Waste Isolation Program are examined. Discussions are presented dealing primarily with the application of numerical models to the design of a waste repository. The various types of models currently available are discussed with reference to design in basalt and the breakdown of the problem of repository design is summarized. It is shown that the most efficient method for analyzing repository design is to break the problem down into several problems which are based on physical scale. These include the area directly surrounding a single waste canister (the very near field), the area including many canisters and canister emplacement rooms (the near field), and the area including the entire repository and the rock mass to the free surface (the far field). The methods by which numerical models are used for design are discussed. Flow charts are used to show the basic input data required, the calculational processes used, and the preliminary criteria for judgment of suitable repository performance. It is shown that the ultimate design of the allowable gross thermal loading density, and, thus, the layout of the underground workings is highly dependent upon the rock mass properties supplied as base line input data to the numerical models. Of the many input properties required, the thermal conductivity, the thermal expansion coefficient, and elastic moduli of the rock mass have, perhaps, the greatest effect on the calculation of induced temperatures, stresses, and displacements and, thus, repository design. To ensure that the design continues with confidence, field (in situ) values of input data must be obtained. The role of the Near-Surface Test Facility in situ testing in obtaining these basic required data is discussed

  5. Science is the first step to siting nuclear waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    As Shaw [2014] notes, U.S. research on shale as a repository host was halted before expending anything close to the effort devoted to studying crystalline rock, salt, and - most notably - tuff at Yucca Mountain. The new political reality regarding Yucca Mountain may allow reconsideration of the decision to abandon research on shale as a repository host.

  6. Building the safety case for a hypothetical underground repository in crystalline rock. Final report. Vol. 2. Safety file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Engelmann, H.J.; Jobmann, M.; Lommerzheim, A.; Popp, W.; Frentz, R.R. v.; Wahl, A.

    1996-10-01

    The study was intended as a desk simulation of the process of preparing a licensing application for a deep repository for spent fuel and high level waste in crystalline rock. After clarifying of organizational aspects of table of contents specifying all aspects in a safety life for license application were considered. The volume II is subdivided in two parts. Part A describes the general information, waste description, site characteristics, disposal facility design, reporitory construction and operation, quality assurance, operational safety, repository closure, organization and financial aspects, and long-term safety assessment. Part B deals with the impact of retrievability. (DG)

  7. FRACTURE GEOMETRY ANALYSIS FOR THE STRATIGRAPHIC UNITS OF THE REPOSITORY HOST HORIZON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardin, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate the geometry of the primary joint sets (i.e., fractures belonging to a group demonstrating a preferential orientation) associated with the lithostratigraphic units of the Repository Host Horizon (RHH). Specifically, the analysis is limited to examining joint sets occurring within the upper lithophysal (Tptpul), middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn), lower lithophysal (Tptpll), and lower non-lithophysal (Tptpln) zones of the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff. The results of this AMR supply the geometric input parameters for the joint sets used as input to the acquired software code DRKBA V3.3 (CRWMS M and O 2000i; hereafter DRKBA), which is used in the determination of key block sizes and distributions within the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' AMR (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Additionally, the results of this AMR provide input for selecting the orientation of the emplacement drifts used in layout design work for the potential repository

  8. Hydro-mechanical modelling of a shaft seal in crystalline and sedimentary host rock media using COMSOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyanto, D.G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, MB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Shaft seals are components of the engineered barriers system considered for closure of a Deep Geological Repository (DGR). These seals would be installed in strategic locations of the shafts, where significant fracture zones (FZ) are located and would serve to limit upward flow of groundwater from the repository level towards the surface. This paper presents the results of hydro-mechanical (HM) numerical modelling exercises to evaluate the performance of a shaft seal using a finite element computer code, COMSOL. This study considered a variety of host geological media as part of generic assessments of system evolution in a variety of environments including five hypothetical sedimentary and crystalline host rock conditions. Four simulations of a shaft seal in different sedimentary rocks were completed, including: shale with isotropic permeability; shale with anisotropic permeability; limestone with isotropic permeability; and limestone with anisotropic permeability. The other simulation was a shaft seal in crystalline rock with isotropic permeability. Two different stages were considered in these HM simulations. Stages 1 and 2 simulated the groundwater flow into an open shaft and after installation of shaft sealing components, respectively. As expected, the models were able to simulate that installation of the shaft seal limits groundwater flow through the shaft. Based on the conditions and assumptions defined for the host media and fracture features examined in this study, the following conclusions can be drawn from the results of the numerical modelling exercises. A shaft that remained open for a longer time was beneficial with respect to delaying of seal saturation because it could reduce the groundwater flow rate around the fracture zone. Delaying saturation time indicates slower movement of the groundwater or other substances that may be transported with the groundwater. The core of the shaft seal (i.e., the bentonite-sand mixture (BSM)) became fully saturated

  9. GRS/ISTec strategy for the treatment of gas-related issues for repositories located in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller-Lyda, I.; Javeri, V.; Muller, W.

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of gas-related issues for repositories located in rock salt by GRS and ISTec has followed a strategy which has been developed with increasing complexity and degree of detail in the past. The strategy today clearly indicates the direction to establish a comprehensive safety case and the work that remains to be done. For gas generation mainly long-term aspects are an issue to increase accuracy of predictions. Physical modelling especially for HLW is still incomplete with regard to the coupling of fluid flow with geomechanics, solution/precipitation effects and geochemistry. The appropriate tools to transform the physical models into numerical solutions are at hand in principle but have to be further developed collaterally to the physical modelling. The first full-scale demonstration of safety regarding gas issues in rock salt will have to be provided for the licensing of the Morsleben repository shut-down in the near future. (authors)

  10. Hosting Early Evolution in Heated Pores of Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, C. B.; Möller, F.; Lanzmich, S.; Keil, L.; Braun, D.

    2017-07-01

    Recent experiments with non-equilibrium micro­systems suggest that porous rock conditions drive early molecular evolution in many ways, including accumulation, polymerization, replication, length selection and gelation.

  11. Investigations of possibilities to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in Lithuania: a model case. Volume 2, Concept of Repository in Crystalline Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motiejunas, S.; Poskas, P.

    2005-01-01

    The aim is to present the generic repository concept in crystalline rocks in Lithuania and cost assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and long-lived intermediate level waste in this repository. Due to limited budget of this project the repository concept development for Lithuania was based mostly on the experience of foreign countries. In this Volume a review of the existing information on disposal concept in crystalline rocks from various countries is presented. Described repository concept for crystalline rocks in Lithuania covers repository layout, backfill, canister, construction materials and auxiliary buildings. Costs calculations for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and long-lived intermediate-level wastes from Ignalina NPP are presented too. Thermal, criticality and other important disposal evaluations for RBMK-1500 spent nuclear fuel emplaced in copper canister were performed and described

  12. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2007 and March 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The experiment has been designed to simulate a disposal tunnel in a real deep repository environment for storage of high-level radioactive waste. The test consists of a 90 m long, 5 m diameter subhorizontal tunnel excavated in dioritic granite. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing

  13. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2007 and March 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The experiment has been designed to simulate a disposal tunnel in a real deep repository environment for storage of high-level radioactive waste. The test consists of a 90 m long, 5 m diameter subhorizontal tunnel excavated in dioritic granite. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing.

  14. Archive of information about geological samples available for research from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Polar Rock Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Rock Repository (PRR) operated by the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) at the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  15. National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedes, H.W.

    1983-04-01

    A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions

  16. National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedes, H.W.

    1983-04-01

    A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions.

  17. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenner, D.B.; Gillon, K.A.

    1980-10-01

    A literature study was conducted on the Piedmont province of Georgia to designate areas that may be favorable for field exploration for consideration of a repository for storage of radioactive waste. The criteria utilized in such a designation was based upon consideration of the rock unit having favorable geological, geotechnical, and geohydrological features. The most important are that the rock unit have: (1) satisfactory unit dimensions (> 100 km 2 outcrop area and at least 1500 meters (approx. 5000 feet) depth of a continuous rock type); and (2) acceptable geohydrological conditions. Among all rock types, it is concluded that the granites of the large post-metamorphic plutons and large, homogeneous orthogneissic units offer the most favorable geologic settings for exploration for siting a radioactive waste repository. Virtually all other rock types, including most metavolcanic and metasedimentary lithologies have unacceptable unit dimensions, generally unfavorable geohydrologic settings, and deleterious mechanical and physical geotechnical properties. After consideration of all major lithologies that comprise the Georgia Piedmont, the following units were deemed favorable: (1) the Elberton Pluton; (2) the Siloam Pluton; (3) the Sparta Pluton; (4) two unnamed plutons adjacent to the Snelson body of S.W. Georgia; (5) the Lithonia Gneiss; (6) basement orthogneisses and charnockites of the Pine Mountain Belt

  18. Rock fill in a KBS-3 repository. Rock material for filling of shafts and ramps in a KBS-3V repository in the closure phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, Roland

    2008-09-01

    The content of large blocks in blasted rock makes it impossible to fill and compact the material effectively unless those larger than about 500 mm are removed. Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) muck gives flat chips, that are usually not longer than a couple of decimeters, and serves better as backfill. The granulometrical composition of both types can be more suitable for effective compaction by crushing, which is hence a preferable process. Use of unsorted, unprocessed blasted rock can only be accepted if the density and physical properties, like self-compaction, are not important. Crushing of blasted rock and TBM muck for backfilling can be made in one or two steps depending on the required gradation. Placement of rock fill is best made by use of tractors with blades that push the material forwards over already placed and compacted material. The dry density of well graded rock fill effectively compacted by very heavy vibratory rollers can be as high as 2,400 kg/m3. For road compaction by ordinary vibratory rollers common dry density values are in the interval 2,050 to 2,200 kg m 3 . Blasted rock dumped and moved on site by tractors can get an average dry density of 1,600-1,800 kg/m3 without compaction. Crushed, blasted rock and TBM muck placed by tractors in horizontal layers and compacted by 5-10 t vibrating rollers in the lower part of the rooms, and moved by tractors to form inclined layers compacted by vibrating plates in the upper part, would get a dry density of 1,900-2,000 kg/m 3 . Flushing water over the rock fill in conjunction with the compaction work gives more effective densification than dry compaction. Based on recorded settlement of Norwegian rock fill dams constructed with water flushing it is estimated that the self-compaction of a 5 m high backfill of crushed rock or TBM muck causes a settlement of the top of the backfill of about 8 mm while a 200 m high shaft fill would undergo compression by more than half a meter. Repeated, strong earthquakes may

  19. Rock fill in a KBS-3 repository. Rock material for filling of shafts and ramps in a KBS-3V repository in the closure phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland (Geodevelopment International AB/SWECO AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-09-15

    The content of large blocks in blasted rock makes it impossible to fill and compact the material effectively unless those larger than about 500 mm are removed. Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) muck gives flat chips, that are usually not longer than a couple of decimeters, and serves better as backfill. The granulometrical composition of both types can be more suitable for effective compaction by crushing, which is hence a preferable process. Use of unsorted, unprocessed blasted rock can only be accepted if the density and physical properties, like self-compaction, are not important. Crushing of blasted rock and TBM muck for backfilling can be made in one or two steps depending on the required gradation. Placement of rock fill is best made by use of tractors with blades that push the material forwards over already placed and compacted material. The dry density of well graded rock fill effectively compacted by very heavy vibratory rollers can be as high as 2,400 kg/m3. For road compaction by ordinary vibratory rollers common dry density values are in the interval 2,050 to 2,200 kg m3. Blasted rock dumped and moved on site by tractors can get an average dry density of 1,600-1,800 kg/m3 without compaction. Crushed, blasted rock and TBM muck placed by tractors in horizontal layers and compacted by 5-10 t vibrating rollers in the lower part of the rooms, and moved by tractors to form inclined layers compacted by vibrating plates in the upper part, would get a dry density of 1,900-2,000 kg/m3. Flushing water over the rock fill in conjunction with the compaction work gives more effective densification than dry compaction. Based on recorded settlement of Norwegian rock fill dams constructed with water flushing it is estimated that the self-compaction of a 5 m high backfill of crushed rock or TBM muck causes a settlement of the top of the backfill of about 8 mm while a 200 m high shaft fill would undergo compression by more than half a meter. Repeated, strong earthquakes may

  20. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Analyses of microorganisms, gases and water chemistry in buffer and backfill, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    The Prototype repository is an international project to build and study a full-scale model of the planned Swedish final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The Prototype repository differs from a real storage in that it is drained. For example, this makes the swelling pressure lower in the Prototype repository compared with a real storage. The project is being conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 450 m. A monitoring programme is investigating the evolution of the water chemistry, gas, and microbial activity at the site, and one of the specific aims is to monitor the microbial consumption of oxygen in situ in the Prototype repository. This document describes the results of the analyses of microbes, gases, and chemistry inside and outside the Prototype in 2009. Hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, and ethene were analysed in the following sampling points in the Prototype repository: KBU10001, KBU10002, KBU10004, KBU10006, KBU10008, KFA01 and KFA04. Where the sampling points in the Prototype delivered pore water, the water was analysed for amount of ATP (i.e., the biovolume), cultivable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (CHAB), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), autotrophic acetogens (AA) and in some cases iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). Cultivation methods were also compared with qPCR molecular techniques to evaluate these before next year's decommission of the Prototype repository. The collected pore water from the Prototype repository was subject to chemistry analysis (as many analyses were conducted as the amount of water allowed). In addition, groundwater from two borehole sections in the rock surrounding the Prototype was analysed regarding its gas composition, microbiology and redox. Chemistry data from a previous investigation of the groundwater outside the Prototype repository were compared with the pore water

  1. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Analyses of microorganisms, gases and water chemistry in buffer and backfill, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydmark, Sara

    2010-09-01

    The Prototype repository is an international project to build and study a full-scale model of the planned Swedish final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The Prototype repository differs from a real storage in that it is drained. For example, this makes the swelling pressure lower in the Prototype repository compared with a real storage. The project is being conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 450 m. A monitoring programme is investigating the evolution of the water chemistry, gas, and microbial activity at the site, and one of the specific aims is to monitor the microbial consumption of oxygen in situ in the Prototype repository. This document describes the results of the analyses of microbes, gases, and chemistry inside and outside the Prototype in 2009. Hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, and ethene were analysed in the following sampling points in the Prototype repository: KBU10001, KBU10002, KBU10004, KBU10006, KBU10008, KFA01 and KFA04. Where the sampling points in the Prototype delivered pore water, the water was analysed for amount of ATP (i.e., the biovolume), cultivable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (CHAB), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), autotrophic acetogens (AA) and in some cases iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). Cultivation methods were also compared with qPCR molecular techniques to evaluate these before next year's decommission of the Prototype repository. The collected pore water from the Prototype repository was subject to chemistry analysis (as many analyses were conducted as the amount of water allowed). In addition, groundwater from two borehole sections in the rock surrounding the Prototype was analysed regarding its gas composition, microbiology and redox. Chemistry data from a previous investigation of the groundwater outside the Prototype repository were compared with the pore water chemistry

  2. Effects of gaseous radioactive nuclides on the design and operation of repositories for spent LWR fuel in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenks, G.H.

    1979-12-01

    Information relating to the identities and amounts of gaseous radionuclides present in spent LWR fuel and to their release from canistered spent fuel under plausible storage and disposal conditions was assembled, reviewed, and analyzed. Information was also reviewed and analyzed on several other subjects that relate to the integrity of the carbon steel canister in which the spent fuel is to be encapsulated and to the expected rates of transfer of gaseous radionuclides through crushed salt backfill within a disposal room in a reference repository in rock salt. The advantages and disadvantages were considered for several different canister-backfill materials, and recommendations were made regarding preferred materials. Other recommendations relate to encapsulation procedures and specifications and to needs for additional experimental studies. The objective of this work was to provide reference information, conclusions, and recommendations that could be used to establish design and operating conditions and procedures for a bedded salt repository for spent LWR fuel and that could also be used to help evaluate the safety of the repository. The results of this work will also generally apply to spent fuel repositories in domal salt. However, because the domal salt may have little or no brine inclusions within it, there may be little or no possibility that brine will migrate into open spaces around an emplaced canister. Addordingly, some of the concerns that result from the possible occurrence of brine migration in bedded salt may be of no importance in domal salt

  3. Organic tissues, graphite, and hydrocarbons in host rocks of the Rum Jungle Uranium Field, northern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C.B.; Robbins, E.I.; Bone, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The Rum Jungle Uranium field consists of at least six early Proterozoic deposits that have been mined either for uranium and/or the associated base and precious metals. Organic matter in the host rocks of the Whites Formation and Coomalie Dolomite is now predominantly graphite, consistent with the metamorphic history of these rocks. For nine samples, the mean total organic carbon content is high (3.9 wt%) and ranged from 0.33 to 10.44 wt%. Palynological extracts from the host rocks include black, filamentous, stellate (Eoastrion-like), and spherical morphotypes, which are typical of early Proterozoic microbiota. The colour, abundance, and shapes of these morphotypes reflect the thermal history, organic richness, and probable lacustrine biofacies of the host rocks. Routine analysis of rock thin sections and of palynological residues shows that mineral grains in some of the host rocks are coated with graphitized organic matter. The grain coating is presumed to result from ultimate thermal degradation of a petroleum phase that existed prior to metamorphism. Hydrocarbons are, however, still present in fluid inclusions within carbonates of the Coomalie Dolomite and lower Whites Formation. The fluid inclusions fluoresce dull orange in blue-light excitation and their hydrocarbon content is confirmed by gas chromatography of whole-rock extracts. Preliminary analysis of the oil suggests that it is migrated, and because it has escaped graphitization through metamorphism it is probably not of early Proterozoic age. The presence of live oil is consistent with fluid inclusion data that suggest subsequent, low-temperature brine migration through the rocks. The present observations support earlier suggestions that organic matter in the host formations trapped uranium to form protore. Subsequent fluid migrations probably brought additional uranium and other metals to these formations, and the organic matter provided a reducing environment for entrapment. ?? 1990.

  4. Distribution coefficient of radionuclides on rocks for performance assessment of high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibutani, Tomoki; Shibata, Masahiro; Suyama, Tadahiro

    1999-11-01

    Distribution coefficients of radionuclides on rocks are selected for safety assessment in the 'Second Progress Report on Research and Development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan (H12 Report)'. The categorized types of rock are granitic rocks (crystalline and acidic rocks), basaltic rocks (crystalline and basic rocks), psammitic rocks (neogene sedimentary (soft)), and tuffaceous-pelitic rocks (pre-neogene sedimentary rocks (hard)). The types of groundwater are FRHP (fresh reducing high-pH), FRLP (fresh reducing low-pH), SRHP (saline reducing high-pH), SRLP (saline reducing low-pH), MRNP (mixing reducing neutral-pH) and FOHP (fresh oxidizing high-pH) groundwater. The elements to be surveyed are Ni, Se, Zr, Nb, Tc, Pd, Sn, Cs, Sm, Pb, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm. Distribution coefficients are collected from literatures describing batch sorption experimental results, and are selected under consideration of conservativity. (author)

  5. Development of a technical concept for a generic final repository for heat-generating wastes and spent fuel elements in crystalline rock formations in Germany. Final report; Entwicklung eines technischen Konzeptes fuer ein generisches Endlager fuer waermeentwickelnde Abfaelle und ausgediente Brennelemente im Kristallingestein in Deutschland. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrams, Niklas; Herold, Philipp; Herold, Maxi; Krone, Juergen; Lommerzheim, Andree; Prignitz, Sabine; Kuate, Eric Simo

    2017-09-15

    The research project concerning the development of a generic concept for final repositories in crystalline rock formations has identified three different concepts for long-term safe enclosure efficacy: (i) the KBS-3 concept as pursued in Sweden and Finland based on corrosion resistant copper containers and bentonite buffers in vertical bore holes; (ii) The concept of ''multiple enclosure efficient rock zones'', based on several spatially separated rock zones that allow the demonstration of efficient enclosure; (iii) the concept of a ''superposed enclosure efficient rock zone'', where a sedimentary coverage of the crystalline host rock (for instance clay or salt) shows enclosure efficacy. For each of these concepts a separate final repository concept was developed covering the construction of shafts, ramps and transport routes, the preparation of boreholes, and the backfilling and closure technology, the planning of mine buildings, ventilation, time and cost estimation.

  6. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin; Smellie, John; Puigdomenech, Ignasi

    2010-12-01

    The main aim of this work was to establish whether the pertaining pressure and temperature conditions and dissolved gas concentration in groundwater is conducive to gas hydrate formation using a modelling approach. The hydrate stability pressure-temperature zone of dissolved methane in the presence of salt has been obtained through calculations which show that a decrease in the system pressure and/or an increase in salt concentration favours hydrate formation, as both factors reduce equilibrium gas solubility in the aqueous phase. This behaviour is unlike that of the system including a gas phase, where the water phase is always saturated with methane, and hence the methane solubility in water is not a limiting factor. The main conclusion is that hydrate formation is not possible at the reported methane concentrations and water salinities for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. At the highest salinities and methane concentrations encountered, namely ∼0.00073 mole fraction methane and ∼10 mass % NaCl at a depth of 1,000 m in Olkiluoto, Finland, hydrates could form if the system temperatures and pressures are below 2.5 deg C and 60 bar, respectively, i.e. values that are much lower than those prevailing at that depth (∼20 deg C and ∼100 bar, respectively). Furthermore, the calculated results provide the necessary data to estimate the effect of increase in dissolved methane concentration on potential hydrate formation, as well as two phase flow. The available depth dependency of methane concentration at the sites studied in Sweden and Finland was used in another study to estimate the diffusive flow of methane in the rock volumes. These diffusion rates, which are highest at Olkiluoto, indicate that even if the conditions were to become favourable to methane hydrate formation, then it would take several millions of years before a thin layer of hydrates could be formed, a condition which is outside the required period of satisfactory

  7. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin (Hydrafact Ltd, Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)); Puigdomenech, Ignasi (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The main aim of this work was to establish whether the pertaining pressure and temperature conditions and dissolved gas concentration in groundwater is conducive to gas hydrate formation using a modelling approach. The hydrate stability pressure-temperature zone of dissolved methane in the presence of salt has been obtained through calculations which show that a decrease in the system pressure and/or an increase in salt concentration favours hydrate formation, as both factors reduce equilibrium gas solubility in the aqueous phase. This behaviour is unlike that of the system including a gas phase, where the water phase is always saturated with methane, and hence the methane solubility in water is not a limiting factor. The main conclusion is that hydrate formation is not possible at the reported methane concentrations and water salinities for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. At the highest salinities and methane concentrations encountered, namely approx0.00073 mole fraction methane and approx10 mass % NaCl at a depth of 1,000 m in Olkiluoto, Finland, hydrates could form if the system temperatures and pressures are below 2.5 deg C and 60 bar, respectively, i.e. values that are much lower than those prevailing at that depth (approx20 deg C and approx100 bar, respectively). Furthermore, the calculated results provide the necessary data to estimate the effect of increase in dissolved methane concentration on potential hydrate formation, as well as two phase flow. The available depth dependency of methane concentration at the sites studied in Sweden and Finland was used in another study to estimate the diffusive flow of methane in the rock volumes. These diffusion rates, which are highest at Olkiluoto, indicate that even if the conditions were to become favourable to methane hydrate formation, then it would take several millions of years before a thin layer of hydrates could be formed, a condition which is outside the required period of

  8. Plugs for deposition tunnels in a deep geologic repository in granitic rock. Concepts and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D. A.; Boergesson, L.; Gunnarsson, D.; Hansen, J.

    2009-11-01

    Regardless of the emplacement geometry selected in a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, there will be a requirement for the access tunnels to remain open while repository operations are ongoing. The period of repository operation will stretch for many years (decades to more than a century depending on disposal concept and number of canisters to be installed). Requirements for extended monitoring of the repository before final closure may further extend the period over which the tunnels must remain open. The intersection of the emplacement rooms/drifts and the access tunnels needs to be physically closed in order to ensure that the canisters remain undisturbed and that no undesirable hydraulic conditions are allowed to develop within the backfilled volume. As a result of these requirements, generic guidelines and design concepts have been developed for 'Plugs' that are intended to provide mechanical restraint, physical security and hydraulic control functions over the short-term (repository operational and pre-closure monitoring periods). This report focuses on the role and requirements of plugs to be installed at emplacement room/ tunnel/drift entrances or in other locations within the repository that may require installation of temporary mechanical or hydraulic control structures. These plugs are not necessarily a permanent feature of the repository and may, if required, be removed for later installation of a permanent seal. Room/Drift plugs are also by their defined function, physically accessible during repository operation so their performance can be monitored and remedial actions taken if necessary (e.g. increased seepage past the plug). A considerable number of sealing demonstrations have been undertaken at several research laboratories that are focussed on development of technologies and materials for use in isolation of spent nuclear fuel and these are briefly reviewed in this report. Additionally, technologies developed for non

  9. Plugs for deposition tunnels in a deep geologic repository in granitic rock. Concepts and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A. (AECL, Chalk River (Canada)); Boergesson, L. (Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)); Gunnarsson, D. (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hansen, J. (Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland))

    2009-11-15

    Regardless of the emplacement geometry selected in a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, there will be a requirement for the access tunnels to remain open while repository operations are ongoing. The period of repository operation will stretch for many years (decades to more than a century depending on disposal concept and number of canisters to be installed). Requirements for extended monitoring of the repository before final closure may further extend the period over which the tunnels must remain open. The intersection of the emplacement rooms/drifts and the access tunnels needs to be physically closed in order to ensure that the canisters remain undisturbed and that no undesirable hydraulic conditions are allowed to develop within the backfilled volume. As a result of these requirements, generic guidelines and design concepts have been developed for 'Plugs' that are intended to provide mechanical restraint, physical security and hydraulic control functions over the short-term (repository operational and pre-closure monitoring periods). This report focuses on the role and requirements of plugs to be installed at emplacement room/ tunnel/drift entrances or in other locations within the repository that may require installation of temporary mechanical or hydraulic control structures. These plugs are not necessarily a permanent feature of the repository and may, if required, be removed for later installation of a permanent seal. Room/Drift plugs are also by their defined function, physically accessible during repository operation so their performance can be monitored and remedial actions taken if necessary (e.g. increased seepage past the plug). A considerable number of sealing demonstrations have been undertaken at several research laboratories that are focussed on development of technologies and materials for use in isolation of spent nuclear fuel and these are briefly reviewed in this report. Additionally, technologies developed for non

  10. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont province of North Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.R.

    1980-10-01

    This report reviews the geology of the Piedmont province in North Carolina, emphasizing those features most pertinent to selection of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. Discussion of criteria for selection indicates that the outcrop area of the rock body, probable homogeneity, low incidence of fractures, and low permeability are among the prime considerations. Application of the criteria leads to the selection of three large granite batholiths (Castalia, Churchland, and Rolesville) as potential field study areas. The report has an extensive bibliography

  11. Thermal dimensioning of the deep repository. Influence of canister spacing, canister power, rock thermal properties and nearfield design on the maximum canister surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Faelth, Billy

    2003-12-01

    The report addresses the problem of the minimum spacing required between neighbouring canisters in the deep repository. That spacing is calculated for a number of assumptions regarding the conditions that govern the temperature in the nearfield and at the surfaces of the canisters. The spacing criterion is that the temperature at the canister surfaces must not exceed 100 deg C .The results are given in the form of nomographic charts, such that it is in principle possible to determine the spacing as soon as site data, i.e. the initial undisturbed rock temperature and the host rock heat transport properties, are available. Results of canister spacing calculations are given for the KBS-3V concept as well as for the KBS-3H concept. A combination of numerical and analytical methods is used for the KBS-3H calculations, while the KBS-3V calculations are purely analytical. Both methods are described in detail. Open gaps are assigned equivalent heat conductivities, calculated such that the conduction across the gaps will include also the heat transferred by radiation. The equivalent heat conductivities are based on the emissivities of the different gap surfaces. For the canister copper surface, the emissivity is determined by back-calculation of temperatures measured in the Prototype experiment at Aespoe HRL. The size of the different gaps and the emissivity values are of great importance for the results and will be investigated further in the future

  12. An integrated approach to isotopic study of crystalline rock for a high-level waste repository: Area phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    An integrated approach to assessing isotopic systems in crystalline rock is planned for area phase studies. This approach combines radiogenic isotope systems with petrography in order to characterize potential crystalline repository media. The coeval use of selected isotope systems will minimize the limitations of each method and provide intensive parameters yielding data on alteration timing, secondary mineral formation, temperature history, and radionuclide species migration. Isotope systems will be selected in order to measure differences in sensitivity to thermal disturbances and mobility due to fluid interaction. Comparative evaluation of isotope pair behavior may be used in combination with mineral versus whole-rock dates to provide data on heating and mobilization of alkali elements, lanthanides, and gases, caused by future introduction of waste

  13. Ecohydrological Responses to Diversion of Groundwater: Case Study of a Deep-Rock Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Kent; Collinder, Per; Berglund, Sten; Maartensson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Planning and license applications concerning groundwater diversion in areas containing water-dependent or water-favored habitats must take into account both hydrological effects and associated ecological consequences. There is at present no established methodology to assess such ecohydrological responses. Thus, this paper describes a new stepwise methodology to assess ecohydrological responses to groundwater diversion from, e.g., water-drained pits, shafts, tunnels, and caverns in rock below the groundwater table. The methodology is illustrated using the planned deep-rock repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in central Sweden as a case study, offering access to a unique hydrological and ecological dataset. The case study demonstrates that results of ecohydrological assessments can provide useful inputs to planning of monitoring programs and mitigation measures in infrastructure projects. As a result of the assessment, artificial water supply to wetlands is planned in order to preserve biological diversity, nature values, and vulnerable species

  14. Support to other nuclear waste disposal programmes considering clay as a potential host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volckaert, G.

    2009-01-01

    SCK-CEN started to study the Boom Clay as potential host rock for nuclear waste disposal in 1974. Since then, SCK-CEN has been involved in other international projects studying clay as potential host rock in order to get a broader support for disposal in clay and to acquire broader insight in clay behaviour. Besides Belgium, France and Switzerland are currently investigating clay formations as potential host rock for the disposal of radioactive waste. In the Netherlands, clay formations have always been considered as an alternative to disposal in salt. The general interest in clays is increasing: in Germany and The United Kingdom, it was decided a few years ago that besides respectively salt and crystalline rock also clays need to be evaluated. In Eastern and Central Europe, the Slovak republic and Lithuania consider both clay and granite as possible host rocks for spent fuel while in Russia recently a project was started to study the possible disposal of low and medium level waste in a clay formation in the Leningrad area. Within the EC research and development framework programs and the OECD/NEA Clay Club, collaborations were developed between countries studying clay and with a strong involvement of SCK-CEN. The collaboration with the Eastern and Central European countries is supported through the support programme of the Belgian Ministry of Economic affairs. The objectives of these co-operations are to deliver expert services to other nuclear waste disposal programs considering clay as host rock; to to acquire broader international recognition of our expertise and support for the development of nuclear waste disposal in clay; to get a broader insight in the properties and behaviour of clays

  15. Chemical buffering capacity of clay rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaucaire, C.; Pearson, F.J.; Gautschi, A.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term performance of a nuclear waste repository is strongly dependent on the chemical properties of the host rock. The host rock establishes the chemical environment that determines such important performance attributes as radionuclide solubilities from the waste and the transport rates from the repository to the accessible environment. Clay-rich rocks are especially favourable host rocks because they provide a strong buffering capacity to resist chemical changes prompted either internally, by reactions of the waste itself and emplacement materials, or externally, by changes in the hydrologic systems surrounding the host rock. This paper will focus on three aspects of the stability of clay-rich host rocks: their ability to provide pCO 2 and redox buffering, and to resist chemical changes imposed by changes in regional hydrology and hydro-chemistry. (authors)

  16. Study on water migration of tunnel surrounding rock in nuclear waste repository based on coupling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zhongming; Zhang Xinmin

    2008-01-01

    Excavation of tunnel changes not only the stresses and deformation of tunnel surrounding rock, but also disturbs the underground water environment in tunnel surrounding rock Water migration happens due to variation of pore water pressure and redistribution. Based on the mechanics of porous media, saturated and unsaturated hydro-mechanical coupling analysis method is employed to study the variation of the stresses, deformation and pore pressure of the surrounding rock. Case study indicates that the excavation of tunnel will induce redistribution of stress and pore water pressure. Redistribution of pore water pressure will seriously affect on evaluation of surrounding rock stability and diffusion of nucleon in the pore water. (authors)

  17. The role of the disturbed rock zone in radioactive waste repository safety and performance assessment. A topical discussion and international overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, A.

    1991-06-01

    A discussion was presented of the role and relative importance of the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) around the underground openings of a repository for nuclear waste in crystalline rock. The term disturbed rock zone was defined and possible criteria to be sued to distinguish if from undisturbed rock was suggested. The processes decisive for the hydraulic characteristics of the DRZ were discussed. With regard to the integral hydraulic characteristics of the DRZ, the effects of the excavation methodology, stress redistribution, thermal changes, chemical changes and backfill were discussed. A review of in-situ observations of the DRZ was provided. Model analysis where the DRZ has been explicitly or implicitly represented, either from a phenomenological and performance assessment aspect were reviewed. The implications of the disturbed rock zone for the safe performance of a nuclear waste repository were discussed. Conceptual models for the geometry of the DRZ and hydraulic conductivity distribution in the DRZ were suggested. (au) (82 refs.)

  18. Summary of United States Geological Survey investigations of fluid-rock-waste reactions in evaporite environments under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, D.B.; Jones, B.F.; Roedder, E.; Potter, R.W. II

    1980-01-01

    The interstitial and inclusion fluids contained in rock salt and anhydrite, though present in amounts less than 1 weight per cent, are chemically aggressive and may react with canisters or wastes. The three basic types of fluids are: (1) bitterns residual from saline mineral precipitation including later recrystallization reactions; (2) brines containing residual solutes from the formation of evaporite that have been extensively modified by reactions with contiguous carbonate of clastic rocks; and (3) re-solution brines resulting from secondary dehydration of evaporite minerals or solution of saline minerals by undersaturated infiltrating waters. Fluid composition can indicate that meteoric flow systems have contacted evaporites or that fluids from evaporites have migrated into other formations. The movement of fluids trapped in fluid inclusions in salt from southeast New Mexico is most sensitive to ambient temperature and to inclusion size, although several other factors such as thermal gradient and vapour/liquid ratio are also important. There is no evidence of a threshold temperature for movement of inclusions. Empirical data are given for determining the amount of brine reaching the heat source if the temperature, approximate amount of total dissolved solids, and Ca:Mg ratio in the brine are known. SrCl 2 and CsCl can reach high concentrations in saturated NaCl solutions and greatly depress the liquidus. The possibility that such fluids, if generated, could migrate from a high-level waste repository must be minimized because the fluid would contain its own radiogenic energy source in the first decades after repository closure, thus changing the thermal evolution of the repository from designed values. (author)

  19. gLibrary/DRI: A grid-based platform to host multiple repositories for digital content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calanducci, A.; Gonzalez Martin, J. M.; Ramos Pollan, R.; Rubio del Solar, M.; Tcaci, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present the gLibrary/DRI (Digital Repositories Infrastructure) platform. gLibrary/DRI extends gLibrary, a system with a easy-to-use web front-end designed to save and organize multimedia assets on Grid-based storage resources. The main goal of the extended platform is to reduce the cost in terms of time and effort that a repository provider spends to get its repository deployed. This is achieved by providing a common infrastructure and a set of mechanisms (APIs and specifications) that the repository providers use to define the data model, the access to the content (by navigation trees and filters) and the storage model. DRI offers a generic way to provide all this functionality; nevertheless the providers can add specific behaviours to the default functions for their repositories. The architecture is Grid based (VO system, data federation and distribution, computing power, etc). A working example based on a mammograms repository is also presented. (Author)

  20. Modeling of Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Processes for Bentonite in a Clay-rock Repository for Heat-generating Nuclear Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Rutqvist, J.; Zheng, L.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) that include a bentonite-based buffer are designed to isolate the high-level radioactive waste emplaced in tunnels in deep geological formations. The heat emanated from the waste can drive the moisture flow transport and induce strongly coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes within the bentonite buffer and may also impact the evolution of the excavation disturbed zone and the sealing between the buffer and walls of an emplacement tunnel The flow and contaminant transport potential along the disturbed zone can be minimized by backfilling the tunnels with bentonite, if it provides enough swelling stress when hydrated by the host rock. The swelling capability of clay minerals within the bentonite is important for sealing gaps between bentonite block, and between the EBS and the surrounding host rock. However, a high temperature could result in chemical alteration of bentonite-based buffer and backfill materials through illitization, which may compromise the function of these EBS components by reducing their plasticity and capability to swell under wetting. Therefore, an adequate THMC coupling scheme is required to understand and to predict the changes of bentonite for identifying whether EBS bentonite can sustain higher temperatures. More comprehensive links between chemistry and mechanics, taking advantage of the framework provided by a dual-structure model, named Barcelona Expansive Model (BExM), was implemented in TOUGHREACT-FLAC3D and is used to simulate the response of EBS bentonite in in clay formation for a generic case. The current work is to evaluate the chemical changes in EBS bentonite and the effects on the bentonite swelling stress under high temperature. This work sheds light on the interaction between THMC processes, evaluates the potential deterioration of EBS bentonite and supports the decision making in the design of a nuclear waste repository in light of the maximum allowance

  1. Mechanisms and consequences of creep in the nearfield rock of a KBS-3 repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Hoekmark, H.

    1992-12-01

    Creep in rock depends on the structure as well as on the stress and temperature. Log time creep is often observed and can be explained on the basis of statistical mechanics. Simple Kelvin behavior can be used as an approximation. The code FLAC is concluded to be useful for predicting creep strain, assuming that the rock obeys the Kelvin law. 22 refs

  2. Assessment of rock mass quality based on rock quality designation and rock block index. Taking the Borehole BS01 in Beishan HLW disposal repository as example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jian; Wang Ju

    2006-01-01

    Rock mass quality assessment plays an important role in the security for all kinds of large-scale buildings, especially for the underground buildings. In this paper, based on two parameters of RQD and RBI, taking the Borehole BS01 as example, lots of measured data prove that the rock block index can reflect the integrity and corresponding variation of mechanical properties of core from Borehole BS01 to some extent. Meanwhile, the rock mass classification around the Borehole BS01 is given in this paper. Finally, comparison of the results for rock mass assessment between RBI and RQD is made. The research result shows that the rock block index has remarkable significance in engineering and advantages in rock mass quality assessment. (authors)

  3. An overview of a possible approach to calculate rock movements due to earthquakes at Finnish nuclear waste repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaPointe, P.R.; Cladouhos, T.T.

    1999-02-01

    The report outlines a possible approach to estimating rock movements due to earthquakes that may diminish canister safety. The method is based upon an approach developed for studying similar problems in Sweden at three generic Swedish sites. In the first part of the report, the problem of rock movements during earthquakes is described. The second section of the report outlines the approach used to estimate rock movements in Sweden, and discusses how the approach could be adapted to evaluating movements at Finnish repositories. This section also discusses data needs and potential problems in applying the approach in Finland. The next section presents some simple earthquake calculations for the four Finnish sites. These simulations use the discrete fracture network model geometric parameters developed by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) for the use in hydrological calculations. The calculations are not meant for performance assessment purposes for reasons discussed in the report, but are designed to show (1) the importance of fracture size, intensity and orientation on induced displacement magnitudes; (2) the need for additional studies with regards to fracture size and intensity; and (3) the need to resolve issues regarding the role of post-glacial faulting, glacial rebound and tectonic processes in present-day and future earthquakes. (orig.)

  4. Hydrogen transfer experiments and modelization in clay rocks for radioactive waste deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulin, P.

    2008-10-01

    Gases will be generated by corrosion of high radioactive waste containers in deep geological repositories. A gas phase will be generated. Gas pressure will build up and penetrated the geological formation. If gases do not penetrate the geological barrier efficiently, the pressure build up may create a risk of fracturing and of creation of preferential pathways for radionuclide migration. The present work focuses on Callovo-Oxfordian argillites characterisation. An experiment, designed to measure very low permeabilities, was used with hydrogen/helium and analysed using the Dusty Gas Model. Argillites close to saturation have an accessible porosity to gas transfer that is lower than 0,1% to 1% of the porosity. Analysis of the Knudsen effect suggests that this accessible network should be made of 50 nm to 200 nm diameter pores. The permeabilities values were integrated to an ANDRA operating model. The model showed that the maximum pressure expected near the repository would be 83 bar. (author)

  5. Use of structural geology in exploration for and mining of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    Structural geology is an important component in regional-, district- and orebody-scale exploration and development of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits.Identification of timing of important structural events in an ore district allows analysis and classification of fluid conduits and construction of genetic models for ore formation.The most practical uses of structural geology deal with measurement and definition of various elements that comprise orebodies, which can then be directly applied to ore-reserve estimation,ground control,grade control, safety issues,and mine planning.District- and regional-scale structural studies are directly applicable to long-term strategic planning,economic analysis,and land ownership. Orebodies in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are discrete, hypogene, epigenetic masses usually hosted in a fault zone,breccia mass, or lithologic bed or unit. These attributes allow structural geology to be directly applied to the mining and exploration of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Internal constituents in orebodies reflect unique episodes relating to ore formation.The main internal constituents in orebodies are ore minerals, gangue, and alteration minerals that usually are mixed with one another in complex patterns, the relations among which may be used to interpret the processes of orebody formation and control.Controls of orebody location and shape usually are due to structural dilatant zones caused by changes in attitude, splays, lithologic contacts,and intersections of the host conduit or unit.In addition,conceptual parameters such as district fabric,predictable distances, and stacking also are used to understand the geometry of orebodies.Controls in ore districts and location and geometry of orebodies in ore districts can be predicted to various degrees by using a number of qualitative concepts such as internal and external orebody plunges,district plunge, district stacking, conduit classification, geochemical, geobarometric and

  6. Geotechnical core and rock mass characterization for the UK radioactive waste repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, C.G.; Barton, N.; Loset, F.; Vik, G.; Bhasin, R.K.; Smallwood, A.; Davies, N.

    1996-01-01

    The NGI method of characterizing joints (using JRC, JCS and φ r ) and characterizing rock masses (using the Q-system) have been and are currently being used extensively in geotechnical consultancy projects. One such project recently completed for UK Nirex Ltd included the logging of 8 km of 100-mm-diameter drill core from boreholes up to 2km in depth. Preliminary rock reinforcement designs were derived from the Q-system statistics, which were logged in parallel with JRC, JCS and φ r . The data from the NGI method of characterizing joints and the Q-system for characterizing rock masses have also been used as the basis for UDEC-BB numerical modelling of the proposed cavern excavations for the disposal of solid, low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The purpose of this numerical modelling was to investigate the stability of rock caverns and in particular the rock reinforcement requirements (giving predicted bolt loads and rock deformations), the extent of the disturbed zone (joint shearing and hydraulic aperture) with respect to cavern orientation, the effect of various pillar widths, and the effect of the cavern excavation sequence. (Author)

  7. Analysis of the stability of underground high-level nuclear waste repository in discontinuous rock mass using 3DEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sang Ki; Park, Jeong Hwa; Choi, Jong Won; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2001-03-01

    For the safe design of a high-level nuclear waste repository in deep location, it is necessary to confirm the stability of the underground excavations under the high overburden pressure and also to investigate the influence of discontinuities such as fault, fracture zone, and joints. In this study, computer simulations using 3DEC, which is a Distince Element (DEM) code, were carried out for determining important parameters on the stability of the disposal tunnel and deposition holes excavated in 500 m deep granite body. The development of plastic zone and stress and strain distributions were analyzed with various modelling conditions with variation on the parameters including joint numbers, tunnel size, joint properties, rock properties, and stress ratio. Furthermore, the influence of fracture zone, which is located around the underground excavations, on the stability of the excavation was investigated. In this study, the variation of stress and strain distribution due to the variation of fracture zone location, dip, and width was analyzed

  8. Formation and fate of gases in the caverns of a repository in salt rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.; Morlock, G.; Gronemeyer, C.

    1992-01-01

    The report summarizes the knowledge avaible today of the mechanisms governing the formation and transport of gases in a salt mine repository for radioactive wastes. The work under review deals with the formation of gases-by way of radiolysis, corrosion, microbial degradation, thermally induced or primary gas generation - and analyses the efficiency of predicting and modelling the gas generation mechanisms in terms of the role of parameters involved, and accuracy. Existing gaps in available knowledge are shown and defined in terms of significance, leading to an analysis of interdependencies between the various mechanisms and to a statement concerning the necessity of establishing materials balances. (orig./EF) [de

  9. Age, sedimentary environments, and other aspects of sandstone and related host rocks for uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Project II of the Uranium Geology Working Group was assigned to the study of sedimentary basins and sandstone - type uranium deposits. About 40% of the worlds's uranium resources are contained in sandstone-type deposits, which has led to extensive research. The research was carried out mainly by correspondence, and the results reported by 21 geologists from 10 nations are summarized in this report. It investigated five topics dealing with important aspects of the geology of uranium ores in sandstone host formations: age of host rock; partitioning of uranium between continental and marine sediments; latitude limitation on formation of sandstone deposits; effect of rock formation dip on sandstone ores; usefulness of stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies. The results of studies on these subjects form part of a wider programme of the Working Group, whose final results will be presented at the 27th International Geological Congress in Moscow in 1984

  10. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Metcalfe, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Murakami, Y.; Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T.; Hayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure

  11. Redox front formation in an uplifting sedimentary rock sequence: An analogue for redox-controlling processes in the geosphere around deep geological repositories for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, H. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: dora@num.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Metcalfe, R. [Quintessa Japan, Queen' s Tower A7-707, Minatomirai, Yokohama 220-6007 (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [Nagoya University Museum, Material Research Section, Furocho, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Murakami, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tono Geoscience Centre (Japan); Hoshii, D.; Kanekiyo, A.; Naganuma, T. [Hiroshima University, Higashi Hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-4-4 (Japan); Hayashi, T. [Asahi University, Department of Dental Pharmacology, Hozumi, Gifu (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Subsurface redox fronts control the mobilization and fixation of many trace elements, including potential pollutants such as certain radionuclides. Any safety assessment for a deep geological repository for radioactive wastes needs to take into account adequately the long-term redox processes in the geosphere surrounding the repository. To build confidence in understanding these processes, a redox front in a reduced siliceous sedimentary rock distributed in an uplifting area in Japan has been studied in detail. Geochemical analyses show increased concentrations of Fe and trace elements, including rare earth elements (REEs), at the redox front, even though concentrations of reduced rock matrix constituents show little change. Detailed SEM observations revealed that fossilized microorganisms composed of amorphous granules made exclusively of Fe and Si occur in the rock's pore space. Microbial 16S rDNA analysis suggests that there is presently a zonation of different bacterial groups within the redox band, and bacterial zonation played an important role in the concentration of Fe-oxyhydroxides at the redox front. These water-rock-microbe interactions can be considered analogous to the processes occurring in the redox fronts that would develop around geological repositories for radioactive waste. Once formed, the Fe-oxyhydroxides within such a front would be preserved even after reducing conditions resume following repository closure.

  12. A theoretical and numerical consideration of rock mass behaviour under thermal loading of radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivinen, M.; Freund, J.; Eloranta, E.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the study is to model the geodynamic response of a ground rock block under horizontal stresses and also consider the thermal fields and deformations, especially on the ground surface, caused by the heat produced by nuclear waste. (12 refs.)

  13. The diffusion of some radionuclides in local rocks collected from potential repository in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, Ibrahim; Abou Jamous, Jamal

    1992-07-01

    Diffusion factor was estimated for 137 Cs in local rocks marl, limestone, and basalt. Slab activity measuring was constructed. Factors affecting the 137 Cs diffusion has been studied. These are dynamic state of water, length of contacting time and the concentration of radioisotope. (author). 9 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Remaining porosity and permeability of compacted crushed rock salt backfill in a HLW repository. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M.; Mueller, C.; Schirmer, S.

    2015-11-15

    The safe containment of radioactive waste is to be ensured by the geotechnical barriers in combination with the containment-providing rock zone (CRZ). The latter is a key element of the recently developed concept of demonstrating the integrity of the geologic barrier (Krone et al., 2013). As stipulated in the safety requirements of the regulating body the CRZ has to have strong barrier properties, and evidence needs to be provided that it retains its integrity throughout the reference period (BMU, 2010). The underground openings excavated in the rock salt will close over time due to the creep properties of the rock salt. This process causes deformations in the surrounding rock salt, which leads to a change in stress state in the virgin rock and may impair the integrity of the containment-providing rock zone. In order to limit the effects of these processes, all underground openings will be backfilled with crushed salt. Immediately after backfilling, the crushed salt will have an initial porosity of approx. 35%, which - over time - will be reduced to very low values due to the creep properties of the rock salt. The supporting pressure that builds up in the crushed salt with increasing compaction slows down the creeping of the salt. Major influencing factors are the temperature (with higher temperatures accelerating the salt creeping) and the moisture of the salt, which - due to the related decrease in the resistance of the crushed salt - facilitates its compaction. The phenomenology of these processes and dependencies is understood to a wide extent. This project investigated the duration until compaction is completed and when and under what circumstances the crushed salt will have the sealing properties necessary to ensure safe containment. Thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes play a crucial role in determining whether solutions which might enter the mine could reach the radioactive waste. This includes changes in material behaviour due to a partial or complete

  15. Preliminary constitutive properties for salt and nonsalt rocks from four potential repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifle, T.W.; Mellegard, K.D.; Senseny, P.E.

    1983-07-01

    Results are presented from laboratory strength and creep tests performed on salt and nonsalt specimens from the Richton Dome in Mississippi, the Vacherie Dome in Louisiana, the Permian Basin in Texas, and the Paradox Basin in Utah. The constititive properties obtained for salt are the elastic moduli and the failure envelope at 24 0 C and parameter values for the exponential-time creep law. Some additional data are presented to indicate how the elastic moduli and strength change with temperature. The nonsalt constitutive properties reported are the elastic moduli, the unconfined compressive strength and the tensile strength at 24 0 C. The properties given in this report will be used in subsequent numerical simulations that will provide information to assist in the screening and selection of site locations for a nuclear waste repository and to assist in the repository design at the selected site. The matrix of tests performed is the minimum effort required to obtain these constitutive properties. The preliminary values obtained will be supplemented by additional testing for sites that are selected for further investigation

  16. Modeling of irradiated graphite {sup 14}C transfer through engineered barriers of a generic geological repository in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskas, Povilas; Grigaliuniene, Dalia, E-mail: Dalia.Grigaliuniene@lei.lt; Narkuniene, Asta; Kilda, Raimondas; Justinavicius, Darius

    2016-11-01

    There are two RBMK-1500 type graphite moderated reactors at the Ignalina nuclear power plant in Lithuania, and they are under decommissioning now. The graphite cannot be disposed of in a near surface repository, because of large amounts of {sup 14}C. Therefore, disposal of the graphite in a geological repository is a reasonable solution. This study presents evaluation of the {sup 14}C transfer by the groundwater pathway into the geosphere from the irradiated graphite in a generic geological repository in crystalline rocks and demonstration of the role of the different components of the engineered barrier system by performing local sensitivity analysis. The speciation of the released {sup 14}C into organic and inorganic compounds as well as the most recent information on {sup 14}C source term was taken into account. Two alternatives were considered in the analysis: disposal of graphite in containers with encapsulant and without it. It was evaluated that the maximal fractional flux of inorganic {sup 14}C into the geosphere can vary from 10{sup −} {sup 11} y{sup −} {sup 1} (for non-encapsulated graphite) to 10{sup −} {sup 12} y{sup −} {sup 1} (for encapsulated graphite) while of organic {sup 14}C it was about 10{sup −} {sup 3} y{sup −} {sup 1} of its inventory. Such difference demonstrates that investigations on the {sup 14}C inventory and chemical form in which it is released are especially important. The parameter with the highest influence on the maximal flux into the geosphere for inorganic {sup 14}C transfer was the sorption coefficient in the backfill and for organic {sup 14}C transfer – the backfill hydraulic conductivity. - Highlights: • Graphite moderated nuclear reactors are being decommissioned. • We studied interaction of disposed material with surrounding environment. • Specifically {sup 14}C transfer through engineered barriers of a geological repository. • Organic {sup 14}C flux to geosphere is considerably higher than inorganic

  17. The OPG/Kincardine hosting agreement for a deep geologic repository for OPG's low- and intermediate-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellan, A.G.; Barker, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    A Hosting Agreement has been reached between Ontario Power Generation and the Municipality of Kincardine for the purpose of siting a long-term management facility for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste at the Western Waste Management Facility. Following an independent review of the feasibility of three options for a long-term facility at the site, including a review of the safety, geotechnical feasibility, social and economic effects and potential environmental effects, Kincardine passed a resolution indicating their preference for a Deep Geologic Repository. A Host Community Agreement has been negotiated based on this preference, and on information that had been gathered from municipal authorities at other locations that have hosted similar facilities. The Hosting Agreement includes financial compensation, totalling $35.7 million (Canadian 2004) to the Municipality of Kincardine and to four surrounding municipalities. The financial aspects include lump sum payments based on achieving specific project milestones as well as annual payments to each of the municipalities. The payments are indexed to inflation, and are also contingent on the municipalities acting reasonably and in good faith during the licencing process of the proposed facility. In addition to the fees, the Agreement includes provision for a Property Value Protection Plan that would provide residents with compensation in the event that there is depreciation in property value shown to directly result from a release from the proposed facility. New permanent OPG jobs supporting the project would be located at the site. OPG and Kincardine will support a centre of nuclear excellence. (author)

  18. Geochemical simulation of the evolution of granitic rocks and clay minerals submitted to a temperature increase in the vicinity of a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, B.; Kam, M.; Tardy, Y.

    1984-07-01

    The alteration of a granitic rock around a repository for spent nuclear fuel has been simulated considering the effect of an increase of temperature due to this kind of induced geothermal system. The results of the simulation have been interpreted in terms of mass transfer and volumic consequences. The alteration proceeds by dissolution of minerals (with an increase of the volumes of fissures and cracks) and precipitation of secondary miminerals as calcite and clay minerals particularly (with a decrease of the porosity). The increase of the temperature from 10 degrees C to about 100 degrees C will favour the alteration of the granitic rock around the repository by the solution filling the porosity. The rock is characterized by a very low fissure porosity and a consequent very low water velocity. This too, favours intense water rock interactions and production of secondary clays and the total possible mass transfer will decrease the porosity. A combination of these thermodynamic mass balance calculations with a kinetic approach of mineral dissolutions gives a first attempt to calibrate the modelling in the time scale: the decrease of porosity can be roughly estimated between 2 and 20% for 100,000 years. The particular problem of Na-bentonites behaviour in the proximate vicinity of the repository has been studied too. One must distinguish between two types of clay-water interactions: -within the rock around the repository, Na-bentonites should evolute with illitization in slighltly open system with low clay/water ratios, -within the repository itself, the clay reacts in a closed system for a long time with high clay/water ratios and a self-buffering effect should maintain the bentonite type. This chemical buffering effect is a positive point for the use of this clay as chemical barrier. (Author)

  19. Safety case approach for a KBS-3 type repository in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastina, Barbara; Lehikoinen, Jarmo; Puigdomenech, Ignasi

    2012-01-01

    Barbara Pastina of Saanio and Riekkola described the approach to considering cementitious materials in a safety case for a KBS-3 repository in Finland. In this concept, cements will be used predominantly as tunnel plugs and seals. Part of the Finnish approach has involved identifying the cement-related FEPs. For example, FEPs representing the effects of cement on spent fuel, on the canister and on radionuclide transport include: - Fuel matrix dissolution at high pH. - Copper corrosion at high pH. - Radionuclide speciation and solubility at high pH. - Radionuclide sorption and diffusion at high pH. - Radionuclide transport due to organic materials (e.g. super-plasticisers). - Colloid formation at a high pH plume front. FEPs representing the effects of cement on bentonite in the buffer and backfill include: - Potential changes in swelling pressure due to mass loss, decrease in clay density, and precipitation of secondary minerals. - Potential cracking and increase of hydraulic conductivity due to cementation. - Increase of the cation exchange capacity due to the loss of silica from the montmorillonite structure. Amongst the cement-related FEPs, the main concerns are related to effects on the performance of the bentonite buffer. Cement-bentonite interactions are complex, there are few experimental data, and there are significant modelling uncertainties (e.g. limited knowledge about the reactions that may occur and their rates, and the effects of temperature). Accepting the existence of various uncertainties, preliminary modelling studies performed using the TOUGHREACT code illustrate the potential for porosity reduction and clogging of porosity in bentonite affected by cementitious pore waters. The modelling also suggests that that the high pH of the pore waters moving from the cementitious materials into the bentonite may be rapidly lowered as a result of reactions with the bentonite close to the cement-bentonite interface. Taking account of the various research and

  20. Relationship of engineering geology to conceptual repository design in the Gibson Dome area, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgerson, R.; Henderson, N.

    1984-01-01

    The Paradox Basin in Southeastern Utah is being investigated as a potential site for development of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Geologic considerations are key areas of concern and influence repository design from a number of aspects: depth to the host rock, thickness of the host rock, and hydrologic conditions surrounding the proposed repository are of primary concern. Surface and subsurface investigations have provided data on these key geologic factors for input to the repository design. A repository design concept, based on the surface and subsurface geologic investigations conducted at Gibson Dome, was synthesized to provide needed information on technical feasibility and cost for repository siting decision purposes. Significant features of the surface and subsurface repository facilities are presented. 5 references, 4 figures

  1. Degradation of rocks, through cracking caused by differential thermal expansion, in relation to nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, J.R.; Davidge, R.W.; Titchell, I.; Sincock, K.; Bromley, A.

    1982-01-01

    Heating to temperatures up to 500 0 C gives a reduction in Young's modulus and increases in permeability of granitic rocks and it is likely that a major reason is grain boundary cracking. The cracking of grain boundary facets in polycrystalline multiphase materials showing anistropic thermal expansion behaviour is controlled by several microstructural factors in addition to the intrinsic thermal and elastic properties. Of specific interest are the relative orientations of the two grains meeting at the facet, and the size of the facet; these factors thus introduce two statistical aspects to the problem and these are introduced to give quantitative data on crack density versus temperature. The theory is compared with experimental measurements of Young's modulus and permeability for various rocks as a function of temperature. There is good qualitative agreement, and the additional (mainly microstructural) data required for a quantitative comparison are defined. 6 figures, 2 tables

  2. Numerical modeling of rock stresses within a basaltic nuclear waste repository. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, M.P.; Hocking, G.

    1978-01-01

    The modeling undertaken during this project incorporated a wide range of problems that impact the design of the waste repository. Interaction of groundwater, heat and stress were considered on a regional scale, whereas on the room and canister scale thermo-mechanical analyses were undertaken. In the Phase II report, preliminary guidelines for waste densities were established based primarily on short-term stress criteria required to maintain stability during the retrievability period. Additional analyses are required to evaluate the effect of joints, borehole linings, room support and ventilation on these preliminary waste loading densities. The regional analyses did not indicate any adverse effect that could control the allowable waste loading densities. However, further refinements of geologic structure, hydrologic models, seismicity and possible induced seismicity are required before firm estimates of the loading densities can be made

  3. Understanding large scale groundwater flow in fractured crystalline rocks to aid in repository siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.; Brown, A.; Gascoyne, M.; Stevenson, D.; Ophori, D.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) conducted a ten-year long groundwater flow study of a 1050 km 2 region of fractured crystalline rock in southeastern Manitoba to illustrate how an understanding of large scale groundwater flow can be used to assist in selecting a hydraulically favourable location for the deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The study involved extensive field investigations that included the drilling testing, sampling and monitoring of twenty deep boreholes distributed at detailed study areas across the region. The surface and borehole geotechnical investigations were used to construct a conceptual model of the main litho-structural features that controlled groundwater flow through the crystalline rocks of the region. Eighty-three large fracture zones and other spatial domains of moderately fractured and sparsely fractured rocks were represented in a finite element model of the area to simulate regional groundwater flow. The groundwater flow model was calibrated to match the observed groundwater recharge rate and the hydraulic heads measured in the network of deep boreholes. Particle tracking was used to determine the pathways and travel times from different depths in the velocity field of the calibrated groundwater flow model. The results were used to identify locations in the regional flow field that maximize the time it takes for groundwater to travel to surface discharge areas through long, slow groundwater pathways. One of these locations was chosen as a good hypothetical location for situating a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault at 750 m depth. (authors)

  4. A preliminary study on the suitability of host rocks for deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Park, Byung Yun; Koh, Young Kown

    2000-02-01

    It is expected that the key issues are listed as the disposal concept, reference disposal system and other relevant technical development for the deep geological disposal of HLW in each country. First above all, however, the preferred host rocks should be suggested prior execution of these activities. And, it is desirable to be reviewed and proposed some host rocks representative its country. For the reviewing of host rocks in Korean peninsula, several issues were considered such as the long-term geological stability, fracture system, surface and groundwater system and geochemical characteristics in peninsula. The three rock types such as plutonic rocks, crystalline gneisses and massive volcanic rocks were suggested as the preferred host rocks for the R and D of HLW disposal based on the upper stated information. In the following stages, it is suggested that these preferred host rocks would be made an object of all relevant R and D activities for HLW disposal. And, many references for these geologic medium should be characterized and constructed various technical development for the Korean reference disposal system.

  5. A preliminary study on the suitability of host rocks for deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Park, Byung Yun; Koh, Young Kown

    2000-02-01

    It is expected that the key issues are listed as the disposal concept, reference disposal system and other relevant technical development for the deep geological disposal of HLW in each country. First above all, however, the preferred host rocks should be suggested prior execution of these activities. And, it is desirable to be reviewed and proposed some host rocks representative its country. For the reviewing of host rocks in Korean peninsula, several issues were considered such as the long-term geological stability, fracture system, surface and groundwater system and geochemical characteristics in peninsula. The three rock types such as plutonic rocks, crystalline gneisses and massive volcanic rocks were suggested as the preferred host rocks for the R and D of HLW disposal based on the upper stated information. In the following stages, it is suggested that these preferred host rocks would be made an object of all relevant R and D activities for HLW disposal. And, many references for these geologic medium should be characterized and constructed various technical development for the Korean reference disposal system

  6. Sellafield repository design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Between 1989 and 1997, UK Nirex Ltd carried out a programme of investigations to evaluate the potential of a site adjacent to the BNFL Sellafield works to host a deep repository for the United Kingdom's intermediate-level and certain low-level radioactive waste. The programme of investigations was wound down following the decision in March 1997 to uphold the rejection of the Company's planning application for the Rock Characterisation Facility (RCF), an underground laboratory which would have allowed further investigations to confirm whether or not the site would be suitable. Since that time, the Company's efforts in relation to the Sellafield site have been directed towards documenting and publishing the work carried out. The design concept for a repository at Sellafield was developed in parallel with the site investigations through an iterative process as knowledge of the site and understanding of the repository system performance increased. This report documents the Sellafield repository design concept as it had been developed, from initial design considerations in 1991 up to the point when the RCF planning application was rejected. It shows, from the context of a project at that particular site, how much information and experience has been gained that will be applicable to the development of a deep waste repository at other potential sites

  7. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2008 and September 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S.

    2009-03-01

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation [Pettitt et al., 1999], and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation [Haycox et al., 2005a and 2005b; Haycox et al., 2006a and 2006b; Zolezzi et al., 2007 and Duckworth et al., 2008]. Further information on this monitoring can be found in Appendix I. This report covers the period between 1st April 2008 and 30th September 2008 and is the seventh instalment of the 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2008 and September 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2009-03-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation [Pettitt et al., 1999], and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation [Haycox et al., 2005a and 2005b; Haycox et al., 2006a and 2006b; Zolezzi et al., 2007 and Duckworth et al., 2008]. Further information on this monitoring can be found in Appendix I. This report covers the period between 1st April 2008 and 30th September 2008 and is the seventh instalment of the 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  9. Long term thermo-hydro-mechanical interaction behavior study of the saturated, discontinuous granitic rock mass around the radwaste repository using a steady state flow algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Bae, Dae Suk; Kang, Chul Hyung; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the long term (500 years) thermo-hydro-mechanical interaction behavior of the 500 m depth underground radwaste repository in the saturated, discontinuous granitic rock mass using a steady state flow algorithm. The numerical model includes a saturated granitic rock mass with joints around the repository and a 45 .deg. C fault passing through the tunnel roof-wall intersection, and a canister with PWR spent fuels surrounded by the compacted bentonite and mixed-bentonite. Barton-Bandis joint constitutive model from the UDEC code is used for the joints. For the hydraulic analysis, a steady state flow algorithm is used for the groundwater flow through the rock joints. For the thermal analysis, heat transfer is modeled as isotropic conduction and heat decays exponentially with time. The results show that the variations of the hydraulic aperture, hydraulic conductivity, normal stress, normal displacements, and shear displacements of the joints are high in the vicinity of the repository and stay fairly constant on the region away from the repository. 14 refs., 15 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  10. Site investigation requirements for a deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, I.W.

    1992-03-01

    Techniques currently available for measuring geotechnical parameters needed in the design, construction and assessment of a deep underground repository have been critically examined. These techniques have been considered under four main areas: definition of the rock discontinuity structure, definition of the in-situ stress distribution in the rock mass, estimation of the geomechanical characteristics of the rock mass, and estimation of flow and transport characteristics of the rock mass. The review concludes that generally rocks and rock masses are not well characterised by tests from cores or from boreholes and gives reason to support this view. The only parameters which can be measured accurately are laboratory index properties which are useful only in a comparative assessment of different rock types. Finally the review concludes that the only way to obtain useful data on rock behaviour is through large pilot scale tests with appropriate and controlled boundary conditions conducted preferably in the potential host strata. (author)

  11. Clay shale as host rock. A geomechanical contribution about Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempp, Christof; Menezes, Flora; Sachwitz, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The Opalinuston is a prominent rock representing the type of organic clay shales or clay stones within the sequence of Triassic and Jurassic marine sediments in Southern Germany. The rock forms a homogenous unit some ten meters thick. The degree of consolidation of this type of pelitic rock depends mainly on the former load conditions, but is also dependent on the long-term weathering and even on the present exposition. The geomechanical parameters such as shear strength, tensional strength and permeability vary with the state of consolidation and become important when the use is discussed of such rocks for radioactive waste disposal. A tunneling project at the northern escarpment of the Swabian Alb (Southwest Germany) within the Opalinus clay offered the rare opportunity to obtain fresh unweathered rock samples in greater amounts compared to fresh drilling cores from which geomechanical investigations are usually undertaken. Consequently, the results of geomechanical laboratory testings are presented in order to compare here the results of multistep triaxial compression tests, of hydraulic fracturing laboratory tests and of some other tests for rock characterization with the corresponding results of Opalinus clay sites in Switzerland that were investigated by the Swiss Nagra Company for host rock characterization. After a discussion of the relevant state of fresh Opalinus clay, especially of suction pressure conditions and saturation state, the results of triaxial shear tests are presented. Increasing shear deformation at increasing pressure and unchanged water saturation do not result in a significant strength reduction of the Opalinus clay. The rock shows increasing cohesion and stiffness, if multiple loading has repeatedly reached the failure point. Thus there is no increased permeability with continued shearing. Only at the beginning of the shearing process is a temporarily increased permeability to be expected due to dilatation processes. An increased

  12. Determination of soil mechanics of salt rock as a potential backfilling material in an underground repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappei, G.

    1987-09-01

    Within the framework of the research and development project 'Backfilling and sealing of boreholes, chambers and roadways in a final dump', the Institute for Underground Dumping chose - from the broad range of possible stowing materials - the material 'salt spoil' and investigated its soil-mechanical properties in detail. Besides the implementation of soil-mechanical standard analyses (determination of the grain size distribution, bulk density, limits of storage density, proctor density, permeabilities, and shear strength) of two selected salt spoils (heap salt and rock salt spoil), the studies concentrated on the determination of the compression behaviour of salt spoil. In order to obtain data on the compaction behaviour of this material in the case of increasing stress, compression tests with obstructed lateral expansion were carried out on a series of spoil samples differing mainly in the composition of grain sizes. In addition to this, for a small number of samples of rock salt spoil, the creep behaviour at constant stress was determined after the compaction phase. (orig./RB) [de

  13. Generic repository concept for RBMK-1500 spent nuclear fuel disposal in crystalline rocks in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskas, P.; Brazauskaite, A.; Narkunas, E.; Smaizys, A.; Sirvydas, A.

    2006-01-01

    During 2002-2005 investigations on possibilities to dispose of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in Lithuania were performed with support of Swedish experts. Disposal concept for RBMK-1500 SNF in crystalline rocks in Lithuania is based on Swedish KBS-3 concept with SNF emplacement into the copper canister with cast iron insert. The bentonite and its mixture with crushed rock are also foreseen as buffer and backfill material. In this paper modelling results on thermal, criticality and other important disposal characteristics for RBMK-1500 SNF fuel emplaced in copper canisters are presented. Based on thermal calculations, the distances between the canisters and between the tunnels were justified. Criticality calculations for the canister with fresh fuel with 2.8 % 235 U enrichment demonstrated that effective neutron multiplication factor k eff values are less than allowable value of 0.95. Dose calculations have shown that total equivalent dose rate from the canister with 50 years stored RBMK-1500 SNF is rather high and is defined mainly by the γ radiation. (author)

  14. Use of safety analysis to site comfirmation procedure in case of hard rock repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltonen, E.K.

    1984-02-01

    The role of safety analysis in a confirmation procedure of a candidate disposal site of radioactive wastes is discussed. Items dealt with include principle reasons and practical goals of the use of safety analysis, methodology of safety analysis and assessment, as well as usefulness and adequacy of the present safety analysis. Safety analysis is a tool, which enables one to estimate quantitatively the possible radiological impacts from the disposal. The results can be compared with the criteria and the suitability conclusions drawn. Because of its systems analytical nature safety analysis is an effective method to reveal, what are the most important factors of the disposal system and the most critical site characteristics inside the lumped parameters often provided by the experimental site investigation methods. Furthermore it gives information on the accuracy needs of different site properties. This can be utilized to judge whether the quality and quantity of the measurements for the characterization are sufficient as well as to guide the further site investigations. A more practical discussion regarding the applicability of the use of safety analysis is presented by an example concerning the assessment of a Finnish candidate site for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste repository. (author)

  15. Repositories; Repositorios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Carolina Braccini; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: cbf@cdtn.br; tellocc@cdtn.br

    2007-11-15

    The use of the nuclear energy is increasing in all areas. Then the radioactive waste management is in continuous development to comply the national and international established requirements. The final objective is to assure that it will not have any contamination of the public or the environmental, and that the exposition doses will be lower than the radiological protection limits. The multi barrier concept for the repository is internationally recognized. Among the repository types, the most used are: near surface, geological formations and of deposition in rock cavities. This article explains the concept and the types of repository and gives some examples of them. (author)

  16. Rock stability considerations for siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. Based on experiences from Aespoe HRL, AECL's URL, tunnelling and mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.D. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Soederhaell, J. [VBB VIAK AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 25 years the international nuclear community has carried out extensive research into the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in hard rocks. In two cases this research has resulted in the construction of dedicated underground research facilities: SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden and AECL's Underground Research Laboratory, Canada. Both laboratories are located in hard rocks considered representative of the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields, respectively. This report is intended to synthesize the important rock mechanics findings from these research programs. In particular the application of these finding to assessing the stability of underground openings. As such the report draws heavily on the published results from the SKB's ZEDEX Experiment in Sweden and AECL's Mine- by Experiment in Canada. The objectives of this report are to: 1. Describe, using the current state of knowledge, the role rock engineering can play in siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. 2. Define the key rock mechanics parameters that should be determined in order to facilitate repository siting and construction. 3. Discuss possible construction issues, linked to rock stability, that may arise during the excavation of the underground openings of a KBS-3 repository. 4. Form a reference document for the rock stability analysis that has to be carried out as a part of the design works parallel to the site investigations. While there is no unique or single rock mechanics property or condition that would render the performance of a nuclear waste repository unacceptable, certain conditions can be treated as negative factors. Outlined below are major rock mechanics issues that should be addressed during the siting, construction and closure of a nuclear waste repository in Sweden in hard crystalline rock. During the site investigations phase, rock mechanics information will be predominately gathered from examination and testing of the rock core and

  17. Rock stability considerations for siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. Based on experiences from Aespoe HRL, AECL's URL, tunnelling and mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.D.; Christiansson, Rolf; Soederhaell, J.

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 25 years the international nuclear community has carried out extensive research into the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in hard rocks. In two cases this research has resulted in the construction of dedicated underground research facilities: SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden and AECL's Underground Research Laboratory, Canada. Both laboratories are located in hard rocks considered representative of the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields, respectively. This report is intended to synthesize the important rock mechanics findings from these research programs. In particular the application of these finding to assessing the stability of underground openings. As such the report draws heavily on the published results from the SKB's ZEDEX Experiment in Sweden and AECL's Mine- by Experiment in Canada. The objectives of this report are to: 1. Describe, using the current state of knowledge, the role rock engineering can play in siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. 2. Define the key rock mechanics parameters that should be determined in order to facilitate repository siting and construction. 3. Discuss possible construction issues, linked to rock stability, that may arise during the excavation of the underground openings of a KBS-3 repository. 4. Form a reference document for the rock stability analysis that has to be carried out as a part of the design works parallel to the site investigations. While there is no unique or single rock mechanics property or condition that would render the performance of a nuclear waste repository unacceptable, certain conditions can be treated as negative factors. Outlined below are major rock mechanics issues that should be addressed during the siting, construction and closure of a nuclear waste repository in Sweden in hard crystalline rock. During the site investigations phase, rock mechanics information will be predominately gathered from examination and testing of the rock core and mapping of the

  18. Finite-element modeling of magma chamber-host rock interactions prior to caldera collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabele, Petr; Žák, Jiří; Somr, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Gravity-driven failure of shallow magma chamber roofs and formation of collapse calderas are commonly accompanied by ejection of large volumes of pyroclastic material to the Earth's atmosphere and thus represent severe volcanic hazards. In this respect, numerical analysis has proven as a key tool in understanding the mechanical conditions of caldera collapse. The main objective of this paper is to find a suitable approach to finite-element simulation of roof fracturing and caldera collapse during inflation and subsequent deflation of shallow magma chambers. Such a model should capture the dominant mechanical phenomena, for example, interaction of the host rock with magma and progressive deformation of the chamber roof. To this end, a comparative study, which involves various representations of magma (inviscid fluid, nearly incompressible elastic, or plastic solid) and constitutive models of the host rock (fracture and plasticity), was carried out. In particular, the quasi-brittle fracture model of host rock reproduced well the formation of tension-induced radial and circumferential fractures during magma injection into the chamber (inflation stage), especially at shallow crustal levels. Conversely, the Mohr-Coulomb shear criterion has shown to be more appropriate for greater depths. Subsequent magma withdrawal from the chamber (deflation stage) results in further damage or even collapse of the chamber roof. While most of the previous studies of caldera collapse rely on the elastic stress analysis, the proposed approach advances modeling of the process by incorporating non-linear failure phenomena and nearly incompressible behaviour of magma. This leads to a perhaps more realistic representation of the fracture processes preceding roof collapse and caldera formation.

  19. Review of Studies of Clay Minerals as Significant Component of Potential Host Rocks or Engineering Barriers for Radioactive Waste Disposals Performed at Comenius University in Bratislava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, Uhlik; Vladimir, Sucha; Maria, Caplovicova; Igor, Stricek

    2013-01-01

    About 50 % of electric power is produced by nuclear power plants in Slovakia. In spite of the significant production of nuclear waste, Slovakia has not defined basic strategy of radioactive-waste isolation. However, some pilot projects and studies have been carried out. Five areas were determined as prospective sites for construction of deep geological repository (DGR). Two of them are situated in the south of Slovakia. Szecseny schlier (mixture of siltstones and Clay-stones) of Lucenec Formation (Egerian) is one of the most prospective host rocks from lithological, structural and spatial perspective. Besides the investigation of potential host rock for DGR the studies of bentonite properties as important part of engineering barriers for radioactive waste disposals were performed. Detailed mineral and structural analyses of smectites from the bentonitic material exposed to laboratory Mock-Up test were realised. Particular interest has been focused on interaction between Fe and smectites. Other field of interest is investigation of sorption of Cs and Sr on natural and modified bentonites, including irradiation. Purpose of this work is to present a short review of other studies done by our group with partial focusing to interaction of organic dye (Rhoda-mine 6G) with smectite that is connected with changes of layer charge after treatment; possibilities to measure preferential orientation of clays after compaction by TEM and to effort to use X-ray micro-tomography for inner structure of sediments. (authors)

  20. Comparison of the intermediate storage periods and areas required for final storage of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel in various types of host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Hoeppe, N.; Lerch, C.; Jobmann, M.; Filbert, W.

    2005-01-01

    The present new version of the German concept for radioactive waste and spent fuel management is based on the assumption that a repository for high-level waste and spent fuel will not be required until 2030. One reason frequently given for this date is the intermediate storage period of at least forty years to allow the very high initial heat generation to decay. However, calculations performed by the authors have shown that the minimum intermediate storage period for a repository in rock salt is only between four and nineteen years, depending on the final storage concept and the load of the waste package. In clay as a host rock, the minimum intermediate storage times were calculated to be between 31 and 142 years; the same time spans are expected to apply to final storage in magmatic rock, such as granite. The maximum permissible loads of a container holding spent fuel in salt are many times those in clay and granite, respectively. It was also seen that the area requirement for final storage of the same waste structures is roughly a factor of ten higher in clay than in salt. The differences between granite and salt are similar. The reasons for these grave differences, on the one hand, are the better thermal conductivity of salt and, on the other hand, the better heat tolerance of the crushed salt used as backfill material compared to that of bentonite used in the clay and granite concepts. While salt will allow temperatures of up to 200 C, the maximum temperature in bentonite is limited to 100 C. (orig.)

  1. Educational and Community Outreach Efforts by the United States Polar Rock Repository during the International Polar Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, A.; Codispoti, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    The US Polar Rock Repository (USPRR) houses more than 19,000 rock samples from polar regions and these samples are made available to the scientific, educational and museum community. The USPRR has been active in promoting polar earth science to educational and community groups. During the past year, outreach efforts reached over 12,000 people. The USPRR outreach involve tours of the facility, school presentations, online laboratory exercises, working with the Columbus Metro Parks, teaching at summer camps, teaching special geology field assignments at the middle school level, as well as offering an ‘Antarctic Rock Box’ that contains representative samples of the three types of rocks, minerals, fossils, and books and activities about geology and Antarctica. The rock box activities have been designed and reviewed by educators and scientists to use as an educational supplement to the Earth Science course of study. The activities have been designed around the Academic Content Standards: k-12 Science manual published by the Ohio Department of Education to ensure that the activities and topics are focused on those mandated by the state of Ohio. The USPRR website has a Virtual Web Antarctic Expedition with many activities for Middle to High School age students. The students learn about how to plan a field season, safety techniques, how to make a remote field camp, identify what equipment is needed, learn about the different transportation choices, weather issues, understanding GPS, etc. Educational and community networks have been built in part, by directly contacting individuals at an institution and partnering with them on educational outreach. The institutions have been very interested in doing this because it brings scientists to the classroom and to the public. This type of outreach has also served as an opening for children to consider possible career choices in science that they may not have considered before. In many of the presentations, a female geologist

  2. Probabilistic methods as a tool aiding dimensioning drift and shaft seals for a repository in rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen; Plischke, Elmar; Li, Xiaoshuo [TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Disposal Research (IELF)

    2015-07-01

    For repositories in rock salt, demonstrating the integrity of drift and shaft seals is an indispensable part of the long-term safety case. In this study, probabilistic methods are applied to assess the fictitious abutment length for a shaft seal and the effective permeability of a drift seal (dam), i.e. the integral entity for the whole structure including contact zone and damaged salt zone. For the seal permeability, the question arises how to derive it based on permeability measurements with a limited number of samples due to cost restrictions. Furthermore, it is of interest which conclusions can be derived regarding the minimum length of drift seals if the failure probability should be smaller than e.g. 10{sup -4}. Based on numerical experiments it was demonstrated that small-scale measurements can be upscale using known averaging methods. This suggests that dimensioning can be carried out based on cautions average estimates and the required reliability statement (e.g. about a failure probability smaller than e.g. 10{sup -4}) can be derived for realistic dam lengths. However, due to the limited amount of data available there are remaining uncertainties concerning the underlying model assumptions.

  3. Probabilistic methods as a tool aiding dimensioning drift and shaft seals for a repository in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen; Plischke, Elmar; Li, Xiaoshuo

    2015-01-01

    For repositories in rock salt, demonstrating the integrity of drift and shaft seals is an indispensable part of the long-term safety case. In this study, probabilistic methods are applied to assess the fictitious abutment length for a shaft seal and the effective permeability of a drift seal (dam), i.e. the integral entity for the whole structure including contact zone and damaged salt zone. For the seal permeability, the question arises how to derive it based on permeability measurements with a limited number of samples due to cost restrictions. Furthermore, it is of interest which conclusions can be derived regarding the minimum length of drift seals if the failure probability should be smaller than e.g. 10 -4 . Based on numerical experiments it was demonstrated that small-scale measurements can be upscale using known averaging methods. This suggests that dimensioning can be carried out based on cautions average estimates and the required reliability statement (e.g. about a failure probability smaller than e.g. 10 -4 ) can be derived for realistic dam lengths. However, due to the limited amount of data available there are remaining uncertainties concerning the underlying model assumptions.

  4. The long-term strength and deformation properties of crystalline rock in a high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuokko, T.

    1990-12-01

    The time-dependent phenomena which can affect the strength and deformation properties of hard crystal line rock are clarified. Suitable measuring methods for field conditions are also summarized. The significance of time is evaluated around a shaft in a high level nuclear waste repository. According to the investigation it is generally held that creep and cyclic fatigue are the most important phenomena. They arise from subcritical crack growth which is most affected by stress intensity, chemical environment, temperature, and microstructure. There are many theoretical models, which can be used to analyse creep and cyclic fatigue, but they are defective in describing the triaxial stress condition and strength criteria. Additionally, the required parameters are often too difficult to determine with adequate accuracy. The joint creep rate depends on the affecting stress regime, on the water conditions, and on the properties of filling material. The acoustic emission method is suited to observe long-term microcrack development in field conditions. The computer program developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is used to evaluate the time-dependent de-formation around a main shaft. According to the model the enlargement of the shaft radius by 30 cm takes millions of years. The possible reduction of shaft radius by 3 mm will happen during 200 years. The model is very sensitive to changes in stress state, in the uniaxial compressive strength, and in the stress corrosion index

  5. Modeling transient heat transfer in nuclear waste repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2009-09-30

    The heat of high-level nuclear waste may be generated and released from a canister at final disposal sites. The waste heat may affect the engineering properties of waste canisters, buffers, and backfill material in the emplacement tunnel and the host rock. This study addresses the problem of the heat generated from the waste canister and analyzes the heat distribution between the buffer and the host rock, which is considered as a radial two-layer heat flux problem. A conceptual model is first constructed for the heat conduction in a nuclear waste repository and then mathematical equations are formulated for modeling heat flow distribution at repository sites. The Laplace transforms are employed to develop a solution for the temperature distributions in the buffer and the host rock in the Laplace domain, which is numerically inverted to the time-domain solution using the modified Crump method. The transient temperature distributions for both the single- and multi-borehole cases are simulated in the hypothetical geological repositories of nuclear waste. The results show that the temperature distributions in the thermal field are significantly affected by the decay heat of the waste canister, the thermal properties of the buffer and the host rock, the disposal spacing, and the thickness of the host rock at a nuclear waste repository.

  6. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Javier B; Gimeno, María J; Auqué, Luis F; Acero, Patricia

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water-rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparison study of single and double layer repositories for high level radioactive wastes within a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Choi, Jong Won; Bae, Dae Suk

    2004-02-01

    The present study is to analyze and compare a long term thermohydro mechanical interaction behavior of a single layer and a double layer repository for high level radioactive wastes within a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass, and then to contribute this understanding to the development of a Korean disposal concept. The model includes a saturated and discontinuous granitic rock mass, PWR spent nuclear fuel in a disposal canister surrounded by compacted bentonite inside a deposition hole, and mixed bentonite backfilled in the rest of the space within a repository cavern. It is assumed that two joint sets exist within the model. Joint set 1 includes joints of 56 .deg. dip angle, spaced at 20 m, and joint set 2 is in the perpendicular direction to joint set 1 and includes joints of .deg. dip angle, spaced at 20 m. The two dimensional distinct element code, UDEC is used for the analysis. To understand the joint behavior adjacent to the repository cavern, Barton-Bandis joint model is used. Effect of the decay heat from PWR spent fuels on the repository model has been analyzed, and a steady state flow algorithm is used for the hydraulic analysis

  8. Accumulated energy determination in salts rocks irradiated by means of thermoluminescence techniques: application to the high level radioactive wastes repositories analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dies, J.; Ortega. J.; Tarrasa. F.; Cuevas, C.

    1995-01-01

    The report summarizes the study carried out to develop the radiation effects on salt rocks in order to repository the high level radioactive wastes. The study is structured into 3 main aspects: 1.- Analysis of irradiation experiences in Haw project of Pet ten reactor. 2.- Irradiation of salt sample of CESAR industrial irradiator. 3.- Correlation study between the accumulated energy, termoluminescence answer and the defect concentration

  9. Effects of Host-rock Fracturing on Elastic-deformation Source Models of Volcano Deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holohan, Eoghan P; Sudhaus, Henriette; Walter, Thomas R; Schöpfer, Martin P J; Walsh, John J

    2017-09-08

    Volcanoes commonly inflate or deflate during episodes of unrest or eruption. Continuum mechanics models that assume linear elastic deformation of the Earth's crust are routinely used to invert the observed ground motions. The source(s) of deformation in such models are generally interpreted in terms of magma bodies or pathways, and thus form a basis for hazard assessment and mitigation. Using discontinuum mechanics models, we show how host-rock fracturing (i.e. non-elastic deformation) during drainage of a magma body can progressively change the shape and depth of an elastic-deformation source. We argue that this effect explains the marked spatio-temporal changes in source model attributes inferred for the March-April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Reunion. We find that pronounced deflation-related host-rock fracturing can: (1) yield inclined source model geometries for a horizontal magma body; (2) cause significant upward migration of an elastic-deformation source, leading to underestimation of the true magma body depth and potentially to a misinterpretation of ascending magma; and (3) at least partly explain underestimation by elastic-deformation sources of changes in sub-surface magma volume.

  10. The Rock Characterization Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.

    1994-01-01

    In 1989, UK Nirex began a programme of surface-based characterization of the geology and hydrogeology of a site at Sellafield to evaluate its suitability to host a deep repository for radioactive waste. The next major stage in site characterization will be the construction and operation of a Rock Characterization Facility (RCF). It will be designed to provide rock characterization information and scope for model validation to permit firmer assessment of long-term safety. It will also provide information needed to decide the detailed location, design and orientation of a repository and to inform repository construction methods. A three-phase programme is planned for the RCF. During each phase, testwork will steadily improve our geological, hydrogeological and geotechnical understanding of the site. The first phase will involve sinking two shafts. That will be preceded by the establishment of a network of monitoring boreholes to ensure that the impact of shaft sinking can be measured. This will provide valuable data for model validation. In phase two, initial galleries will be excavated, probably at a depth of 650 m below Ordnance datum, which will host a comprehensive suite of experiments. These galleries will be extended in phase three to permit access to most of the rock volume that would host the repository. (Author)

  11. Repository design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C M

    1982-01-01

    Various technical issues of radioactive waste design are addressed in this paper. Two approaches to repository design considered herein are: (1) design to minimize the disturbance of the hot rock; and (2) designs that intentionally modify the hot rock to insure better containment of the wastes. The latter designs range from construction of a highly impermeable barrier around a spherical cavern to creating a matrix of tunnels and boreholes to form a cage within which the hydraulic pressure is nearly constant. Examples of these design alternatives are described in some detail. It is concluded that proposed designs for repositories illustrate that performance criteria considered acceptable for such facilities can be met by appropriate site selection and repository engineering. With these technically feasible design concepts, it is also felt that socioeconomic and institutional issues can be better resolved. (BLM)

  12. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, Javier B.; Gimeno, María J.; Auqué, Luis F.; Acero, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water–rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations. - Highlights: • Laxemar (Sweden) groundwater is the combined result

  13. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Javier B., E-mail: jgomez@unizar.es; Gimeno, María J., E-mail: mjgimeno@unizar.es; Auqué, Luis F., E-mail: lauque@unizar.es; Acero, Patricia, E-mail: patriace@unizar.es

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water–rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations. - Highlights: • Laxemar (Sweden) groundwater is the combined result

  14. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Implications of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupling on the Near-Field Safety of a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Homogeneous Rock Mass. Report of BMT1B/WP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.

    2005-02-01

    saturated nature of the buffer/backfill in different ways. For the generic repository design considered in BMT1B, only the fully THM analysis predicts some localized rock mass failure around the boreholes, which might in turn result in a zone of higher permeability. Other important effects of THM and HM coupling would be on the stress developed in the buffer, which would be transferred to the canister and influence its stability. From a safety point of view, engineering measures could be easily carried out to minimize these effects. From the results of the present work, it appears that from a technical point of view the effect of coupling will be either short lived (several decades to 100 years) and would not impact on long term (thousands to hundred of thousand years) safety issues, or could be rectified by adequate design and operation methodology (e.g. avoid over-cooling the galleries). The influence of the host rock properties (e.g. permeability) on the long-term safety seems to be much more important than coupling, since one has much less control over these properties. However, for confidence building and demonstration purposes, a fully coupled approach is necessary to interpret monitoring data that would be collected in the first few decades after repository closure, since coupled processes would prevail during that period of time

  15. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Implications of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupling on the Near-Field Safety of a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Homogeneous Rock Mass. Report of BMT1B/WP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology; Nguyen, T.S. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] (eds.)

    2005-02-15

    the variably saturated nature of the buffer/backfill in different ways. For the generic repository design considered in BMT1B, only the fully THM analysis predicts some localized rock mass failure around the boreholes, which might in turn result in a zone of higher permeability. Other important effects of THM and HM coupling would be on the stress developed in the buffer, which would be transferred to the canister and influence its stability. From a safety point of view, engineering measures could be easily carried out to minimize these effects. From the results of the present work, it appears that from a technical point of view the effect of coupling will be either short lived (several decades to 100 years) and would not impact on long term (thousands to hundred of thousand years) safety issues, or could be rectified by adequate design and operation methodology (e.g. avoid over-cooling the galleries). The influence of the host rock properties (e.g. permeability) on the long-term safety seems to be much more important than coupling, since one has much less control over these properties. However, for confidence building and demonstration purposes, a fully coupled approach is necessary to interpret monitoring data that would be collected in the first few decades after repository closure, since coupled processes would prevail during that period of time.

  16. Ground deformation at collapse calderas: influence of host rock lithology and reservoir multiplicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, A; Gottsmann, J [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, BS8 1RJ, Bristol (United Kingdom)], E-mail: A.GeverTraver@bristol.ac.uk

    2008-10-01

    A variety of source mechanisms have been proposed to account for observed caldera deformation. Here we present a systematic set of new results from numerical forward modelling using a Finite Element Method. which provides a link between measured ground deformation and the inaccessible deformation source. We simulate surface displacements due to pressure changes in a shallow oblate reservoir overlain by host rock with variable mechanical properties. We find that the amplitude and wavelength of resultant ground deformation is dependent on the distribution of mechanically stiff and soft lithologies and their relative distribution above a reservoir. In addition, we note an influence of layering on the critical ratio of horizontal over vertical displacements, a criterion employed to discriminate between different finite source geometries.

  17. Site investigations, design, construction, operation, shutdown and surveillance of repositories for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in rock cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The report provides an overview and technical guidelines for considerations and for activities to be undertaken for safety assessment, site investigations, design, construction, operation, shutdown and surveillance of repositories for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in rock cavities. A generalized sequence of investigations is introduced which proceeds through region and site selection to the stage where the site is confirmed by detailed geoscientific investigations as being suitable for a waste repository. The different procedures and somewhat specific investigative needs with respect to existing mines are dealt with separately. General design, as well as specific requirements with respect to the different stages of design and construction, are dealt with. A review of activities related to the operational and post-operational stages of repositories in rock cavities is presented. The report describes in general terms the procedures related to different stages of disposal operation; also the conditions for shutdown together with essential shutdown and sealing activities and the related safety assessment requirements. Guidance is also given on the surveillance programme which will allow for inspection, testing, maintenance and security of a disposal facility during the operational phase, as well as for the post-operational stage for periods determined as necessary by the national authorities

  18. Low temperature geomicrobiology follows host rock composition along a geochemical gradient in Lau Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B Sylvan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR comprise a ridge segment in the southwest Pacific Ocean where rapid transitions in the underlying mantle chemistry manifest themselves as gradients in seafloor rock geochemistry. We studied the geology and microbial diversity of three silicate rock samples and three inactive sulfide chimney samples collected, from north to south, at the vent fields Kilo Moana, ABE, Tui Malila and Mariner. This is the first study of microbial populations on basaltic andesite, which was sampled at Mariner vent field. Silicate rock geochemistry exhibits clear latitudinal trends that are mirrored by changes in bacterial community composition. α-proteobacteria, ε-proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes are most common on a silicate collected from Kilo Moana and their proportions decrease linearly on silicates collected further south. Conversely, a silicate from Mariner vent field hosts high proportions of a unique lineage of Chloroflexi unrelated (<90% sequence similarity to previously recovered environmental clones or isolates, which decrease at ABE and are absent at Kilo Moana. The exteriors of inactive sulfide structures are dominated by lineages of sulfur oxidizing α-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and ε-proteobacteria while the interior of one chimney is dominated by putative sulfur-reducing δ-proteobacteria. A comparison of bacterial communities on inactive sulfides from this and previous studies reveals the presence of a clade of uncultured Bacteroidetes exclusive to sulfidic environments, and a high degree of heterogeneity in bacterial community composition from one sulfide structure to another. In light of the heterogeneous nature of bacterial communities observed here and in previous studies of both active and inactive hydrothermal sulfide structures, the presence of numerous niches may be detected on these structures in the future by finer scale sampling and analysis.

  19. 10 CFR 960.3-1-2 - Diversity of rock types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diversity of rock types. 960.3-1-2 Section 960.3-1-2... NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-1-2 Diversity of rock types. Consideration... sites for characterization shall have different types of host rock. ...

  20. Basic feature of host rock and its relation to the formation of leachable sandstone type uranium deposit in Shihongtan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Zhigao; Zhang Jiamin; Ji Haijun; Sun Yanhuan; Zhang Fa

    2012-01-01

    Basic feature of sedimentology and petrology and lithogeochemistry of middle Jurassic Xishanyao formation were discussed for Shihongtan uranium deposit in the paper. The relation between host rock and ore formation was analysed. It is indicated that the formation of Shihongtan uranium deposit de-ponds on the following host features in sedimentology, petrology, lithogeochemistry and the intense oxidized epigenetic alteration under hot dry climate condition during the formation of peneplain caused by the slow tilting uplift. (authors)

  1. Investigations of possibilities to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in Lithuania: a model case. Volume 3, Generic Safety Assessment of Repository in Crystalline Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motiejunas, S.; Poskas, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this Volume a generic safety assessment of the repository for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rock in Lithuania is presented. Modeling of safety relevant radionuclide release from the defected canister and their transport through the near field and far field was performed. Doses to humans due to released radionuclides in the well water were calculated and compared with the dose restrictions existing in Lithuania. For this stage of generic safety assessment only two scenarios were chosen: base scenario and canister defect scenario. KBS-3 concept developed by SKB for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden was chosen as prototype for repository in crystalline basement in Lithuania. The KBS-3H design with horizontal canister emplacement is proposed as a reference design for Lithuania

  2. 10 CFR 960.4-2-3 - Rock characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Postclosure Guidelines § 960.4-2-3 Rock characteristics. (a) Qualifying condition. The present and... the waste could significantly decrease the isolation provided by the host rock as compared with pre...

  3. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype repository. Analyses of microorganisms, gases, and water chemistry in buffer and backfill, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydmark, Sara

    2011-06-01

    The prototype repository (hereafter, 'Prototype') is an international project to build and study a fullscale model of the planned Swedish final repository for spent nuclear fuel. However, the Prototype differs from a real storage in that it is drained, which makes the swelling pressure lower in the Prototype than in a real storage facility. The heat from the radioactive decay is simulated by electrical heaters. The project is being conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 450 m. A monitoring programme is investigating the evolution of the water chemistry, gas, and microbial activity at the site, and a specific aim is to monitor the microbial consumption of oxygen in situ in the Prototype. This document describes the results of the analyses of microbes, gases, and chemistry inside the Prototype in 2010. Hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, and ethene were analysed at the following sampling points in the Prototype: KBU10001, KBU10002, KBU10004, KBU10008, and KFA04. Where the sampling points in the Prototype delivered pore water, the water was analysed for amount of ATP (i.e. the biovolume), culturable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (CHAB), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). The pore water collected from the Prototype was subject to as many chemical analyses as the amount of water allowed. Chemical analyses were also performed on pore water from two additional sampling points, KBU10005 and KBU10006. Chemical data from a previous investigation of the groundwater outside the Prototype were compared with the pore water chemistry. The improved sampling and analysis protocols introduced in 2007 worked very well. The International Progress Report (IPR) 08-01 (Eriksson 2008) revealed that many of the hydrochemical sampling points differ greatly from each other. The 16 sampling points were therefore

  4. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype repository. Analyses of microorganisms, gases, and water chemistry in buffer and backfill, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2011-06-15

    The prototype repository (hereafter, 'Prototype') is an international project to build and study a fullscale model of the planned Swedish final repository for spent nuclear fuel. However, the Prototype differs from a real storage in that it is drained, which makes the swelling pressure lower in the Prototype than in a real storage facility. The heat from the radioactive decay is simulated by electrical heaters. The project is being conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 450 m. A monitoring programme is investigating the evolution of the water chemistry, gas, and microbial activity at the site, and a specific aim is to monitor the microbial consumption of oxygen in situ in the Prototype. This document describes the results of the analyses of microbes, gases, and chemistry inside the Prototype in 2010. Hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, and ethene were analysed at the following sampling points in the Prototype: KBU10001, KBU10002, KBU10004, KBU10008, and KFA04. Where the sampling points in the Prototype delivered pore water, the water was analysed for amount of ATP (i.e. the biovolume), culturable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (CHAB), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). The pore water collected from the Prototype was subject to as many chemical analyses as the amount of water allowed. Chemical analyses were also performed on pore water from two additional sampling points, KBU10005 and KBU10006. Chemical data from a previous investigation of the groundwater outside the Prototype were compared with the pore water chemistry. The improved sampling and analysis protocols introduced in 2007 worked very well. The International Progress Report (IPR) 08-01 (Eriksson 2008) revealed that many of the hydrochemical sampling points differ greatly from each other. The 16 sampling points were

  5. Preliminary environmental assessments of disposal of rock mined during excavation of a federal repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Since the environmental impact of mined rock handling will be dependent not only upon the nature of the material and the way in which it might be disposed but also upon the features of the disposal site area and surroundings, it was necessary to select ''reference environmental locii'' within the regions of geological interest to typify the environmental setting into which the rock would be placed. Reference locii (locations) were developed for consideration of the environmental implications of mined rock from: bedded rock salt from the Salina region, bedded rock salt from the Permian region, dome rock salt from the Gulf Interior region, Pierre shale from the Argillaceous region, granite from the crystalline rock region, volcanic basalt rock from the crystalline ash region, and carbonate rock from the limestone region. Each of these reference locii was examined with respect to those demographic, geographic, physical and ecological attributes which might be impacted by various mined rock disposal alternatives. Alternatives considered included: onsite surface storage, industrial or commercial use, offsite disposal, and environmental blending. Potential impact assessment consists of a qualitative look at the environmental implications of various alternatives for handling the mined rock, given baseline characteristics of an area typified by those represented by the ''reference locus''

  6. Post-closure resaturation of a deep radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, I.C.S.; Rodwell, W.R.

    1989-03-01

    The post-closure resaturation of a deep radioactive waste repository has been modelled for a number of generic disposal concepts. A combination of numerical ground water flow simulations and analytical calculations has been used to investigate the variation of repository fluid pressure and degree of water saturation with time, and to determine the factors influencing resaturation times. The host rock permeability was found to be the most important determining factor. For geological environments regarded as likely for a waste repository, resaturation is predicted to be a short term process compared with gas generation and contaminant migration timescales. (author)

  7. Hydrologic issues in repository siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remson, I.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Extrapolation of Darcy's law to the transport of water an solutes in unfractured poorly permeable rocks being studied for nuclear waste disposal is questioned. The hydrologic literature includes numerous references to both non-Darcian flow in dense materials devoid of macrofractures and microfractures and to threshold gradients below which no flow occurs. For such situations to occur, the pore-size range must be small enough so that all pore water is sufficiently close to mineral surfaces to be affected by the surficial forces. Then the flow will be non-Newtonian and non-Darcian, and solute transport will be by molecular diffusion. If fluid transport in very dense unfractured rocks is non-Darcian, useful methods of testing candidate host rocks become apparent. In situ nondestructive pressure testing of canister waste emplacement boreholes in a mined repository can verify the absence of both fracture flow and Darcian flow. 18 references

  8. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeast United States-Southern Piedmont subregion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    A literature study was conducted on the geology of the Southern Piedmont province in the states of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The purpose was to identify geologic areas potentially suitable for containment of a repository for the long-term isolation of solidified radioactive waste. The crystalline rocks of the Southern Piedmont province range in age from Precambrian to Paleozoic, and are predominantly slates, phyllites, argillites, schists, metavolcanics, gneisses, gabbros, and granites. These rock units were classified as either favorable, potentially favorable, or unfavorable as potential study areas based on an evaluation of the geologic, hydrologic, and geotechnical characteristics. No socio-economic factors were considered. Rocks subjected to multiple periods of deformation and metamorphism, or described as highly fractured, or of limited areal extent were generally ranked as unfavorable. Potentially favorable rocks are primarily the high-grade metamorphic gneisses and granites. Sixteen areas were classified as being favorable for additional study. These areas are primarily large igneous granite plutons as follows: the Petersburg granite in Virginia; the Rolesville-Castallia, Churchland, and Landis plutons in North Carolina; the Liberty Hill, Winnsboro, and Ogden plutons in South Carolina; and the Siloam, Elberton, and six unnamed granite plutons in Georgia

  9. Design aspects of the Alpha Repository: III. Uniaxial quasi-static and creep properties of the site rock. Technical memorandum report RSI-0029

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.D.; Gnirk, P.F.

    1975-01-01

    Candidate mining horizons for the Alpha Repository have been tentatively selected at depths of 1,900, 2,100, and 2,700 ft in the massive salt formations underlying Eddy and Lea counties in New Mexico. The rock salt in the mining horizon at 1,900 ft exhibits average tensile and uniaxial compressive strengths of 200 and 2,445 psi, while the rock salt in the 2,700 ft horizon is 20 to 35 percent stronger. The elastic constants were essentially identical for the two horizons, with an average Young's modulus of 1.94 x 10 6 psi and a Poisson's ratio of 0.33 to 0.34. The anhydrite exhibits tensile and uniaxial compressive strengths of 830 and 13,085 psi, and its Poisson's ratio is 0.35, essentially the same as for rock salt, but its Young's modulus is 10.2 x 10 6 psi, five times greater than that of rock salt. In general, rock salt exhibits a type of bilinear stress-strain curve, with a discontinuity in slope occurring at about 750 psi. Rock salt appears to fail by crushing, rather than in an abrupt ''brittle fracture'' fashion. Anhydrite exhibits a linear stress-strain relationship, with abrupt and distinct failure at the level required for rupture. Uniaxial creep tests were performed on specimens from the 1,900 ft and 2,700 ft horizons using stress levels of 750 and 1,500 psi from 30 to over 200 hours. Results indicate that, for a constant stress level, strain is a function of time to the power of 0.20 to 0.24 and strain appears to be a nonlinear function of the deviatoric stress. Neither steady-state nor tertiary creep was observed

  10. How many geologic repositories will be needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.J.; Halstead, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    DOE's postponement of site-specific work on the second repository program had rekindled debate over the number of geologic repositories needed for disposal of high level radioactive waste. The multiple repository approach grew out of the March, 1979 IRG report, which recommended co-disposal of civilian and defense HLW in a system of regional repositories. The multiple repository approach was adopted by DOE, and incorporated in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act passed by Congress in December, 1982. Since the late 1970's, the slower than anticipated growth of the nuclear power industry has substantially reduced earlier estimates of the amount of civilian spent fuel which will require geologic disposal. Reactors currently in operation (78.5 GWe) and reactors in the construction pipeline (28 GWe) are expected to discharge about 103,200 MTU of spent fuel by the year 2036, assuming no increase in fuel burnup rate. By the year 2020, defense high level radioactive wastes equivalent to as much as 27,000 MTU could require geologic disposal. Small amounts of high level waste from other sources will also require geologic disposal. Total disposal requirements appear to be less than 140,000 MTU. The five sites nominated for the first repository, as well as hypothetical sites in granite, the host rock under primary consideration for the second repository, all appear capable of accommodating up to 140,000 MTU

  11. Analysis of the geological stability of a hypothetical radioactive waste repository in a bedded salt formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, M.S.; Lusso, F.; Shaw, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    This document reports on the development of mathematical models used in preliminary studies of the long-term safety of radioactive wastes deeply buried in bedded salt formations. Two analytical approaches to estimating the geological stability of a waste repository in bedded salt are described: (a) use of probabilistic models to estimate the a priori likelihoods of release of radionuclides from the repository through certain idealized natural and anthropogenic causes, and (b) a numerical simulation of certain feedback effects of emplacement of waste materials upon ground-water access to the repository's host rocks. These models are applied to an idealized waste repository for the sake of illustration

  12. Mont Terri Project - Heater experiment : rock and bentonite thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the near field of a thermal source for development of deep underground high level radioactive waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, I.; Alheid, H.-J.; Kaufhold, St.; Naumann, M.; Pletsch, Th.; Plischke, I.; Schnier, H.; Schuster, K.; Sprado, K. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Meyer, T.; Miehe, R.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Mayor, J.C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J.; Rey, M. [Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales (AITEMIN), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, E.; Lloret, A.; Munoz, J.J. [Centre Internacional de Metodos Numerics en Ingenyeria (CIMNE), Barcelona (Spain); Weber, H. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen (Switzerland); Ploetze, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich, Institut fuer Geotechnik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Klubertanz, G. [Colenco Power Engineering Ltd, Baden (Switzerland); Ammon, Ch. [Rothpletz Lienhard und Cie AG, Aarau (Switzerland); Graf, A.; Nussbaum, Ch.; Zingg, A. [Goetechnical Institute Ltd, Saint-Ursanne (Switzerland); Bossart, P. [Federal Office of Topography (swisstopo), Wabern (Switzerland); Buehler, Ch.; Kech, M.; Trick, Th. [Solexperts AG, Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Emmerich, K. [ITC-WGT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fernandez, A. M. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The long-term safety of underground permanent repositories for radioactive waste relies on a combination of several engineered and geological barriers. The interactions between a host rock formation of the type 'Opalinus Clay' and an engineered barrier of the type 'bentonite buffer' are observed in the Heater Experiment (HE) during a hydration and a heating phase. The objective of the experiment is an improved understanding of the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in a host rock-buffer system achieved by experimental observations as well as numerical modelling. The basic objectives are in detail: a) Long-term monitoring in the vicinity of the heater during hydration and heating; especially observation and study of coupled THM processes in the near field, i.e. continuous measurements of temperatures, pore pressures, displacements, electric conductivity, and analysis of the gases and water released into the rock by effect of heating; b) Determination of the properties of barrier and host rock done mainly by laboratory and in situ experiments, i.e. general mechanical and mineralogical properties, mechanical state in-situ, and changes induced by the experiment; c) Study of the interaction between host rock and bentonite buffer as well as validation and refinement of existing tools for modelling THM processes; d) Study of the behaviour and reliability of instrumentation and measuring techniques, i.e. inspection of sensors after dismantling the experimental setting. To achieve the objectives, the experiment was accompanied by an extensive programme of continuous monitoring, experimental investigations on-site as well as in laboratories, and numerical modelling of the coupled THM processes. Finally, the experiment was dismantled to provide laboratory specimens of post-heating buffer and host rock material. The continuous monitoring of the experiment by a multitude of sensors (for temperature, pore pressure, total pressure, relative

  13. Microbial Influence on the Performance of Subsurface, Salt-Based Radioactive Waste Repositories. An Evaluation Based on Microbial Ecology, Bioenergetics and Projected Repository Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, J.S.; Reed, D.T.; Cherkouk, A.; Arnold, T.; Meleshyn, A.; Patterson, Russ

    2018-01-01

    For the past several decades, the Nuclear Energy Agency Salt Club has been supporting and overseeing the characterisation of rock salt as a potential host rock for deep geological repositories. This extensive evaluation of deep geological settings is aimed at determining - through a multidisciplinary approach - whether specific sites are suitable for radioactive waste disposal. Studying the microbiology of granite, basalt, tuff, and clay formations in both Europe and the United States has been an important part of this investigation, and much has been learnt about the potential influence of microorganisms on repository performance, as well as about deep subsurface microbiology in general. Some uncertainty remains, however, around the effects of microorganisms on salt-based repository performance. Using available information on the microbial ecology of hyper-saline environments, the bioenergetics of survival under high ionic strength conditions and studies related to repository microbiology, this report summarises the potential role of microorganisms in salt-based radioactive waste repositories

  14. Study on high-resolution sequence stratigraphy framework of uranium-hosting rock series in Qianjiadian sag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fanghong; Zhang Mingyu

    2005-01-01

    The ore-hosting Yaojia Formation is composed of a set of braided stream medium-fine grained sediments. Guided by the basic theory of high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, and based on the core observation, the analysis of chemical composition of rocks, and data of natural potential logging and apparent resistivity logging, the authors have set up the high-resolution sequence stratigraphy framework of the ore-hosting Yaojia Formation, and discussed the relation of the stratigraphic structure of the middle cycle, as well as the paleotopography, the micro-facies to the formation of uranium deposit. (authors)

  15. Physical properties of uranium host rocks and experimental drilling at Long Park, Montrose County, Colorado. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manger, G.E.; Gates, G.L.; Cadigan, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A core-drilling study in uranium host rocks of the Jurassic Morrison Formation in southwestern Colorado attempted to obtain samples of host rock in its natural state. Three holes were drilled, holes and core were logged for radioactivity and electrical properties. Samples were analyzed for physical and chemical properties. Drilling results suggest that drilling with dried air yields core with least contamination at least cost. Drilling with oil results in maximum core recovery but also maximum cost and significant core contamination. Drilling with water results in contamination and loss of original pore water. A factor group of variables present are: Those positively related to uranium mineralization are poor sorting, percent by weight clay, percent of pore space containing water; negatively related variables are median grain size (mm), electrical resistivity, permeability. Optimum depth to locate ore seems to be at the top of the pore water capillary circulation zone, below the dehydrated no-capillary-circulation zone

  16. Radioactive waste repository study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This is the second part of a report of a preliminary study for AECL. It considers the requirements for an underground waste repository for the disposal of wastes produced by the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Program. The following topics are discussed with reference to the repository: 1) geotechnical assessment, 2) hydrogeology and waste containment, 3) thermal loading and 4) rock mechanics. (author)

  17. Self-sealing of rock fractures. A possibility around the repositories of high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigira, Masahiro; Nakata, Eiji

    1995-01-01

    To the goal of the safe geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), we must provide long-term confidence for the isolation of HLW in various ways. In particular, groundwater flow, the most likely transport media of radioactive nuclides from HLW, must be restricted around a repository for long time. For that purpose, grouting techniques using cement, bentonite, or other materials have been studied in many countries. In this paper we report the results of a series of experiments on silica precipitation behavior in a flow path with negative temperature gradients in granite and also describe a natural example of hydrothermal alteration of diatomite intruded by andesite. Based on these, we will discuss the possibility of self-sealing around HLW repository. (J.P.N.)

  18. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeast United States: Southeastern Coastal Plain Subregion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    A literature review was made of the geological characteristics of the Southeastern Coastal Plain physiograhic province in the states of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The purpose of this study was to identify candidate exploration areas for the possible location of a mined repository for the storage of radioactive waste in the argillaceous sedimentary rocks of the Coastal Plain. Candidate areas were selected on the basis of geological characteristics, available subsurface data, and generally accepted requirements for waste isolation developed by previous studies. Factors considered in the evaluation include the stratigraphy and lithology, geologic history, structure, seismicity, hydrogeology, and natural resources of the candidate area. Unlike other potential regions, the Southeastern Coastal Plain is not composed of competent rock, but consists primarily of unconsolidated and water-saturated sediments overlying a basement of crystalline and metavolcanic rocks. Thus, construction of both shafts and tunnels to depths of approx. 1000 meters may encounter difficulties. Socio-economic and construction considerations have not been addressed in the evaluation. Based on the applied criteria, four areas were selected as being most favorable for future field investigation. These include one in Maryland, one in North Carolina, and two in Georgia

  19. Mechanical behavior of host rock close to H.L.W. disposal cavities in a deep granitic formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoorelbeke, J.M.; Dourthe, M.

    1986-01-01

    The construction of a H.L.W. repository in a deep granitic formation creates mechanical disturbances in the rock on the scale of the massif and in the nearfield. Amongst all the disturbances noted in the nearfield, this study is concerned with examining the evolution of stresses linked with the excavation of the rock and the rise in temperature in the proximity of the waste packages. Several linear elasticity calculations were made using on the one hand finite element models and on the other simple analytical models. These calculations concern two different storage concepts - in room concept and in floor concept- whose differences in mechanical behavior are analyzed. A study of sensitivity with regard to the characteristics of the rock and to the initial geostatic stresses is presented. The comparison of the calculated stresses with three-dimensional failure criteria gives a clear indication of the satisfactory behavior of granite for final storage. However, the need for experimental study and complementary calculation must be emphasized

  20. Life in a rock pool: Radiation and population genetics of myxozoan parasites in hosts inhabiting restricted spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Lövy, Alena; Reed, Cecile C; Lisnerová, Martina; Tomková, Tereza; Holzer, Astrid S; Fiala, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Intertidal rock pools where fish and invertebrates are in constant close contact due to limited space and water level fluctuations represent ideal conditions to promote life cycles in parasites using these two alternate hosts and to study speciation processes that could contribute to understanding the roles of parasitic species in such ecosystems. Gall bladder and liver samples from five clinid fish species (Blenniiformes: Clinidae) were morphologically and molecularly examined to determine the diversity, prevalence, distribution and host specificity of Ceratomyxa parasites (Cnidaria: Myxozoa) in intertidal habitats along the coast of South Africa. Phylogenetic relationships of clinid ceratomyxids based on the SSU rDNA, LSU rDNA and ITS regions were assessed additionally to the investigation of population genetic structure of Ceratomyxa cottoidii and subsequent comparison with the data known from type fish host Clinus cottoides. Seven Ceratomyxa species including previously described Ceratomyxa dehoopi and C. cottoidii were recognized in clinids. They represent a diverse group of rapidly evolving, closely related species with a remarkably high prevalence in their hosts, little host specificity and frequent concurrent infections, most probably as a result of parasite radiation after multiple speciation events triggered by limited host dispersal within restricted spaces. C. cottoidii represents the most common clinid parasite with a population structure characterized by young expanding populations in the south west and south east coast and by older populations in equilibrium on the west coast of its distribution. Parasite and fish host population structures show overlapping patterns and are very likely affected by similar oceanographic barriers possibly due to reduced host dispersal enhancing parasite community differentiation. While fish host specificity had little impact on parasite population structure, the habitat preference of the alternate invertebrate host as

  1. Self-sealing barriers of sand/bentonite-mixtures in a clay repository. SB-experiment in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Czaikowski, Oliver; Hartwig, Lothar; Hellwald, Karsten; Komischke, Michael; Miehe, Ruediger; Zhang, Chun-Liang

    2012-10-01

    Several years ago, GRS performed laboratory investigations on the suitability of clay/mineral mixtures as optimized sealing materials in underground repositories for radioactive wastes /JOC 00/ /MIE 03/. The investigations yielded promising results so that plans were developed for testing the sealing properties of those materials under representative in-situ conditions in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (MTRL). The project was proposed to the ''Projekttraeger Wassertechnologie und Entsorgung (PtWT+E)'', and finally launched in January 2003 under the name SB-project (''Self-sealing Barriers of Clay/Mineral Mixtures in a Clay Repository''). The project was divided in two parts, a pre-project running from January 2003 until June 2004 under contract No. 02E9713 /ROT 04/ and the main project running from January 2004 until June 2012 under contract No. 02E9894 with originally PtWT+E, later renamed as PTKA-WTE. In the course of the pre-project it was decided to incorporate the SB main project as a cost shared action of PtWT+E and the European Commission (contract No. FI6W-CT-2004-508851) into the EC Integrated Project ESDRED (Engineering Studies and Demonstrations of Repository Designs) performed by 11 European project partners within the 6th European framework programme. The ESDRED project was terminated prior to the termination of the SB project. Interim results were reported by mid 2009 in two ESDRED reports /DEB09/ /SEI 09/. This report presents the results achieved in the whole SB-project comprising preceding laboratory investigations for the final selection of suited material mixtures, the conduction of mock-up tests in the geotechnical laboratory of GRS in Braunschweig and the execution of in-situ experiments at the MTRL.

  2. Experimental studies on the migration of radionuclides of the elements I, Sr, Cs, Co and Pd in the roof rock of the projected waste repository at Gorleben

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.; Lang, H.; Moser, H.

    1985-07-01

    The studies were intended to provide information on the sorptive properties of 15 samples of fine-grain and medium-grain sands with regard to the radionuclides of I, Sr, Cs, Co, and Pd, and on their hydraulic properties. The samples were taken from the geologic formations in the area surrounding the projected waste repository in the Gorleben salt mine, at depth of up to 250 m down from terrain surface, and were analysed by means of column and batch experiments. Further goals were to determine the radionuclide migration as a function of flow velocity of the groundwater, and of sand compactness, as well as the effects of carrier ions and main groundwater contituents. The margins of retardation factors for the various radionuclides are given. One important result of the studies is that it could be expeimentally verified that there is the process of quasi irreversible sorption, i.e. it could be shown that desorption of radionuclides from natural, unconsolidated rock proceeds very much slowlier than sorption, so that this finding is of great significance to the safety assessment of a radioactive waste repository in geologic formations. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Siting regions for deep geological repositories. Why just here?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, A.

    2009-09-01

    This report helps to the popularization of the Nagra works accomplished for the management and disposal of the radioactive wastes in Switzerland. The programme for management and disposal of the radioactive wastes are extensively determined by regulations. Protection of mankind and environment is the primary objective. The basic storage process is considered as having been solved. The question addressed in the report is where the facility has to be built; the site selection procedure includes five steps: 1) according to their type the wastes have to be allocated to two different repositories: for low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW), and for high-level and alpha-toxic wastes (HLW); 2) the safety concept for both repositories and the requirements on the geology have to be determined; 3) large suitable geological-tectonic zones must be found where repositories could be built; 4) in these geological zones a suitable host rock has to be identified; 5) the most important spatial geological conditions of the host rock (minimum depth with respect to surface erosion, maximum depth in terms of engineering requirements, lateral extent) have to be identified. Based on these criteria, three suitable siting regions for a HLW repository were found in the North of Switzerland. The preferred host rock is Opalinus clay because of its very low permeability; it is therefore an excellent barrier against nuclide transport. In the three proposed siting regions, Opalinus clay is present in sufficient volumes at a suitable depth. For a L/ILW repository six different possible siting regions were identified, five in Northern Switzerland and one in Central Switzerland. In the three siting regions found for a possible HLW repository, it would also be possible to built a combined repository for both HLW and L/ILW wastes

  4. Measured sections and analyses of uranium host rocks of the Dockum Group, New Mexico and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, R.E.; Drake, D.P.; Reese, T.J.

    1977-02-01

    This report presents 27 measured sections from the Dockum Group of Late Triassic age, in the southern High Plains of eastern New Mexico and northwestern Texas. Many of the measured sections are only partial; the intent in those cases was to measure the parts of sections that had prominent sandstone/conglomerate beds or that had uranium deposits. No attempt was made to relate rock color to a rock color chart; rock colors are therefore approximate. Modal analyses (by thin-section examination) of sandstone and conglomerate samples and gamma-ray spectrometric analyses of the samples are presented in appendices

  5. Rock mechanics evaluation of potential repository sites in the Paradox, Permian, and Gulf Coast Basins: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    Thermal and thermomechanical analyses of a conceptual radioactive waste repository containing commercial and defense high-level wastes and spent fuel have been performing using finite element models. The thermal and thermomechanical responses of the waste package, disposal room, and repository regions were evaluated. four bedded salt formations, in Davis and Lavender Canyons in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah and in Deaf Smith and Swisher counties in the Permian Basin of northwestern Texas, and three salt domes, Vacherie Dome in northwestern Louisiana and Richton and Cypress Creek Domes in southeastern Mississippi, located in the Gulf Coast Basin, were examined. In the Paradox Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was much greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closure was less than 10 percent after 5 years. Surface uplift was nominal, and no significant thermomechanical perturbation of the aquitards was observed. In the Permian Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closures were greater than 10 percent in less than 5 years. Surface uplift was nominal, and no significant thermomechanical perturbation of the aquitards was observed. In the Gulf Coast Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closures were greater than 10 percent in less than 5 years. No significant thermomechanical perturbation of the overlying geology was observed. 40 refs., 153 figs., 32 tabs

  6. Rock deformation in hydrothermal systems: the nature of fractures in plutons and their host rocks. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, D.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this program is to accumulate the types of field data which are important for the analysis of magma-hydrothermal systems. The structural effects of thermal processes were identified in order to distinguish the thermally induced deformations from the deformations that occurred subsequent to complete cooling of the system. Mapping techniques were developed to record the structural data on the ground from local domains characteristic of larger areas in the magma chamber, and in the air from low-angle oblique aerial photography of the entire region. The ground system is complete and preliminary testing is currently being carried out to verify the method. The results indicate that granitic crystalline rocks have no structural resistance to thermal perturbations. If nuclear wastes are to be stored in granite, precautionary buffers would have to be incorporated into the system. A total of 30 fossil magma chambers have been studied over the past 2 years. An extensive set of fracture imagery has been collected, together with information related to the geological history of the plutons. Fossil magma chambers in Arizona, Utah, California, Washington, Montana, and British Columbia have been studied.

  7. Clay shale as host rock. A geomechanical contribution about Opalinus clay; Tonstein als Wirtsgestein. Ein geomechanischer Beitrag ueber Opalinuston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempp, Christof; Menezes, Flora; Sachwitz, Simon [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Saale) (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften und Geographie

    2016-12-15

    The Opalinuston is a prominent rock representing the type of organic clay shales or clay stones within the sequence of Triassic and Jurassic marine sediments in Southern Germany. The rock forms a homogenous unit some ten meters thick. The degree of consolidation of this type of pelitic rock depends mainly on the former load conditions, but is also dependent on the long-term weathering and even on the present exposition. The geomechanical parameters such as shear strength, tensional strength and permeability vary with the state of consolidation and become important when the use is discussed of such rocks for radioactive waste disposal. A tunneling project at the northern escarpment of the Swabian Alb (Southwest Germany) within the Opalinus clay offered the rare opportunity to obtain fresh unweathered rock samples in greater amounts compared to fresh drilling cores from which geomechanical investigations are usually undertaken. Consequently, the results of geomechanical laboratory testings are presented in order to compare here the results of multistep triaxial compression tests, of hydraulic fracturing laboratory tests and of some other tests for rock characterization with the corresponding results of Opalinus clay sites in Switzerland that were investigated by the Swiss Nagra Company for host rock characterization. After a discussion of the relevant state of fresh Opalinus clay, especially of suction pressure conditions and saturation state, the results of triaxial shear tests are presented. Increasing shear deformation at increasing pressure and unchanged water saturation do not result in a significant strength reduction of the Opalinus clay. The rock shows increasing cohesion and stiffness, if multiple loading has repeatedly reached the failure point. Thus there is no increased permeability with continued shearing. Only at the beginning of the shearing process is a temporarily increased permeability to be expected due to dilatation processes. An increased

  8. Basic investigation and analysis for preferred host rocks and natural analogue study area with reference to high level radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Ryul; Park, J. K.; Hwang, D. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yun, H. S.; Kim, D. Y.; Park, H. S.; Koo, S. B.; Cho, J. D.; Kim, K. E. [Korea Inst. of Geology, Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is basic investigation and analysis for preferred host rocks and natural analogue study area to develope underground disposal technique of high level radioactive waste in future. The study has been done for the crystalline rocks(especially granitic rocks) with emphasis of abandoned metallic mines and uranium ore deposits, and for the geological structure study by using gravity and aeromagnetic data. 138 refs., 54 tabs., 130 figs. (author)

  9. Fluid geochemistry associated associated to rocks: preliminary tests om minerals of granite rocks potentially hostess of radioactive waste repository; Geoquimica de fluidos associados a rochas: testes preliminares em minerais de rochas granitoides potencialmente hospedeiras de repositorios de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Lucas E.D.; Rios, Francisco J.; Oliveira, Lucilia A.R. de; Alves, James V.; Fuzikawa, Kazuo; Garcia, Luiz; Ribeiro, Yuri, E-mail: LDAmorim@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Matos, Evandro C. de [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Caetite, BA (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Fluid inclusions (FI) are micro cavities present on crystals and imprison the mineralizer fluids, and are formed during or posterior to the mineral formation. Those kind of studies are very important for orientation of the engineer barrier projects for this purpose, in order to avoid that the solutions present in the mineral FI can affect the repository walls. This work proposes the development of FI micro compositional studies in the the hostess minerals viewing the contribution for a better understanding of the solution composition present in the metamorphosis granitoid rocks. So, micro thermometric, microchemical and characterization of the material confined in the FI, and the hostess minerals. Great part of the found FI are present in the quartz and plagioclase crystals. The obtained data on the mineral compositions and their inclusions will allow to formulate hypothesis on the process which could occurs at the repository walls, decurrens from of the corrosive character (or not) of the fluids present in the FI, and propose measurements to avoid them

  10. Region-to-area screening methodology for the crystalline repository project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The ''Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982'' (NWPA), enacted January 7, 1983 as Public Law 97-425, confirmed the responsibility of the US Department of Energy (DOE) for management of high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA directed the DOE to provide safe facilities for isolation of high-level radioactive waste from the environment in federally owned and federally licensed repositories. To achieve the goals of providing licensed repositories for high-level radioactive waste, a technical program has been developed by the DOE to meet all relevant radiological protection criteria and other requirements. By March 1987, the NWPA requires the DOE to recommend to the President a single site, chosen from five nominated sites for construction of the first repository. Rock types being considered as potential hosts for the first repository include salt, basalt, and tuff. The NWPA also requires the DOE to select three candidate sites, chosen from five nominated sites to be recommended to the President by July 1989, as possible locations for the second repository. Potential host rock types for the second federal repository will include crystalline rock. This document outlines the methodology for region-to-area screening of exposed crystalline rock bodies for suitability as sites for further study. 17 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Factor analysis of geochemical data from ore and host rocks of the uranium mineralization at Mika, N. E. Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funtua, I. I.

    1997-01-01

    The Mika uranium occurrence is located in one of a series of NW-NE trending shear zones which host uraniferous Jurassic rhyolitic dykes located in Pan-African brecciated granites within peraluminous granite complex of NE Nigeria. The bodies of mineralization are about 100 metres long and up to 4 metres thick. The U mineralization associated with the rhyolite dykes contains predominantly meta-autunite and apatite, while that of the brecciated granites displays variable mineralogy with meta-autunite, one or two generations of coffinite and colloformic, pitch blend in open veins. The mineralization is thought to be related to bimodel magmatism of the Burashika group and the reactivation of regional structures. Multivariate statistical evaluation of geochemical data of 28 elements/oxides in 296 host rock and mineralized samples from the surface and drill cores display a coherent association of [(U, Pb, Zn, Cu, P 2 O 5 , Fe 2 O 3 ) + Mo], [(CaO, Zr, Sr) +(Y, Mo, V, As)] and [(MgO, K 2 O) + (TiO 2 , Rb)] in the mineralized rocks; reflecting the presence of hamatized phosphate bearing ores in association with sulphide minerals and apatite in the granite rhyolites. A link of the mineralizing fluids with the emplacement of the rhyolites is implied from the striking resemblance between the above element association in mineralized rocks to those of the unmineralized rhyolites. A source of ore fluids over saturated in uranium and silica emanating from crystallizing rhyolitic melts which were expelled into faults and/or shear zones in the surrounding country rock is inferred

  12. Hydrological evaluation of five sedimentary rocks for high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Kanehiro, B.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Utilizing performance criteria that are based upon siting guidelines issued by DOE for postclosure as well as preclosure conditions, a preliminary hydrologic evaluation and ranking is being conducted to determine the suitability of five sedimentary rocks as potential host rocks for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Based upon both quantitative and qualitative considerations, the hydrological ranking of the rocks in order of their potential as a host rock for the disposal of radioactive wastes would be shale, anhydrock, sandstone, chalk, and carbonates, with the first three rocks being significantly better than the remaining two types

  13. Natural analogs in the host rock salt. Pt. 1. General study (2011). Pt. 2. Detail studies (2012-2013); Natuerliche Analoga im Wirtsgestein Salz. T. 1. Generelle Studie (2011). T. 2. Detailstudien (2012-2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasser, Thomas; Fahrenholz, Christine; Kull, Herbert; Meleshyn, Artur; Moenig, Heike; Noseck, Ulrich; Schoenwiese, Dagmar; Wolf, Jens

    2014-12-15

    The first part of the project ISIBELII on natural analogs in the host rock salt included a summary of available studies on the topic to be used in a safety analysis for a final repository for heat generating radioactive waste. In 2012 the results of the preliminary safety analysis Gorleben was available, including results on the fracturing of anhydrite, the formation of cryogenic gaps and the influence of earthquakes. The requirements for the barrier system have been modified due to the safety requirements for the final disposal of heat-generating radioactive wastes valid since 2010. For containers the functionality gas to be demonstrated for 500 years. The following issues are covered: natural analogs for the integrity demonstration of the geological barrier, natural analogs for the integrity demonstration of geotechnical barriers, natural analogs for the evaluation of release scenarios. The detail studies include anhydrite fracturing, salt grit compaction, chemical composition of fluid inclusions, thermal stability of salt rock, mechanical stability of salt rock, influence of earthquakes, qualified closures, iron corrosion, and microbial processes.

  14. Geochemical homogeneity of tuffs at the potential repository level, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, Zell E.; Cloke, Paul

    2001-01-01

    In a potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, radioactive waste and canisters, drip shields protecting the waste from seepage and from rock falls, the backfill and invert material of crushed rock, the host rock, and water and gases contained within pores and fractures in the host rock together would form a complex system commonly referred to as the near-field geochemical environment. Materials introduced into the rock mass with the waste that are designed to prolong containment collectively are referred to as the Engineered Barrier System, and the host rock and its contained water and gases compose the natural system. The interaction of these component parts under highly perturbed conditions including temperatures well above natural ambient temperatures will need to be understood to assess the performance of the potential repository for long-term containment of nuclear waste. The geochemistry and mineralogy of the rock mass hosting the emplacement drifts must be known in order to assess the role of the natural system in the near-field environment. Emplacement drifts in a potential repository at Yucca Mountain would be constructed in the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff which is composed of both lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones. The chemical composition of the phenocryst-poor member has been characterized by numerous chemical analyses of outcrop samples and of core samples obtained by surface-based drilling. Those analyses have shown that the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff is remarkably uniform in composition both vertically and laterally. To verify this geochemical uniformity and to provide rock analyses of samples obtained directly from the potential repository block, major and trace elements were analyzed in core samples obtained from drill holes in the cross drift, which was driven to provide direct access to the rock mass where emplacement drifts would be constructed

  15. Mechanical stability of repository tunnels and factors to be considered for determining tunnel spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Kunifumi

    1994-01-01

    Kristallin-1 organized by Nagra is currently advanced as a synthetic project regarding a high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository in Switzerland. Its host rock is granitic rocks, and the potential siting area is located in northern Switzerland. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the long term safety of a HLW repository under more site-specific conditions than before. As the detailed geological data were investigated, the average size of undisturbed crystalline rock blocks is limited horizontally to about several hundred meter, therefore, the HLW repository area must be divided into several panels to avoid fracture zones. It is necessary to make tunnel spacing as small as possible for the purpose of reasonably designing the entire layout of repository tunnels. The main factors to be considered for determining repository tunnel spacing are listed. Rock mass modeling, rock mass material properties, the analysis model and parameters, the numerical analysis of repository tunnel stability and its main conclusion are reported. The numerical analysis of the temperature distribution in near field was carried out. Tunnel spacing should be set more than 20 m in view of the maximum temperature. (K.I.)

  16. Chemical and Mineralogical Features of Smectite from the Morron de Mateo Bentonite Deposit (Cabo de Gata, Almeria) in Relation to the Parent Rocks and the Alteration Processes Occurred After the Bentonite Formation: Analogies and Implications for the Engineered Clayey Barrier of a Deep Geological Rad waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelayo, M.; Labajo, M. A.; Garcia Romero, L.; Perez del Villar, L.

    2009-01-01

    The Morron de Mateo bentonite deposit is being studied as a natural analogue of the thermal and geochemical effects on the clayey barrier of a Deep Geological Rad waste Repository (DGRR) after its closure, in relation to the radioactive decay of the fission products and the container corrosion. This bentonite deposit and their host rocks were intruded by a rhyodacitic volcanic dome that induced a hydrothermal metasomatic process affecting the bioclastic calcarenite beds close to the dome. Bentonite from the NE sector of the deposit have been chemically and mineralogically characterized. Pyroclastic rocks (white tuffs), epyclastic rocks (mass flow) and andesitic breccia all of them hydrothermally altered, have been studied at the site. Samples are composed of feldspars, quartz and amphybols, as inherited minerals, and phyllosilicates, zeolites, crystoballite and calcite, as new formed minerals. White tuffs have the highest phyllosilicate contents, mainly dioctahedral smectite of montmorillonite type. Epyclastic rocks and andesitic breccia have a highest proportion of inherited minerals, the new formed phillosilicates being di octahedral smectite of beidellite type and an ordered interlayer chlorite/smectite mineral, of corrensite type. Smectite from the epyclastic rocks have higher Fe and Mg contents and chemical variability, as a consequence of nature of their parent rocks. The presence of corrensite in the epyclastic rocks suggests that in the Morron de Mateo area a propilitic alteration process occurred after bentonite formation, which transformed Fe-Mg-rich smectite into corrensite. This transformation was probably favoured by the sub volcanic intrusion, which also produced a temperature increase in the geological media and a supply of Fe-Mg-rich solutions, which also were the responsible for the metasomatic transformations observed in the calcarenite beds. (Author) 57 refs

  17. Some observations on the mechanism of corrosion to be encountered in nuclear waste repositories located in tuffaceous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, M.H.; Wilde, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    Potentiostatic anodic polarization studies have been conducted in a J-13 simulated nuclear waste repository environment, which was allowed to evaporate to dryness followed by rehydration prior to polarization. The behavior of Type 316L stainless steel, AISI 1020 carbon steel, Hastelloy C22 and platinum was compared with that noted previously for a non-baked simulate. The anodic dissolution characteristics of Type 316L stainless steel in environments containing 1000X Cl - J-13 depend markedly on whether the solution is merely a mixture of virgin chemicals or a mixture that has been evaporated to dryness, baked and rehydrated to the same volume. In the non-evaporated environment Type 316L stainless steel pitted severely, and in the evaporated/rehydrated environment a non-corroding type of behavior was observed along with the precipitation of a dense scale. Similar behavior was observed for Hastelloy C22. The polarization curves for carbon steel and platinum were the same as those noted for 316L and Hastelloy C22, when conducted in the evaporated/rehydrated environment. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that the scale produced in all tests conducted on evaporated/rehydrated solutions was calcium carbonate. Based on the qualitatively similar polarization characteristics of materials having such widely differing corrosion properties, it is concluded that the major factor controlling the anodic charge transfer reaction under these conditions is the formation of a calcium carbonate scale. (Author)

  18. The function of packing materials in a high-level nuclear waste repository and some candidate materials: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Shade, J.W.

    1987-03-01

    Packing materials should be included in waste package design for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. A packing material barrier would increase confidence in the waste package by alleviating possible shortcomings in the present design and prolonging confinement capabilities. Packing materials have been studied for uses in other geologic repositories; appropriately chosen, they would enhance the confinement capabilities of salt repository waste packages in several ways. Benefits of packing materials include retarding or chemically modifying brines to reduce corrosion of the waste package, providing good thermal conductivity between the waste package and host rock, retarding or absorbing radionuclides, and reducing the massiveness of the waste package. These benefits are available at low percentage of total repository cost, if the packing material is properly chosen and used. Several candidate materials are being considered, including oxides, hydroxides, silicates, cement-based mixtures, and clay mixtures. 18 refs

  19. Coupled thermo–hydro–mechanical processes for the Dutch radioactive waste repository

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buragohain, P.; Vardon, P.J.; Hicks, M.A.; Vardon, P.J.; Bykov, D.

    2016-01-01

    Disposal of spent nuclear fuel and long lived radioactive waste in deep clay geological formations is one of the promising options worldwide. In this concept of the geological disposal system, the Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock when designing a generic waste repository in the

  20. Heterogeneity of uranium host rocks in Zhiluo formation in Dongsheng area and its relation to uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Chao; Zheng Yunlong; Wang Mingtai

    2013-01-01

    Numbers of uranium deposits have be found in Dongsheng area. The major ore-bearing layer is the sub member of the lower member of the Zhiluo Formation, the heterogeneity of host rocks plays an important role during the process of uranium mineralization. This paper sorted and counted up the data of sand body and the impermeable bed in Dongsheng area to study the heterogeneity characteristic of host rock and its relationship to uranium mineralization in horizontal and vertical directions. The thickness of sand body in Dongsheng area decreases gradually from northwest to southeast. The uranium mineralization is mainly distributed in the place where the thickness of sand body changed from the thick to the thin. Statistics shows that the best uranium mineralization occurred in sand body thickness between 20 m to 40 m and the sand rate over 60% in the eastern part of Dongsheng area. And the best uranium mineralization in the western part occurred in area of sand body thickness between 60 m to 70 m and the sand rate over 70%. In vertical direction, the numbers and the thickness of the impermeable beds have negative relation to sand rate. Moreover, uranium deposits generally exist in the area of less number impermeable bed and small thickness. The uranium mineralization grade decreased with the increase of number and thickness of the impermeable beds. (authors)

  1. On thermal properties of hard rocks as a host environment of an underground thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, L.; Hladky, R.; Broz, M.; Novak, P.; Lachman, V.; Sosna, K.; Zaruba, J.; Metelkova, Z.; Najser, J.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing focus on environmentally friendly technologies waste heat recycling became an important issue. Under certain circumstances subsurface environment could be utilized to accommodate relatively large quantity of heat. Industrial waste heat produced during warm months can be stored in an underground thermal energy storage (UTES) and used when needed. It is however a complex task to set up a sustainable UTES for industrial scale. Number of parameters has to be studied and evaluated by means of thermohydromechanical and chemical coupling (THMC) before any UTES construction. Thermal characteristics of various rocks and its stability under thermal loading are amongst the most essential. In the Czech Republic study two complementary projects THMC processes during an UTES operation. The RESEN project (www.resen.cz) employs laboratory tests and experiments to characterise thermal properties of hard rocks in the Bohemian Massif. Aim of the project is to point out the most suitable rock environment in the Bohemian Massif for moderate to ultra-high temperature UTES construction (Sanyal, 2005). The VITA project (www.geology.cz/mokrsko) studies THM coupling in non-electrical temperature UTES using long term in-situ experiment. In both projects thermal properties of rocks were studied. Thermal conductivity and capacity were measured on rock samples. In addition an influence of increasing temperature and moisture content was considered. Ten hard rocks were investigated. The set included two sandstones, two ignibrites, a melaphyr, a syenite, two granites, a gneiss and a serpentinite. For each rock there were measured thermal conductivity and capacity of at least 54 dried samples. Subsequently, the samples were heated up to 380°C in 8 hours and left to cool down. Thermal characteristics were measured during the heating period and after the sample reached room temperature. Heating and cooling cycle was repeated 7 to 10 times to evaluate possible UTES-like degradation of

  2. Geochronology of the Swift Current granite and host volcanic rocks of the Love Cove group, southwestern Avalon zone, Newfoundland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallmeyer, R.D.; O'Driscoll, C.F.; Hussey, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Zircon fractions from the variably deformed and metamorphosed Swift Current granite and host volcanic rocks of the Love Cove Group record individually discordant U-Pb ages with well-defined upper concordia intercept ages of 580 +- 20 and 590 +- 30 Ma, respectively. These are interpreted to be crystallization dates and indicate a late Proterozoic cogmagmatic relationship. Primary hornblende from the pluton record disturbed 40 Ar/ 39 Ar age spectra that suggest postcrystallization argon loss, probably during Acadian (Devonian) regional metamorphism. 40 Ar/ 39 Ar plateau ages of 560-566 Ma are well defined for the hornblende and are interpreted to date times of postmagmatic cooling. The similarity between zircon and hornblende dates suggests relatively rapid postmagmatic cooling. A six-point, Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron age of 548 +- 11 Ma is defined for the pluton. The slight discordancy of this date in comparison with the zircon and hornblende ages may reflect a minor disturbance of whole-rock isotopic systems during Acadian regional metamorphism. (author)

  3. The Metamorphic Rocks-Hosted Gold Mineralization At Rumbia Mountains Prospect Area In The Southeastern Arm of Sulawesi Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasria Hasria

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, in Indonesia gold exploration activities  are not only focused along volcanic-magmatic belts, but also starting to shift along metamorphic and sedimentary terrains. The study area is located in Rumbia mountains, Bombana Regency, Southeast Sulawesi Province. This paper is aimed to describe characteristics of alteration and ore mineralization associated  with metamorphic rock-related gold deposits.  The study area is found the placer and  primary gold hosted by metamorphic rocks. The gold is evidently derived from gold-bearing quartz veins hosted by Pompangeo Metamorphic Complex (PMC. These quartz veins are currently recognized in metamorphic rocks at Rumbia Mountains. The quartz veins are mostly sheared/deformed, brecciated, irregular vein, segmented and  relatively massive and crystalline texture with thickness from 1 cm to 15.7 cm. The wallrock are generally weakly altered. Hydrothermal alteration types include sericitization, argillic, inner propylitic, propylitic, carbonization and carbonatization. There some precious metal identified consist of native gold and ore mineralization including pyrite (FeS2, chalcopyrite (CuFeS2, hematite (Fe2O3, cinnabar (HgS, stibnite (Sb2S3 and goethite (FeHO2. The veins contain erratic gold in various grades from below detection limit <0.0002 ppm to 18.4 ppm. Based on those characteristics, it obviously indicates that the primary gold deposit present in the study area is of orogenic gold deposit type. The orogenic gold deposit is one of the new targets for exploration in Indonesia

  4. searchSCF: Using MongoDB to Enable Richer Searches of Locally Hosted Science Data Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knosp, B.

    2016-12-01

    Science teams today are in the unusual position of almost having too much data available to them. Modern sensors and models are capable of outputting terabytes of data per day, which can make it difficult to find specific subsets of data. The sheer size of files can also make it time consuming to retrieve this big data from national data archive centers. Thus, many science teams choose to store what data they can on their local systems, but they are not always equipped with tools to help them intelligently organize and search their data. In its local data repository, the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) science team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has collected over 300TB of atmospheric science data from 71 missions/models that aid in validation, algorithm development, and research activities. When the project began, the team developed a MySQL database to aid in data queries, but this database was only designed to keep track of MLS and a few ancillary data sets, leving much of the data uncatalogued. The team has also seen database query time rise over the life of the mission. Even though the MLS science team's data holdings are not the size of a national data center's, team members still need tools to help them discover and utilize the data that they have on-hand. Over the past year, members of the science team have been looking for solutions to (1) store information on all the data sets they have collected in a single database, (2) store more metadata about each data file, (3) develop queries that can find relationships among these disparate data types, and (4) plug any new functions developed around this database into existing analysis, visualization, and web tools, transparently to users. In this presentation, I will discuss the searchSCF package that is currently under development. This package includes a NoSQL database management system (MongoDB) and a set of Python tools that both ingests data into the database and supports user queries. I will also

  5. Deep ground water microbiology in Swedish granite rock and it's relevance for radio-nuclide migration from a Swedish high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    1989-03-01

    Data on numbers, species and activity of deep ground water microbial populations in Swedish granite rock have been collected. Specific studies are performed on radio-nuclid uptake on bacteria judge to be probable inhabitants in Swedish nuclear waste repositories. An integrated mobile field laboratory was used for water sampling and for the immediate counting and inoculation of the samples from boreholes at levels between 129 and 860 m. A sampler adapted for the collection of undisturbed samples for gas analysis was used to collect samples for bacterial enumerations and enrichments. The sampler can be opened and closed from the surface at the actual sampling depth. The samples can subsequently be brought to the surface without contact with air and with the pressure at the actual sampling depth. The number of bacteria were determined in samples from the gas sampler when this was possible. Else numbers are determined in the water that is pumped up to the field lab. The average total number of bacteria is 3 x 10 5 bacterial ml -1 . The number of bacteria possible to recover with plate count arrays from 0.10 to 21.9%. (author)

  6. Use of the mixture of clay and crushed rock as a backfill material for low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository. Appendix 10: Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, W.J.; Lee, J.O.; Hahn, P.S.; Chun, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    At the time of the CRP, a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes arising from nuclear power plant operation and radioisotope application in the Republic of Korea was to be constructed in the bedrock below ground surface. As the intermediate level waste cavern would contain the major part of radionuclide inventory in the cavern, the radionuclide release from the intermediate level waste cavern was therefore important from the viewpoint of disposal facility performance. The then current design concept suggested that the intermediate level waste would be emplaced into the compartment made of reinforced concrete, and the space between the concrete wall and cavern surface would be backfilled with a clay-based material. As compacted clay-based materials have a low hydraulic conductivity and the hydraulic gradient in a disposal cavern was expected to be relatively low, molecular diffusion was considered to be the principal mechanism by which radionuclides would migrate through the backfill. The mixture of calcium bentonite and crushed rock was being suggested as a candidate backfill material. This appendix summarises the KAERI research activities on the evaluation of hydraulic conductivity, radionuclide diffusion coefficient, and mechanical properties of the candidate clay-based backfill material for the intermediate level waste cavern

  7. Migration of fluids as a tool to evaluate the feasibility of the implantation of geological radioactive wastes repositories (RARN) in granitoid rocks: tests on granites submitted to natural deformation vs. not deformed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Nilo Henrique Balzani; Barbosa, Pedro Henrique Silva; Santos, Alanna Leite dos; Amorim, Lucas Eustáquio Dias; Freitas, Mônica Elizetti de; Rios, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    Fluid composition and migration studies in granitoid rocks subjected to deformation events are a factor that should be considered in the selection of geologically favorable areas for RANR construction, and may be an excellent complement to engineering barrier designs. The research objective was to develop an academic approach, comparing the behavior of deformed and non-deformed granites, not being related to any CNEN project of deploying repositories. It is concluded that in the choice of suitable sites for the construction of repositories, granite bodies that are submitted to metamorphic / deformation / hydrothermal events or that are very fractured should be disregarded. The domes of granite batholith that have undergone hydraulic billing should also be discarded. It has been found that, because of the warming caused by radioactive decay reactions, there is a real possibility that the release of potentially abrasive fluids contained in the minerals can reach and corrode the walls of the repositories and / or packaging

  8. Do Hf isotopes in magmatic zircons represent those of their host rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Cai, Yue; Goldstein, Steven L.; Yang, Tao

    2018-04-01

    Lu-Hf isotopic system in zircon is a powerful and widely used geochemical tracer in studying petrogenesis of magmatic rocks and crustal evolution, assuming that zircon Hf isotopes can represent initial Hf isotopes of their parental whole rock. However, this assumption may not always be valid. Disequilibrium partial melting of continental crust would preferentially melt out non-zircon minerals with high time-integrated Lu/Hf ratios and generate partial melts with Hf isotope compositions that are more radiogenic than those of its magma source. Dissolution experiments (with hotplate, bomb and sintering procedures) of zircon-bearing samples demonstrate this disequilibrium effect where partial dissolution yielded variable and more radiogenic Hf isotope compositions than fully dissolved samples. A case study from the Neoproterozoic Jiuling batholith in southern China shows that about half of the investigated samples show decoupled Hf isotopes between zircons and the bulk rocks. This decoupling could reflect complex and prolonged magmatic processes, such as crustal assimilation, magma mixing, and disequilibrium melting, which are consistent with the wide temperature spectrum from ∼630 °C to ∼900 °C by Ti-in-zircon thermometer. We suggest that magmatic zircons may only record the Hf isotopic composition of their surrounding melt during crystallization and it is uncertain whether their Hf isotopic compositions can represent the primary Hf isotopic compositions of the bulk magmas. In this regard, using zircon Hf isotopic compositions to trace crustal evolution may be biased since most of these could be originally from disequilibrium partial melts.

  9. The Impact of Host Rock Geochemistry on Bacterial Community Structure in Oligotrophic Cave Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel A. Barton

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite extremely starved conditions, caves contain surprisingly diverse microbial communities. Our research is geared toward understanding what ecosystems drivers are responsible for this high diversity. To asses the effect of rock fabric and mineralogy, we carried out a comparative geomicrobiology study within Carlsbad Cavern, New Mexico, USA. Samples were collected from two different geologic locations within the cave: WF1 in the Massive Member of the Capitan Formation and sF88 in the calcareous siltstones of the Yates Formation. We examined the organic content at each location using liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy and analyzed microbial community structure using molecular phylogenetic analyses. In order to assess whether microbial activity was leading to changes in the bedrock at each location, the samples were also examined by petrology, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. Our results suggest that on the chemically complex Yates Formation (sF88, the microbial community was significantly more diverse than on the limestone surfaces of the Capitan (WF1, despite a higher total number of cells on the latter. Further, the broader diversity of bacterial species at sF88 reflected a larger range of potential metabolic capabilities, presumably due to opportunities to use ions within the rock as nutrients and for chemolithotrophic energy production. The use of these ions at sF88 is supported by the formation of a corrosion residue, presumably through microbial scavenging activities. Our results suggest that rock fabric and mineralogy may be an important driver of ecosystem function and should be carefully reviewed when carrying out microbial community analysis in cave environments.

  10. A Natural Analogue for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Coupled Processes at the Proposed Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bill Carey; Gordon Keating; Peter C. Lichtner

    1999-01-01

    Dike and sill complexes that intruded tuffaceous host rocks above the water table are suggested as natural analogues for thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Scoping thermal-hydrologic calculations of temperature and saturation profiles surrounding a 30-50 m wide intrusion suggest that boiling conditions could be sustained at distances of tens of meters from the intrusion for several thousand years. This time scale for persistence of boiling is similar to that expected for the Yucca Mountain repository with moderate heat loading. By studying the hydrothermal alteration of the tuff host rocks surrounding the intrusions, insight and relevant data can be obtained that apply directly to the Yucca Mountain repository and can shed light on the extent and type of alteration that should be expected. Such data are needed to bound and constrain model parameters used in THC simulations of the effect of heat produced by the waste on the host rock and to provide a firm foundation for assessing overall repository performance. One example of a possible natural analogue for the repository is the Paiute Ridge intrusive complex located on the northeastern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The complex consists of dikes and sills intruded into a partially saturated tuffaceous host rock that has stratigraphic sequences that correlate with those found at Yucca Mountain. The intrusions were emplaced at a depth of several hundred meters below the surface, similar to the depth of the proposed repository. The tuffaceous host rock surrounding the intrusions is hydrothermally altered to varying extents depending on the distance from the intrusions. The Paiute Ridge intrusive complex thus appears to be an ideal natural analogue of THC coupled processes associated with the Yucca Mountain repository. It could provide much needed physical and chemical data for understanding the influence of heat

  11. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeastern United States. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bledsoe, H.W. Jr.; Marine, I.W.

    1980-10-01

    The geology of the southeastern United States was studied to recommend areas that should be considered for field exploration in order to select a site for a radioactive waste repository. The region studied included the Piedmont Province, the Triassic Basins, and the Atlantic Coastal Plain in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. This study was entirely a review of literature and existing knowledge from a geotechnical point of view and was performed by subcontractors whose individual reports are listed in the bibliography. No field work was involved. The entire study was geotechnical in nature, and no consideration was given to socioeconomic or demographic factors. These factors need to be addressed in a separate study. For all areas, field study is needed before any area is further considered. A total of 29 areas are recommended for further consideration in the Piedmont Province subregion: one area in Maryland, 8 areas in Virginia, 4 areas in North Carolina, 6 areas in South Carolina, and 10 areas in Georgia. Of the 14 exposed and 5 buried or hypothesized basins identified in the Triassic basin subregion, 6 are recommended for further study: one basin in Virginia, 3 basins in North Carolina, and 2 basins in South Carolina. Four potential candidate areas are identified within the Atlantic Coastal Plain subregion: one in Maryland, one in North Carolina, and 2 in Georgia

  12. Geotechnical and geological aspects for repository concepts with retrievability of radioactive waste; Geotechnische und geologische Aspekte fuer Tiefenlagerkonzepte mit der Option der Rueckholung der radioaktiven Reststoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlmann, Joachim; Leon Vargas, Rocio; Mintzlaff, Volker [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Grundbau und Bodenmechanik

    2016-03-15

    The retrievability of heat-producing high-level radioactive waste (HAW) is on debate internationally as well as in Germany. This article deals with the geological and geotechnical consequences of the design of a repository with retrievability in different host rocks. The properties of rock salt, clay, shale and crystalline rock - potential host rocks for a repository with retrievability in Germany - will be presented. Based on these properties generic models of repositories with measurements for retrievability and monitoring will be also presented. With these models it can be derived that due the different stress-deformation-behavior there is a conflict of aims between the best possible closure of the waste and the option of retrieval.

  13. Review of the potential effects of alkaline plume migration from a cementitious repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, D.

    1997-01-01

    Extensive use of cement and concrete is envisaged in the construction of geological repositories for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes, both for structural, and encapsulation and backfilling purposes. Saturation of these materials with groundwater may occur in the post-closure period of disposal, producing a hyperalkaline pore fluid with a pH in the range 10-13.5. These pore fluids have the potential to migrate from the repository according to local groundwater flow conditions and react chemically with the host rock. These chemical reactions may affect the rock's capacity to retard the migration of radionuclides released from the repository after the degradation of the waste packages. The effects of these chemical reactions on the behaviour of the repository rock as a barrier to waste migration need to be investigated for the purposes of assessing the safety of the repository design (so-called 'safety assessment' or 'performance assessment'). The objectives of the work reported here were to: identify those processes influencing radionuclide mobility in the geosphere which could be affected by plume migration; review literature relevant to alkali-rock reaction; contact organisations carrying out relevant research and summarise their current and future activities; and make recommendations how the effects of plume migration can be incorporated into models of repository performance assessment. (author)

  14. False colour backscatter electron images and their application during electron microprobe analysis of ores and host rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousens, D.R.; French, D.H.; Ramsden, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    The limited contrast range of conventional black and white imaging does not enable full use to be made of the dynamic range of the video signal obtained from a scanning electron microscope or microprobe. The use of false colour substantially increases the information that can be derived from such images enabling relationships to be displayed that cannot be observed in black and white. This capability is now used extensively in combination with quantitative electron microprobe analysis as a research tool for ore characterization and host rocks studies related to minerals exploration in the CSIRO Div.sion of Exploration Geoscience. Thus the CAMEBAX scanning electron microprobe has been modified to allow digital images acquisition and software (IMAGE) developed which allows false colour backscatter electron (BSE) images to be obtained during the course of routine electron microprobe analysis. 1 fig

  15. ONKALO rock mechanics model (RMM) - Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moenkkoenen, H.; Hakala, M.; Paananen, M.; Laine, E.

    2012-02-01

    The Rock Mechanics Model of the ONKALO rock volume is a description of the significant features and parameters related to rock mechanics. The main objective is to develop a tool to predict the rock properties, quality and hence the potential for stress failure which can then be used for continuing design of the ONKALO and the repository. This is the second implementation of the Rock Mechanics Model and it includes sub-models of the intact rock strength, in situ stress, thermal properties, rock mass quality and properties of the brittle deformation zones. Because of the varying quantities of available data for the different parameters, the types of presentations also vary: some data sets can be presented in the style of a 3D block model but, in other cases, a single distribution represents the whole rock volume hosting the ONKALO. (orig.)

  16. Metamorphic Rock-Hosted Orogenic Gold Deposit Type as a Source of Langkowala Placer Gold, Bombana, Southeast Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifudin Idrus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v6i1.114In 2008, placer gold was discovered in Langkowala area (Bombana Regency, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia, and more than 60,000 traditional gold miners in the early 2009 have been operating by digging vertical pits and panning active stream sediments. The grade of placer gold ranges from 50 to 140 g/t. Local geological framework indicates that the placer gold is not related to volcanic rock-related hydrothermal gold deposit, e.g. epithermal, skarn or porphyry. This paper describes a preliminary study on possible primary deposit type as a source of the Langkowala (Bombana secondary placer gold. A field study indicates that the Langkowala (Bombana placer/paleoplacer gold is possibly related to gold-bearing quartz veins/veinlets hosted by metamorphic rocks particularly mica schist and metasediments in the area. These quartz veins/veinlets are currently recognized in metamorphic rocks at Wumbubangka Mountains, a northern flank of Rumbia Mountain Range. Sheared, segmented quartz veins/veinlets are of 2 cm to 2 m in width and contain gold in a grade varying between 2 and 61 g/t. At least, there are two generations of the quartz veins. The first generation of quartz vein is parallel to foliation of mica schist and metasediments with general orientation of N 300oE/60o; the second quartz vein generation crosscut the first quartz vein and the foliation of the wallrock. The first quartz veins are mostly sheared/deformed, brecciated, and occasionally sigmoidal, whereas the second quartz veins are relatively massive. The similar quartz veins/veinlets types are also probably present in Mendoke Mountain Range, in the northern side of Langkowala area. This primary gold deposit is called as ‘orogenic gold type’. The orogenic gold deposit could be a new target of gold exploration in Indonesia in the future.

  17. The influence of geological loading on the structural integrity of an underground nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakeman, N.

    1985-08-01

    Stresses are developed in underground nuclear waste repositories as a result of applied loads from geological movements caused by the encroachment of ice sheets or seismic activity for example. These stresses may induce fracturing of the waste matrix, repository vault and nearfield host geology. This fracturing will enhance the advective flow and allow more-rapid transfer of radionuclides from their encapsulation through the repository barriers and nearfield host rock. Geological loads may be applied either gradually as in crustal folding or encroachment of ice sheets, or rapidly as in the case of seismic movements. The analysis outlined in this report is conducted with a view to including the effects of geological loading in a probabilistic repository site assessment computer code such as SYVAC. (author)

  18. Forecasts and restrictions on vibrations from rock excavation and transportation. Encapsulation Plant and Repository for spent nuclear fuel, Laxemar; Prognoser och restriktioner foer vibrationer fraan bergschaktning och transporter. Inkapslingsanlaeggning och slutfoervar foer anvaent kaernbraensle, Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Carl; Johansson, Sven-Erik (Nitro Consult AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This study describes the impact on the surroundings that may occur during rock excavation activities for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Laxemar and the encapsulation facility in Simpevarp. The study also includes vibrations created by heavy shipments related to activities at the final repository. The study will provide input to the environmental impact assessment and future design work. The survey area for buildings and facilities covered by the study extends approximately 1,000 metres from the proposed location of the final repository. For the encapsulation facility the survey area has been limited to residential buildings and summer houses within 1,000 metres of the proposed location. In addition, residential buildings along road 743 have been surveyed with regard to the impact of heavy shipments between Laxemar and Faarbo. The results of the surveys and information on planned rock excavation activities have been used to formulate preliminary restrictions and predictions of vibrations and air shock waves from blasting, as well as noise from rock drilling. Predictions have also been made of vibrations from heavy shipments, and a reference survey has been carried out in a residential building near road 743. The predictions of vibrations from blasting rounds reveal low or very low levels. No risk of damage to buildings or equipment is expected. Vibrations from blasting may, however, be perceptible within large parts of the study area, since the human perception threshold for vibration is very low. They will hardly be regarded as disturbing, however. When the accesses to the final repository have been built and rock excavation continues at repository level, the impact on the surroundings is expected to be minimal. The main reason for this is that the blasting will then occur at a depth of about 500 metres, at an ample distance to buildings at surface level. Predictions of air shock waves from blasting rounds indicate low levels. There is no risk of

  19. Radiation induced F-center and colloid formation in synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt: applications to radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.; Loman, J.M.; Kierstead, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation damage, particularly Na metal colloid formation, has been studied in synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt using unique equipment for making optical absorption, luminescence and other measurements during irradiation with 1 to 3 MeV electrons. Previous studies have established the F-center and colloid growth phenomenology. At temperatures where colloids form most rapidly, 100 to 250 C, F-centers appear when the irradiation is initiated and increase at a decreasing rate to a plateau, reached at doses of 10 6 to 10 7 rad. Concomitant colloid growth is described by classical nucleation and growth curves with the transition to rapid growth occurring at 10 6 to 10 7 rad. The colloid growth rate is low at 100 C, increases markedly to a maximum at 150 to 175 C and decreases to a negligible rate at 225 C. At 1.2x10 8 rad/h the induction period is >10 4 sec at 100 C, 10 4 sec at 275 C. The colloid growth in salt from 14 localities is well described by C(dose)/sup n/ relations. Data on WIPP site salt (Los Medanos, NM, USA) has been used to estimate roughly the colloid expected in radioactive waste repositories. Doses of 1 to 2x10 10 rad, which will accumulate in salt adjacent to lightly shielded high level canisters in 200 to 500 years, will convert between 1 and 100% of the salt to Na colloids (and Cl) if back reactions or other limiting reactions do not occur. Each high level lightly shielded canister may ultimately be surrounded by 200 to 300 kg of colloid sodium. Low level or heavily shielded canisters may produce as little as 1 kg sodium

  20. Granite-repository - geochemical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    Some geochemical data of importance for a radioactive waste repository in hard rock are reviewed. The ground water composition at depth is assessed. The ground water chemistry in the vicinity of uranium ores is discussed. The redox system in Swedish bedrock is described. Influences of extreme climatic changes and of repository mining and construction are also evaluated

  1. Scientific data necessary to predict radionuclide migration within or near a mined nuclear repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, W.F.

    1983-03-01

    The National Waste Terminal Storage Program was created to develop a system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. It has been determined that the most reasonable means for accomplishing this task is to place the high-level and transuranic wastes in mined geologic repositories. Three geologic environments have been selected for further study and evaluation: (1) domed or bedded salt formations, (2) thick basalt flows fo the Columbia River Plateau and (3) alkali igneous rocks, both tuffs and granites, of the Nevada Test Site. Each of these candidate geologies will present a different physical-chemical environment to the waste package. The physical environments have been estimated based on depth of repository, radionuclide loading, and spacing of canisters. The chemical environments are based on initial host-rock mineralogy, native ground-water geochemistry, and likely alteration assemblages. The latter sections of this report discuss the mechanisms of radionuclide release, transport, and retention on the host rocks or their alteration products

  2. Iron-nickel alloys as canister material for radioactive waste disposal in underground repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apps, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Canisters containing high-level radioactive waste must retain their integrity in an underground waste repository for at least one thousand years after burial (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1981). Since no direct means of verifying canister integrity is plausible over such a long period, indirect methods must be chosen. A persuasive approach is to examine the natural environment and find a suitable material which is thermodynamically compatible with the host rock under the environmental conditions with the host rock under the environmental conditions expected in a waste repository. Several candidates have been proposed, among them being iron-nickel alloys that are known to occur naturally in altered ultramafic rocks. The following review of stability relations among iron-nickel alloys below 350 0 C is the initial phase of a more detailed evaluation of these alloys as suitable canister materials

  3. Barriers to migration of radionuclides from radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, I.

    1999-01-01

    Natural inorganic sorbents are known as effective barriers that reduce the migration of radionuclides from radioactive waste repositories and contaminated sites. They could be used as buffer, backfill and sealing materials in the repository and their presence in the host rock and the surrounding geological formations increases the retention properties of the strata. Natural occurring minerals from local origin are used in the study - zeolites (clinoptilolite and mordenite), celadonite and loess. Sorption of wide range of radionuclides is studies. Batch capacity is determined. Sorption of radionuclides from simulated natural solution is studied. Distribution coefficients are calculated from sorption isotherms. Desorption in presence of different natural solutions is studied. Sorption properties are compared. It is shown that clinoptilolite acts as effective barrier against migration of radionuclides from repositories. The presence of celadonite in the clinoptilolite rock increases the retention of polyvalent ions. The retention of radionuclides on loess samples fulfils the requirements for host media for repository for low and intermediate level waste. A method for construction of additional barrier to the existing in the country disposal vault for spent sealed sources is proposed

  4. Microcrack growing and long-term mechanical stability in a HLW deep-borehole repository in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Hahne, K.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term host rock integrity assessment of a deep borehole emplacement for HLW in granite has been addressed with a detailed new constitutive model considering temperature and pressure effects on microscale phenomena (as microcracking) under repository conditions. The results of these finite element calculations have been compared with results obtained using conventional, state-of-the-art constitutive modelling. While the results of conventional modelling did suggest the existence of an important safety margin before failure, the improved calculations with the new model predict a thin but very long region of degradated host rock along the waste canister column. The results obtained up to now may well be considered as safety relevant, because they suggest that the actual long-term granite strength lies well below the conventionally determined failure limits, thus challenging the barrier properties of this host rock if the actual strength is not properly considered in the repository design

  5. Tourmaline occurrences within the Penamacor-Monsanto granitic pluton and host-rocks (Central Portugal): genetic implications of crystal-chemical and isotopic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, I. Ribeiro; Mourão, C.; Récio, C.; Guimarães, F.; Antunes, I. M.; Ramos, J. Farinha; Barriga, F. J. A. S.; Palmer, M. R.; Milton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Tourmalinization associated with peraluminous granitic intrusions in metapelitic host-rocks has been widely recorded in the Iberian Peninsula, given the importance of tourmaline as a tracer of granite magma evolution and potential indicator of Sn-W mineralizations. In the Penamacor-Monsanto granite pluton (Central Eastern Portugal, Central Iberian Zone), tourmaline occurs: (1) as accessory phase in two-mica granitic rocks, muscovite-granites and aplites, (2) in quartz (±mica)-tourmaline rocks (tourmalinites) in several exocontact locations, and (3) as a rare detrital phase in contact zone hornfels and metapelitic host-rocks. Electron microprobe and stable isotope (δ18O, δD, δ11B) data provide clear distinctions between tourmaline populations from these different settings: (a) schorl-oxyschorl tourmalines from granitic rocks have variable foititic component (X□ = 17-57 %) and Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios (0.19-0.50 in two-mica granitic rocks, and 0.05-0.19 in the more differentiated muscovite-granite and aplites); granitic tourmalines have constant δ18O values (12.1 ± 0.1 ‰), with wider-ranging δD (-78.2 ± 4.7 ‰) and δ11B (-10.7 to -9.0 ‰) values; (b) vein/breccia oxyschorl [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.31-0.44] results from late, B- and Fe-enriched magma-derived fluids and is characterized by δ18O = 12.4 ‰, δD = -29.5 ‰, and δ11B = -9.3 ‰, while replacement tourmalines have more dravitic compositions [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.26-0.64], close to that of detrital tourmaline in the surrounding metapelitic rocks, and yield relatively constant δ18O values (13.1-13.3 ‰), though wider-ranging δD (-58.5 to -36.5 ‰) and δ11B (-10.2 to -8.8 ‰) values; and (c) detrital tourmaline in contact rocks and regional host metasediments is mainly dravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.35-0.78] and oxydravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.51-0.58], respectively. Boron contents of the granitic rocks are low (<650 ppm) compared to the minimum B contents normally required for tourmaline saturation in

  6. Nagra technical report 14-02, Geological basics - Dossier VI - Barrier properties of proposed host rock sediments and neighbouring rock; SGT Etappe 2: Vorschlag weiter zu untersuchender geologischer Standortgebiete mit zugehörigen Standortarealen für die Oberflächenanlage -- Geologische Grundlagen -- Dossier VI -- Barriereneigenschaften der Wirt- und Rahmengesteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautschi, A.; Deplazes, G.; Traber, D.; Marschall, P. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Mazurek, M.; Gimmi, T.; Maeder, U. [Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    This dossier is the sixth of a series of eight reports concerning the safety and technical aspects of locations for the disposal of radioactive wastes in Switzerland. It discusses the barrier properties of the proposed host rock sediments and neighbouring rock layers. The mineralogical composition of the host rocks are discussed as are their pore densities and hydrological properties. Diffusion aspects are discussed. The aquifer systems in the proposed depository areas and their classification are looked at. The barrier properties of the host rocks and those of neighbouring sediments are discussed. Finally, modelling concepts and parameters for the transport of radionuclides in the rocks are discussed.

  7. Geochemical Characteristics of Metamorphic Rock-Hosted Gold Deposit At Onzon-Kanbani Area, Central Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Tay Zar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold and associated base metal mineralization of Onzon-Kabani area located in the western border of generally N-S trending Mogoke Metamorphic Belt where well-known Sagaing fault is served as a western boundary of this area. In this research area, many artisanal and small-scale gold mines were noted in last three decades. Gold mineralization is hosted in marble and gneiss unit of research area but most common in marble unit. Variety of igneous intrusions are also observed in research area. Mineralizations are observed as fissure filling veins as well as lesser amount of disseminated nature in marble unit. Mineralogically, gold are associated with other base metal such as pyrite, galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, marcasite and arsenopyrite. Hydrothermal alteration halos are developed in peripheral of hydrothermal conduits or mineralization veins from proximal to distal such as 1 silicic, 2 sericite-illite, and 3 propylitic alteration.  Most of hydrothermal minerals from each altered zones showed that near neutral condition of pH (e.g. adularia, calcite, illite, sericite and chlorite. Alternatively, hydrothermal alteration zones that show with ore minerals such as native gold, electrum, sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite and marcasite which mostly observed in silicic alteration zone. Typical boiling characters of vein textures and fluid inclusion petrography are observed in hydrothermal system of research area. Boiling, cooling and mixing are possiblily responsible for gold deposition in hydrothermal system. In this paper, authors are documented to clarify the type of mineralization based on hydrothermal alterations, ore and gangue mineral assemblages and fluid inclusion study. All of these data can describe and play an important role for both with respect to understanding deposit genesis and in mineral exploration.

  8. Project Guarantee 1985. Repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste: construction and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    A constructional engineering project study aimed at clarification of the feasibility of a repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (type B repository) has been carried out; the study is based on a model data-set derived from the geological, rock mechanical and topographical characterictics of one of Nagra's planned exploration areas. Final storage is effected in subterranean rock caverns accessed by horizontal tunnel. The reception area also is sited below the surface. Storage is conceived in such a way that, after closure of the repository, maintenance and supervision can be dispensed with and a guarantee of high long-term safety can nevertheless be provided. The envisaged repository consists of an entry tunnel for road vehicles and a reception area with a series of caverns for receiving waste, for additional technical facilities and for the production of the concrete back-fill material. The connecting tunnel is serviced by a tunnel railway and the actual repository area consists of several storage caverns. The repository is intended to accomodate a total of 200'000 m3 of solidified low- and intermediate-level waste. Valanginian marl is assumed as the host rock, although it would also be basically possible to house the proposed installations in other host rocks. The excavated material will total around 1'000'000 m3. The construction time for the whole installation is estimated as about 7 years and a working team of around 30 people will be required for the estimated 60-year operational duration. The project described in the present report justifies the conclusion that construction of a repository for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste is feasible with present-day technology. This conclusion takes into consideration quantitative and operational constraints as well as geological and hydrogeological data relevant to constructional engineering. The latter are derived from a model data-set based on a specific locality

  9. Study of scenario 'mistake in determination of adsorbing properties of radionuclides on the materials of engineering barriers and host rock'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosov, P.V.; Novozhilova, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    During investigations within the framework of this ASE of a storage facility, conceptual and mathematical models remained the same, as in SNE. Basic provisions of models, a solution 'tool' for diffusion equation taking into account radioactive decay and the chosen boundary conditions are presented in paper. The 79 Se isotope is chosen as basic analyzed radionuclide within the framework of the accepted ASE. The selection of this isotope can be substantiated by the following reasons: 1) Migration parameters of this radionuclide, in particular, the distribution coefficient of 79 Se isotope has specific enough values. For example, in granitoid formations (according to different research groups from Sweden, Finland, Switzerland during rather a small time range of experiments carrying out) the values of distribution coefficient vary within 20 times and thus its numerical value is small enough (0.0005 - 0.01 m 3 /kg). At the same time, the situation is reverse with cement materials: from references accessible to us only in one the value of this parameter is cited. 2) Performing calculations for the full list of radio-nuclides (in the SNE there were 8 of them) will require considerable labor expenditures and computer facilities resources: much processor time and much memory on a hard disk to store information. Since, when considering the selected ASE of facility there are accepted 4 areas of materials (the source, concrete, bentonite, the host rock) generally, it means practically a fourfold increase of all specified expenses in comparison with similar expenses for a SNE of facility. The main conclusions are: There are considered possible variants of error, which consequence is the 79 Se isotope transition in the category of a non-sorbing one in respective barrier of the near field that can conservatively lead to an increase of the facility hazard. If there is an error in selection of sorption parameters of 79 Se isotope in the host rock an increase in pollution of the

  10. Siting regions for deep geological repositories. Why just here?; Standortgebiete fuer geologische Tiefenlager. Warum gerade hier?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieser, A

    2009-09-15

    This report helps to the popularization of the Nagra works accomplished for the management and disposal of the radioactive wastes in Switzerland. The programme for management and disposal of the radioactive wastes are extensively determined by regulations. Protection of mankind and environment is the primary objective. The basic storage process is considered as having been solved. The question addressed in the report is where the facility has to be built; the site selection procedure includes five steps: 1) according to their type the wastes have to be allocated to two different repositories: for low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW), and for high-level and alpha-toxic wastes (HLW); 2) the safety concept for both repositories and the requirements on the geology have to be determined; 3) large suitable geological-tectonic zones must be found where repositories could be built; 4) in these geological zones a suitable host rock has to be identified; 5) the most important spatial geological conditions of the host rock (minimum depth with respect to surface erosion, maximum depth in terms of engineering requirements, lateral extent) have to be identified. Based on these criteria, three suitable siting regions for a HLW repository were found in the North of Switzerland. The preferred host rock is Opalinus clay because of its very low permeability; it is therefore an excellent barrier against nuclide transport. In the three proposed siting regions, Opalinus clay is present in sufficient volumes at a suitable depth. For a L/ILW repository six different possible siting regions were identified, five in Northern Switzerland and one in Central Switzerland. In the three siting regions found for a possible HLW repository, it would also be possible to built a combined repository for both HLW and L/ILW wastes.

  11. Multibarrier system preventing migration of radionuclides from radioactive waste repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olszewska Wioleta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Safety of radioactive waste repositories operation is associated with a multibarrier system designed and constructed to isolate and contain the waste from the biosphere. Each of radioactive waste repositories is equipped with system of barriers, which reduces the possibility of release of radionuclides from the storage site. Safety systems may differ from each other depending on the type of repository. They consist of the natural geological barrier provided by host rocks of the repository and its surroundings, and an engineered barrier system (EBS. The EBS may itself comprise a variety of sub-systems or components, such as waste forms, canisters, buffers, backfills, seals and plugs. The EBS plays a major role in providing the required disposal system performance. It is assumed that the metal canisters and system of barriers adequately isolate waste from the biosphere. The evaluation of the multibarrier system is carried out after detailed tests to determine its parameters, and after analysis including mathematical modeling of migration of contaminants. To provide an assurance of safety of radioactive waste repository multibarrier system, detailed long term safety assessments are developed. Usually they comprise modeling of EBS stability, corrosion rate and radionuclide migration in near field in geosphere and biosphere. The principal goal of radionuclide migration modeling is assessment of the radionuclides release paths and rate from the repository, radionuclides concentration in geosphere in time and human exposure to ionizing radiation

  12. Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economy, Kathleen M.; Helton, Jon Craig; Vaughn, Palmer

    1999-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a

  13. Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

    1999-10-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a

  14. Global thermo-mechanical effects from a KBS-3 type repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakami, E.; Olofsson, Stig-Olof

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to identify the global thermo-mechanical effects in the bedrock hosting a nuclear waste repository. Numerical thermo-mechanical modeling using distinct element models was performed. The number of fracture zones, the heat intensity of the waste, the material properties of the rock mass and the boundary conditions of the models were varied. Different models for multi-level repositories were also analyzed and compared to the main single-level case. Further, the global influence from the excavation of repository tunnels and deposition holes was examined by introducing weaker rock mass material properties in the repository region of one model. The maximum compression stress obtained for the main model is 44 MPa and occurs at the repository level after about 100 years of deposition. Due to thermal expansion, the rock mass displaces upward, and the maximum heave at the ground surface after 1000 years is calculated to be 16 cm. In the area close to the ground surface the horizontal stresses reduce, causing the rock to yield in tension down to a depth of about 80 meters. The fracture zones show opening displacements at shallow depths and closing and shearing at the repository level. The maximum displacements are 0.3-2.5 cm for closing, 0.0-0.8 cm for opening and 0.2-2.2 cm for shearing. The resultant stresses and displacements depend in large part on the assumptions made concerning the heat intensity of the waste. In the main model, an initial heat intensity of 10 W/m 2 is assumed, which gives larger effects than the case with 6 W/m 2 . Another important input parameter for the analysis is the Young's modulus of the rock mass. In the main model, a value of 30 GPa is assumed. Higher values of Young's modulus give larger thermo-mechanical effects. All multi-level repository layouts give rise to higher temperatures than the single-level layout, causing the compressive stresses to increase more at the repository level. The multi

  15. Low- and intermediate-level waste repository-induced effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leupin, O.X.; Marschall, P.; Johnson, L.; Cloet, V.; Schneider, J. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Smith, P. [Safety Assessment Management Ltd, Henley-On-Thames, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [Savage Earth Associates Ltd, Bournemouth, Dorset (United Kingdom); Senger, R. [Intera Inc., Ennetbaden (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    This status report aims at describing and assessing the interactions of the radioactive waste emplaced in a low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW) repository with the engineered materials and the Opalinus Clay host rock. The Opalinus Clay has a thickness of about 100 m in the proposed siting regions. Among other things the results are used to steer the RD and D programme of NAGRA. The repository-induced effects considered in this report are of the following broad types: - Thermal effects: i.e. effects arising principally from the heat generated by the waste and the setting of cement. - Rock-mechanical effects: i.e. effects arising from the mechanical disturbance to the rock caused by the excavation of the emplacement caverns and other underground structures. - Hydraulic and gas-related effects: i.e. the effects of repository resaturation and of gas generation, e.g. due to the corrosion of metals within the repository, on the host rock and engineered barriers. - Chemical effects: i.e. chemical interactions between the waste, the engineered materials and the host rock. Deep geological repositories are designed to avoid or mitigate the impact of potentially detrimental repository-induced effects on long-term safety. For the repository under consideration in the present report, an assessment of those repository-induced effects that remain shows that detrimental chemical and mechanical impacts are largely confined to the rock adjacent to the excavations, thermal impacts are minimal and gas effects can be mitigated by appropriate design measures to reduce gas production and provide pathways for gas transport that limit gas pressure build-up (engineered gas transport system, or EGTS). Specific measures that are part of the current reference design are discussed in relation to their significance with respect to repository-induced effects. The disposal system described in this report provides a system of passive barriers with multiple safety functions. The disposal

  16. Low- and intermediate-level waste repository-induced effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leupin, O.X.; Marschall, P.; Johnson, L.; Cloet, V.; Schneider, J.; Smith, P.; Savage, D.; Senger, R.

    2016-10-01

    This status report aims at describing and assessing the interactions of the radioactive waste emplaced in a low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW) repository with the engineered materials and the Opalinus Clay host rock. The Opalinus Clay has a thickness of about 100 m in the proposed siting regions. Among other things the results are used to steer the RD and D programme of NAGRA. The repository-induced effects considered in this report are of the following broad types: - Thermal effects: i.e. effects arising principally from the heat generated by the waste and the setting of cement. - Rock-mechanical effects: i.e. effects arising from the mechanical disturbance to the rock caused by the excavation of the emplacement caverns and other underground structures. - Hydraulic and gas-related effects: i.e. the effects of repository resaturation and of gas generation, e.g. due to the corrosion of metals within the repository, on the host rock and engineered barriers. - Chemical effects: i.e. chemical interactions between the waste, the engineered materials and the host rock. Deep geological repositories are designed to avoid or mitigate the impact of potentially detrimental repository-induced effects on long-term safety. For the repository under consideration in the present report, an assessment of those repository-induced effects that remain shows that detrimental chemical and mechanical impacts are largely confined to the rock adjacent to the excavations, thermal impacts are minimal and gas effects can be mitigated by appropriate design measures to reduce gas production and provide pathways for gas transport that limit gas pressure build-up (engineered gas transport system, or EGTS). Specific measures that are part of the current reference design are discussed in relation to their significance with respect to repository-induced effects. The disposal system described in this report provides a system of passive barriers with multiple safety functions. The disposal

  17. Some Key Features and Possible Origin of the Metamorphic Rock-Hosted Gold Mineralization in Buru Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifudin Idrus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.172This paper discusses characteristics of some key features of the primary Buru gold deposit as a tool for a better understanding of the deposit genesis. Currently, about 105,000 artisanal and small-scale gold miners (ASGM are operating in two main localities, i.e. Gogorea and Gunung Botak by digging pits/shafts following gold-bearing quartz vein orientation. The gold extraction uses mercury (amalgamation and cyanide processing. The field study identifies two types/generations of quartz veins namely (1 Early quartz veins which are segmented, sigmoidal, dis­continous, and parallel to the foliation of host rock. The quartz vein is lack of sulfides, weak mineralized, crystalline, relatively clear, and maybe poor in gold, and (2 Quartz veins occurred within a ‘mineralized zone’ of about 100 m in width and ~1,000 m in length. The gold mineralization is strongly overprinted by an argillic alteration zone. The mineralization-alteration zone is probably parallel to the mica schist foliation and strongly controlled by N-S or NE-SW-trending structures. The gold-bearing quartz veins are characterized by banded texture particularly colloform following host rock foliation and sulphide banding, brecciated, and rare bladed-like texture. The alteration types consist of propylitic (chlorite, calcite, sericite, argillic, and carbonation represented by graphite banding and carbon flakes. The ore mineralization is characterized by pyrite, native gold, pyrrhotite, and arsenopyrite. Cinnabar, stibnite, chalcopyrite, galena, and sphalerite are rare or maybe absent. In general, sulphide minerals are rare (<3%. Fifteen rock samples were collected in Wamsaid area for geochemical assaying for Au, Ag, As, Sb, Hg, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Eleven of fifteen samples yielded more than 1.00 g/t Au, in which six of them are in excess of 3.00 g/t Au. It can be noted that all high-grade samples are originally or containing limonitic materials, that suggest

  18. THM-coupled modeling of selected processes in argillaceous rock relevant to rock mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaikowski, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Scientific investigations in European countries other than Germany concentrate not only on granite formations (Switzerland, Sweden) but also on argillaceous rock formations (France, Switzerland, Belgium) to assess their suitability as host and barrier rock for the final storage of radioactive waste. In Germany, rock salt has been under thorough study as a host rock over the past few decades. According to a study by the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, however, not only salt deposits but also argillaceous rock deposits are available at relevant depths and of extensions in space which make final storage of high-level radioactive waste basically possible in Germany. Equally qualified findings about the suitability/unsuitability of non-saline rock formations require fundamental studies to be conducted nationally because of the comparatively low level of knowledge. The article presents basic analyses of coupled mechanical and hydraulic properties of argillaceous rock formations as host rock for a repository. The interaction of various processes is explained on the basis of knowledge derived from laboratory studies, and open problems are deduced. For modeling coupled processes, a simplified analytical computation method is proposed and compared with the results of numerical simulations, and the limits to its application are outlined. (orig.)

  19. Shear-flow coupling in non-planar rock joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makurat, A.; Barton, N.

    1985-01-01

    Crystalline rock masses are regarded as a possible host rock for permanent nuclear waste disposal. During the excavation of the required shafts and tunnels, the initial state of stress will be changed and cause a deformation of the rock mass and discontinuities. During the lifetime of the nuclear repository joint apertures may change due to thermally induced stress variations during the heating and cooling phase. As the conductivity of a joint is very sensitive to its aperture, fluid flow from and towards a repository, as well as the potential transport times of radionuclides are highly dependent on the deformability of the joints. Theoretical calculations of coupled flow in rock joints (Barton et al. 1984) predict an increase of conductivity of several orders of magnitude for the first few millimeters for shear displacement. The shear-dilation-conductivity coupling for two block sizes at two effective stress levels is shown

  20. Thermal-hydraulic-geochemical coupled processes around disposed high level nuclear waste in deep granite hosted geological repositories: frontier areas of advanced groundwater research in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Indian policy for permanent disposal of high level nuclear wastes with radionuclide having very long half lives include their immobilization in a stable matrix i.e. glasses of suitable composition, its storage in high integrity steel canisters and subsequent disposal in suitable host rock like granites at a depth of 400-500m in stable geological set up. The site for such disposal facilities are selected after vigorous assessment of their stability implying an exhaustive site selection methodology based on a large number of criteria and attributes. In India, an area of about 70000 square kilometers occupied by granites has been subjected to such evaluation for generating comprehensive database on host rock parameters. The sites selected after such intensive analysis are expected to remain immune to processes like seismicity, volcanism, faulting, uplift, erosion, flooding etc. even in distant future spanning over tens of thousands of years. Nevertheless, groundwater has emerged as the only credible pathway through which disposed waste can eventually find its way to accessible biosphere. Hence groundwater research constitutes one of the most important aspects in demonstration of safety of such disposal. The disposed waste due to continuous emission of decay heat creates high temperature field around them with resultant increase in groundwater temperature in the vicinity. Hot groundwater on reacting with steel canisters, backfill clays and cement used around the disposed canister, produces geochemical environment characterized by altered Ph, Eh and groundwater compositions. Acceleration in geochemical interaction among waste-groundwater-clay-cement-granite often results in dissolution or precipitation reactions along the groundwater flow paths i.e. fractures with resultant increase or decrease in their permeability. Thus thermal, hydraulic and geochemical processes work interdependently around the disposed waste. These coupled processes also control the release and

  1. Characterisation of gas transport properties of the Opalinus clay, a potential host rock formation for radioactive waste disposal; Caracterisation des proprietes des argiles d'Opalinus (roche d'accueil potentielle pour un stockage de dechets radioactifs) relatives au transport des gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschall, P. [Nagra - National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); Horseman, S. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Gimmi, T. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    The Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland has been identified as a potential host rock formation for the disposal of radioactive waste. Comprehensive understanding of gas transport processes through this low-permeability formation forms a key issue in the assessment of repository performance. Field investigations and laboratory experiments suggest an intrinsic permeability of the Opalinus Clay in the order of 10{sup -20} to 10{sup -21} m{sup 2} and a moderate anisotropy ratio {<=} 10. Porosity depends on clay content and burial depth; values of {approx} 0.12 are reported for the region of interest. Porosimetry indicates that about 10-30% of voids can be classed as macro-pores, corresponding to an equivalent pore radius > 25 nm. The determined entry pressures are in the range of 0.4-10 MPa and exhibit a marked dependence on intrinsic permeability. Both in situ gas tests and gas permeameter tests on drill-cores demonstrate that gas transport through the rock is accompanied by pore water displacement, suggesting that classical flow concepts of immiscible displacement in porous media can be applied when the gas entry pressure (i.e. capillary threshold pressure) is less than the minimum principal stress acting within the rock. Essentially, the pore space accessible to gas flow is restricted to the network of connected macro-pores, which implies a very low degree of desaturation of the rock during the gas imbibition process. At elevated gas pressures (i.e. when gas pressure approaches the level of total stress that acts on the rock body), evidence was seen for dilatancy controlled gas transport mechanisms. Further field experiments were aimed at creating extended tensile fractures with high fracture transmissivity (hydro- or gas-fractures). The test results lead to the conclusion that gas fracturing can be largely ruled out as a risk for post-closure repository performance. (authors)

  2. Test plan: Sealing of the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ), including Marker Bed 139 (MB139) and the overlying halite, below the repository horizon, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, E.H.

    1992-05-01

    This test plan describes activities intended to demonstrate equipment and techniques for producing, injecting, and evaluating microfine cementitious grout. The grout will be injected in fractured rock located below the repository horizon at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These data are intended to support the development of the Alcove Gas Barrier System (AGBS), the design of upcoming, large-scale seal tests, and ongoing laboratory evaluations of grouting efficacy. Degradation of the grout will be studied in experiments conducted in parallel with the underground grouting experiment

  3. Natural geochemical analogues of the near field of high-level nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apps, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    United States practice has been to design high-level nuclear waste (HLW) geological repositories with waste densities sufficiently high that repository temperatures surrounding the waste will exceed 100 degrees C and could reach 250 degrees C. Basalt and devitrified vitroclastic tuff are among the host rocks considered for waste emplacement. Near-field repository thermal behavior and chemical alteration in such rocks is expected to be similar to that observed in many geothermal systems. Therefore, the predictive modeling required for performance assessment studies of the near field could be validated and calibrated using geothermal systems as natural analogues. Examples are given which demonstrate the need for refinement of the thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modeling of near-field natural analogues and the extent to which present models can predict conditions in geothermal fields

  4. Hydrothermal modification of host rock geochemistry within Mo-Cu porphyry deposits in the Galway Granite, western Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolometti, Gavin; McCarthy, Will

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration of host rock is a process inherent to the formation of porphyry deposits and the required geochemical modification of these rocks is regularly used to indicate proximity to an economic target. The study involves examining the changes in major, minor and trace elements to understand how the quartz vein structures have influenced the chemistry within the Murvey Granite that forms part of the 380-425Ma Galway Granite Complex in western Ireland. Molybdenite mineralisation within the Galway Granite Complex occurred in close association with protracted magmatism at 423Ma, 410Ma, 407Ma, 397Ma and 383Ma and this continues to be of interest to active exploration. The aim of the project is to characterize hydrothermal alteration associated with Mo-Cu mineralisation and identify geochemical indicators that can guide future exploration work. The Murvey Granite intrudes metagabbros and gneiss that form part of the Connemara Metamorphic complex. The intrusion is composed of albite-rich pink granite, garnetiferous granite and phenocrytic orthoclase granite. Minor doleritic dykes post-date the Murvey Granite, found commonly along its margins. Field mapping shows that the granite is truncated to the east by a regional NW-SE fault and that several small subparallel structures host Mo-Cu bearing quartz veins. Petrographic observations show heavily sericitized feldspars and plagioclase and biotite which have undergone kaolinization and chloritisation. Chalcopyrite minerals are fine grained, heavily fractured found crystallized along the margins of the feldspars and 2mm pyrite crystals. Molybdenite are also seen along the margins of the feldspars, crystallized whilst the Murvey Granite cooled. Field and petrographic observations indicate that mineralisation is structurally controlled by NW-SE faults from the selected mineralization zones and conjugate NE-SW cross cutting the Murvey Granite. Both fault orientations exhibit quartz and disseminated molybdenite

  5. GRS' research on clay rock in the Mont Terri underground laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieczorek, Klaus; Czaikowski, Oliver [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit gGmbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    For constructing a nuclear waste repository and for ensuring the safety requirements are met over very long time periods, thorough knowledge about the safety-relevant processes occurring in the coupled system of waste containers, engineered barriers, and the host rock is indispensable. For respectively targeted research work, the Mont Terri rock laboratory is a unique facility where repository research is performed in a clay rock environment. It is run by 16 international partners, and a great variety of questions are investigated. Some of the work which GRS as one of the Mont Terri partners is involved in is presented in this article. The focus is on thermal, hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of host rock and/or engineered barriers.

  6. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100 0 C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced

  7. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100{sup 0}C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced.

  8. Properties of uranium and thorium in host rocks of multi-metal (Ag, Pb, U, Cu, Bi, Z, F) Big Kanimansur deposit (Tajikistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayziev, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-metal Big Kanimansur Deposit host rocks contain high averages of uranium and thorium which are more than clark averages by 7 and 2.5 times accordingly. The second property of radio-active elements distribution are low ratio of thorium to uranium. That criteria can be used as prospecting sings for flanks and depth of know ore fields as well as for new squares of multi-metal mineralisation

  9. Impact of Drill and Blast Excavation on Repository Performance Confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, R.; Francis, N.; Houseworth, J.; Kramer, N.

    2000-01-01

    There has been considerable work accomplished internationally examining the effects of drill and blast excavation on rock masses surrounding emplacement openings of proposed nuclear waste repositories. However, there has been limited discussion tying the previous work to performance confirmation models such as those proposed for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This paper addresses a possible approach to joining the available information on drill and blast excavation and performance confirmation. The method for coupling rock damage data from drill and blast models to performance assessment models for fracture flow requires a correlation representing the functional relationship between the peak particle velocity (PPV) vibration levels and the potential properties that govern water flow rates in the host rock. Fracture aperture and frequency are the rock properties which may be most influenced by drill and blast induced vibration. If it can be shown (using an appropriate blasting model simulation) that the effect of blasting is far removed from the waste package in an emplacement drift, then disturbance to the host rock induced in the process of drill and blast excavation may be reasonably ignored in performance assessment calculations. This paper proposes that the CANMET (Canada Center for Mineral and Energy Technology) Criterion, based on properties that determine rock strength, may be used to define a minimum PPV. This PPV can be used to delineate the extent of blast induced damage. Initial applications have demonstrated that blasting models can successfully be coupled with this criterion to predict blast damage surrounding underground openings. The Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain has used a blasting model to generate meaningful estimates of near-field vibration levels and damage envelopes correlating to data collected from pre-existing studies conducted. Further work is underway to expand this application over a statistical distribution of geologic

  10. Long term effects on potential repository sites: occurrence and diagenesis of anhydrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, A.H.; George, I.A.; Milodowski, A.E.; Darling, W.G.

    1985-10-01

    The report deals with the long-term behaviour of anhydrite as a potential host rock for deep disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The principal long-term effect on the integrity of such a repository is the possibility of penetration of groundwater and consequent transformation to gypsum. Therefore, in order to assess the chydrological and geochemical processes of hydration in detail, mineralogical and geochemical analyses have been carried out on anhydrite samples in a drillcore taken near Darlington, United Kingdom. The results are discussed in terms of the long-term integrity of anhydrite as a repository site. (U.K.)

  11. Some geochemical considerations for a potential repository site in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdal, B.R.; Bish, D.L.; Crowe, B.M.; Daniels, W.R.; Ogard, A.E.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vaniman, D.T.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1982-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, which is evaluating potential locations for a high-level waste repository at the Nevada Test Site and environs, is currently focusing its investigations on tuff, principally in Yucca Mountain, as a host rock. This paper discusses some of the geochemical investigations. Particular emphasis is placed on definition of some basic elements and necessary technical approaches for the geochemistry data acquisition and modeling program. Some site-specific tuff geochemical information that is important for site selection and repository performance will be identified and the current status of knowledge will then be discussed

  12. Final repositories for high-level radioactive waste; Endlagerung hochradioaktiver Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-10-15

    The brochure on final repositories for high-level radioactive waste covers the following issues: What is the origin of radioactive wastes? How large are the waste amounts? What is going to happen with the wastes? What is the solution for the Waste disposal? A new site search is started. Safety requirements for the final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Comparison of host rocks. Who is responsible and who will pay? Final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes worldwide. Short summary: History of the search for a final repository for high-level radioactive wastes in Germany.

  13. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the nearfield around a HLW repository in argillaceous formations. Vol. I. Laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Czaikowski, Oliver; Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2013-06-15

    All over the world, clay formations are being investigated as host medium for geologic disposal of radioactive waste because of their favourable properties, such as very low hydraulic conductivity against fluid transport, good sorption capacity for retardation of radionuclides, and high potential of self-sealing of fractures. The construction of a repository, the disposal of heat-emitting high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the backfilling and sealing of the remaining voids, however, will inevitably induce mechanical (M), hydraulic (H), thermal (T) and chemical (C) disturbances to the host formation and the engineered barrier system (EBS) over very long periods of time during the operation and post-closure phases of the repository. The responses and resulting property changes of the clay host rock and engineered barriers are to be well understood, characterized, and predicted for assessing the long-term performance and safety of the repository.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock

  15. Mineralogy and geochemistry of Skarn Fe orebody and syenodioritic intrusive host rock in Zeber Kuh prospect area (SW Bardaskan, South Khorasan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Narooie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Zeber Kuh prospect area is located southwest of Bardaskan, South Khorasan province, in the northeastern Iran. Lithologically, the area includes Rizu and Soltanieh Formations metamorphosed carbonate rocks, which were intruded by syenogranitic and syenodioritic intrusions. Field observations and laboratory studies such as structural controls of orebody, metasomatic replacement and formation of low temperature H2O-bearing minerals, and the occurrence of magnetite and pyrite associated with chlorite, epidote, calcite, and quartz indicate that  the iron mineralization is low temperature skarn-type. The source of Fe mineralization is probably a younger intrusive rock at depth. Hydrothermal ore fluid was ascended within fault zone and/or contact between the intrusive rock and the  carbonate unit and generated orebody. Iron grade ranges from 54 to 65 wt.% and sulfur value is > 3 wt.%. Magnetite chemistry and Ti, V, Al, Mn, Ni, and Cr contents are similar to skarn deposit. Biotite syenodiorite host rock has hypidiomorphic granular texture and it consists of plagioclase, K-feldspar, biotite, and apatite minerals. Chemically, this intrusive rock is K-series alkaline type, which was generated in within plate zone. This magma is characterized by strong enrichment in LREE, LILE (Rb, Cs, Ba, and K, HFSE (Nb, Zr, and Ti, and P elements. The primary magma is produced by low degree partial melting of garnet lherzolite from asthenospheric to boundary of asthenospheric-lithospheric mantle.

  16. Hydrothermal evolution of repository groundwaters in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apps, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwaters in the near field of a radioactive waste repository in basalt will change their chemical composition in response to reactions with the basalt. These reactions will be promoted by the heat generated by the decaying waste. It is important to predict both the rate and the extent of these reactions, and the secondary minerals produced, because the alteration process controls the chemical environment affecting the corrosion of the canister, the solubility and complexation of migrating radionuclides, the reactivity of the alteration products to radionuclides sorption, and the porosity and permeability of the host rock. A comprehensive review of the literature leads to the preliminary finding that hydrothermally altering basalts in geothermal regions such as Iceland lead to a secondary mineralogy and groundwater composition similar to that expected to surround a repository. Furthermore, laboratory experiments replicating the alteration conditions approximate those observed in the field and expected in a repository. Preliminary estimates were made of the rate of hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass and the zero-order dissolution rate of basaltic materials. The rates were compared with those for rhyolitic glasses and silicate minerals. Preliminary calculations made of mixed process alteration kinetics, involving pore diffusion and surface reaction suggest that at temperatures greater than 150 0 C, alteration proceeds so rapidly as to become pervasive in normally fractured basalt exposed to higher temperatures in the field. 70 references

  17. Studies of the behaviour of backfill taking into account the interaction between rock and backfill, and other sealing components at a salina repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diekmann, N.; Stuehrenberg, D.

    1991-09-01

    According to the present planning level of the designed Gorleben repository, the salt produced by opening up cavities for ultimate disposal will be used as salt fines for backfilling residual cavities after radioactive waste emplacement. The essential function properties of the backfill - compaction and permeability - were studied for salt fines, and the results achieved were discussed. (BBR) [de

  18. Safety-relevant assessment concerning the proposals for investigations in proposed locations for stage 3 of the deep geological repositories project; Sicherheitstechnisches Gutachten zum Vorschlag der in Etappe 3 SGT weiter zu untersuchenden geologischen Standortgebiete - Sachplan geologische Tiefenlager, Etappe 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-04-15

    This comprehensive report published by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI examines the proposals made by the Swiss National Cooperative for the disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) concerning proposed locations for deep waste repositories. Important basic considerations to be made when narrowing down the choice of host rock types and the selection of possible locations are discussed. These include, amongst others, safety concepts for the repositories, geological models and technical feasibility of repositories in Opalinus Clay, Brown Dogger layers and marl. The properties of various host rocks are discussed. Methods to be used in choosing at least two possible sites for repositories are considered. Also, the radioactive dosage to be expected at the various sites proposed is discussed. A safety-relevant comparison of the sites is made and an overall assessment is presented. The locations proposed for surface facilities at three proposed locations are discussed. The report is completed with an appendix containing tables and a list of relevant expert reports.

  19. Project Guarantee 1985. Final repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: The system of safety barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The safety barrier system for the type B repository for low- and intermediate-level waste is described. The barrier parameters which are relevant for safety analysis are quantified and associated error limits and data scatter are given. The aim of the report is to give a summary documentation of the safety analysis input data and their scientific background. For secure containment of radioactive waste safety barriers are used which effectively limit the release of radioactive material from the repository (release barriers) and effectively retard the entry of the original radioactive material into the biosphere (time barriers). In the case of low- and intermediate-level waste the technical safety barrier system comprises: waste solidification matrix (cement, bitumen and resin), immobilisation of the waste packages in containers using liquid cement, concrete repository containers, backfilling of remaining vacant storage space with special concrete, concrete lining of the repository caverns, sealing of access tunnels on final closure of the repository. Natural geological safety barriers - host rock and overlying formations - have the following important functions. Because of its stability, the host rock in the repository zone protects the technical safety barrier system from destruction caused by climatic effects and erosion for a sufficient length of time. It also provides for low water flow and favourable chemistry (reducing conditions)

  20. Electrical Resistance Tomography to Monitor Mitigation of Metal-Toxic Acid-Leachates Ruby Gulch Waste Rock Repository Gilt Edge Mine Superfund Site, South Dakota USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R.; Heath, G.; Richardson, A.; Paul, D.; Wangerud, K.

    2003-12-01

    At a cyanide heap-leach open-pit mine, 15-million cubic yards of acid-generating sulfides were dumped at the head of a steep-walled mountain valley, with 30 inches/year precipitation generating 60- gallons/minute ARD leachate. Remediation has reshaped the dump to a 70-acre, 3.5:1-sloped geometry, installed drainage benches and runoff diversions, and capped the repository and lined diversions with a polyethylene geomembrane and cover system. Monitoring was needed to evaluate (a) long-term geomembrane integrity, (b) diversion liner integrity and long-term effectiveness, (c) ARD geochemistry, kinetics and pore-gas dynamics within the repository mass, and (d) groundwater interactions. Observation wells were paired with a 600-electrode resistivity survey system. Using near-surface and down-hole electrodes and automated data collection and post-processing, periodic two- and three-dimensional resistivity images are developed to reflect current and changed-conditions in moisture, temperature, geochemical components, and flow-direction analysis. Examination of total resistivity values and time variances between images allows direct observation of liner and cap integrity with precise identification and location of leaks; likewise, if runoff migrates from degraded diversion ditches into the repository zone, there is an accompanying and noticeable change in resistivity values. Used in combination with monitoring wells containing borehole resistivity electrodes (calibrated with direct sampling of dump water/moisture, temperature and pore-gas composition), the resistivity arrays allow at-depth imaging of geochemical conditions within the repository mass. The information provides early indications of progress or deficiencies in de-watering and ARD- mitigation that is the remedy intent. If emerging technologies present opportunities for secondary treatment, deep resistivity images may assist in developing application methods and evaluating the effectiveness of any reagents

  1. Spent fuel performance in geologic repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1985-10-01

    The performance assessment of the waste package is a current area of study in the United States program to develop a geologic repository for nuclear waste isolation. The waste package is presently envisioned as the waste form and its surrounding containers and possibly a packing material composed of crushed host rock or mixtures of that rock with clays. This waste package is tied to performance criteria set forth in recent legislation. It is the goal of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program to obtain the necessary information on the waste package, in several geologic environments, to show that the waste package provides reasonable assurance of meeting established performance criteria. This paper discusses the United States program directed toward managing high-level radioactive waste, with emphasis on the current effort to define the behavior of irradiated spent fuel in repository groundwaters. Current studies are directed toward understanding the rate and nature (such as valence state, colloid form if any, solid phase controlling solubility) of radionuclide release from the spent fuel. Due to the strong interactive effect of radiation, thermal fields, and waste package components on this release, current spent fuel studies are being conducted primarily in the presence of waste package components over a wide range of potential environments

  2. Review of excavation methods and their implications for the near-field barrier of a deep underground repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The report reviews excavation techniques for use in the construction of deep underground radioactive waste repositories, gives a summary of responses of the host rock to excavation and the means of measuring that response and discusses techniques for predicting that response. The review of excavation techniques included technical developments and current practice. To this end an extensive database was developed reviewing major excavations in rock types relevant to disposal and the techniques employed. Creation of an underground opening alters the properties of the rock mass around it. This study identifies stress, displacement, rock mass deformability and permeability as key parameters and reviews how they may be determined. Finally the report discusses the techniques available for predicting the behaviour of the near-field host rock. This concentrates on methods of numerical analysis since existing empirical or analytical methods are not considered suitable. (author)

  3. Backfilling and sealing of repositories and access shafts and galleries in clay, granite and salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, L.M.; Davies, I.L.; Gera, F.; Jorda, M.; McEwen, T.; Neerdael, B.; Schmidt, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper summarizes the work carried out under ten Commission contracts in the field of backfilling and sealing radioactive waste repositories. It covers theoretical, laboratory and field trials and experiments involving three potential host types, namely clay, salt and hard rock. It concludes that maximum opportunity should be taken over the next 15 to 25 years with a view to obtaining first hand experience in real ground with real wastes

  4. High-level waste repository-induced effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leupin, O.X.; Marschall, P.; Johnson, L.; Cloet, V.; Schneider, J. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Smith, P. [Safety Assessment Management Ltd, Henley-On-Thames, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [Savage Earth Associates Ltd, Bournemouth, Dorset (United Kingdom); Senger, R. [Intera Inc., Ennetbaden (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    This status report aims at describing and assessing the interactions of the radioactive waste emplaced in a high-level waste (HLW) repository with the engineered materials and the Opalinus Clay host rock. The Opalinus Clay has a thickness of about 100 m in the proposed siting regions. Among other things the results are used to steer the RD and D programme of NAGRA. The repository-induced effects considered in this report are of the following broad types: - Thermal effects: i.e. effects on the host rock and engineered barriers arising principally from the heat generated by the waste. - Rock-mechanical effects: i.e. effects arising from the mechanical disturbance to the rock caused by the excavation of the emplacement rooms and other underground structures. - Hydraulic and gas-related effects: i.e. the effects of repository resaturation and of gas generation, e.g. due to the corrosion of metals within the repository, on the host rock and engineered barriers. - Chemical effects: i.e. chemical interactions between the waste, the engineered materials and the host rock, with a focus on chemical effects of the waste and engineered materials on the host rock. The assessment of the repository-induced effects shows that detrimental chemical and mechanical impacts are largely confined to the rock immediately adjacent to the excavations, thermal impacts are controllable by limiting the heat load and gas effects are limited by ensuring acceptably low gas production rates and by the natural tendency of the gas to escape along the excavations and the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) rather than through the undisturbed rock. Specific measures that are part of the current reference design are discussed in relation to their significance with respect to repository-induced effects. The SF/HLW emplacement rooms (emplacement drifts) are designed, constructed, operated and finally backfilled in such a way that formation of excavation damaged zones is limited. Specifically this is achieved

  5. High-level waste repository-induced effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leupin, O.X.; Marschall, P.; Johnson, L.; Cloet, V.; Schneider, J.; Smith, P.; Savage, D.; Senger, R.

    2016-10-01

    This status report aims at describing and assessing the interactions of the radioactive waste emplaced in a high-level waste (HLW) repository with the engineered materials and the Opalinus Clay host rock. The Opalinus Clay has a thickness of about 100 m in the proposed siting regions. Among other things the results are used to steer the RD and D programme of NAGRA. The repository-induced effects considered in this report are of the following broad types: - Thermal effects: i.e. effects on the host rock and engineered barriers arising principally from the heat generated by the waste. - Rock-mechanical effects: i.e. effects arising from the mechanical disturbance to the rock caused by the excavation of the emplacement rooms and other underground structures. - Hydraulic and gas-related effects: i.e. the effects of repository resaturation and of gas generation, e.g. due to the corrosion of metals within the repository, on the host rock and engineered barriers. - Chemical effects: i.e. chemical interactions between the waste, the engineered materials and the host rock, with a focus on chemical effects of the waste and engineered materials on the host rock. The assessment of the repository-induced effects shows that detrimental chemical and mechanical impacts are largely confined to the rock immediately adjacent to the excavations, thermal impacts are controllable by limiting the heat load and gas effects are limited by ensuring acceptably low gas production rates and by the natural tendency of the gas to escape along the excavations and the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) rather than through the undisturbed rock. Specific measures that are part of the current reference design are discussed in relation to their significance with respect to repository-induced effects. The SF/HLW emplacement rooms (emplacement drifts) are designed, constructed, operated and finally backfilled in such a way that formation of excavation damaged zones is limited. Specifically this is achieved

  6. Conceptual design of repository facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, H.; Engelmann, H.J.; Souquet, G.; Mayence, M.; Hamstra, J.

    1980-01-01

    As part of the European Economic Communities programme of research into underground disposal of radioactive wastes repository design studies have been carried out for application in salt deposits, argillaceous formations and crystalline rocks. In this paper the design aspects of repositories are reviewed and conceptual designs are presented in relation to the geological formations under consideration. Emphasis has been placed on the disposal of vitrified high level radioactive wastes although consideration has been given to other categories of radioactive waste

  7. Aspects on the gas generation and migration in repositories for high level waste in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebel, Andre; Buhmann, Dieter; Meleshyn, Artur; Moenig, Joerg; Spiessl, Sabine

    2013-07-01

    In a deep geological repository for high-level waste, gases may be produced during the post-closure phase by several processes. The generated gases can potentially affect safety relevant features and processes of the repository, like the barrier integrity, the transport of liquids and gases in the repository and the release of gaseous radionuclides from the repository into the biosphere. German long-term safety assessments for repositories for high-level waste in salt which were performed prior 2010 did not explicitly consider gas transport and the consequences from release of volatile radionuclides. Selected aspects of the generation and migration of gases in repositories for high-level waste in a salt formation are studied in this report from the viewpoint of the performance assessment. The knowledge on the availability of water in the repository, in particular the migration of salt rock internal fluids in the temperature field of the radioactive waste repository towards the emplacement drifts, was compiled and the amount of water was roughly estimated. Two other processes studied in this report are on the one hand the release of gaseous radionuclides from the repository and their potential impact in the biosphere and on the other hand the transport of gases along the drifts and shafts of the repository and their interaction with the fluid flow. The results presented show that there is some gas production expected to occur in the repository due to corrosion of container material from water disposed of with the backfill and inflowing from the host rock during the thermal phase. If not dedicated gas storage areas are foreseen in the repository concept, these gases might exceed the storage capacity for gases in the repository. Consequently, an outflow of gases from the repository could occur. If there are failed containers for spent fuel, radioactive gases might be released from the containers into the gas space of the backfill and subsequently transported together

  8. The new Wallula CO2 project may revive the old Columbia River Basalt (western USA) nuclear-waste repository project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael O.

    2018-02-01

    A novel CO2 sequestration project at Wallula, Washington, USA, makes ample use of the geoscientific data collection of the old nuclear waste repository project at the Hanford Site nearby. Both projects target the Columbia River Basalt (CRB). The new publicity for the old project comes at a time when the approach to high-level nuclear waste disposal has undergone fundamental changes. The emphasis now is on a technical barrier that is chemically compatible with the host rock. In the ideal case, the waste container is in thermodynamic equilibrium with the host-rock groundwater regime. The CRB groundwater has what it takes to represent the ideal case.

  9. Thermal Management and Analysis for a Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. A. Van Luik

    2004-01-01

    In the current Yucca Mountain repository design concept, heat from the emplaced waste (mostly from spent nuclear fuel) would keep the temperature of the rock around the waste packages higher than the boiling point of water for hundreds to thousands of years after the repository is closed. The design concept allows below-boiling portions of the pillars between drifts to serve as pathways for the drainage of thermally mobilized water and percolating groundwater by limiting the distance that boiling temperatures extend into the surrounding rock. This design concept takes advantage of host rock dry out, which would create a dry environment within the emplacement drifts and reduce the amount of water that might otherwise be available to enter the drifts and contact the waste packages during this thermal pulse. Table 1 provides an overview of design constraints related to thermal management after repository closure. The Yucca Mountain repository design concept also provides flexibility to allow for operation over a range of lower thermal operating conditions. The thermal conditions within the emplacement drifts can be varied, along with the relative humidity, by modifying operational parameters such as the thermal output of the waste packages, the spacing of the waste packages in the emplacement drifts, and the duration and rate of active and passive ventilation. A lower range has been examined to quantify lower-temperature thermal conditions (temperatures and associated humidity conditions) in the emplacement drifts and to quantify impacts to the required emplacement area and excavated drift length. This information has been used to evaluate the potential long-term performance of a lower-temperature repository and to estimate the increase in costs associated with operating a lower-temperature repository. This presentation provides an overview of the thermal management evaluations that have been conducted to investigate a range of repository thermal conditions and

  10. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. BEAN

    2004-09-27

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity.

  11. Screening methodology for site selection of a nuclear waste repository in shale formations in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoth, P.; Krull, P.; Wirth, H.

    2004-01-01

    The radioactive waste disposal policy in the Federal Republic of Germany is based on the principle that all types of radioactive waste must be disposed of in deep geological formations. Because of the favourable properties of rock salt and the existence of thick rock salt formations in Germany, so far most of the research in the field of radioactive waste disposal sites was focused on the study of the use of rock salt. In addition, German research organisations have also conducted generic research and development projects in alternative geological formations (Wanner and Brauer, 2001), but a comprehensive evaluation of their utilisation has been only done for parts of the crystalline rocks in Germany. Research projects on argillaceous rocks started relatively late, so that German experience is mainly connected to German research work with the corresponding European Underground Research Laboratories and the exploration of the former Konrad iron mine as a potential repository site for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation. The German Federal Government has signed in 2001 an agreement with national utility companies to end electricity generation by nuclear power. This decision affected the entire German radioactive waste isolation strategy and especially the repository projects. The utility companies agreed upon standstill of exploration at the Gorleben site and the Federal Ministry for the Environment tries to establish a new comprehensive procedure for the selection of a repository site, built upon well-founded criteria incorporating public participation. Step 3 of the planning includes the examination of further sites in Germany and the comparison with existing sites and concepts. Under these circumstances, argillaceous rock (clay and shale) formations are now a special area of interest in Germany and the development of a screening methodology was required for the evaluation of shales as host and barrier rocks for nuclear waste repositories. (author)

  12. The preliminary design and feasibility study of the spent fuel and high level waste repository in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valvoda, Z.; Holub, J.; Kucerka, M.

    1996-01-01

    In the year 1993, began the Program of Development of the Spent Fuel and High Level Waste Repository in the Conditions of the Czech Republic. During the first phase, the basic concept and structure of the Program has been developed, and the basic design criteria and requirements were prepared. In the conditions of the Czech Republic, only an underground repository in deep geological formation is acceptable. Expected depth is between 500 to 1000 meters and as host rock will be granites. A preliminary variant design study was realized in 1994, that analyzed the radioactive waste and spent fuel flow from NPPs to the repository, various possibilities of transportation in accordance to the various concepts of spent fuel conditioning and transportation to the underground structures. Conditioning and encapsulation of spent fuel and/or radioactive waste is proposed on the repository site. Underground disposal structures are proposed at one underground floor. The repository will have reserve capacity for radioactive waste from NPPs decommissioning and for waste non acceptable to other repositories. Vertical disposal of unshielded canisters in boreholes and/or horizontal disposal of shielded canisters is studied. As the base term of the start up of the repository operation, the year 2035 has been established. From this date, a preliminary time schedule of the Project has been developed. A method of calculating leveled and discounted costs within the repository lifetime, for each of selected 5 variants, was used for economic calculations. Preliminary expected parametric costs of the repository are about 0,1 Kc ($0.004) per MWh, produced in the Czech NPPs. In 1995, the design and feasibility study has gone in more details to the technical concept of repository construction and proposed technologies, as well as to the operational phase of the repository. Paper will describe results of the 1995 design work and will present the program of the repository development in next period

  13. Hard-rock GMPEs versus Vs30-Kappa Host-to-Target Adjustment Techniques : Why so Large Differences in High Frequency Hard-Rock Motion ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, P. Y.; Laurendeau, A.; Hollender, F.; Perron, V.; Hernandez, B.; Foundotos, L.

    2016-12-01

    Assessment of local seismic hazard on hard rock sites (1000 processing of the Japanese KiK-net recordings from stiff sites (500 deep, within-motion to outcropping motion, or on a deconvolution of surface recordings using the velocity profile and 1D simulation, which has been performed both in the response spectrum and Fourier domains. Each of these virtual "outcropping hard-rock motion" data sets has then been used to derive GMPEs with simple functional forms, using as site condition proxy the S-wave velocity at depth (VSDH), ranging from 1000 to 3000 m/s. Both sets provide very similar predictions, which are much smaller at high frequencies (f > 10 Hz) than those estimated with the traditional HTTA technique - by a factor up to 3-4,. These differences decrease for decreasing frequency, and become negligible at low frequency (f shallow, moderate velocity layers. Not only this resonant amplification is not correctly accounted for by the quarter-wavelength approach used in the traditional HTTA adjustment techniques, but it may also significantly impact and bias the κ measurements, and the (VS30- κ0) relationships implicitly used in HTTA techniques.

  14. Age and geochemistry of host rocks of the Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, central Panama: Implications for the Paleogene evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael J.; Hollings, Peter; Thompson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Jay M.; Burge, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, located in the Petaquilla district of central Panama, is hosted by a sequence of medium- to high-K calc-alkaline volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks. New crystallisation ages obtained from a granodiorite Petaquilla batholith and associated mineralised diorite to granodiorite porphyry stocks and dikes at Cobre Panama indicate that the batholith was emplaced as a multi-phase intrusion, over a period of 4 million years from 32.20 ± 0.76 Ma to 28.26 ± 0.61 Ma, while the porphyritic rocks were emplaced over a 2 million year period from 28.96 ± 0.62 Ma to 27.48 ± 0.68 Ma. Both the volcanic to sub-volcanic host rocks and intrusive rocks of the Cobre Panama deposit evolved via fractional crystallisation processes, as demonstrated by the major elements (e.g. Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and MgO) displaying negative trends with increasing SiO2. The Petaquilla intrusive rocks, including the diorite-granodiorite porphyries and granodiorite batholith, are geochemically evolved and appear to have formed from more hydrous magmas than the preceding host volcanic rocks, as evidenced by the presence of hornblende phenocrysts, higher degrees of large-ion lithophile element (LILE) and light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment and heavy rare earth element (HREE) depletion, and higher Sr/Y and La/Yb values. However, the degree of LREE enrichment, HREE depletion and La/Yb values are insufficient for the intrusive rocks to be considered as adakites. Collectively, the volcanic and intrusive rocks have LILE, REE and mobile trace element concentrations similar to enriched Miocene-age Cordilleran arc magmatism found throughout central and western Panama. Both the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc magmatic suites are geochemically more evolved than the late Cretaceous to Eocene Chagres-Bayano arc magmas from northeastern Panama, as they display higher degrees of LILE and LREE enrichment. The geochemical similarities between the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc magmas

  15. Possible effects of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository on consumer demand for goods and services produced in the host community. An overview of the Finnish study; Ydinjaetteen loppusijoituslaitoksen mahdolliset vaikutukset kuluttajien valintoihin ja loppusijoituspaikkakunnan tuotteiden menekkiin markkinoilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, I.; Niva, M.; Timonen, P. [Kuluttajatutkimuskeskus, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    The report provides an overview of a series of reports evaluating the possible impacts of a proposed Finnish high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository on consumer behavior and, subsequently, on the host community` s economy. In addition to the overview, the study consists of three parts: Report I reviews the literature on the impacts of analogous industrial facilities; Report II examines the possible reactions of industry and trade, and Report III studies the consumers` risk perceptions in relation to their consuming practices. Theoretically, this series of reports is based on previous research on risk perception, with two modifications. Report II studies products currently available on the consumer market to find out what possibilities the marketplace offers to a consumer interested in environmental risks to act according to his/her risk perception. Report III studies those everyday consuming practices on the basis of which consumers define risks. These two contexts mold the consumer reaction to risks that stem from industrial installations. The proposed HLNW repository benefits the host community in various direct and indirect ways, and may create new opportunities for developing the local economy. The proposed repository may also have negative impacts on the local economy. Food production in particular and, to a lesser extent, tourism might be affected harmfully. Consumer reaction is unlikely to be targeted at other goods produced in the proposed host communities. Under normal conditions (i.e., the repository functions as planned), consumers have fairly few possibilities to identify the products of this community without an extensive search for information, given the structure of the current food market: the proposed communities have few products with specific local identity. Also, fairly few consumers are willing to spend a substantial amount of time for studying the products and their raw materials in detail. Also, consumers are confident that they can manage

  16. Possible effects of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository on consumer demand for goods and services produced in the host community. An overview of the Finnish study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, I.; Niva, M.; Timonen, P.

    1998-12-01

    The report provides an overview of a series of reports evaluating the possible impacts of a proposed Finnish high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository on consumer behavior and, subsequently, on the host community' s economy. In addition to the overview, the study consists of three parts: Report I reviews the literature on the impacts of analogous industrial facilities; Report II examines the possible reactions of industry and trade, and Report III studies the consumers' risk perceptions in relation to their consuming practices. Theoretically, this series of reports is based on previous research on risk perception, with two modifications. Report II studies products currently available on the consumer market to find out what possibilities the marketplace offers to a consumer interested in environmental risks to act according to his/her risk perception. Report III studies those everyday consuming practices on the basis of which consumers define risks. These two contexts mold the consumer reaction to risks that stem from industrial installations. The proposed HLNW repository benefits the host community in various direct and indirect ways, and may create new opportunities for developing the local economy. The proposed repository may also have negative impacts on the local economy. Food production in particular and, to a lesser extent, tourism might be affected harmfully. Consumer reaction is unlikely to be targeted at other goods produced in the proposed host communities. Under normal conditions (i.e., the repository functions as planned), consumers have fairly few possibilities to identify the products of this community without an extensive search for information, given the structure of the current food market: the proposed communities have few products with specific local identity. Also, fairly few consumers are willing to spend a substantial amount of time for studying the products and their raw materials in detail. Also, consumers are confident that they can manage

  17. Proposals of geological sites for L/ILW and HLW repositories. Geological background. Text volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    On April 2008, the Swiss Federal Council approved the conceptual part of the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories. The Plan sets out the details of the site selection procedure for geological repositories for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and high-level waste (HLW). It specifies that selection of geological siting regions and sites for repositories in Switzerland will be conducted in three stages, the first one (the subject of this report) being the definition of geological siting regions within which the repository projects will be elaborated in more detail in the later stages of the Sectoral Plan. The geoscientific background is based on the one hand on an evaluation of the geological investigations previously carried out by Nagra on deep geological disposal of HLW and L/ILW in Switzerland (investigation programmes in the crystalline basement and Opalinus Clay in Northern Switzerland, investigations of L/ILW sites in the Alps, research in rock laboratories in crystalline rock and clay); on the other hand, new geoscientific studies have also been carried out in connection with the site selection process. Formulation of the siting proposals is conducted in five steps: A) In a first step, the waste inventory is allocated to the L/ILW and HLW repositories; B) The second step involves defining the barrier and safety concepts for the two repositories. With a view to evaluating the geological siting possibilities, quantitative and qualitative guidelines and requirements on the geology are derived on the basis of these concepts. These relate to the time period to be considered, the space requirements for the repository, the properties of the host rock (depth, thickness, lateral extent, hydraulic conductivity), long-term stability, reliability of geological findings and engineering suitability; C) In the third step, the large-scale geological-tectonic situation is assessed and large-scale areas that remain under consideration are defined. For the L

  18. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of Virginia and Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.R.

    1980-10-01

    This study is a detailed follow-up of a broad study of the Southeastern Piedmont by Acres American, Inc. (1978) based upon literature and existing knowledge. The purpose is to designate broad areas in which the rock type is favorable for field exploration for the possible designation of a site for disposal of solidified radioactive waste. The Acres study classified rock units as favorable, potentially favorable, and unfavorable. The objective of the present study is: (1) to review the criteria used in this classification, and (2) on the basis of a detailed knowledge of local rock units to reassign the rock types in the potentially favorable category to either the favorable or the unfavorable categories. As in the Acres study, the objective is to designate field study areas, not potential sites. This study was based entirely upon a literature study, discussions with persons knowledgeable of the region, and a personal acquaintance with the rocks and structures. No field work was done specifically for this project. No consideration was given to sociological, economic, or non-technical factors

  19. Fracture characteristics in Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Akahori, Kuniaki

    1999-11-01

    It is crucial for the performance assessment of geosphere to evaluate the characteristics of fractures that can be dominant radionuclide migration pathways from a repository to biosphere. This report summarizes the characteristics of fractures obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields surveys at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at outcrops and galleries throughout the country. The characteristics of fractures described in this report are fracture orientation, fracture shape, fracture frequency, fracture distribution in space, transmissivity of fracture, fracture aperture, fracture fillings, alteration halo along fracture, flow-wetted surface area in fracture, and the correlation among these characteristics. Since granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media, a large amount of fracture data is available in literature. In addition, granitic rock has been treated as a potential host rock in many overseas programs, and has JNC performed a number of field observations and experiments in granodiorite at the Kamaishi mine. Therefore, the characteristics of fractures in granitic rock are qualitatively and quantitatively clarified to some extent in this report, while the characteristics of fractures in another rock types are not clarified. (author)

  20. Hydrothermal conditions around a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunvik, R.; Braester, C.

    1981-12-01

    Numerical solutions for the hydrothermal conditions around a hard rock repository for nuclear fuel waste are presented. The objective of the present investigation is to illustrate in principle the effect of heat released from a hypothetical radioactive waste repository with regard to anisotropy in the rock permeability. Permeability and porosity are assumed to be constant or to decrease exponentially with depth. The hypothetical repository is situated below a horizontal ground surface or below the crest of a hill, and it is assumed that the water table follows the topography. Major interest in the analysis is directed towards the influence of anisotropy in the permeability on the flow patterns and travel times for water particles, being traced from the repository to the ground surface. The presented results show that anisotropy in the permeability may have a significant influence on the flow conditions around the repository and subsequently also on the travel times from the repository. (Authors)

  1. Nuclear waste repository research at the micro- to nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, T.; Denecke, M. A.

    2010-04-01

    Micro- and nano-focused synchrotron radiation techniques to investigate determinant processes in contaminant transport in geological media are becoming especially an increasingly used tool in nuclear waste disposal research. There are a number of reasons for this but primarily they are driven by the need to characterize actinide speciation localized in components of heterogeneous natural systems. We summarize some of the recent research conducted by researchers of the Institute of Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology using micro- and nano-focused X-ray beams for characterization of colloids and their interaction with minerals and of elemental and phase distributions in potential repository host rocks and actinide speciation in a repository natural analogues sample. Such investigations are prerequisite to ensuring reliable assessment of the long term radiological safety for proposed nuclear waste disposal sites.

  2. Long term effects on potential repository sites: the alteration of the Lower Oxford Clay during weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milowdowski, A.E.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Wilmot, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The report is one of a short series describing work carried out to investigate the long-term effects of various geological processes on the performance of both shallow and deep repositories for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. This paper deals with the alteration as a result of weathering of the Lower Oxford Clay, a potential host rock for shallow disposal of wastes. A description of the Lower Oxford Clay is given, along with the weathering of argillaceous rocks. Investigations of the weathering at the Elstow Storage Depot are described, as well as the implications for radioactive waste disposal. (U.K.)

  3. Preliminary waste acceptance requirements - Konrad repository project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennecke, P.W.; Warnecke, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    In Germany, the planned Konrad repository is proposed for the disposal of all types of radioactive wastes whose thermal influence upon the host rock is negligible. The Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz has established Preliminary Waste Acceptance Requirements (as of April 1990) for this facility. The respective requirements were developed on the basis of the results of site-specific safety assessments. They include general requirements on the waste packages to be disposed of as well as more specific requirements on the waste forms, the packaging and the radionuclide inventory per waste package. In addition, the delivery of waste packages was regulated. An outline of the structure and the elements of the Preliminary Waste Acceptance Requirements of April 1990 is given including comments on their legal status. (Author)

  4. Modelling of radionuclide transport along the underground access structures of deep geological repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poller, A. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Smith, P. [SAM Switzerland GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland); Mayer, G.; Hayek, M. [AF-Consult Switzerland AG, Baden (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    The arrangement and sealing of the access routes to a deep geological repository for radioactive waste should ensure that any radionuclide release from the emplacement rooms during the post closure phase does not by-pass the geological barriers of the repository system to a significant extent. The base case of the present study, where realistic values for the hydraulic properties of the seals and the associated excavation damage zones were assumed, assesses to what extent this is actually the case for different layout variants (ramp and shaft access and shaft access only). Furthermore, as a test of robustness of system performance against uncertainties related to such seals and the associated excavation damage zones, the present study also considers a broad spectrum of calculation cases including the hypothetical possibility that the seals perform much more poorly than expected and to check whether, consequently, the repository tunnel system and the access structures may provide significant release pathways. The study considers a generic repository system for high-level waste (HLW repository) and for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW repository), both with Opalinus Clay as the host rock. It also considers the alternative possibilities of a ramp or a shaft as the access route for material transport (waste packages, etc.) to the underground facilities. Additional shafts, e.g. for the transport of persons and for ventilation, are included in both cases. The overall modelling approach consists of three broad steps: (a) the network of tunnels and access structures is implemented in a flow model, which serves to calculate water flow rates along the tunnels and through the host rock; (b) all relevant transport paths are implemented in a radionuclide release and transport model, the water flow rates being obtained from the preceding flow model calculations; (c) individual effective dose rates arising from the radionuclides released from the considered repository

  5. Influence analysis of Github repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaomei; Yu, Shuo; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    With the support of cloud computing techniques, social coding platforms have changed the style of software development. Github is now the most popular social coding platform and project hosting service. Software developers of various levels keep entering Github, and use Github to save their public and private software projects. The large amounts of software developers and software repositories on Github are posing new challenges to the world of software engineering. This paper tries to tackle one of the important problems: analyzing the importance and influence of Github repositories. We proposed a HITS based influence analysis on graphs that represent the star relationship between Github users and repositories. A weighted version of HITS is applied to the overall star graph, and generates a different set of top influential repositories other than the results from standard version of HITS algorithm. We also conduct the influential analysis on per-month star graph, and study the monthly influence ranking of top repositories.

  6. Thermal management and analysis for a potential yucca mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Luik, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the current Yucca Mountain repository design concept, heat from the emplaced. waste (mostly from spent nuclear fuel.) would keep the temperature of the rock around the waste packages higher than the boiling point of water for hundreds to thousands of years after the repository is closed. The design concept allows below-boiling portions of the pillars between drifts to serve as pathways for the drainage of thermally mobilized water and percolating groundwater by limiting the distance that boiling temperatures extend into the surrounding rock. This design concept takes advantage of host rock dry out, which would create a dry environment within the emplacement drifts and reduce the amount of water that might otherwise be available to enter the drifts and contact the waste packages during this thermal pulse. The Yucca Mountain repository design concept also provides flexibility to allow for operation over a range of lower thermal operating conditions. The thermal conditions within the emplacement drifts can be varied, along with the relative humidity, by modifying operational parameters such as the thermal output of the waste packages, the spacing of the waste packages in the emplacement drifts, and. the duration and rate of active and passive ventilation. A lower range has been examined to quantify lower-temperature thermal conditions (temperatures and associated humidity conditions) in the emplacement drifts and to quantify impacts to the required emplacement area and excavated drift length. This information has been used to evaluate the potential long-term performance of a lower-temperature repository and to estimate the increase in costs associated with operating a lower-temperature repository. This presentation provides an overview of the thermal management evaluations that have been conducted to investigate a range of repository thermal conditions and includes a summary of the technical basis that supports these evaluations. The majority of the material

  7. Numerical modeling of magma-repository interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno

    2001-01-01

    This report explains the numerical programs behind a comprehensive modeling effort of magma-repository interactions. Magma-repository interactions occur when a magma dike with high-volatile content magma ascends through surrounding rock and encounters a tunnel or drift filled with either a magmatic

  8. Disposal of radioactive waste in Swedish crystalline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greis Dahlberg, Christina; Wikberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SKB, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is tasked with managing Swedish nuclear and radioactive waste. Crystalline rock is the obvious alternative for deep geological disposal in Sweden. SKB is, since 1988, operating a near surface repository for short-lived low and intermediate-level waste, SFR. The waste in SFR comprises operational and decommissioning waste from nuclear plants, industrial waste, research-related waste and medical waste. Spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in an interim facility while waiting for a license to construct a deep geological repository. The Swedish long-lived low and intermediate-level waste consists mainly of BWR control rods, reactor internals and legacy waste from early research in the Swedish nuclear programs. The current plan is to dispose of this waste in a separate deep geological repository, SFL, sometimes after 2045. Understanding of the rock properties is the basis for the design of the repository concepts. Swedish crystalline rock is mechanical stable and suitable for underground constructions. The Spent Fuel Repository is planned at approximately 500 meters depth in the rock at the Forsmark site. The host rock will keep the spent fuel isolated from human and near-surface environment. The rock will also provide the stable chemical and hydraulic conditions that make it possible to select suitable technical barriers to support the containment provided by the rock. A very long lasting canister is necessary to avoid release and transport of radionuclides through water conducting fractures in the rock. A canister designed for the Swedish rock, consists of a tight, 5 cm thick corrosion barrier of copper and a load-bearing insert of cast iron. To restrict the water flow around the canister and by that prevent fast corrosion, a bentonite buffer will surround the canister. Secondary, the bentonite buffer will retard a potential release by its strong sorption of radionuclides. The SFR repository is situated in

  9. Disposal of radioactive waste in Swedish crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greis Dahlberg, Christina; Wikberg, Peter [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    SKB, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is tasked with managing Swedish nuclear and radioactive waste. Crystalline rock is the obvious alternative for deep geological disposal in Sweden. SKB is, since 1988, operating a near surface repository for short-lived low and intermediate-level waste, SFR. The waste in SFR comprises operational and decommissioning waste from nuclear plants, industrial waste, research-related waste and medical waste. Spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in an interim facility while waiting for a license to construct a deep geological repository. The Swedish long-lived low and intermediate-level waste consists mainly of BWR control rods, reactor internals and legacy waste from early research in the Swedish nuclear programs. The current plan is to dispose of this waste in a separate deep geological repository, SFL, sometimes after 2045. Understanding of the rock properties is the basis for the design of the repository concepts. Swedish crystalline rock is mechanical stable and suitable for underground constructions. The Spent Fuel Repository is planned at approximately 500 meters depth in the rock at the Forsmark site. The host rock will keep the spent fuel isolated from human and near-surface environment. The rock will also provide the stable chemical and hydraulic conditions that make it possible to select suitable technical barriers to support the containment provided by the rock. A very long lasting canister is necessary to avoid release and transport of radionuclides through water conducting fractures in the rock. A canister designed for the Swedish rock, consists of a tight, 5 cm thick corrosion barrier of copper and a load-bearing insert of cast iron. To restrict the water flow around the canister and by that prevent fast corrosion, a bentonite buffer will surround the canister. Secondary, the bentonite buffer will retard a potential release by its strong sorption of radionuclides. The SFR repository is situated in

  10. Heterogeneous redox conditions, arsenic mobility, and groundwater flow in a fractured-rock aquifer near a waste repository site in New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthropogenic sources of carbon from landfill or waste leachate can promote reductive dissolution of in situ arsenic (As) and enhance the mobility of As in groundwater. Groundwater from residential-supply wells in a fractured crystalline-rock aquifer adjacent to a Superfund site ...

  11. Radioactive repository in Brazil - useful tools in suitable site selection; Repositorios radioativos no Brasil - ferramentas utilizadas na escolha de sitios adequados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prates, Sonia P.; Javier Rios, Francisco; Alves, James V.; Fuzikawa, Kazuo [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: pratess@cdtn.br

    2005-07-01

    Geological studies represent a useful tool in the selection of suitable areas for nuclear waste repository constructions. A detailed geological study can be obtained by structural - geological mapping, including tectonics studies; hydrogeological studies; petrological and geochemical studies of host rocks and geochemical studies of fluids in minerals. The study of the composition and behavior of fluids in minerals is based upon the study of solutions sometimes present inside the minerals, known as fluid inclusions. These solutions were imprisoned when minerals were formed and may represent the original conditions under which the minerals were formed. The working methodology allows to obtain these fluids presence and composition and to check their microfracturing and leaking probabilities. The LIFM ( Metallogenesis and Fluid Inclusions Laboratory) at CDTN is enable do develop some of these studies, mainly petrological and geochemical studies of host rocks and also geochemical studies of fluids in minerals. Some aspects of rocks used for nuclear waste repository constructions are discussed. (author)

  12. The FORGE (Fate Of Repository Gases) pan European project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The multiple barrier concept is the cornerstone of all proposed schemes for underground disposal of radioactive wastes. The concept invokes a series of barriers, both engineered and natural, between the waste and the surface. Achieving this concept is the primary objective of all disposal programmes, from site appraisal and characterisation to repository design and construction. However, the performance of the repository as a whole (waste, buffer, engineering disturbed zone, host rock), and in particular its gas transport properties, are still poorly understood. Issues still to be adequately examined that relate to understanding basic processes include: dilational versus visco-capillary flow mechanisms; long-term integrity of seals, in particular gas flow along contacts; role of the EDZ as a conduit for preferential flow; laboratory to field up-scaling. Understanding gas generation and migration is thus vital in the quantitative assessment of repositories and is the focus of the research in this proposal for an integrated, multidisciplinary project. The FORGE project is a pan-European project with links to international radioactive waste management organisations, regulators and academia, specifically designed to tackle the key research issues associated with the generation and movement of repository gasses with partners from 24 organisations in 12 European countries. It is supported by funding under the European Commission FP7 Euratom programme and runs from 2009 to 2013. Of particular importance are the long-term performance of bentonite buffers, plastic clays, indurated mud-rocks and crystalline formations. Further experimental data are required to reduce uncertainty relating to the quantitative treatment of gas in performance assessment. FORGE will address these issues through a series of laboratory and field-scale experiments, including the development of new methods for up

  13. Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael C.; Newell, Dennis L.; McCarney, Mary Kate

    2012-01-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

  14. Characterization of Geologic Structures and Host Rock Properties Relevant to the Hydrogeology of the Standard Mine in Elk Basin, Gunnison County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Manning, Andrew H.; Berger, Byron R.; Kremer, Yannick; Guzman, Mario A.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Schuller, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    The Standard Mine Superfund Site is a source of mine drainage and associated heavy metal contamination of surface and groundwaters. The site contains Tertiary polymetallic quartz veins and fault zones that host precious and base metal sulfide mineralization common in Colorado. To assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in its effort to remediate mine-related contamination, we characterized geologic structures, host rocks, and their potential hydraulic properties to better understand the sources of contaminants and the local hydrogeology. Real time kinematic and handheld global positioning systems were used to locate and map precisely the geometry of the surface traces of structures and mine-related features, such as portals. New reconnaissance geologic mapping, field and x-ray diffraction mineralogy, rock sample collection, thin-section analysis, and elemental geochemical analysis were completed to characterize hydrothermal alteration, mineralization, and subsequent leaching of metallic phases. Surface and subsurface observations, fault vein and fracture network characterization, borehole geophysical logging, and mercury injection capillary entry pressure data were used to document potential controls on the hydrologic system.

  15. Moessbauer and XRD Comparative Study of Host Rock and Iron Rich Mineral Samples from Paz del Rio Iron Ore Mineral Mine in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, M.; Perez Alcazar, G. A.; Moreira, A. M.; Speziali, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study between the host rock and the iron rich mineral samples from the Paz del Rio iron ore mineral mine in Colombia was performed using X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Diffraction results of the iron rich mineral sample show that goethite, hematite, quartz, kaolinite and siderite are the main phases, and that a small amount of illite is also present. By Moessbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (RT) the presence of all the above mentioned phases was detected except quartz as well as an additional presence of small amount of biotite. The goethite, which appears as four sextets with hyperfine fields of 33.5, 30.5, 27.5 and 18.5 T, respectively, is the majority phase. This result shows the different grades of formation of this oxyhydroxide. The Moessbauer spectrum of this sample at 80 K presents the same phases obtained at RT without any superparamagnetic effect. In this case the goethite appears as two sextets. Diffraction results of the host rock sample show a large amount of quartz and kaolinite and small amounts of illite and biotite, whereas by Moessbauer spectroscopy illite, kaolinite and biotite were detected.

  16. Modelling of Fracture Initiation, Propagation and Creep of a KBS-3V and KBS-3H Repository in Sparsely Fractured Rock with Application to the Design at Forsmark Candidate Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backers, Tobias; Stephansson, Ove

    2008-01-01

    The stability issues of deposition holes of a repository layout according to the KBS-3 concept in the sparsely fractured Forsmark granites are analysed with the emphasis on fracture mechanics. At the start of the project the rock mass is viewed as a continuum. In a second step explicit fracture networks are introduced and included in the numerical rock fracture models. The software Fracod2D was used for the rock fracture mechanics analysis. Assuming deposition holes located in a continuous, homogeneous elastic rock mass and The presented stress state of the rock mass the following results were obtained: For single KBS-3H deposition holes oriented in the direction of the minimum horizontal stress, Sh, bore hole breakouts are introduced for all depth levels. For KBS-3H holes which are oriented in direction of SH, no significant fracturing can be expected. In case of vertical deposition holes according to KBS-3V an increased risk of fracturing at greater depth levels (> 500m) is evident. At shallow depth levels ( 5MPa gives a favourable situation about spalling for the KBS-3H and KBS-3V layouts. To prevent spalling, it is important to build up a swelling pressure soon after excavation, so that the enhanced stresses in the surrounding of the deposition ii holes are reduced. This has a positive impact on other excavation activities and also on time-dependent fracturing. After excavation and filling of the deposition holes with subsequent increase of swelling pressure, the temperature will increase in the vicinity of the excavation. For the range of swelling pressures predicted for the KBS-3 concept, i.e. 5.5MPa to 7.2MPa, no significant fracturing for the KBS-3H concept with the axis parallel SH at depths below about 600m was discovered. The results from other layouts bare the risk of partly significant fracturing. About 60ka from closing the repository an ice cover of approximately 3km is expected over Forsmark. This dead load increases the in-situ stresses and

  17. Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site, as a host for a rock mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-02-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Climax pluton, at the Nevada Test Site, as the host for a granite mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Climax granitic pluton has been the site of three nuclear weapons effects tests: Hard Hat, Tiny Tot, and Piledriver. Geologic exploration and mapping of the granite body were performed at the occasion of these tests. Currently, it is the site Spent Fuel Test (SFT-C) conducted in the vicinity of and at the same depth as that of the Piledriver drifts. Significant exploration, mapping, and rock mechanics work have been performed and continue at this Piledriver level - the 1400 (ft) level - in the context of SFT-C. Based on our technical discussions, and on the review of the significant geological and rock mechanics work already achieved in the Climax pluton, based also on the ongoing work and the existing access and support, it is concluded that the Climax site offers great opportunities for a rock mechanics test facility. It is not claimed, however, that Climax is the only possible site or the best possible site, since no case has been made for another granite test facility in the United States. 12 figures, 3 tables

  18. Overview of adaptive phased management repository design development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization is implementing Adaptive Phased Management, Canada's plan for long-term management of used nuclear fuel. The organization is proceeding with the process for selecting a site in partnership with an informed and willing host community to safely and securely container and isolate used nuclear fuel in a deep geological repository in a suitable rock formation. Adaptive Phased Management is the culmination of more than 30 years of research, development and demonstration of repository concepts in Canada. Adaptive Phased Management uses a phased and adaptive step-wise approach to the multi-barrier system which is consistent with the long-term waste management approaches being developed in many other countries with nuclear power programs such as Sweden, Finland, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and France. The Nuclear Waste Management Organization is examining and developing conceptual designs for a deep geological repository and associated facilities for the placement of used nuclear fuel in long-lived containers. This paper will examine two of these generic conceptual designs which have recently been refined and updated. These conceptual designs will be used to support a pre-project review of repository design and safety by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. (author)

  19. Gas and water flow in an excavation-induced fracture network around an underground drift: A case study for a radioactive waste repository in clay rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Vaissière, Rémi; Armand, Gilles; Talandier, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) surrounding a drift, and in particular its evolution, is being studied for the performance assessment of a radioactive waste underground repository. A specific experiment (called CDZ) was designed and implemented in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in France to investigate the EDZ. This experiment is dedicated to study the evolution of the EDZ hydrogeological properties (conductivity and specific storage) of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone under mechanical compression and artificial hydration. Firstly, a loading cycle applied on a drift wall was performed to simulate the compression effect from bentonite swelling in a repository drift (bentonite is a clay material to be used to seal drifts and shafts for repository closure purpose). Gas tests (permeability tests with nitrogen and tracer tests with helium) were conducted during the first phase of the experiment. The results showed that the fracture network within the EDZ was initially interconnected and opened for gas flow (particularly along the drift) and then progressively closed with the increasing mechanical stress applied on the drift wall. Moreover, the evolution of the EDZ after unloading indicated a self-sealing process. Secondly, the remaining fracture network was resaturated to demonstrate the ability to self-seal of the COx claystone without mechanical loading by conducting from 11 to 15 repetitive hydraulic tests with monitoring of the hydraulic parameters. During this hydration process, the EDZ effective transmissivity dropped due to the swelling of the clay materials near the fracture network. The hydraulic conductivity evolution was relatively fast during the first few days. Low conductivities ranging at 10-10 m/s were observed after four months. Conversely, the specific storage showed an erratic evolution during the first phase of hydration (up to 60 days). Some uncertainty remains on this parameter due to volumetric strain during the

  20. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Evaluation of the Impact of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Couplings in Bentonite and Near-Field Rock Barriers on a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Sparsely Fractured Hard Rock. Report of BMT1C/WP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.

    2005-02-01

    This report presents the works performed for the third, also the last, phase (BMT1C) of BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project for the period of 1999-2002. The works of BMT1 is divided into three phases: BMT1A, BMT1B and BMT1C. The BMT1A concerns with calibration of the computer codes with a reference Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan. The objective is to validate the numerical approaches, computer codes and material models, so that the teams simulating tools are at a comparable level of maturity and sophistication. The BMT1B uses the calibrated codes to perform scoping calculations, considering varying degrees of THM coupling and varying permeability values of the surrounding rock for a reference generic repository design without fractures. The aim is to identify the coupling mechanisms of importance for construction, performance and safety of the repository. BMT1C concerns with scoping calculations with different coupling combinations for the case where a horizontal fracture intersects the deposition hole and a vertical fracture zone divides two adjacent deposition tunnel/hole system. A hydrostatic condition is applied along the vertical fracture as a hydraulic boundary condition. In addition, the SKI/KTH team performed an additional calculation case of a highly fractured rock mass with two orthogonal sets of fractures with a spacing of 0.5 m. The chosen measures for evaluating the long term safety and performance of the repository are the maximal temperature created by the thermal loading from the emplaced wastes, the time for resaturation of the buffer, the maximal swelling stress developed in the buffer, the structural integrity of the rock mass and the permeability evolution in the rock mass. The analyses fro BMT1C were conducted by four research teams: SKI/KTH (Sweden), CNSC (Canada), IRSN/CEA(France) and JNC (Japan), using FEM approach with different computer codes. From the results, it is clear that the

  1. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Evaluation of the Impact of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Couplings in Bentonite and Near-Field Rock Barriers on a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Sparsely Fractured Hard Rock. Report of BMT1C/WP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology; Nguyen, T.S. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] (eds.)

    2005-02-15

    This report presents the works performed for the third, also the last, phase (BMT1C) of BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project for the period of 1999-2002. The works of BMT1 is divided into three phases: BMT1A, BMT1B and BMT1C. The BMT1A concerns with calibration of the computer codes with a reference Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan. The objective is to validate the numerical approaches, computer codes and material models, so that the teams simulating tools are at a comparable level of maturity and sophistication. The BMT1B uses the calibrated codes to perform scoping calculations, considering varying degrees of THM coupling and varying permeability values of the surrounding rock for a reference generic repository design without fractures. The aim is to identify the coupling mechanisms of importance for construction, performance and safety of the repository. BMT1C concerns with scoping calculations with different coupling combinations for the case where a horizontal fracture intersects the deposition hole and a vertical fracture zone divides two adjacent deposition tunnel/hole system. A hydrostatic condition is applied along the vertical fracture as a hydraulic boundary condition. In addition, the SKI/KTH team performed an additional calculation case of a highly fractured rock mass with two orthogonal sets of fractures with a spacing of 0.5 m. The chosen measures for evaluating the long term safety and performance of the repository are the maximal temperature created by the thermal loading from the emplaced wastes, the time for resaturation of the buffer, the maximal swelling stress developed in the buffer, the structural integrity of the rock mass and the permeability evolution in the rock mass. The analyses fro BMT1C were conducted by four research teams: SKI/KTH (Sweden), CNSC (Canada), IRSN/CEA(France) and JNC (Japan), using FEM approach with different computer codes. From the results, it is clear that the

  2. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Asahina, Daisuke [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Fei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the EDZ, and (3) development of a THM model for the FE tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the purpose of model validation. The overall objective of these activities is to provide an improved understanding of EDZ evolution in clay repositories and the associated coupled processes, and to develop advanced relevant modeling capabilities.

  3. Provenance and tectonic setting of the Neoproterozoic clastic rocks hosting the Banana Zone Cu-Ag mineralisation, northwest Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelepile, Tebogo; Bineli Betsi, Thierry; Franchi, Fulvio; Shemang, Elisha; Suh, Cheo Emmanuel

    2017-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical data were combined in order to decipher the petrogenesis of the Neoproterozoic sedimentary succession associated with the Banana Zone Cu-Ag mineralisation (northwest Botswana), in the Kalahari Copperbelt. The investigated Neoproterozoic sedimentary succession is composed of two formations including the Ngwako Pan and the D'kar Formations. The Ngwako Pan Formation is made up of continental siliciclastic sediments, mainly sandstones interbedded with siltstones and mudstones, whereas the D'kar Formation is comprised of shallow marine laminated siltstones, sandstones and mudstones, with subordinate limestone. Copper-Ag mineralisation is essentially confined at the base of the D'kar Formation, which bears reduced organic components, likely to have controlled Cu-Ag precipitation. Sandstones of both the Ngwako Pan and the D'kar Formations are arkoses and subarkoses, composed of quartz (Q), feldspars (F) and lithic fragments (L). Moreover, geochemically the sandstones are considered as potassic and classified as arkoses. On the other hand, mudrocks of the D'kar Formation are finely laminated and are dominated by muscovite, sericite, chlorite and quartz. The modified chemical index of weathering (CIW‧) values indicated an intense chemical weathering of the source rock. The dominance of detrital quartz and feldspar grains coupled with Al2O3/TiO2 ratios (average 29.67 and 24.52 for Ngwako Pan and D'kar Formations, respectively) and Ni and Cr depletion in the sandstones, suggest a dominant felsic source. However, high concentrations of Ni and Cr and a low Al2O3/TiO2 ratio (block and deposited in a continental rift setting (passive margin) in a humid environment. The source rocks might have been the Palaeoproterozoic basement rocks (granitoids and granitic gneiss) and the Mesoproterozoic Kgwebe volcanic rocks exposed north of the study area.

  4. Engineering rock mass classification of the Olkiluoto investigation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeikaes, K. [ed.; Hagros, A.; Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    2000-06-01

    Olkiluoto in Eurajoki is being investigated as a possible site for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel from the Finnish nuclear power plants. The selection of the depth, placement and layout of the repository is affected by the constructability of the bedrock. The constructability, in turn, is influenced by several properties of the host rock, such as its Ethology, the extent of fracturing, its hydrogeological properties and rock engineering characteristics and also by the magnitude and orientation of the in situ stresses and the chemistry of the groundwater. The constructability can be evaluated by the application of a rock classification system in which the properties of the host rock are assessed against common rock engineering judgements associated with underground construction. These judgements are based partly on measurements of in situ stresses and the properties of the bedrock determined from rock samples, but an important aspect is also the practical experience which has been gained during underground excavation in similar conditions and rock types. The aim of the engineering rock mass classification was to determine suitable bedrock volumes for the construction of the repository and has used data from the site characterisation programme carried out at Olkiluoto, which consisted of both surface studies and borehole investigations. The classification specifies three categories of constructability - normal, demanding and very demanding. In addition, rock mass quality has also been classified according to the empirical Q-system to enable a comparison to be made. The rock mass parameters that determine the constructability of the bedrock at Olkiluoto depend primarily on the depth and the Ethology, as well as on whether construction takes place in intact or in fractured rock. The differences in the characteristics of intact rock within a single rock type have been shown to be small. The major lithological unit at Olkiluoto, the mica gneiss, lies in the

  5. Factors controlling Li concentration and isotopic composition in formation waters and host rocks of Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W.; Macpherson, Gwen; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hammack, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, water and whole rock samples from hydraulically fractured wells in the Marcellus Shale (Middle Devonian), and water from conventional wells producing from Upper Devonian sandstones were analyzed for lithium concentrations and isotope ratios (δ7Li). The distribution of lithium concentrations in different mineral groups was determined using sequential extraction. Structurally bound Li, predominantly in clays, accounted for 75-91 wt. % of total Li, whereas exchangeable sites and carbonate cement contain negligible Li (< 3%). Up to 20% of the Li is present in the oxidizable fraction (organic matter and sulfides). The δ7Li values for whole rock shale in Greene Co., Pennsylvania, and Tioga Co., New York, ranged from -2.3 to + 4.3‰, similar to values reported for other shales in the literature. The δ7Li values in shale rocks with stratigraphic depth record progressive weathering of the source region; the most weathered and clay-rich strata with isotopically light Li are found closest to the top of the stratigraphic section. Diagenetic illite-smectite transition could also have partially affected the bulk Li content and isotope ratios of the Marcellus Shale.

  6. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Staub, Isabelle; Knight, Les

    2005-02-01

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability to real problems in

  7. DECOVALEX III III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan (comp.) [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Staub, Isabelle (comp.) [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Knight, Les (comp.) [Nirex UK Ltd, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability

  8. Petrogenesis of volcanic rocks that host the world-class Agsbnd Pb Navidad District, North Patagonian Massif: Comparison with the Jurassic Chon Aike Volcanic Province of Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhier, Verónica E.; Franchini, Marta B.; Caffe, Pablo J.; Maydagán, Laura; Rapela, Carlos W.; Paolini, Marcelo

    2017-05-01

    We present the first study of the volcanic rocks of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation that host the Navidad world-class Ag + Pb epithermal district located in the North Patagonian Massif, Patagonia, Argentina. These volcanic and sedimentary rocks were deposited in a lacustrine environment during an extensional tectonic regime associated with the breakup of Gondwana and represent the mafic to intermediate counterparts of the mainly silicic Jurassic Chon Aike Volcanic Province. Lava flows surrounded by autobrecciated carapace were extruded in subaerial conditions, whereas hyaloclastite and peperite facies suggest contemporaneous subaqueous volcanism and sedimentation. LA-ICPMS Usbnd Pb ages of zircon crystals from the volcanic units yielded Middle Jurassic ages of 173.9 ± 1.9 Ma and 170.8 ± 3 Ma. In the Navidad district, volcanic rocks of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation show arc-like signatures including high-K basaltic-andesite to high-K dacite compositions, Rb, Ba and Th enrichment relative to the less mobile HFS elements (Nb, Ta), enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE), Ysbnd Ti depletion, and high Zr contents. These characteristics could be explained by assimilation of crustal rocks in the Jurassic magmas, which is also supported by the presence of zircon xenocrysts with Permian and Middle-Upper Triassic ages (281.3 Ma, 246.5, 218.1, and 201.3 Ma) and quartz xenocrysts recognized in these volcanic units. Furthermore, Sr and Nd isotope compositions suggest a contribution of crustal components in these Middle Jurassic magmas. High-K basaltic andesite has initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70416-0.70658 and ξNd(t) values of -5.3 and -4. High-K dacite and andesite have initial 87Sr/86Sr compositions of 0.70584-0.70601 and ξNd(t) values of -4,1 and -3,2. The range of Pb isotope values (206Pb/204Pb = 18.28-18.37, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.61-15.62, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.26-38.43) of Navidad volcanic rocks and ore minerals suggest mixing Pb sources with contributions of

  9. Single or multi-repository concept? A personal contribution to the discussion of pros and cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closs, K.-D.; Duphorn, K.; Kuehn, K.

    2002-01-01

    The coalition agreement concluded between the parties in government, i.e. SPD and Alliance 90/The Greens, after the 1998 federal elections provided for an approach to back-end fuel cycle conditions for German nuclear power plants which differed from the practice intended up to that point. Among other things, only one single repository in deep geologic formations is to be available approximately from 2030 on. Exploration of the Gorleben salt dome is to be interrupted because of prevailing doubts while, at the same time, a basic discussion is to be held about potentially suitable host rock varieties and sites. The 'Working Party of Selection Procedures for Repository Sites (AkEnd)' instituted by the federal government is to elaborate scientific siting criteria under these conditions. The authors, who are members of AkEnd, come to the conclusion, based on technical findings and the historical back-end fuel cycle and siting situation in Germany, that a multi-repository concept incorporates substantial advantages. These are the aspects referred to: - Back-end fuel cycle concept: The multi-repository concept offers clearcut advantages in the far advanced Konrad repository project. This is true also against the background of the volume of waste with negligible heat generation to be managed by public authorities. - Long-term safety: Advantages exist, among other things, with respect to technical safety regarding possible compromises in a single-repository concept and the possible restriction of the number of potential sites. - Methods of detection: Spreading the waste over two or more repositories offers benefits in the technical aspects of detection. - Cost: A differentiated assessment of the cost arising in connection with the total amount of waste to be stored in repositories indicates benefits of a multi-repository concept, especially for the public authorities. (orig.) [de

  10. Selection and durability of seal materials for a bedded salt repository: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Grutzeck, M.W.; Wakeley, L.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report details preliminary results of both experimental and theoretical studies of cementitious seal materials for use in a proposed nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. Effects of changes in bulk composition and environment upon phase stability and physical/mechanical properties have been evaluated for more than 25 formulations. Bonding and interfacial characteristics of the region between host rock and seal material or concrete aggregate and cementitious matrix for selected formulations have been studied. Compatibilities of clays and zeolites in brines typical of the SE New Mexico region have been investigated, and their stabilities reviewed. Results of these studies have led to the conclusion that cementitious materials can be formulated which are compatible with the major rock types in a bedded salt repository environment. Strengths are more than adequate, permeabilities are consistently very low, and elastic moduli generally increase only very slightly with time. Seal formulation guidelines and recommendations for present and future work are presented. 73 references, 25 figures, 61 tables

  11. Global thermo-mechanical effects from a KBS-3 type repository. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakami, E.; Olofsson, Stig-Olof; Hakami, H.; Israelsson, Jan

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this study has been to identify the global thermomechanical effects in the bedrock hosting a nuclear waste repository - i.e. the effects at large distances from the repository. Numerical thermomechanical modeling was performed in several steps, beginning with elastic continuum models and followed by distinct element models (3DEC), in which fracture zones are explicitly simulated. The number of fracture zones, the heat intensity of the waste, the material properties of the rock mass and the boundary conditions of the models were varied in different simulations. The results from the numerical modeling show that the principal stresses increase near the repository. The maximum stress obtained for the main model is 44 MPa and occurs at the repository level after about 100 years of deposition. Due to thermal expansion, the rock mass displaces upward, and the maximum heave at the ground surface after 1000 years is calculated to be 16 cm. In the area close to the ground surface, above the center of the repository, the horizontal stresses reduce, causing the rock to yield in tension down to a depth of about 80 m. In correspondence with the stress changes, the fracture zones show opening normal displacements at shallow depths and closing normal displacements and shearing at the repository level. The maximum displacements of the different fracture zones are 0.3-2.5 cm for closing, 0.0-0.8 cm for opening and 0.2-2.2 cm for shearing. Another important input parameter for the analysis is the Young's modulus of the rock mass. In the main model, a value of 30 GPa is assumed. Higher values of Young's modulus give larger thermo-mechanical effects. Other changes of the properties considered give minor changes of the rock mass behavior. All multi-level repository layouts give rise to higher temperatures than the single-level layout, causing the compressive stresses to increase more at the repository level. Fracture zone displacements caused by different layouts are

  12. NF-PRO research on a repository for vitrified waste and spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneyers, A.

    2006-01-01

    NF-PRO is a four-year (2004-2007) Integrated Project supported by funding under the Sixth Research (EURATOM) Programme of the European Commission. NF-PRO is coordinated by SCK C EN and investigates key processes in the near-field of geological repositories for the disposal of high-level vitrified waste and spent nuclear fuel. The near-field of a geological repository consists of the area surrounding the waste packages and is composed of several engineered barriers that enclose and confine the disposed waste. These barriers include the waste form, the waste canisters, backfills, seals, plugs and the part of the host rock that has been modified by the excavation of the repository. In all repository designs under investigation within EU Member States, the near-field plays an important role in ensuring the overall safety of disposal: its principal function is to retain radionuclides over extended periods of time and to minimise their release from the waste to the host rock. The main objective of NF-PRO is to integrate European research on the near field with the aim of enhancing common understanding of the long-term changes taking place in a deep repository. NF-PRO assesses how these changes affect the containment of the disposed radioactive waste. Knowledge generated by the project can be applied in waste management programmes to optimise repository designs and to make barriers functional and resource-efficient. The integration of results from detailed process studies in assessments on the overall near-field system performance is a key objective of NF-PRO. The level of integration envisaged by NF-PRO has not yet been achieved in earlier research projects supported by the European Commission. Accordingly, NF PRO represents a major step forward in the establishing of the scientific and technical basis for geological disposal and the safe management of radioactive wastes

  13. EBS modelling for the development of repository concepts tailored to siting environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, K.; Ueda, H.; Wakasugi, K.; Sakabe, Y.; Kitayama, K.; Umeki, H.; Takase, H.

    2007-01-01

    The Japanese siting approach for a HLW repository calls for volunteer host municipalities and thereby places particular emphasis on design flexibility. In particular, the repository concept needs to be tailored to the specific site characteristics. Starting from the H12 repository concept, NUMO has been examining a range of possible repository design options, including the EBS. In this paper. the requirements and strategy for the development of models for performance assessment and process understanding are discussed, taking into account the step-wise, iterative process of developing repository concepts. The areas requiring further development of models and databases in the long-term R and D programme have been identified as a 'wish list' that relates to the evaluation of a range of potential repository concepts, focusing on the near-field for the early stages of the development process. Among the issues on the list, NUMO has started the development of a flexible computer code for modelling three-dimensional mass transport to evaluate the impacts of various design options and components of the EBS. This tool has been applied to the analysis of the barrier effects of the tunnel plugs located in fractured rock. (authors)

  14. Thermal effects of the Santa Eulália Plutonic Complex (southern Portugal on the meta-igneous and metasedimentary host rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz, C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Santa Eulália Plutonic Complex (SEPC is a late-Variscan granitic body located in the northern part of the Ossa Morena Zone, a inner zone of the Variscan Iberian Massif. The SEPC host rocks are composed of meta-igneous and metasedimentary units, from Upper Proterozoic to Paleozoic ages, with a NW-SE structure, cross-cut by the SEPC. The SEPC host rocks, with low grade metamorphism show well preserved primary sedimentary or igneous mineralogical, textural and structural features. The thermal effect induced by the SEPC is restricted to the roof pendants. At N and NE of the SEPC, textures and paragenesis resulting from thermal metamorphism, are not related to the SEPC intrusion but to a previous magmatism, controlled by the NW-SE regional anisotropies. The restriction of the thermal effects to the pluton roof may be caused by a combination of several interrelated factors: higher volume of granitic mass, thermal effect by advection of fluids and longer period of prevalence of high thermal conditions. The geochemical study of SEPC host rocks shows the heterogeneous character and diversity of metasedimentary, igneous and meta-igneous rocks. The whole rock geochemical data indicate that all the metasedimentary lithologies derived from an upper continental crustal source and the igneous and meta-igneous rocks show no evidence of metasomatic effects by the SEPC emplacement.El Complejo Plutónico de Santa Eulalia (CPSE es un cuerpo granítico tardi-Varisco situado en la parte norte de la Zona de Ossa Morena, en la zona interior del Macizo Ibérico Varisco. Las rocas encajantes del CPSE están compuestas por unidades meta-ígneas y metasedimentarias, de edades que van desde el Proterozoico Superior hasta el Paleozoico, con una estructura de dirección NW-SE, cortada por el CPSE. Las rocas encanjantes del CPSE, con metamorfismo de bajo grado conservan estructuras, mineralogía y textura primarias. El efecto térmicoinducido por el CPSE se limita a los

  15. Considerations for developing seismic design criteria for nuclear waste storage repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, G.N.; Yanev, P.I.; Scholl, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    The function of seismic design criteria is to reduce the potential for hazards that may arise during various stages of the repository life. During the operational phase, the major concern is with the possible effects of earthquakes on surface facilities, underground facilities, and equipment. During the decommissioned phase, the major concern is with the potential effects of earthquakes on the geologic formation, which may result in a reduction in isolation capacity. Existing standards and guides or criteria used for the static and seismic design of licensed nuclear facilities were reviewed and evaluated for their applicability to repository design. This report is directed mainly toward the development of seismic design criteria for the underground structures of repositories. An initial step in the development of seismic design criteria for the underground structures of repositories is the development of performance criteria, or minimum standards of acceptable behavior. A number of possible damage modes are identified for the operating phase of the repository; however, no damage modes are foreseen that would perturb the long-term function of the repository, except for the possibility of increased permeability within the rock mass. Subsequent steps in formulating acceptable seismic design criteria for the underground structures involve the quantification of the design process. The report discusses the necessity of specifying the form of ground motion that would be needed for seismic analysis and the procedures that may be used for making ground motion predictions. Further discussions outline what is needed for analysis, including rock properties, failure criteria, modeling techniques, seismic hardening criteria for the host rock mass, and probabilistic considerations

  16. Coupled processes in repository sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, J.B.; Kelsall, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The significance of coupled processes in repository sealing is evaluated. In most repository designs, shaft seals will be located in areas of relatively low temperature perturbation, in which case the coupling of temperature with stress and permeability may be less significant than the coupling between stress and permeability that occurs during excavation. Constitutive relationships between stress and permeability are reviewed for crystalline rock and rocksalt. These provide a basis for predicting the development of disturbed zones near excavations. Field case histories of the degree of disturbance are presented for two contrasting rock types - Stripa granite and Southeastern New Mexico rocksalt. The results of field investigations in both rock types confirm that hydraulic conductivity or permeability is stress dependent, and that shaft seal performance may be related to the degree that stresses are perturbed and restored near the seal

  17. Metamorphic Rock-Hosted Orogenic Gold Deposit Type as a Source of Langkowala Placer Gold, Bombana, Southeast Sulawesi

    OpenAIRE

    Idrus, Arifudin; Nur, I; Warmada, I. W; Fadlin, Fadlin

    2011-01-01

    DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v6i1.114In 2008, placer gold was discovered in Langkowala area (Bombana Regency), Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia, and more than 60,000 traditional gold miners in the early 2009 have been operating by digging vertical pits and panning active stream sediments. The grade of placer gold ranges from 50 to 140 g/t. Local geological framework indicates that the placer gold is not related to volcanic rock-related hydrothermal gold deposit, e.g. epithermal, skarn or porphyry. This pa...

  18. Repository exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentz, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses exploration objectives and requirements for a nuclear repository in the U.S.A. The importance of designing the exploration program to meet the system performance objectives is emphasized and some examples of the extent of exploration required before the License Application for Construction Authorization is granted are also discussed

  19. Chemical and Mineralogical Features of Smectite from the Morron de Mateo Bentonite Deposit (Cabo de Gata, Almeria) in Relation to the Parent Rocks and the Alteration Processes Occurred After the Bentonite Formation: Analogies and Implications for the Engineered Clayey Barrier of a Deep Geological Rad waste Repository; Naturaleza de las Esmectitas del Yacimiento de Morron de Mateo (Cabo de Gata, Almeria) en Relacion con la Roca Madre y con los Procesos Posteriores a la Bentonitizacion: Implicaciones Analogicas para la Barrera de Ingenieria de un Almacenamiento Geologico de Residuos Radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelayo, M; Labajo, M A; Garcia Romero, L; Perez del Villar, L

    2009-10-12

    The Morron de Mateo bentonite deposit is being studied as a natural analogue of the thermal and geochemical effects on the clayey barrier of a Deep Geological Rad waste Repository (DGRR) after its closure, in relation to the radioactive decay of the fission products and the container corrosion. This bentonite deposit and their host rocks were intruded by a rhyodacitic volcanic dome that induced a hydrothermal metasomatic process affecting the bioclastic calcarenite beds close to the dome. Bentonite from the NE sector of the deposit have been chemically and mineralogically characterized. Pyroclastic rocks (white tuffs), epyclastic rocks (mass flow) and andesitic breccia all of them hydrothermally altered, have been studied at the site. Samples are composed of feldspars, quartz and amphybols, as inherited minerals, and phyllosilicates, zeolites, crystoballite and calcite, as new formed minerals. White tuffs have the highest phyllosilicate contents, mainly dioctahedral smectite of montmorillonite type. Epyclastic rocks and andesitic breccia have a highest proportion of inherited minerals, the new formed phillosilicates being di octahedral smectite of beidellite type and an ordered interlayer chlorite/smectite mineral, of corrensite type. Smectite from the epyclastic rocks have higher Fe and Mg contents and chemical variability, as a consequence of nature of their parent rocks. The presence of corrensite in the epyclastic rocks suggests that in the Morron de Mateo area a propilitic alteration process occurred after bentonite formation, which transformed Fe-Mg-rich smectite into corrensite. This transformation was probably favoured by the sub volcanic intrusion, which also produced a temperature increase in the geological media and a supply of Fe-Mg-rich solutions, which also were the responsible for the metasomatic transformations observed in the calcarenite beds. (Author) 57 refs.

  20. VerSi. A method for the quantitative comparison of repository systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaempfer, T.U.; Ruebel, A.; Resele, G. [AF-Consult Switzerland Ltd, Baden (Switzerland); Moenig, J. [GRS Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Decision making and design processes for radioactive waste repositories are guided by safety goals that need to be achieved. In this context, the comparison of different disposal concepts can provide relevant support to better understand the performance of the repository systems. Such a task requires a method for a traceable comparison that is as objective as possible. We present a versatile method that allows for the comparison of different disposal concepts in potentially different host rocks. The condition for the method to work is that the repository systems are defined to a comparable level including designed repository structures, disposal concepts, and engineered and geological barriers which are all based on site-specific safety requirements. The method is primarily based on quantitative analyses and probabilistic model calculations regarding the long-term safety of the repository systems under consideration. The crucial evaluation criteria for the comparison are statistical key figures of indicators that characterize the radiotoxicity flux out of the so called containment-providing rock zone (einschlusswirksamer Gebirgsbereich). The key figures account for existing uncertainties with respect to the actual site properties, the safety relevant processes, and the potential future impact of external processes on the repository system, i.e., they include scenario-, process-, and parameter-uncertainties. The method (1) leads to an evaluation of the retention and containment capacity of the repository systems and its robustness with respect to existing uncertainties as well as to potential external influences; (2) specifies the procedures for the system analyses and the calculation of the statistical key figures as well as for the comparative interpretation of the key figures; and (3) also gives recommendations and sets benchmarks for the comparative assessment of the repository systems under consideration based on the key figures and additional qualitative

  1. 3D numerical modelling of the thermal state of deep geological nuclear waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, Yu. N.

    2017-09-01

    One of the important aspects of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in deep geological repositories is ensuring the integrity of the engineered barriers which is, among other phenomena, considerably influenced by the thermal loads. As the HLW produce significant amount of heat, the design of the repository should maintain the balance between the cost-effectiveness of the construction and the sufficiency of the safety margins, including those imposed on the thermal conditions of the barriers. The 3D finite-element computer code FENIA was developed as a tool for simulation of thermal processes in deep geological repositories. Further the models for mechanical phenomena and groundwater hydraulics will be added resulting in a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) solution. The long-term simulations of the thermal state were performed for two possible layouts of the repository. One was based on the proposed project of Russian repository, and another features larger HLW amount within the same space. The obtained results describe the spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature filed inside the repository and in the surrounding rock for 3500 years. These results show that practically all generated heat was ultimately absorbed by the host rock without any significant temperature increase. Still in the short time span even in case of smaller amount of the HLW the temperature maximum exceeds 100 °C, and for larger amount of the HLW the local temperature remains above 100 °C for considerable time. Thus, the substantiation of the long-term stability of the repository would require an extensive study of the materials properties and behaviour in order to remove the excessive conservatism from the simulations and to reduce the uncertainty of the input data.

  2. Geologic report of the Maquoketa Shale, New Albany Shale, and Borden Group rocks in the Illinois Basin as potential solid waste repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droste, J.B.; Vitaliano, C.J.

    1976-06-01

    We have evaluated the Illinois Basin in order to select a ''target site'' for a possible solid nuclear waste repository. In the process we have been mindful of geology (particularly stratigraphy and lithology and structure), terrane, population density, land use, land ownership and accessibility. After taking these restrictions into account, we have singled out a strip of land in south central Indiana in which we have selected four potential sites worthy of further exploration. In three of the sites the geology, lithology, and depth below the surface are more than adequate for crypt purposes in two separate formations--the Maquoketa Shale of the Ordovician System and the New Albany Shale-Borden Group of the Upper Devonian-Mississippian Systems. The interval between the two is several hundred feet. The geology and associated features in the fourth site are undoubtedly similar to those in the first three. In all four selections a sizeable proportion of the land is in public ownership and the population density in the nonpublicly owned land is low. The geology, lithology, and position of the target formations have been projected into the sites in question from data provided by drill core records of the Indiana Geological Survey. Precise details would, of course, require exploratory drilling on the selected site

  3. Factors controlling Li concentration and isotopic composition in formation waters and host rocks of Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W.; Macpherson, Gwen; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hammack, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, water and whole rock samples from hydraulically fractured wells in the Marcellus Shale (Middle Devonian), and water from conventional wells producing from Upper Devonian sandstones were analyzed for lithium concentrations and isotope ratios (δ7Li). The distribution of lithium concentrations in different mineral groups was determined using sequential extraction. Structurally bound Li, predominantly in clays, accounted for 75-91 wt. % of total Li, whereas exchangeable sites and carbonate cement contain negligible Li (shale in Greene Co., Pennsylvania, and Tioga Co., New York, ranged from -2.3 to + 4.3‰, similar to values reported for other shales in the literature. The δ7Li values in shale rocks with stratigraphic depth record progressive weathering of the source region; the most weathered and clay-rich strata with isotopically light Li are found closest to the top of the stratigraphic section. Diagenetic illite-smectite transition could also have partially affected the bulk Li content and isotope ratios of the Marcellus Shale.

  4. Fifteen years of microbiological investigation in Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leupin, O.X. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Bernier-Latmani, R.; Bagnoud, A. [Swiss Federal Office of Technology EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Moors, H.; Leys, N.; Wouters, K. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Stroes-Gascoyne, S. [University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    Microbiological studies related to the geological disposal of radioactive waste have been conducted at the Mont Terri rock laboratory in Opalinus Clay, a potential host rock for a deep geologic repository, since 2002. The metabolic potential of microorganisms and their response to excavation-induced effects have been investigated in undisturbed and disturbed claystone cores and in pore- (borehole) water. Results from nearly 15 years of research at the Mont Terri rock laboratory have shown that microorganisms can potentially affect the environment of a repository by influencing redox conditions, metal corrosion and gas production and consumption under favourable conditions. However, the activity of microorganisms in undisturbed Opalinus Clay is limited by the very low porosity, the low water activity, and the largely recalcitrant nature of organic matter in the claystone formation. The presence of microorganisms in numerous experiments at the Mont Terri rock laboratory has suggested that excavation activities and perturbation of the host rock combined with additional contamination during the installation of experiments in boreholes create favourable conditions for microbial activity by providing increased space, water and substrates. Thus effects resulting from microbial activity might be expected in the proximity of a geological repository i.e., in the excavation damaged zone, the engineered barriers, and first containments (the containers). (authors)

  5. Fifteen years of microbiological investigation in Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leupin, O.X.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Bagnoud, A.; Moors, H.; Leys, N.; Wouters, K.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.

    2017-01-01

    Microbiological studies related to the geological disposal of radioactive waste have been conducted at the Mont Terri rock laboratory in Opalinus Clay, a potential host rock for a deep geologic repository, since 2002. The metabolic potential of microorganisms and their response to excavation-induced effects have been investigated in undisturbed and disturbed claystone cores and in pore- (borehole) water. Results from nearly 15 years of research at the Mont Terri rock laboratory have shown that microorganisms can potentially affect the environment of a repository by influencing redox conditions, metal corrosion and gas production and consumption under favourable conditions. However, the activity of microorganisms in undisturbed Opalinus Clay is limited by the very low porosity, the low water activity, and the largely recalcitrant nature of organic matter in the claystone formation. The presence of microorganisms in numerous experiments at the Mont Terri rock laboratory has suggested that excavation activities and perturbation of the host rock combined with additional contamination during the installation of experiments in boreholes create favourable conditions for microbial activity by providing increased space, water and substrates. Thus effects resulting from microbial activity might be expected in the proximity of a geological repository i.e., in the excavation damaged zone, the engineered barriers, and first containments (the containers). (authors)

  6. Rock mechanics in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsees, J.E.; Wigley, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The overall objective of the rock mechanics program of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation is to predict the response of a rock mass hosting a waste repository during its construction, operation, and postoperational phases. The operational phase is expected to be 50 to 100 yr; the postoperational phase will last until the repository no longer poses any potential hazard to the biosphere, a period that may last several thousand years. The rock mechanics program is concerned with near-field effects on mine stability, as well as far-field effects relative to the overall integrity of the geologic waste isolation system. To accomplish these objectives, the rock mechanics program has established interactive studies in numerical simulation, laboratory testing, and field testing. The laboratory and field investigations provide input to the numerical simulations and give an opportunity for verification and validation of the predictive capabilities of the computer codes. Ultimately the computer codes will be used to predict the response of the geologic system to the development of a repository. 3 references, 5 figures

  7. Mineral chemistry of magnetite from magnetite-apatite mineralization and their host rocks: examples from Kiruna, Sweden, and El Laco, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughm, Shannon G.; Hanchar, John M.; Tornos, Fernando; Westhues, Anne; Attersley, Samuel

    2017-12-01

    Interpretation of the mineralizing environment of magnetite-apatite deposits remains controversial with theories that include a hydrothermal or magmatic origin or a combination of those two processes. To address this controversy, we have analyzed the trace element content of magnetite from precisely known geographic locations and geologic environments from the Precambrian magnetite-apatite ore and host rocks in Kiruna, Sweden, and the Pliocene-Holocene El Laco volcano in the Atacama desert of Chile. Magnetite samples from Kiruna have low trace element concentrations with little chemical variation between the ore, host, and related intrusive rocks. Magnetite from andesite at El Laco, and dacite from the nearby Láscar volcano, has high trace element concentrations typical of magmatic magnetite. El Laco ore magnetite have low trace element concentrations and displays growth zoning in incompatible elements (Si, Ca, and Ce), compatible elements (Mg, Al, and Mn), large-ion lithophile element (Sr), and high field strength element (Y, Nb, and Th). The El Laco ore magnetite are similar in composition to magnetite that has been previously interpreted to have crystallized from hydrothermal fluids; however, there is a significant difference in the internal zoning patterns. At El Laco, each zoned element is either enriched or depleted in the same layers, suggesting the magnetite crystallized from a volatile-rich, iron-oxide melt. In general, the compositions of magnetite from these two deposits plot in very wide fields that are not restricted to the proposed fields in published discriminant diagrams. This suggests that the use of these diagrams and genetic models based on them should be used with caution.

  8. Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model Analyses of Heterogeneity and Thermal-Loading Factors for the Proposed Repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glascoe, L.G.; Buscheck, T.A.; Gansemer, J.; Sun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2002-01-01

    The MultiScale ThermoHydrologic Model (MSTHM) predicts thermohydrologic (TH) conditions in emplacement drifts and the adjoining host rock throughout the proposed nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The MSTHM is a computationally efficient approach that accounts for TH processes occurring at a scale of a few tens of centimeters around individual waste packages and emplacement drifts, and for heat flow at the multi-kilometer scale at Yucca Mountain. The modeling effort presented here is an early investigation of the repository and is simulated at a lower temperature mode and with a different panel loading than the repository currently being considered for license application. We present these recent lower temperature mode MSTHM simulations that address the influence of repository-scale thermal-conductivity heterogeneity and the influence of preclosure operational factors affecting thermal-loading conditions. We can now accommodate a complex repository layout with emplacement drifts lying in non-parallel planes using a superposition process that combines results from multiple mountain-scale submodels. This development, along with other improvements to the MSTHM, enables more rigorous analyses of preclosure operational factors. These improvements include the ability to (1) predict TH conditions on a drift-by-drift basis, (2) represent sequential emplacement of waste packages along the drifts, and (3) incorporate distance- and time-dependent heat-removal efficiency associated with drift ventilation. Alternative approaches to addressing repository-scale thermal-conductivity heterogeneity are investigated. We find that only one of the four MSTHM submodel types needs to incorporate thermal-conductivity heterogeneity. For a particular repository design, we find that the most influential parameters are (1) percolation-flux distribution, (2) thermal-conductivity heterogeneity within the host-rock units, (3) the sequencing of waste-package emplacement, and (4) the

  9. THM-coupled modeling of selected processes in argillaceous rock relevant to rock mechanics; THM-Gekoppelte Modellierung ausgewaehlter gesteinsmechanisch relevanter Prozesse im Tongestein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czaikowski, Oliver [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany). Repository Safety Research Div.

    2012-08-15

    Scientific investigations in European countries other than Germany concentrate not only on granite formations (Switzerland, Sweden) but also on argillaceous rock formations (France, Switzerland, Belgium) to assess their suitability as host and barrier rock for the final storage of radioactive waste. In Germany, rock salt has been under thorough study as a host rock over the past few decades. According to a study by the German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, however, not only salt deposits but also argillaceous rock deposits are available at relevant depths and of extensions in space which make final storage of high-level radioactive waste basically possible in Germany. Equally qualified findings about the suitability/unsuitability of non-saline rock formations require fundamental studies to be conducted nationally because of the comparatively low level of knowledge. The article presents basic analyses of coupled mechanical and hydraulic properties of argillaceous rock formations as host rock for a repository. The interaction of various processes is explained on the basis of knowledge derived from laboratory studies, and open problems are deduced. For modeling coupled processes, a simplified analytical computation method is proposed and compared with the results of numerical simulations, and the limits to its application are outlined. (orig.)

  10. Mineralogical and geochemical studies on apatites and phosphate host rocks of Esfordi deposit, Yazd province, to determine the origin and geological setting of the apatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Iron-apatite ore deposits well known as Kiruna iron type formed in association with calc-alkaline volcanism from Proterozoic to Tertiary (Hitzman et al., 1992. Liquid immiscibility in an igneous system was proposed to explain the formation of the iron oxides accompanying apatite in mineralized zones (Förster and Jafarzadeh, 1994; Daliran, 1999. The mode of ore formation however, is a matter in debate. Bafq region in Central Iran is one of the greatest iron mining regions in Iran with 750 million tons of reservoir. The majority of the iron deposits contains apatite as minor mineral and underwent metamorphism-alteration in varying degrees. The mode of formation and geological setting of Esfordi iron-apatite deposit in this region with an average of 13.9 wt% apatite are discussed using geochemical and mineralogical data along with field description. Materials and methods Fifty-three samples of mineralized zones and host rocks collected from 7 cross sections were studied by conventional microscopic methods. Seven representative samples were determined by XRD at Department of Physics, Shiraz University. Fifteen and six samples were also analyzed for major and trace elements using XRF at Binaloud Co. Iran, and ICP-MS at Labwest Minerals Analysis, Australia, respectively. Microprobe analyses were carried out on apatite in Geo Forschungs Zentrum Telegrafenberg at Potsdam University, Germany. Results Field observation shows that igneous host rocks in Esfordi were intensively altered by hydrothermal fluids. The ores are surrounded by wide altered halos. Petrographic investigation indicated that the most important alterations are of potassic, carbonatitic and silicification types. Magnetite and apatite occur as major minerals, accompanied by minor hematite and goethite in the mineralized zones. Rare Earth Element (REE minerals are present as minor phases in the ores. Three apatite mineralization types (vein, massive, and disseminated were

  11. Comparison of sorption measurements on argillaceous rocks and bentonite with predictions using the SGT-E2 approach to derive sorption data bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B; Marques Fernandes, M.

    2014-11-15

    In Stage 1 of the Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories, four rock types have been identified as being suitable host rocks for a radioactive waste repository, namely, Opalinus Clay for a high-level (HLW) and a low- and intermediate-level (L/ILW) repository, and 'Brauner Dogger', Effingen Member and Helvetic Marls for a L/ILW repository. Sorption data bases (SDBs) for all of these host rocks are required for the provisional safety analyses, including all of the bounding porewater and mineralogical composition combinations. In addition, SDBs are needed for the rock formations lying below Opalinus Clay (lower confining units) and for the bentonite backfill in the HLW repository. A detailed procedure was developed for deriving SDBs for argillaceous rocks (and bentonite) based on sorption edge measurements on illite (and montmorillonite), the hypothesis that 2:1 clay minerals are the dominant sorbents and a series of so called conversion factors which take into account the different radionuclide speciations in the different porewaters. Since this methodology for generating SDBs is relatively new, a validation and demonstration of the robustness and reliability of the sorption values derived was required. This report describes an extensive piece of work in which blind predictions of sorption values were compared with measured ones. Sorption isotherms were measured for the following metal ions Cs(I), Co(II), Ni(II), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) in a range of realistic porewater chemistries for a range of host rock mineralogies. In the end 53 isotherm data sets were measured. For each of these isotherms a prediction was made of the sorption at trace concentrations using the SDB derivation methodology. A comparison between measured and predicted values for each case was then made. This validation study shows that the methodology used for the derivation of the sorption data bases for argillaceous rocks and bentonite produces reliable sorption values. (authors)

  12. Nature of parent rocks, mineralization styles and ore genesis of regolith-hosted REE deposits in South China: An integrated genetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Hei Martin; Zhao, Wen Winston; Zhou, Mei-Fu

    2017-10-01

    Regolith-hosted rare earth element (REE) deposits, also called ion-adsorption or weathered crust elution-deposited REE deposits are distributed over Jiangxi, Guangdong, Fujian, Hunan, Guangxi and Yunnan provinces in South China. In general, these deposits can be categorized into the HREE-dominated type, for example the famous Zudong deposit in southern Jiangxi province and the LREE-dominated type, such as the Heling and Dingnan deposits in southern Jiangxi province. Most of these deposits form from weathering of biotite and muscovite granites, syenites, monzogranites, granodiorites, granite porphyries, and rhyolitic tuffs. The parent rocks are generally peraluminous, siliceous, alkaline and contain a variety of REE-bearing minerals. Mostly, REE patterns of regolith are inherited from the parent rocks, and therefore, characteristics of the parent rocks impose a significant control on the ore formation. Data compilation shows that autometasomatism during the latest stage of granite crystallization is likely essential in forming the HREE-enriched granites, whereas LREE-enriched granites could form through magmatic differentiation. These deposits are normally two- to three-fold, but could be up to ten-fold enrichment in REE compared to the parent granites, where the maximum enrichment usually occurs from the lower B to the upper C horizon. Ce shows different behavior with the other REEs. Strongly positive Ce anomalies commonly occur at the upper part of weathering profiles, likely due to oxidation of Ce3+ to Ce4+ and removal of Ce from soil solutions through precipitation of cerianite. Vertical pH and redox gradients in weathering crusts facilitate dissolution of REE-bearing minerals at shallow level and fixation of REE at depth through either adsorption on clay minerals or precipitation of secondary minerals. At the same time, mass removal of major elements plays an important role in concentrating REE in regolith. Combination of mass removal and eluviation

  13. VerSi - A Methodology for a Comparison of Potential Repository Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hund, Wilhelm

    2010-09-01

    In the year 2000 the moratorium on the exploration of the Gorleben salt dome as a potential repository for all kinds of radioactive waste became effective as a result of the consensus agreement between the Federal Government and the utilities about phasing out nuclear energy in Germany. All exploration activities were interrupted for at maximum ten years to clarify conceptual and safety relevant questions. A new set of safety requirements for the final disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in deep geological formations was established in July 2009 by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU). As the BMU intended to carry out a comparison of potential repository sites it was necessary to initiate the development of a methodology for the identification of the site with the highest level of safety. A comparison of different repository sites requires a tool ensuring most confident and objective criteria for the comparison, whereas up to present long-term safety analyses were focused on confirming the suitability of sites by meeting the protection objectives by the measures of dose and risk. Within the 2006 established project VerSi a methodology for comparing different sites in different host rocks will be developed on the basis of long-term safety analyses taking into account geoscientific databases, inventory of radioactive waste, waste containers, corresponding disposal concepts and the feasibility of appropriate backfilling and closure concepts. The development of the method is aiming at providing measures other than dose and risk for the evaluation of the level of safety. For testing the tools a HLW-repository hosted in a salt dome (Gorleben) will be compared with a generic HLW-repository in consolidated clay as a host rock. As until now in Germany no clay stone site has been investigated for hosting a HLW repository, the required data are transferred from international research projects and repository concepts

  14. Siting guidelines and their role in repository site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    The first requirement of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act was for the Secretary of Energy to issue general guidelines for siting repositories. The guidelines were to specify detailed geologic considerations that would be the primary criteria for the selection of sites in various host rocks, as well as factors that would qualify or disqualify any site from development as a repository. These guidelines were clearly intended to provide not only the framework for the siting program but also the stimulus for establishing effective communication and consultation among the parties involved in the program. The Act further required that the guidelines be a factor in the development of all future decision documents of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, including the environmental assessments that would accompany the nomination of sites for characterization, the site-characterization plans that are to be prepared before the sinking of exploratory shafts at any candidate site, and the environmental impact statement that is to support the recommendation of a site for development as a repository. More than two years after its passage, the intention of the Act for the guidelines has been realized. Concurred in by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on June 22, 1984, and issued by the Department in November 1984, the guidelines include postclosure technical guidelines that apply to conditions governing the long-term performance of the repository system; preclosure technical guidelines that apply to conditions governing the siting, construction, operation, and closure of the repository; and system guidelines whose objective is to ensure that the regulatory requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are met

  15. Deformations of fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.

    1977-09-01

    Results of the DBM and FEM analysis in this study indicate that a suitable rock mass for repository of radioactive waste should be moderately jointed (about 1 joint/m 2 ) and surrounded by shear zones of the first order. This allowes for a gentle and flexible deformation under tectonic stresses and prevent the development of large cross-cutting failures in the repository area. (author)

  16. Project Guarantee 1985. Final repository for high-level radioactive wastes: Safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive was involves preventing releases to the biosphere for a long period of time and subsequently limiting the magnitude of releases by means of a series of safety barriers: the waste solidification matrix (borosilicate glass), massive steel canisters in highly compacted bentonite, sealing of void spacer and access routes on repository closure. The geological barriers are formed by the crystalline bed-rock and the overlying sedimentary layers. In order to perform a safety assessment the behaviour of these technical barriers and of the host rock must be understood and this understanding must be translated into quantitative models which allow calculation of repository performance. For the particular case of a Swiss repository, the main criterion is the individual dose limit of 10 mrem/year, which is given in the safety guidelines of the Swiss authorities. The procedure for the safety analysis involves examination of all scenarios which could give rise to radionuclide release from the repository. Qualitative considerations of both the magnitude of their consequences and their likelihood are used in order to identify a restricted number of scenarios for quantitative analysis

  17. Geoengineering properties of potential repository units at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillerson, J.R.; Nimick, F.B.

    1984-12-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is currently evaluating volcanic tuffs at the Yucca Mountain site, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, for possible use as a host rock for a radioactive waste repository. The behavior of tuff as an engineering material must be understood to design, license, construct, and operate a repository. Geoengineering evaluations and measurements are being made to develop confidence in both the analysis techniques for thermal, mechanical, and hydrothermal effects and the supporting data base of rock properties. The analysis techniques and the data base are currently used for repository design, waste package design, and performance assessment analyses. This report documents the data base of geoengineering properties used in the analyses that aided the selection of the waste emplacement horizon and in analyses synopsized in the Environmental Assessment Report prepared for the Yucca Mountain site. The strategy used for the development of the data base relies primarily on data obtained in laboratory tests that are then confirmed in field tests. Average thermal and mechanical properties (and their anticipated variations) are presented. Based upon these data, analyses completed to date, and previous excavation experience in tuff, it is anticipated that existing mining technology can be used to develop stable underground openings and that repository operations can be carried out safely

  18. Logistics Modeling of Emplacement Rate and Duration of Operations for Generic Geologic Repository Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-11-01

    This study identified potential geologic repository concepts for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and (2) evaluated the achievable repository waste emplacement rate and the time required to complete the disposal for these concepts. Total repository capacity is assumed to be approximately 140,000 MT of spent fuel. The results of this study provide an important input for the rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) disposal cost analysis. The disposal concepts cover three major categories of host geologic media: crystalline or hard rock, salt, and argillaceous rock. Four waste package sizes are considered: 4PWR/9BWR; 12PWR/21BWR; 21PWR/44BWR, and dual purpose canisters (DPCs). The DPC concepts assume that the existing canisters will be sealed into disposal overpacks for direct disposal. Each concept assumes one of the following emplacement power limits for either emplacement or repository closure: 1.7 kW; 2.2 kW; 5.5 kW; 10 kW; 11.5 kW, and 18 kW.

  19. Logistics Modeling of Emplacement Rate and Duration of Operations for Generic Geologic Repository Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-01-01

    This study identified potential geologic repository concepts for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and (2) evaluated the achievable repository waste emplacement rate and the time required to complete the disposal for these concepts. Total repository capacity is assumed to be approximately 140,000 MT of spent fuel. The results of this study provide an important input for the rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) disposal cost analysis. The disposal concepts cover three major categories of host geologic media: crystalline or hard rock, salt, and argillaceous rock. Four waste package sizes are considered: 4PWR/9BWR; 12PWR/21BWR; 21PWR/44BWR, and dual purpose canisters (DPCs). The DPC concepts assume that the existing canisters will be sealed into disposal overpacks for direct disposal. Each concept assumes one of the following emplacement power limits for either emplacement or repository closure: 1.7 kW; 2.2 kW; 5.5 kW; 10 kW; 11.5 kW, and 18 kW.

  20. Mechanical effects associated with surface loading of dry rock due to glaciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahi, K.K.; Hunter, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Many scenarios of interest for a repository in the Pasco Basin begin with glaciation. Loading and unloading of joints and fractures due to the weight of ice sheets could affect the hydrologic properties of the host rock and surrounding units. Scoping calculations performed using two-dimensional numerical models with simplifying assumptions predict stress changes and uplift or subsidence caused by an advancing glacier. The magnitudes of surface uplift and subsidence predicted by the study agree well with previous independent predictions. Peak stress unloading near the repository horizon is a small fraction of the ambient stress. Any resultant aperture increase is likewise small. Based on the results of this study, mechanical loading caused by a glacier is expected to have a minimal effect on rock permeability, assuming that the excess compressive loads do not crush the rock. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Comparison of disposal concepts for rock salt and hard rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, R.

    1998-01-01

    The study was carried out in the period 1994-1996. The goals were to prepare a draft on spent fuel disposal in hard rock and additionally a comparison with existing disposal concepts for rock salt. A cask for direct disposal of spent fuel and a repository for hard rock including a safeguards concept were conceptually designed. The results of the study confirm, that the early German decision to employ rock salt was reasonable. (orig.)

  2. Metamorphic rock-hosted orogenic gold deposit style at Bombana (Southeast Sulawesi and Buru Island (Maluku: Their key features and significances for gold exploration in Eastern Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifudin Idrus

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, gold is commonly mined from epithermal-, porphyry-, and skarn-type deposits that are commonly found in volcanic belts along island arcs or active continental margin settings. Numerous gold prospects, however, were recently discovered in association with metamorphic rocks. This paper focuses on metamorphic rock-hosted gold mineralization in Eastern Indonesia, in particular the Bombana (SE Sulawesi and Buru Island (Maluku prospects. At Bombana, gold-bearing quartz-veins are hosted by the Pompangeo metamorphic complex. Sheared, segmented veins vary in thickness from 2 cm to 2 m. Gold is mainly present in the form of ‘free gold’ among silicate minerals and closely related to cinnabar, stibnite, tripuhyite, and in places, minor arsenopyrite. The gold distribution is erratic, however, ranging from below detection limit up to 134 g/t. At least three generations of veins are identified. The first is parallel to the foliation, the second crosscuts the first generation of veins as well as the foliation, and the late-stage laminated deformed quartz-calcite vein represents the third mineralization stage. The early veins are mostly massive to crystalline, occasionally brecciated, and sigmoidal, whereas the second-stage veins are narrower than the first ones and less subjected to brecciation. Gold grades in the second- and third-stage veins are on average higher than that in the earlier veins. Microthermometric and Raman spectrometric studies of fluid inclusions indicate abundant H2O-NaCl and minor H2O-NaCl-CO2 fluids. Homogenization temperatures and salinities vary from 114 to 283 ºC and 0.35 to 9.08 wt.% NaCl eq., respectively. Crush-leach analysis of fluid inclusions suggests that the halogen fluid chemistry is not identical to sea water, magmatic or epithermal related fluids, but tends to be similar to fluids in mesothermal-type gold deposits. In Buru Island (Gunung Botak and Gogorea prospects, two distinct generations of quartz veins

  3. Mineralogical assemblages forming at hyperalkaline warm springs hosted on ultramafic rocks: A case study of Oman and Ligurian ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavagnac, Valérie; Ceuleneer, Georges; Monnin, Christophe; Lansac, Benjamin; Hoareau, Guilhem; Boulart, Cédric

    2013-07-01

    We report on the mineralogical assemblages found in the hyperalkaline springs hosted on Liguria and Oman ophiolites based on exhaustive X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microprobe analyses. In Liguria, hyperalkaline springs produce a thin brownish calcite precipitate that covers the bedrock due to the concomitant atmospheric CO2 uptake and neutralization of the hyperalkaline waters. No brucite and portlandite minerals are observed. The discharge of alkaline waters in Oman ophiolite forms white-orange precipitates. Calcium carbonate minerals (calcite and/or aragonite) are the most abundant and ubiquitous precipitates and are produced by the same mechanism as in Liguria. This process is observed as a thin surface crust made of rhombohedral calcite. Morphological features of aragonite vary from needle-, bouquet-, dumbbell-, spheroidal-like habitus according to the origin of carbon, temperature, and ionic composition of the hyperalkaline springs, and the biochemical and organic compounds. Brucite is observed both at hyperalkaline springs located at the thrust plane and at the paleo-Moho. The varying mixing proportions between the surface runoff waters and the hyperalkaline ones control brucite precipitation. The layered double hydroxide minerals occur solely in the vicinity of hyperalkaline springs emerging within the bedded gabbros. Finally, the dominant mineralogical associations we found in Oman (Ca-bearing carbonates and brucite) in a serpentinizing environment driven by the meteoric waters are surprisingly the same as those observed at the Lost City hydrothermal site in a totally marine environment.

  4. Understanding large scale groundwater flow to aid in repository siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.; Brown, A.; Gascoyne, M.; Stevenson, D.R.; Ophori, D.U.

    1996-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) with support from Ontario Hydro has developed a concept for the safe disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste in a deep (500 to 1000 m) mined repository in plutonic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The disposal concept involves the use of multiple engineered and natural barriers to ensure long-term safety. The geosphere, comprised of the enclosing rock mass and the groundwater which occurs in cracks and pores in the rock, is expected to serve as an important natural barrier to the release and migration of wastes from the engineered repository. Although knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the groundwater in the rock at potential repository sites is needed to help design the engineered barriers of the repository it can also be used to aid in repository siting, to take greater advantage of natural conditions in the geosphere to enhance its role as a barrier in the overall disposal system

  5. Status of the safety concept and safety demonstration for an HLW repository in salt. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Buhmann, D.; Filbert, W.; and others

    2013-12-15

    Salt formations have been the preferred option as host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive waste in Germany for more than 40 years. During this period comprehensive geological investigations have been carried out together with a broad spectrum of concept and safety related R and D work. The behaviour of an HLW repository in salt formations, particularly in salt domes, has been analysed in terms of assessment of the total system performance. This was first carried out for concepts of generic waste repositories in salt and, since 1998, for a repository concept with specific boundary conditions, taking the geology of the Gorleben salt dome as an example. Suitable repository concepts and designs were developed, the technical feasibility has been proven and operational and long-term safety evaluated. Numerical modelling is an important input into the development of a comprehensive safety case for a waste repository. Significant progress in the development of numerical tools and their application for long-term safety assessment has been made in the last two decades. An integrated approach has been used in which the repository concept and relevant scientific and engineering data are combined with the results from iterative safety assessments to increase the clarity and the traceability of the evaluation. A safety concept that takes full credit of the favourable properties of salt formations was developed in the course of the R and D project ISIBEL, which started in 2005. This concept is based on the safe containment of radioactive waste in a specific part of the host rock formation, termed the containment providing rock zone, which comprises the geological barrier, the geotechnical barriers and the compacted backfill. The future evolution of the repository system will be analysed using a catalogue of Features, Events and Processes (FEP), scenario development and numerical analysis, all of which are adapted to suit the safety concept. Key elements of the

  6. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-05-23

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

  7. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive

  8. Consequences of the Thermal Transient on the Evolution of the Damaged Zone Around a Repository for Heat-Emitting High-Level Radioactive Waste in a Clay Formation: a Performance Assessment Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Weetjens, Eef; Sillen, Xavier; Vietor, Tim; Li, Xiangling; Delage, Pierre; Labiouse, Vincent; Charlier, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A proper evaluation of the perturbations of the host rock induced by the excavation and the emplacement of exothermic wastes is essential for the assessment of the long-term safety of high-level radioactive waste disposals in clay formations. The impact of the thermal transient on the evolution of the damaged zone (DZ) has been explored in the European Commission project TIMODAZ (thermal impact on the damaged zone around a radioactive waste disposal in clay host rocks, 2006-2010). This paper integrates the scientific results of the TIMODAZ project from a performance assessment (PA) point of view, showing how these results support and justify key PA assumptions and the values of PA model parameters. This paper also contextualises the significance of the thermal impact on the DZ from a safety case perspective, highlighting how the project outcomes result into an improved understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of the clay host rocks. The results obtained in the TIMODAZ project strengthen the assessment basis of the safety evaluation of the current repository designs. There was no evidence throughout the TIMODAZ experimental observations of a temperature-induced additional opening of fractures nor of a significant permeability increase of the DZ. Instead, thermally induced plasticity, swelling and creep seem to be beneficial to the sealing of fractures and to the recovery of a very low permeability in the DZ, close to that of an undisturbed clay host rock. Results from the TIMODAZ project indicate that the favourable properties of the clay host rock, which guarantee the effectiveness of the safety functions of the repository system, are expected to be maintained after the heating-cooling cycle. Hence, the basic assumptions usually made in PA calculations so far are expected to remain valid, and the performance of the system should not be affected in a negative way by the thermal evolution of the DZ around a radioactive waste repository in clay host rock.

  9. Host-rock controlled epigenetic, hydrothermal metasomatic origin of the Bayan Obo REEFe-Nb ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, P.R.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Yinchen, R.

    1992-01-01

    Bayan Obo, a complex rare earth element (REE)FeNb ore deposit, located in Inner Mongolia, P.R.C. is the world's largest known REE deposit. The deposit is chiefly in a marble unit (H8), but extends into an overlying unit of black shale, slate and schist unit (H9), both of which are in the upper part of the Middle Proterozoic Bayan Obo Group. Based on sedimentary structures, the presence of detrital quartz and algal fossil remains, and the 16-km long geographic extent, the H8 marble is a sedimentary deposit, and not a carbonatite of magmatic origin, as proposed by some previous investigators. The unit was weakly regionally metamorphosed (most probably the lower part of the green schist facies) into marble and quartzite prior to mineralization. Tectonically, the deposit is located on the northern flank of the Sino-Korean craton. Many hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of the Bayan Obo deposit; the studies reported here support an epigenetic, hydrothermal, metasomatic origin. Such an origin is supported by field and laboratory textural evidence; 232Th/208Pb internal isochron mineral ages of selected monazite and bastnaesite samples; 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating minimum mineral ages of selected alkali amphiboles; chemical compositions of different generations of both REE ore minerals and alkali amphiboles; and evidence of host-rock influence on the various types of Bayan Obo ores. The internal isochron ages of the REE minerals indicate Caledonian ages for various episodes of REE and Fe mineralization. No evidence was found to indicate a genetic relation between the extensive biotite granitic rocks of Hercynian age in the mine region and the Bayan Obo are deposit, as suggested by previous workers. ?? 1992.

  10. Pervasive remagnetization of detrital zircon host rocks in the Jack Hills, Western Australia and implications for records of the early geodynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Maloof, Adam C.; Tailby, Nicholas; Ramezani, Jahandar; Fu, Roger R.; Hanus, Veronica; Trail, Dustin; Bruce Watson, E.; Harrison, T. Mark; Bowring, Samuel A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas L.; Coe, Robert S.

    2015-11-01

    It currently is unknown when Earth's dynamo magnetic field originated. Paleomagnetic studies indicate that a field with an intensity similar to that of the present day existed 3.5 billion years ago (Ga). Detrital zircon crystals found in the Jack Hills of Western Australia are some of the very few samples known to substantially predate this time. With crystallization ages ranging from 3.0-4.38 Ga, these zircons might preserve a record of the missing first billion years of Earth's magnetic field history. However, a key unknown is the age and origin of magnetization in the Jack Hills zircons. The identification of >3.9 Ga (i.e., Hadean) field records requires first establishing that the zircons have avoided remagnetization since being deposited in quartz-rich conglomerates at 2.65-3.05 Ga. To address this issue, we have conducted paleomagnetic conglomerate, baked contact, and fold tests in combination with U-Pb geochronology to establish the timing of the metamorphic and alteration events and the peak temperatures experienced by the zircon host rocks. These tests include the first conglomerate test directly on the Hadean-zircon bearing conglomerate at Erawandoo Hill. Although we observed little evidence for remagnetization by recent lightning strikes, we found that the Hadean zircon-bearing rocks and surrounding region have been pervasively remagnetized, with the final major overprinting likely due to thermal and/or aqueous effects from the emplacement of the Warakurna large igneous province at ∼1070 million years ago (Ma). Although localized regions of the Jack Hills might have escaped complete remagnetization, there currently is no robust evidence for pre-depositional (>3.0 Ga) magnetization in the Jack Hills detrital zircons.

  11. Shaft seals for final high-level radioactive waste repositories. ELSA. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudla, W.; Schreiter, F.; Gruner, M.

    2013-01-01

    The state of the art in science and technology fir shaft seals with long-term stability is summarized regarding their applicability for high-level waste repository in Germany. The concepts and drafts for the shaft sealing systems ERAM, Asse, Konrad, the WIPP side, the RESEAL concept, the NAGRA concept and the project LASA are reviewed. The methodology of applying partial factors in a safety analysis is summarized and the applicability of this method for geotechnical sealing structures is confirmed. To establish geomechanical boundary conditions of the host rocks and clay stone the stress-strain behavior of the rock mass adjoining the shaft has to be identified including time-dependent thermo-mechanical processes. The general and special requirements for the design of shaft sealing systems, especially in salt rock and clay formations are described, derived from the safety requirements (BMU 2010). Finally general information needs were identified.

  12. Groundwater movements around a repository. Geological and geotechnical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stille, H.; Burgess, A.; Lindblom, U.E.

    1977-09-01

    The report was prepared as one of a series of technical reports within a study of the groundwater movements around a repository for radioactive waste in the Precambrian bedrock of Sweden. This assessment is intended to provide basic geotechnical data for the analysis. These data include properties and conditions that are representative of the intact rock, the rock mass in general, and the groundwater regime. As there exist a considerable range in the mineralogy of potentially suitable plutonic rocks and since a specific site has not yet been selected, all of the parameters presented in this report must be based on presumptive geological and hydrogeological conditions. Where possible, data for two potential site areas, namely Oskarshamn and Forsmark, are presented. This report is divided into four parts. First, a brief description of the procedure for modelling groundwater movements is presented, along with a tabulation of the important parameters. Secondly, a description of the geological and hydrogeological conditions of the Fennoscandian shield, as well as of the two general site areas, is given. The final two sections of the report provide thermomechanical and geohydrological characteristics and properties of the host rock

  13. Use of Groundwater Lifetime Expectancy for the Performance Assessment of Deep Geologic Radioactive Waste Repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaton, F.; Park, Y.; Normani, S.; Sudicky, E.; Sykes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Long-term solutions for the disposal of toxic wastes usually involve isolation of the wastes in a deep subsurface geologic environment. In the case of spent nuclear fuel, the safety of the host repository depends on two main barriers: the engineered barrier and the natural geological barrier. If radionuclide leakage occurs from the engineered barrier, the geological medium represents the ultimate barrier that is relied upon to ensure safety. Consequently, an evaluation of radionuclide travel times from the repository to the biosphere is critically important in a performance assessment analysis. In this study, we develop a travel time framework based on the concept of groundwater lifetime expectancy as a safety indicator. Lifetime expectancy characterizes the time radionuclides will spend in the subsurface after their release from the repository and prior to discharging into the biosphere. The probability density function of lifetime expectancy is computed throughout the host rock by solving the backward-in-time solute transport equation subject to a properly posed set of boundary conditions. It can then be used to define optimal repository locations. In a second step, the risk associated with selected sites can be evaluated by simulating an appropriate contaminant release history. The proposed methodology is applied in the context of a typical Canadian Shield environment. Based on a statistically-generated three-dimension network of fracture zones embedded in the granitic host rock, the sensitivity and the uncertainty of lifetime expectancy to the hydraulic and dispersive properties of the fracture network, including the impact of conditioning via their surface expressions, is computed in order to demonstrate the utility of the methodology.

  14. The carbonaceous phyllite rock-hosted Pedra Verde copper mine, Borborema Province, Brazil: Stable isotope constraints, structural controls and metallogenic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Nogueira de Matos, José Henrique; Saraiva dos Santos, Ticiano José; Virgínia Soares Monteiro, Lena

    2017-12-01

    The Pedra Verde Copper Mine is located in the Viçosa do Ceará municipality, State of Ceará, NE Brazil. The copper mineralization is hosted by the Pedra Verde Phyllite, which is a carbonaceous chlorite-calcite phyllite with subordinate biotite. It belongs to the Neoproterozoic Martinópole Group of the Médio Coreaú Domain, Borborema Province. The Pedra Verde deposit is stratabound and its ore zoning is conspicuous, according to the following sequence, from bottom to top: marcasite/pyrite, native silver, chalcopyrite, bornite, chalcocite, native copper and hematite. Barite and carbonaceous material are reported in ore zones. Zoning reflects the ore formation within a redox boundary developed due to the interaction between oxidized copper- and sulfate-bearing fluids and the reduced phyllite. Structural control on mineralization is evidenced by the association of the ore minerals with veins, hinge folds, shadow pressures, and mylonitic foliation. It was mainly exercised by a dextral transcurrent shear zone developed during the third deformational stage identified in the Médio Coreaú Domain between 590 Ma and 570 Ma. This points to the importance of epigenetic, post-metamorphic deformational events for ore formation. Oxygen isotopic composition (δ18OH2O = 8.94 to 11.28‰, at 250 to 300 °C) estimated for the hydrothermal fluids in equilibrium with calcite indicates metamorphic or evolved meteoric isotopic signatures. The δ13CPDB values (-2.60 to -9.25‰) obtained for hydrothermal calcite indicate mixing of carbon sources derived from marine carbonate rocks and carbonaceous material. The δ34SCDT values (14.88 to 36.91‰) of sulfides suggest evaporites as sulfate sources or a closed system in relation to SO42- availability to form H2S. Carbonaceous matter had a key role in thermochemical sulfate processes and sulfide precipitation. The Pedra Verde Copper Mine is considered the first stratabound meta-sedimentary rock-hosted copper deposit described in Brazil

  15. Comparative geology and geochemistry of sedimentary-rock-hosted (Carlin Type) gold deposits in the People's Republic of China and in Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiping; Peters, Stephen G.

    1998-01-01

    Sedimentary-rock-hosted (Carlin-type) gold deposits have been considered economically significant and geologically distinct since the early 1960's. This report consists of a nine-part text and an interactive database. This small database is to help Western companies get more information about these gold deposits in China, and to help geologists who are interested in world Carlin-type deposits conduct research on them. Because of their economic significance and geological distinctiveness, these deposits have caught the interest of economic geologists all over the world since the early 1960's. Similar deposits have been discovered in China, Australia, Dominican Republic, Spain, and Russia besides Nevada. Perhaps most significant are the 165 Carlin-type gold deposits that were found in southwest China during the past 15 years. Of these, at least 19 deposits have proven to be of substantial tonnage, making China the second leading country to exploit such deposits. With the increasing interest in Chinese Carlin-type gold deposits, some western companies and geologists desire to get more information about these Chinese deposits. This seems to have been very difficult because the literature was in Chinese. It is estimated that several hundred scientific publications (including papers, books, and technical reports) have been published. This database of Chinese Carlin-type Gold deposits is built on the documentation published during the most recent 10 years and includes six subjects, which consist of 165 records and 30 fields. A new Proterozoic-age sedimentary-rock-hosted gold deposit in northeastern P.R. China also is described. Note that for the old version 1.1 on the CD-ROM, the latitude and longitude locations of the mineral occurrences have been estimated from sketch maps and journal articles and are not intended for digital analysis. One of the improvements in this version 1.2 is the accuracy of geographic data. Version 1.3 updates to the database and includes maps

  16. Learning Object Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    This chapter looks at the development and nature of learning objects, meta-tagging standards and taxonomies, learning object repositories, learning object repository characteristics, and types of learning object repositories, with type examples. (Contains 1 table.)

  17. The geochemical immobilization of uranium in a spent fuel