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  1. The 10 basic requirements for a scientific paper reporting antioxidant, antimutagenic or anticarcinogenic potential of test substances in in vitro experiments and animal studies in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhagen, H.; Aruoma, O.I.; van Delft, J.H.M.;

    2003-01-01

    future, it has become essential that studies reported in this journal reflect an adequate level of scientific scrutiny. Therefore a set of essential characteristics of studies has been defined. These basic requirements are default properties rather than non-negotiables: deviations are possible and useful......, provided they can be justified on scientific grounds. The 10 basic requirements for a scientific paper reporting antioxidant, antimutagenic or anticarcinogenic potential of test substances in in vitro experiments and animal studies in vivo concern the following areas: (1) Hypothesis-driven study design; (2...

  2. ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTIMUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF TAIF GRAPE (VITIS VINIFERA CULTIVARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmegid Ibrahim Fahmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extract of grape Vitis vinifera has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and antimutagenic activities and the phenolic compounds play a vital role in determining these activities. Therefore; the objective of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-mutagenic activities as well as the phenolic composition of different grape cultivar extracts collected from Taif region. The grape cultivars namely; Italian, American, Lebanese, Taifyb and Taifye were collected at maturity stage to represent Taif region cultivars. The total concentrations of phenoles were determined for the five cultivar extracts and results indicated that the concentrations ranged from 115-960 mg L-1 Gallic Acid Equivalent (GAE. Also, HPLC analysis included was carried out of nine important phenolic compounds namely; Cyanidine chloride, Myricetin, Chrysin, Quercetin, Delphinidine chloride, Malvidine chloride, Naringenin, Galangin and Caffeic acid. Significant differences among cultivars were obtained for each compound. However, the highest cultivar for each compound differed from compound to another. At the same time, DPPH was used to estimate antioxidant activity and the data showed that different grape cultivar extracts were able to quench 47-60% of DPPH radical solution and to exhibited potent radical scavenging activity. Also, antimutagenic activity was measured as a decrease of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of mice treated with the mutagen Endoxan. Results showed that treatment of mice with grape cultivar extracts resulted in a significant decrease in all types of chromosomal aberrations induced by Endoxan. Also, the anticlastogenic effect was measured using micronulei test and results indicated that all grape cultivar extracts reduced significantly the effect of Endoxan on micronulei test. Finally, treatment of mice with grape cultivar extracts enhanced mitotic index of mice bone marrow cells reduced by Endoxan treatment. The relationship

  3. Phenolic content and antioxidant and antimutagenic activities in tomato peel, seeds, and byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Morales, Maribel; Espinosa-Alonso, Laura Gabriela; Espinoza-Torres, Libia Citlali; Delgado-Vargas, Francisco; Medina-Godoy, Sergio

    2014-06-11

    The phenolic content and antioxidant and antimutagenic activities from the peel and seeds of different tomato types (grape, cherry, bola and saladette type), and simulated tomato industrial byproducts, were studied. Methanolic extracts were used to quantify total phenolic content, groups of phenolic compounds, antioxidant activities, and the profile of phenolic compounds (by HPLC-DAD). Antimutagenic activity was determined by Salmonella typhimurium assay. The total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of tomato and tomato byproducts were comparable or superior to those previously reported for whole fruit and tomato pomace. Phenolic compounds with important biological activities, such as caffeic acid, ferulic acid, chlorogenic acids, quercetin-3-β-O-glycoside, and quercetin, were quantified. Differences in all phenolic determinations due to tomato type and part of the fruit analyzed were observed, peel from grape type showing the best results. Positive antimutagenic results were observed in all samples. All evaluated materials could be used as a source of potential nutraceutical compounds.

  4. Antioxidant and antimutagenic activity of Curcuma caesia Roxb. rhizome extracts

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    Heisanam Pushparani Devi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rhizomes of Curcuma caesia Roxb. (zingiberacea are traditionally used in treatment of various ailments and metabolic disorders like leukoderma, asthma, tumours, piles, bronchitis, etc. in Indian system of medicine. Considering the importance of natural products in modern phytomedicine, the antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of C. caesia Roxb. rhizome extract and its fractions were evaluated. The ethanolic fraction showed highest antioxidant activity by DPPH assay (86.91% comparable to ascorbic acid (94.77% with IC50 value of 418 μg/ml for EECC followed by MECC (441.90 μg/ml > EAECC(561 μg/ml > AECC(591 μg/ml. Based on the antioxidant activity, three of the rhizome extracts were evaluated for their antimutagenic properties against indirect acting mutagen cyclophosphamide (CP using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. The antimutagenic activity of the extracts against indirect acting mutagen cyclophosphamide in the presence of mammalian metabolic activation system was found to be significant (p < 0.01, p < 0.05. All the extracts showed similar antimutagenicity in dose dependent manner. The total phenolic content as well as reducing ability of the extracts was also determined.

  5. Antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of bark extract of Terminalia arjuna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh Kumar Vaidya; Ramesh C; Nandakumar Krishnadas; Srinath Rangappa

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The alcoholic extract of stem bark of Terminalia arjuna (ALTA) was screened for antioxidant and antimutagenic (anticlastogenic) activity. Methods: Antioxidant property was determined by 1,1,Diphynyl,2-Picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) assay, super oxide radical scavenging activity, lipid peroxidation assay and total polyphenolic content was determined by Folin-Ciocalteau's reagent. Antimutagenic activity was evaluated using micronucleus test in mice. Results: The ALTA has shown potent antioxidant activity with EC50 of 2.491±0.160, 50.110±0.150 &71.000±0.250 in DPPH assay, superoxide radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation assay, which is comparable with ascorbic acid with EC50 of 2.471±0.140, 40.500±0.390 and 63.000±0.360 respectively. In micronucleus test, ALTA (100 & 200 mg/kg, p.o.) showed significant reduction in percentage of micronucleus in both polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) and normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) and also shown significant reduction in P/N ratio. Conclusions: These results suggested that ALTA possess significant antioxidant and antimutagenic activity.

  6. Antimutagenic and antioxidant potentials of Teucrium ramosissimum essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaier, Mohamed Ben; Boubaker, Jihed; Neffati, Aicha; Limem, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Bouhlel, Ines; Kilani, Soumaya; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Ghedira, Kamel

    2010-07-01

    The mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of the essential oil extracted from the aerial parts of Teucrium ramosissimum were evaluated by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98, TA100, and TA1535, with and without exogenous metabolic activation (S9 fraction). The T. ramosissimum essential oil showed no mutagenic effect. In contrast, our results established that it possessed antimutagenic effects against sodium azide (SA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPD). The antioxidant capacity of the tested essential oil was evaluated using enzymatic, i.e., the xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XOD) assay, and nonenzymatic systems, i.e., the nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBT)/riboflavin and the DPPH assays. A moderate free radical-scavenging activity was observed towards DPPH(.) and O2(.-). In contrast, T. ramosissimum essential oil showed no effect for all the tested concentrations in the X/XOD assay.

  7. Antimutagenic, antiproliferative, and antioxidant effect of extracts obtained from octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana-Gabriela CRUZ-RAMÍREZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The search for chemopreventive/chemoprotective compounds in marine organism has been extensively reported; however, the presence of these compounds in octopus has been incipiently explored. In this research, the antimutagenic, antiproliferative, and antioxidant potential of three crude extracts (methanolic, acetonic, and hexanic from Paroctopus limaculatus was investigated. Antimutagenic activity against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 was evaluated through the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and 100. Antiproliferative activity was assessed using the standard MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay on M12.C3.F6 murine cell line. Antioxidant activity was assessed using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and ABTS (2,2′-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid methods. Hexanic extract showed the highest antimutagenic and antiproliverative activities inhibiting 80 and 43% of mutagenicity induced by AFB1 for TA98 and TA100, respectively, and showing a high antiproliferative activity at 200 and 100 µg/mL. However, when the antioxidant activity was evaluated at a concentration of 50 mg/mL, the methanolic fraction exerted inhibition of 98 and 96 % ABTS and DPPH radicals, respectively. RP-HPLC and 1H-RMN analyses suggested the presence of double bonds with extended conjugation and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols, esters, ethers or ketones. These results suggested that hexanic and methanolic extract form octopus contained compounds with chemoprotective and antioxidant properties.

  8. Antimutagenicity of Methanolic Extracts from Anemopsis californica in Relation to Their Antioxidant Activity

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    Carmen Lizette Del-Toro-Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemopsis californica has been used empirically to treat infectious diseases. However, there are no antimutagenic evaluation reports on this plant. The present study evaluated the antioxidant activity in relation to the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity properties of leaf (LME and stem (SME methanolic extracts of A. californica collected in the central Mexican state of Querétaro. Antioxidant properties and total phenols of extracts were evaluated using DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and Folin-Ciocalteu methods, respectively. Mutagenicity was evaluated using the Ames test employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (TA98, TA100, and TA102, with and without an aroclor 1254 (S9 mixture. Antimutagenesis was performed against mutations induced on the Ames test with MNNG, 2AA, or 4NQO. SME presented the highest antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content. None of the extracts exhibited mutagenicity in the Ames test. The extracts produced a significant reduction in 2AA-induced mutations in S. typhimurium TA98. In both extracts, mutagenesis induced by 4NQO or methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG was reduced only if the exposure of strains was <10 μg/Petri dish. A. californca antioxidant properties and its capacity to reduce point mutations render it suitable to enhance medical cancer treatments. The significant effect against antimutagenic 2AA suggests that their consumption would provide protection against carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic compounds.

  9. Antimutagenicity of Methanolic Extracts from Anemopsis californica in Relation to Their Antioxidant Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Toro-Sánchez, Carmen Lizette; Bautista-Bautista, Nereyda; Blasco-Cabal, José Luis; Gonzalez-Ávila, Marisela; Gutiérrez-Lomelí, Melesio; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Anemopsis californica has been used empirically to treat infectious diseases. However, there are no antimutagenic evaluation reports on this plant. The present study evaluated the antioxidant activity in relation to the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity properties of leaf (LME) and stem (SME) methanolic extracts of A. californica collected in the central Mexican state of Querétaro. Antioxidant properties and total phenols of extracts were evaluated using DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) and Folin-Ciocalteu methods, respectively. Mutagenicity was evaluated using the Ames test employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains (TA98, TA100, and TA102), with and without an aroclor 1254 (S9 mixture). Antimutagenesis was performed against mutations induced on the Ames test with MNNG, 2AA, or 4NQO. SME presented the highest antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content. None of the extracts exhibited mutagenicity in the Ames test. The extracts produced a significant reduction in 2AA-induced mutations in S. typhimurium TA98. In both extracts, mutagenesis induced by 4NQO or methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was reduced only if the exposure of strains was <10 μg/Petri dish. A. californca antioxidant properties and its capacity to reduce point mutations render it suitable to enhance medical cancer treatments. The significant effect against antimutagenic 2AA suggests that their consumption would provide protection against carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic compounds. PMID:25152760

  10. Antioxidant, antimutagenic and antibacterial activities of extracts from Phyllanthus emblica branches

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    Bungorn Sripanidkulchai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phyllanthus emblica is an euphorbiaceous plant that has long been used as an ingredient in traditional medicines and functional foods. Although traditional remedies use several parts including the fruit, leaf, flower, stem and roots, the fruit is the most popular. It has been used for health promotion, anti-aging and also for treatment of wide ranges of symptoms and diseases. Because of the broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and high demand for the P. emblica fruit, there is a shortage of raw materials. Furthermore, there is a seasonal limitation in which the fruit comes out once a year. The aim of this study is to investigate the bioactive potential and the possibility to use the plant branch. Alcohol based extracts of P.emblica branch were analyzed for total phenolic content, antioxidant, antibacterial and antimutagenic activities. P. emblica branches were used to prepare the 50% ethanolic extract by maceration (EBE and methanolic extract by Soxhlet apparatus (MBE. Total phenolic content was determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method and DPPH was used to analyze the antioxidative activity. Antibacterial activity was evaluated by microdilution method and expressed by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC. Antimutagenicity was performed by preincubation bacterial assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains. It was found that both EBE and MBE contained high total phenolic content (643 and 547 TAE mg/g and strong antioxidative activity (EC50 at 30 and 23 mg/ml. The extracts showed antimutagenicity to both direct and indirect-acting mutagens in TA98 and TA100 strains. Both extracts possess antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In conclusion, the alcoholic extracts of P. emblica branch possess high phenolic content with strong antioxidative, antimutagenic and antibacterial activities as previously

  11. Antioxidant, antimutagenic, and antitumor effects of pine needles (Pinus densiflora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Chung Shil; Moon, Sung Chae; Lee, Mee Sook

    2006-01-01

    Pine needles (Pinus densiflora Siebold et Zuccarini) have long been used as a traditional health-promoting medicinal food in Korea. To investigate their potential anticancer effects, antioxidant, antimutagenic, and antitumor activities were assessed in vitro and/or in vivo. Pine needle ethanol extract (PNE) significantly inhibited Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation and scavenged 1,1-diphenyl- 2-picrylhydrazyl radical in vitro. PNE markedly inhibited mutagenicity of 2-anthramine, 2-nitrofluorene, or sodium azide in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 or TA100 in Ames tests. PNE exposure effectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells (MCF-7, SNU-638, and HL-60) compared with normal cell (HDF) in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In in vivo antitumor studies, freeze-dried pine needle powder supplemented (5%, wt/wt) diet was fed to mice inoculated with Sarcoma-180 cells or rats treated with mammary carcinogen, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 50 mg/kg body weight). Tumorigenesis was suppressed by pine needle supplementation in the two model systems. Moreover, blood urea nitrogen and aspartate aminotransferase levels were significantly lower in pine needle-supplemented rats in the DMBA-induced mammary tumor model. These results demonstrate that pine needles exhibit strong antioxidant, antimutagenic, and antiproliferative effects on cancer cells and also antitumor effects in vivo and point to their potential usefulness in cancer prevention.

  12. Antimutagenic Profile of Antioxidant Vitamins in Drosophila Mulation Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.K.KHAN; S.P.SINHA

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the antimutagenicity of antioxidant vitamins(vitamins A,C,and E)as expressed by their efficacy to of X-chromosome linked recessive lethal mutations(XRLMs)in Drosophila.Larvae were exposed to dietary concentration of aflatoxins and/or the human therapeutic doses of any ofthe three antioxidant vitamins. Absence of normal eyedmales among M2 progeny gave an indication of mutation induction. Results Aflatoxin supplimentation significantly increased the incidence of XRLMs in Drosophila.Mutation frequency was also raised a little above the control level in case of vitamin treatment.However,notable mitigation in mutation frequency was registered when aflatoxin-treated larvae were concomitantly fed with any of the three antioxidant vitamins.Conclusion Aflatoxin exposure can enhance the frequency of gene mutation in Drosophila which is significantly lowered by each of the three antioxidant vitamins.The degree of amelioration produced by them is almost identical.This mitigation is based on the scavenging/trapping by antioxidant vitamins of DNA-reactive products (metabolites and radicals)emanating from aflatoxin metabofism.

  13. Mutagenic, antimutagenic, antioxidant, anti-lipoxygenase and antimicrobial activities of Scandix pecten-veneris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Rad, M; Tayeboon, G S; Miri, A; Sharifi-Rad, M; Setzer, W N; Fallah, F; Kuhestani, K; Tahanzadeh, N; Sharifi-Rad, J

    2016-05-30

    Scandix pecten-veneris L. or Shepherd's-needle is a weed species used in some countries for medicinal purposes. In this study S. pecten-veneris leaves were shade dried, powdered and extracted with methanol. The purpose of this study was to assay the in vitro mutagenic, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antilipoxygenase and antimicrobial activities of S. pecten-veneris leaf extract. The methanolic extract indicated no mutagenicity when tested with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. Antimutagenic activity was reported with inhibition of mutagenicity in a concentration dependent fashion. The methanolic extract demonstrated antioxidant activity in the DPPH radical-scavenging test (IC50 = 4.57 mg/mL), comparable to ascorbic acid and BHT. Moreover, the extract presented a remarkable and potent inhibition against soybean lipoxygenase (IC50 = 641.57 µg/mL). The methanolic extract was examined for its antimicrobial powers against four different bacteria with MIC values >100. Our results introduced this plant as a useful factor for the treatment of cancer, inflammatory and infectious diseases.

  14. In vitro antioxidant, antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities of collagen hydrolysates of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas byproducts

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    Guadalupe Miroslava Suárez-Jiménez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHydrolysates from two different jumbo squid byproducts (fins and arms, produced by trypsin and protease type XIV were compared on the basis of their antioxidant (DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assays, antimutagenic (Ames test and antiproliferative (Transformation cell proliferation in M12.C3F6 murine cells activities. Jumbo squid arms had higher content of collagen than fins, and their hydrolysates had the highest antioxidant activity. Also, jumbo squid arm-derived collagen hydrolyzed with protease XIV showed the highest antimutagenic activity. The four hydrolysates obtained showed low antiproliferative activity, however they are susceptible for further studies to be applied as food additives.

  15. Assessment of anti-mutagenic, anti-histopathologic and antioxidant capacities of Egyptian bee pollen and propolis extracts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tohamy, Amany A; Abdella, Ehab M; Ahmed, Rasha R; Ahmed, Yara K

    2014-01-01

    Bee pollen and propolis are popular, traditional health foods. The objective of the current study was to investigate the anti-mutagenic, anti-histopathologic and antioxidant effects among water extracts of Egyptian bee pollen (WEBP...

  16. A study on antimicrobial, antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okmen, G; Turkcan, O

    2014-01-01

    [corrected] The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antimutagenic potentials of methanol extracts from E. angustifolia. Methanol extracts were screened for antimicrobial activity against different species of 4 Gram positive and 3 Gram negative bacteria and one fungus. These bacteria included food pathogens. The leaf extract was tested using disc diffusion assay. The methanol extract of E. angustifolia showed maximum inhibition zone of 16 mm against Yersinia enterocolitica. Whereas, the inhibition zone was not determined by methanol extract against Escherichia coli ATCC 1122 and Candida albicans RSKK 02029. The MIC was evaluated on plant extracts as antimicrobial activity. All of bacterial strains showed the lowest sensitivity to methanol extract of E. angustifolia (3.5 mg/mL), except Yersinia enterocolitica NCTC 11174. In addition, the plant extracts were tested against the stable DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-hydrate) free-radical. Finally, the methanol extract displayed a strong antioxidant activity (Trolox equivalent = 1.49 mM). Also, E. angustifolia methanol extracts were screened for their antimutagenic activity against sodium azide by Ames test in absence of rat microsomal liver enzyme (-S9). The results showed that E. angustifolia methanol extracts can inhibit mutagenic agents of sodium azide. The plant leaf extracts with the inhibition of 36% sodium azide showed moderate potential in decreasing mutagenic agents in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. E. angustifolia methanol extracts have antimicrobial, antioxidant and antimutagenic potential.

  17. Antioxidant, anti-microbial and antimutagenicity activities of pistachio (Pistachia vera) green hull extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Ahmad; Barzegar, Mohsen; Mobarez, Ashraf Mohabati; Sahari, Mohammad Ali; Esfahani, Zohre Hamidi

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidant, anti-microbial and antimutagenicity activities of pistachio (Ahmadaghaei variety) green hull extracts (crude and purified extracts) were studied. At first, different solvents were compared for determining of the best solvent for extraction of phenolic compounds from pistachio green hull. Water and acetonitrile with 49.32 and 6.22 (mg of gallic acid equivalents/g sample) were the best and the worst solvent in the extraction of phenolic compounds, respectively. The antioxidant capacity of crude and purified extracts were assessed through ABTS assay, DPPH assay and beta-carotene bleaching (BCB) method. A concentration-dependent antioxidative capacity was verified in ABTS, DPPH assays and BCB method. The anti-microbial capacity was screened against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, and fungi. Aqueous and purified extracts inhibited the growth of Gram positive bacteria; Bacillus cereus was the most susceptible one with MIC of 1mg/mL and 0.5mg/mL for the crude and purified extracts, respectively. The results of antimutagenicity test showed that phenolic compounds of pistachio green hull have antimutagenicity activity against direct mutagen of 2-nitrofluorene. The results obtained indicate that pistachio green hull may become important as a cheap and noticeable source of compounds with health protective potential and anti-microbial activity.

  18. Relationship among antimutagenic, antioxidant and enzymatic activities of methanolic extract from common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador-Martínez, Anaberta; Albores, Arnulfo; Bah, Moustapha; Calderón-Salinas, Victor; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Guevara-González, Ramón; Shimada-Miyasaka, Armando; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2006-12-01

    Common beans are rich in phenolic compounds, which can provide health benefits to the consumer. The objective of this work was to study the relationship among antimutagenicity, antioxidant and enzymatic activities of methanolic extract and trolox by principal components multivariate analysis. Antimutagenicity of phenolic compounds present in methanolic extract from the seed coat of common beans (P. vulgaris, Flor de Mayo Bajío cultivar) and trolox against AFB1 mutagenicity were evaluated in the Salmonella typhimurium microsuspension assay. Antioxidant capacity of methanolic extract and trolox were evaluated using beta-carotene and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) in vitro model assays. Cythrome P450 activity was measured by fluorometric assay. For phenolic extract, trolox and phenolic extract+trolox, the inhibition on AFB1 mutagenicity in tester strain TA100 was 47, 59 and 69%, respectively. While in TA98 was 39, 48 and 68%. The inhibition of phenolic compounds, trolox and phenolic compounds+trolox on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) activity was 48, 59 and 88%, respectively. Correlation analysis showed that phenolic extract and trolox have high antimutagenic and antioxidant activity and also inhibited enzymatic activity. The results suggest that the primary mechanism of action of phenolic compounds in beans against AFB1 mutagenicity may be extra-cellular in the microsuspension assay.

  19. Antimutagenicity and antioxidative DNA damage properties of oligomeric proanthocyanidins from Thai grape seeds in TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praphasawat, Ratsada; Klungsupya, Prapaipat; Muangman, Thunchanok; Laovitthayanggoon, Sarunya; Arunpairojana, Vullapa; Himakoun, Lakana

    2011-01-01

    Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs) are found mostly in red grape seeds. Many publications have reported that OPCs possess an excellent anti-oxidant effects. Since it could against cellular damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS) led to reduce the risk of chronic disease and cancers. We carried out this study on the Thai OPCs to evaluate the mutagenicity/ anti-mutagenicity and anti-oxidative DNA damage effects in TK6 cells by micronucleus (MN) and comet assays. In the MN assay, OPCs-treatment of TK6 cells at concentrations ranging from 10-200 ?g/ml (4 and 24 h) did not cause micronucleus induction over the negative control group but revealed a significant reduction the micronucleus frequencies against the known mutagen (mitomycin C). In the comet assay, OPCs-treated TK6 cells at concentrations of 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 ?g/ml could inhibit DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) as indicated by 18.7, 36.4, 30.6, and 60.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that OPCs possess the anti-mutagenic and anti-oxidative DNA damage effects in TK6 cells under the conditions of this assay.

  20. Antibiofilm, Antioxidant, Antimutagenic Activities and Phenolic Compounds of Allium orientale BOISS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Ceylan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This is the first study to investigate the antibiofilm, antioxidant and antimutagenic activities and phenolic compounds of Allium orientale. Antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts of A. orientale was determined by a broth microdilution method. Antibiofilm activity was evaluated by microplate biofilm assay. The antioxidant activity was determined using three complementary assays; namely, DPPH scavenging, β-carotene-linoleic acid, and total phenolic compounds assays. Phenolic compounds were evaluated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The antimutagenic effect of extracts was analyzed by the Ames test. In RP-HPLC analysis, (+-catechin, apigenin and caffeic acid were identified as major phenolic compounds in the aerial parts of A. orientale. The aerial parts extract possessed the highest total phenolic content (120.979 ± 1.05 mg gallic acid equivalent/g, which were in good correlation with its significant DPPH (IC50 42.18 ± 1.68 mg/mL and lipid peroxidation (89.98 ± 0.69% at 10 mg/mL concentration capacities. A. orientale exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against the organisms tested with MICs ranging from 3.125 to 25 mg/mL. Escherichia coli biofilm formation was inhibited maximum by the aerial parts extract to an extent of 68.51%. The strongest antimutagenic activity was observed at 2.5 mg/plate concentration of aerial parts extract against Salmonella typhimurium TA98.These results suggested that the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of A.orientale could become useful supplement for pharmaceutical products as a new antioxidant, antibiofilm and antimutagenic agent.

  1. Evaluation of antioxidant and antimutagenic potential of Justicia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous), n-butanol and ethyl acetate exhibited significant antioxidant ... anion radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals and reactive ... these antioxidants are being identified as anticarcinogens. (Ames ... An aliquot (1 ml) of extract solution was mixed with 4 ml of water and 0.3 ...

  2. FTIR Spectrum and Antimutagenicity of Coffea arabica Pulp and Arachis hypogaea Testa In Relation to their In Vitro Antioxidant Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Barcelo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Coffee pulp (Coffea arabica and peanut testa (Arachis hypogaea are common agricultural wastes which are extensively studied as potential sources of bioactive compounds. This study attempted to determine the correlation of the antioxidant potential, lipid peroxidation inhibition and antimutagenic activities of the crude extracts of both plant samples. Quantification of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and monomeric anthocyanins and Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR analysis were performed to characterize bioactive compounds. Based from the results, peanut testa extract (PTE exhibited higher total antioxidant capacity (TAC compared to coffee pulp extract (CPE at 500 μg/mL but was lower than L-Ascorbic Acid (LAA. The antimutagenic activity of PTE at > 125 μg/mL was higher compared to both RPE and LAA. Mitotic indices of A. cepa treated with PTE+MMS were higher compared to groups treated with RCPE+MMS, LAA+MMS, deionized water and MMS only. Correlation analysis revealed the TAC of ripe coffee pulp extract had significant moderate correlation with its antimutagenic activity but high correlation with LPI. The LPI of CPE showed significant moderate correlation with its antimutagenic activity. In PTE, TAC shows high significant correlation with its antimutagenic property and LPI while LPI has significant moderate correlation with its antimutagenic property. The observed activity of the CPE and PTE may be attributed primarily to the phenolic compounds in both plant extracts.

  3. Screening of antimutagenicity via antioxidant activity in Cuban medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A; Visozo, A; Piloto, J; García, A; Rodríguez, C A; Rivero, R

    2003-08-01

    The reducing activity on the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, z.rad;OH radical scavenging potential, in vitro inhibition of lipid peroxidation and modulation of mutagenicity induced by ter-butyl hydroperoxide (TBH) in Escherichia coli were sequentially screened in 45 species of plants used with medicinal purposes in Cuba, in a search for antioxidant agents which protect DNA against oxidative stress.Five species, e.g. Tamarindus indica L., Lippia alba L., Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr, Rheedia aristata Griseb. and Curcuma longa L. displayed IC(50)essential oil of Pimenta dioica, also inhibited oxidative mutagenesis by TBH in Escherichia coli, at concentrations ranging from 150 to 400 micro g/plate.

  4. Effect of probiotics on antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of crude peptide extract from yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, B N P; Vasiljevic, T; McKechnie, S; Donkor, O N

    2014-08-01

    Search for bioactive peptides is intensifying because of the risks associated with the use of synthetic therapeutics, thus peptide liberation by lactic acid bacteria and probiotics has received a great focus. However, proteolytic capacity of these bacteria is strain specific. The study was conducted to establish proteolytic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC® 4356™), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC® 393™) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (ATCC® BAA52™) in yogurt. Crude peptides were separated by high-speed centrifugation and tested for antioxidant and antimutagenic activities. The degree of proteolysis highly correlated with these bioactivities, and its value (11.91%) for samples containing all the cultures was double that of the control. Liberated peptides showed high radical scavenging activities with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), IC50 1.51 and 1.63mg/ml, respectively and strong antimutagenicity (26.35%). These probiotics enhanced the generation of bioactive peptides and could possibly be commercially applied in new products, or production of novel anticancer peptides.

  5. Effect of pineapple waste powder on probiotic growth, antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, B N P; Vasiljevic, T; McKechnie, S; Donkor, O N

    2016-03-01

    Although many fruit by-products are good sources of nutrients, little is known about their prebiotic potential. This research was aimed at establishing the prebiotic effect of pineapple wastes on probiotics including Lactobacillus (L.) acidophilus (ATCC® 4356™), L. casei (ATCC® 393™) and L. paracasei spp. paracasei (ATCC® BAA52™) and the subsequent release of antioxidant and antimutagenic peptides in yogurt during their growth. Oven- and freeze- dried peel and pomace were milled separately into powders and tested for prebiotic activities. The net probiotic growth (1.28-2.14 log cfu/g) in customized MRS broth containing the pineapple powders as a direct carbohydrate source was comparable to MRS broth containing glucose. The powders were also separately added to milk during the manufacturing of yogurt with or without probiotics. An increase (by 0.3-1.4 log cycle) in probiotic populations was observed in the yogurts as a consequence of pineapple powder supplementation. Crude water-soluble peptide extracts, prepared by high-speed centrifugation of the yogurts, displayed remarkable antioxidant activities assessed through in vitro assays, namely scavenging activity of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals (IC50 = 0.37-0.19 mg/ml) and hydroxyl radicals (58.52-73.55 %). The peptide extracts also exhibited antimutagenic activities (18.60-32.72 %) as sodium azide inhibitor in the Salmonella mutagenicity test. Together, these results suggest that pineapple by-products exhibited prebiotic properties and could possibly be commercially applied in new functional food formulations.

  6. Antimutagenic and antioxidant activities of quebracho phenolics (Schinopsis balansae) recovered from tannery wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Martinez, Raúl; Veloz-García, Rafael; Veloz-Rodríguez, Rafael; Guzmán-Maldonado, Salvador H; Loarca-Pina, Guadalupe; Cardador-Martinez, Anabertha; Guevara-Olvera, Lorenzo; Miranda-López, Rita; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Pérez, Cristina Pérez; Herrera-Hernández, Guadalupe; Villaseñor-Ortega, Francisco; González-Chavira, Mario; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramón G

    2009-01-01

    Quebracho extracts are used in tannery due to their high concentration of phenolics. The Mexican tannery industry uses around 450 kg/m(3) of which, 150 kg/m(3) remains in wastewaters and are discharged in drain pipe systems or rivers. The quebracho phenolics recovered from tannery wastewater (QPTW) was characterized by HPLC. The antimutagenic and antioxidant activities as well as the microbiological quality were evaluated. Total phenolic content of QPTW was 621mg catechin equivalent/g sample. Gallic and protocatechuic acids were the major components characterized by HPLC. QPTW showed an inhibition range on aflatoxin B(1) mutagenicity from 16 to 60% and was dose-dependent. Antioxidant activity (defined as beta-carotene bleaching) of QPTW (64.4%) at a dose of 12.3mg/mL was similar to that of BHT (68.7%) at a dose of 0.33 mg/mL, but lower than Trolox (90.8% at a dose of 2.5mg/mL); meanwhile antiradical activity (measured as reduction of DPPH) (60.8%) was higher than that of BHT (50.8%) and Trolox (34.2%). Quebracho residues were demonstrated to be an outstanding source of phenolic acids and for research and industrial uses.

  7. Antioxidant and antimutagenic properties of aqueous extract of date fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L. Arecaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayalil, Praveen K

    2002-01-30

    Fruits of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. Arecaceae) are very commonly consumed in many parts of the world and are a vital component of the diet in most of the Arabian countries. This preliminary study documents for the first time its antioxidant and antimutagenic properties in vitro. There was a dose-dependent inhibition of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals by an aqueous extract of date fruit. The amount of fresh extract required to scavenge 50% of superoxide radicals was equivalent to 0.8 mg/mL of date fruit in the riboflavin photoreduction method. An extract of 2.2 mg/mL of date fruit was needed for 50% hydroxyl-radical-scavenging activity in the deoxyribose degradation method. Concentrations of 1.5 and 4.0 mg/mL completely inhibited superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Aqueous date extract was also found to inhibit significantly the lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. In an Fe(2+)/ascorbate system, an extract of 1.9 mg/mL of date fruit was needed for 50% inhibition of lipid peroxides. In a time course inhibition study of lipid peroxide, at a 2.0 mg/mL concentration of date extract, there was a complete inhibition of TBARS formation in the early stages of the incubation period that increased during later stages of the incubation. Similarly, in the high Fe(2+)/ascorbate induction system a concentration of 2.3 mg/mL inhibited carbonyl formation measured by DNPH reaction by 50%. Moreover, a concentration of 4.0 mg/mL completely inhibited lipid peroxide and protein carbonyl formation. Date fruit extract also produced a dose-dependent inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene-induced mutagenecity on Salmonella tester strains TA-98 and TA-100 with metabolic activation. Extract from 3.6 mg/plate and 4.3 mg/plate was found required for 50% inhibition of His+ revertant formation in TA-98 and TA-100, respectively. These results indicate that antioxidant and antimutagenic activity in date fruit is quite potent and implicates the presence

  8. Essential Oil of Eucalyptus Gunnii Hook. As a Novel Source of Antioxidant, Antimutagenic and Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Bugarin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes radical scavenging capacity (RSC, antimutagenic and antibacterial properties of the essential oil (EO of the leaves of Eucalyptus gunnii Hook. (Southern Montenegro. Chemical composition was evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. In oil, 1,8-cineole (67.8% and α-pinene (14.12% were the major compounds comprising almost 82% of total EO. EO exhibited moderate DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity, with IC50 value of 7.19 µL/mL. The antimutagenic properties were assayed against the spontaneous and t-BOOH-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli IC202 oxyR mutant strain, deficient in removing radical oxygen species (ROS. Reduction of the spontaneous mutagenesis in the presence of E. gunnii EO was only slight, up to 12% at the highest concentration tested. However, when the oxidative mutagen was used, EO displayed more significant reduction of mutagenesis (maximum 23% in a concentration dependent manner. Antibacterial activity was tested against the selected strains from ATTC and NCIB collections: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and the two Escherichia coli strains from our laboratory collection (SY252 and IB112 using both the disk-diffusion and MIC assays. The greatest sensitivity was shown by M. flavus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli lpcA (MIC = 0.83 mg/mL, while the highest resistance was shown by E. coli (ATTC 25922 and S. epidermidis. This study represents the first report on chemical composition and biological activity of the Eucalyptus gunnii in the South Balkan region and beyond.

  9. Antioxidant capacity and antimutagenic activity of anthocyanin and carotenoid extracts from nixtamalized pigmented Creole maize races (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Díaz, Sandra; Ortiz-Valerio, Ma del Carmen; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Figueroa-Cárdenas, Juan de Dios; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía; Ramos-Gómez, Minerva; Campos-Vega, Rocio; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2012-12-01

    Nixtamalization process is the first step to obtain maize based products, like tortillas; however, in both the traditional and commercial processes, white grain is generally preferred. Creole maize races, mainly pigmented varieties, have increasingly attention since these are rich in anthocyanins and carotenoids. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the antioxidant and antimutagenic activity of rich anthocyanins and carotenoids extracts from creole maize races before (grain) and after (masa and tortilla) the nixtamalization process. Most anthocyanins and carotenoids were lost during nixtamalization. Before nixtamalization, blue and red genotypes contained either higher antioxidant capacity and anthocyanin contents (963 ± 10.0 and 212.36 ± 0.36 mg of cyanidin-3-glucoside eq/100 g, respectively) than the white and yellow genotypes. However, the highest carotenoid levels were displayed by red grains (1.01 ± 0.07 to 1.14 ± 0.08 μg of β-carotene eq/g extract). Anthocyanins losses were observed when the blue grains were processed into masa (83 %) and tortillas (64 %). Anthocyanins content correlated with antiradical activity (r = 0.57) and with 2-aminoanthracene -induced mutagenicity inhibition on TA98 and TA100 (r = -0.62 and r = -0.44, respectively). For white grains, nixtamalization also reduced carotenoids (53 to 56 %), but not antioxidant activity and 2-Aa-induced mutagenicity. Throughout the nixtamalization process steps, all the extracts showed antimutagenic activity against 2-aminoanthracene-induced mutagenicity (23 to 90 %), displaying higher potential to inhibit base changes mutations than frameshift mutations in the genome of the tasted microorganism (TA100 and TA98, respectively). The results suggest that even though there were pigment losses, creole maize pigments show antioxidant and antimutagenic activities after nixtamalization process.

  10. Mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of Heterotheca inuloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Nancy J; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Sánchez-Navarrete, Jaime; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Hernández-Ojeda, Sandra; Espinosa-Aguirre, Javier J

    2014-10-23

    The antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of Heterotheca inuloides have been reported before, nevertheless its use as a possible chemopreventive agent has not been documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of H. inuloides extracts using the Ames test. Both, the methanolic and acetonic extracts, were mutagenic in the TA98 but not in TA100 or TA102 strains. On the other hand, the methanolic extract reduced the mutagenicity of norfloxacin, benzo[a]pyrene and 2-aminoanthracene. Quercetin, one of the main components in the methanolic extract, also presented a mutagenic/antimutagenic dual effect and is an inhibitor of Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A. The antigenotoxic properties of H. inuloides could be due to the antioxidant properties previously reported and to its CYP inhibitory effect mediated by quercetin. Further studies with in vivo systems will afford information about H. inuloides beneficial and detrimental properties.

  11. Essential oil of Myrtus communis L. as a potential antioxidant and antimutagenic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Bugarin, Dusan; Grbović, Slavenko; Mitić-Culafić, Dragana; Vuković-Gacić, Branka; Orcić, Dejan; Jovin, Emilija; Couladis, Maria

    2010-04-15

    The present study describes DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity and antimutagenic properties of the essential oil of myrtle (Myrtus communis L.). Plant samples were collected from the two distant localities (southernmost and northern point) of the Montenegro coastline. Chemical profiles of the two samples were evaluated by GC-MS. In both of the samples monoterpenes were found to be the predominant compounds. Among them alpha-pinene, linalool, 1,8-cineole, and myrtenyl acetate were the major compounds. Significant differences between the samples were found in the ranges of alpha-pinene (14.7%-35.9%) and myrtenyl acetate (5.4%-21.6%). Both oils exhibited moderate DPPH scavenging activity, with IC50 values of 6.24 mg/mL and 5.99 mg/mL. The antimutagenic properties were assayed against spontaneous and t-BOOH-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli oxyR mutant IC202, a bacterial strain deficient in removing ROS. Reduction of the spontaneous mutagenesis in presence of myrtle EO was only slight, up to 13% at the highest concentration tested. When the oxidative mutagen was used, EO expressed higher reduction of mutagenesis, in a concentration dependent manner, with statistical significance for effect at the highest concentration tested (28%). Suppression of t-BOOH induced mutagenesis was correlated with the observed scavenging activity.

  12. Essential Oil of Myrtus communis L. as a Potential Antioxidant and Antimutagenic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Mimica-Dukić

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity and antimutagenic properties of the essential oil of myrtle (Myrtus communis L.. Plant samples were collected from the two distant localities (southernmost and northern point of the Montenegro coastline. Chemical profiles of the two samples were evaluated by GC-MS. In both of the samples monoterpenes were found to be the predominant compounds. Among them a-pinene, linalool, 1,8-cineole, and myrtenyl acetate were the major compounds. Significant differences between the samples were found in the ranges of a-pinene (14.7%–35.9% and myrtenyl acetate (5.4%–21.6%. Both oils exhibited moderate DPPH scavenging activity, with IC50 values of 6.24 mg/mL and 5.99 mg/mL. The antimutagenic properties were assayed against spontaneous and t-BOOH-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli oxyR mutant IC202, a bacterial strain deficient in removing ROS. Reduction of the spontaneous mutagenesis in presence of myrtle EO was only slight, up to 13% at the highest concentration tested. When the oxidative mutagen was used, EO expressed higher reduction of mutagenesis, in a concentration dependent manner, with statistical significance for effect at the highest concentration tested (28%. Suppression of t-BOOH induced mutagenesis was correlated with the observed scavenging activity.

  13. Antimutagenic and antioxidant activity of a selected lectin-free common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in two cell-based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, Stefania; Gabriele, Morena; Caltavuturo, Leonardo; Longo, Vincenzo; Pucci, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Legumes and particularly beans are a key food of Mediterranean diet representing an important source of proteins, fiber, some minerals and vitamins and bioactive compounds. We evaluated the antioxidant and anti-mutagenic effects of a new fermented powder of a selected lectin-free and phaseolamin-enriched variety of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), named Lady Joy. Lady Joy lysate (Lys LJ) was studied in human erythrocytes and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells. The antioxidant and anti-hemolytic properties of Lys LJ, studied in an ex vivo erythrocytes system using the cellular antioxidant assay (CAA-RBC) and the hemolysis test, evidenced a dose-dependent antioxidant activity as well as a significant hemolysis inhibition. Besides, results evidenced that Lys LJ treatment significantly decreased the intracellular ROS concentration and mutagenesis induced by hydrogen peroxide in S. cerevisiae D7 strain. In conclusion, Lys LJ showed both an antimutagenic effect in yeast and a strong scavenging activity in yeast and human cells.

  14. Study of antimutagenic and antioxidant activities of gallic acid and 1,2,3,4,6-pentagalloylglucose from Pistacia lentiscus. Confirmation by microarray expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, Afef; Bouhlel, Ines; Skandrani, Ines; Valenti, Kita; Kadri, Malika; Guiraud, Pascal; Steiman, Régine; Mariotte, Anne-Marie; Ghedira, Kamel; Laporte, François; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Geneviève; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2007-01-05

    In vitro antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of two polyphenols isolated from the fruits of Pistacia lentiscus was assessed. Antioxidant activity was determined by the ability of each compound to scavenge the free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*), to inhibit xanthine oxidase and to inhibit the lipid peroxidation induced by H(2)O(2) in K562 cell line. Antimutagenic activity was assayed with SOS chromotest using Escherichia coli PQ37 as tester strain and Comet assay using K562 cell line. 1,2,3,4,6-Pentagalloylglucose was found to be more effective to scavenge DPPH* radical and protect against lipid peroxidation. Moreover, these two compounds induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide and aflatoxin B1 mutagenicity. The protective effect exhibited by these molecules was also determined by analysis of gene expression as response to an oxidative stress. For this purpose, we used a cDNA-microarray containing 82 genes related to cell defense, essentially represented by antioxidant and DNA repair proteins. We found that 1,2,3,4,6-pentagalloylglucose induced a decrease in the expression of 11 transcripts related to antioxidant enzymes family (GPX1, TXN, AOE372, SHC1 and SEPW1) and DNA repair (POLD1, APEX, POLD2, MPG, PARP and XRCC5). The use of Gallic acid, induced expression of TXN, TXNRD1, AOE372, GSS (antioxidant enzymes) and LIG4, POLD2, MPG, GADD45A, PCNA, RPA2, DDIT3, HMOX2, XPA, TDG, ERCC1 and GTF2H1 (DNA repair) as well as the repression of GPX1, SEPW1, POLD1 and SHC1 gene expression.

  15. Antimutagenicity of components of dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelali, H; Cassand, P; Soussotte, V; Koch-Bocabeille, B; Narbonne, J F

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the potential antimutagenicity of some components of dairy products. For both milk and fermented milk, Bifidobacterium sp. Bio (strain Danone 173010), casein and calcium showed a dose-dependent antimutagenic activity against benzo[a]pyrene mutagenicity in the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium TA98. Fatty compounds present in milk had no antimutagenic effect. At the level occurring in cultured or uninoculated milks, and even more, the bifidobacteria, casein and calcium showed less antimutagenic activity than fermented and uninoculated milks. So, the mix of all these components must contribute to the total protective effect of dairy products against induced mutagenicity, and this does not rule out the possibility of contribution of other unknown substances. The total antimutagenicity of uninoculated skim milk corresponds to the additional activity of casein and calcium. The observed antimutagenic activity of fermented skim milk remains lower than expected.

  16. 42. The Report of Antimutagenicity and Mutagenicity of 7 Kinds Natrual Edible Plants and Vegetables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: With improvement of living standard, environmental quality become more and more seriously damaged. While the SOS bacterioplage induction methed is nearly a high-speed and reliable method to detect genetic toxins. The SOS syndronous test make an improvement on the above method. On the one hand, we are reducing the environmental pollution, on the other hand, we are attempt to find antimugens and some ways against cancer. Using the natrual edible plants against mutage and cancer is one of the important topic on preventing carcinogenic factors. The study examed 7 kinds natrual edible plants and vegetables. Method: We adopted the test of the Antimutagenicity and mutagenicity with S9 (rat liver microsomal enzymes system) and without S9 and repeat test. Result: The results showed all samples had no mutagenicity. Scallion seed, sweet potato and pomegranate peel were antimutagens against Mitomicy(MMC) with S9 and without S9. They are well worth of devoloping and using further. Pea seedling, crowndaisy chrysanthemum. alon and romaine had no antimutagenicity with and without S9. The people can eat usually.

  17. Antimutagenic; differentiation-inducing; and antioxidative effects of fragrant ingredients in Katsura-uri (Japanese pickling melon; Cucumis melo var. conomon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasushi; Watanabe, Shinpei; Kageyama, Minami; Shirota, Keiko; Shirota, Koji; Amano, Hisashi; Kashimoto, Tadahiro; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Okamoto, Shigehisa; Park, Eun Young; Sato, Kenji

    2010-12-21

    Six fragrant ingredients were identified in fully-ripened Katsura-uri (Japanese pickling melon; Cucumis melo var. conomon). Four of them were sulfur-containing compounds [methylthioacetic acid ethyl ester (MTAE), acetic acid 2-methylthio ethyl ester (AMTE), 3-methylthiopropionic acid ethyl ester (MTPE), and acetic acid 3-methylthio propyl ester (AMTP)]; and the others were benzyl acetate and eugenol. The newly identified MTAE and AMTP possessed antimutagenic activity as determined by their ability to inhibit the UV-induced mutation in repair-proficient E. coli B/r WP2. MTAE and MTPE (esters with thiocarbonic acid and alkyl alcohol) induced the differentiation of human colon cancer cells (RCM-1 cells), but AMTE and AMTP (esters with carbonic acid and thioalkyl alcohol) did not. A specific thioester motif containing a thiocarbonic acid and alkyl alcohol correlated with these compounds ability to induce differentiation. AMTE, MTPE, AMTP, and eugenol had higher oxygen radical absorbing capacity than the antioxidative vitamin, ascorbic acid. The quantity of MTPE, AMTP and eugenol increased 49-fold, >1175-fold and 11-fold, respectively, in the fully-ripened fruit as compared to the mid-ripened fruit.

  18. Effect of refrigerated storage on probiotic viability and the production and stability of antimutagenic and antioxidant peptides in yogurt supplemented with pineapple peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, B N P; Vasiljevic, T; McKechnie, S; Donkor, O N

    2015-09-01

    Fruit by-products are good resources of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals, which may function as growth nutrients for probiotic bacteria. This research aimed at evaluating effects of pineapple peel powder addition on the viability and activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 4356), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC393), and Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei (ATCC BAA52) in yogurts throughout storage at 4°C for 28d. Plain and probiotic yogurts supplemented with or without pineapple peel powder or inulin were prepared. The probiotic counts in supplemented yogurts at 28d of storage ranged from 7.68 and 8.03 log cfu/g, one log cycle higher compared with nonsupplemented control yogurt. Degree of proteolysis in synbiotic yogurts was significantly higher than plain yogurts and increased substantially during storage. Crude water-soluble peptide extract of the probiotic yogurt with peel possessed stronger antimutagenic and antioxidant activities [evaluated measuring reducing power and scavenging capacity of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl; 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), and hydroxyl radicals] than control and maintained during storage. Pineapple peel, a by-product of juice production, could be proposed as a prebiotic ingredient in the manufacture of yogurts with enhanced nutrition, and functionality.

  19. Antimutagenic activity of major fractions of Zataria multiflora Boiss by Ames method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Sharififar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zataria multiflora is a medicinal plant that has been interested in antimutagenicity effect because of its high antioxidant activity and richness of flavonoids. Antimutagenicity effect of total extract of the plant has been reported previously. Aerial parts of Z. multiflora were extracted by petroleum ether, chloroform and 80% methanol by liquid-liquid extraction method consequently. The fractions were concentrated in vacuum and dried at 40°C in oven. The genotype of two standard strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA98, TA100 was confirmed by the evaluation of two important factors of histidine requirement and the presence of R factor. The minimum inhibition concentration (MIC of the fractions against these two strains was determined by agar dilution method. From each fraction, various concentrations less than MIC were studied for anti-mutagenic test. The sample along with bacterial strain and mutagen agent were incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The number of revertant colonies was counted and compared with control plates. Our results showed that all fractions especially petroleum ether and chloroform ones maintain the number of colonies in the standard range in control plates and prevent from the growth of many strains of bacteria and increase of revertant colonies enhancement in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was prominent against TA100 starin. Methanolic fraction exhibited anti-mutagen activity just in the highest used concentration in the presence of TA98.

  20. A parallel synthesis demonstration library of tri-substituted indazoles containing new antimutagenic/antioxidant hits related to benzydamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sanjay; Vaidya, Hemin; Pillai, Segaran; Vidya, Ramdas; Mitscher, Lester A

    2003-08-01

    A solution phase strategy for the multiple parallel synthesis of a demonstration library of indazoles is described by which regio-selectivity problems inherent to previous syntheses of this nucleus are largely overcome. Synthesis of selected components proceeded satisfactorily indicating that a fully realized library of indazole analogs could readily be produced using this methodology. Simple modifications of the basic nucleophilic aromatic substitution route unambiguously produce a range of N-1 substitutions (alkyl, aryl and aralkyl) in 50-75% yields. Next a range of substituents was introduced at the C-3 position in 50-80% yields by O-alkylation. Careful choice of reagents and reaction conditions were required to prevent by-product formation due to competing alkylation at N-2 (trace to 15% yields). When present, these contaminants were readily removed by chromofiltration. A third diversity site was sketched in at C-5 in 75-90% yield by reductive alkylation or acylation. Screening of some of the demonstration library members in vitro revealed highly active antioxidants suggesting that producing a full library would be worthwhile.

  1. Antimutagenic activity of spearmint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian-Wei; Xu, Meirong; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2004-01-01

    The antimutagenic activity of spearmint (Mentha spicata), a popular food flavoring agent, was studied in the Salmonella assay. Spearmint leaves were brewed in hot water for 5 min at concentrations up to 5% (w/v), and the water extracts were tested against the direct-acting mutagens 4-nitro-1,2-phenylenediamine (NPD) and 2-hydroxyamino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (N-OH-IQ) using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. Nontoxic concentrations of spearmint extract inhibited the mutagenic activity of N-OH-IQ in a concentration-dependent fashion, but had no effect against NPD. These experiments by design focused on the water extract consumed commonly as an herbal tea, but chloroform and methanol extracts of spearmint also possessed antimutagenic activity against N-OH-IQ. Water extract of spearmint inhibited the mutagenic activity of the parent compound, 2-amino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), in the presence of rat liver S9; however, the concentration for 50% inhibition (IC50) against IQ was approximately 10-fold higher than in assays with N-OH-IQ minus S9. At concentrations similar to those used in the Salmonella assays, spearmint extract inhibited two of the major enzymes that play a role in the metabolic activation of IQ, namely, cytochromes P4501A1 and 1A2, based on ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase assays in vitro. In vivo, rats were given spearmint water extract (2%; w/v) as the sole source of drinking fluid before, during, and after 2-week treatment with IQ; colonic aberrant crypt foci were inhibited significantly at 8 weeks (P < 0.05, compared with rats given IQ alone). Collectively, these findings suggest that spearmint tea protects against IQ and possibly other heterocyclic amines through inhibition of carcinogen activation and via direct effects on the activated metabolite(s).

  2. Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.): From a variety of traditional medicinal applications to its novel roles as active antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic and analgesic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidpour, Rafie; Hamidpour, Soheila; Hamidpour, Mohsen; Shahlari, Mina; Sohraby, Mahnaz; Shahlari, Nooshin; Hamidpour, Roxanna

    2017-01-01

    Elaeagnus angustifolia L., which is commonly known as oleaster or Russian olive, is a deciduous plant from Elaeagnacea family. This plant can tolerate and survive a wide variety of environmental conditions. Different parts of E. angustifolia plant, especially the fruits and flowers, have been used traditionally in treating a variety of common illnesses such as nausea, cough, asthma, fever, jaundice, and diarrhea. The use of fruit powder and extract of E. angustifolia L. have shown to be effective in alleviating pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and also in reducing the healing time of wounds in injured person. In addition, some recent reports have indicated the anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticancer and some other properties of oleaster plant. The other important property of this plant would be its role in bio-monitoring the environment for some toxic elements and also its action as a bio-fertilizer agent in distressed lands. It seems that with more advanced studies on E. angustifolia L. and its bioactive components, this plant might be potentially effective and can be used as a natural alternative resource in pharmaceutical industries for treating chronic and serious problems, Fig. 1.

  3. Antimutagenic activity of cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale Sapindales, Anacardiaceae) fresh juice and processed juice (cajuína) against methyl methanesulfonate, 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide and benzo[a]pyrene

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Cashew apple juice (CAJ), produced from the native Brazilian cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale), and has been reported to have antibacterial, antifungal, antitumor, antioxidant and antimutagenic properties. Both the fresh unprocessed juice and the processed juice (cajuína in Portuguese) has been shown to consist of a complex mixture containing high concentrations of anacardic and ascorbic acids plus several carotenoids, phenolic compounds and metals. We assessed both types of juice for thei...

  4. Antimutagenic Effects of Selenium-Enriched Polysaccharides from Pyracantha fortuneana through Suppression of Cytochrome P450 1A Subfamily in the Mouse Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Peng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both selenium (Se and polysaccharides from Pyracantha fortuneana (Maxim. Li (PFPs (P. fortuneana have been reported to possess antioxidative and immuno-protective activities. Whether or not Se-containing polysaccharides (Se-PFPs have synergistic effect of Se and polysaccharides on enhancing the antioxidant and immune activities remains to be determined. We previously reported that polysaccharides isolated from Se-enriched P. fortuneana (Se-PFPs possessed hepatoprotective effects. However, it is not clear whether or not they have anti-mutagenic effects. In the present study, we compared and evaluated anti-mutagenic effects of Se-PFPs at three concentrations (1.35, 2.7 and 5.4 g/kg body weight with those of PFPs, Se alone or Se + PFPs in mice using micronucleus assay in bone marrow and peripheral blood as well as mitomycin C-induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse testicular cells. We also elucidated the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that Se-PFPs inhibited cyclophosphamide (CP-induced micronucleus formation in both bone marrow and peripheral blood, enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx in mouse liver, and reduced the activity and expression of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP4501A in mouse liver in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that the anti-mutagenic potential of Se-PFPs was higher than those of PFPs, Se alone or Se + PFPs at the same level. These results suggest that the anti-mutagenic potential of Se-PFPs may be mediated through the inhibition of the activity and expression of CYP4501A. This study indicates that application of Se-PFPs may provide an alternative strategy for cancer therapy by targeting CYP1A family.

  5. Antimutagenic activity of cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale Sapindales, Anacardiaceae fresh juice and processed juice (cajuína against methyl methanesulfonate, 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide and benzo[a]pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Amelia Melo-Cavalcante

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cashew apple juice (CAJ, produced from the native Brazilian cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale, and has been reported to have antibacterial, antifungal, antitumor, antioxidant and antimutagenic properties. Both the fresh unprocessed juice and the processed juice (cajuína in Portuguese has been shown to consist of a complex mixture containing high concentrations of anacardic and ascorbic acids plus several carotenoids, phenolic compounds and metals. We assessed both types of juice for their antimutagenic properties against the direct mutagens methyl methanesulfonate (MMS and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO and the indirect mutagen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP using pre-treatment, co-treatment and post-treatment assays with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100, TA102, and TA97a. In pre-treatment experiments with strains TA100 and TA102 the fresh juice showed high antimutagenic activity against MMS but, conversely, co-treatment with both juices enhanced MMS mutagenicity and there was an indication of toxicity in the post-treatment regime. In pre-, co-, and post-treatments with TA97a as test strain, antimutagenic effects were also observed against 4-NQO and BaP. These results suggest that both fresh and processed CAJ can protect the cells against mutagenesis induced by direct and indirect mutagens.

  6. Anti-mutagenic activity of Salvia merjamie extract against gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Khalid Mashay

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is an anti-cancer drug with clinically uses in the treatment of various neoplasms, including breast, ovarian, non-small cell lung, pancreaticand cervical cancers, T-cell malignancies, germ cell tumours, and hepatocellular carcinomas. However, it has also been reported to have many adverse effects. Naturally occurring anti-mutagenic effects, especially those of plant origin, have recently become a subject of intensive research. The present study was therefore designed to investigate the anti-mutagenic effects of Salvia merjamie (Family: Lamiaceae) plant extracts against the mutagenic effects of gemcitabine. The anti-mutagenic properties of Salvia merjamie were tested in Inbred SWR/J male and female mice bone marrow cells. The mice were treated in four groups; a control group treated with 30 mg/kg body weight gemcitabine and three treatment groups, each with 30 mg/kg body weight gemcitabine together with, respectively, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight Salvia merjamie extract. Chromosomal aberration and mitotic index assays were performed with the results demonstrating that Salvia merjamie extract protects bone marrow cells in mice against gemcitabine induced mutagenicity. This information can be used for the development of a potential therapeutic anti-mutagenic agents.

  7. Antimutagenic potential of curcumin on chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAGUNATHAN Irulappan; PANNEERSELVAM Natarajan

    2007-01-01

    Turmeric has long been used as a spice and food colouring agent in Asia. In the present investigation, the antimutagenic potential of curcumin was evaluated in Allium cepa root meristem cells. So far there is no report on the biological properties of curcumin in plant test systems. The root tip cells were treated with sodium azide at 200 and 300 μg/ml for 3 h and curcumin was given at 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 16 h, prior to sodium azide treatment. The tips were squashed after colchicine treatment and the cells were analyzed for chromosome aberration and mitotic index. Curcumin induces chromosomal aberration in Allium cepa root tip cells in an insignificant manner, when compared with untreated control. Sodium azide alone induces chromosomal aberrations significantly with increasing concentrations. The total number of aberrations was significantly reduced in root tip cells pretreated with curcumin. The study reveals that curcumin has antimutagenic potential against sodium azide induced chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa root meristem cells. In addition, it showed mild cytotoxicity by reducing the percentage of mitotic index in all curcumin treated groups, but the mechanism of action remains unknown. The antimutagenic potential of curcumin is effective at 5 μg/ml in Allium cepa root meristem cells.

  8. Assessment of antimutagenic and genotoxic potential of senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.) aqueous extract using in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C R; Monteiro, M R; Rocha, H M; Ribeiro, A F; Caldeira-de-Araujo, A; Leitão, A C; Bezerra, R J A C; Pádula, M

    2008-02-01

    Senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.) is widely used as a laxative, although potential side effects, such as toxicity and genotoxicity, have been reported. This study evaluated genotoxic and mutagenic effects of senna aqueous extract (SAE) by means of four experimental assays: inactivation of Escherichia coli cultures; bacterial growth inhibition; reverse mutation test (Mutoxitest) and DNA strand break analysis in plasmid DNA. Our results demonstrated that SAE produces single and double strand breaks in plasmid DNA in a cell free system. On the other hand, SAE was not cytotoxic or mutagenic to Escherichia coli strains tested. In effect, SAE was able to avoid H(2)O(2)-induced mutagenesis and toxicity in Escherichia coli IC203 (uvrA oxyR) and IC205 (uvrA mutM) strains, pointing to a new antioxidant/antimutagenic action of SAE.

  9. The anti-mutagenic properties of bile pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, A C; Ried, K; Blanchfield, J T; Wagner, K-H

    2008-01-01

    Bile pigments, including bilirubin and biliverdin, are endogenous compounds belonging to the porphyrin family of molecules. In the past, bile pigments and bilirubin in particular were thought of as useless by-products of heme catabolism that can be toxic if they accumulate. However, in the past 20 years, research probing the physiological relevance of bile pigments has been mounting, with evidence to suggest bile pigments possess significant antioxidant and anti-mutagenic properties. More specifically, bile pigments are potent peroxyl radical scavengers and inhibit the mutagenic effects of a number of classes of mutagens (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines, oxidants). Coincidentally, persons with elevated circulating bilirubin concentrations have a reduced prevalence of cancer and cardio-vascular disease. Despite the encouraging in vitro anti-mutagenic effects of bile pigments, relatively little research has been conducted on their inhibitory capacity in bacterial and cultured cell assays of mutation, which might link the existing in vitro and in vivo observations. This is the first review to summarise the published data and it is our hope it will stimulate further research on these potentially preventative compounds.

  10. Antimutagenic Compounds of White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei): Isolation and Structural Elucidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Saiz, Carmen-María; Hernández, Javier; Cinco-Moroyoqui, Francisco-Javier; Velázquez, Carlos; Ocaño-Higuera, Víctor-Manuel; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Robles-Sánchez, Maribel; Machi-Lara, Lorena; Burgos-Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, cancer is the main cause of mortality worldwide; thus, the search of chemopreventive compounds to prevent the disease has become a priority. White shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) has been reported as a source of compounds with chemopreventive activities. In this study, shrimp lipids were extracted and then fractionated in order to isolate those compounds responsible for the antimutagenic activity. The antimutagenic activity was assessed by the inhibition of the mutagenic effect of aflatoxin B1 on TA98 and TA100 Salmonella tester strains using the Ames test. Methanolic fraction was responsible for the highest antimutagenic activity (95.6 and 95.9% for TA98 and TA100, resp.) and was further separated into fifteen different subfractions (M1–M15). Fraction M8 exerted the highest inhibition of AFB1 mutation (96.5 and 101.6% for TA98 and TA100, resp.) and, after further fractionation, four subfractions M8a, M8b, M8c, and M8d were obtained. Data from 1H and 13C NMR, and mass spectrometry analysis of fraction M8a (the one with the highest antimutagenic activity), suggest that the compound responsible for its antimutagenicity is an apocarotenoid. PMID:27006678

  11. Antimutagenic Compounds of White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei: Isolation and Structural Elucidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-María López-Saiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, cancer is the main cause of mortality worldwide; thus, the search of chemopreventive compounds to prevent the disease has become a priority. White shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei has been reported as a source of compounds with chemopreventive activities. In this study, shrimp lipids were extracted and then fractionated in order to isolate those compounds responsible for the antimutagenic activity. The antimutagenic activity was assessed by the inhibition of the mutagenic effect of aflatoxin B1 on TA98 and TA100 Salmonella tester strains using the Ames test. Methanolic fraction was responsible for the highest antimutagenic activity (95.6 and 95.9% for TA98 and TA100, resp. and was further separated into fifteen different subfractions (M1–M15. Fraction M8 exerted the highest inhibition of AFB1 mutation (96.5 and 101.6% for TA98 and TA100, resp. and, after further fractionation, four subfractions M8a, M8b, M8c, and M8d were obtained. Data from 1H and 13C NMR, and mass spectrometry analysis of fraction M8a (the one with the highest antimutagenic activity, suggest that the compound responsible for its antimutagenicity is an apocarotenoid.

  12. Mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of aqueous extract of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) on meristematic cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicidade, I; Lima, J D; Pesarini, J R; Monreal, A C D; Mantovani, M S; Ribeiro, L R; Oliveira, R J

    2014-11-28

    Polyphenolic compounds present in rosemary were found to have antioxidant properties, anticarcinogenic activity, and to increase the detoxification of pro-carcinogens. The aim of the study was to determine the effect the aqueous extract of rosemary (AER) on mutagenicity induced by methylmethane sulfonate in meristematic cells of Allium cepa, as well as to describe its mode of action. Anti-mutagenicity experiments were carried out with 3 different concentrations of AER, which alone showed no mutagenic effects. In antimutagenicity experiments, AER showed chemopreventive activity in cultured meristematic cells of A. cepa against exposure to methylmethane sulfonate. Additionally, post-treatment and simultaneous treatment using pre-incubation protocols were the most effective. Evaluation of different protocols and the percent reduction in DNA indicated bioantimutagenic as well desmutagenic modes of action for AER. AER may be chemopreventive and antimutagenic.

  13. [The antimutagenic action of apiculture products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariliak, I R; Berdyshev, G D; Dugan, A M

    1996-01-01

    Using the battery of test-systems, we studied the possible antimutagenic activity of some products of apiculture. It is established that apilak-preparation made on the basis of queen bee milk didn't show gene-protective abilities in Ames test. The rest products of apiculture: propolis, beebread, honey preparations N1 and N2, and queen bee milk manifested to some degree their ability to decrease the mutagenic effects of some chemical and physical mutagens. The toxic effect of propolis upon yeast cells was established. Queen bee milk manifested the least antimutagenic properties (on all test-objects used in experiments).

  14. Antigenotoxic, antimutagenic and ROS scavenging activities of a Rhoeo discolor ethanolic crude extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Avila, M; Arriaga-Alba, M; de la Garza, M; del Carmen HernándezPretelín, M; Domínguez-Ortíz, M A; Fattel-Fazenda, S; Villa-Treviño, S

    2003-02-01

    Rhoeo discolor is a legendary plant used for treatment of superficial mycoses in Mexican traditional medicine. Despite its extended use, it is not known whether it has side-effects. An ethanolic crude extract from Rhoeo discolor was prepared, its mutagenic capacity was investigated by the Ames test, and its genotoxic activity in primary liver cell cultures using the unscheduled DNA synthesis assay. This extract was not mutagenic when tested with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97, TA98 and TA100, and it did not elicit unscheduled DNA synthesis in hepatocyte cultures. In addition, we explored the antimutagenic and antigenotoxic activities of the extract and its ROS scavenger behaviour. Our results show that Rhoeo extract is antimutagenic for S. typhimurium strain TA102 pretreated with ROS-generating mutagen norfloxacin in the Ames test, and protects liver cell cultures against diethylnitrosamine induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis even at 1.9 ng per dish, which was the lowest dose tested. A free radical scavenging test was used in order to explore the antioxidant capacity of Rhoeo extract, as compared with three commercial well-known antioxidants quercetin, ascorbic acid and tocopherol. Rhoeo extract showed less radical scavenging effect than quercetin, but similar to that of alpha-tocopherol and more than ascorbic acid. It is important to note that this extract was neither mutagenic in S. typhimurium nor genotoxic in liver cell culture, even at concentrations as high as four- and 166-fold of those needed for maximal antimutagenic or chemoprotective activities, respectively.

  15. Antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) leaves on Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboro, Akeem; Bin Mohamed, Kamaruzaman; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Yekeen, Taofeek A

    2014-01-01

    Natural plant extracts offer a promising hope in the prevention/treatment of cancer arising from genetic mutations. This study evaluated in vitro and in vivo mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (AFMF) leaves on TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus (Male Swiss albino mice), respectively. The antioxidant activity of AFMF against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined, followed by its phytochemical elucidation using the Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography technique (UPLC). The mutagenicity of AFMF at 4, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 µg/well was Rutin was elucidated by the UPLC technique, and thereby suspected to be the phytochemical responsible for the observed antimutagenic activity. Thus far, AFMF seems to contain a promising chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention of genetic damage that is crucial for cancer development.

  16. Antimutagenicity of an acetone extract of yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadathur, S R; Gould, S J; Bakalinsky, A T

    1995-04-01

    Reconstituted non-fat dry milk powder, fermented by a mixture of Streptococcus thermophilus CH3 and Lactobacillus bulgaricus 191R to produce yogurt, was freeze-dried and extracted in acetone. After evaporation of the acetone, the extract was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and tested for antimutagenicity. In the Ames test, significant dose-dependent activity was observed against N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), 4-nitro-quinoline-N-oxide (4NQO), 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl (DMAB), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA), and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole acetate (Trp-P-2). Weak activity was observed against 1,2,7,8-diepoxyoctane (DEO), and no activity was observed against methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), or aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). In a related assay (Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7), significant antimutagenic activity was detected against MNNG and 4NQO. Activity against the experimental colon carcinogens MNNG and DMAB was examined further, as assayed in the Ames test (Salmonella typhimurium TA100). Compounds responsible for both activities were less soluble in aqueous solutions than in DMSO. Adjustment of yogurt pH to 3, 7.6, or 13 prior to freeze-drying and acetone extraction did not significantly alter the amount of anti-MNNG activity recovered. In contrast, extractability of anti-DMAB activity was significantly greater at acidic pH. Conjugated linoleic acid, a known dairy anticarcinogen, failed to inhibit mutagenesis caused by either mutagen, suggesting that other yogurt-derived compound(s) are responsible. Unfermented milk was treated with lactic acid, yogurt bacteria without subsequent growth, or both, to determine if formation of antimutagenic activity required bacterial growth. Extracts of the milk treatments exhibited the same weak antimutagenicity observed in unfermented milk, approximately 2.5-fold less than in the yogurt extracts, suggesting that antimutagenic activity is associated with bacterial

  17. Antimutagenic and free radical scavenger effects of leaf extracts from Accacia salicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boubaker Jihed

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three extracts were prepared from the leaves of Accacia salicina; ethyl acetate (EA, chloroform (Chl and petroleum ether (PE extracts and was designed to examine antimutagenic, antioxidant potenty and oxidative DNA damage protecting activity. Methods Antioxidant activity of A. salicina extracts was determined by the ability of each extract to protect against plasmid DNA strand scission induced by hydroxyl radicals. An assay for the ability of these extracts to prevent mutations induced by various oxidants in Salmonella typhimurium TA102 and TA 104 strains was conducted. In addition, nonenzymatic methods were employed to evaluate anti-oxidative effects of tested extracts. Results These extracts from leaf parts of A. salicina showed no mutagenicity either with or without the metabolic enzyme preparation (S9. The highest protections against methylmethanesulfonate induced mutagenicity were observed with all extracts and especially chloroform extract. This extract exhibited the highest inhibitiory level of the Ames response induced by the indirect mutagen 2- aminoanthracene. All extracts exhibited the highest ability to protect plasmid DNA against hydroxyl radicals induced DNA damages. The ethyl acetate (EA and chloroform (Chl extracts showed with high TEAC values radical of 0.95 and 0.81 mM respectively, against the ABTS.+. Conclusion The present study revealed the antimutagenic and antioxidant potenty of plant extract from Accacia salicina leaves.

  18. 62. STUDY ON THE ANTIMUTAGENICITY OF ORIDONIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Oridonin (Orid) is an efficacious component of antitumour extracted from Chinese Herb Rabdisia rubeseas (Hemsl.) Hara. It was used to treat the tumour of digestive tract on the clinic. To investigate the mechanism of the antitumour of Orid, We used different methods to detect its antimutagenicity. ①Ames test: Salmonella typhimurium strains contained TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA102 were used. The test was without S-9.

  19. Antimutagenic effect of sage tea in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenkovic, Aleksandra; Stamenkovic-Radak, Marina; Banjanac, Tijana; Andjelkovic, Marko

    2009-01-01

    The present study assayed the antimutagenic potential of Salvia officinalis (sage) in the form of tea infusion, by the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) on Drosophila melanogaster. The use of herbal infusions is much common in the human diet, so the aim of the present study was to estimate the antimutagenic effects of the S. officinalis tea rather than essential oils. Methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) was used as the mutagen and positive control. Several types of treatment were performed: short acute treatment with sage infusion or MMS, longer (chronic) treatment with sage solution or MMS, and two combined treatments, i.e. short treatment with sage followed by a longer treatment with MMS and vice versa. Sage infusion used in our experiments showed a clear antimutagenic effect, reducing the frequency of mutations induced by MMS. The inhibition effect of sage tea is obtained and confirmed when pre- or post-treatments with mutagen were used. The results indicate that although sage in this regime decreases the number of mutation events, it is not efficient enough in case of the 2 h sage pre-treatment. Antioxidant activity, suppression of metabolic activation, could be mechanisms through which sage or some of its components act as desmutagen.

  20. Antimutagenic properties of Mangifera indica L. stem bark extract and evaluation of its effects on hepatic CYP1A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morffi, Janet; Rodeiro, Idania; Hernández, Sandra Luz; González, Leonora; Herrera, Jose; Espinosa-Aguirre, J Javier

    2012-09-01

    Mangifera indica stem bark extract (MSBE) is a Cuban natural product which has shown strong antioxidant properties. In this work, the antimutagenic effect of MSBE was tested against 10 well-known mutagens/carcinogens in the Ames test in the absence or presence of metabolic fraction (S9). The chemical mutagens tested included: cyclophosphamide, mitomycin C, bleomycin, cisplatin, dimethylnitrosamine (DMNA), benzo[a]pyrene (BP), 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), sodium azide, 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) and picrolonic acid. Protective effects of the extract were also evaluated by comparing the efficiency of S9 fraction obtained from rats treated during 28 days with oral doses of MSBE (50-500 mg/kg) with that obtained from rats treated with vehicle (control) to activate bleomycin and cyclophosphamide in the Ames test. MSBE concentrations between 50 and 500 μg/plate significantly reduced the mutagenicity mediated by all the chemicals tested with the exception of sodium azide. Higher mutagenicity was found when bleomycin and cyclophosphamide (CP) were activated by control S9 than by MSBE S9. In addition, inhibition of CYP1A1 microsomal activity was observed in the presence of MSBE (10-20 μg/ml). We can conclude that besides its potent antioxidant activity previously reported, MSBE may also exert a chemoprotective effect due to its capacity to inhibit CYP activity.

  1. Comparing the functional components, SOD-like activities, antimutagenicity, and nutrient compositions of Phellinus igniarius and Phellinus linteus mushrooms

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Many species of the genus Phellinus possess beneficial properties, including antioxidant, immune-enhancing, and antimutagenic effects. Phenolic compounds and polysaccharides are two kinds of bioactive compounds; however, few studies have compared the differences between Phellinus igniarius and Phellinus linteus in their functional components, functional activities, and nutrient compositions. Herein, the proximate compositions and microelements of the fruiting body of P. igniarius and P. linte...

  2. Comparative study of the antimutagenic properties of vitamins C and E against mutation induced by norfloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Myriam Arriaga; Sánchez, Roberto Rivera; Pérez, Nancy Jannet Ruíz; Navarrete, Jaime Sánchez; Paz, Rocío Flores; Montoya-Estrada, Araceli; Gómez, Juan José Hicks

    2008-01-01

    Background Norfloxacin like other fluoroquinolones, is known to be mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium TA102 strain. This mutagenic effect is due to free oxygen radicals (ROS), because it is inhibited by antioxidants such as β-carotene and naturally occurring antioxidants of Roheo discolor and other plants. The aim of this work was to evaluate combination therapy with norfloxacin and vitamins C and E, to reduce the possible genotoxic risk associated with fluoroquinolones. Method The antimutagenicity of α-tocoferol (Vitamin E) and ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) against norfloxacin-induced mutation was evaluated on S. typhimurium TA102, using the aroclor-1254-induced S9 rat liver homogenate. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) a measure of the bactericidal effect of norfloxacin, was obtained in vitro by the plate dilution method. Results Vitamin E (0.5 mg per Petri dish) induced a statistically significant reduction (P norfloxacin, whereas Vitamin C (1 mg per Petri dish) had no such effect. Neither of these vitamins altered the MIC for norfloxacin against 25 uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. Conclusion These results suggest that Vitamin E is a potent antimutagen that would be worthwhile being used in conjunction with fluoroquinolone treatment. The minimal antimutagenic effect of Vitamin C observed under these experimental conditions may have been because Vitamin C in the Ames test induces a Fenton reaction, and if divalent cations are present, it can act as a pro-oxidant rather than an antioxidant. Ascorbic acid should be further evaluated in the presence of different divalent cations concentrations. PMID:18267022

  3. Determination of antimutagenic properties of apigenin-7-O-rutinoside, a flavonoid isolated from Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds. ssp. longifolia with yeast DEL assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulluce, Medine; Orhan, Furkan; Adiguzel, Ahmet; Bal, Tugba; Guvenalp, Zuhal; Dermirezer, Lutfiye Omur

    2013-07-01

    Lamiaceae is an important plant family that has been investigated for its medicinal properties due to its large amounts of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Flavonoids have been shown to have antioxidant and antimutagenic activities in different test systems, but their certain mechanisms are still unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of apigenin 7-O-rutinoside, a flavonoid isolated from Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds. ssp. longifolia. The possible antimutagenic potential of apigenin 7-O-rutinoside (A7R) was examined against mutagens ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and acridine (AC) in a eukaryotic cell system Saccharomyces cerevisiae RS112. The results showed that A7R has different inhibition rates against EMS and AC-induced mutagenicity. Thus, the properties of A7R are of great pharmacological importance and might be beneficial for reducing the risk of reactive oxygen species-related diseases.

  4. Antimutagenic property of a Chinese herb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongen Zhang; Te-Hsiu Ma; Byeong-Seon Jeong; Chang-Deok Won [Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Shandong (China)

    1994-12-31

    The root extracts of a Chinese herb, Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, has been used as internal medicine to improve liver and kidney functions for centuries. The antimutagenic property of this drug was evaluated with the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay in this study. The Trad-MCN bioassay is a well-established test for chromosome damage induced by physical or chemical agents in terms of micronuclei (MCN) frequency. Inflorescences of the Tradescantia plant cuttings were first exposed to 35 R soft X-rays (80 Kv, 5 ma, 1 mm Al filter, dose rate around 50 R/min) and followed by drug treatments at 1%, 3% and 6% concentrations of the aqueous solution for a total of 24 hr recovery period. The positive (X-rays), negative (nutrient solution) and drug control (3% drug solution) groups were maintained in each of the three series of repeated experiments. Flower buds of the treated and control groups were fixed in aceto-alcohol (1:3 ratio) for preparation of slides to score MCN frequencies in the early tetrads of the meiotic pollen mother cells. The mean MCN frequencies (MCN/100 tetrads + SD) of the positive control (X-irradiated) was 26.67 + 9.62; the negative control was 2.92 + 1.90; the drug control was 2.06 + 1.50 and the 35 R X-ray/6% drug treated was 18.75 + 6.54. A 30% reduction of chromosome damage was observed. Antimutagenic effects were relatively lower at lower concentrations. This antimutagenic effect could be the results of the meiotic inhibition, DNA repair or radical elimination from the X-irradiation plant cells.

  5. Potential antimutagenic activity of berberine, a constituent of Mahonia aquifolium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Jaroslav

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of a study aimed at developing new pharmaceutical products from natural resources, the purpose of this research was twofold: (1 to fractionate crude extracts from the bark of Mahonia aquifolium and (2 to evaluate the strength of the antimutagenic activity of the separate components against one of the common direct-acting chemical mutagens. Methods The antimutagenic potency was evaluated against acridine orange (AO by using Euglena gracilis as an eukaryotic test model, based on the ability of the test compound/fraction to prevent the mutagen-induced damage of chloroplast DNA. Results It was found that the antimutagenicity of the crude Mahonia extract resides in both bis-benzylisoquinoline (BBI and protoberberine alkaloid fractions but only the protoberberine derivatives, jatrorrhizine and berberine, showed significant concentration-dependent inhibitory effect against the AO-induced chloroplast mutagenesis of E. gracilis. Especially berberine elicited, at a very low dose, remarkable suppression of the AO-induced mutagenicity, its antimutagenic potency being almost three orders of magnitude higher when compared to its close analogue, jatrorrhizine. Possible mechanisms of the antimutagenic action are discussed in terms of recent literature data. While the potent antimutagenic activity of the protoberberines most likely results from the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I, the actual mechanism(s for the BBI alkaloids is hard to be identified. Conclusions Taken together, the results indicate that berberine possesses promising antimutagenic/anticarcinogenic potential that is worth to be investigated further.

  6. Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antioxidants are man-made or natural substances that may prevent or delay some types of cell damage. Antioxidants are found in many foods, including fruits and ... are also available as dietary supplements. Examples of antioxidants include Beta-carotene Lutein Lycopene Selenium Vitamin A ...

  7. Antimutagenic effect of crown ethers on heavy metal-induced sister chromatid exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, M Y; Arenaz, P

    1998-01-01

    Macrocyclic polyethers (crown ethers) are a family of compounds that possess the ability to complex with and transport metal ions across membranes. Because of their unique ionophoric characteristic, they have wide application in industry and research, chemistry and biology. In the current investigation the relationship between heavy metal mutagenesis and crown ether co-mutagenicity and/or antimutagenicity in mammalian cells has been examined using sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as the cytogenetic end point. Chinese hamster ovary cells were treated with lead or cadmium, with and without selected crown ethers. Several genotoxic end points, including SCEs were scored and statistically compared. We report here that most of the crown ethers studied had little or no influence on lead- or cadmium-induced SCEs or chromosome aberrations. On the other hand, the substituted crown ether dicyclohexyl 21-crown-7 significantly decreased both spontaneous and metal-induced SCE frequencies, suggesting that this crown ether may possess antimutagenic activity.

  8. Antimutagenic potential of the Thai herb, Mucuna collettii Lace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Sutjit, Wandee; Pulcharoen, Kade; Panriansaen, Rattana; Chulasiri, Malyn

    2008-01-04

    Mucuna collettii Lace is a Thai herb with a long record of consumption among mature Thai males for the promotion of sexual potency. The mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials of Mucuna collettii extract were carried out by using the Ames test pre-incubation method in the presence and absence of S9 mixture. Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 were applied as the tester strains. Prior to mutagenic and antimutagenic tests, the survival of the tester strains was performed by treating with the plant extract. Results showed Mucuna collettii extract exhibited strong cytotoxic effects in a dose-dependent manner. Toxicity of the plant was confirmed in mice in which negative adverse effect was found in kidney, uterus, ovary, and testis. Mucuna collettii extract in the presence and absence of S9 mixture was negative for mutagenic Ames test. Mucuna collettii extract in the presence and absence of S9 mixture was positive for antimutagenic Ames test towards either one or both of the tested mutagens: 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-acrylamide (AF-2) and benzo(a)pyrene. The antimutagenic activity of the plant extract was confirmed in rec-assays. Micronucleus test demonstrated that Mucuna collettii extract at high dose and a long incubation time could induce micronucleus formation in tested animals, but less than the response of the positive control. The overall mutagenic and antimutagenic assays are further evidences for the antimutagenic potential of Mucuna collettii.

  9. Sesamol: an efficient antioxidant with potential therapeutic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, Thiraviam; Rohit, Bhandari; Pal, Kaur Indu

    2009-07-01

    Sesamol has been shown earlier to exhibit antimutagenic (reactive oxygen mediated) and antiageing activity in our lab and it has also been found to exert chemopreventive effect. Here we report the in vitro antioxidant activity of sesamol. As most of the antioxidants act due to their property to auto-oxidise and the pro- or antioxidant activity would depend on the concentration of the agent used and the free radical source, at least 6 dilutions in concentration range of 5-1000 nmoles of sesamol were selected for each test system. Further the antioxidant activity was compared with a water soluble antioxidant (ascorbic acid). Eventhough some preliminary studies on the antioxidant activity of sesamol have been reported in DPPH assay & inhibition of lipid peroxidation, it is not complete. We, here in report comprehensively (both in terms of the no. of doses and also a variety of test systems being employed) on the antioxidant activity of sesamol. Furthermore, since all the data has been generated by the same workers and under same laboratory conditions, hence is scientifically significant. Also the process of dose selection as discussed earlier is more scientific; and the data treatment, i.e. calculation of IC(50) values and comparisons with ascorbic acid has been statistically validated. In conclusion, sesamol was found to be an efficient scavenger of the entire range of ROS in several test systems pointing towards the potential of sesamol to be developed as a possible therapeutic.

  10. EFFECT OF THE ANTIMUTAGENS VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON THE SPONTANEOUS MUTATION SPECTRA OF SALMONELLA TA104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effect of the Antimutagens Vanillin and Cinnamaldehyde on the / Spontaneous Mutation Spectra of Salmonella TAlO4 Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that, when added to assay plates, reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella typhi...

  11. Antimutagenic evaluation of traditional medicinal plants from South America Peumus boldus and Cryptocarya alba using Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Erico R; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie; Parodi, Jorge; Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Peumus boldus Mol. ("Boldo") and Cryptocarya alba Mol. Looser ("Peumo") are medicinal shrubs with wide geographical distribution in South America. Their leaves and fruits are commonly used in traditional medicine because they exhibit natural medicinal properties for treatment of liver disorders and rheumatism. However, there are no apparent data regarding potential protective effects on cellular genetic components. In order to examine potential mutagenic and/or antimutagenic effects of these medicinal plants, the Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster) wing-spot test was employed. This assay detects a wide range of mutational events, including point mutations, deletions, certain types of chromosomal aberrations (nondisjunction), and mitotic recombination. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of phenolic and anthocyanin compounds were carried out using biochemical and high-performance liquid chromatography methodologies. In addition, the antioxidant capacity of P. boldus and C. alba leaf extracts was also analyzed. P. boldus and C. alba extracts did not induce significant mutagenic effects in the D. melanogaster model. However, simultaneous treatment of extracts concurrently with the mutagen ethyl methane sulphonate showed a decrease of mutant spots in somatic cells of D. melanogaster, indicating desmutagenic effects in this in vivo model. Flavonoids and anthocyanins were detected predominantly in the extracts, and these compounds exerted significant antioxidant capacity. The observed antimutagenic effects may be related to the presence of phytochemicals with high antioxidant capacity, such as flavonoids and antohocyanins, in the extracts.

  12. Structures of antimutagenic constituents in the peels of Citrus limon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Takahashi, Kazuki; Kanayama, Sumire; Nakano, Yuka; Imai, Hiromi; Kibi, Masumi; Imahori, Daisuke; Hasei, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Tetsushi

    2017-07-11

    The methanolic extracts from the peels of Citrus limon were found to show antimutagenic effects against 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole, and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in the Ames test. From the methanolic extracts, four new coumarins (wakayamalimonol A-D) and a new furanocoumarin (wakayamalimonol E) were isolated together with fifteen known compounds. The absolute stereostructures of the new compounds were determined by chemical synthesis and the modified Mosher's method. Among the isolated constituents, coumarins, furanocoumarins, and limonoids showed antimutagenic effects in the Ames test. One of the major constituent, limonin, showed significant antimutagenic effects against mitomycinC and PhIP in the micronucleus test in vivo.

  13. Antimutagenic activities of common vegetables and their chlorophyll content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, C.N.; Butler, M.A.; Matney, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    Aqueous and acetone extractions of some common vegetables inhibited the activation of 3-methylcholanthrene and benzo(a)pyrene in the Ames Salmonella gene reversion mutagenesis/mammalian microsomal activation assay. The potency of the inhibitory activity was correlated with the chlorophyll content of the acetone extracts. The aqueous fractions contained sufficient histidine to interfere with the interpretation of the result. However, grouping the aqueous extracts from vegetables yielding low, medium, and high levels of histidine allowed comparison between antimutagenic activity and chlorophyll content. Increasing chlorophyll contents corresponded to increasing antimutagenic activities in all 3 groups. Sodium copper chlorophyllin demonstrated comparable inhibitory activity when compared at the same chlorophyll level.

  14. Antimutagenic and antigenotoxic effects of vegetable matrices on the activity of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidori, M; Caterino, E; Criscuolo, E; Fatigati, V; Liguori, G; Parrella, A

    2009-07-01

    Two in vitro tests, one to detect bacterial mutagenicity (Ames test) on Salmonella typhimurium TA98, TA100, and TA1535 and the other the primary DNA damage (SOS Chromotest) on Escherichia coli PQ37, were applied to determine the overall genotoxic activity of 12 pesticides (azinphos methyl, chlorothalonil, chlorphyriphos ethyl, chlorphyriphos methyl, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, fenazaquin, fludioxonil, indoxacarb, iprodione and penconazol). These were detected by gas chromatography (GC) analysis with electron capture (ECD) and nitrogen phosphorus detection (NPD) in 18 samples of vegetables. Some extracts of vegetables, found positive for pesticides with GC, were subjected to the Ames test and SOS Chromotest to evaluate the possible antimutagenic and/or antigenotoxic effects of vegetable matrices. The same bioassays were also performed on the mixtures of pesticides found in these samples to evaluate whether interactions could occur between pesticides and be responsible for the possible antimutagenic and/or antigenotoxic effects of the contaminated matrices. Experiments were also carried out to compare the results found for contaminated vegetables with their content of antioxidant components. Significant differences in mutagenicity and genotoxicity were found among the pesticides selected for this study. Of the 12 pesticides tested, only azinphos methyl, cyprodinil, fludioxonil and iprodione were found to be positive for both S. typhimurium and E. coli. No mutagenic/genotoxic activity was found in the extracts of vegetables contaminated by pesticides. S. typhimurium TA1535 showed a strong positive mutagenic effect for the mixtures of pesticides while they were not able to induce the SOS system. The data concerning the content of polyphenols and the total reducing activity of the contaminated vegetables indicated high amounts of antioxidants that could explain the inhibitory effect on the activity of pesticides shown by vegetables.

  15. Antimutagenic and antibacterial activities of Peltophorum ferrugineum flower extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinki Dandapat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the antibacterial and antimutagenic properties of the Peltophorum ferrugineum flower extracts. Methods: Dried flowers of P. ferrugineum were extracted successively with hexane, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol, and the total phenolic content of extracts were determined spectrophotometrically at 760 nm after reaction with the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. The extracts were tested against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica by agar dilution method. The antimutagenicity of extracts was studied using the tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium by the standard plate incorporation test. The effect of extracts on nucleic acid leakage (spectrophotometrically at 260 nm, bacterial respiration (total dissolved oxygen and bacterial cell wall (Scanning Electron Microscopy were also determined. Results: The total phenolic content of extracts was in the order of methanol > acetone > hexane > ethyl acetate. All the extracts showed antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC ranging from 0.1 to 1.25%. However, higher activity was found with acetone and methanol extracts. The acetone and methanol extracts showed strong antimutagenic activity against sodium azide and methyl methane sulfonate induced mutation in Salmonella tester strains. The antibacterial action of extracts was probably due to the ability of these extracts to cause the disintegration of cell wall, leakage of genetic material and inhibition of respiration. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the acetone and methanol extracts of P. ferrugineum possess antibacterial and antimutagenic activities, and can find application as food preservatives and nutraceuticals.

  16. Antimutagenic potential of harpagoside and Harpagophytum procumbens against 1-nitropyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Manon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: 1-nitropyrene (1-NPy is one of the most abundant nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons particularly in diesel exhausts. It is a mutagenic and carcinogenic pollutant very widespread in the environment. So the discovery of antimutagenic agents is essential. Harpagophytum procumbens (HP is traditionally used as anti-inflammatory and analgesic particularly against painful osteoarthritis. Harpagoside (HS, its major iridoid glycoside, is considered as the main active component. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimutagenic activity of HS and HP extracts against mutagenic activity of 1-NPy. Materials and Methods: The antimutagenic activity was investigated using the in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in cultured human lymphocytes. Cells were exposed to HS or HP extracts before (pretreatment, during (co-treatment, and after (posttreatment treatment with 1-NPy. Results: Results showed that HS significantly reduced the mutagenicity of 1-NPy in pretreatment and particularly in co-treatment, whereas all HP extracts significantly reduced the genotoxicity in the three protocols. Conclusion: These results suggested that HS was strongly involved in antimutagenic activity of HP extracts in co-treatment, but other components in HP extracts participated in this activity in pre- and post-treatment.

  17. Comparing the functional components, SOD-like activities, antimutagenicity, and nutrient compositions of Phellinus igniarius and Phellinus linteus mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nae-Cherng Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many species of the genus Phellinus possess beneficial properties, including antioxidant, immune-enhancing, and antimutagenic effects. Phenolic compounds and polysaccharides are two kinds of bioactive compounds; however, few studies have compared the differences between Phellinus igniarius and Phellinus linteus in their functional components, functional activities, and nutrient compositions. Herein, the proximate compositions and microelements of the fruiting body of P. igniarius and P. linteus were determined. The fruiting body of P. igniarius and P. linteus were extracted by boiling water [water extract of P. igniarius (WEPI and P. linteus (WEPL]. The contents of total phenolics and polysaccharides, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD-like and antimutagenic activities of WEPI and WEPL, were compared. We found that WEPI was rich in phenolics and polysaccharides and had higher SOD-like activity than WEPL. Nutrient compositions were mainly different in minerals, whereas anitmutagenicity was similar. All of these results suggested that P. igniarius has greater potential for the development of antioxidant and immunomodulating food products than P. linteus.

  18. Antimutagenic and antiherpetic activities of different preparations from Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caon, Thiago; Kaiser, Samuel; Feltrin, Clarissa; de Carvalho, Annelise; Sincero, Thaís Cristine Marques; Ortega, George González; Simões, Cláudia Maria Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Uncaria tomentosa have been used to treat viral diseases such as herpes due to multiple pharmacological effects, but its therapeutic efficacy against this virus have not been reported yet. Thus, in vitro antiherpetic activity of hydroethanolic extract from barks, purified fractions of quinovic acid glycosides and oxindole alkaloids was evaluated by plaque reduction assay, including mechanistic studies (virucidal, attachment and penetration action). Once exposure to physical agents might lead to reactivation of the herpetic infection, antimutagenic effect (pre-, simultaneous and post-treatment protocols) was also evaluated by Comet assay. The antiherpetic activity from the samples under investigation seemed to be associated with the presence of polyphenols or their synergistic effect with oxindole alkaloids or quinovic acid glycosides, once both purified fractions did not present activity when evaluated alone. Inhibition of viral attachment in the host cells was the main mechanism of antiviral activity. Although both purified fractions displayed the lowest antimutagenic activity in pre and simultaneous treatment, they provided a similar effect to that of cat's claw hydroethanolic extract in post-treatment. Given that purified fractions may result in a reduced antiherpetic activity, the use of cat's claw hydroethanolic extract from barks should be prioritized in order to obtain a synergistic effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimutagenicity of a suberin extract from Quercus suber cork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizková, L; Lopes, M H; Polónyi, J; Belicová, A; Dobias, J; Ebringer, L

    1999-12-13

    The possible protective effect of a suberin extract from Quercus suber cork on acridine orange (AO)-, ofloxacin- and UV radiation-induced mutagenicity (bleaching activity) in Euglena gracilis was examined. To our knowledge, the present results are the first attempt to analyse suberin in relation to mutagenicity of some chemicals. Suberin exhibits a significant dose-dependent protective effect against AO-induced mutagenicity and the concentration of 500 micrograms/ml completely eliminates the Euglena-bleaching activity of AO. The mutagenicity of ofloxacin is also significantly reduced in the presence of suberin (125, 250 and 500 micrograms/ml). However, the moderate protective effect of suberin on UV radiation-induced mutagenicity was observed only at concentrations 500 and 1000 micrograms/ml. Our data shows that suberin extract from Q. suber cork possess antimutagenic properties and can be included in the group of natural antimutagens acting in a desmutagenic manner.

  20. Antimutagenic potential of harpagoside and Harpagophytum procumbens against 1-nitropyrene

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Manon; Baghdikian Béatrice; Orsière Thierry; Pompili Jocelyne; Mabrouki Fathi; Ollivier Evelyne; Botta Alain

    2015-01-01

    Background: 1-nitropyrene (1-NPy) is one of the most abundant nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons particularly in diesel exhausts. It is a mutagenic and carcinogenic pollutant very widespread in the environment. So the discovery of antimutagenic agents is essential. Harpagophytum procumbens (HP) is traditionally used as anti-inflammatory and analgesic particularly against painful osteoarthritis. Harpagoside (HS), its major iridoid glycoside, is considered as the main active component. Obje...

  1. Assessment of estrogenic, mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana S. Camargo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a wide range of research involving natural products is focused on the discovery of new drugs in many different therapeutic areas. A great number of the synthetic compounds on the market were derived from natural products, especially plants. Nemorosone is the major constituent of the floral resin of Clusia rosea Jacq., Clusiaceae, and in Cuban propolis. In vitro studies have shown cytotoxic activity in this substance against various tumor cell lines, including those resistant to various cytotoxic drugs, whereas it has low cytotoxicity to non-tumoral cells. Therefore, in order to characterize the biological activity of nemorosone, a substance with potential antitumor activity, and in view of preclinical testing of the toxicity of drug candidate compounds, the main aim of this study was to determine the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone by the Ames test, using the strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 of Salmonella typhimurium. Secondly, to characterize the estrogenic activity in an experimental recombinant yeast model (Recombinant Yeast Assay mutagenic activity was observed at in any of the concentrations in any of the test strains. To evaluate the antimutagenic potential, direct and indirect mutagenic agents were used: 4 nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NPD, mitomycin C (MMC and aflatoxin B1 (AFL. Nemorosone showed moderate antimutagenic activity (inhibition level 31%, in strain TA100 in the presence of AFL, and strong antimutagenic activity in TA102 against MMC (inhibition level 53%. Estrogenic activity was observed, with an EEq of 0.41±0.16 nM at various tested concentrations.

  2. Antimutagenic effect of resveratrol against Trp-P-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenobe, F; Nakamura, S; Miyazawa, M

    1997-02-03

    The methanol extract of Yucca schidigera (YE) showed a suppressive effect on umu gene expression of the SOS response induced by 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. The suppressive effect of YE was also observed for 2-aminoanthracene and activated Trp-P-1, without a significant effect on bacterial growth. The extract exhibited a weak suppressive effect on SOS-induction by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, but not by furylfuramide or 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide. The antimutagenic activity of YE against Trp-P-1 was demonstrated by Ames assay using Salmonella typhimurium TA98. Isolation and purification of the active component of YE was carried out using SiO2 column chromatography, and 275 mg of antimutagenic compound was isolated from 2.5 kg of dried chips of yucca roots and branches. The compound was identified as 3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene (THS). The SOS suppression and antimutagenicity of THS against Trp-P-1 was determined by umu test and Ames test.

  3. Antimutagenicity and Anticarcinogenic Effects of Gel and Latex Extracts of Aloe Vera Cultivated: A Comparative Study in Two Cities, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheiri A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in the world and many mutagens are the cause of death in millions of patients. Due to the side effects of anticancer drugs, scientists are in search of natural drugs with fewer side effects and more therapeutic efficacy. This study aims to, firstly, investigate the antimutgenic effects of different Aloe vera gel and latex extracts on mutated Salmonella typhimurium bacterium by using Ames test and to, secondly, study the probable effects of the habitat conditions on the antimutagenic effects of the plant.Methods: After preparing different Aloe vera gel and latex extracts, the antimutagenic effects of the extracts were evaluated by Ames test. In this test, a mutated strain of S. typhimurium was grown on culture media containing a minimum of salt and glucose in the presence of a mutagen substance (NaN3. Subsequently, only those bacteria that had turned HIS+ by reverse mutation formed colonies. As different alcoholic and aqueous extracts of Aloe vera reduced reversed mutations, the difference between the means of revertant mutants per plate was calculated by one-way ANOVA using SPSS software (version 18. Results: The ethanol extracts of latex from Karaj had a maximum (91% and aqueous extract from Dezfoul had a minimum (42% percentage of inhibition. Conclusion: Maximum percentage of inhibition was observed in the extracts of the plant cultivated in Karaj reflecting the impact of environmental conditions on the construction of antioxidant compounds in plants.

  4. Taurine and ellagic acid: two differently-acting natural antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, R; Ricordy, R; Bartolini, F; Ramadori, L; Perticone, P; De Salvia, R

    1995-01-01

    Naturally occurring antimutagenic compounds are extensively analyzed for their capacity to protect cells from induced damage. We selected two agents, taurine and ellagic acid, treated in the literature as antioxidants, but whose activity is insufficiently known. This paper reports on the ability of these agents to act against damage induced by mitomycin-C and hydrogen peroxide in Chinese hamster ovary cells cultivated in vitro. Cytogenetic and cytofluorimetric analyses were performed. Ellagic acid proved to have more than one mechanism of action, probably as a scavenger of oxygen species produced by H2O2 treatment, and as a protector of the DNA double helix from alkylating agent injury. In our experimental conditions, taurine seems able to scavenge oxygen species.

  5. Identification of antimutagenic properties of anthocyanins and other polyphenols from rose (Rosa centifolia) petals and tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Gautam, Satyendra; Sharma, Arun

    2013-06-01

    Petals from different rose (Rosa centifolia) cultivars ("passion," "pink noblesse," and "sphinx") were assessed for antimutagenicity using Escherichia coli RNA polymerase B (rpoB)-based Rif (S) →Rif (R) (rifampicin sensitive to resistant) forward mutation assay against ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced mutagenesis. The aqueous extracts of rose petals from different cultivars exhibited a wide variation in their antimutagenicity. Among these, cv. "passion" was found to display maximum antimutagenicity. Upon further fractionation, the anthocyanin extract of cv. "passion" displayed significantly higher antimutagenicity than its phenolic extract. During thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis, the anthocyanin extract got resolved into 3 spots: yellow (Rf : 0.14), blue (Rf : 0.30), and pink (Rf : 0.49). Among these spots, the blue one displayed significantly higher antimutagenicity than the other 2. Upon high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, this blue spot further got resolved into 2 peaks (Rt : 2.7 and 3.8 min). The 2nd peak (Rt : 3.8 min) displaying high antimutagenicity was identified by ESI-IT-MS/MS analysis as peonidin 3-glucoside, whereas less antimutagenic peak 1 (Rt : 2.7) was identified as cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside. The other TLC bands were also characterized by ESI-IT-MS/MS analysis. The least antimutagenic pink band (Rf : 0.49) was identified as malvidin 3-acetylglucoside-4-vinylcatechol, whereas non-antimutagenic yellow band (Rf : 0.14) was identified as luteolinidin anthocyanin derivative. Interestingly, the anthocyanin extracted from rose tea of cv. "passion" exhibited a similar antimutagenicity as that of the raw rose petal indicating the thermal stability of the contributing bioactive(s). The findings thus indicated the health protective property of differently colored rose cultivars and the nature of their active bioingredients.

  6. Antimutagenicity of xanthophylls present in Aztec Marigold (Tagetes erecta) against 1-nitropyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Mejía, E; Loarca-Piña, G; Ramos-Gómez, M

    1997-03-17

    The principal natural food colorants used in modern food manufacture are anthocyanins, betalains, carotenoids, chlorophylls, riboflavin and caramel. Carotenoids (carotenes and xanthophylls) occur naturally in some foods such as carrots, red tomatoes, butter, cheese, paprika, palm oil, corn kernels, marigold petals, annatto, and red salmon. Carotenoids (alpha- or beta-carotene and xanthophylls) are excellent antioxidants and inhibit some types of cancers. In the present study, we used the Salmonella typhimurium tester strain YG1024 in the plate-incorporation test to examine the antimutagenicity of xanthophylls extracted from Aztec Marigold (Tagetes erecta) on 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) mutagenicity. Further, we investigated the effect of lutein on DNA-repair system of tester strain YG1024, using a preincubation test. The possible mechanism of lutein on 1-NP mutagenicity was studied by comparing the absorption spectrum of lutein, 1-NP and lutein plus 1-NP. In a dose-response curve of 1-NP, the mutagenic potency was 4317 revertants/nmol, and the dose of 0.06 microgram of 1-NP/plate was chosen for the antimutagenicity studies. Lutein and xanthophylls from Aztec Marigold (pigments for poultry and human use) inhibited mutagenicity of 1-NP in a dose-dependent manner. Lutein and the pigments were not toxic to the bacteria at the concentrations tested (0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 2.0 and 10 micrograms/plate). The percentages of inhibition of 1-NP mutagenicity were 72%, 92% and 66.2% for lutein (10 micrograms/plate), pigment for poultry use (10 micrograms/plate) and pigment for human use (2 micrograms/plate), respectively. Lutein had no effect on the DNA-repair system of strain YG1024. A new peak was detected at 429 nm when lutein was added at 1-NP, and it was stable throughout the incubation time. The results suggest that the major mechanisms of lutein against 1-NP mutagenicity is the potential formation of a complex between lutein and 1-NP, which could limit the bioavailability of 1-NP.

  7. Daily lifestyles and anti-mutagenicity of saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Masahiro; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Nakamura, Sei-Ichi; Hayakawa, Kazuo

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between lifestyle and the antimutagenicity of saliva. Subjects were 52 healthy female university students. The collection of the saliva samples and the lifestyle measurements were carried out for them. The anti-mutagenicity of the saliva was measured using the umu test. With regard to the lifestyle items, only "nutrient balance" tended to contribute positively to the inhibiting capacity of the saliva on the mutagenicity of AF-2. In addition, there was a significant inverse correlation between the score of 7 other items and the inhibiting capacity of the saliva (r=-0.32; pcoffee consumption and the inhibiting capacity of the saliva. These findings suggest that the inhibiting capacity of saliva worked to decrease mutagen levels that were enhanced by poor lifestyle. In addition, "nutrient balance" may contribute to the inhibiting capacity of the saliva independent of 7 other items. With regard to the tea and/or coffee consumption. further studies should be carried out.

  8. Assessment of mutagenic, antimutagenic and genotoxicity effects of Mimosa tenuiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Genotoxic effects of Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poir, Fabaceae, were investigated by using both micronucleus test and bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102 respectively. In respect of Ames test results show that the extract does not induce mutations in any strains of Salmonella typhimurium tested since the mutagenicity index is less than 2. In the antimutagenic effect was observed that the extract at the concentrations tested significantly decreased the mutagenicity index of all strains tested which characterized the extract as antimutagenic in these conditions. In the micronucleus test in vivo, we observed that the concentrations used did not induce an increase in the frequency of micronucleus in normochromatic erythrocytes of mice. Therefore, we concluded that the extract of M. tenuiflora is not mutagenic in the absence of exogenous metabolizing system and does not induce an increase in the frequency of the micronucleus characterized as an agent not mutagenic in these conditions. Further studies of toxicity need to be made to the use of this plant in the treatment of diseases to be stimulated.

  9. Antimutagenic properties of lactic acid-cultured milk on chemical and fecal mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosono, A.; Kashina, T.; Kada, T.

    1986-09-01

    The antimutagenic properties of milk cultured with Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus were examined using streptomycin-dependent strains of Salmonella in an in vitro assay system. The mutagens utilized for testing included 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl) acrylamide, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, and fecal mutagenic extracts from cats, monkeys, dogs and other mammals. Both types of cultured milk exhibited antimutagenic activity on all mutagens used. Antimutagenic activities of the cultured milks with 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl) acrylamide and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide increased with incubation time but were thermolabile beyond 55/sup 0/C for 10 min.

  10. The antimicrobial activity of Liquidambar orientalis mill. against food pathogens and antioxidant capacity of leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okmen, G; Turkcan, O; Ceylan, O; Gork, G

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal plants are an important source of substances which are claimed to induce antimicrobial, antimutagenic and antioxidant effects. Many plants have been used due to their antimicrobial treatments. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of L. orientalis have not been reported to the present day. The aim of this work was to investigate of the antimicrobial and antioxidant potentials of different extracts from L. orientalis. The extracts were screened for antimicrobial activity against different food pathogens. These bacteria include 4 Gram positive and 3 Gram negative bacteria and one fungi. The leaf extracts of plant were tested by disc diffusion assay. The MIC was evaluated on plant extracts as antimicrobial activity. In addition to, the plant extracts were tested against the stable DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazylhydrate) free-radical. The acetone, ethanol and methanol extracts of L. orientalis showed maximum inhibition zone of 12 mm against Yersinia enterocolitica, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition to, the methanol extract displayed a strong antioxidant activity (trolox equivalent = 2.23 mM). L. orientalis extracts have antimicrobial, and antioxidant potential. Our results support the use of this plant in traditional medicine and suggest that some of the plant extracts possess compounds with good antibacterial properties that can be used as antibacterial agents in the search for new drugs.

  11. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid against Iron-Induced Free Radical Generation--A Chemical Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago C Genaro-Mattos

    Full Text Available Caffeic acid (CA is a phenolic compound widely found in coffee beans with known beneficial effects in vivo. Many studies showed that CA has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties, which could be linked to its antioxidant activity. Taking in consideration the reported in vitro antioxidant mechanism of other polyphenols, our working hypothesis was that the CA antioxidant activity could be related to its metal-chelating property. With that in mind, we sought to investigate the chemical antioxidant mechanism of CA against in vitro iron-induced oxidative damage under different assay conditions. CA was able to prevent hydroxyl radical formation promoted by the classical Fenton reaction, as determined by 2-deoxyribose (2-DR oxidative degradation and DMPO hydroxylation. In addition to its ability to prevent hydroxyl radical formation, CA had a great inhibition of membrane lipid peroxidation. In the lipid peroxidation assays CA acted as both metal-chelator and as hydrogen donor, preventing the deleterious action promoted by lipid-derived peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Our results indicate that the observed antioxidant effects were mostly due to the formation of iron-CA complexes, which are able to prevent 2-DR oxidation and DMPO hydroxylation. Noteworthy, the formation of iron-CA complexes and prevention of oxidative damage was directly related to the pH of the medium, showing better antioxidant activity at higher pH values. Moreover, in the presence of lipid membranes the antioxidant potency of CA was much higher, indicating its enhanced effectiveness in a hydrophobic environment. Overall, our results show that CA acts as an antioxidant through an iron chelating mechanism, preventing the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and, therefore, inhibiting Fenton-induced oxidative damage. The chemical properties of CA described here--in association with its reported signaling effects--could be an explanation to its

  12. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid against Iron-Induced Free Radical Generation—A Chemical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C.; Maurício, Ângelo Q.; Rettori, Daniel; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound widely found in coffee beans with known beneficial effects in vivo. Many studies showed that CA has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties, which could be linked to its antioxidant activity. Taking in consideration the reported in vitro antioxidant mechanism of other polyphenols, our working hypothesis was that the CA antioxidant activity could be related to its metal-chelating property. With that in mind, we sought to investigate the chemical antioxidant mechanism of CA against in vitro iron-induced oxidative damage under different assay conditions. CA was able to prevent hydroxyl radical formation promoted by the classical Fenton reaction, as determined by 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) oxidative degradation and DMPO hydroxylation. In addition to its ability to prevent hydroxyl radical formation, CA had a great inhibition of membrane lipid peroxidation. In the lipid peroxidation assays CA acted as both metal-chelator and as hydrogen donor, preventing the deleterious action promoted by lipid-derived peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Our results indicate that the observed antioxidant effects were mostly due to the formation of iron-CA complexes, which are able to prevent 2-DR oxidation and DMPO hydroxylation. Noteworthy, the formation of iron-CA complexes and prevention of oxidative damage was directly related to the pH of the medium, showing better antioxidant activity at higher pH values. Moreover, in the presence of lipid membranes the antioxidant potency of CA was much higher, indicating its enhanced effectiveness in a hydrophobic environment. Overall, our results show that CA acts as an antioxidant through an iron chelating mechanism, preventing the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and, therefore, inhibiting Fenton-induced oxidative damage. The chemical properties of CA described here—in association with its reported signaling effects—could be an explanation to its beneficial effects

  13. Evaluation of the antimutagenic activity and mode of action of the fructooligosaccharide inulin in the meristematic cells of Allium cepa culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, M O; Pesarini, J R; Marin-Morales, M A; Monreal, M T F D; Monreal, A C D; Mantovani, M S; Oliveira, R J

    2014-02-14

    This study evaluated the mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of inulin in a chromosomal aberration assay in cultures of the meristematic cells of Allium cepa. The treatments evaluated were as follows: negative control--seed germination in distilled water; positive control--aqueous solution of methyl methanesulfonate (10 μg/mL MMS); mutagenicity--aqueous solutions of inulin (0.015, 0.15, and 1.50 μg/mL); and antimutagenicity--associations between MMS and the different inulin concentrations. The antimutagenicity protocols established were pre-treatment, simultaneous simple, simultaneous with pre-incubation, and post-treatment. The damage reduction percentage (DR%) was 43.56, 27.77, and 55.92% for the pre-treatment; -31.11, 18.51, and 7.03% for the simultaneous simple; 30.43, 19.12, and 21.11% for the simultaneous with pre-incubation; and 64.07, 42.96, and 53.70% for the post-treatment. The results indicated that the most effective treatment for inhibiting damages caused by MMS was the post-treatment, which was followed by the pre-treatment, suggesting activity by bioantimutagenesis and desmutagenesis. The Allium cepa assay was demonstrated to be a good screening test for this type of activity because it is easy to perform, has a low cost, and shows DR% that is comparable to that reported studies that evaluated the prevention of DNA damage in mammals by inulin.

  14. Synthesis and Antimutagenic Effects of SelenaMorpholine Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The synthesis of selenamorpholine hydrate was described and its antimutagenic effects were investigated by the Ames tests. The results indicated that the mutation induced by the indirect mutagen 2-AF was inhibited obviously by selenamorpholine hydrate at the dosage of Se 0. 16~100 μg /dish for 35.8%~53.7%(TA97) and the mutation induced by direct mutagen Dexon was inhibited for 6.2%~30.0%(TA97) and 2.3%~34.1%(TA100). The mutagenesis of the indirect mutagen cyclophosphamide was suppressed for 5.4%~16.1% by selenamorpholine hydrate at the dosage of Se 0. 16~100 μg /dish.

  15. ANTIMUTAGENIC EFFECT OF CINNEMALDEHYDE DUE TO INHIBITION OF MUTATIONS AT GC SITES BUT NOT AT SITES IN SALMONELLA TA104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanillin and cinnemaldehyde are dietary antimutagens that reduce the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella strain TA104 (hisG428, rfa, duvrB, pKM101) by 50%. To date, no study has ever demonstrated whether the antimutagenic effect of an agent is due to a reduction in all cla...

  16. Antimutagenic activity of green tea and black tea extracts studied in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, C.A.M.; Luiten-Schuite, A.; Tenfelde, A.; Ommen, B. van; Verhagen, H.; Havenaar, R.

    2001-01-01

    An in vitro gastrointestinal model, which simulates the conditions in the human digestive tract, was used to determine potential antimutagenic activity of extracts of black tea and green tea. In this paper, results are presented on the availability for absorption of potential antimutagenic compounds

  17. Antimutagenic activity of green tea and black tea extracts studied in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, C.A.M.; Luiten-Schuite, A.; Tenfelde, A.; Ommen, B. van; Verhagen, H.; Havenaar, R.

    2001-01-01

    An in vitro gastrointestinal model, which simulates the conditions in the human digestive tract, was used to determine potential antimutagenic activity of extracts of black tea and green tea. In this paper, results are presented on the availability for absorption of potential antimutagenic compounds

  18. [Antimutagenic substances in the Armeniacae semen and Persicae semen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Osaki, Y; Kato, T; Miyazaki, T

    1992-12-01

    Using the Ames/Salmonella/microsome assay, we examined the antimutagenic effect of the hexane extract of Armeniacae semen (apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) seed), Persicae semen (peach (P. persica Bat.) seed), and seeds of cherry (P. avium L.), plum (P. salicina Lindle) and almond (P. dulcis Mill). Hexane extracts of Armeniacae semen and Persicae semen inhibited the mutagenicity of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), but those of seeds of cherry, plum and almond did not. The mutagenicities of 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) and 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (AF-2) were also inhibited by the extracts of Armeniacae semen and Persicae semen. Inhibitory substances in Persicae semen were fractionated by silica gel column chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography, and were identified as oleic acid and linoleic acid. The contents of oleic acid and linoleic acid were 0.7 and 0.4% in the hexane extract of Armeniacae semen, and 1.5 and 0.5% in that of Persicae semen, respectively.

  19. Effect of troxerutin on 2-aminoanthracene and DNA interaction and its anti-mutagenic property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subastri, A; Harikrishna, K; Sureshkumar, M; Alshammari, Ghedeir M; Aristatile, B; Thirunavukkarasu, C

    2017-04-01

    One of the pivotal mechanisms projected for bioflavonoids in cancer chemoprevention is through their intervention against mutagen-DNA interaction. Recent literatures emphasize the role of troxerutin (TXER) as an emerging anticancer agent. However, there are no reports on its intervention in any carcinogen-DNA interaction. The present study investigates the possibility of TXER, in prevention of 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) contact with DNA. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy results, highlight the direct contact of 2-AA with DNA, while presence of TXER prevented this interaction. Gel-electrophoresis study clearly revealed that, TXER inhibits 2-AA+UVA radiation induced DNA damage. Fluorescence microscopic studies elucidated that, TXER treatment obstructs the 2-AA interaction with cellular DNA, while molecular docking showed the energetically favourable structure of TXER/2-AA/TXER complex. Further anti-mutagenicity experiment revealed that, TXER prevents the mutation induced colony formation in mutant strain of S. typhymurium. Our in vitro and ex vivo experimental findings provide imperative evidence about the protective role of TXER against environmental carcinogens through the inhibition of carcinogen-DNA interaction, implicating its potential for therapeutic applications in cancer.

  20. Bioactive Lipidic Extracts from Octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus: Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Moreno-Félix

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractions from an organic extract from fresh octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus were studied for biological activities such as antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9 and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma, respectively. A chloroform extract obtained from octopus tentacles was sequentially fractionated using thin layer chromatography (TLC, and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Organic extract reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxin B1 showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. Based on the results obtained, the isolated fractions obtained from octopus contain compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB1 and proliferation of cancer cell lines.

  1. Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies of Lipidic Extracts from White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Sanchez, Griselda; Moreno-Félix, Carolina; Velazquez, Carlos; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Acosta, Anita; Machi-Lara, Lorena; Aldana-Madrid, María-Lourdes; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat-Marina; Robles-Zepeda, Ramón; Burgos-Hernandez, Armando

    2010-01-01

    An organic extract from fresh shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) was studied for antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma), respectively. Shrimp extract was sequentially fractionated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Crude organic extracts obtained from shrimp reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxina B1, showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. These results suggested that the lipid fraction of the tested species contained compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB1 and proliferation of a cancer cell line. PMID:21139845

  2. Screening antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties of extracts isolated from Jackfruit pulp (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Montañez, G; Burgos-Hernández, A; Calderón-Santoyo, M; López-Saiz, C M; Velázquez-Contreras, C A; Navarro-Ocaña, A; Ragazzo-Sánchez, J A

    2015-05-15

    The present focused on the study of the antimutagenic and antiproliferative potential of pulp Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam) extract, using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line M12.C3.F6 (murine B-cell lymphoma), respectively. Jackfruit pulp extract was sequentially fractionated by chromatography (RP-HPLC) and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. The organic extracts obtained from Jackfruit pulp reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and proliferation of cells M12.C3.F6; a dose-response relationship was showed. Sequential RP-HPLC fractionation of the active extracts produced both antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. These results suggested that the Jackfruit contained compounds with chemoprotective properties to reduce the mutagenicity of AFB1, also proliferation of a cancer cell line.

  3. Bioactive Lipidic Extracts from Octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus): Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Félix, Carolina; Wilson-Sánchez, Griselda; Cruz-Ramírez, Susana-Gabriela; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Acosta, Ana; Machi-Lara, Lorena; Aldana-Madrid, María-Lourdes; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat-Marina; Rocha-Alonzo, Fernando; Burgos-Hernández, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Fractions from an organic extract from fresh octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus) were studied for biological activities such as antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma), respectively. A chloroform extract obtained from octopus tentacles was sequentially fractionated using thin layer chromatography (TLC), and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Organic extract reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxin B1 showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. Based on the results obtained, the isolated fractions obtained from octopus contain compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB1 and proliferation of cancer cell lines. PMID:23401709

  4. Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies of Lipidic Extracts from White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Moreno-Félix

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available An organic extract from fresh shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei was studied for antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9 and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma, respectively. Shrimp extract was sequentially fractionated by thin layer chromatography (TLC and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Crude organic extracts obtained from shrimp reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxina B1, showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. These results suggested that the lipid fraction of the tested species contained compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB1 and proliferation of a cancer cell line.

  5. DNA-binding studies of AV-153, an antimutagenic and DNA repair-stimulating derivative of 1,4-dihydropiridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraka, E; Chen, C Yu-Chian; Gavare, M; Grube, M; Makarenkova, G; Nikolajeva, V; Bisenieks, I; Brūvere, I; Bisenieks, E; Duburs, G; Sjakste, N

    2014-09-05

    The ability to intercalate between DNA strands determines the cytotoxic activity of numerous anticancer drugs. Strikingly, intercalating activity was also reported for some compounds considered to be antimutagenic. The aim of this study was to determine the mode of interaction of DNA with the antimutagenic and DNA repair-stimulating dihydropyridine (DHP) AV-153. DNA and AV-153 interactions were studied by means of UV/VIS spectroscopy, fluorimetry and infrared spectroscopy. Compound AV-153 is a 1,4 dihydropyridine with ethoxycarbonyl groups in positions 3 and 5. Computer modeling of AV-153 and DNA interactions suggested an ability of the compound to dock between DNA strands at a single strand break site in the vicinity of two pyrimidines, which was confirmed in the present study. AV-153 evidently interacted with DNA, as addition of DNA to AV-153 solutions resulted in pronounced hyperchromic and bathochromic effects on the spectra. Base modification in a plasmid by peroxynitrite only minimally changed binding affinity of the compound; however, induction of single-strand breaks using Fenton's reaction greatly increased binding affinity. The affinity did not change when the ionic strength of the solution was changed from 5 to 150 mM NaCl, although it increased somewhat at 300 mM. Neither was it influenced by temperature changes from 25 to 40°C, however, it decreased when the pH of the solution was changed from 7.4 to 4.7. AV-153 competed with EBr for intercalation sites in DNA: 116 mM of the compound caused a two-fold decrease in fluorescence intensity. FT-IR spectral data analyses indicated formation of complexes between DNA and AV-153. The second derivative spectra analyses indicated interaction of AV-153 with guanine, cytosine and thymine bases, but no interaction with adenine was detected. The antimutagenic substance AV-153 appears to intercalate between the DNA strands at the site of a DNA nick in the vicinity of two pyrimidines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  6. Antimutagenic and Anticarcinogenic Effect of Methanol Extracts of Sweetpotato (Ipomea batata) Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hwan-Goo; Jeong, Sang-Hee; Cho, Joon-Hyoung

    2010-03-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the antimutagenic potential of the methanolic extract from the leaves of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas, IB) with the SOS chromotest (umu test) and Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100. The anticarcinogenic effects were also studied by calculation of the IC50 on human cancer cell lines and investigating the function of gap junction in rat liver epithelial cells. The IB extract inhibited dose-dependently the β-galactosidase activity induced spontaneously at concentration of more than 200 mg/ml in S. typhimurium TA 1535/pSK 1002, and decreased significantly (p batatas has antimutagenic and anticarcionogenic activity in vitro.

  7. The antioxidative effect of bread crust in a mouse macrophage reporter cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzsch, Sandy; Dalgalarrondo, Michele; Bakan, Benedicte; Marion, Didier; Somoza, Veronika; Stangl, Gabriele; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Simm, Andreas; Navarrete Santos, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Free radicals and oxidative stress are important factors in the biology of aging and responsible for the development of age-related diseases. One way to reduce the formation of free radicals is to boost the antioxidative system by nutrition. Heat treatment of food promote the Maillard reaction which is responsible for their characteristic color and taste. During the Maillard reaction reducing sugars react with proteins in a non-enzymatic way leading to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). As an AGE-rich source our group used bread crust (BCE) to investigate the effect of AGEs on the antioxidant defense. It is well known that the NF-kB pathway is activated by treatment of cells with AGEs. Therefore for stimulation with the BCE we used the macrophage reporter cell line RAW/NF-kB/SEAPorter™. Amino acid analysis and LC-MS/MS by Orbitrap Velo was used to determine the bioactive compounds in the soluble BCE. The radical scavenging effect was conducted by the DPPH-assay. BCE induced the NF-kB pathway in RAW/NF-kB/SEAPorter™ cells and also showed a concentration-dependent antioxidative capacity by the DPPH-assay. With the LC/MS and amino acid analyses, we identified the presence of gliadin in BCE confirmed by using specific gliadin antibodies. By immunoprecipitation (IP) with an antibody against γ-gliadin and western blot probing against the AGE carboxymethyllysine (CML) the presence of AGE-gliadin in BCE was confirmed. Stimulation of the RAW/NF-kB/SEAPorter™ cells with the γ-gliadin depleted fractions did not activate the NF-kB pathway. CML-modified gliadin in the BCE is a bioactive compound of the bread crust which is responsible for the antioxidative capacity and for the induction of the NF-kB pathway in mouse macrophages. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Antimutagenicity of Propolis Against Some Mutagens in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-YUN FU; YONG XIA; YUN-YAN ZHENG

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the antimutagenicity of propolis in vivo and in vitro. Methods Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 were used as a test model in vitro against a direct mutagen DMC and an indirect mutagen 2AF with or without S9 mix, and MN formation of mice bone marrow cell and CAs induction of mice testicle cell were applied as a test model in vivo against two mutagens CP and MMC. Results The present study clearly demonstrated that propolis could inhibit mutagenicity of both DMC and 2AF directly in a dose-dependent manner, and significant antimutagenic effects (P<0.05) were obtained in TA98 strain at 2000 and 3000 (g/plate. It also could inhibit mutagenicity of both DMC and 2AF to TA98 strain in a dose-dependent manner, with significant antimutagenic effects (P<0.05) appeared at 1000, 2000, and 3000 (g/plate. The results of antimutagenicity test in vivo revealed that propolis could inhibit MN formation significantly (P<0.05) at the doses of 45.0 and 135.0 mg/kg b. w., and decrease the frequency of chromosome aberrants and chromosome aberrant cells significantly (P<0.05) only at the dose of 135.0 mg/kg b. w. Conclusion The propolis is a good inhibitor for mutagencity of DMC and 2AF in vitro, as well as for CP and MMC in vivo.

  9. Antimutagenic activity of casein against MNNG in the E. coli DNA repair host-mediated assay.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Goeptar, A.R.; Alink, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of caseinate and soy protein in the diet on the mutagenicity induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was assessed in-vivo and ex-vivo in the DNA-repair host-mediated assay and liquid suspension assay, respectively. Of the two proteins only casein showed a strong antimutagen

  10. QUANTITATIVE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE - ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS ANALYSIS ANTIMUTAGENIC BENZALACETONE DERIVATIVES BY PRINCIPAL COMPONENT REGRESSION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana Yuliana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative Electronic Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR analysis of a series of benzalacetones has been investigated based on semi empirical PM3 calculation data using Principal Components Regression (PCR. Investigation has been done based on antimutagen activity from benzalacetone compounds (presented by log 1/IC50 and was studied as linear correlation with latent variables (Tx resulted from transformation of atomic net charges using Principal Component Analysis (PCA. QSAR equation was determinated based on distribution of selected components and then was analysed with PCR. The result was described by the following QSAR equation : log 1/IC50 = 6.555 + (2.177.T1 + (2.284.T2 + (1.933.T3 The equation was significant on the 95% level with statistical parameters : n = 28 r = 0.766  SE  = 0.245  Fcalculation/Ftable = 3.780 and gave the PRESS result 0.002. It means that there were only a relatively few deviations between the experimental and theoretical data of antimutagenic activity.          New types of benzalacetone derivative compounds were designed  and their theoretical activity were predicted based on the best QSAR equation. It was found that compounds number 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 44, 47, 48, 49 and 50  have  a relatively high antimutagenic activity.   Keywords: QSAR; antimutagenic activity; benzalaceton; atomic net charge

  11. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of bioflavonoids and structural analogues in the Ames/Salmonella test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn GR; Van der Stel JJ; Stavenuiter JFC; Hamzink MRJ; Kreijl CF; LEO; LBO

    1996-01-01

    The mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of bioflavonoids were determined in the bacterial mutagenicity test of Ames, using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. The decreasing order of mutagenic activity found in both strains was quercetin>myricetin-kaempferol>morin hydrate. The compound

  12. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of food compounds : Application of a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, Cyrille Anna Maria

    2001-01-01

    Exposure of humans to potential mutagenic and carcinogenic food compounds through the diet is unavoidable. On the other hand, there is epidemiological evidence for antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties of food as well (such as vegetables and fruit). The assessment of carcinogenic and cancer

  13. Antioxidant and Antimutagenic Metabolites in Animals with Opposite Sensitivity to Tuberculosis Mycobacteria and Mutagenic Xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, V A; Kotomtsev, V V; Doronin, A I; Sabadash, E V

    2016-11-01

    Different sensitivity of guinea pigs and rats to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and membranotropic mutagenic xenobiotics is associated with differences in the metabolism of amino acid precursors of phospholipids. In turn, specific features of phospholipid metabolism are determined by differences in the level of sulfur-containing regulatory metabolites (methionine, taurine, and glutathione) in tissues. Taurine and methionine increase organism's resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (typical of rats), glutathione and its constituent amino acids improve resistance to the mutagenic effects of xenobiotics (typical of guinea pigs). These metabolites can be used for strengthening of natural resistance to tuberculosis and mutagenic and carcinogenic xenobiotics.

  14. Investigation of the antimutagenic effects of selected South African medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschaeve, L; Kestens, V; Taylor, J L S; Elgorashi, E E; Maes, A; Van Puyvelde, L; De Kimpe, N; Van Staden, J

    2004-02-01

    Dichloromethane extracts from different parts of Rhamnus prinoides, Ornithogalum longibracteatum, Gardenia volkensii, Spirostachys africana, Diospyros whyteana, Syzigium cordatum and Prunus africana were investigated for mutagenic and antimutagenic effects in Salmonella/microsome and micronucleus tests. None of the extracts tested in the Ames test were found to induce mutations or to modify the effect of the mutagen 4-nitroquinoline-oxide (4NQO). In the micronucleus test, extracts from twigs/bark of R. prinoides, twigs of D. whyteana, P. africana and S. cordatum significantly lowered the effect of the mutagen mitomycin C (MMC). Extracts from twigs/bark of G. volkensii and S. africana were genotoxic in the micronucleus test, while extracts of O. longibracteatum leaves potentiated the genotoxicity of MMC. This preliminary investigation shows that plant extracts used in traditional medicine may have particular effects with regard to mutagenicity and antimutagenicity indicating careful use in some instances and the need to isolate their active principles for further research.

  15. Antimutagenic and anticancer activity of Al Madinah Alhasawy mint (Mentha longifolia) leaves extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Khalil; Abdelrazik, Mohamad; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz; Diab, Atef; El-Beshbishy, Hesham; Baghdadi, Hussam

    2014-12-01

    Mentha is one of the genera of Lamiaceae family. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimutagenic and anticancer activity of the water and methanolic extract of Alhasawy mint (Mentha longifolia), that grown in Madina Province, western region, Saudi Arabia using three different bioassays namely; Brine shrimp bioassay, Ames mutagenicity bioassay using 3 Hist-Salmonella typhimurium strains of different mutations (TA98, TA97 and TA100) and 2 reference mutagenic drugs nitrosopiperidine (NP) and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-quinolidine (IQ) and Mammalian cell lines bioassays using 2 different cell lines HepG2 and Vero cell lines. The plant extract showed an efficient antimutagenic activity against the studied bioassays in a directly proportional effect with concentration.

  16. Antimutagenic Activity and Radical Scavenging Activity of Water Infusions and Phenolics from Ligustrum Plants Leaves

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    Milan Nagy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Water infusions of Ligustrum delavayanum and Ligustrum vulgare leaves and eight phenolics isolated therefrom have been assayed in vitro on ofloxacin-induced genotoxicity in the unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis. The tested compounds luteolin, quercetin, luteolin-7-glucoside, luteolin-7-rutinoside, quercetin-3-rutinoside, apigenin-7-rutinoside, tyrosol and esculetin inhibited the mutagenic activity of ofloxacin (43 µM in E. gracilis. Water infusions from leaves of L. delavayanum and L. vulgare showed higher antimutagenic effect (pt < 0.001. The activity of these samples against ofloxacin (86 µM-induced genotoxicity was lower, but statistically significant (pt < 0.05, excluding the water infusion of L. delavayanum leaves (pt < 0.01. Efficacy of quercetin, luteolin-7-rutinoside, apigenin-7-rutinoside was insignificant. The antimutagenic effect of most phenolics we studied could be clearly ascribed to their DPPH scavenging activity, substitution patterns and lipophilicity.

  17. Antimutagenic activity and radical scavenging activity of water infusions and phenolics from ligustrum plants leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Milan; Krizková, Lívia; Mucaji, Pavel; Kontseková, Zuzana; Sersen, Frantisek; Krajcovic, Juraj

    2009-01-22

    Water infusions of Ligustrum delavayanum and Ligustrum vulgare leaves and eight phenolics isolated therefrom have been assayed in vitro on ofloxacin-induced genotoxicity in the unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis. The tested compounds luteolin, quercetin, luteolin-7-glucoside, luteolin-7-rutinoside, quercetin-3-rutinoside, apigenin-7-rutinoside, tyrosol and esculetin inhibited the mutagenic activity of ofloxacin (43 microM) in E. gracilis. Water infusions from leaves of L. delavayanum and L. vulgare showed higher antimutagenic effect (p(t) < 0.001). The activity of these samples against ofloxacin (86 microM)-induced genotoxicity was lower, but statistically significant (p(t) < 0.05), excluding the water infusion of L. delavayanum leaves (p(t) < 0.01). Efficacy of quercetin, luteolin-7-rutinoside, apigenin-7-rutinoside was insignificant. The antimutagenic effect of most phenolics we studied could be clearly ascribed to their DPPH scavenging activity, substitution patterns and lipophilicity.

  18. In vitro anti-inflammatory, mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of ethanolic extract of Clerodendrum paniculatum root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuneerub, Pravaree; Limpanasithikul, Wacharee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2015-01-01

    Clerodendrum paniculatum L. (Family Verbenaceae) has been used as an antipyretic and anti-inflammatory drug in traditional Thai medicine. This present study investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory, mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of the ethanolic extract of C. paniculatum (CPE) dried root collected from Sa Kaeo Province of Thailand. Murine macrophage J774A.1 cells were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evaluate nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in the anti-inflammatory test while the mutagenic and antimutagenic potential was performed by the Ames test. The outcome of this study displayed that the CPE root significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO, TNF-α, and PGE2 production in macrophage cell line. In addition, the CPE root was not mutagenic toward Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 and TA100 with and without nitrite treatment. Moreover, it inhibited the mutagenicity of nitrite treated 1-aminopyrene on both strains. The findings suggested the anti-inflammatory and antimutagenic potentials of CPE root.

  19. Evaluation of the antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of inulin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, M O; Monreal, M T F D; Silva, M T P; Pesarini, J R; Mantovani, M S; Ribeiro, L R; Dichi, J B; Carreira, C M; Oliveira, R J

    2013-07-08

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is growing worldwide. The characterization of compounds present in the human diet that can prevent the occurrence of colorectal tumors is vital. The oligosaccharide inulin is such a compound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antigenotoxic, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of inulin in vivo. Our study is based on 3 assays that are widely used to evaluate chemoprevention (comet assay, micronucleus assay, and aberrant crypt focus assay) and tests 4 protocols of treatment with inulin (pre-treatment, simultaneous, post-treatment, and pre + continuous). Experiments were carried out in Swiss male mice of reproductive age. In order to induce DNA damage, we used the pro-carcinogenic agent 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Inulin was administered orally at a concentration of 50 mg/kg body weight following the protocols mentioned above. Inulin was not administered to the control groups. Our data from the micronucleus assay reveal antimutagenic effects of inulin in all protocols. The percentage of inulin-induced damage reduction ranged from 47.25 to 141.75% across protocols. These data suggest that inulin could act through desmutagenic and bio-antimutagenic mechanisms. The anticarcinogenic activity (aberrant crypt focus assay) of inulin was observed in all protocols and the percentages of damage reduction ranged from 55.78 to 87.56% across protocols. Further tests, including human trials, will be necessary before this functional food can be proven to be effective in the prevention and treatment of colon cancer.

  20. Mushroom Shiitake, is it mutagenic or antimutagenic agent? Shiitake, um cogumelo mutagênico ou antimutagênico?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilce Mara de Syllos Cólus

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Mushrooms have been consumed by eastern populations due to their edible and medicinal properties, for a long time. Over the years, there has also been a gradual increase in the consumption of mushrooms in the western countries, including Brazil. However, the benefits or harms that these mushrooms may cause to the human health are still uncertain. Shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berk. Pegler is one of the most appreciated fungi in the Brazilian cuisine and its functional and nutritional properties have been extensively studied. Other characteristics of this basidiomycet have also been reported, including its antitumoral, antiviral, bactericidal properties, as well as being a homeostasis and biorhythm regulator. However, studies regarding its mutagenic and antimutagenic potential in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms are scarce. Knowledge of these biological properties is essential before a product can be recommended as food and/or drug. Therefore, its indication as a beneficial product to human health is premature since it is necessary to broaden studies on the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of the mushroom Shiitake or of its active compounds.   Desde a antigüidade, os cogumelos vêm sendo consumidos pelos povos orientais devido às suas  propriedades medicinais e comestíveis e ao longo dos anos tem-se observado um aumento gradativo no consumo também nos países ocidentais, inclusive o Brasil. No entanto, ainda há dúvidas quanto aos benefícios ou prejuízos à saúde, decorrentes do uso destes cogumelos pelas populações humanas. Entre os cogumelos muito apreciados na culinária brasileira, destaca-se o Shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berk. Pegler, um dos fungos comestíveis mais estudados quanto às suas propriedades funcionais e nutricionais. Já se tem conhecimento sobre várias atividades deste basidiomiceto superior, como antitumoral, antiviral, bactericida, regulador da homeostase e do biorritmo. No entanto, poucos trabalhos

  1. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

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    Robert D. Kross

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals.

  2. Mutagenic and Anti-mutagenic properties of the essential oil of Jurinea leptoloba DC by Ames Test

    OpenAIRE

    TAHERKHANI, Tofigh; ASGHARI ZAKARIA, Rasool; TAHERKHANI, Mahboubeh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to determine the mutagenic and anti-mutagenic properties of the essential oil of Jurinea leptoloba DC in vitro. The mutagenic and anti-mutagenic activities of the oil was evaluated using the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100, together with nitrofluorene for TA98 and sodium azide for TA100 without (-S9) metabolic activation, and 2-aminoantracene for TA98 and TA100 with metabolic (+S9) activation. The results obtained with S. typhimurium su...

  3. ANTIMUTAGENIC EFFECT OF TRIPHALA ON CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS IN SWISS ALBINO MICE

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    Thomas Amrutha Merin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Triphala is a herbal formula used in the ancient Science of Ayurveda. Triphala, a composite mixture of Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula and Emblica officinalis, has been used in traditional system of medicine for the treatment of many malaises such as heart ailment and hepatic disease. The present set of investigation is designed to evaluate the antimutagenic potential of aqueous extract of Triphala using in vivo chromosomal aberration assay in Swiss albino mice. Cyclophosphamide(CP, a well known mutagen was given by intraperitoneal injection at a dose of 40mg/kg body weight. Triphala was given at the dose of 125,250 and 500mg/kg body weight orally for seven consecutive days prior to Cyclophosphamide treatment. The animals were sacrificed at the sampling time of 24hrs after treatment and their bone marrow tissues were analysed for chromosomal damage and mitotic index. In Cyclophosphamide treated animals, a significant induction of chromosomal aberration was recorded with decrease in mitotic index. However, in Triphala supplemented animals, no significant induction in chromosomal damage or change in mitotic index was recorded. In different Triphala supplemented groups, a dose dependent significant decrease in Cyclophosphsmide induced clastogenicity was recorded. The incidence of aberrant cell was found to be reduced by the doses of Triphala when compared to Cyclophosphamide treated group. The study revealed the antimutagenic potential of Triphala against Cyclophosphamide induced chromosomal mutations. Analysis of the individual constituents of Triphala is shown to be rich in tannins as well as other chemical agents like carbohydrates, saponins, gallic acid, ellagic acids. Presence of these active principles in Triphala is likely to make it an effective antimutagenic agent.

  4. Antimutagenicity of coriander (Coriandrum sativum) juice on the mutagenesis produced by plant metabolites of aromatic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2004-11-02

    Aromatic amines are metabolically activated into mutagenic compounds by both animal and plant systems. The 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOP) is a well-known direct-acting mutagen whose mutagenic potential can be enhanced by plant metabolism; m-phenylenediamine (m-PDA) is converted to mutagenic products detected by the Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain, and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) is the plant-activated promutagen most extensively studied. Plant cells activate both 2-AF and m-PDA into potent mutagens producing DNA frameshift mutations. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is a common plant included in the Mexican diet, usually consumed uncooked. The antimutagenic activity of coriander juice against the mutagenic activity of 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine, m-phenylenediamine and 2-aminofluorene was investigated using the Ames reversion mutagenicity assay (his- to his+) with the S. typhimurium TA98 strain as indicator organism. The plant cell/microbe coincubation assay was used as the activating system for aromatic transformation and plant extract interaction. Aqueous crude coriander juice significantly decreased the mutagenicity of metabolized aromatic amines (AA) in the following order: 2-AF (92.43%) > m-PDA (87.14%) > NOP (83.21%). The chlorophyll content in vegetable juice was monitored and its concentration showed a positive correlation with the detected antimutagenic effect. Protein content and peroxidase activity were also determined. The concentration of coriander juice (50-1000 microl/coincubation flask) was neither toxic nor mutagenic. The similar shape of the antimutagenic response curves obtained with coriander juice and chlorophyllin (used as a subrogate molecule of chlorophyll) indicated that comparable mechanisms of mutagenic inhibition could be involved. The negative correlation between chlorophyll content and mutagenic response of the promutagenic and direct-acting used amines allows us to deduce that a chemical interaction takes place between the two molecules

  5. Antimutagenic activity of a novel ascorbic derivative, disodium isostearyl 2-O-L-ascorbyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisama, Masayoshi; Matsuda, Sanae; Shibayama, Hiroharu; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2008-06-01

    A novel amphiphilic vitamin C derivative, disodium isostearyl 2-O-L-ascorbyl phosphate (VCP-IS-2Na) possessing an alkyl chain of C(18) to a stable ascorbate derivative sodium L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (VCP-Na), was synthesized and evaluated as an anti-mutagen with suppressive effect on SOS-inducing activity on mutagen in the Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 umu test. VCP-IS-2Na was assayed with chemical mutagens, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl) acrylamide (furylfuramide) and 4-nitroquinolin 1-oxide (4NQO), which do not require liver metabolizing enzymes. VCP-IS-2Na at a concentration of 0.40 micromol/ml suppressed 66.2%, 54.7% and 60.2% of the SOS-inducing activity on MNNG, furylfuramide, and 4NQO, and the 50% inhibitory dose value (ID(50)) was 0.12 micromol/ml, 0.26 micromol/ml, and 0.17 micromol/ml, respectively. In addition, VCP-IS-2Na was assayed with 2-aminoanthracene (2AA) and 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1), which require liver metabolizing enzymes. To study the structure-activity relationship, L-ascorbic acid (VC) and VCP-Na were also assayed with all mutagens. VCP-IS-2Na, suppressed the chemical and physical mutagens-induced SOS response greater than VC and VCP-Na in the umu test. Also, the antimutagenic activities of VCP-IS-2Na, VC, and VCP-Na against MNNG and Trp-P-1 were assayed by the Ames test using the S. typhimurium TA100 strain. In summary, this research suggests that VCP-IS-2Na showed potent antimutagenic effects against chemical mutagens and UV irradiation.

  6. Methods for testing antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolovich, Michael; Prenzler, Paul D; Patsalides, Emilios; McDonald, Suzanne; Robards, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Antioxidant activity has been assessed in many ways. The limitation of many newer methods is the frequent lack of an actual substrate in the procedure. The combination of all approaches with the many test methods available explains the large variety of ways in which results of antioxidant testing are reported. The measurement of antioxidant activities, especially of antioxidants that are mixtures, multifunctional or are acting in complex multiphase systems, cannot be evaluated satisfactorily by a simple antioxidant test without due regard to the many variables influencing the results. Several test procedures may be required to evaluate such antioxidant activities. A general method of reporting antioxidant activity independent of the test procedure is proposed.

  7. First report of the nutritional profile and antioxidant potential of Holothuria arguinensis, a new resource for aquaculture in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggatz, Christina C; González-Wangüemert, Mercedes; Pereira, Hugo; Rodrigues, Maria João; da Silva, Manuela Moreira; Barreira, Luísa; Varela, João; Custódio, Luísa

    2016-09-01

    This work reports for the first time the nutritional profile and antioxidant potential of the edible sea cucumber Holothuria arguinensis from the North-eastern Atlantic. H. arguinensis has high levels of protein, with the amino acids profile dominated by alanine, glycine and proline and low lysine/arginine ratios. Its carbohydrate and energetic contents are also low as well as the total lipid levels, although its lipid profile is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), especially arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. In addition, H. arguinensis has high levels of calcium. The water and ethanol extracts show ability to scavenge free radicals and to chelate copper and iron ions. Our results indicate that H. arguinensis has a balanced nutritional quality suitable for human consumption. In addition, it contains compounds with antioxidant potential; thus its intake can contribute for a healthy and well-balanced diet.

  8. Absence of antimutagenicity of Cochlospermum regium (Mart. and Schr. Pilger 1924 by micronucleus test in mice

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    LS. Andrade

    Full Text Available Cochlospermum regium (Mart. and Schr. Pilger, popularly known as "algodãozinho do campo", is a medicinal plant that grows in the Cerrado of Brazil. This plant has been used in traditional medicine against various diseases such as leucorrhoea, gastritis and ulcers. It has also been effective in treating skin problems like pimples, boils and blotches. In the present study, the in vivo antimutagenicity of aqueous extract of C. regium was evaluated. The Micronucleus Test was performed in polychromatic erythrocytes from Swiss male mice treated with one of the four doses of extract of the plant (19, 38, 76 and 114 mg.kg-1 body weight, administered by intraperitonial injection (i.p. simultaneously with cyclophosphamide (24 mg.kg-1 b.w. or mitomycin C (4 mg.kg-1 b.w.. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by polychromatic and normochromatic erythrocytes ratio (PCE/NCE. The results showed no significant reduction of the micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes frequency (P > 0.05. In conclusion, the data indicate that C. regium roots aqueous extract, for the conditions used, did not exhibit the antimutagenic effect.

  9. Antimutagenic effects of piperine on cyclophosphamide-induced chromosome aberrations in rat bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongpa, Sareeya; Himakoun, Lakana; Soontornchai, Sarisak; Temcharoen, Punya

    2007-01-01

    Piperine is a major pungent substance and active component of black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn.) and long pepper (Piper longum Linn.). Both plants are used worldwide as household spices and condiments. They are also used as important ingredients in folklore medicine in many Asian countries. Therefore, it is of interest to study antimutagenic effects of piperine. In this study, its influence on chromosomes was investigated in rat bone marrow cells. Male Wistar rats were orally administered piperine at the doses of 100, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight for 24 hours then challenged with cyclophosphamide at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight by intraperitoneal injection. Twenty-four hours thereafter, all animals were sacrificed and bone marrow samples were collected for chromosomal analysis. The results demonstrated that piperine at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight gave a statistically significant reduction in cyclophosphamide-induced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, piperine may have antimutagenic potential. The underlying molecular mechanisms now require attention.

  10. Suppression of SOS repair in E. coli: possible mechanism of antimutagenicity and protective effects of common vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Nilantana; Gautam, Satyendra; Sharma, Arun

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to understand variations in antimutagenic potential of vegetables, as observed in reduction of UV-induced mutation (Rif(S)→Rif(R)) in Escherichia coli cells. On further investigation, the juice of vegetables [eggplant (small-violet), pepper (hot Arbol), bean (French), and tomato] was found to suppress mutagenic SOS response as measured by cell filamentation, LexA degradation, and induction of defective prophage as per their antimutagenic potential. Cell filamentation which was observed in 25 and 60% of the UV- and gamma-induced cells, reduced to 2-8%, and 3-16%, respectively in the presence of the vegetable juice; moreover, LexA was also not significantly affected. Phage induction frequency reduced upto 76% compared to control UV-exposed cells. The antimutagenic effect was found to be partially dependent on recB, ruvB gene functions, and was independent of uvrA function. Phenolic compounds were found to be the major contributors to the observed antimutagenicity.

  11. ANTIMUTAGENICITY OF CINNAMALDEHYDE AND VANILLIN IN HUMAN CELLS: GLOBAL GENE EXPRESSION AND POSSIBLE ROLE OF DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the possibility that chemicals identified as antimutagens may, in fact, operate through a mechanism involving DNA damage. We addressed this question by using two chemicals to which a large proportion of the population are exposed: vanillin and cinnemaldehy...

  12. The mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of the traditional phytoestrogen-rich herbs, Pueraria mirifica and Pueraria lobata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherdshewasart, W; Sutjit, W; Pulcharoen, K; Chulasiri, M

    2009-09-01

    Pueraria mirifica is a Thai phytoestrogen-rich herb traditionally used for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Pueraria lobata is also a phytoestrogen-rich herb traditionally used in Japan, Korea and China for the treatment of hypertension and alcoholism. We evaluated the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of the two plant extracts using the Ames test preincubation method plus or minus the rat liver mixture S9 for metabolic activation using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 as indicator strains. The cytotoxicity of the two extracts to the two S. typhimurium indicators was evaluated before the mutagenic and antimutagenic tests. Both extracts at a final concentration of 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 mg/plate exhibited only mild cytotoxic effects. The plant extracts at the concentrations of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/plate in the presence and absence of the S9 mixture were negative in the mutagenic Ames test. In contrast, both extracts were positive in the antimutagenic Ames test towards either one or both of the tested mutagens 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-acrylamide and benzo(a)pyrene. The absence of mutagenic and the presence of anti-mutagenic activities of the two plant extracts were confirmed in rec-assays and further supported by a micronucleus test where both plant extracts at doses up to 300 mg/kg body weight (equivalent to 16 g/kg body weight plant tuberous powder) failed to exhibit significant micronucleus formation in rats. The tests confirmed the non-mutagenic but reasonably antimutagenic activities of the two plant extracts, supporting their current use as safe dietary supplements and cosmetics.

  13. Antioxidant potential of spices and their active constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K

    2014-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation overbalancing the rate of their removal leads to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology of cardiovascular disease, inflammatory diseases, cancer, and other chronic diseases. Antioxidants are compounds that hinder the oxidative processes and thereby delay or suppress oxidative stress. There is a growing interest in natural antioxidants found in plants. Herbs and spices are most important targets to search for natural antioxidants from the point of view of safety. A wide variety of phenolic compounds present in spices that are extensively used as food adjuncts possess potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, and cancer preventive activities. This paper reviews a host of spice compounds as exogenous antioxidants that are experimentally evidenced to control cellular oxidative stress, both in vitro and in vivo, and their beneficial role in preventing or ameliorating oxidative-stress-mediated diseases, from atherosclerosis to diabetes to cataract to cancer. The antioxidative effects of turmeric/curcumin, clove/eugenol, red pepper/capsaicin, black pepper/piperine, ginger/gingerol, garlic, onion, and fenugreek, which have been extensively studied and evidenced as potential antioxidants, are specifically reviewed in this treatise.

  14. Evaluation of the mutagenic, antimutagenic and antiproliferative potential of Croton lechleri (Muell. Arg.) latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, D; Bruni, R; Bianchi, N; Chiarabelli, C; Gambari, R; Medici, A; Lista, A; Paganetto, G

    2003-03-01

    Sangre de Drago is a red viscous latex extracted from Croton lechleri (Euphorbiaceae) cortex, renowned in South American popular medicine for its wound-healing properties. The in vitro antiproliferative effects were determined on the human myelogenous leukemia K562 cells line (IC50 = 2.5 +/- 0.3 microg ml(-1)). The mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of C. lechleri sap was examined by means of the Ames/Salmonella test. No mutagenic activity was found on the Salmonella typhimurium strains T98 and T100, either with or without S9 activation. On the other hand, the sap showed an inhibitory effect against the mutagenic activity of the indirectly acting mutagen 2-Aminoanthracene in presence of S9 and a moderate protective activity against directly acting mutagens Sodium Azide and 2-Nitrofluorene. Therefore we suggest that C. lechleri sap interacts with the enzymes of the S9 mix, thereby inhibiting the transformation of 2-Aminoantracene into its active forms.

  15. Bacterial mutagenicity of terasi and antimutagenicity of Indonesian jasmine tea against terasi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surono, I S; Hosono, A

    1996-09-01

    Terasi, a traditional fermented product of Indonesia was evaluated by Salmonella mutagenesis assay. The higher the heating temperature and the longer the heating time, the more mutagenicity observed in both terasi and its starter, and the highest mutagenic activity was shown by heating each of them at 100 degrees C for 60 min. Terasi starter has stronger mutagenic properties as compared to terasi. Indonesian jasmine tea, which is a yellow tea, was examined for its antimutagenic properties against mutagenic terasi. Tea component presented in fraction C (water soluble, chloroform and ethyl acetate insoluble fraction) as well as in fraction D (water soluble, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol insoluble fraction) were found to suppress the mutagenicities exerted by heated terasi and heated terasi starter. Yet, the tea components presented in fraction E (chloroform soluble fraction) were found to enhance the mutagenicity of terasi.

  16. Antimutagenic effect of aqueous extract from Agaricus brasiliensis on culture of human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Paula H; Nascimento, José S; Rocha, Beatriz H G; Piana, Clause F B; Santos, Raquel A; Takahashi, Catarina S

    2013-02-01

    The mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis (sun mushroom), native from the southeast of Brazil, is well known by its medicinal properties that include effects on diabetes, cholesterol levels, and osteoporosis. The antimutagenic effects of A. brasiliensis has been investigated recently and revealed some controversial results depending on the temperature by which the A. brasiliensis tea is obtained. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the A. brasiliensis extract prepared in two different temperatures, 4°C and 25°C, on the doxorubicin-induced DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in human lymphocytes. The results demonstrated that A. brasiliensis was able to reduce the DXR-induced DNA damage in both temperatures; however, the CA test was more sensitive to demonstrate a better reduction when the cells were treated with an extract obtained at 25°C. A. brasiliensis extract obtained in different temperatures exhibited antigenotoxic and anticlastogenic effects in human lymphocytes.

  17. Evaluation of the mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of Ziziphus joazeiro Mart. bark in the micronucleus assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriollo, Marcelo Fabiano Gomes; Resende, Marielly Reis; da Silva, Thaísla Andrielle; Públio, Juliana Yoshida; Souza, Luiz Silva; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos; de Mello Silva Oliveira, Nelma; Fiorini, João Evangelista

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mutagenicity (clastogenicity/aneugenicity) of a glycolic extract of Ziziphus joazeiro bark (GEZJ) by the micronucleus assay in mice bone marrow. Antimutagenic activity was also assessed using treatments associated with GEZJ and doxorubicin (DXR). Mice were evaluated 24–48 h after exposure to positive (N-nitroso-N-ethylurea, NEU - 50 mg.kg−1 and DXR - 5 mg.kg−1) and negative (150 mM NaCl) controls, as well as treatment with GEZJ (0.5–2 g.kg−1), GEZJ (2 g.kg−1) + NEU and GEZJ (2 g.kg−1) + DXR. There were no significant differences in the frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in mice treated with GEJZ and GEJZ + DXR compared to the negative controls, indicating that GEZJ was not mutagenic. Analysis of the polychromatic:normochromatic erythrocyte ratio revealed significant differences in the responses to doses of 0.5 g.kg−1 and 1–2 g.kg−1 and the positive control (NEU). These results indicated no systemic toxicity and moderate toxicity at lower and higher doses of GEZJ. The lack of mutagenicity and systemic toxicity in the antimutagenic assays, especially for treatment with GEZJ + DXR, suggested that phytochemical compounds in Z. joazeiro bark attenuated DXR-induced mutagenicity and the moderate systemic toxicity of a high dose of Z. joazeiro bark (2 g.kg−1). Further studies on the genotoxicity of Z. joazeiro extracts are necessary to establish the possible health risk in humans and to determine the potential as a chemopreventive agent for therapeutic use. PMID:25071409

  18. Report: Antioxidant and hypoglycemic activity of strawberry fruit extracts against alloxan induced diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulazeez, Sheriff Sheik; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2016-01-01

    The strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa) of Rosaceae family are an accomplished source of bioactive compounds such as ascorbic acid and diverse range of polyphenols including anthocyanins, phenolic acids, flavonols, ellagitannins etc. These phenolic compounds classify strawberry as an important health promoting food. Strawberries are proved to have potent antioxidant capacity in various in vitro assay systems. The in vivo beneficial effects are getting explored against various ailments including cancer, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases. The present research study was designed to analyze the effect of strawberry fruit extracts (water and methanol) against alloxan induced hyperglycemia in albino rats of Wister strain. Upon alloxan (150mg/kg body weight) induction, the diabetic animals showed marked increase in the values of plasma glucose, urea, uric acid, creatinine and concomitant decrease in body weight and plasma insulin level. The oral administration of strawberry extracts for 45 days in diabetic animals reversed the biochemical changes significantly (P0.05) to near normal. Furthermore, the restoration of body weight loss was also observed. The results suggest that the strawberry extract has effective hypoglycemic activity against alloxan diabetes. The poly phenolic antioxidant contents of the strawberry fruit extracts are responsible for the observed biological effect.

  19. Beneficial effects of Korean red ginseng on lymphocyte DNA damage, antioxidant enzyme activity, and LDL oxidation in healthy participants: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Park, Ju Yeon; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Oh Yoen; Lee, Jong Ho

    2012-07-17

    The reported health benefits of Korean red ginseng (KRG) include antioxidant, antitumor, antimutagenic, and immunomodulatory activities; however, the effects on oxidative stress have not yet been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the effect of KRG on antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress markers in humans. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with three groups, including placebo, low-dose (3 g/day), and high-dose (6 g/day), which were randomly assigned to healthy subjects aged 20-65 years. Lymphocyte DNA damage, antioxidative enzyme activity, and lipid peroxidation were assessed before and after the 8-week supplementation. Fifty-seven subjects completed the protocol. Plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity after the 8-week KRG supplementation was significantly higher in the low-and high-dose groups compared to baseline. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase activities were also increased after the high-dose supplementation. Furthermore, the DNA tail length and tail moment were significantly reduced after the supplementation (low-dose and high-dose), and plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels were reduced in low-dose and high-dose groups, but increased in the placebo group. The net changes in oxidized LDL after the supplementation differed significantly between both KRG supplementation groups and the placebo group. Net changes in GPx, SOD and catalase activities, and DNA tail length and tail moment were significantly different between the high-dose group and the placebo group. Additionally, the net changes in urinary 8-epi-PGF(2α) were significantly different between the KRG supplementation groups and the placebo group. KRG supplementation may attenuate lymphocyte DNA damage and LDL oxidation by upregulating antioxidant enzyme activity.

  20. Antimutagenic activity and in vitro anticancer effects of bamboo salt on HepG2 human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Ju, Jaehyun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Park, Kun-Young

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo salt is a traditional Korean baked solar salt processed by packing the solar salt in bamboo joint cases and heating it several times to high temperatures. The antimutagenic activity and in vitro anticancer effects of bamboo salt on HepG2 human hepatoma cells were investigated and compared to those of other salt samples. Although solar salt and purified salt exhibited comutagenicity with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in the Salmonella typhimurium TA100 strain, bamboo salt was associated with a lower degree of comutagenicity or antimutagenic activity. Bamboo salt baked nine times (9×) showed a greater increase in antimutagenic activity than salts baked once (1×) or three times (3×). At a concentration of 1%, the growth rate of HepG2 cells treated with 9× bamboo salt determined by a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MIT) assay was reduced by 65%; this rate of inhibition was higher than that achieved with 1× baked bamboo salt (40%). Purified and solar salts had relatively lower inhibitory effects on growth rate (25% and 29%, respectively). Compared to the other salt samples, 9× bamboo salt significantly (pbamboo salts, especially 9× bamboo salt, also significantly (p<0.05) downregulated the expression of inflammation-related NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2, and upregulated the gene expression of IκB-α compared to the other salt sample.

  1. Morphoanatomic characterization of the stem and the leaf of Tabernaemontana catharinensis A.DC (Apocynaceae and antimutagenic activity of its leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.G.G. GUIDOTI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tabernaemontana catharinensis A. DC (Apocynaceae is used as a medicinal plant by the population. In order to contribute to the safe use of the plant as herbal medicine, this study aimed to morphoanatomically characterize the aereal vegetative organs of T. catharinensis and to evaluate the leaves’ mutagenic and antimutagenic activities. Histological blades of leaves and stem of T. catharinensis were performed; the methionine system (methG1 and Aspergillusnidulans conidia germination analysis were employed for mutagenic and antimutagenic evaluation. The morphoanatomic analysis did not show trichomes in the stem, petiole and leaf. Besides, it was observed both the presence of bi-collateral bundles - except in the foliar apex where the bundles were from the collateral type - as well as anamphistomatic leaf with paracyte stomata and sub-epidermal layer in the region of the leaf edges. The mutagenicity/antimutagenicity trial indicated a significant decrease of mutation frequency in comparison with the control group and showed that the T. catharinensis had antimutagenic activity within the type, time and form of treatment. Since the germination test showed that the conidia germination was accelerated from the bud phase, activities at the cell cycle level and polarized growth proved to be possible. The morphoanatomic analysis of the leaf and stem associated with the mutagenic and antimutagenic analyses contributes to the safe use of the plant by humans and also for the quality control of a possible phytotherapeutic drug.

  2. A report on the antioxidant activity of the powder of the entire plant of Phyllanthus reticulatus Poir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruthappan V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we determined the antioxidant activity of the entire plant of Phyllanthus reticulatus by performing different in vitro antioxidant assays, including 2,2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power and metal chelating assay at different concentrations (100, 200 and 400 μg/ml. The entire plant powder of P. reticulatus shows good antioxidant activity of about 90.0% when compared with standard Butylated Hydroxy Toluene (BHT (85% at a concentration of 400 μg/ml. Results obtained reveal that methanolic extracts of entire plant of P. reticulatus possess higher antioxidant activity when compared with ethanolic extracts. Thus, this study suggests that P. reticulatus plant can be used as a potent source of natural antioxidants.

  3. Antimutagenic effect of essential oil of sage (Salvia officinalis L. and its fractions against UV-induced mutations in bacterial and yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević-Vukčević Jelena B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of spontaneous and UV-induced mutations by essential oil (EO of sage (Salvia officinalis L. and its fractions F1-F5 containing different proportions of mono- and sesquiterpenes was studied with the Salmonella/microsome, E. coli K12, and S. cerevisiae D7 reversion assays. The EO, F1, and F2 exhibited antimutagenic potential against UV-induced mutations in all tests. Fractions F3 and F4 produced a toxic, mutagenic, or antimutagenic response, depend­ing on the test organism used. Reduction of spontaneous and UV-induced mutations by F5 was detected only in permeable strains of E. coli. The obtained results demonstrate antimutagenic activity of volatile sage terpenes and recommend them for further antimutagenesis and anticarcinogenesis studies.

  4. Evaluation of mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of new derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione with anti-epileptic activity, by use of the Vibrio harveyi mutagenicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pękala, Elżbieta; Liana, Piotr; Kubowicz, Paulina; Powroźnik, Beata; Obniska, Jolanta; Chlebek, Iwona; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-12-12

    The Vibrio harveyi test was used to evaluate mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of nineteen new derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione (compounds 1-19) with antiepileptic activity. Four V. harveyi strains were used: BB7 (wild type) and the genetically modified strains BB7M, BB7X and BB7XM (i.e. strains with additional mucA and mucB genes, UV hypersensitivity, and UV hypersensitivity with plasmid pAB91273, respectively). None of the derivatives of 2-ethyl-2-methylsuccinic acid (compounds 1-7) had mutagenic activity against the tester strains of V. harveyi, but this set had strong or moderate antimutagenic activity against 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (NQNO) in the tester strains BB7, BB7X, and BB7M. This antimutagenic activity ranged from 51% to 67%, through 51-66% to 71-83% for V. harveyi BB7, BB7X and BB7M strains, respectively. Mutagenic activities in the group of 2,2-diphenyl-succinic acid derivatives (compounds 8-19) were variable and depended on the tester strain used. Compounds 8-19 were devoid of mutagenic properties against BB7 (wild-type strain). Among this group only compound 9, with the fluorine substituent in position 2 of the aromatic system, was devoid of mutagenic potential against all tester strains. The compounds in this group (8-19) demonstrated strong antimutagenic activity only against strain BB7 (inhibition ranging from 51% to 71%). We conclude that there are various mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of derivatives of pyrrolidine-2,5-dione. Moreover, our studies have proven that the V. harveyi test can be applied for primary mutagenicity and antimutagenicity assessment of these new compounds.

  5. Antioxidant therapies in COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Irfan

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an important feature in the pathogenesis of COPD. Targeting oxidative stress with antioxidants or boosting the endogenous levels of antioxidants is likely to be beneficial in the treatment of COPD. Antioxidant agents such as thiol molecules (glutathione and mucolytic drugs, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine and N-acystelyn), dietary polyphenols (curcumin, resveratrol, green tea, catechins/quercetin), erdosteine, and carbocysteine lysine salt, all have been reported to control nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κ B) activation, regulation of glutathione biosynthesis genes, chromatin remodeling, and hence inflammatory gene expression. Specific spin traps such as α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a catalytic antioxidant (ECSOD mimetic), porphyrins (AEOL 10150 and AEOL 10113), and a superoxide dismutase mimetic M40419 have also been reported to inhibit cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory responses in vivo. Since a variety of oxidants, free radicals, and aldehydes are implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD, it is possible that therapeutic administration of multiple antioxidants will be effective in the treatment of COPD. Various approaches to enhance lung antioxidant capacity and clinical trials of antioxidant compounds in COPD are discussed. PMID:18046899

  6. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of (−-hinokinin a trypanosomicidal compound measured by Salmonella microsome and comet assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resende Flávia Aparecida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan (−-hinokinin (HK was derived by partial synthesis from (−-cubebin, isolated from the dry seeds of the pepper, Piper cubeba. Considering the good trypanosomicidal activity of HK and recalling that natural products are promising starting points for the discovery of novel potentially therapeutic agents, the aim of the present study was to investigate the (anti mutagenic∕ genotoxic activities of HK. Methods The mutagenic∕ genotoxic activities were evaluated by the Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100 and TA102, and the comet assay, so as to assess the safe use of HK in the treatment of Chagas’ disease. The antimutagenic ∕antigenotoxic potential of HK were also tested against the mutagenicity of a variety of direct and indirect acting mutagens, such as 4- nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPD, sodium azide (SA, mitomycin C (MMC, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF, by the Ames test, and doxorubicin (DXR by the comet assay. Results The mutagenicity∕genotoxicity tests showed that HK did not induce any increase in the number of revertants or extent of DNA damage, demonstrating the absence of mutagenic and genotoxic activities. On the other hand, the results on the antimutagenic potential of HK showed a strong inhibitory effect against some direct and indirect-acting mutagens. Conclusions Regarding the use of HK as an antichagasic drug, the absence of mutagenic effects in animal cell and bacterial systems is encouraging. In addition, HK may be a new potential antigenotoxic ∕ antimutagenic agent from natural sources. However, the protective activity of HK is not general and varies with the type of DNA damage-inducing agent used.

  7. Assessment of median lethal dose and anti-mutagenic effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract against chemically induced micronucleus formation in Swiss albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Based on this study, it may be concluded that Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract possess anti-mutagenic behavior and this hydro-methanolic crude extract may be safe as per the LD50 was observed. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 292-297

  8. THE ANTIMUTAGENIC EFFECT OF VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON SPONTANEOUS MUTATION IN SALMONELLA TA104 IS DUE TO A REDUCTION IN MUTATIONS AT GC BUT NOT AT SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutagens that, when added to assay plates, reduced the spontaneous mutant frequency in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA104 (hisG428, rfa, uvrB, pKM101) by 50%. To date, no study has demonstrated whether or not...

  9. Estrogenic potency of food-packaging-associated plasticizers and antioxidants as detected in ERa and ERb reporter gene cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, ter M.G.R.; Schouten, B.; Louisse, J.; Es, van D.S.; Saag, van der P.T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Murk, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    This study presents the estrogenic potency of 21 food-packaging-associated compounds determined for the first time, using two transfected U2-OS (human osteoblasts devoid of endogenous estrogen receptors) estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta cell lines. Six plasticizers and three antioxidants were s

  10. Syntheses of Resveratrol Analogues and Evaluation of Their Antioxidant Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Jeong; Jung, Se Hoon; Moon, Insu; Jun Jonggab; Lee, Jeong Tae [Hallym Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Free radicals such as superoxide anion radicals (O{sub 2}·{sup -}), hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and non-free radical species such as hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) are considered as ROS. These ROS not only oxidize membrane lipids but damage nucleic acids, proteins and carbohydrates leading to mutations. If ROS are not scavenged by antioxidants, they could be involved in ageing and various diseases related to oxidative stress. Resveratrol is a natural phytoalexin found in the skin of grapes, red wines, and peanuts. It has three hydroxyl groups at the trans-stilbene structure, in which resorcinol and phenol are bridged by a trans double bond. The recent extensive studies on the resveratrol and its derivatives revealed that they have antioxidant, antimutagenic, antiinflammatory, antidiabetic, cardiovascular protective, and anticancer properties. It has been believed that the majority of the biological functions of resveratrol has been attributed to its antioxidant activity.

  11. Findings on sperm alterations and DNA fragmentation, nutritional, hormonal and antioxidant status in an elite triathlete. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vaamonde

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: In this high-intensity endurance athlete, sperm parameters, mainly sperm morphology and DNA fragmentation, are altered. Further knowledge is needed with regards nutritional antioxidant intake and other dietetic strategies oriented toward avoiding oxidative damage in semen of high-performance triathletes. Moreover, adequate nutritional strategies must be found and nutritional advice given to athletes so as to palliate or dampen the effects of exercise on semen quality.

  12. A Further Study of the Role of Copper in Regard to the Antimutagenic Action of Sodium Copper Chlorophyllin (SCC) in Somatic Cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Emilio; Cruces, Martha P; Zimmering, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that copper plays a crucial role in the antimutagenic effect of sodium copper chlorophyllin (SCC). The objective of the current research was to compare the antimutagenic effects of two SCC compounds with different amounts of copper (3.7% and 5.4%, respectively) on the genetic damage induced by gamma rays in somatic cells of Drosophila. Data indicate that an increase in copper content of 31.5% in SCC-5.4 resulted in a greater inhibition of gamma ray genetic damage of 49% whereas only a 2% inhibition with SCC-3.7 occurred. Of greater interest is the association of SCC with a variety of uses in humans, such as a chemo preventive agent and food supplement. A greater attention to the concentration of copper in the SCC product in use should be required.

  13. Antimutagenic activity of some naturally occurring compounds towards cigarette-smoke condensate and benzo(a)pyrene in the Salmonella/microsome assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwel, L.; van der Hoeven, J.C.

    1985-10-01

    Several compounds, occurring in food, were tested for antimutagenic activity towards cigarette-smoke condensate (CSC) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Antimutagenicity was determined in the Salmonella/microsome test, with tester strain TA98, in the presence of rat-liver homogenate. Dose-response curves did show reduction of CSC- and BaP-induced mutagenicity by ellagic acid, riboflavin and chlorophyllin. Chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, although less distinct, also inhibited CSC- and BaP-induced mutagenicity. Ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, tocopherol acetate, chlorogenic acid and butyl hydroxyanisole did not have any influence on the mutagenicity of CSC and BaP. The similarity in results for cigarette-smoke condensate and for BaP indicates that a general mechanism may be involved in the inhibition of CSC- and BaP-induced mutagenicity.

  14. Antimutagenic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Activities of Silybum Marianum [L.] Gaertn Assessed by the Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay (Ames Test) and the Micronucleus Test in Mice Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Flávio Fernandes Veloso; Silva, Carolina Ribeiroe; Véras, Jefferson Hollanda; Cardoso, Clever Gomes; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino; Chen, Lee Chen

    2016-07-01

    Silymarin (SM), a standardized extract from Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn., is composed mainly of flavonolignans, and silibinin (SB) is its major active constituent. The present study aimed to evaluate the antimutagenic activities of SM and SB using the Ames mutagenicity test in Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as their anticytotoxic and antigenotoxic activities using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. To assess antimutagenicity, Salmonella Typhimurium strains were treated with different concentrations of SM or SB and the appropriate positive control for each strain. To assess antigenotoxicity and anticytotoxicity, Swiss mice were treated with different concentrations of SM or SB and mitomycin C (MMC). The results showed that SM was not significantly effective in reducing the number of frameshift mutations in strain TA98, while SB demonstrated significant protection at higher doses (P < 0.05). Regarding strain TA 100, SM and SB significantly decreased mutagenicity (point mutations) (P < 0.05). The results of the antigenotoxic evaluation demonstrated that SM and SB significantly reduced the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) (P < 0.05). The results also indicated that SM and SB significantly attenuated MMC-induced cytotoxicity (P < 0.05). Based on these results, both SM and SB presented antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic actions.

  15. Preliminary assessment of mutagenic and anti-mutagenic potential of some aminoalkanolic derivatives of xanthone by use of the Vibrio harveyi assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoczyńska, Karolina; Waszkielewicz, Anna Maria; Marona, Henryk

    2014-07-01

    The Vibrio harveyi assay was used to evaluate mutagenic and anti-mutagenic effects of four new aminoalkanolic derivatives of xanthone with anticonvulsant activity, to select the potentially safe compounds for further in vivo studies in animal models. The study showed that at a concentration of 40 ng/ml the test compounds were not mutagenic. Additionally, two of the investigated compounds, namely the (R,S)-N-methyl-1-amino-2-propanol derivative of 6-methoxyxanthone (compound III) and the (R)-N-methyl-2-amino-1-butanol derivative of 7-chloroxanthone (compound IV) were strong inhibitors of the mutagenicity induced by 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO) in V. harveyi strains BB7M and BB7XM. The inhibition percentages for compound IV were 49 (in BB7M) and 69 (in BB7XM), whereas for compound III these percentages were 47 (in BB7M) and 42 (in BB7XM), respectively. The present study demonstrates that four bioactive derivatives of xanthone display no mutagenic activity in the V. harveyi assay. In addition, compounds III and IV demonstrated considerable anti-mutagenic activity in this test. Based on the results obtained here, these compounds could be selected for further studies in animal models, while compounds III and IV should be tested further for their anti-mutagenic properties.

  16. Antioxidant enzyme polymorphisms and neuropsychological outcomes in medulloblastoma survivors: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Julienne; Krull, Kevin R; Scheurer, Michael E; Liu, Wei; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Stovall, Marilyn; Merchant, Thomas E; Packer, Roger J; Robison, Leslie L; Okcu, M Fatih

    2012-08-01

    Psychological or neurocognitive impairment is often seen in medulloblastoma survivors after craniospinal radiation; however, significant variability in outcomes exists. This study investigated the role of antioxidant enzyme polymorphisms in moderating this outcome and hypothesized that patients who had polymorphisms associated with lower antioxidant enzyme function would have a higher occurrence of impairment. From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort, 109 medulloblastoma survivors and 143 siblings were identified who completed the CCSS Neurocognitive Questionnaire (NCQ) and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) and who provided buccal DNA samples. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allelic discrimination was used for SOD2 (rs4880), GPX1 (rs1050450), and GSTP1 (rs1695 and rs1138272) genotyping and PCR for GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene deletions. Outcomes on NCQ and BSI-18 subscale scores were examined in association with genotypes and clinical factors, including age at diagnosis, sex, and radiation dose, using univariate and multivariate analysis of variance. Patients survivors across multiple domains, suggesting that this genotype may predispose patients for increased emotional late effects.

  17. ANTIOXIDANT THERAPEUTIC ADVANCES IN COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Irfan

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress is intimately associated with the progression and exacerbation of COPD and therefore targeting oxidative stress with antioxidants or boosting the endogenous levels of antioxidants is likely to have beneficial outcome in the treatment of COPD. Among the various antioxidants tried so far, thiol antioxidants and mucolytic agents, such as glutathione, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, N-acystelyn, erdosteine, fudosteine, and carbocysteine; Nrf2 activators, and dietary polyphenols (curcumin, resveratrol, green tea, and catechins/quercetin) have been reported to increase intracellular thiol status alongwith induction of GSH biosynthesis. Such an elevation in the thiol status in turn leads to detoxification of free radicals and oxidants as well as inhibition of ongoing inflammatory responses. In addition, specific spin traps, such as a-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a catalytic antioxidant (ECSOD mimetic), porphyrins (AEOL 10150 and AEOL 10113), and a SOD mimetic M40419 have also been reported to inhibit cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory responses in vivo in the lung. Since a variety of oxidants, free radicals and aldehydes are implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD; it is possible that therapeutic administration of multiple antioxidants and mucolytics will be effective in management of COPD. However, a successful outcome will critically depend upon the choice of antioxidant therapy for a particular clinical phenotype of COPD, whose pathophysiology should be first properly understood. This article will review the various approaches adopted to enhance lung antioxidant levels, antioxidant therapeutic advances and recent past clinical trials of antioxidant compounds in COPD. PMID:19124382

  18. Electrophoretic characterization of D. melanogaster strains deficient in endogenous anti-oxidants in combination with gamma radiation; Caracterizacion electroforetica de cepas de D. melanogaster deficientes en antioxidantes endogenos en combinacion con radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomar A, S.

    2012-07-01

    proven anti-oxidants the bilirubin induced a major quantity of both enzymes, followed by the protoporphyrin-Ix without metallic ion, and the SCC in minor proportion. Therefore the conclusion is that this action of the SCC can provide it the anti-mutagenic action broadly reported. (Author)

  19. Cytoprotective and antioxidant effects of phenolic compounds from Haberlea rhodopensis Friv. (Gesneriaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondeva-Burdina, Magdalena; Zheleva-Dimitrova, Dimitrina; Nedialkov, Paraskev; Girreser, Ulrich; Mitcheva, Mitka

    2013-10-01

    Haberlea rhodopensis Friv. (Gesneriaceae) is a rare poikilohydric endemic and preglacial relict growing in Balkan Peninsula. Previous investigations demonstrated strong antioxidant, antimicrobial and antimutagenic potential of alcoholic extract from the plant. The isolation of known caffeoyl phenylethanoid glucoside - myconoside and flavone-C-glycosides hispidulin 8-C-(2-O-syringoyl-β-glucopyranoside), hispidulin 8-C-(6-O-acetyl-2-O-syringoyl-β-glucopyranoside), and hispidulin 8-C-(6-O-acetyl-β-glucopyranoside) from the leaves of H. rhodopensis was carried out. The aim of this study was to investigate cyto-protective and antioxidant effects of isolated compounds. Antioxidant activity of isolated substances was examined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) radicals; ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in linoleic acid system by ferric thyocianate method. The compounds were investigated for their possible protective and antioxidant effects against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress in isolated rat hepatocytes. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were assayed as an index of LPO. Lactate dehydrogenase leakage, cell viability, and reduced glutathione depletion were used as signs of cytotoxicity. Myconoside demonstrated the highest DPPH radical scavenging, ABTS, FRAP, and antioxidant activity in linoleic acid system as well as the highest and statistically most significant protection and antioxidant activity against the toxic agent. Phenolic compounds isolated from H. rhodopensis demonstrated significant cytoprotective, radical scavenging potential, and inhibit lipid peroxidation, moreover, myconoside was found to be a new powerful natural antioxidant.

  20. Evaluation of mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of neem (Azadirachta indica) seed oil in the in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, V; Tiwari, P K; Meshram, G P

    2011-04-12

    The possible mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of neem oil (NO) and its DMSO extract (NDE) were, examined in the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay. Eight different strains of Salmonella typhimurium were, used to study the genotoxicity of neem oil both in the presence and absence of Aroclor-1254 induced rat liver homogenate (S9). Two-dose treatment protocol was, employed to study the cytogenetic activity in micronucleus assay. Similarly, the antimutagenic activity of neem oil and NDE was studied against mitomycin (MMC) and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) in the above two test systems. Neem oil was non-mutagenic in all the eight tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium both in the presence and absence of S9 mix. In the present study, there was no significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) in neem oil treated groups over the negative control (DMSO) group of animals, indicating the non-clastogenic activity of neem oil in the micronucleus test. Neem oil showed good antimutagenic activity against DMBA induced mutagenicity compared to its DMSO extract. However, neem oil showed comparatively less antimutagenicity against MMC in the Ames assay. In vivo anticlastogenic assays shows that neem oil exhibited better activity against DMBA induced clastogenicity. These results indicate non-mutagenic activity of neem oil and significant antimutagenic activity of neem oil suggesting its pharmacological importance for the prevention of cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antioxidative defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals occur constantly during metabolism and take part in numerous physiological processes, such as: intra-cellular and inter-cellular signalization, gene expression, removal of damaged or senescent cells, and control of the tone of blood vessels. However, there is an increased quantity of free radicals in situations of so-called oxidative stress, when they cause serious damage to cellular membranes (peroxidation of their lipids, damage of membrane proteins, and similar, to interior cellular protein molecules, as well as DNA molecules and carbohydrates. This is precisely why the organism has developed numerous mechanisms for removing free radicals and/or preventing their production. Some of these are enzyme-related and include superoxide-dismutase, catalase, glutathione-peroxidase, and others. Other, non-enzyme mechanisms, imply antioxidative activities of vitamins E and C, provitamin A, coenzyme Q, reduced glutation, and others. Since free radicals can leave the cell that has produced them and become dispersed throughout the body, in addition to antioxidative defense that functions within cellular structures, antioxidant extra-cellular defense has also been developed. This is comprised by: transferrin, lactoferrin, haptoglobin, hemopexin, ceruloplasmin, albumins, extra-cellular isoform SOD, extracellular glutathione-peroxidase, glucose, bilirubin, urates, and many other molecules.

  2. Antioxidants for female subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showell, Marian G; Mackenzie-Proctor, Rebecca; Jordan, Vanessa; Hart, Roger J

    2017-07-28

    pregnancy rate between 6% and 11%. Likewise, there was insufficient evidence to determine whether there was a difference between the groups in rates of gastrointestinal disturbances (OR 1.55, 95% CI 0.47 to 5.10, P = 0.47, 3 RCTs, 343 women, I(2) = 0%, very low quality evidence). This suggests that among subfertile women with an expected gastrointestinal disturbance rate of 2%, use of antioxidants would be expected to result in a rate between 1% and 11%. Overall adverse events were reported by 35 trials in the meta-analysis, but there was insufficient evidence to draw any conclusions.Only one trial reported on live birth, clinical pregnancy or adverse effects in the antioxidant versus antioxidant comparison, and no conclusions could be drawn.Very low-quality evidence suggests that pentoxifylline may be associated with an increased clinical pregnancy rate compared with placebo or no treatment (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.20 to 3.56, P = 0.009, 3 RCTs, 276 women, I(2) = 0%). This suggests that among subfertile women with an expected clinical pregnancy rate of 25%, the rate among women using pentoxifylline would be between 28% and 53%.There was insufficient evidence to determine whether there was a difference between the groups in rates of miscarriage (OR 1.34, 95% CI 0.46 to 3.90, P = 0.58, 3 RCTs, 276 women, I(2) = 0%) or multiple pregnancy (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.20 to 3.09, one RCT, 112 women, very low quality evidence). This suggests that among subfertile women with an expected miscarriage rate of 4%, the rate among women using pentoxifylline would be between 2% and 15%. For multiple pregnancy, the data suggest that among subfertile women with an expected multiple pregnancy rate of 9%, the rate among women using pentoxifylline would be between 2% and 23%.The overall quality of evidence was limited by serious risk of bias associated with poor reporting of methods, imprecision and inconsistency. In this review, there was very low-quality evidence to show that taking an antioxidant may

  3. Cytotoxicity and Antioxidant Activity of 23 Plant Species of Leguminosae Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalighi-Sigaroodi, Farahnaz; Ahvazi, Maryam; Hadjiakhoondi, Abbas; Taghizadeh, Mitra; Yazdani, Darab; Khalighi-Sigaroodi, Shahram; Bidel, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have been focused on natural anticarcinogenic agents. Many antioxidants have been identified as anticarcinogens. Antimutagens have also been proposed as cancer chemopreventive agents. The use of natural products as anticancer has a long history that began with traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity of twenty-three plant species of Leguminosae family from different regions of Iran. Twenty-three plant species of Leguminosae family were collected in May-June 2009 from different regions of Iran.Methanol extracts of these species were tested through the brine shrimp lethality assay in order to detect potential sources of novel cytotoxic compounds. The total antioxidant activity was evaluated with DPPH free radical-scavenging method. The extracts of twelve species showed moderate cytotoxicity against brine shrimp (LC50 between 30 and 50 μg/mL). The extracts of Taverniera spartea and Tephrosia persica showed significant cytotoxicity (LC50 tested plant species that Taverniera spartea had the most cytotoxic and antioxidant activity and was the best candidate for these effects. Further investigations are necessary for chemical characterization of the active compounds and more comprehensive biological assays. PMID:24250452

  4. ANTIOXIDANT PHARMACOLOGIAL THERAPIES FOR COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Irfan; MacNee, William

    2013-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress occurs in the lungs and systemically in COPD, which plays a role in many of the pathogenic mechanisms in COPD. Hence, targeting local lung and systemic oxidative stress with agents that modulate the antioxidants/redox system or boost endogenous antioxidants would be a useful therapeutic approach in COPD. Thiol antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine and N-acystelyn, carbocysteine, erdosteine, and fudosteine have been used to increase lung thiol content. Modulation of cigarette smoke induced oxidative stress and its consequent cellular changes have also been reported to be effected by synthetic molecules, such as spin traps (α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone), catalytic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase [ECSOD] mimetics), porphyrins, and lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation blockers/inhibitors (edaravone and lazaroids/tirilazad). Pre-clinical and clinical trials have shown that these antioxidants can reduce oxidative stress, affect redox and glutathione biosynthesis genes, and pro-inflammatory gene expression. In this review the approaches to enhance lung antioxidants in COPD and the potential beneficial effects of antioxidant therapy on the course of the disease are discussed. PMID:22349417

  5. Dietary antioxidant vitamins intake and mortality: A report from two cohort studies of Chinese adults in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Long-Gang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Li, Hong-Lan; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Jing; Sun, Jiang-Wei; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have evaluated dietary antioxidant vitamins intake in relation to risk of mortality in Asia. We examined the associations between total carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E from diet and risk of mortality from all causes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease in 134,358 participants (59,739 men and 74,619 women) from the Shanghai Men's Health Study and Shanghai Women's Health Study, two prospective cohort studies of middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults in urban Shanghai. Participants were followed up for a median period of 8.3 and 14.2 years for men and women, respectively. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. During the 495,332 and 1,029,198 person-years of follow-up for men and women, respectively, there were 10,079 deaths (4170 men and 5909 women). For men, compared with the lowest quintiles, the multivariable-adjusted risk reductions in the highest categories were 17% (HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76-0.92) for dietary total carotene and 17% (HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.75-0.91) for dietary vitamin C. Associations were weaker in women than in men, though they were still statistically significant (highest versus lowest quintiles of dietary total carotene, HR 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.95; dietary vitamin C: HR 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77-0.91). Significant inverse associations were observed between dietary total carotene, vitamin C, and risk of cardiovascular disease mortality but not cancer mortality. This study suggests that total carotene and vitamin C intake from diet were inversely associated with deaths from all causes and cardiovascular disease in middle-aged or elderly people in China. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimutagenic and antirecombinagenic activities of noni fruit juice in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEONARDO P. FRANCHI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Noni, a Hawaiian name for the fruit of Morinda citrifolia L., is a traditional medicinal plant from Polynesia widely used for the treatment of many diseases including arthritis, diabetes, asthma, hypertension and cancer. Here, a commercial noni juice (TNJ was evaluated for its protective activities against the lesions induced by mitomycin C (MMC and doxorrubicin (DXR using the Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART in Drosophila melanogaster. Three-day-old larvae, trans-heterozygous for two genetic markers (mwh and flr3 , were co-treated with TNJ plus MMC or DXR. We have observed a reduction in genotoxic effects of MMC and DXR caused by the juice. TNJ provoked a marked decrease in all kinds of MMC- and DXR-induced mutant spots, mainly due to its antirecombinagenic activity. The TNJ protective effects were concentration-dependent, indicating a dose-response correlation, that can be attributed to a powerful antioxidant and/or free radical scavenger ability of TNJ.

  7. Antimutagenic Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Aqueous Extract on Rats Treated with Monosodium Glutamate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoff, Jacqueline; Vieira Júnior, Gerardo Magela; de Campos, Kleber Eduardo; Sugui, Marina Mariko

    2017-01-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa L. is a plant of the Malvaceae family, commonly known as roselle. H. sabdariffa is known to contain antioxidant, cholesterol-lowering, antiobesity, insulin resistance reduction, antihypertensive, and skin cancer chemopreventive properties. This study evaluated the effects of H. sabdariffa aqueous extract against cyclophosphamide (CPA, 25 mg/Kg) induced damage to DNA in male Wistar rats by micronucleus test. Samples of H. sabdariffa calyx were obtained in the municipality of Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The aqueous extract was prepared by infusion and each animal received a daily dose of 400 mg/Kg by gavage for 15 consecutive days of treatment. The presence of anthocyanins was confirmed by ferric chloride test and phenolic compounds using high-performance liquid chromatography, with emphasis on the identification of rutin. The animals were sacrificed by deepening of anaesthesia to obtain bone marrow and determination of the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. The group treated with the aqueous extract of H. sabdariffa revealed a 91% reduction in micronucleus frequency when compared with the positive control group. Under the conditions tested, H. sabdariffa L. presented a protective effect to CPA-induced damage to DNA of the treated animals, and it is a potential candidate as a chemopreventive agent against carcinogenesis. PMID:28197528

  8. ANTIOXIDANTS AMELIORATION OF ARSENICAL-INDUCED EFFECTS IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antioxidant amelioration of arsenical-induced effects in vivo. ES Hunter and EH Rogers. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC. Antioxidants have been reported to ameliorate the effects of many developmental toxicants. We tested the hypothesis that oxi...

  9. Mismatch base pairing of the mutagen 8-oxoguanine and its derivatives with adenine: A theoretical search for possible antimutagenic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    Molecular geometries of 8-oxoguanine (8OG), those of its substituted derivatives with the substitutions CH2, CF2, CO, CNH, O, and S in place of the N7H7 group, adenine (A), and the base pairs of 8OG and its substituted derivatives with adenine were optimized using the RHF/6-31+G* and B3LYP/6-31+G* methods in gas phase. All the molecules and their hydrogen-bonded complexes were solvated in aqueous media employing the polarized continuum model (PCM) of the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) theory using the RHF/6-31+G* and B3LYP/6-31+G* methods. The optimized geometrical parameters of the 8OG-A base pair at the RHF/6-31+G* and B3LYP/6-31+G* levels of theory agree satisfactorily with those of an oligonucleotide containing the base pair found from X-ray crystallography. The pattern of hydrogen bonding in the CF2- and O-substituted 8OG-A base pair is of Watson-Crick type and that in the unsubstituted and CH2-, CNH-, and S-substituted base pairs is of Hoogsteen type. In the CO-substituted base pair, the hydrogen bonding pattern is of neither Watson-Crick nor Hoogsteen type. The CF2-substitution appears to introduce steric hindrance for stacking of DNA bases. On the basis of these results, it appears that among all the substituted 8OG molecules considered here, the O-substituted derivative may be useful as an antimutagenic drug. It is, however, subject to experimental verification. Content:text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

  10. Antimutagenic, Antirecombinogenic, and Antitumor Effect of Amygdalin in a Yeast Cell-Based Test and Mammalian Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, Atanaska; Pesheva, Margarita; Iliev, Ivan; Bardarov, Krum; Todorova, Teodora

    2017-04-01

    Amygdalin is a major component of the seeds of Rosaceae family of plants such as apricots, peaches, cherry, nectarines, apples, plums, and so on, as well as almonds. It is used in alternative medicine for cancer prevention, alleviation of fever, cough suppression, and quenching thirst. The aim of the present study is to determine the mutagenic and recombinogenic effects of amygdalin in a test system Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to evaluate its potential antitumor effect in a yeast cell-based test and colon cancer cell lines. Results obtained show that concentrations 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL did not have any cytotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effect in yeast cell-based tests. Pretreatment with amygdalin at concentration 100 μg/mL leads to around twofold of the cell survival and decrease of reverse mutation frequency, induced by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. The frequency of gene conversion and mitotic crossing-over is around threefold lower. The anticarcinogenic potential of amygdalin at the same concentration is presented as around fourfold reduction of Ty1 retrotransposition induced by hexavalent chromium. In summary, data presented in this study provide evidence concerning the inability of amygdalin itself to provoke events related to the initial steps of tumorigenesis. In addition, the observed antimutagenic/antirecombinogenic effect could be activation of error-free and error-prone recombination events. Based on the high selectivity toward normal or tumor cell lines, it could be speculated that amygdalin has higher cytotoxic effect in cell lines with higher proliferative and metabolic activity, which are the majority of fast developing tumors.

  11. Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity of Some Pteridophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Semwal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to find the antioxidant value of certain Pteridophytes in Garhwalregion. Antioxidants have been reported to prevent oxidative damage caused by free radical and can be used in cardiovascular and anti-inflammatory diseases to treat of burn and wounds. The methanolic crude extracts of some commonly used Pteridophytes were screened for their free radical scavengingproperties using ascorbic acid as standard antioxidant. Free radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical. The overall antioxidant activity of Diplaziumesculantum was the strongest, followed in descending order by Adiantumlunulatum, Pterisvittata, Equisetum romosissimumand Ampelopterisprolifera. All the methanolicextracts exhibited antioxidant activity significantly. The IC50 of the methanolic extracts ranged between 0.32 ± 0.12 and 0.81 ± 0.21 mg/ml. The study reveals that the consumption of these spices would exert several beneficial effects by virtue of their antioxidant activity.

  12. EFFECTS OF THE ANTIMUTAGENS VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON SPONTANEOUS MUTATION IN E. COLI LACL STRAINS AND ON GLOBAL GENE EXPRESSION IN SALMONELLA TA104 AND HUMAN HEPG2 CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of the Antimutagens Vanillin and Cinnamaldehyde on Spontaneous Mutation in E. coli lacI Strains and on Global Gene Epression in Salmonella TAlO4 and Human HepG2 Cells In previous work we have shown that vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutag...

  13. EFFECTS OF THE ANTIMUTAGENS VANILLIN AND CINNAMALDEHYDE ON SPONTANEOUS MUTATION IN E. COLI LACL STRAINS AND ON GLOBAL GENE EXPRESSION IN SALMONELLA TA104 AND HUMAN HEPG2 CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of the Antimutagens Vanillin and Cinnamaldehyde on Spontaneous Mutation in E. coli lacI Strains and on Global Gene Epression in Salmonella TAlO4 and Human HepG2 Cells In previous work we have shown that vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary antimutag...

  14. ANTIOXIDANT POTENCY OF WATER KEFIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Alsayadi M.S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have strong relationship with several diseases. Many fermented foods were reported to be important sources for antioxidant compounds. Antioxidant activity of water kefir never reported in the scientific literature. The objective of this study was to detect and investigate the antioxidant potency of water kefir. Water kefir was prepared by fermentation of sugar solution with kefir grains for 24h. Antioxidant activity of fresh water kefir drink and its extract with (0.125–5 mg/ml was evaluated using 2,2,-diphenyl-1-pricrylhydrozyl (DPPH scavenging method, and inhibition of ascorbate autoxidation and the reducing power of water kefir were determined, Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA and ascorbic acid were used for comparison. Water kefir demonstrated great ability to DPPH scavenging ranged (9.88-63.17%. And inhibit ascorbate oxidation by (6.08-25.57% increased in consequent with concentration raising. These results prime to conclude that water kefir could be promisor source of natural antioxidants with good potency in health developing.

  15. Oxidants, antioxidants and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gibanananda; Husain, Syed Akhtar

    2002-11-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), such as superoxide anions (O2*-) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (*OH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) are directly or indirectly involved in multistage process of carcinogenesis. They are mainly involved in DNA damage leading sometimes to mutations in tumour suppressor genes. They also act as initiator and/or promotor in carcinogenesis. Some of them are mutagenic in mammalian systems. O2*-, H2O2 and *OH are reported to be involved in higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosome breaks and gaps (CBGs). MDA, a bi-product of lipid peroxidation (LPO), is said to be involved in DNA adduct formations, which are believed to be responsible for carcinogenesis. NO, on the other hand, plays a duel role in cancer. At high concentration it kills tumour cells, but at low concentration it promotes tumour growth and metastasis. It causes DNA single and double strand breaks. The metabolites of NO such as peroxynitrite (OONO-) is a potent mutagen that can induce transversion mutations. NO can stimulate O2*-/H2O2/*OH-induced LPO. These deleterious actions of oxidants can be countered by antioxidant defence system in humans. There are first line defense antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT). SOD converts O2*- to H2O2, which is further converted to H2O with the help of GPx and CAT. SOD inhibits *OH production. SOD also act as antipoliferative agent, anticarcinogens, and inhibitor at initiation and promotion/transformation stage in carcinogenesis. GPx is another antioxidative enzyme which catalyses to convert H2O2, to H2O. The most potent enzyme is CAT. GPx and CAT are important in the inactivation of many environmental mutagens. CAT is also found to reduce the SCE levels and chromosomal aberrations. Antioxidative vitamins such as vitamin A, E, and C have a number of biological activities such as immune stimulation, inhibition of

  16. Antimutagenic Activity of Some Natural supplements on Ivermectin genotoxicity in Lymphocytes of Buffalo

    OpenAIRE

    Aida I. El-makawy and Karima F. Mahrous

    2008-01-01

    Ivermectin is a veterinary anthelminthic drug, highly effective against a number of arthropod and nematode infestations in vertebrates. The literature reported that ivermectin have mutagenic activities. The extensive use of ivermectin in food producing animals can cause potential hazard to humanity by causing gene mutation or chromosomal aberrations. Recently, there have been con-siderable efforts to search for naturally occurring substances that can inhibit, reverse, retard or pre-vent mutag...

  17. Phytochemical, antioxidant, antiviral and cytotoxic evaluation of Opuntia dillenii flowers

    OpenAIRE

    Arthanari Saravana Kumar; Mani Ganesh; Mei Mei Peng; Jang Hyun Tae

    2014-01-01

    Opuntia dillenii used in Asian traditional medicine especially in China. We here report on the investigation of the phytochemical content, antioxidant, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanolic extract of O. dillenii flowers. The antioxidant activity was measured with the DPPH, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging method. In the antiviral and cytotoxic assay we used different viruses in different cell lines. In antioxidant assay, the DPPH assay exhibited potent antioxid...

  18. Antioxidant activity of Citrus limon essential oil in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campêlo, Lidianne Mayra Lopes; Gonçalves, Fabrício Custódio Moura; Feitosa, Chistiane Mendes; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2011-07-01

    Citrus limon (L.) Burms (Rutaceae) has been shown in previous studies to have various biological functions (anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antiviral, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic). However, traditional uses in folk medicine suggest that C. limon may have an effect on the central nervous system (CNS). This study investigated the effects of C. limon essential oil (EO) on lipid peroxidation level, nitrite content, glutathione reduced (GSH) concentration, and antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] activities in mice hippocampus. Swiss mice were treated with the suspension of 0.5% Tween 80, in distilled water used as vehicle (i.p., control group) and with EO in three different doses (0.05, 0.1, or 0.15 g/kg, i.p., EO 50, EO 100, and EO 150 groups, respectively). After the treatments, all groups were observed for 24 h. The enzyme activities as well as the lipid peroxidation, nitrite, and GSH concentrations in mice hippocampus were measured using spectrophotometric methods and the results were compared with values obtained from control group. EO of C. limon treatment significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation level and nitrite content but increased the GSH levels and the SOD, catalase, and GPx activities in mice hippocampus. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress in hippocampus can occur during neurodegenerative diseases, proving that hippocampal damage induced by the oxidative process plays a crucial role in brain disorders, and also imply that a strong protective effect could be achieved using EO of C. limon as an antioxidant.

  19. Antioxidants in aqueous extract of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) suppress mitosis and cyclophosphamide-induced chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa L. cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboro, Akeem; Mohamed, Kamaruzaman Bin; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza; Sofiman, Othman Ahmad

    2011-11-01

    In this study, freeze-dried water extract from the leaves of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) was tested for mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials using the Allium cepa assay. Freeze-dried water extract alone and its combination with cyclophosphamide (CP) (50 mg/kg) were separately dissolved in tap water at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 mg/kg. Onions (A. cepa) were suspended in the solutions and controls for 48 h in the dark. Root tips were prepared for microscopic evaluation. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals' scavenging power of the extract was tested using butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as standards. Water extract of Myristica fragrans scavenged free radicals better than BHA, but worse than BHT. The extract alone, as well as in combination with CP suppressed cell division, and induced chromosomal aberrations that were insignificantly different from the negative control (P ≤ 0.05). However, cytotoxic and mutagenic actions of CP were considerably suppressed. The observed effects on cell division and chromosomes of A. cepa may be principally connected to the antioxidant properties of the extract. The obtained results suggest mitodepressive and antimutagenic potentials of water extract of the leaves of M. fragrans as desirable properties of a promising anticancer agent.

  20. Antioxidants in aqueous extract of Myristicafragrans (Houtt.) suppress mitosis and cyclophosphamide-induced chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa L.cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akeem AKINBORO; Kamaruzaman Bin MOHAMED; Mohd Zaini ASMAWI; Shaida Fariza SULAIMAN; Othman Ahmad SOFIMAN

    2011-01-01

    In this study,freeze-dried water extract from the leaves of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) was tested for mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials using the Allium cepa assay.Freeze-dried water extract alone and its combination with cyclophosphamide (CP) (50 mg/kg) were separately dissolved in tap water at 500,1000,2000,and 4000 mg/kg.Onions (A.cepa) were suspended in the solutions and controls for 48 h in the dark.Root tips were prepared for microscopic evaluation.2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals' scavenging power of the extract was tested using butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as standards.Water extract of Myristica fragrans scavenged free radicals better than BHA,but worse than BHT.The extract alone,as well as in combination with CP suppressed cell division,and induced chromosomal aberrations that were insignificantly different from the negative control (P≤0.05).However,cytotoxic and mutagenic actions of CP were considerably suppressed.The observed effects on cell division and chromosomes of A.cepa may be principally connected to the antioxidant properties of the extract.The obtained results suggest mitodepressive and antimutagenic potentials of water extract of the leaves of M.fragrans as desirable properties of a promising anticancer agent.

  1. Evaluation on Antioxidant Effect of Xanthohumol by Different Antioxidant Capacity Analytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Li Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several assays have been frequently used to estimate antioxidant capacities including ABTS•+, DPPH, and FRAP assays. Xanthohumol (XN, the major prenylated flavonoid contained in beer, witnessed various reports on its antioxidant capacity. We systematically evaluated the antioxidant activity of XN using three systems, 2,2,-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS•+ scavenging assays, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical assays, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. The results are expressed as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC. The TEAC of XN was 0.32±0.09 μmol·l−1 by the ABTS assay and 0.27±0.04 μmol·l−1 by the FRAP. Meanwhile, the XN did not show obviously scavenging effect on DPPH radical reaction system. These results showed that different methods in the evaluation of compound antioxidant capicity, there may be a different conclusion.

  2. Flavonoid constituents, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities of Gleditsia triacanthos L. leaves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed, R S; Abou Zeid, A H; El Hawary, S S; Sleem, A A; Ashour, W E

    2014-01-01

    Gleditsia triacanthos L. is a deciduous tree belonging to the family Fabaceae. It possesses important biological activities as anti-mutagenic, anticancer, cytotoxic and treating rheumatoid arthritis...

  3. Antioxidants in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Varadraj V; Pankaj Shukla; Naveen Narayanshetty Kikkeri

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer′s disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology.

  4. Antioxidants in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj V Pai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer′s disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology.

  5. Antioxidants in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Varadraj V.; Pankaj Shukla; Naveen Narayanshetty Kikkeri

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology.

  6. Salt tolerance in Solanum pennellii: antioxidant response and related QTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive soil salinity is an important problem for agriculture, however, salt tolerance is a complex trait that is not easily bred into plants. Exposure of cultivated tomato to salt stress has been reported to result in increased antioxidant content and activity. Salt tolerance of the related wild species, Solanum pennellii, has also been associated with similar changes in antioxidants. In this work, S. lycopersicum M82, S. pennellii LA716 and a S. pennellii introgression line (IL) population were evaluated for growth and their levels of antioxidant activity (total water-soluble antioxidant activity), major antioxidant compounds (phenolic and flavonoid contents) and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase) under both control and salt stress (150 mM NaCl) conditions. These data were then used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for controlling the antioxidant parameters under both stress and nonstress conditions. Results Under control conditions, cultivated tomato had higher levels of all antioxidants (except superoxide dismutase) than S. pennellii. However, under salt stress, the wild species showed greater induction of all antioxidants except peroxidase. The ILs showed diverse responses to salinity and proved very useful for the identification of QTL. Thus, 125 loci for antioxidant content under control and salt conditions were detected. Eleven of the total antioxidant activity and phenolic content QTL matched loci identified in an independent study using the same population, thereby reinforcing the validity of the loci. In addition, the growth responses of the ILs were evaluated to identify lines with favorable growth and antioxidant profiles. Conclusions Plants have a complex antioxidant response when placed under salt stress. Some loci control antioxidant content under all conditions while others are responsible for antioxidant content only under saline or nonsaline

  7. Salt tolerance in Solanum pennellii: antioxidant response and related QTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şığva Hasan Ö

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive soil salinity is an important problem for agriculture, however, salt tolerance is a complex trait that is not easily bred into plants. Exposure of cultivated tomato to salt stress has been reported to result in increased antioxidant content and activity. Salt tolerance of the related wild species, Solanum pennellii, has also been associated with similar changes in antioxidants. In this work, S. lycopersicum M82, S. pennellii LA716 and a S. pennellii introgression line (IL population were evaluated for growth and their levels of antioxidant activity (total water-soluble antioxidant activity, major antioxidant compounds (phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase under both control and salt stress (150 mM NaCl conditions. These data were then used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL responsible for controlling the antioxidant parameters under both stress and nonstress conditions. Results Under control conditions, cultivated tomato had higher levels of all antioxidants (except superoxide dismutase than S. pennellii. However, under salt stress, the wild species showed greater induction of all antioxidants except peroxidase. The ILs showed diverse responses to salinity and proved very useful for the identification of QTL. Thus, 125 loci for antioxidant content under control and salt conditions were detected. Eleven of the total antioxidant activity and phenolic content QTL matched loci identified in an independent study using the same population, thereby reinforcing the validity of the loci. In addition, the growth responses of the ILs were evaluated to identify lines with favorable growth and antioxidant profiles. Conclusions Plants have a complex antioxidant response when placed under salt stress. Some loci control antioxidant content under all conditions while others are responsible for antioxidant content only under

  8. Antigenotoxicity and antimutagenicity of ethanolic extracts of Brazilian green propolis and its main botanical source determined by the Allium cepa test system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Mantuanelli Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brazilian green propolis is a resinous substance prepared by bees from parts of the plant Baccharis dracunculifolia. As it possess several biological properties, this work assessed the cytotoxic/anticytotoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic and mutagenic/antimutagenic potential of ethanolic extracts of Brazilian green propolis (EEGP and of B. dracunculifolia (EEBD, by means of the Allium cepa test system. The effects were evaluated by assessing the chromosomal aberrations (CA and micronuclei (MN frequencies on meristematic and F1 generation cells from onion roots. Chemical analyses performed with the extracts showed differences in flavonoid quality and quantity. No genotoxic or mutagenic potential was detected, and both extracts were capable of inhibiting cellular damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS treatment, reducing the frequencies of CA and MN. By these data, we can infer that, independent of their flavonoid content, the extracts presented a protective effect in A. cepa cells against the clastogenicity of MMS.

  9. Evaluation of the genotoxicity/mutagenicity and antigenotoxicity/antimutagenicity induced by propolis and Baccharis dracunculifolia, by in vitro study with HTC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Matheus Mantuanelli; Matsumoto, Sílvia Tamie; Jamal, Cláudia Masrouah; Malaspina, Osmar; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    The ethanolic extract of propolis, especially the Brazilian green type, is widely and mainly used for therapeutic purposes despite the lack of knowledge about its effects and its cellular mode of action. This type of propolis, derived from Baccharis dracunculifolia (alecrim-do-campo), has been extensively commercialized and the consumers use it to enhance health. This work aimed to assess the genotoxic/mutagenic and antigenotoxic/antimutagenic potentials of the ethanolic extracts of Brazilian green propolis and of B. dracunculifolia, on mammalian cells. It was not observed genotoxic and mutagenic effects by both extracts. After evaluate the exposure of the cells to each extract with a recognized mutagen, simultaneously, the results showed a significant reduction on DNA damage. The experiment carried out with a pre-incubation period was more effective than without incubation test, showing that the tested extracts were able to inactivate the mutagen before it could react with the DNA.

  10. [Protection of radiosensitive human cells against the action of heavy metals by antimutagens and adapting factors: association with genetic and protein polymorphisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, I M; Shagirova, Zh M; Sinel'shchikova, T A; Mavletova, D A; Kuz'mina, N S; Zasukhina, G D

    2009-06-01

    Cells of a diploid line obtained from embryos with the Down's syndrome, known to be unable to repair gamma-induced DNA damage, were treated with natural (garlic extract, retinol) and synthetic (crown compound) antimutagens and with adapting factors (heat shock, low CdCl2 concentrations, 10(-8) M). The protective effect was evaluated by registering DNA breaks and cell survival, and the protection coefficients were calculated. The most effective results were obtained with the use of the garlic extract and retinol. No protection of the DNA structure was observed when cells were treated with low concentrations of cadmium chloride and then with high concentrations, i. e., no adaptive response (AR) was formed under these conditions. The spectrum of proteins in treated and control cells as well as detoxication genes (GSTM1, GSTT1 , CYPIA1) were determined.

  11. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production.

  12. Antioxidant activity of lichen Cetraria aculeata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomović Jovica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the antioxidant properties of the lichen Cetraria aculeata. Antioxidant activity of the methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of lichen was tested by different methods including determination of total phenolics content, determination of total antioxidant capacity, DPPH free radical scavenging activity, inhibitory activity towards lipid peroxidation, ferrous ion chelating ability and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. The extracts of the lichen C. aculeata showed significant antioxidant activity. The methanol extract showed higher values for total phenolics and total antioxidant capacity compared to the ethyl acetate extract, while the ethyl acetate extract demonstrated better results for DPPH radical scavenging, inhibitory activity towards lipid peroxidation, chelating ability and hydroxyl radical scavenging than the methanol extract. This is the first report of the antioxidant properties of Cetraria aculeata growing in Serbia. The results of antioxidant activity indicate the application of this lichen as source of natural antioxidants that could be used as a possible food supplement, in the pharmaceutical industry and in the treatment of various diseases.

  13. Anti-mutagenic lichen extract has double-edged effect on azoxymethane-induced colorectal oncogenesis in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoqiong; Hu, Ying; Winter, Jean; Young, Graeme P

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the effects of three anti-mutagenic lichen extracts on colorectal oncogenesis in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice and determined whether the extracts also regulated the homeostatic response to genotoxic damage. C57BL/6J mice (n = 12 per group) were treated with the lichen extracts Antimutagen-He (AMH): AMH-C, AMH-D, or AMH-E dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, control) for 2 weeks. At the end of the treatment, mice were given a single AOM injection to induce DNA damage and killed 6 h later for measuring apoptosis and proliferation. Apoptotic and proliferation indexes in mice treated with AMH-C, AMH-D, and AMH-E were 0.61%, 1.41%, and 0.77%; and 30.62%, 21.93%, and 27.27%, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of control mice (5.88% and 38.69%) (p lichen extracts on colorectal cancer, separate groups of mice (n = 25 per group) treated with AMH-C, AMH-D, AMH-E, or DMSO were given 4-weekly AOM injections to induce oncogenesis. Mice were killed 24 weeks after the last AOM injection for assessing colon tumor formation. Colonic tumor incidences were 47.3%, 13%, and 20%; the tumor volumes were 18.47, 2.75, and 10.78 mm(3), respectively, in mice treated with AMH-C (p 0.05), compared to 24% and 13.28 mm(3) in mice of control correspondingly. No lichen extract showed evident toxic effects on mice. No usnic acid was found in these lichen extracts. The regulation of acute apoptosis and cell proliferation in colonic epithelial cells and the anti-mutagenesis do not seem directly related to the cancer protective effect.

  14. Antioxidants in liver health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sael; Casas-Grajales; Pablo; Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases are a worldwide medical problem because the liver is the principal detoxifying organ and maintains metabolic homeostasis. The liver metabolizes various compounds that produce free radicals(FR).However, antioxidants scavenge FR and maintain the oxidative/antioxidative balance in the liver. When the liver oxidative/antioxidative balance is disrupted, the state is termed oxidative stress. Oxidative stress leadsto deleterious processes in the liver and produces liver diseases. Therefore, restoring antioxidants is essential to maintain homeostasis. One method of restoring antioxidants is to consume natural compounds with antioxidant capacity. The objective of this review is to provide information pertaining to various antioxidants found in food that have demonstrated utility in improving liver diseases.

  15. Diabetic nephropathy and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavafi, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has crucial role in pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Despite satisfactory results from antioxidant therapy in rodent, antioxidant therapy showed conflicting results in combat with DN in diabetic patients. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar,Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Treatment of DN in human are insufficient with rennin angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, so additional agent ought to combine with this management. Meanwhile based on DN pathogenesis and evidences in experimental and human researches, the antioxidants are the best candidate. New multi-property antioxidants may be improved human DN that show high power antioxidant capacity, long half-life time, high permeability to mitochondrion, improve body antioxidants enzymes activity and anti-inflammatory effects. Based on this review and our studies on diabetic rats, rosmarinic acid a multi-property antioxidant may be useful in DN patients, but of course, needs to be proven in clinical trials studies.

  16. An antioxidant resveratrol significantly enhanced replication of hepatitis C virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsuyasu; Nakamura; Masanori; Ikeda; Ryota; Hokari; Nobuyuki; Kato; Toshifumi; Hibi; Soichiro; Miura

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To elucidate the effect of antioxidants,resveratrol (RVT)and astaxanthin(AXN),on hepatitis C virus(HCV) replication. METHODS:We investigated the effect of recent popular antioxidant supplements on replication of the HCV replicon system OR6.RVT is a strong antioxidant and a kind of polyphenol that inhibits replication of various viruses.AXN is also a strong antioxidant.The replication of HCV RNA was assessed by the luciferase reporter assay.An additive effect of antioxidants on antiviral effects of inter...

  17. Antioxidant activity of the medicinal plant Enicostemma littorale Blume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Abirami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are the source for wide variety of natural antioxidants. In the study reported here, we have conducted a comparative study between the different parts of the plant Enicostemma littorale. The amount of total phenols and antioxidant enzymes Glutathione-S-Transferase, Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase and Peroxidase activities were evaluated and also the non-enzymatic antioxidants ascorbic acid, α- tocopherol and Glutathione activities were evaluated. The results showed that the antioxidant activities varied greatly among the different plant parts used in this study and some parts are rich in natural antioxidants especially the flowers of E. littorale. These results suggest that Enicostemma littorale have strong antioxidant potential. Further study is necessary for isolation and characterization of antioxidant agents, which can be used to treat various oxidative stress-related diseases.

  18. ANTIOXIDANT MUSHROOMS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Preeti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant properties of wild mushrooms have been extensively studied and many antioxidant compounds such as phenolic compounds, tocopherols, ascorbic acid, and carotenoids identified. The various antioxidant mechanisms of the mushroom species extracts may be attributed to strong hydrogen-donating ability, metal-chelating ability, and their effectiveness as good scavengers of superoxide and free radicals. This indicates the potential of mushrooms as panacea for many diseases and also reveals a novel potential to fight against tumors in man.

  19. Antioxidants of Edible Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Kozarski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by an imbalanced metabolism and an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS lead to a range of health disorders in humans. Our endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms and our dietary intake of antioxidants potentially regulate our oxidative homeostasis. Numerous synthetic antioxidants can effectively improve defense mechanisms, but because of their adverse toxic effects under certain conditions, preference is given to natural compounds. Consequently, the requirements for natural, alternative sources of antioxidant foods identified in edible mushrooms, as well as the mechanistic action involved in their antioxidant properties, have increased rapidly. Chemical composition and antioxidant potential of mushrooms have been intensively studied. Edible mushrooms might be used directly in enhancement of antioxidant defenses through dietary supplementation to reduce the level of oxidative stress. Wild or cultivated, they have been related to significant antioxidant properties due to their bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols, polysaccharides, vitamins, carotenoids and minerals. Antioxidant and health benefits, observed in edible mushrooms, seem an additional reason for their traditional use as a popular delicacy food. This review discusses the consumption of edible mushrooms as a powerful instrument in maintaining health, longevity and life quality.

  20. Antioxidants of Edible Mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarski, Maja; Klaus, Anita; Jakovljevic, Dragica; Todorovic, Nina; Vunduk, Jovana; Petrović, Predrag; Niksic, Miomir; Vrvic, Miroslav M; van Griensven, Leo

    2015-10-27

    Oxidative stress caused by an imbalanced metabolism and an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) lead to a range of health disorders in humans. Our endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms and our dietary intake of antioxidants potentially regulate our oxidative homeostasis. Numerous synthetic antioxidants can effectively improve defense mechanisms, but because of their adverse toxic effects under certain conditions, preference is given to natural compounds. Consequently, the requirements for natural, alternative sources of antioxidant foods identified in edible mushrooms, as well as the mechanistic action involved in their antioxidant properties, have increased rapidly. Chemical composition and antioxidant potential of mushrooms have been intensively studied. Edible mushrooms might be used directly in enhancement of antioxidant defenses through dietary supplementation to reduce the level of oxidative stress. Wild or cultivated, they have been related to significant antioxidant properties due to their bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols, polysaccharides, vitamins, carotenoids and minerals. Antioxidant and health benefits, observed in edible mushrooms, seem an additional reason for their traditional use as a popular delicacy food. This review discusses the consumption of edible mushrooms as a powerful instrument in maintaining health, longevity and life quality.

  1. A review of antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Birangane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants play the essential role in reducing the free radicals. Free radicals can cause various changes in human body from DNA mutation to cell death. Free radical formation form the biological basis of several medical problems including cancer. The antioxidants are useful in preventing the transfer of premalignant lesion to malignancy- Hence are usually prescribed in oral premalignant lesions like leukoplakia, lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis. Antioxidants include beta carotene, carotenoid, vitamin C, vitamin E, trace elements like zinc and selenium. Functions of these antioxidants are discussed here.

  2. Study on the antioxidant activity and membrane interaction of a multiple antioxidant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jodko-Jodko-Piórecka, Kasia; Klösgen, Beate; Litwinienko, Grzegorz

    Catecholamines, including dopamine, have a role in the transduction of nervous stimuli. Apart from that, they might behave as endogenous phenolic antioxidants protecting the neuronal tissue from deleterious effects of oxidative stress. Results from our preliminary study1 even indicate a synergistic...... effect: an interplay of catecholamines with other molecules seems to enhance their antioxidant activity (e.g. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine - L-DOPA -, and 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-hydroxychroman - PMHC -, an analogue of α-tocopherol). Addition of small amounts of catecholamines suppresses or largely...... inhibits the peroxidation of lipids2. The understanding of the mechanism of antioxidant action of catecholamines and their interplay with other antioxidants in lipid membranes requires interdisciplinary research on the kinetics and thermodynamics of antioxidant(s)/membrane interactions. Here we report...

  3. Thai Fruits Exhibit Antioxidant Activity and Induction of Antioxidant Enzymes in HEK-293 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthinee Anantachoke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cellular antioxidant enzymes play the important role of protecting the cells and organisms from the oxidative damage. Natural antioxidants contained in fruits have attracted considerable interest because of their presumed safety and potential nutritional value. Even though antioxidant activities of many fruits have been reported, the effects of phytochemicals contained in fruits on the induction of antioxidant enzymes in the cells have not been fully defined. In this study, we showed that extracts from Antidesma ghaesembilla, Averrhoa bilimbi, Malpighia glabra, Mangifera indica, Sandoricum koetjape, Syzygium malaccense, and Ziziphus jujuba inhibited H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in HEK-293 cells. Additionally, these Thai fruit extracts increased the mRNA and protein expressions of antioxidant enzymes, catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, and manganese superoxide dismutase. The consumption of Thai fruits rich in phenolic compounds may reduce the risk of oxidative stress.

  4. Thai Fruits Exhibit Antioxidant Activity and Induction of Antioxidant Enzymes in HEK-293 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantachoke, Natthinee; Lomarat, Pattamapan; Praserttirachai, Wasin; Khammanit, Ruksinee

    2016-01-01

    The cellular antioxidant enzymes play the important role of protecting the cells and organisms from the oxidative damage. Natural antioxidants contained in fruits have attracted considerable interest because of their presumed safety and potential nutritional value. Even though antioxidant activities of many fruits have been reported, the effects of phytochemicals contained in fruits on the induction of antioxidant enzymes in the cells have not been fully defined. In this study, we showed that extracts from Antidesma ghaesembilla, Averrhoa bilimbi, Malpighia glabra, Mangifera indica, Sandoricum koetjape, Syzygium malaccense, and Ziziphus jujuba inhibited H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in HEK-293 cells. Additionally, these Thai fruit extracts increased the mRNA and protein expressions of antioxidant enzymes, catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, and manganese superoxide dismutase. The consumption of Thai fruits rich in phenolic compounds may reduce the risk of oxidative stress. PMID:28074103

  5. Antioxidant Vitamins and Trace Elements in Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekkoek, W A C Kristine; van Zanten, Arthur R H

    2016-08-01

    This comprehensive narrative review summarizes relevant antioxidant mechanisms, the antioxidant status, and effects of supplementation in critically ill patients for the most studied antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E and the enzyme cofactor trace elements selenium and zinc. Over the past 15 years, oxidative stress-mediated cell damage has been recognized to be fundamental to the pathophysiology of various critical illnesses such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and multiorgan dysfunction in sepsis. Related to these conditions, low plasma levels of antioxidant enzymes, vitamins, and trace elements have been frequently reported, and thus supplementation seems logical. However, low antioxidant plasma levels per se may not indicate low total body stores as critical illness may induce redistribution of antioxidants. Furthermore, low antioxidant levels may even be beneficial as pro-oxidants are essential in bacterial killing. The reviewed studies in critically ill patients show conflicting results. This may be due to different patient populations, study designs, timing, dosing regimens, and duration of the intervention and outcome measures evaluated. Therefore, at present, it remains unclear whether supplementation of antioxidant micronutrients has any clinical benefit in critically ill patients as some studies show clear benefits, whereas others demonstrate neutral outcomes and even harm. Combination therapy of antioxidants seems logical as they work in synergy and function as elements of the human antioxidant network. Further research should focus on defining the normal antioxidant status for critically ill patients and to study optimal supplement combinations either by nutrition enrichment or by enteral or parenteral pharmacological interventions.

  6. Structural elucidation and cellular antioxidant activity evaluation of major antioxidant phenolics in lychee pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongxiao; Ti, Huihui; Zhang, Ruifen; Zhang, Mingwei; Wei, Zhengchen; Deng, Yuanyuan; Guo, Jinxin

    2014-09-01

    Lychee pulp contains phenolic compounds that are strong antioxidants, but the identities of the major antioxidants present are unknown. In the present study, the major contributors to the antioxidant activity of fresh lychee pulp were identified and their cellular antioxidant activities were investigated. Aqueous acetone extracts of lychee pulp were fractionated on polyamide resin, and those fractions with the largest antioxidant and radical scavenging activities were selected using cellular antioxidant activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity assays. Three compounds that were major contributors to the antioxidant activity in these fractions were obtained by reverse-phase preparative HPLC and identified as quercetin 3-O-rutinoside-7-O-α-L-rhamnosidase (quercetin 3-rut-7-rha), quercetin 3-O-rutinoside (rutin) and (-)-epicatechin using NMR spectroscopy, HMBC, and ESI-MS spectrometry. The concentration of quercetin 3-rut-7-rha was 17.25mg per 100g of lychee pulp fresh weight. This is the first report of the identification and cellular antioxidant activity of quercetin 3-rut-7-rha from lychee pulp.

  7. Antioxidants of edible mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozarski, Maja; Klaus, Anita; Jakovljevic, Dragica; Todorovic, Nina; Vunduk, Jovana; Petrović, Predrag; Niksic, Miomir; Vrvic, Miroslav M.; Griensven, Van Leo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by an imbalanced metabolism and an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) lead to a range of health disorders in humans. Our endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms and our dietary intake of antioxidants potentially regulate our oxidative homeostasis. Numerous synthetic

  8. Antioxidants of edible mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozarski, Maja; Klaus, Anita; Jakovljevic, Dragica; Todorovic, Nina; Vunduk, Jovana; Petrović, Predrag; Niksic, Miomir; Vrvic, Miroslav M.; Griensven, Van Leo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by an imbalanced metabolism and an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) lead to a range of health disorders in humans. Our endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms and our dietary intake of antioxidants potentially regulate our oxidative homeostasis. Numerous synthetic

  9. Antioxidants: real medicines?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    that the antioxidants should have a salu- tary role to play in ... medicines? Antioxidants are widely recommended despite ... our dietary intake of an abundant supply of ... Table I. Examples of clinical disorders evoked by oxidative ... ly recognised, what is much less well known ..... and low in salt and saturated and trans-fatty ...

  10. Evolution of dietary antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, Iris F F

    2003-09-01

    Oxygen is vital for most organisms but, paradoxically, damages key biological sites. Oxygenic threat is met by antioxidants that evolved in parallel with our oxygenic atmosphere. Plants employ antioxidants to defend their structures against reactive oxygen species (ROS; oxidants) produced during photosynthesis. The human body is exposed to these same oxidants, and we have also evolved an effective antioxidant system. However, this is not infallible. ROS breach defences, oxidative damage ensues, accumulates with age, and causes a variety of pathological changes. Plant-based, antioxidant-rich foods traditionally formed the major part of the human diet, and plant-based dietary antioxidants are hypothesized to have an important role in maintaining human health. This hypothesis is logical in evolutionary terms, especially when we consider the relatively hypoxic environment in which humans may have evolved. In this paper, the human diet is discussed briefly in terms of its evolutionary development, different strategies of antioxidant defence are outlined, and evolution of dietary antioxidants is discussed from the perspectives of plant need and our current dietary requirements. Finally, possibilities in regard to dietary antioxidants, evolution, and human health are presented, and an evolutionary cost-benefit analysis is presented in relation to why we lost the ability to make ascorbic acid (vitamin C) although we retained an absolute requirement for it.

  11. Evaluation of Toxic, Cytotoxic, Mutagenic, and Antimutagenic Activities of Natural and Technical Cashew Nut Shell Liquids Using the Allium cepa and Artemia salina Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aracelli de Sousa Leite

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cashew nut releases a substance that is known as cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL. There are both natural (iCNSL and technical (tCNSL cashew nut shell liquids. This study used an Artemia salina bioassay to evaluate the toxic effects of iCNSL and tCNSL cashew nut shell liquids. It also evaluated the toxicity, cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity of CNSL and its effects on the damage induced by copper sulfate (CuSO4·5H2O on the meristems’ root of Allium cepa. Effects of the damage induced by CuSO4·5H2O were evaluated before (pre-, during (co-, and after (post- treatments. The iCNSL contained 94.5% anacardic acid, and the tCNSL contained 91.3% cardanol. The liquids were toxic to A. salina. Toxicity, cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity were observed with iCNSL compared with the negative control. Similarly, iCNSL failed to inhibit the toxicity and cytotoxicity of CuSO4·5H2O. The tCNSL was not toxic, cytotoxic, or mutagenic in any of the concentrations. However, the lowest iCNSL concentrations and all of the tCNSL concentrations had preventive, antimutagenic, and reparative effects on micronuclei and on chromosomal aberrations in the A. cepa. Therefore, protective, modulating, and reparative effects may be observed in the A. cepa, depending on the concentration and type of CNSL used.

  12. Evaluation of toxic, cytotoxic, mutagenic, and antimutagenic activities of natural and technical cashew nut shell liquids using the Allium cepa and Artemia salina bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Aracelli de Sousa; Dantas, Alisson Ferreira; Oliveira, George Laylson da Silva; Gomes Júnior, Antonio L; de Lima, Sidney Gonçalo; Citó, Antônia Maria das Graças Lopes; de Freitas, Rivelilson M; Melo-Cavalcante, Ana Amélia de C; Dantas Lopes, José Arimateia

    2015-01-01

    The cashew nut releases a substance that is known as cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL). There are both natural (iCNSL) and technical (tCNSL) cashew nut shell liquids. This study used an Artemia salina bioassay to evaluate the toxic effects of iCNSL and tCNSL cashew nut shell liquids. It also evaluated the toxicity, cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity of CNSL and its effects on the damage induced by copper sulfate (CuSO4·5H2O) on the meristems' root of Allium cepa. Effects of the damage induced by CuSO4·5H2O were evaluated before (pre-), during (co-), and after (post-) treatments. The iCNSL contained 94.5% anacardic acid, and the tCNSL contained 91.3% cardanol. The liquids were toxic to A. salina. Toxicity, cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity were observed with iCNSL compared with the negative control. Similarly, iCNSL failed to inhibit the toxicity and cytotoxicity of CuSO4·5H2O. The tCNSL was not toxic, cytotoxic, or mutagenic in any of the concentrations. However, the lowest iCNSL concentrations and all of the tCNSL concentrations had preventive, antimutagenic, and reparative effects on micronuclei and on chromosomal aberrations in the A. cepa. Therefore, protective, modulating, and reparative effects may be observed in the A. cepa, depending on the concentration and type of CNSL used.

  13. In vitro and in vivo antimutagenic effects of DIG, a herbal preparation of Berberis vulgaris, Taraxacum officinale and Arctium lappa, against mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giorgio, C; Boyer, L; De Meo, M; Laurant, C; Elias, R; Ollivier, E

    2015-07-01

    DIG, a liquid herbal preparation made from a mixture of diluted mother tinctures of Berberis vulgaris, Taraxacum officinale and Arctium lappa, was assessed for its antimutagenic properties against mitomycin C. The micronucleus assay on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells was used to evaluate the in vitro anticlastogenic activity of DIG compared to those of separately diluted mother tinctures. The micronucleus assay was performed on mouse erythrocytes and the comet assay was performed on mouse liver, kidney, lung, brain and testicles to assess the protective effects of DIG (0.2 and 2 % at libitum) against an intraperitoneal injection of mitomycin C (1 mg Kg(-1)) in mice. DIG exerted a powerful anticlastogenic activity, under both pretreatment and simultaneous treatment conditions as assessed by the micronucleus assay in CHO-K1 cells. Its protective activity was greater than that observed for each mother tincture. DIG reduced micronuclei levels in mouse erythrocytes and suppressed >80 % of DNA strand breaks in the liver, kidney, lung, brain and testicles of mice exposed to mitomycin C.

  14. Honey: A Novel Antioxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd S. Ab Wahab

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atherosclerosis, cancer and Alzheimer's disease is on the rise. These diseases, which constitute the major causes of death globally, are associated with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is defined as an “imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favor of the oxidants, potentially leading to damage”. Individuals with chronic diseases are more susceptible to oxidative stress and damage because they have elevated levels of oxidants and/or reduced antioxidants. This, therefore, necessitates supplementation with antioxidants so as to delay, prevent or remove oxidative damage. Honey is a natural substance with many medicinal effects such as antibacterial, hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic, reproductive, antihypertensive and antioxidant effects. This review presents findings that indicate honey may ameliorate oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, liver, pancreas, kidney, reproductive organs and plasma/serum. Besides, the review highlights data that demonstrate the synergistic antioxidant effect of honey and antidiabetic drugs in the pancreas, kidney and serum of diabetic rats. These data suggest that honey, administered alone or in combination with conventional therapy, might be a novel antioxidant in the management of chronic diseases commonly associated with oxidative stress. In view of the fact that the majority of these data emanate from animal studies, there is an urgent need to investigate this antioxidant effect of honey in human subjects with chronic or degenerative diseases.

  15. Antioxidants in food: mere myth or magic medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R G; Lunkenbein, S; Ströhle, A; Hahn, A

    2012-01-01

    The powerful action of antioxidants in preventing premature lipid oxidation in food suggests that the same compounds, when consumed with the daily diet, could unfold antioxidative/anti-aging effects in the human body. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that antioxidants are helpful in preventing various diseases. More detailed chemical and physiological examination of antioxidants shows, however, that the extrapolation of in vitro data to in vivo behavior may be misleading. Indeed, such a procedure fails to take into account the mismatch between most in vitro models (e.g., cell cultures) and in vivo systems. For example, the physiological relevance of pro-oxidative and other physiological activities of antioxidants have been largely underestimated. Actually, contrary to the antioxidant hypothesis, clinical trials testing the health benefits of dietary antioxidants have reported rather mixed or negative results. Many clinical studies have not taken into account the nutrikinetic and nutridynamic nature of antioxidants. Further, oxidative stress is not only an inevitable event in a healthy human cell, but responsible for the functioning of vital metabolic processes, such as insulin signaling and erythropoietin production. In the light of recent physiological studies it appears more advisable to maintain the delicate redox balance of the cell than to interfere with the antioxidant homeostasis by a non-physiological, excessive exogenous supply of antioxidants in healthy humans.

  16. IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF SAUROPUS BACCIFORMIS BLUME (EUPHORBIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arockia Jenecius Alphonse

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant activity of methanol extract of different parts of Sauropus bacciformis Blume. Among the investigated plant parts, highest amount of total phenolics and flavonoids were reported in the stem. The in vitro antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH radical scavenging activity, hydroxyl scavenging activity, superoxide scavenging activity and ABTS radical cation scavenging activity with reference standard ascorbic acid and trolox. The methanol extract showed highest in vitro antioxidant activities. These in vitro assays indicate that this plant extracts is a significant source of natural antioxidant, which might be helpful in preventing the progress of various oxidative stresses.

  17. Antioxidant properties of fungal metabolite nigerloxin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresha, B S; Srinivasan, K

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the beneficial influence of the fungal metabolite nigerloxin, a new aldose reductase inhibitor and a lipoxygenase inhibitor on oxidative stress in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. In the present study we have investigated the antioxidant potential of nigerloxin in vitro as compared to one of the well known natural antioxidant, curcumin. The fungal metabolite nigerloxin was found to be an effective antioxidant in different in vitro assays including the phosphomolybdenum, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH.),2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS.+) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods. The antioxidant potency of nigerloxin may be attributed to its electron donating nature. The ferric reducing potency of nigerloxin as demonstrated by FRAP assay method was even found to be superior to that of the natural antioxidant curcumin.

  18. Solvent effects on the antioxidant capacity of lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants measured by CUPRAC, ABTS/persulphate and FRAP methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Saliha Esin; Ozyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2010-06-15

    Antioxidants are health beneficial compounds that can protect cells and macromolecules (e.g., fats, lipids, proteins, and DNA) from the damage of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Solvent effect is a crucial parameter on the chemical behaviour of antioxidant compounds but there has been limited information regarding its role on antioxidant capacity and its assays. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of some certain lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants, measured in different solvent media such as ethanol (EtOH) (100%), methanol (MeOH) (100%), methanol/water (4:1, v/v), methanol/water (1:1, v/v), dichloromethane (DCM)/EtOH (9:1, v/v). The cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) values of selected antioxidants were experimentally reported in this work as trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and compared to those found by reference TAC assays, i.e., 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)/persulphate (ABTS/persulphate) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods. The TAC values of synthetic mixtures of antioxidants were experimentally measured as trolox equivalents and compared to those theoretically found by making use of the principle of additivity of absorbances assuming no chemical interaction between the mixture constituents. Possible synergistic (e.g., BHT and BHA in DCM/EtOH) or antagonistic behaviours of these synthetic mixtures were investigated in relation to solvent selection.

  19. Volemic Resuscitation in a Patient with Multiple Traumas and Haemorrhagic Shock. Anti-oxidative Therapy Management in Critical Patients. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedreag Ovidiu Horea

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient with multiple traumas is usually found in severe haemorrhagic shock. In 40% of the cases, the patient with multiple traumas and haemorrhagic shock cannot recover due to secondary injuries and complications associated with the shock. In this paper we present the case of a male patient 30 years old, who suffered a car accident. The patient is admitted in our hospital with haemorrhagic shock due to femur fracture, acute cranial-cerebral trauma and severe thoracic trauma with bleeding scalp wound, associated with lethal triad of trauma. The clinical and biological parameters demand massive transfusion with packed red blood cells (PRBCs, fresh frozen plasma (FFP, cryoprecipitate (CRY and colloidal solution (CO sustained with vassopresor for the haemodynamic stabilisation. During his stay in the ICU, the patient benefits from anti-oxidative therapy with Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Vitamin B1. After 14 days the clinical state of the patient improves and he is transferred in Polytrauma Department.

  20. Antioxidative properties of flavonoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowedes, T.C.F.; Luttikhold, J.; Stijn, van M.F.M.; Visser, M.; Norren, van K.; Vermeulen, M.A.R.; Leeuwen, P.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence accumulates that a family of plant compounds, known as flavonoids, can prevent or slow down the progression of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Flavonoids are considered beneficial, this is often attributed to their powerful antioxidant propertie

  1. Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention On This Page What are free radicals, and ... nine trials are summarized below. Linxian General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial : This trial was the first large- ...

  2. Atmospheric oxidation and antioxidants

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    1993-01-01

    Volume I reviews current understanding of autoxidation, largely on the basis of the reactions of oxygen with characterised chemicals. From this flows the modern mechanism of antioxidant actions and their application in stabilisation technology.

  3. Plasma antioxidants from chocolate

    OpenAIRE

    Serafini, M; Bugianesi, R.; Maiani, G.; Valtuena, S.; De Santis, S.; Crozier, A.

    2003-01-01

    There is some speculation that dietary flavonoids from chocolate, in particular (-)epicatechin, may promote cardiovascular health as a result of direct antioxidant effects or through antithrombotic mechanisms. Here we show that consumption of plain, dark chocolate results in an increase in both the total antioxidant capacity and the (-)epicatechin content of blood plasma, but that these effects are markedly reduced when the chocolate is consumed with milk or if milk is incorporated as milk ch...

  4. Antioxidant supplements and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage to cells and tissues is considered involved in the aging process and in the development of chronic diseases in humans, including cancer and cardiovascular diseases, the leading causes of death in high-income countries. This has stimulated interest in the preventive potential of a...... of antioxidant supplements. Today, more than one half of adults in high-income countries ingest antioxidant supplements hoping to improve their health, oppose unhealthy behaviors, and counteract the ravages of aging....

  5. Antioxidants in Translational Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Harald H H W; Stocker, Roland; Vollbracht, Claudia; Paulsen, Gøran; Riley, Dennis; Daiber, Andreas; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2015-11-10

    It is generally accepted that reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging molecules or antioxidants exert health-promoting effects and thus their consumption as food additives and nutraceuticals has been greatly encouraged. Antioxidants may be beneficial in situations of subclinical deficiency and increased demand or acutely upon high-dose infusion. However, to date, there is little clinical evidence for the long-term benefit of most antioxidants. Alarmingly, recent evidence points even to health risks, in particular for supplements of lipophilic antioxidants. The biological impact of ROS depends not only on their quantities but also on their chemical nature, (sub)cellular and tissue location, and the rates of their formation and degradation. Moreover, ROS serve important physiological functions; thus, inappropriate removal of ROS may cause paradoxical reductive stress and thereby induce or promote disease. Any recommendation on antioxidants must be based on solid clinical evidence and patient-relevant outcomes rather than surrogate parameters. Such evidence-based use may include site-directed application, time-limited high dosing, (functional) pharmacological repair of oxidized biomolecules, and triggers of endogenous antioxidant response systems. Ideally, these approaches need guidance by patient stratification through predictive biomarkers and possibly imaging modalities.

  6. Simple and Rapid Method for the Determination of Uric Acid-Independent Antioxidant Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Determination of the relative contribution of uric acid level increases to the total measured antioxidative activity could be very useful for testing antioxidative products and their effect on human health. The aim of this report is to present a simple spectrophotometric method that combines the measurement of total antioxidative capacity of a sample by ferric reducing/antioxidative power (FRAP) assay, with the uricase-reaction (specific elimination of uric acid), in order to establish and co...

  7. Food Processing Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, F J; Zamora, R

    Food processing has been carried out since ancient times as a way to preserve and improve food nutritional and organoleptic properties. Although it has some undesirable consequences, such as the losses of some nutrients and the potential formation of toxic compounds, a wide range of benefits can be enumerated. Among them, the increased total antioxidant capacity of many processed foods has been known for long. This consequence has been related to both the release or increased availability of natural antioxidants and the de novo formation of substances with antioxidant properties as a consequence of the produced reactions. This review analyzes the chemical changes produced in foods during processing with special emphasis on the formation of antioxidants as a consequence of carbonyl-amine reactions produced by both carbohydrate- and lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. It discusses the lastest advances produced in the characterization of carbonyl-amine adducts and their potential action as primary (free radical scavengers), secondary (chelating and other ways to prevent lipid oxidation), and tertiary (carbonyl scavengers as a way to avoid lipid oxidation consequences) antioxidants. Moreover, the possibility of combining amino compounds with different hydrophobicity, such as aminophospholipids and proteins, with a wide array of reactive carbonyls points out to the use of carbonyl-amine reactions as a new way to induce the formation of a great variety of substances with antioxidant properties and very variable hydrophilia/lipophilia. All presented results point out to carbonyl-amine reactions as an effective method to generate efficacious antioxidants that can be used in food technology. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Obtaining of the antioxidants by supercritical fluid extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babović Nada V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the important trends in the food industry today is demand for natural antioxidants from plant material. Synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA are now being replaced by the natural antioxidants because of theirs possible toxicity and as they may act as promoters of carcinogens. The natural antioxidants may show equivalent or higher antioxidant activity than the endogenous or the synthetic antioxidants. Thus, great effort is being devoted to the search for alternative and cheap sources of natural antioxidants, as well as to the development of efficient and selective extraction techniques. The supercritical fluid extraction (SFE with carbon dioxide is considered to be the most suitable method for producing natural antioxidants for the use in food industry. The supercritical extract does not contain residual organic solvents as in conventional extraction processes, which makes these products suitable for use in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry. The recovery of antioxidants from plant sources involves many problematic aspects: choice of an adequate source (in terms of availability, cost, difference in phenolic content with variety and season; selection of the optimal recovery procedure (in terms of yield, simplicity, industrial application, cost; chemical analysis of extracts (for optimization purposes a fast colorimetric method is more preferable than a chromatographic one; evaluation of the antioxidant power (preferably by the different assay methods. The paper presents information about different operational methods for SFE of bioactive compounds from natural sources. It also includes the various reports on the antioxidant activity of the supercritical extracts from Lamiaceae herbs, in comparison with the activity of the synthetic antioxidants and the extracts from Lamiaceae herbs obtained by the conventional methods.

  9. First report of a thioredoxin homologue in jellyfish: molecular cloning, expression and antioxidant activity of CcTrx1 from Cyanea capillata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Ruan

    Full Text Available Thioredoxins (Trx proteins are a family of small, highly-conserved and ubiquitous proteins that play significant roles in the resistance of oxidative damage. In this study, a homologue of Trx was identified from the cDNA library of tentacle of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and named CcTrx1. The full-length cDNA of CcTrx1 was 479 bp with a 312 bp open reading frame encoding 104 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the putative CcTrx1 protein harbored the evolutionarily-conserved Trx active site 31CGPC34 and shared a high similarity with Trx1 proteins from other organisms analyzed, indicating that CcTrx1 is a new member of Trx1 sub-family. CcTrx1 mRNA was found to be constitutively expressed in tentacle, umbrella, oral arm and gonad, indicating a general role of CcTrx1 protein in various physiological processes. The recombinant CcTrx1 (rCcTrx1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3, and then purified by affinity chromatography. The rCcTrx1 protein was demonstrated to possess the expected redox activity in enzymatic analysis and protection against oxidative damage of supercoiled DNA. These results indicate that CcTrx1 may function as an important antioxidant in C. capillata. To our knowledge, this is the first Trx protein characterized from jellyfish species.

  10. First report of a thioredoxin homologue in jellyfish: molecular cloning, expression and antioxidant activity of CcTrx1 from Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zengliang; Liu, Guoyan; Guo, Yufeng; Zhou, Yonghong; Wang, Qianqian; Chang, Yinlong; Wang, Beilei; Zheng, Jiemin; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trx proteins) are a family of small, highly-conserved and ubiquitous proteins that play significant roles in the resistance of oxidative damage. In this study, a homologue of Trx was identified from the cDNA library of tentacle of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and named CcTrx1. The full-length cDNA of CcTrx1 was 479 bp with a 312 bp open reading frame encoding 104 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the putative CcTrx1 protein harbored the evolutionarily-conserved Trx active site 31CGPC34 and shared a high similarity with Trx1 proteins from other organisms analyzed, indicating that CcTrx1 is a new member of Trx1 sub-family. CcTrx1 mRNA was found to be constitutively expressed in tentacle, umbrella, oral arm and gonad, indicating a general role of CcTrx1 protein in various physiological processes. The recombinant CcTrx1 (rCcTrx1) protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then purified by affinity chromatography. The rCcTrx1 protein was demonstrated to possess the expected redox activity in enzymatic analysis and protection against oxidative damage of supercoiled DNA. These results indicate that CcTrx1 may function as an important antioxidant in C. capillata. To our knowledge, this is the first Trx protein characterized from jellyfish species.

  11. Skin and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljsak, Borut; Dahmane, Raja; Godic, Aleksandar

    2013-04-01

    It is estimated that total sun exposure occurs non-intentionally in three quarters of our lifetimes. Our skin is exposed to majority of UV radiation during outdoor activities, e.g. walking, practicing sports, running, hiking, etc. and not when we are intentionally exposed to the sun on the beach. We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc.). UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. At this point it would be reasonable to ingest additional antioxidants and/or to apply them on the skin in topical preparations. We review endogenous and exogenous skin protection with antioxidants.

  12. Simultaneous total antioxidant capacity assay of lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants in the same acetone-water solution containing 2% methyl-beta-cyclodextrin using the cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyürek, Mustafa; Bektaşoğlu, Burcu; Güçlü, Kubilay; Güngör, Nilay; Apak, Reşat

    2008-12-07

    Antioxidants are health beneficial compounds that can protect cells from the damage caused by unstable molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This work reports the capacity assay of both lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants simultaneously, by making use of their 'host-guest' complexes with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (M-beta-CD), a cyclic oligosaccharide, in acetonated aqueous medium using the cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) method. Thus the order of antioxidant potency of various compounds irrespective of their lipophilicity could be established in the same solvent medium. M-beta-CD was introduced as the water solubility enhancer for lipophilic antioxidants. Two percent M-beta-CD (w/v) in an acetone-H(2)O (9:1, v/v) mixture was found to sufficiently solubilize beta-carotene, lycopene, vitamin E, vitamin C, synthetic antioxidants and other phenolic antioxidants. This assay was validated through linearity, additivity, precision, and recovery. The validation results demonstrate that the CUPRAC assay is reliable and robust. In acetonated aqueous solution of M-beta-CD, only CUPRAC and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays were capable of measuring carotenoids together with hydrophilic antioxidants. The CUPRAC antioxidant capacities of a wide range of polyphenolics and flavonoids were experimentally reported in this work as trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) in the CUPRAC assay, and compared to those found by reference methods, ABTS/horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-H(2)O(2) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays.

  13. In vitro antioxidant activity of Vetiveria Zizanioides root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhadradevi, Varadharajan; Asokkumar, Kuppusamy; Umamaheswari, Muthuswamy; Sivashanmugam, Andichettiarthirumalasia; Sankaranand, Rajakannu

    2010-10-01

    Free radicals induce numerous diseases by lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. It has been reported that some of the extracts from plants possess antioxidant properties capable of scavenging free radicals in vivo. Vetiveria zizanioides belonging to the family Gramineae, is a densely tufted grass which is widely used as a traditional plant for aromatherapy, to relieve stress, anxiety, nervous tension and insomnia. In this regard, the roots of V zizanioides was extracted with ethanol and used for the evaluation of various in vitro antioxidant activities such as reducing power ability, superoxide anion radical scavenging activity, deoxyribose degradation assay, total antioxidant capacity, total phenolics and total flavonoid composition. The various antioxidant activities were compared with suitable antioxidants such as butyl hydroxy toluene, ascorbic acid, quercetin, alpha tocopherol, pyrocatechol and curcumin respectively. The generation of free radicals O2, H2O2 OH and N O were effectively scavenged by the ethanolic extract of V zizanioides. In all these methods, the extract showed strong antioxidant activity in a dose dependent manner. The results obtained in the present study clearly indicates that V zizanioides scavenges free radicals, ameliorating damage imposed by oxidative stress in different disease conditions and serve as a potential source of natural antioxidant. The study provides a proof for the ethnomedical claims and reported biological activities. The plant has, therefore, very good therapeutic and antioxidant potential.

  14. In vitro antioxidant activities of Asteraceae Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaylakshmi, S; Nanjan, M J; Suresh, B

    2009-10-01

    Anaphalis neelgerriana DC and Cnicus wallichi DC belonging to the family Asteraceae (Compositae) are important medicinal plants indigenous to Nilgiris. Since the related species Anaphalis morrisonicola and Cnicus benedictus were reported for its anti cancer activities, the above mentioned plants were screened for Invitro antioxidant activity. In vitro antioxidant studies were carried out by DPPH, Nitric oxide and Hydrogen peroxide methods for the aerial part extracts of the plants. Different extracts were obtained from the aerial parts of the whole plant by successive solvent extraction and cold maceration process and subjected for Invitro antioxidant activity studies. Among the extracts tested, the ethyl acetate extract of Anaphalis neelgerriana DC and Cnicus wallchi DC showed significant anti oxidant activity in all the above methods. The potent ethyl acetate extract should be tested for anti oxidant activity in animal models.

  15. Profiling oxidative DNA damage: effects of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Harold C; Patrzyc, Helen B; Budzinski, Edwin E; Dawidzik, Jean B; Freund, Harold G; Zeitouni, Nathalie C; Mahoney, Martin C

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this research was to determine whether antioxidant usage could be correlated with changes in DNA damage levels. Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to simultaneously measure five different oxidatively-induced base modifications in the DNA of WBC. Measurements of the five modifications were made before and after an 8-week trial during which participants took the SU.VI.MAX supplement. Levels of the five DNA modifications were compared among different groupings: users versus non-users of antioxidant supplements, before versus after the supplement intervention and men versus women. The statistical significance of differences between groups was most significant for pyrimidine base modifications and the observed trends reflect trends reported in epidemiological studies of antioxidant usage. A combination of modifications derived from pyrimidine bases is suggested as a superior indicator of oxidative stress.

  16. Antioxidants for pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Jens, Sjoerd; Busch, Olivier R C; Keus, Frederik; van Goor, Harry; Gooszen, Hein G; Boermeester, Marja A

    2014-08-21

    the cross-over trials (RR 5.80, 95% CI 1.56 to 21.53, P value 0.0009, moderate-quality evidence). Adverse events occurred in 16% of participants and were mostly mild (e.g. headache, gastrointestinal complaints), but were sufficient to make participants stop antioxidant use. Other important outcomes such as use of analgesics, exacerbation of pancreatitis and quality of life were rarely reported. One trial from 1991 evaluated the effects of antioxidants on acute pain during exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis and found that a significantly higher proportion of participants in the antioxidant group experienced pain relief. This trial was conducted more than 25 years ago and has not been reproduced since that time. Therefore, additional trials are needed before reliable conclusions can be drawn. Current evidence shows that antioxidants can reduce pain slightly in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The clinical relevance of this small reduction is uncertain, and more evidence is needed. Adverse events in one of six patients may prevent the use of antioxidants. Effects of antioxidants on other outcome measures, such as use of analgesics, exacerbation of pancreatitis and quality of life remain uncertain because reliable data are not available.

  17. Phytochemical analysis, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Euphorbia golondrina L.C. Wheeler (Euphorbiaceae Juss.): an unexplored medicinal herb reported from Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndam, Lawrence Monah; Mih, Afui Mathias; Tening, Aaron Suh; Fongod, Augustina Genla Nwana; Temenu, Nkegua Anna; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the phytochemical constituents of Euphorbia golondrina L.C. Wheeler, an alien invasive medicinal herb that is used for the treatment of gastroenteritis related ailments, diabetes, conjunctivitis, gastritis, enterocolitis, tonsillitis, vaginitis, hemorrhoids, prostatism, warts and painful swellings by the Mundani people of the mount Bambouto Caldera in SouthWestern Cameroon, and to evaluate its in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Susceptibility testing by agar well diffusion assay revealed good antibacterial activity with inhibition zone diameter of 20 ± 1.1 mm against Bacillus cereus followed by Staphylococcus aureus with inhibition zone diameter of 17 ± 1.6 mm which was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the positive control (amoxicillin). None of the fungi was inhibited by the acetone extract of E. golondrina except Candida albicans wherein the zone of inhibition was not significantly different from that of the positive control (Amphotericin B). The ABTS scavenging activity of E. golondrina was higher than that of gallic acid and BHT at concentrations greater than 0.1 and 0.2 mg/mL respectively while at all concentrations, nitric oxide scavenging activity was higher than those of both rutin and vitamin C. GC-MS profile of E. golondrina steam distilled volatiles revealed that the plant has potent phytoconstituent classes such as sesquiterpenes, monoterpenes, alkaloids, phenolics and aromatic hydrocarbons. Among the 30 compounds identified, caryophyllene oxide (14.16 %), camphor (9.41 %) and phytol (5.75 %) were the major compounds. Further structural characterisation based on (1)H and (13)C NMR is required to demonstrate structural integrity including correct stereochemistry. The current study partially justifies the ethnomedicinal uses of E. golondrina in Cameroon.

  18. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies.

  19. Antioxidants and Health: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Antioxidants: In Depth Share: On This Page Introduction Key ... safe care. About Free Radicals, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidants Free radicals are highly unstable molecules that are ...

  20. Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities of Wampee (Clausena lansium (Lour. Skeels Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nagendra Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant activities of wampee peel extracts using five different solvents (ethanol, hexane, ethyl acetate, butanol and water were determined by using in-vitro antioxidant models including total antioxidant capability, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing power, and superoxide scavenging activity. Ethyl acetate fraction (EAF exhibited the highest antioxidant activity compared to other fractions, even higher than synthetic antioxidant butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT. In addition, the EAF exhibited strong anticancer activities against human gastric carcinoma (SGC-7901, human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG-2 and human lung adenocarcinoma (A-549 cancer cell lines, higher than cisplatin, a conventional anticancer drug. The total phenolic content of wampee fraction was positively correlated with the antioxidant activity. This is the first report on the antioxidant and anticancer activities of the wampee peel extract. Thus, wampee peel can be used potentially as a readily accessible source of natural antioxidants and a possible pharmaceutical supplement.

  1. The antioxidant activity and thermal stability of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrahim, Fatima; Estrella, Seyer; Susín, Cristina; Arribas, Silvia M; González, M Carmen; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2011-05-01

    Because of its good sensorial attributes, lemon verbena is used as a primary ingredient in infusions and nonalcoholic drinks. The present study was designed to assess the antioxidant activity (AA) of lemon verbena infusion (LVI) as well as the thermal stability of its AA and the content of polyphenolic compounds. The values reflecting the AA of LVI, including AA index, fast scavenging rate against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging, are higher than those of many herbal infusions and antioxidant drinks estimated from reported data. In addition, the slope lag time and specific oxyradical antioxidant capacity values of LVI are comparable to those of a commercial antioxidant drink based on green tea. Hence, LVI is a source of bifunctional antioxidants, and thus in vivo studies of the antioxidant capacity of LVI would be useful to evaluate its potential as an ingredient in antioxidant drinks.

  2. Antioxidants in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Ira T

    2012-05-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have high levels of oxidative stress throughout the lifespan. Mouse models of DS share some structural and functional abnormalities that parallel findings seen in the human phenotype. Several of the mouse models show evidence of cellular oxidative stress and have provided a platform for antioxidant intervention. Genes that are overexpressed on chromosome 21 are associated with oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis. The lack of balance in the metabolism of free radicals generated during processes related to oxidative stress may have a direct role in producing the neuropathology of DS including the tendency to Alzheimer disease (AD). Mitochondria are often a target for oxidative stress and are considered to be a trigger for the onset of the AD process in DS. Biomarkers for oxidative stress have been described in DS and in AD in the general population. However, intervention trials using standard antioxidant supplements or diets have failed to produce uniform therapeutic effect. This chapter will examine the biological role of oxidative stress in DS and its relationship to abnormalities in both development and aging within the disorder. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antioxidants and Antioxidant Treatment in Disease.

  3. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  4. Neuroprotective antioxidants from marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, A J; Grimaldi, M; Lolic, M; Wink, D; Rosenthal, R; Axelrod, J

    2000-01-01

    Cannabidiol and other cannabinoids were examined as neuroprotectants in rat cortical neuron cultures exposed to toxic levels of the neurotransmitter, glutamate. The psychotropic cannabinoid receptor agonist delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol, (a non-psychoactive constituent of marijuana), both reduced NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptor mediated neurotoxicities. Neuroprotection was not affected by cannabinoid receptor antagonist, indicating a (cannabinoid) receptor-independent mechanism of action. Glutamate toxicity can be reduced by antioxidants. Using cyclic voltametry and a fenton reaction based system, it was demonstrated that Cannabidiol, THC and other cannabinoids are potent antioxidants. As evidence that cannabinoids can act as an antioxidants in neuronal cultures, cannabidiol was demonstrated to reduce hydroperoxide toxicity in neurons. In a head to head trial of the abilities of various antioxidants to prevent glutamate toxicity, cannabidiol was superior to both alpha-tocopherol and ascorbate in protective capacity. Recent preliminary studies in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia suggest that cannabidiol may be at least as effective in vivo as seen in these in vitro studies.

  5. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  6. Antioxidants and coronary artery disease: from pathophysiology to preventive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Jane A

    2015-03-01

    Oxidant stress in the cardiovascular system may occur when antioxidant capacity is insufficient to reduce reactive oxygen species and other free radicals. Oxidant stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and incident coronary artery disease. As a result of this connection, early observational studies focused on dietary antioxidants, such as β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between intake of these antioxidants and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings supported a number of randomized trials on the use of selected antioxidants as primary or secondary prevention strategies to decrease cardiac risk; however, many of these studies reported disappointing results with little or no observed risk reduction in antioxidant-treated patients. Several plausible explanations for these findings have been suggested, including incorrect antioxidant choice or dose, synthetic versus dietary antioxidants as the intervention, and patient selection, all of which will be important to consider when designing future clinical trials. This review will focus on the contemporary evidence that is the basis for our current understanding of the role of antioxidants in cardiovascular disease prevention.

  7. Antioxidants and Coronary Artery Disease: From Pathophysiology to Preventive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidant stress in the cardiovascular system may occur when antioxidant capacity is insufficient to reduce reactive oxygen species and other free radicals. Oxidant stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and incident coronary artery disease. As a result of this connection, early observational studies focused on dietary antioxidants, such as β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between intake of these antioxidants and major adverse cardiovascular events. These findings supported a number of randomized trials of selected antioxidants as primary and secondary prevention to decrease cardiac risk; however, many of these studies reported disappointing results with little or no observed risk reduction in antioxidant treated patients. Several plausible explanations for these findings have been suggested, including incorrect antioxidant choice or dose, synthetic versus dietary antioxidant as the intervention, and patient selection, all of which will be important to consider when designing future clinical trials. This review will focus on the contemporary evidence that is the basis for our current understanding of the role of antioxidants in cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:25369999

  8. Anti-oxidative effect of turmeric on frying characteristics of soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anindita; Ghosh, Santinath; Ghosh, Mahua

    2015-03-01

    Curcumin, the active principle of turmeric, is known to act as an anti-oxidant, anti-mutagen and anti-carcinogen. This study aimed to find out the thermal and oxidative stability of soybean oil when potatoes marinated with turmeric were deep fried in the oil. Two sets of experiment were carried out. In one set, 1 L of oil was heated for 24 h (8 h daily for 3 consecutive days) and 200 g of potato chips without any marination were fried each time twice daily. Foods were fried in batches to replicate the commercial practice of the food industries. The temperature maintained during the whole experiment was at 180-190 °C i.e. at the frying temperature. About 50 ml of the oil sample was collected after every 4 h. In the second set, another 1 L of soybean oil was heated for 24 h in the similar manner and potato chips marinated with turmeric was fried twice daily. Oil samples were collected as before and comparative studies were done. The chemical parameters like acid value, peroxide value, content of 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (HNE) and fatty acid composition for all the oil samples of each set were determined. The comparative studies on peroxide value and content of HNE revealed that the antioxidant property of curcumin in turmeric helped in reducing the oxidation of the oil initially, but with increase in duration of time, the antioxidant potency got gradually reduced. The loss of unsaturated fatty acids were calculated from the fatty acid composition and it was found that loss of unsaturation in soybean oil where turmeric marinated potatoes were fried was 6.37 % while the controlled one showed 7.76 % loss after 24 h of heating. These results indicated higher thermal and oxidative stability of the soybean oil in presence of turmeric. However, the antioxidant effect gradually decreased with increase in duration of heating.

  9. 蛹虫草子实体多糖抗突变作用%Study on the anti-mutagenic effect of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭丽新; 冯哲; 魏博洋; 齐彦; 王世龙; 赵敏

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides(CMPS)on micronucleus formation rate of polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE)of bone marrow cells in mice and chromosome aberration rates induced by cyclophosphamide(CTX).Micronucleus test and chromosomal aberration test were carried out.The micronucleus inhibition rates were 29.75%,36.20% and 44.48% respectively in CMPS1,CMPS2 and CMPS3 group.Inhibition rates were increased with the dose increasing.Compared with the CTX group,each dose group were significantly different(p < O.05).The aberration rates which were decreased with the dose increasing were 36.7% ± 5.46%,20.8%±3.52% and 18.1% ±3.28% respectively in CMPS1,CMPS2 and CMPS3 group.CMPS could reduce the micronucleus inhibition rates of PCE of bone marrow cells in mice and the aberration rates induced by CTX,CMPS had anti-mutagenic activity.%研究蛹虫草多糖(CMPS)对环磷酰胺(CTX)诱导小鼠骨髓嗜多染红细胞(PCE)微核形成率及染色体畸变率的影响,探讨其抗突变作用.采用微核实验和染色体畸变实验技术,镜下观察并计数.结果显示:CMPS三个剂量组小鼠微核抑制率分别为29.75%、36.20%、44.48%,抑制率随剂量增多呈增加趋势,各剂量组与环磷酰胺组比较,均有显著性差异(p <0.05);CMPS三个剂量组染色体畸变率分别为36.7%±5.46%、20.8%±3.52%、18.1%±3.28%,畸变率随CMPS剂量增多呈下降趋势.蛹虫草多糖可降低环磷酰胺诱导小鼠骨髓嗜多染红细胞微核率及染色体畸变率,具有抗突变活性.

  10. Effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on total antioxidant capacity of fasting and postprandial plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Dragsted, L. O.; Pedersen, A.

    2001-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are known to protect against cancer and heart disease. This is often ascribed to their high content of antioxidants. We have therefore tested whether a daily intake of fruits and vegetables corresponding to the recommended 600 g had any effect on the antioxidant activity of ...... of fasting and postprandial plasma samples. Antioxidant activity was determined by the Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) assay and the Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP) assay, which have been reported to be affected by the presence of dietary antioxidants....

  11. Antioxidant cosmeto-textiles: skin assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina; Martí, Meritxell; Martínez, Vanessa; Rubio, Laia; Parra, José L; Coderch, Luisa

    2013-05-01

    Resveratrol, a natural product, has been reported to have antioxidant activities such as the scavenging of free radicals. This compound could be used in the dermocosmetic field to protect the skin from oxidative stress. In this work, the percutaneous profile of resveratrol in ethanol solutions through pig skin was determinated by an in vitro methodology. The percutaneous absorption of resveratrol was measured and compared with trolox, an analogous of Vitamin E. Both antioxidants were found in all skin sections (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis). Besides, the free radical scavenging activity of resveratrol and trolox has been evaluated using DPPH method. The effective dose (ED₅₀) of compounds and DPPH radical inhibition in each skin layer were evaluated. Under the conditions used for these experiments, it can be deduced that resveratrol is more efficient than trolox as an antioxidant, also in the inner skin layers. The cosmeto-textiles with an active substance incorporated into their structure are increasingly used in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. The action of several cosmeto-textiles on the skin was assessed by in vitro and in vivo methodologies. Samples of these cosmeto-textiles were prepared with resveratrol incorporated into cotton and polyamide fabrics. An in vitro percutaneous absorption was used to demonstrate the delivery of the resveratrol from the textile to the different skin layers (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis). Additionally, these cosmeto-textiles containing the antioxidant were applied onto the forearms of volunteers to evaluate the textiles' efficacy in skin penetration. The antioxidant's antiradical capacity was evaluated using the DPPH method. Results showed that resveratrol could be detected in the dermis, epidermis, and stratum corneum (SC) by an in vitro percutaneous absorption method and was also detected in the outermost layers of the SC by an in vivo method (stripping). A smaller amount of resveratrol was

  12. Total dietary antioxidant capacity, individual antioxidant intake and breast cancer risk: the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantavos, Athanasios; Ruiter, Rikje; Feskens, Edith F; de Keyser, Catherine E; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H; Franco, Oscar H; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C

    2015-05-01

    Some studies suggest a favorable role of antioxidants on breast cancer risk but this is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess whether overall dietary antioxidant capacity, as assessed by dietary ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), and individual dietary antioxidant intake were associated with breast cancer risk. Data was used from women participating in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study among subjects aged 55 years and older (N = 3,209). FRAP scores and antioxidant intake (i.e., vitamin A, C, E, selenium, flavonoids and carotenoids) was assessed at baseline by a food frequency questionnaire. Incident cases of breast cancer were confirmed through medical reports. During a median follow-up of 17 years, 199 cases with breast cancer were identified. High dietary FRAP score was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer [hazard ratio (HR): 0.68; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.49, 0.96]. No overall association between individual antioxidant intake and breast cancer risk was found. However, low intake of alpha carotene and beta carotene was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer among smokers (HR: 2.48; 95% CI: 1.21, 5.12 and HR: 2.31; 95% CI: 1.12, 4.76 for alpha and beta carotene, respectively) and low intake of flavonoids was associated with breast cancer risk in women over the age of 70 (HR: 1.80; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.99). These results suggest that high overall dietary antioxidant capacity is associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. Individual effects of dietary carotenoids and dietary flavonoids may be restricted to subgroups such as smokers and elderly.

  13. Studies on antioxidant activity of teasaponins after hydrolyzed by enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Zhao, Sen; Xu, Longquan; Fei, Xu; Wang, Xiuying; Wang, Yi

    The biological activity of teasaponins and their molecular structure are closely related, and the activity of saponins may be increased with the change of their molecular structure. In this report, teasaponins were hydrolyzed by Aspergillus niger for increasing the antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of teasaponins before and after hydrolyzed was tested by DPPH, and the result showed four new teasaponins were produced after hydrolysis, and their antioxidant activity was increased significantly than the original teasaponins before hydrolysis, the radical scavenging capacity (RSC) was partly up to 95 %.

  14. Antioxidant Activity of the Successive Extracts of Aesculus indica Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guno Sindhu Chakraborthy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants are the best source of active secondary metabolites which are beneficial to mankind. Many plant origin drugs have been reported with biological properties like Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant, hypoglycemic agents and many more. The successive extracts of Aesculus indica leaves were screened for in vitro antioxidant properties using the standard procedures. The successive extracts such as petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, methanol and water and 50% crude methanol extracts exhibited IC 50 values of respectively in DPPH and respectively in nitric oxide radical inhibition assays. The values are comparable with the standards such as ascorbic acid and quercetin. The Aesculus indica leaves are showing significant antioxidant activity.

  15. Antioxidant System in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şemsettin Karaca

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In healthy body, oxygen species and antioxidant defence mechanisms work in balance. Overproduction or inadequate removal of reactive oxygen species result in oxidative stress, leading to lipid peroxidation, DNA mutation or breakage, activation or inactivation of enzymes, protein oxidation. Clinically, these cause several unfavorable effects included erythema, edema, wrinkles, photoaging, inflammation, autoimmune reactions, hipersensitivity reactions, keratinization disorders, neoplastic or preneoplastic lesions. Although reactive oxygen species play a role in various skin diseases, their biological targets and pathogenic mode of action are still not fully understood. In addition, strategies in the therapeutic management of reactive oxygen species effects in are still lacking. The aim of this review is to give information to readers about reactive oxygen species, antioxidants and skin disorders influenced by reactive oxygen species.

  16. 四物汤抗环磷酰胺诱变作用的研究%The anti-mutagenic effects of Siwu decoction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董小艳

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究四物汤抗环磷酰胺的诱变作用.方法:小鼠骨髓细胞实验中,设四物汤高、中、低剂量组[分别为9.36、4.68、2.34 mg/(kg·d)],环磷酰胺(cyclophosphamide,CP)阳性对照组和空白对照组,四物汤各组以不同浓度药液给小鼠连续灌胃7d,阳性对照组和空白对照组灌服等量生理盐水.于第7天灌胃后,四物汤各组和阳性对照组小鼠腹腔注射CP 20 mg/kg,24 h后处死动物,取股骨骨髓细胞制备微核标本和染色体标本.人外周血淋巴细胞实验中,四物汤设高、中、低剂量[分别为3.36、1.68、0.84 g/(kg·d)],以家兔含药血清的形式加入淋巴细胞培养液中,四物汤各组和阳性对照组均在培养液中加入10-5 mg/mL的CP,空白对照组加入等量生理盐水.培养72 h后收获细胞,制备微核标本和染色体标本.在光镜下观察、计数含微核及染色体畸变的细胞数,计算微核率及染色体畸变率.结果:四物汤3个剂量组在上述测试系统中,与阳性对照组比较,微核率及染色体畸变率均明显降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);与空白对照组比较,微核率及染色体畸变率差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论:在本实验条件下,四物汤有明显的抗环磷酰胺诱变的作用.%OBJECTIVE: To study the anti-mutagenic effects of Siwu decoction. METHODS: Four test methods were used; Mouse bone marrow cell micronucleus test, chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells test, micronucleus test and chromosomal aberration test in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Five groups were included in each test method, including blank control group (physiological saline group), positive control group (cyclophosphamide group) and different doses of Siwu decoction groups. High dose group Siwu decoction was 9.36 mg/(g ·d), middle dose group 4.68 mg/(g·d), and low dose group 2.34 mg/(g·d). In blood lymphocytes in vitro test, Siwu decoction was added to culture medium

  17. Anti-Oxidative Polyphenolic Compounds of Cocoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed F; Sureda, Antoni; Daglia, Maria; Rezaei, Parizad; Nabavi, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of different serious chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders, etc. Recent research has been focused on the beneficial role of dietary antioxidants against oxidative stress both under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Theobroma cacao L. (cacao tree) is an evergreen tree which is native to South America. It is a plant of great economic importance and its seeds are commonly used to produce cocoa powder and chocolate. In addition to its uses in food industry, cocoa is a rich source of polyphenolic antioxidants. There is a plethora of in vitro and in vivo studies that report cocoa antioxidant capacity. The protective activity of cocoa seems to be due to its phytochemical constituents, especially catechins. However, bioavailability of cocoa polyphenolic constituents following oral administration is very low (nanomolar concentrations). In the present paper, we critically reviewed the available literature on the antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of cocoa and its polyphenolic constituents. In addition to these, we provide brief information about cultivation, phytochemistry, bioavailability and clinical impacts of cocoa.

  18. Radical scavenging, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of halophytic species

    OpenAIRE

    Meot-Duros, Laetitia; Le Floch, Gaëtan; Magné, Christian

    2008-01-01

    International audience; For the first time, both antioxidant and antimicrobial activities are simultaneously reported in halophytic plants, particularly on polar fractions. Chloroformic and methanolic extracts of the halophytes Eryngium maritimum L., Crithmum maritimum L. and Cakile maritima Scop. were tested for their antimicrobial activities against 12 bacterial and yeast strains. In addition, radical scavenging and antioxidant activities were assessed, as well as total phenol contents. Onl...

  19. Antioxidant activity of Citrus fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhuo; Xi, Wanpeng; Hu, Yan; Nie, Chao; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2016-04-01

    Citrus is well-known for its nutrition and health-promotion values. This reputation is derived from the studies on the biological functions of phytochemicals in Citrus fruits and their derived products in the past decades. In recent years, the antioxidant activity of Citrus fruits and their roles in the prevention and treatment of various human chronic and degenerative diseases have attracted more and more attention. Citrus fruits are suggested to be a good source of dietary antioxidants. To have a better understanding of the mechanism underlying the antioxidant activity of Citrus fruits, we reviewed a study on the antioxidant activity of the phytochemicals in Citrus fruits, introduced methods for antioxidant activity evaluation, discussed the factors which influence the antioxidant activity of Citrus fruits, and summarized the underlying mechanism of action. Some suggestions for future study were also presented.

  20. Antioxidant enzyme levels in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oberley, T. D.; Oberley, L W

    1997-01-01

    Normal cells are protected by antioxidant enzymes from the toxic effects of high concentrations of reactive oxygen species generated during cellular metabolism. Even though cancer cells generate reactive oxygen species, it has been demonstrated biochemically that antioxidant enzyme levels are low in most animal and human cancers. However, a few cancer types have been found to have elevated levels of antioxidant enzymes, particularly manganese superoxide dismuta...

  1. [Antioxidant activity of flaxseed oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozorovskaia, N N; Rusina, I F; Lupinovich, V L; Beketova, N A; Sorokin, I V; Ipatova, O M; Levachev, M M

    2003-01-01

    Effective concentration of antioxidants and its reactivity toward peroxil radicals (constant k7) have been measured by the chemiluminescence technique for flaxseed oil. Effective concentration of antioxidants is shown to depend on the technology of producing flaxseed oil; period of seed storage before use; and storing duration of flaxseed oil also. Minor component content of flaxseed oil, which may be the members of antioxidant pool, has been quantitatively estimated.

  2. Total antioxidant capacity in the black mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) from Black Sea coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncheva, S.; Trakhtenberg, S.; Katrich, E.; Zemser, M.; Goshev, I.; Toledo, F.; Arancibia-Avila, P.; Doncheva, V.; Gorinstein, S.

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the total antioxidant radical scavenging capacity (TARSC) in tissue extracts for understanding biochemical adaptations involving the antioxidant defense system of a bivalve mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, sampled in polluted (Pol) and non-polluted (Npol) sites from Black Sea coasts. Antioxidant-rich polyphenol fractions were extracted from whole dry mussel tissue with methanol and water in different proportions. The extracts were screened for polyphenol content and their potential as antioxidants using various in vitro models, such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH rad ), β-carotene-linoleate (β-carotene) and nitric oxide (NO rad ). The total polyphenol extract of the whole mussel tissue from polluted site (TPMEPol) showed the highest antioxidant capacity among all of the extracts with the tested methods and was comparable with the antioxidant capacity of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). The antioxidant capacities of this extract determined by DPPH rad , β-carotene and NO rad methods and polyphenol content showed the highest correlation coefficients ( R2) such as 0.9985, 0.9915 and 0.9895, respectively. The free polyphenol extracts (FPMEPol and FPMENPol) had lower antioxidant capacity than the two others of total polyphenols (TPMEPol and TPMENPol) with three scavenging methods. Responses were linear in all tested methods and the antioxidant capacity values of soluble antioxidants showed the following relative order: Trolox>BHA>TPMEPol>TPMENPol>FPMEPol>FPMENPol. Nutritional antioxidants, such as polyphenols, were probably the main antioxidant contribution to mussel antioxidants. The mussel extracts from the polluted site exhibited higher antioxidant capacity than from the non-polluted one. The results presented in this report indicate that the antioxidant capacity of the whole tissue of the mussel extract could possibly be a useful biomarker for aquatic environments.

  3. Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant properties from mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sánchez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Preventive medicine and food industry have shown an increased interest in the development of natural antioxidants, since those most commonly used synthetic antioxidants may have restricted use in food. This could explain why there is currently much research on the antioxidant properties from natural products such as mushrooms. Many mushrooms have been reported to possess antioxidant properties, which enable them to neutralize free radicals. The oxygen molecule is a free radical, which lead to the generation of the reactive oxygen species and can damage the cells. Cell damage caused by free radicals appears to be a major contributor to aging and degenerative diseases. Mushrooms antioxidant components are found in fruit bodies, mycelium and culture both, which include polysaccharides, tocopherols, phenolics, carotenoids, ergosterol and ascorbic acid among others. Fruit bodies or mycelium can be manipulated to produce active compounds in a relatively short period of time, which represent a significant advantage in antioxidant compounds extraction from mushrooms. Antioxidant compounds may be extracted to be used as functional additives or mushrooms can be incorporated into our food regime, representing an alternative source of food to prevent damage caused by oxidation in the human body.

  4. Evaluation of mutagenicity and anti-mutagenicity of aloe-emodin and aloe extract%芦荟大黄素及芦荟提取物的诱变性和抗诱变性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁亚; 陈维; 张立实

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the mutagenicity and anti-mutagenicity of aloe-emodin and aloe extract by in vitro micronucleus test in L5178Y cells. METHODS: For 4 concentration of both aloe-emodin and aloe extract, mutagenicity and anti-mutagenicity groups were set up, as well as solvent control, positive control and anti-mutagenicity control. The L5178Y cells were treated respectively for 12 h, and in vitro micronucleus test was analyzed by routine method. RERULTS: Aloe-emodin showed mutagenic effect at 6.67 μg/ml. Micronucleus rate at this dose showed a significant difference compared with the control group (P < 0.05), but aloe extract showed non-mutagenic effect in this study. Within a certain dose range, both aloe-emodin(0.22 μg/ml) and aloe extract(20 μg/ml) could exert antagonistic effect on the increase of micronucleus rate induced by MMS, showing a significant difference compared with the control group(P< 0.01). CONCLUSION: Under our experimental conditions, aloe-emodin showed weak mutagenic effect, while aloe extract was not found to have mutagenic effect. Both of them displayed anti-mutagenic activity.%目的:用L5178Y小鼠淋巴瘤细胞体外微核试验评价芦荟大黄素和芦荟提取物的诱变和抗诱变作用,为其安全性评价提供依据.方法:设溶剂对照、阳性对照和抗诱变对照,芦荟大黄素和芦荟提取物诱变和抗诱变试验各设4个剂量组,处理L5178Y细胞12h后按常规方法进行体外微核试验分析.结果:较高浓度(6.67μg/ml)的芦荟大黄素可致微核细胞率增加,与对照组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);而芦荟提取物未见此效应.在一定剂量范围内,芦荟大黄素(0.22~6μg/ml)和芦荟提取物(20~180μg/ml)对甲磺酸甲酯(MMS)所致微核细胞率均有一定程度的拮抗作用,与对照组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论:芦荟大黄素具有一定的诱变作用,而在本实验剂量范围内的芦荟提取物未见遗传毒性.两种

  5. Role of antioxidant substances in foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Gambacorta

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are compounds present in food at low concentrations and able to both protect oxidable substrates and countenrbalance the negative effects that the reactive oxygen species (ROS cause in the human body (reduction of the risk to develop cardiovascular pathologies, cancer and degenerative diseases that accelerate the aging processes. In foods, lipid oxidation is a degradation regarding the unsaturated fatty acids that react with oxygen through several mechanisms such as chemical autoxidation, action of lipoxigenases, photoxidation, and others. Autoxidation is the main oxidation process and proceed via initiation, propagation, and termination steps leading to the hydroperoxide formation. Hydroperoxides could degraded into low molecular weigh compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketons, acids and other low reactive compounds that negatively influence quality, nutritional value and shelf life of foods. Antioxidants are known to act at different levels of the lipid oxidation. They may act in several ways: they can decrease the oxygen concentration, intercept the singlet oxygen, slow the initiation step by scavenging the first free radicals, break the reaction chain to prevent the hydrogen subtraction, and decompose primary products of oxidation into non-radical products. This work reports the results of two studies on the phenolic fraction and potential antioxidant activity of virgin olive oils and red wines produced in Apulia region. Oils were extracted from olives produced at Cerignola and Torremaggiore using a two phase continuous system. Results showed a different phenolic composition of the oils and a good linear correlation between phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Wines were produced from Primitivo grapes pickled at the so-called technological maturity in a vineyard located at Manduria (Taranto. Nine different maceration techniques were applied. Results showed that the addition of tannins from skins and seeds and the saign

  6. Role of antioxidant substances in foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennio La Notte

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are compounds present in food at low concentrations and able to both protect oxidable substrates and countenrbalance the negative effects that the reactive oxygen species (ROS cause in the human body (reduction of the risk to develop cardiovascular pathologies, cancer and degenerative diseases that accelerate the aging processes. In foods, lipid oxidation is a degradation regarding the unsaturated fatty acids that react with oxygen through several mechanisms such as chemical autoxidation, action of lipoxigenases, photoxidation, and others. Autoxidation is the main oxidation process and proceed via initiation, propagation, and termination steps leading to the hydroperoxide formation. Hydroperoxides could degraded into low molecular weigh compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketons, acids and other low reactive compounds that negatively influence quality, nutritional value and shelf life of foods. Antioxidants are known to act at different levels of the lipid oxidation. They may act in several ways: they can decrease the oxygen concentration, intercept the singlet oxygen, slow the initiation step by scavenging the first free radicals, break the reaction chain to prevent the hydrogen subtraction, and decompose primary products of oxidation into non-radical products. This work reports the results of two studies on the phenolic fraction and potential antioxidant activity of virgin olive oils and red wines produced in Apulia region. Oils were extracted from olives produced at Cerignola and Torremaggiore using a two phase continuous system. Results showed a different phenolic composition of the oils and a good linear correlation between phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Wines were produced from Primitivo grapes pickled at the so-called technological maturity in a vineyard located at Manduria (Taranto. Nine different maceration techniques were applied. Results showed that the addition of tannins from skins and seeds and the saign

  7. MARCKO thermal insulation layers. Life predictions for thermal insulation and antioxidant layers. Final report; MARCKO-Waermedaemmschichten. Methoden zur Lebensdauervorhersage von Waermedaemm- und Oxidationsschutzschichten. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetze, M.

    2003-07-01

    The project was carried out by MTU, Rolls-Royce and Siemens as industrial partners and FZ-Juelich, DLR and DECHEMA as institutes for the purpose of developing a life model for monocrystalline gas turbine blades with metal coatings. This model was to provide reliable information on the life of the ceramic and coupling agent layers. This report describes the activities of the Karl-Winnacker Institute of DECHEMA e.V.: Isothermal oxidation experiments were carried out in the laboratory at 950-1100 degrees centigrade, followed by a characterisation of the oxidation characteristics on the basis of metallographic sections. Particular interest was taken in the development of the TGO (thermally grown oxide) layers, aluminium depletion in the bond coat on the oxide side, and physical defects in the form of pores, pore populations and microcracks within the TGO or in its immediate vicinity. For the first time ever, these microcracks were classified post-experimentally using SEM pictures, and the maximum dimensions of the cracks were quantified as a function of ageing. Kinetics were established for all these parameters. Growth-induced lateral stresses in the TGO were assessed on the basis of the bending of a thin metal foil of pure bond coat material. In the framework of a sub-project carried out by Rolls-Royce, the mechanical characteristics of APS-sprayed thermal insulation layers was investigated in uniaxial pressure experiments on free, hollow cylindrical annular probes. On the one hand, their thermoelastic characteristics were established using path-controlled cyclic load tests; on the other hand, the thermoplastic characteristics were established using load-controlled creep experiments. Samples were used both in the initial and the sintered state in order to assess the effect of sintering, which was described on the basis of porosity as measured in ceramographic sections. The methods and results are presented in this report. [German] In diesem Verbundprojekt, an dem MTU

  8. PHARMACOLOGICAL ANTIOXIDANT STRATEGIES AS THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS FOR COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette/tobacco smoke/biomass fuel-induced oxidative and aldehyde/carbonyl stress are intimately associated with the progression and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, targeting systemic and local oxidative stress with antioxidants/redox modulating agents, or boosting the endogenous levels of antioxidants are likely to have beneficial effects in the treatment/management of COPD. Various antioxidant agents, such as thiol molecules (glutathione and mucolytic drugs, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine and N-acystelyn, erdosteine, fudosteine, ergothioneine, and carbocysteine), all have been reported to modulate various cellular and biochemical aspects of COPD. These antioxidants have been found to scavenge and detoxify free radicals and oxidants, regulate of glutathione biosynthesis, control nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, and hence inhibiting inflammatory gene expression. Synthetic molecules, such as specific spin traps like α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a catalytic antioxidant (ECSOD mimetic), porphyrins (AEOL 10150 and AEOL 10113), and a superoxide dismutase mimetic M40419, iNOS inhibitors, lipid peroxidation inhibitors/blockers edaravone, and lazaroids/tirilazad have also been shown to have beneficial effects by inhibiting the cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory responses and other carbonyl/oxidative stress-induced cellular alterations. A variety of oxidants, free radicals, and carbonyls/aldehydes are implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD, it is therefore, possible that therapeutic administration or supplementation of multiple antioxidants and/or boosting the endogenous levels of antioxidants will be beneficial in the treatment of COPD. This review discusses various novel pharmacological approaches adopted to enhance lung antioxidant levels, and various emerging beneficial and/or prophylactic effects of antioxidant therapeutics in halting or intervening the progression of COPD. PMID:22101076

  9. Antioxidant activity of different fractions of Spirulina platensis protean extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero Estrada, J E; Bermejo Bescós, P; Villar del Fresno, A M

    2001-01-01

    Spirulina platensis, planktonic blue-green algae, is gaining increasing attention because of its nutritional and medicinal properties. This microalgae contains phycobiliproteins (phycocyanin and allophycocyanin). Previous reports from our laboratory have shown that a protean extract of S. platensis is a potent free-radical scavenger (hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals) and inhibits microsomal lipid peroxidation. The aim of this study was to purify and characterize phycocyanin of S. platensis. Besides, we tried to demonstrate that one of the main components responsible for this antioxidant activity is a biliprotein phycocyanin. For this purpose, we studied the antioxidant activity of different fractions obtained during the phycocyanin purification process, through the scavenger activity of hydroxyl radical. We also observed that an increase in phycocyanin content was related to an increase in the antioxidant activity in different fractions, and therefore phycobiliprotein phycocyanin is the component mainly responsible for the antioxidant activity.

  10. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Saraca thaipingensis Cantley ex Prain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supaluk Prachayasittikul; Apilak Worachartcheewan; Sakda Yainoy; Natthakaln Lomchoey; Paveena Kittiphatcharin; Somsak Ruchirawat; Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Saraca thaipingensis Cantley ex Prain; and isolation of its flower extracts. Methods: The plant species (flowers, leaves, and twigs) were extracted by hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanol; and tested for antioxidant activity (DPPH assay) and antimicrobial activity (agar dilution method) against twenty-seven strains of microorganisms; gram positive and gram negative bacteria, and diploid fungus. Bioactive constituents were isolated by column chromatography. Results: The plant extracts has been firstly reported to display strong antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity selective against gram positive bacteria (Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC 10356 and Streptococcus pyogenes) with MIC of 256 μg/mL. Stigmasterol and a mixture of triterpenoids and phenolic compounds were isolated from the flower extracts. Conclusions: The study revealed that the S. thaipingensis is a new source of natural antioxidants and antimicrobials with potential for medicinal uses.

  11. Antimutagenic activity of berry extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope Smith, S; Tate, Patricia L; Huang, George; Magee, James B; Meepagala, Kumudini M; Wedge, David E; Larcom, Lyndon L

    2004-01-01

    Plants are proven sources of useful anti-tumor and chemopreventative compounds. Hence, identification of phytochemicals useful in dietary prevention and intervention of cancer is of paramount importance. The initial step in the formation of cancer is damage to the genome of a somatic cell producing a mutation in an oncogene or a tumor-suppressor gene. Fresh juices and organic solvent extracts from the fruits of strawberry, blueberry, and raspberry were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the production of mutations by the direct-acting mutagen methyl methanesulfonate and the metabolically activated carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene. Juice from strawberry, blueberry, and raspberry fruit significantly inhibited mutagenesis caused by both carcinogens. Ethanol extracts from freeze-dried fruits of strawberry cultivars (Sweet Charlie and Carlsbad) and blueberry cultivars (Tifblue and Premier) were also tested. Of these, the hydrolyzable tannin-containing fraction from Sweet Charlie strawberries was most effective at inhibiting mutations.

  12. Flavonoid constituents, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities of Gleditsia triacanthos L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, R S; Abou Zeid, A H; El Hawary, S S; Sleem, A A; Ashour, W E

    2014-12-01

    Gleditsia triacanthos L. is a deciduous tree belonging to the family Fabaceae. It possesses important biological activities as anti-mutagenic, anticancer, cytotoxic and treating rheumatoid arthritis. The total ethanol extract (EtOHE) and successive extracts (petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and aqueous ethanol) were prepared from the leaves. Eight flavone glycosides and two flavone aglycones named vicenin-I (1), vitexin (2), isovitexin (3), orientin (4), isoorientin (5), luteolin-7-O-ß-glucopyranoside (6), luteolin-7-O-ß-galactopyranoside (7), apigenin-7-O-ß-glucopyranoside (8), luteolin (9) and apigenin (10) were isolated from the aqueous ethanol extract of G. triacanthos L. leaves. Potent cytotoxic activity of the EtOHE extract was observed against the liver (IC50 = 1.68 μg), breast (IC50 = 0.74 μg), cervix (IC50 = 1.28 μg), larynx (IC50 = 0.67 μg) and colon (IC50 = 2.50 μg) cancer cell lines. Cytotoxic activity of compounds 2, 4, 6 and 8 against, the liver, breast and colon cancer cell lines was also proved. Evaluation of the in-vivo antioxidant activity of the EtOHE and successive extracts revealed that the highest activity was exhibited by 100 mg of EtOHE (97.89% potency) as compared with vitamin E (100% potency). Compound 6 showed 91.8% free radical scavenging activity.

  13. Fisetin: A Dietary Antioxidant for Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naghma; Syed, Deeba N.; Ahmad, Nihal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Diet-derived antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects, including their role in the chemoprevention of cancer. In general, botanical antioxidants have received much attention, as they can be consumed for longer periods of time without any adverse effects. Flavonoids are a broadly distributed class of plant pigments that are regularly consumed in the human diet due to their abundance. One such flavonoid, fisetin (3,3′,4′,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), is found in various fruits and vegetables, such as strawberry, apple, persimmon, grape, onion, and cucumber. Recent Advances: Several studies have demonstrated the effects of fisetin against numerous diseases. It is reported to have neurotrophic, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, and other health beneficial effects. Critical Issues: Although fisetin has been reported as an anticarcinogenic agent, further in-depth in vitro and in vivo studies are required to delineate the mechanistic basis of its observed effects. In this review article, we describe the multiple effects of fisetin with special emphasis on its anticancer activity as investigated in cell culture and animal models. Future Directions: Additional research focused toward the identification of molecular targets could lead to the development of fisetin as a chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agent against cancer and other diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 151–162. PMID:23121441

  14. Antioxidant supplements for liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2011-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal.......Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  15. Fingerprinting antioxidative activities in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Livia; Plieth, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Background A plethora of concurrent cellular activities is mobilised in the adaptation of plants to adverse environmental conditions. This response can be quantified by physiological experiments or metabolic profiling. The intention of this work is to reduce the number of metabolic processes studied to a minimum of relevant parameters with a maximum yield of information. Therefore, we inspected 'summary parameters' characteristic for whole classes of antioxidative metabolites and key enzymes. Results Three bioluminescence assays are presented. A horseradish peroxidase-based total antioxidative capacity (TAC) assay is used to probe low molecular weight antioxidants. Peroxidases are quantified by their luminol converting activity (LUPO). Finally, we quantify high molecular weight superoxide anion scavenging activity (SOSA) using coelenterazine. Experiments with Lepidium sativum L. show how salt, drought, cold, and heat influence the antioxidative system represented here by TAC, LUPO, SOSA, catalase, and glutathione reductase (GR). LUPO and SOSA run anti-parallel under all investigated stress conditions suggesting shifts in antioxidative functions rather than formation of antioxidative power. TAC runs in parallel with GR. This indicates that a majority of low molecular weight antioxidants in plants is represented by glutathione. Conclusion The set of assays presented here is capable of characterising antioxidative activities in plants. It is inexpensive, quick and reproducible and delivers quantitative data. 'Summary parameters' like TAC, LUPO, and SOSA are quantitative traits which may be promising for implementation in high-throughput screening for robustness of novel mutants, transgenics, or breeds. PMID:19171044

  16. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Bernard M; Voynow, Judith A; Ghio, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. PMID:25673984

  17. Losartan-antioxidant hybrids: novel molecules for the prevention of hypertension-induced cardiovascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; Alajarín, Ramón; Serrano, Isabel; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia; Griera, Mercedes; Vaquero, Juan J; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego; Alvarez-Builla, Julio; Díez-Marqués, María L

    2009-11-26

    We report the first examples of a new series of antioxidant-sartan hybrids (AO-sartans), which were made by adding an antioxidant fragment to the hydroxymethyl side chain of losartan. Experiments performed in cultured cells demonstrate that these new hybrids retain the ability to block the angiotensin II effect with increased antioxidant ability. In hypertensive rats, these compounds show properties that suggest they may be more useful than losartan for controlling hypertension and preventing hypertension-induced cardiovascular damage.

  18. Preliminary phytochemical screening and antioxidant activities of solvent extracts from Daucus crinitus Desf., from Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Bendiabdellah, Amel; DIB, Mohammed El Amine; Meliani, Nawel; Djabou, Nassim; Allali, Hocine; Tabti, Boufeldja

    2012-01-01

    The presence of natural antioxidant in plants is well known. Plant phenolics constitute one of the major groups of components that act as primary antioxidant free radical terminators. This paper reports the antioxidative activity of methanolic and water extract of Daucus crinitus Desf. Phytochemical screening of the crude extracts of stems/leaves revealed the presence of different kind of chemical groups such as tannin, flavonoids, phenolic acids and coumarins. The amounts of tota...

  19. Cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity assay for food antioxidants: vitamins, polyphenolics, and flavonoids in food extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apak, Reşat; Güçlü, Kubilay; Ozyürek, Mustafa; Bektas Oğlu, Burcu; Bener, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    Antioxidants are health beneficial compounds through their combat with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and free radicals that may cause tissue damage leading to various diseases. This work reports the development of a simple and widely applicable antioxidant capacity index for dietary polyphenols, vitamins C and E, and plasma antioxidants utilizing the copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) reagent as the chromogenic oxidizing agent. This novel method based on an electron-transfer mechanism was named by our research group as 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity', abbreviated as the CUPRAC method. The method is comprised of mixing the antioxidant solution with aqueous copper(II) chloride, alcoholic neocuproine, and ammonium acetate aqueous buffer at pH 7, and subsequently measuring the developed absorbance at 450 nm after 30 min. Since the color development is fast for compounds like ascorbic acid, gallic acid, and quercetin but slow for naringin and naringenin, the latter compounds are assayed after incubation at 50 degrees C on a water bath for 20 min. The flavonoid glycosides are hydrolyzed to their corresponding aglycones by refluxing in 1.2 M: HCl-containing 50% MeOH so as to exert maximal reducing power towards Cu(II)-Nc. The CUPRAC antioxidant capacities of synthetic mixtures are equal to the sum of individual capacities of antioxidant constituents, indicating lack of chemical deviations from Beer's law. Tests on antioxidant polyphenols demonstrate that the highest CUPRAC capacities are observed for epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin gallate, quercetin, fisetin, epigallocatechin, catechin, and caffeic acid in this order, in accord with the number and position of the -OH groups as well the conjugation level of the molecule. The parallelism of the linear calibration curves of pure antioxidants in water and in a given complex matrix (plant extract) demonstrates that there are no chemical interactions of interferent nature among the solution constituents

  20. Antioxidant relevance to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    Human ecology requires both oxygen and water with the generation from food of an immediate energy source, ATP, by oxidative phosphorylation. A continuing balance between oxidation and antioxidation is necessary for longer less-disabled lives, taking account of oxidative stresses and the critical roles of oxidants in defence against infection, tissue repair and signalling. Antioxidant capacity is derived both exogenously (from food, beverage and sunlight) and endogenously (from enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways). A number of oxidant food factors service antioxidant metallo-enzymes. The capacity operates extra- or intracellularly. Uric acid is the major antioxidant in primate blood. Uric acid synthesis is increased by dietary fructose from fruit, sugary foods and drinks. This indirect antioxidant effect of fruit is separate from that attributable to its flavonoids. Alcohol also increases serum uric acid. Urate excess and retention is associated with disease. The high prevalence of hyperuricaemia in NE Asia presents a major public health dilemma in regard to putative benefits and risks. Foods with high antioxidant activity include berries, nuts and legumes, tomatoes and sweet potato leaves. Each of the antioxidants in these foods is pleiotropic being inter-alia anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic or anti-neoplastic. Moreover, food matrices and patterns contribute to the safety of antioxidant consumption. There is no evidence to date that isolated antioxidants as food supplements improve health outcomes or survival; and some that indicate unacceptable risk. Their use as biomarkers of food cannot justify their isolated use. Nevertheless, a spectrum of dietary pluripotential antioxidants for tissues, metabolic and immune systems is advantageous.

  1. Synergistic combinatorial antihyperlipidemic study of selected natural antioxidants; modulatory effects on lipid profile and endogenous antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Peer Abdul; Khan, Jamshaid Ali; Ullah, Irfan; Ullah, Safi

    2016-09-09

    Hyperlipidemia, a major pathological condition associated with disrupted lipid levels and physiological redox homeostasis. The excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to enhanced lipid peroxidation, aggravated atherosclerosis and oxidative stress. Integration of natural antioxidant blends in alone or with conventional treatments can alleviate these issues synergistically contributing least side effects. Published literature reported the efficacy of natural antioxidants as individual and in combinations in various conditions but less data is available on their evaluation in low dose ratio blends particularly in hypercholesterolemic diet. Antihyperlipidemic effects of selected natural antioxidants; the phenolic oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) and pterostilbene (PT) with niacin (NA) were investigated in current study. Their effects on lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and their aptitude to establish redox state between oxidants and antioxidants in body were evaluated in high cholesterol diet fed animal model. Male albino rabbits (n = 6) weighing 1.2-1.6 kg, supplemented with high cholesterol diet (400 mg/kg) for 12 weeks were used in the experiment. Antioxidants were administered individual high (100 mg/kg) and in low dose combinations (total dose = 100 mg/kg). Student's t test and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Dunnet's test were used as statistical tools for evaluation. The results showed synergistic effects of low dose antioxidant blends. Therapies retarded elevation in blood lipid levels, lipid peroxidation and blood antioxidant depletion and consequently contributed in reestablishing redox homeostasis. The LDL/HDL ratio and atherogenic index were suppressed significantly in blend therapies with maximum effects of 59.3 and 25 % (p >0.001) observed in 50:30:20 ratios of OPC, NA and PT, compared to individual therapies 37 and 18 % max respectively. Moreover the results were also in close proximity with the statin

  2. An in vitro model to test relative antioxidant potential: Ultraviolet-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelle, E.; Maes, D.; Padulo, G.A.; Kim, E.K.; Smith, W.P. (Estee Lauder Research and Development, Melville, NY (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Since antioxidants have been shown to play a major role in preventing some of the effects of aging and photoaging in skin, it is important to study this phenomenon in a controlled manner. This was accomplished by developing a simple and reliable in vitro technique to assay antioxidant efficacy. Inhibition of peroxidation by antioxidants was used as a measure of relative antioxidant potential. Liposomes, high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), were dispersed in buffer and irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light. Irradiated liposomes exhibited a significantly higher amount of hydroperoxides than liposomes containing antioxidants in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner. Lipid peroxidation was determined spectrophotometrically by an increase in thiobarbituric acid reacting substances. To further substantiate the production of lipid peroxides, gas chromatography was used to measure a decrease in PUFA substrate. In order of decreasing antioxidant effectiveness, the following results were found among lipophilic antioxidants: BHA greater than catechin greater than BHT greater than alpha-tocopherol greater than chlorogenic acid. Among hydrophilic antioxidants, ascorbic acid and dithiothreitol were effective while glutathione was ineffective. In addition, ascorbic acid was observed to act synergistically with alpha-tocopherol, which is in agreement with other published reports on the interaction of these two antioxidants. Although peroxyl radical scavengers seem to be at a selective advantage in this liposomal/UV system, these results demonstrate the validity of this technique as an assay for measuring an antioxidant's potential to inhibit UV-induced peroxidation.

  3. Natural Antioxidants: Piper sarmentosum (Kadok) and Morinda elliptica (Mengkudu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vimala; Adenan, Mohd Ilham; Ahmad, Abdull Rashih; Sahdan, Rohana

    2003-03-01

    The antioxidant activity of two edible medicinal plants commonly used in Malaysian traditional medicine i.e. Piper sarmentosum (kadok) and Morinda elliptica (mengkudu) were tested for antioxidant activity. The methanolic leave extracts of kadok and mengkudu, at 250ug/ml, were tested using the Xanthine/Xanthine Oxidase (X/XOD) Superoxide Scavenging assay. Both extracts showed high superoxide scavenging assay, 88% and 80% respectively compared to superoxide dismutase (SOD) standard. The crude extracts were further fractionated using column chromatography and tested for superoxide scavenging activity, to obtain antioxidant active fractions. Two active fractions were obtained from kadok, PsFr6-71.3%, PsFr7-71.3%, and one active fraction from mengkudu, MeFr3-86.6%. These active fractions were compared against 14 phenolic compound standards. After a series of HPLC analysis of samples and standards, a natural antioxidant compound was identified in kadok and mengkudu i.e. Naringenin (4',5,7-Trihydroxyflavanone) with 75.7% superoxide scavenging activity. Naringenin is a highly potent natural antioxidant that has been reported in the raw materials of larch and grapefruit extracts. Thus, kadok and mengkudu which contain Naringenin, could be used as antioxidant dietary supplements.

  4. Antioxidants and Dementia Risk: Consideration through a Cerebrovascular Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Lam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of natural and chemical compounds that exert anti-oxidative properties are demonstrated to be beneficial for brain and cognitive function, and some are reported to reduce the risk of dementia. However, the detailed mechanisms by which those anti-oxidative compounds show positive effects on cognition and dementia are still unclear. An emerging body of evidence suggests that the integrity of the cerebrovascular blood-brain barrier (BBB is centrally involved in the onset and progression of cognitive impairment and dementia. While recent studies revealed that some anti-oxidative agents appear to be protective against the disruption of BBB integrity and structure, few studies considered the neuroprotective effects of antioxidants in the context of cerebrovascular integrity. Therefore, in this review, we examine the mechanistic insights of antioxidants as a pleiotropic agent for cognitive impairment and dementia through a cerebrovascular axis by primarily focusing on the current available data from physiological studies. Conclusively, there is a compelling body of evidence that suggest antioxidants may prevent cognitive decline and dementia by protecting the integrity and function of BBB and, indeed, further studies are needed to directly examine these effects in addition to underlying molecular mechanisms.

  5. The Antioxidants Changes in Ornamental Flowers during Development and Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Cavaiuolo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of antioxidant compounds is constitutive and variable from species to species and is also variable considering the development of the plant tissue. In this review, we take into consideration the antioxidant changes and the physiological, biochemical and molecular factors that are able to modulate the accumulation of antioxidant compounds in ornamental flowers during the whole development process until the senescence. Many ornamental flowers are natural sources of very important bioactive compounds with benefit to the human health and their possible role as dietary components has been reported. The most part of antioxidants are flower pigments such as carotenoids and polyphenols, often present in higher concentration compared with the most common fruits and vegetables. The antioxidants content changes during development and during senescence many biochemical systems and molecular mechanisms are activated to counteract the increase of reactive oxygen species and free radicals. There is a tight correlation between antioxidants and senescence processes and this aspect is detailed and appropriately discussed.

  6. Dietary antioxidants, cognitive function and dementia--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Georgina E; Bryan, Janet; Murphy, Karen J

    2013-09-01

    Antioxidant compounds, contained in fruit, vegetables and tea, have been postulated to have a protective effect against age-related cognitive decline by combating oxidative stress. However, recent research on this subject has been conflicting. The aim of this systematic review was to consider current epidemiological and longitudinal evidence for an association between habitual dietary intake of antioxidants and cognition, with consideration given to both cognitive functioning and risk for dementia and its subtypes, including Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Searches of electronic databases were undertaken to identify peer-reviewed journal articles that reported on associations between antioxidant intakes (vitamins C, E, flavonoids, carotenoids) and cognitive function or risk for dementia. Eight cross-sectional and 13 longitudinal studies were identified and included in the review. There were mixed findings for the association between antioxidant intake, cognition and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Large heterogeneity in study design, differential control of confounders, insufficient measures of cognitive performance, and difficulties associated with dietary assessment may contribute to the inconsistent findings. Overall, findings do not consistently show habitual intakes of dietary antioxidants are associated with better cognitive performance or a reduced risk for dementia. Future intervention trials are warranted to elucidate the effects of a high intake of dietary antioxidants on cognitive functioning, and to explore effects within a whole dietary pattern.

  7. Antioxidants and Dementia Risk: Consideration through a Cerebrovascular Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Virginie; Hackett, Mark; Takechi, Ryusuke

    2016-12-20

    A number of natural and chemical compounds that exert anti-oxidative properties are demonstrated to be beneficial for brain and cognitive function, and some are reported to reduce the risk of dementia. However, the detailed mechanisms by which those anti-oxidative compounds show positive effects on cognition and dementia are still unclear. An emerging body of evidence suggests that the integrity of the cerebrovascular blood-brain barrier (BBB) is centrally involved in the onset and progression of cognitive impairment and dementia. While recent studies revealed that some anti-oxidative agents appear to be protective against the disruption of BBB integrity and structure, few studies considered the neuroprotective effects of antioxidants in the context of cerebrovascular integrity. Therefore, in this review, we examine the mechanistic insights of antioxidants as a pleiotropic agent for cognitive impairment and dementia through a cerebrovascular axis by primarily focusing on the current available data from physiological studies. Conclusively, there is a compelling body of evidence that suggest antioxidants may prevent cognitive decline and dementia by protecting the integrity and function of BBB and, indeed, further studies are needed to directly examine these effects in addition to underlying molecular mechanisms.

  8. Co-adjustment of yolk antioxidants and androgens in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudeau, Mathieu; Ducatez, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Mothers can shape the developmental trajectory of their offspring through the transmission of resources such as hormones, antioxidants or immunoglobulins. Over the last two decades, an abundant literature on maternal effects in birds has shown that several of these compounds (i.e. androgens, glucocorticoids and antioxidants) often influence the same offspring phenotypic traits (i.e. growth, immunity or oxidative stress levels), making interaction effects between egg components a likely scenario. However, the potential interactive effects of maternally transmitted compounds on offspring development and potential co-adjustment of these compounds within an egg are still poorly understood. Here, we report the results of an interspecific comparative analysis on birds' egg yolk composition (i.e. androgens and antioxidants) where we found that yolk carotenoid and vitamin E concentrations are positively associated, supporting the hypothesis that these two antioxidants act in synergy. The concentrations of vitamin E also increased with increasing concentrations of testosterone. This last result confirms the emerging idea that androgens and antioxidants are co-adjusted within eggs and that maternally transmitted antioxidants might limit the potential direct and indirect effects of prenatal exposure to high testosterone levels on oxidative stress. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Antiglycation and antioxidant properties of soy sauces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashilipa, Changwe; Wang, Qiuyu; Slevin, Mark; Ahmed, Nessar

    2011-12-01

    Diabetes-induced hyperglycemia increases formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and metal-catalyzed production of free radicals. This study compared the antioxidant capacities of dark and light soy sauces of different brands and investigated their abilities to inhibit AGEs and whether their mechanism of action was pre- or post-Amadori or involved chelation of transition metals. The antioxidant capacities of soy sauces were compared using the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) method and by measuring their total phenolic contents. Model proteins (lysozyme, albumin) were glycated using fructose with or without soy sauces with subsequent analysis of cross-linked AGEs by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The effect of soy sauces on pre- and post-Amadori inhibition of AGEs was investigated by measuring fructosamine and AGEs following reincubation of ribose-glycated (ribated) lysozyme, respectively. Dark soy sauces had higher antioxidant capacities and phenolic content and were more effective inhibitors of post-Amadori-derived cross-linked AGEs. However, light soy sauces were more effective at inhibiting fructosamine and had more potent metal chelation properties. This study reports the antiglycation properties of soy sauces, but further studies are required to determine the constituents responsible for this effect and whether soy sauce consumption can reduce oxidative stress and AGEs in diabetic subjects.

  10. Shrimp thioredoxin is a potent antioxidant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aispuro-Hernandez, Emmanuel; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D; Muhlia-Almazan, Adriana; Del-Toro-Sanchez, Lizette; Robles-Sanchez, Rosario M; Hernandez, Jesus; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Gustavo; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2008-07-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) is a main component of the redox homeostasis machinery in the cell and it is required for ribonucleotide reductase function among others. In invertebrates, the redox balance is compromised during disease and changes in the physiological state and it is one of the components of the innate immune response. In this work, the shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) LvTRX cDNA was sequenced, cloned and over-expressed in bacteria to further characterize the function of the recombinant protein. LvTRX was able to reduce insulin disulfides and it was a better antioxidant compared to reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid, by means of the Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) assay. Interestingly, LvTRX contains aside of the canonical active site CXXC disulfide motif, one Cys (C73) residue in the interface of a putative dimer previously reported for human TRX. Using qRT-PCR, we found that shrimp LvTRX is mainly expressed in gills and pleopods; the variation of LvTRX mRNA upon hypoxia and re-oxygenation is not statistically significant. LvTRX stands as an important antioxidant that must be considered in future physiological and immune challenges studies.

  11. EVALUATION OF ANTIOXIDANT POTENTIAL OF PYRAZOLONE DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mariappan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article the antioxidant property of pyrazolones derivatives (PYZ1 to PYZ10 are reported. It was assessed by estimation of Malonaldehyde (MDA and 4-Hydroxyl-2-noneal (4-HNE as lipid peroxidation markers in myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury. The inhibition of lipid peroxidation was compared with the standard ascorbic acid. Among synthesized derivatives PYZ2, PYZ3, PYZ7, PYZ8, PYZ9, and PYZ10 were found to have potent antioxidant effect against MDA marker. In case of 4-HNE, PYZ4, PYZ5, PYZ6, PYZ7, PYZ8, PYZ9 and PYZ10 were found to have effective antioxidant activity and the rest of the compounds are moderately active. Comparatively PYZ7, PYZ8, PYZ9 and PYZ10 are having effective role to control both MDA and 4-HNE generation. All the experimental data were statistically significant at p<0.05 level. Interestingly, beyond its NSAID property, this study explores the protective role of pyrazolone derivatives in ischemic heart injury.

  12. Effects of ozonated autohemotherapy on the antioxidant capacity of Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Nao; Endo, Yoshiro; Kikkawa, Lisa; Korosue, Kenji; Kaneko, Yasuyuki; Kitauchi, Akira; Katamoto, Hiromu; Hidaka, Yuichi; Hagio, Mitsuyoshi; Torisu, Shidow

    2016-01-01

    The performance of horses undergoing regular intense exercise is adversely affected by oxidative stress. Thus, it is important to increase antioxidant production in horses in order to reduce oxidative stress. Ozonated autohemotherapy (OAHT) reportedly promotes antioxidant production. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of OAHT on antioxidant capacity. Ten Thoroughbred horses were used in this study. After the OAHT, we collected serum samples and measured biological antioxidant potential (BAP). We found that BAP began to increase after the OAHT and was significantly higher in the OAHT group than at 3 (Phorses.

  13. Structural Correlation of Some Heterocyclic Chalcone Analogues and Evaluation of Their Antioxidant Potential

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    Hoong-Kun Fun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of six novel heterocyclic chalcone analogues 4(a–f has been synthesized by condensing 2-acetyl-5-chlorothiophene with benzaldehyde derivatives in methanol at room temperature using a catalytic amount of sodium hydroxide. The newly synthesized compounds are characterized by IR, mass spectra, elemental analysis and melting point. Subsequently; the structures of these compounds were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction. All the synthesized compounds were screened for their antioxidant potential by employing various in vitro models such as DPPH free radical scavenging assay, ABTS radical scavenging assay, ferric reducing antioxidant power and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity. Results reflect the structural impact on the antioxidant ability of the compounds. The IC50 values illustrate the mild to good antioxidant activities of the reported compounds. Among them, 4f with a p-methoxy substituent was found to be more potent as antioxidant agent.

  14. Antioxidants and Polyphenols: Concentrations and Relation to Male Infertility and Treatment Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Tali; Har-Vardi, Iris; Harlev, Avi; Friger, Michael; Hamou, Batel; Barac, Tamar; Levitas, Eli; Saphier, Oshra

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is induced by reactive oxygen substances (ROS) that are known to affect male fertility. The aims of this study were to prospectively investigate and characterize total antioxidant and specifically polyphenols concentrations and their relations to sperm quality and fertility treatment success. During their infertility treatment, sixty-seven males were prospectively recruited to this study. After separation of the sperm from the semen sample, the semen fluid samples antioxidants and polyphenols concentrations were determined. Antioxidant concentration was significantly associated with sperm concentration and total motile count. Antioxidants concentration in the group of male with sperm concentration ≥ 15 × 10(6) was significantly higher than in the group of male with antioxidants concentration antioxidants or polyphenols concentrations. This is the first study that reports on polyphenols concentration within semen fluid. More studies are needed in order to investigate polyphenols role in male fertility.

  15. Role of antioxidant enzymes and small molecular weight antioxidants in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Paulina; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2013-10-01

    Cells in aerobic condition are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may induce damage to biomolecules, including proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. In normal circumstances, the amount of ROS is counterbalanced by cellular antioxidant defence, with its main components-antioxidant enzymes, DNA repair and small molecular weight antioxidants. An imbalance between the production and neutralization of ROS by antioxidant defence is associated with oxidative stress, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many age-related and degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting the macula-the central part of the retina. The retina is especially prone to oxidative stress due to high oxygen pressure and exposure to UV and blue light promoting ROS generation. Because oxidative stress has an established role in AMD pathogenesis, proper functioning of antioxidant defence may be crucial for the occurrence and progression of this disease. Antioxidant enzymes play a major role in ROS scavenging and changes of their expression or/and activity are reported to be associated with AMD. Therefore, the enzymes in the retina along with their genes may constitute a perspective target in AMD prevention and therapy.

  16. Treatment of stable COPD: antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. MacNee

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that an increased oxidative burden occurs in the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and this results in an imbalance between oxidants/antioxidants or oxidative stress, which may play a role in many of the processes involved in the pathogenesis of COPD. These include enhanced proteolytic activity, mucus hypersecretion and the enhanced inflammatory response in the lungs to inhaling tobacco smoke, which is characteristic of COPD. COPD is now recognised to have multiple systemic consequences, such as weight loss and skeletal muscle dysfunction. It is now thought that oxidative stress may extend beyond the lungs and is involved in these systemic effects. Antioxidant therapy therefore would seem to be a logical therapeutic approach in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There is a need for more potent antioxidant therapies to test the hypothesis that antioxidant drugs may be a new therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  17. Antioxidant activity of polyaniline nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Well-confined uniform polyaniline (PANT) nanofibers were synthesized by using photo-assisted chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of different dopant acids, and the radical scavenging ability of the produced PANI nanofibers was determined by the DPPH assay. It was found that the antioxidant activity of PANI nanofibers was higher than conventional PANI,and increased with decreasing of averaged diameter of the nanofibers. The enhanced antioxidant activity was concerned with increased surface area of PANI nanofibers.

  18. The sources of natural antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Sikora

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Intensive oxidative processes occuring in human organism lead to formation of oxygen reactive forms, which can damage systemic cells and tissues. It is shown, that body endogenous protective system can be supported in that case by natural antioxidant compounds provided from food. The assessment of food products as the potential sources of antioxidants was performed, taking into consideration the kinds of compounds supplied, and their significance in the diet of different nations.

  19. Oxidants and antioxidants in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Svendsen, Ove

    2007-01-01

    Important infectious diseases in farm animals, such as pneumonia and enteritis, are thought to be associated with the so-called oxidative stress, i.e. a chemical phenomenon involving an imbalance in the redox status of the individual animal. The specifics of oxidative stress and how it may result...... theoretically, oxidative stress should be easily prevented with antioxidants yet the use of antioxidants as therapy remains controversial. The present knowledge on oxidative stress in farm animals is the topic of this review....

  20. IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF IPOEMA BILOBA

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    Priti Tagde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecules can be oxidized by free radicals. This oxidative damage has an important etiological role in aging and the development of diseases like cancer, atherosclerosis, and other inflammatory disorders. Synthetic antioxidants, like butylated hydroxyanisole, are good free radical scavengers; however, the synthetic antioxidants can be carcinogenic. Therefore, there is an increasing interest in searching for antioxidants of natural origin.   Antioxidants with different chemical properties may recharge each other in an antioxidant network. The total antioxidant content of dietary plants may therefore be a useful tool for testing the 'antioxidant network' hypothesis. Several berries, fruits, nuts, seeds, vegetables, drinks and spices have been found to be high in total antioxidants. Initial studies in animals and humans are supportive as to the beneficial effects of dietary plants rich in total antioxidants. Additionally, antioxidants and other plant compounds may also improve the endogenous antioxidant defense through induction of antioxidant and phase 2 enzymes.1,2 Dietary plants rich in such compounds include broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, kale, cauliflower, carrots, onions, tomatoes, spinach and garlic , antioxidants and other plant compounds may also improve the endogenous antioxidant defense through induction of antioxidant and phase 2 enzymes.

  1. Determining the effects of lipophilic drugs on membrane structure by solid-state NMR spectroscopy: the case of the antioxidant curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Jeffrey; Fritz, Michelle; Brender, Jeffrey R; Smith, Pieter E S; Lee, Dong-Kuk; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2009-04-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of turmeric powder, a natural spice used for generations in traditional medicines. Curcumin's broad spectrum of antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antimutagenic, and anti-inflammatory properties makes it particularly interesting for the development of pharmaceutical compounds. Because of curcumin's various effects on the function of numerous unrelated membrane proteins, it has been suggested that it affects the properties of the bilayer itself. However, a detailed atomic-level study of the interaction of curcumin with membranes has not been attempted. A combination of solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetry experiments shows curcumin has a strong effect on membrane structure at low concentrations. Curcumin inserts deep into the membrane in a transbilayer orientation, anchored by hydrogen bonding to the phosphate group of lipids in a manner analogous to cholesterol. Like cholesterol, curcumin induces segmental ordering in the membrane. Analysis of the concentration dependence of the order parameter profile derived from NMR results suggests curcumin forms higher order oligomeric structures in the membrane that span and likely thin the bilayer. Curcumin promotes the formation of the highly curved inverted hexagonal phase, which may influence exocytotic and membrane fusion processes within the cell. The experiments outlined here show promise for understanding the action of other drugs such as capsaicin in which drug-induced alterations of membrane structure have strong pharmacological effects.

  2. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, functional properties and mutagenicity studies of protein and protein hydrolysate obtained from Prosopis alba seed flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Florencia; Sayago, Jorge Esteban; Alberto, María Rosa; Zampini, Iris Catiana; Ordoñez, Roxana Mabel; Chamorro, Verónica; Pazos, Adriana; Isla, María Inés

    2014-10-15

    Prosopis species are considered multipurpose trees and shrubs by FAO and their fruit constitute a food source for humans and animals. According to the "Código Alimentario Argentino", "algarrobo flour" is produced by grinding the whole mature pod, but in the traditional process most of the seeds are discarded. In this paper, the flour from seed was obtained. Then, the proteins were extracted and enzymatic hydrolysis was carried out. According to their amino acid profile and chemical score (>100%), the Prosopis alba proteins, are not deficient in essential amino acids considering the amount of amino acid necessary by adults. The protein isolate showed a good solubility (pH 7.4-9), emulsificant capacity, oil binding capacity and water adsorption capacity. The antioxidant ability of proteins was significantly increased with hydrolysis (SC50 values: 50-5μg/mL, respectively). Inhibitory activity of pro-inflammatory enzymes (lipoxygenase and phospholipase) was described. The mutagenicity/antimutagenicity of proteins and protein hydrolysates from seed flour were also analysed. The results suggest that P. alba cotyledon flour could be a new alternative in the formulation of functional foods not only for its high protein content but also by the biological and functional properties of its proteins and protein hydrolysates.

  3. Phytochemical, antioxidant, antiviral and cytotoxic evaluation of Opuntia dillenii flowers

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    Arthanari Saravana Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Opuntia dillenii used in Asian traditional medicine especially in China. We here report on the investigation of the phytochemical content, antioxidant, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanolic extract of O. dillenii flowers. The antioxidant activity was measured with the DPPH, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging method. In the antiviral and cytotoxic assay we used different viruses in different cell lines. In antioxidant assay, the DPPH assay exhibited potent antioxidant abilities with IC50 of 58.7 µg/mL. In antiviral assay, the extract possess strongest antiviral activity against herpes simplex 1(EC50= 25 µg/mL and 2 (EC50= 20 µg/mL, vaccinia (EC50= 100 µg/mL and moderate activity for remaining viruses (EC50= >100 µg/mL. The cytotoxicity effect was evaluated using MTT assay and the results revealed that the extracts exhibited cytotoxicity above the range of 100 µg/mL. Our present reports confirmed that the O. dillenii could be a potential antioxidant and antimicrobial agent in near future.

  4. Lycopene content, antioxidant capacity and colour attributes of selected watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Mansfeld) cultivars grown in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagal, Shweta; Kaur, Charanjit; Choudhary, Harshawardhan; Singh, Jashbir; Bhushan Singh, Braj; Singh, K N

    2012-12-01

    The present investigation reports variability in lycopene, ascorbic acid, total phenolics, antioxidant capacity and colour attributes of 12 watermelon cultivars grown in India. Antioxidant capacity was evaluated using four in vitro assays, namely ferric reducing antioxidant power, cupric reducing antioxidant capacity, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl. Among watermelon cultivars, significant differences (p < 0.05) were found with respect to lycopene content and antioxidant capacity. Lycopene content ranged from 03.46 to 8.00 mg/100 g fresh weight. Colour of watermelon flesh was described by an optimized colour index (CI). Cultivars 'PWM25-4', 'Arun', 'Kiran' and 'Kareena' were found to be the most promising ones with highest lycopene content, antioxidant capacity and CI. Results indicate that watermelon is a good source of dietary lycopene and there exists significant variation that can be exploited to produce high-quality cultivars.

  5. Comparison of phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and cellular antioxidant activities of different varieties of blueberry (Vaccinium spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huailing; Guo, Xinbo; Hu, Xiaodan; Li, Tong; Fu, Xiong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2017-02-15

    Numerous reports have demonstrated that the consumption of fruits and vegetables is beneficial for the human health. Blueberries, in particular, are rich in phytochemicals including free and bound forming. Phytochemical profiles of 14 varieties of blueberry were compared in this study. 12 compounds were analyzed and had significant changes in blueberry fruits. Total antioxidant activities in different blueberry varieties varied about 2.6times by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, and 2times by peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PSC) assay. The cellular antioxidant activities (CAA) in different varieties varied about 3.9times without phosphate buffer saline (PBS) wash, and 4.7times with PBS wash by CAA assay. Blueberry extracts had potent antiproliferative activities against HepG2 human liver cancer cells, indicating the potential protective benefits associated with their use as functional foods. The anti-proliferative activity was observed to be dose-dependent in blueberry extracts.

  6. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of leaf infusions of Myrtaceae species from Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, L K; Imatomi, M; Gualtieri, S C J

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying new antioxidants from plant materials. Several studies have emphasized the antioxidant activity of species belonging to the Myrtaceae family. However, there are few reports on these species from the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). In this study, the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of 12 native Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado were evaluated (Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Eugenia bimarginata, Eugenia dysenterica, Eugenia klotzschiana, Hexachlamys edulis, Myrcia bella, Myrcia lingua, Myrcia splendens, Myrcia tomentosa, Psidium australe, Psidium cinereum, and Psidium laruotteanum). Antioxidant potential was assessed using the antioxidant activity index (AAI) by the DPPH method and total phenolic content (TPC) by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. There was a high correlation between TPC and AAI values. Psidium laruotteanum showed the highest TPC (576.56 mg GAE/g extract) and was the most potent antioxidant (AAI = 7.97, IC50 = 3.86 µg·mL-1), with activity close to that of pure quercetin (IC50 = 2.99 µg·mL-1). The extracts of nine species showed IC50 of 6.24-8.75 µg·mL-1. Most species showed TPC and AAI values similar to or higher than those for Camellia sinensis, a commonly consumed tea with strong antioxidant properties. The results reveal that the analyzed Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado possess high phenolic contents and antioxidant activities. Thus, they are a potential source of new natural antioxidants.

  7. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of leaf infusions of Myrtaceae species from Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Takao

    Full Text Available Abstract There is considerable interest in identifying new antioxidants from plant materials. Several studies have emphasized the antioxidant activity of species belonging to the Myrtaceae family. However, there are few reports on these species from the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna. In this study, the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of 12 native Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado were evaluated (Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Eugenia bimarginata, Eugenia dysenterica, Eugenia klotzschiana, Hexachlamys edulis, Myrcia bella, Myrcia lingua, Myrcia splendens, Myrcia tomentosa, Psidium australe, Psidium cinereum, and Psidium laruotteanum. Antioxidant potential was assessed using the antioxidant activity index (AAI by the DPPH method and total phenolic content (TPC by the Folin–Ciocalteu assay. There was a high correlation between TPC and AAI values. Psidium laruotteanum showed the highest TPC (576.56 mg GAE/g extract and was the most potent antioxidant (AAI = 7.97, IC50 = 3.86 µg·mL−1, with activity close to that of pure quercetin (IC50 = 2.99 µg·mL−1. The extracts of nine species showed IC50 of 6.24–8.75 µg·mL−1. Most species showed TPC and AAI values similar to or higher than those for Camellia sinensis, a commonly consumed tea with strong antioxidant properties. The results reveal that the analyzed Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado possess high phenolic contents and antioxidant activities. Thus, they are a potential source of new natural antioxidants.

  8. Portable ceria nanoparticle-based assay for rapid detection of food antioxidants (NanoCerac)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Erica; Frasco, Thalia; Andreescu, Daniel; Andreescu, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    With increased awareness of nutrition and the advocacy for healthier food choices, there exists a great demand for a simple, easy-to-use test that can reliably measure the antioxidant capacity of dietary products. We report development and characterization of a portable nanoparticle based-assay, similar to a small sensor patch, for rapid and sensitive detection of food antioxidants. The assay is based on the use of immobilized ceria nanoparticles, which change color after interaction with antioxidants by means of redox and surface chemistry reactions. Monitoring corresponding optical changes enables sensitive detection of antioxidants in which the nanoceria provides an optical ‘signature’ of antioxidant power, while the antioxidants act as reducing agents. The sensor has been tested for the detection of common antioxidant compounds including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, vanilic acid, quercetin, caffeic acid, and epigallocatechin gallate and its function has been successfully applied for the assessment of antioxidant activity in real samples (teas and medicinal mushrooms). The colorimetric response was concentration dependent, with detection limits ranging from 20–400 μM depending on the antioxidant involved. Steady-state color intensity was achieved within seconds upon addition of antioxidants. The results are presented in terms of Gallic Acid Equivalents (GAE). The sensor performed favorably when compared with commonly used antioxidant detection methods. This assay is particularly appealing for remote sensing applications, where specialized equipment is not available, and also for high throughput analysis of a large number of samples. Potential applications for antioxidant detection in remote locations are envisioned. PMID:23139929

  9. English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) protect endogenous antioxidants in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellagic acid monomers, polymeric tannins and related phenolic compounds isolated from English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) have been reported to inhibit LDL oxidation ex vivo and decrease biomarkers of oxidative stress in animal models. To determine whether dietary and endogenous antioxidants are pres...

  10. Determination of the effects of organic antioxidants and fat sources on performance, carcass and bone characteristics of broilers under heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyyed javad Hosseini-vashan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Heat stress is one of the major environmental stressors that negatively influence feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, nutrient digestion, absorption, and retention in the poultry production. In the two last decades, several researches were done to find approaches for decreasing the undesirable effects of high ambient temperatures. Supplementation of powder, extract and essence of some medicinal plants were proposed that could be used in poultry production to improve the performance, immune system and antioxidant status in heat stress condition. Turmeric powder is known as a natural antioxidant, because it has several antioxidant component specially curcumin that prevent the oxidative reaction and the free radicals production in the live body. On the other hand, some of by-products in food industry may also be used in heat stressed birds. Tomato pomace is a reachable source of vit E, C and A and several carotenoids specially lycopene that has antimutagenic, anticancer and antioxidant properties. Therefore the objective of this research was to investigate the effects of organic antioxidants including turmeric powder and tomato pomace and fat sources including soybean oil, canola oil and tallow on performance, carcass and bone characteristics of broilers under heat stress. Materials and Methods An experiment with factorial arrangement 3× 2× 2 (3 oils involved: canola, soybean, tallow, 2 turmeric powder (TRP levels involved 0.4, 0.8% and 2 tomato pomace (TP levels 3, 5 of TP% in a completely randomized design in heat stressed birds was done. Five hundred four one-d-old male Ross broilers were randomly allocated to 36 experimental units with 12 dietary treatments (3 replicates with 12 birds in each. The feed and water were supplied ad libitum. All diets were balanced to meet the nutrient requirement proposed by the Ross committee. A daily heat stressed (HS schedule (33oC for 5 h was applied from 29 to 42d of

  11. Tissue damage and oxidant/antioxidant balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Borekci, Bunyamin; Yapca, O Erkan; Bilen, Habib; Suleyman, Halis

    2013-02-01

    The oxidant/antioxidant balance in healthy tissues is maintained with a predominance of antioxidants. Various factors that can lead to tissue damage disrupt the oxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of oxidants. In this study, disruptions of the oxidant/antioxidant balance in favor of oxidants were found to be a consequence of the over-consumption of antioxidants. For this reason, antioxidants are considered to be of importance in the prevention and treatment of various types of tissue damage that are aggravated by stress.

  12. 藏茵陈总萜酮的致突变及抗突变作用%The safety and anti-mutagenicity of total terpene ketones from Swertiamussotii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冲; 侯娟; 韩晶; 芮菁

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究藏茵陈总萜酮的致突变及抗突变作用。方法:致突变实验采用Ames实验及小鼠体内微核实验。Ames实验采用常规掺入法;微核实验采用连续灌胃给药10 d的骨髓嗜多染红细胞微核计数法。抗突变实验采用体内、体外两种方法,体外法选用TA100及TA102菌株与环磷酰胺(每皿200µg)和丝裂霉素C(每皿2 g)共孵育30 min后,分别给予藏茵陈总萜酮每皿156、312、µ625、1250及2500µg,检测其对阳性剂诱发的已突变菌落的保护作用;体内实验采用藏茵陈总萜酮25、50及100 mg/kg小鼠连续灌胃给药10 d后,给予40 mg/kg环磷酰胺或2 mg/kg丝裂霉素C,计算微核率,检测其对未发生突变的骨髓细胞的保护作用。结果:致突变实验中,藏茵陈总萜酮在每皿<2500µg剂量下,未诱发Ames实验各菌株回变菌落数增加;在每皿<40 mg/kg剂量下,未诱发骨髓嗜多染红细胞微核率增高。抗突变实验中,藏茵陈总萜酮在每皿625~2500µg范围内,可使阳性致突变剂环磷酰胺和丝裂霉素C所诱发的高回变菌落数出现明显降低;藏茵陈总萜酮在50~100 mg/kg剂量范围,可使阳性剂环磷酰胺或丝裂霉素C所诱发的高微核率出现明显降低。结论:本实验条件下,藏茵陈总萜酮未表现出诱导基因突变和染色体畸变作用,且有显著的抗突变作用。%OBJECTIVE:To study the mutagenic and anti-mutagenic activities of total terpene ketones from Swertia mussotii (TTKS) at different doses. METHODS:Mutagenic experiments:conventional Ames test and micronucleus test were selected. Ames experiment was used with the incorporation method. Micronucleus test was conducted in mice which were treated orally once a day for 10 days consecutively. Anti-mutagenic experiments:methods in vitro,pre-incubated the TA100 and TA102 strains with CP (200 µg/plate) or MMC (2 µg/plate) for 30 minutes,then mixed the above materials with

  13. Synergistic antioxidant activity of green tea with some herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj P Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, etc. are caused by free radicals that are byproducts of metabolic pathways. Selected plants namely Vitis vinifera, Phyllanthus emblica L., Punica granatum, Cinnamomum cassia, Ginkgo biloba L., and Camellia sinensis Linn. are reported to produce antioxidant property. This study is undertaken to support the hypothesis that formulation of a polyherbal combination of these plants shows a synergistic effect with green tea. The extracts of each drug were characterized by phytochemical studies and tests for phenolics and flavonoids. In vitro antioxidant activity for individual drug and its combination was determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, superoxide, and nitric oxide free radical scavenging methods. Our results suggest that a combination of all these herbs with green tea can synergistically enhance antioxidant activity and thus lower doses of each herb with green tea may be used. Antioxidant potential of polyherbal combination was also comparable to that of standard ascorbic acid. Studies showed that selected individual plants contained abundant quantity of phenolics and flavonoids and their polyherbal combination with green tea was found to produce best antioxidant activity among all individual extracts. This will help in avoiding undesirable side effects due to higher doses of single herb.

  14. Nanostructured amorphous nickel oxide with enhanced antioxidant activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhu, G. [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695581 (India); Department of Physics, University College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695034 (India); Biju, V., E-mail: bijunano@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695581 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nanostructured amorphous nickel oxide by a facile chemical route. • Enhanced antioxidant activity of amorphous NiO compared to crystalline samples. • Role of O{sup 2−} vacancies and high specific surface area in antioxidant activity. • Use of DC conductivity, XPS and BET to explain enhanced antioxidant activity. - Abstract: Nanostructured amorphous nickel oxide was synthesized by the thermal decomposition of nickel chloride–ethanol amine complex. The X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopic studies established the amorphous nature of the sample. The Fourier Transform Infrared, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic studies of the sample revealed the formation of NiO. The specific surface area of the sample is measured using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis and the mesoporous nature of the sample is established through Barrett–Joyner–Halenda pore size distribution analysis. The antioxidant activity of the amorphous sample measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging is found to be nearly twice greater than that reported for nanocrystalline NiO samples. The estimated radical scavenging activity of the sample is correlated with the DC conductivity values measured in vacuum and air ambience. The enhanced antioxidant activity of the amorphous NiO is accounted by the increase in the concentration of O{sup 2−} vacancies and the specific surface area. The Ni 2p and O 1s X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic studies of the sample support the inference.

  15. Antioxidant Properties of Aminoethylcysteine Ketimine Decarboxylated Dimer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Marina Matarese

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminoethylcysteine ketimine decarboxylated dimer is a natural sulfur-containing compound detected in human plasma and urine, in mammalian brain and in many common edible vegetables. Over the past decade many studies have been undertaken to identify its metabolic role. Attention has been focused on its antioxidant properties and on its reactivity against oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. These properties have been studied in different model systems starting from plasma lipoproteins to specific cellular lines. All these studies report that aminoethylcysteine ketimine decarboxylated dimer is able to interact both with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite and its derivatives. Its antioxidant activity is similar to that of Vitamin E while higher than other hydrophilic antioxidants, such as trolox and N-acetylcysteine.

  16. Mushrooms: A rich source of the antioxidants ergothioneine and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaras, Michael D; Richie, John P; Calcagnotto, Ana; Beelman, Robert B

    2017-10-15

    While mushrooms are the highest dietary source for the unique sulfur-containing antioxidant ergothioneine, little is known regarding levels of the major biological antioxidant glutathione. Thus, our objectives were to determine and compare levels of glutathione, as well as ergothioneine, in different species of mushrooms. Glutathione levels varied >20-fold (0.11-2.41mg/gdw) with some varieties having higher levels than reported for other foods. Ergothioneine levels also varied widely (0.15-7.27mg/gdw) and were highly correlated with those of glutathione (r=0.62, Pglutathione compared to the first flush, possibly as a response to increased oxidative stress. This study demonstrated that certain mushroom species are high in glutathione and ergothioneine and should be considered an excellent dietary source of these important antioxidants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of antioxidant properties of monoaromatic derivatives of pulvinic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habrant, Damien; Poigny, Stéphane; Ségur-Derai, Muriel; Brunel, Yves; Heurtaux, Benoît; Le Gall, Thierry; Strehle, Axelle; Saladin, Régis; Meunier, Stéphane; Mioskowski, Charles; Wagner, Alain

    2009-04-23

    The natural mushroom pigment Norbadione A and three other pulvinic acids were shown by our group to display very efficient antioxidant properties by comparison with a collection of potent molecules including catechols, flavonoids, stilbenes, or coumarins. Despite numerous publications on robust and straightforward synthetic access to pulvinic acids by us and others, no report has been made to unravel the structure-activity relationships that govern the striking antioxidant activity. Herein is presented the synthesis of 18 diverse pulvinic acid derivatives and the study of their radical scavenging capacities by four different assays. The influence of each of the two phenyl rings, of their substituents and of the lateral chain on the antioxidant properties, was explored to reveal a simplified structure of excellent activity. These results, along with the absence of cytotoxicity, make the synthesized compounds interesting to evaluate for several biological activities and especially for anti-inflammatory effects and skin protection against UV induced oxidative stress.

  18. The proper time for antioxidant consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Michaël; Schaefer, H Martin

    2014-04-10

    Consuming food rich in antioxidants may help organisms to increase their antioxidant defences and avoid oxidative damage. Under the hypothesis that organisms actively consume food for its antioxidant properties, they would need to do so in view of other physiological requirements, such as energy requirements. Here, we observed that Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) consumed most seeds rich in antioxidants in the middle of the day, while their consumption of staple seeds more profitable in energy intake (and poor in antioxidants) was maximal in the morning and the evening. This consumption of seeds rich in antioxidants in the middle of the day may be explicable (1) because birds took advantage of a time window associated with relaxed energy requirements to ingest antioxidant resources, or (2) because birds consumed antioxidant resources as a response to the highest antioxidant requirements in the middle of the day. If the latter hypothesis holds true, having the possibility to ingest antioxidants should be most beneficial in terms of oxidative balance in the middle of the day. Even though feeding on seeds rich in antioxidants improved Gouldian finches' overall antioxidant capacity, we did not detect any diurnal effect of antioxidant intake on plasma oxidative markers (as measured by the d-ROM and the OXY-adsorbent tests). This indicates that the diurnal pattern of antioxidant intake that we observed was most likely constrained by the high consumption of staple food to replenish or build up body reserves in the morning and in the evening, and not primarily determined by elevated antioxidant requirements in the middle of the day. Consequently, animals appear to have the possibility to increase antioxidant defences by selecting food rich in antioxidants, only when energetic constraints are relaxed.

  19. Peroxidoxins: a new antioxidant family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, S; Dalton, J P; James, E R

    1998-04-01

    Peroxidoxins are a recently described family of antioxidants. They have an ancient origin, being present in organisms as primitive as the archaea, and they appear to be ubiquitous in living cells. Here, Sharon McGonigle, John Dalton and Eric James review the present understanding of the functions and mechanism of action of these enzymes and suggest that these antioxidants may represent the ;missing link' in the metabolism of reactive oxygen species by some protozoan and helminth parasites. Also, by performing sequence comparisons of homologues entered in the public databases, they have classified the parasite peroxidoxins as 1-cys or 2-cys enzymes. The discovery of these antioxidants may change our understanding of how reactive oxygen species, of parasite or host origin, are managed by parasites.

  20. ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriraja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hyperglycemia and dislipidemia in DM induce increased lipid peroxdation and free radical formation. This is an important mechanism of microangiopathy. AIM To measure the antioxidant status in type 2 DM with nephropathy and compared with nondiabetic control group. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 type 2 DM patients aged between 50 to 70 years according to national diabetes data group criteria with nephropathy diagnosed on the basis of history, physical examination and biochemical parameters were included. 50 age and sex matched apparently healthy individuals with normal plasma glucose, normal renal parameters and with no symptoms suggestive of DM were taken as controls. RESULTS Antioxidant status was significantly less in patients with diabetic nephropathy. CONCLUSION Data suggests that alteration in antioxidant status may help predict the risk of diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Amphiphilic NO-donor antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegaev, Konstantin; Lazzarato, Loretta; Rolando, Barbara; Marini, Elisabetta; Lopez, Gloria V; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2007-02-01

    Models of amphiphilic NO-donor antioxidants 24-26 were designed and synthesized. The products were obtained by linking a lipophilic tail (C(6), C(8), C(10)) with a polar head constituted by the 2,6-dimethoxyphenol antioxidant joined to the NO-donor 3-furoxancarboxamide substructure through a bridge containing a quaternary ammonium group. Compound 23, containing the shortest C(2)-alkyl chain, was also studied as a reference. The antioxidant properties (TBARS and LDL oxidation assays) and the vasodilator properties of the compounds were studied in vitro. The ability of these products to interact with phospholipid vesicles was also investigated by NMR techniques. The results indicate that both activities are modulated by the ability of the compounds to accumulate on phospholipid layers.

  2. Chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities of eight mulberry cultivars from China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liang, Linghong; Wu, Xiangyang; Zhu, Maomao; Zhao, Weiguo; Li, Fang; Zou, Ye; Yang, Liuqing

    2012-01-01

    Mulberry (Morus, Moraceae) is widely distributed in the temperate, subtropical, or tropical regions of the world, while there are no conclusive reports on the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant properties...

  3. Multifunctional polyoxometalates-modified upconversion nanoparticles: integration of electrochromic devices and antioxidants detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yanling; Zhu, Chengzhou; Ren, Jiangtao; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-03-25

    We report a novel design, based on a combination of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles and polyoxometalates, for electrically controlled fluorescence switches and sensitive detection of antioxidants in aqueous solution.

  4. Effect of seed maturation stages on physical properties and antioxidant activity in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahid HERCHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe changes in flaxseed constituents at different stages of maturity are reported. The physical properties and antioxidant activity of flaxseed oil during flaxseed development have been evaluated. Continuous decrease in total polyphenol content during flaxseed development. All the results showed no significant differences between HPLC-MS and TLC for quantitative determination of phospholipids classes. The fatty acid compositions of individual phospholipids were also reported. The antioxidant activity of oilseed was assessed by means of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging assay. The test demonstrated that the antioxidant activity of the flaxseed oil was found to be harvesting time-dependant.

  5. Partitioning of selected antioxidants in mayonnaise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Schwarz, K.; Stockmann, H.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined partitioning of alpha-, beta-, and gamma- tocopherol and six polar antioxidants (Trolox, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, propyl gallate, gallic acid, and catechin) in mayonnaise. Partitioning of antioxidants between different phases was determined after separation of mayonnaise by...

  6. Antioxidant potential of Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Munish; Garg, Chanchal; Mukherjee, Pulok K.; Suresh, B.

    2004-01-01

    The present study is based on the evaluation of antioxidant potential of a well known plant Lactuca sativa. Methanolic leaf extract was investigated for in vitro inhibition of oxidative damage induced by UV-radiations to the salmonella typhi bacteria and in vivo effect on the production of body enzymes i.e. catalase and superoxide dismutase. The lipid peroxidation masurement was also done in terms of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in blood and brain of male albino wistar rats. The plant extract has shown significant antioxidant potential both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22557144

  7. Total dietary antioxidant capacity, individual antioxidant intake and breast cancer risk: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantavos, A.; Ruiter, R.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Keyser, de C.E.; Hofman, A.; Stricker, B.H.C.; Franco, O.H.; Kiefte-de Jong, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Some studies suggest a favorable role of antioxidants on breast cancer risk but this is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess whether overall dietary antioxidant capacity, as assessed by dietary ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), and individual dietary antioxidant intake

  8. Antioxidant intake, plasma antioxidants and oxidative stress in a randomized, controlled, parallel, Mediterranean dietary intervention study on patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Jan

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have reported that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA obtained a significant reduction in disease activity by adopting a Mediterranean-type diet. The present study was carried out to investigate the antioxidant intake, the plasma levels of antioxidants and a marker of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde during the study presented earlier. Methods RA patients randomized to either a Mediterranean type diet (MD group; n = 26 or a control diet (CD group; n = 25 were compared during a three month dietary intervention study. Their antioxidant intake was assessed by means of diet history interviews and their intake of antioxidant-rich foods by a self-administered questionnaire. The plasma levels of retinol, antioxidants (α- and γ-tocopherol, β-carotene, lycopene, vitamin C and uric acid and urinary malondialdehyde (MDA, a marker for oxidative stress, were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. The Student's t-test for independent samples and paired samples were used to test differences between and within groups. For variables with skewed distributions Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test were performed. To evaluate associations between dietary intake of antioxidants, as well as between disease activity, MDA and antioxidants we used Pearson's product moment correlation or Spearman's rank correlation. Results The MD group had significantly higher intake frequencies of antioxidant-rich foods, and also higher intakes of vitamin C (p = 0.014, vitamin E (p = 0.007 and selenium (p = 0.004, and a lower intake of retinol (p = 0.049, compared to the CD group. However, the difference between the groups regarding vitamin C intake was not significant when under- and over-repoters were excluded (p = 0.066. There were no changes in urine MDA or in the plasma levels of antioxidants (after p-lipid adjustments of the tocopherol results, from baseline to the end of the study. The levels of retinol

  9. Antioxidant activity of the microalga Spirulina maxima

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, M. S.; Cintra,R.G.; S.B.M. Barros; J. Mancini-Filho

    1998-01-01

    Spirulina maxima, which is used as a food additive, is a microalga rich in protein and other essential nutrients. Spirulina contains phenolic acids, tocopherols and ß-carotene which are known to exhibit antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of a Spirulina extract. The antioxidant activity of a methanolic extract of Spirulina was determined in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro antioxidant capacity was tested on a brain homogenate incubated ...

  10. Antiradical and antioxidant activities of new bio-antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheva, V D; Saso, L; Angelova, S E; Foti, M C; Slavova-Kasakova, A; Daquino, C; Enchev, V; Firuzi, O; Nechev, J

    2012-02-01

    Antioxidants could be promising agents for management of oxidative stress-related diseases. New biologically active compounds, belonging to a rare class of natural lignans with antiangiogenic, antitumoral and DNA intercalating properties, have been recently synthesized. These compounds are benzo[kl]xanthene lignans (1,2) and dihydrobenzofuran neolignans (3,4). The radical scavenging and chain-breaking antioxidant activities of compounds 1-4 were studied by applying different methods: radical scavenging activity by DPPH rapid test, chain-breaking antioxidant activity and quantum chemical calculations. All studied compounds were found to be active as DPPH scavengers but reaction time with DPPH and compounds' concentrations influenced deeply the evaluation. The highest values of radical scavenging activity (%RSAmax) and largest rate constants for reaction with DPPH were obtained for compounds 2 and 3. Comparison of %RSAmax with that of standard antioxidants DL-α-tocopherol (TOH), caffeic acid (CA) and butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT) give the following new order of %RSA max: TOH (61.1%) > CA (58.6%) > 3 (36.3%) > 2 (28.1%) > 4 (6.7%) > 1 (3.6%) = BHT (3.6%). Chain-breaking antioxidant activities of individual compounds (0.1-1.0 mM) and of their equimolar binary mixtures (0.1 mM) with TOH were determined from the kinetic curves of lipid autoxidation at 80 °C. On the basis of a comparable kinetic analysis with standard antioxidants a new order of the antioxidant efficiency (i.e., protection factor, PF) of compounds 1-4 were obtained: 2 (7.2) ≥ TOH (7.0) ≥ CA (6.7) > 1 (3.1) > 3 (2.2) > ferulic acid FA (1.5) > 4 (0.6); and of the antioxidant reactivity (i.e. inhibition degree, ID): 2 (44.0) > TOH (18.7) > CA (9.3) > 1 (8.4) > 3 (2.8) > FA (1.0) > 4 (0.9). The important role of the catecholic structure in these compounds, which is responsible for the high chain-breaking antioxidant activity, is discussed and a reaction

  11. Antioxidants for pain in chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Jens, Sjoerd; Busch, Olivier R C; Keus, Frederik; van Goor, Harry; Gooszen, Hein G; Boermeester, Marja A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reduced intake and absorption of antioxidants due to pain and malabsorption are probable causes of the lower levels of antioxidants observed in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). Improving the status of antioxidants might be effective in slowing the disease process and reducing pai

  12. Analysis of Two Methods to Evaluate Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasina, Florencia; Carabio, Claudio; Celano, Laura; Thomson, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This exercise is intended to introduce undergraduate biochemistry students to the analysis of antioxidants as a biotechnological tool. In addition, some statistical resources will also be used and discussed. Antioxidants play an important metabolic role, preventing oxidative stress-mediated cell and tissue injury. Knowing the antioxidant content…

  13. 21 CFR 181.24 - Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Antioxidants. 181.24 Section 181.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Antioxidants. Substances classified as antioxidants, when migrating from food-packaging material (limit of...

  14. Analysis of Two Methods to Evaluate Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasina, Florencia; Carabio, Claudio; Celano, Laura; Thomson, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This exercise is intended to introduce undergraduate biochemistry students to the analysis of antioxidants as a biotechnological tool. In addition, some statistical resources will also be used and discussed. Antioxidants play an important metabolic role, preventing oxidative stress-mediated cell and tissue injury. Knowing the antioxidant content…

  15. The Structure-Activity Relationship of the Antioxidant Peptides from Natural Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tang-Bin; He, Tai-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin; Tang, Huan-Wen; Xia, En-Qin

    2016-01-12

    Peptides derived from dietary proteins, have been reported to display significant antioxidant activity, which may exert notably beneficial effects in promoting human health and in food processing. Recently, much research has focused on the generation, separation, purification and identification of novel peptides from various protein sources. Some researchers have tried to discover the structural characteristics of antioxidant peptides in order to lessen or avoid the tedious and aimless work involving the ongoing generated peptide preparation schemes. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on the relationship between the structural features of peptides and their antioxidant activities. The relationship between the structure of the precursor proteins and their abilities to release antioxidant fragments will also be summarized and inferred. The preparation methods and antioxidant capacity evaluation assays of peptides and a prediction scheme of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) will also be pointed out and discussed.

  16. In vitro antioxidant assay of selected aqueous plant extracts and their polyherbal formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganga Raju M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To support the use of selected plant extracts in Ayurveda, naturopathy, the antioxidant potential of the aqueous extract of Vincarosea (VR, Gymnemasylvestre (GS, Tinosporacordifolia (TC and Emblicaofficinalis (EO and their mixture (PHF of Indian origin was investigated for in vitro antioxidant activity by using in vitro models like superoxide, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxide inhibition assay. The results were compared with standard (ascorbic acid, a known antioxidant. The various phytoconstituents identified in the above selected plants extracts were poly phenols, flavonoids, terpenoids, tannins, alkaloids. The terpenoids were reported to protect lipids, blood and body fluids against the attack of free radicals, some types of reactive oxygen, hydroxylic groups, peroxides and superoxide radicals. The presence of these phytoconstituents in selected plants might be responsible for antioxidant activity with that of known antioxidant ascorbic acid.

  17. Comparative study on Allium schoenoprasum cultivated plant and Allium schoenoprasum tissue culture organs antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajner, D; Popović, B M; Calić-Dragosavac, D; Malenčić, D; Zdravković-Korać, S

    2011-11-01

    This study was designed to examine Allium schoenoprasum tissue culture organs antioxidant and scavenging activity and to make a comparison between Allium schoenoprasum cultivated plant and Allium schoenoprasum tissue culture organs antioxidant activity. This study reports the results on the root, stalk and leaf antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and glutathione peroxidase), reduced glutathione quantity, flavonoids and soluble protein contents and quantities of malonyldialdehyde and ·OH radical. In Allium schoenoprasum tissue culture organs the total antioxidant capacity was determined by the FRAP method and scavenger activity by the DPPH method. The present results indicated that the crude extract of Allium schoenoprasum tissue culture exhibited antioxidant and scavenging abilities in all investigated plant parts, especially in the roots. According to our results, the tissue culture plants exhibited the highest activities in the roots in contrast to the cultivated plants where highest activities were observed in the leaves.

  18. Antioxidative activity of Geranium macrorrhizum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miliauskas, G.; Beek, van T.A.; Venskutonis, P.R.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Waard, de P.

    2004-01-01

    The composition of radical-scavenging compounds from Geranium macrorrhizum leaves was analyzed and the antioxidative activities of various extracts was determined. Seven compounds, namely gallic acid, ellagic acid, 4-galloyl quinic acid, the flavonoid quercetin and three of its glycosides, quercetin

  19. Beta-carotene as antioxidant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Plas, R.M. van der; Berg, H. van den; Haenen, G.R.M.M.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Beta-carotene has been shown to exhibit a good radical-trapping antioxidant activity in vitro. We were interested to see if dietary β-carotene in combination with various intake levels for vitamin A would also inhibit lipid peroxidation. Design: Sixty male Wistar rats received vitamin A (

  20. Antioxidant capacity and physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marciniak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is a presentation of current knowledge regarding the changes of plasma antioxidant capacity observed in response to physical exercise. Human body created the enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems, which play a protective role in the harmful impact of free radicals. Those two systems constitute what is known as the plasma total antioxidant capacity. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (NOS in combination with oxidation processes increases in some tissues during physiological response to physical exercise. These changes are observed after single bout of exercise as well as after regular training. The response of human body to physical exercise can be analysed using various models of exercise test. Application of repeated type of exhaustion allows for characterizing the ability of human body to adjust to the increased energy loss and increased oxygen consumption. This article presents the characteristics of components of plasma antioxidant capacity, the mechanisms of free radicals production and their role in human body. It discusses also the currently used methods of detecting changes in total antioxidant capacity and its individual elements in response to single bout of exercise and regular training. It presents the review of literature about research performed in groups of both regularly training and low exercise activity individuals as well as in group of healthy subjects and patients with circulation diseases.

  1. Antioxidant therapy in idiopathic oligoasthenoteratozoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Majzoub

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Additional randomized controlled studies are required to confirm the efficacy and safety of antioxidant supplementation in the medical treatment of idiopathic male infertility as well as the dosage required to improve semen parameters, fertilization rates, and pregnancy outcomes in iOAT.

  2. Fruit antioxidants during vinegar processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakir, Sena; Toydemir, Gamze; Boyacioglu, Dilek; Beekwilder, Jules; Capanoglu, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vinegars based on fruit juices could conserve part of the health-associated compounds present in the fruits. However, in general very limited knowledge exists on the consequences of vinegar-making on different antioxidant compounds from fruit. In this study vinegars derived from apple an

  3. In Vitro Antioxidant and Anticancer potential of Bark of Costus pictus D.DON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malairaj Sathuvan; Anadhan Vignesh; Ramar Thangam; Perumal Palani; Ramasamy Rengasamy; Kandasamy Murugesan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant and anticancer potential of different fractions of bark of Costus pictus using various in vitro antioxidant assay systems. Methods: In this study, assay like DPPH radical, superoxide anion radical scavenging activity, nitric oxide scavenging activity, hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity, metal chelating activity and reducing power were used. The concentrations of total phenolic and flavonoids were also calculated for the extracts.Result:pictus. This study suggested that, among the three fractions, the chloroform fraction possesses high antioxidant activity which might be helpful in preventing or slowing the progress of various oxidative stress related disorders. Moreover, all fractions possess potent anticancer properties against colon cancer cells of HT29 and lung carcinoma cells of A549. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the extract of the bark of C. pictus has potential natural antioxidant and this can be used in food industries. There are few reports on the antioxidant capacity of bark of C. pictus and the mechanism of different fractions of bark of C. pictus as antioxidative agents is still not fully understood. Hence further research is underway to analyse and isolate the active compounds responsible for the antioxidant and anticancer activity of different fractions of the bark of C.pictus. The present study elucidated for the first time the antioxidant property of bark of C.

  4. Isolation and characterisation of novel antioxidant constituents of Croton zambesicus leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderogba, M A; McGaw, L J; Bezabih, M; Abegaz, B M

    2011-08-01

    A 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-activity-directed fractionation was used to target antioxidant constituents of the ethyl acetate fraction obtained from a 20% aqueous methanol crude extract of Croton zambesicus leaf. Repeated column chromatography of the fraction on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 led to the isolation of a new natural product, identified as quercetin-3-O-β-6″(p-coumaroyl) glucopyranoside-3'-methyl ether, helichrysoside-3'-methyl ether (1), along with kaempferol-3-O-β-6″(p-coumaroyl) glucopyranoside, tiliroside (2) and apigenin-6-C-glucoside, isovitexin (3) as the antioxidant constituents. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated using spectroscopic techniques, namely NMR (1D and 2D) and mass spectrometry. Compounds 1 and 2 are reported from this species for the first time. In the qualitative antioxidant assay, the three isolated compounds instantly bleached the DPPH (0.2% MeOH) purple colour indicating antioxidant activity. In the quantitative antioxidant assay, all the isolated compounds demonstrated weak antioxidant activity compared to quercetin and rutin used as positive control antioxidant agents. The compounds displayed little to no cytotoxicity against Vero cells in an in vitro assay. The presence of these antioxidant compounds in the leaf extract of C. zambesicus could provide a rationale for the ethnomedicinal use of the plant in the management of oxidative-stress-related diseases in folk medicine.

  5. Simple and Rapid Method for the Determination of Uric Acid-Independent Antioxidant Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Modun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the relative contribution of uric acid level increases to the total measured antioxidative activity could be very useful for testing antioxidative products and their effect on human health. The aim of this report is to present a simple spectrophotometric method that combines the measurement of total antioxidative capacity of a sample by ferric reducing/antioxidative power (FRAP assay, with the uricase-reaction (specific elimination of uric acid, in order to establish and correct for the contribution of uric acid in FRAP values. We measured FRAP values, with (uric acid-independent antioxidant capacity, TAC-UA and without (total antioxidant capacity, TAC uricase treatment, and expressed it as μmol/L of uric acid equivalents. In such way, it was possible to determine both total and uric acid-independent antioxidant capacity, plasma uric acid (UA, as the difference between TAC and TAC-UA, and the ratio of the uric acid in total antioxidant capacity (UA/TAC.

  6. Effect of processing on phenolic antioxidants of fruits, vegetables, and grains--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Balunkeswar; Liu, Rui Hai; Tang, Juming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of processing operations such as drying/dehydration, canning, extrusion, high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric field, and ohmic heating on the phytochemicals of fruits, vegetables, and grains is important in retaining the health benefiting properties of these antioxidative compounds in processed food products. Most of the previous investigations in the literature on the antioxidants of fruits, vegetables, and grains have shown that food-processing operations reduced the antioxidants of the processed foods, which is also the usual consumer perception. However, in the last decade some articles in the literature reported that the evaluation of nutritional quality of processed fruits and vegetables not only depend on the quantity of vitamin C but should include analyses of other antioxidant phytochemicals and antioxidant activity. Thermal processing increased the total antioxidant activity of tomato and sweet corn. Most importantly, analysis also depends on the condition, type, and mechanism of antioxidant assays used. This review aims to provide concise information on the influence of various thermal and nonthermal food-processing operations on the stability and kinetics of health beneficial phenolic antioxidants of fruits, vegetables, and grains.

  7. A simple electrochemical method for the rapid estimation of antioxidant potentials of some selected medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidi, Salimeh; Mojab, Faraz; Bayandori Moghaddam, Abdolmajid; Tabib, Kimia; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Clinical and Epidemiological studies have shown that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular diseases, cancers and other related disorders. These beneficial health effects have been attributed in part to the presence of antioxidants in dietary plants. Therefore screening for antioxidant properties of plant extracts has been one of the interests of scientists in this field. Different screening methods have been reported for the evaluation of antioxidant properties of plant extracts in the literature. In the present research a rapid screening method has been introduced based on cyclic voltammetry for antioxidant screening of some selected medicinal plant extracts. CYCLIC VOLTAMMETRY OF METHANOLIC EXTRACTS OF SEVEN MEDICINAL PLANTS: Buxus hyrcana, Rumex crispus, Achillea millefolium, Zataria multiflora, Ginkgo biloba, Lippia citriodora and Heptaptera anisoptera was carried out at different scan rates. Based on the interpretation of voltammograms, Rumex crispus, Achillea millefolium and Ginkgo biloba showed higher antioxidant capability than the others while Lippia citriodora contained the highest amount of antioxidants. Cyclic voltammetry is expected to be a simple method for screening antioxidants and estimating the antioxidant activity of foods and medicinal plants.

  8. Impact of Antioxidants on Cardiolipin Oxidation in Liposomes: Why Mitochondrial Cardiolipin Serves as an Apoptotic Signal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhmatikov, Alexey V; Voskoboynikova, Natalia; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Skulachev, Maxim V; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y

    2016-01-01

    Molecules of mitochondrial cardiolipin (CL) get selectively oxidized upon oxidative stress, which triggers the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In a chemical model most closely resembling the mitochondrial membrane-liposomes of pure bovine heart CL-we compared ubiquinol-10, ubiquinol-6, and alpha-tocopherol, the most widespread naturally occurring antioxidants, with man-made, quinol-based amphiphilic antioxidants. Lipid peroxidation was induced by addition of an azo initiator in the absence and presence of diverse antioxidants, respectively. The kinetics of CL oxidation was monitored via formation of conjugated dienes at 234 nm. We found that natural ubiquinols and ubiquinol-based amphiphilic antioxidants were equally efficient in protecting CL liposomes from peroxidation; the chromanol-based antioxidants, including alpha-tocopherol, were 2-3 times less efficient. Amphiphilic antioxidants, but not natural ubiquinols and alpha-tocopherol, were able, additionally, to protect the CL bilayer from oxidation by acting from the water phase. We suggest that the previously reported therapeutic efficiency of mitochondrially targeted amphiphilic antioxidants is owing to their ability to protect those CL molecules that are inaccessible to natural hydrophobic antioxidants, being trapped within respiratory supercomplexes. The high susceptibility of such occluded CL molecules to oxidation may have prompted their recruitment as apoptotic signaling molecules by nature.

  9. Phenolic antioxidants from Rosa soulieana flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Fu; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lun; Zhou, Zhiqiong; Wang, Mingkui

    2013-01-01

    Rosa soulieana has been widely used in traditional medicine to treat cardiovascular disorders. In this study, antioxidant activity-guided fractionation and purification of the methanol extract from the flowers of R. soulieana has led to the isolation of nine phenolic antioxidants, which were identified as catechin (1), tiliroside (2), astragalin (3), isoquercitrin (4), nicotiflorin (5), eugenol 4-O-β-d-(6'-O-galloyl) glucoside (6), michehedyosides D (7), citrusin C (8) and strictinin (9), respectively. Among them, compounds 5-9 were reported from the genus Rosa for the first time. All the compounds were also assayed by in vitro ABTS [2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) diammonium salt] radical cation scavenging activity. Among these bioactive isolates (1-9), compounds 1, 6, 7 and 9 exhibited strong scavenging activity in ABTS (SC50 = 10.17, 7.38, 8.60, 4.72 μmol/L, respectively) compared with the positive control l-ascorbic acid (SC50 = 15.97 μmol/L).

  10. Antioxidant Properties and Cardioprotective Mechanism of Malaysian Propolis in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Romana; Hossen, Md. Sakib; Ahmmed, Istiyak; Rumpa, Nur-E-Noushin; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2017-01-01

    Propolis contains high concentrations of polyphenols, flavonoids, tannins, ascorbic acid, and reducing sugars and proteins. Malaysian Propolis (MP) has been reported to exhibit high 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values. Herein, we report the antioxidant properties and cardioprotective properties of MP in isoproterenol- (ISO-) induced myocardial infarction in rats. Male Wistar rats (n = 32) were pretreated orally with an ethanol extract of MP (100 mg/kg/day) for 30 consecutive days. Subcutaneous injection of ISO (85 mg/kg in saline) for two consecutive days caused a significant increase in serum cardiac marker enzymes and cardiac troponin I levels and altered serum lipid profiles. In addition significantly increased lipid peroxides and decreased activities of cellular antioxidant defense enzymes were observed in the myocardium. However, pretreatment of ischemic rats with MP ameliorated the biochemical parameters, indicating the protective effect of MP against ISO-induced ischemia in rats. Histopathological findings obtained for the myocardium further confirmed the biochemical findings. It is concluded that MP exhibits cardioprotective activity against ISO-induced oxidative stress through its direct cytotoxic radical-scavenging activities. It is also plausible that MP contributed to endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity via inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  11. Antioxidant Properties and Cardioprotective Mechanism of Malaysian Propolis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis contains high concentrations of polyphenols, flavonoids, tannins, ascorbic acid, and reducing sugars and proteins. Malaysian Propolis (MP has been reported to exhibit high 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical-scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP values. Herein, we report the antioxidant properties and cardioprotective properties of MP in isoproterenol- (ISO- induced myocardial infarction in rats. Male Wistar rats (n=32 were pretreated orally with an ethanol extract of MP (100 mg/kg/day for 30 consecutive days. Subcutaneous injection of ISO (85 mg/kg in saline for two consecutive days caused a significant increase in serum cardiac marker enzymes and cardiac troponin I levels and altered serum lipid profiles. In addition significantly increased lipid peroxides and decreased activities of cellular antioxidant defense enzymes were observed in the myocardium. However, pretreatment of ischemic rats with MP ameliorated the biochemical parameters, indicating the protective effect of MP against ISO-induced ischemia in rats. Histopathological findings obtained for the myocardium further confirmed the biochemical findings. It is concluded that MP exhibits cardioprotective activity against ISO-induced oxidative stress through its direct cytotoxic radical-scavenging activities. It is also plausible that MP contributed to endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity via inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  12. Total antioxidant status in lung cancer is associated with levels of endogenous antioxidants and disease stage rather than lifestyle factors – preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porębska, Irena; Gołecki, Marcin; Kosacka, Monika; Pawełczyk, Konrad; Pawlik-Sobecka, Lilla; Zarębska, Katarzyna; Grajeta, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC) has been reported in different neoplasms, including lung cancer. However, no study concerning the relationship between endogenous antioxidants, lifestyle factors, and TAC has been conducted among lung cancer patients. The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations between endogenous antioxidants, severity of disease, lifestyle factors, and TAC in lung cancer patients. Material and methods The study was conducted among 59 lung cancer patients. The levels of total antioxidant status (ATBS method), endogenous antioxidants, and C-reactive protein were measured in patients’ sera automatically. Dietary habits of the subjects were evaluated based on the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) on the day of admission to hospital. Results We found a positive correlation between serum albumin, uric acid (UA), and TAC and a negative correlation between CRP and TAC. Moreover, TAC was significantly positively associated with disease stage. We did not find any significant relationship between the frequency of selected food consumption and TAC in lung cancer patients, except for a positive correlation between the frequency of refined cereal products consumption and TAC level. Smoking status did not correlate with TAC. Conclusions Total antioxidant status of lung cancer patients results from their disease stage and levels of endogenous antioxidants rather than from lifestyle factors. The lack of influence of diet and smoking on the TAC presumably result from disturbed homeostasis in which cancer, while developing, could determine the redox state to a greater extent than lifestyle factors. PMID:27688727

  13. Antibacterial, antioxidant and cell proliferative properties of Coccinia grandis fruits

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    Prashant Sakharkar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Little knowledge is available on the antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of Coccina grandis fruits and no study has reported on its cell proliferative property. The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial, antioxidant and cell proliferative property of fruits of C. grandis. Material and Methods: Fruits of C. grandis were extracted using water; ethanol and acetone by cold and hot Soxhlet extraction. The antibacterial activities of the extracts were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using the modified Kirby-Bauer diffusion method and compared against erythromycin. The antioxidant property was determined using Cayman's antioxidant assay; whereas cell proliferation/cytotoxic properties were evaluated using the Cell Titer 96 Aqueous One Solution Cell MTS assay with MDA-MB 321 breast cancer cells. Data were analyzed for correlation and differences using unpaired student's t-test and one-way ANOVA. A p value of Results: Both cold and hot ethanol and acetone extracts of C. grandis fruits showed some degree of bacterial growth inhibition. Acetone extracts exhibited higher antibacterial activity. Both ethanol extracts showed antioxidant property when compared with standard Trolox. In contrary to cytotoxicity, all four extracts showed cell proliferation compared to controls at different concentrations. However, acetone extracts exhibited greater cell proliferation compared to ethanol extracts and cold extracts performed better than the hot extracts. Conclusion: C. grandis fruits exhibited some degree of antimicrobial, antioxidant and cell proliferative properties. Further investigation is warranted to isolate, confirm and characterize phytochemicals that are responsible for the medicinal properties observed.

  14. ANTIOXIDANT EFFECT OF MAJORANA HORTENSIS LEAVES

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    Palaniswamy Radha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals can be generated in the biological systems in the form of reactive oxygen species which are harmful and these are removed by the antioxidant system in the body. Antioxidants protect us from free radicals that cause tissue damage, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Plants are a rich source of antioxidants. In the present study, Majorana hortensis, commonly called majoram was chosen as the candidate plant to determine the antioxidant potential. The enzymic activity and non-enzymic levels of the fresh leaves was determined proving the plant to be a potent source of antioxidants.

  15. Isolation and biological evaluation of novel Tetracosahexaene hexamethyl, an acyclic triterpenoids derivatives and antioxidant from Justicia adhatoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhankhar, Sandeep; Dhankhar, Seema; Ruhil, Sonam; Balhara, Meenakshi; Malik, Vinay; Chhillar, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Forty five extracts fraction of nine selected Indian medicinal plants, based on their use in traditional systems of medicine were analyzed for their antioxidant potential. All the extracts were investigated for phenol content value calculated in Gallic acid equivalents (% of GAE) and antioxidant potential. Moreover, total phenolic content (% dw equivalents to gallic acid) of all plant extracts were found in the range of 3.04 to 24.03, which correlated with antioxidant activity. The findings indicated a promising antioxidant activity of crude extracts fractions of three plants (Justicia adhatoda, Capparis aphylla and Aegle marmelos) and required the further exploration for their effective utilization. Results indicated that petroleum ether fraction of J. adhatoda out of three plants also possesses the admirable antioxidant abilities with high total phenolic content. Following, in vitro antioxidant activity-guided phytochemical separation procedures, twelve fractions of petroleum ether extract of J. adhatoda were isolated by silica gel column chromatography. One fraction (Rf value: 0.725) showed the noticeable antioxidant activity with ascorbic acid standard in hydroxyl radical scavenging assays. The molecular structures elucidations of purified antioxidant compound were carried out using spectroscopic studies ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and MS). This compound was reported from this species for the first time. The results imply that the J. adhatoda might be a potential source of natural antioxidants and 2,6,10,14,18,22-Tetracosahexaene, 2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyl is an antioxidant ingredient in J. adhatoda.

  16. 体内外微核试验评价亚硒酸钠的致突变性和抗突变性%Detection of Mutagenicity and Antimutagenicity of Sodium Selenite in Vivo and Vitro Micronucleus Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卿艳; 郭亚杰; 陈锦瑶; 张立实

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of sodium selenite. Methods Negative control groups, positive control groups, mutagenic control groups and anti - mutagenic groups at 5 concentration levels of sodium selenite were set in vitro micronucleus test; L5178Y cells were treated respectively for 3h. Slide specimen were fixed and dried after hypotonic treatment. In vivo test, positive groups and negative groups, mutagenic and anti - mutagenic groups at 4 concentration levels of sodium selenite were set. Mice were administered by gavage once a day for 5 d consecutively, and sacrificed at 24 h after the last administration. Bone marrow was used to make slide speciments, which were dyed with Giemsa and then counted by light microscope. Resultsln vitro test, the percentage of micronucleated cell (MNC) increased significantly at dose groups from 3 μg/ml to 24 μg/ml and the MNC% of the groups with concentration from 0. 2 μg/ml to 3. 2 μg/ ml was lower significantly than MMC control. In vivo test, the MNC% were significantly increased in mutagen- ic groups at the concentration of 6. 32, 7. 90 mg/kg. bw than the negative control the MNC% of the anti - mutagenicity groups were reduced significantly than cyclophosphamide control. Conclusions Under this experimental condition, sodium selenite showed mutagenic effect at a certain dose range and antimutagenic effect at a different dose range.%目的 评价亚硒酸钠(Na2SeO3)的致突变性和抗突变性.方法 使用体外和体内微核试验.体外试验设阴性对照组、阳性对照组、抗突变对照组,以及致突变和抗突变试验各5组,处理L5178Y细胞3h、低渗、固定、制片.体内试验设阴性对照组、阳性对照组,以及致突变和抗突变试验各4组,昆明种小鼠连续灌胃5d,末次灌胃后24h处死小鼠,取骨髓制片,染色,观察.结果 体外试验中,3 ~24 μg/ml Na2SeO3致突变试验组的细胞微核率与阴性对照组

  17. Natural Antioxidants: Fascinating or Mythical Biomolecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Van Staden

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on the use, properties, characteristics and sources of antioxidants especially phenolic compounds, flavonoids, vitamins, synthetic chemicals and some micronutrients began in the late 18th century. Since then antioxidant research has received considerable attention and over a hundred thousand papers have been published on the subject. This has led to a rampant use of antioxidants in order to try to obtain and preserve optimal health. A number of nutraceuticals and food supplements are frequently fortified with synthetic or natural antioxidants. However, some research outcomes have led to the belief that antioxidants exist as mythical biomolecules. This review provides a critical evaluation of some common in vitro antioxidant capacity methods, and a discussion on the role and controversies surrounding non-enzymatic biomolecules, in particular phenolic compounds and non-phenolic compounds, in oxidative processes in an attempt of stemming the tidal wave that is threatening to swamp the concept of natural antioxidants.

  18. Probiotics as potential antioxidants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vijendra; Shah, Chandni; Mokashe, Narendra; Chavan, Rupesh; Yadav, Hariom; Prajapati, Jashbhai

    2015-04-15

    Probiotics are known for their health beneficial effects and are established as dietary adjuncts. Probiotics have been known for many beneficial health effects. In this view, there is interest to find the potential probiotic strains that can exhibit antioxidant properties along with health benefits. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that probiotics exhibit antioxidant potential. In this view, consumption of probiotics alone or foods supplemented with probiotics may reduce oxidative damage, free radical scavenging rate, and modification in activity of crucial antioxidative enzymes in human cells. Incorporation of probiotics in foods can provide a good strategy to supply dietary antioxidants, but more studies are needed to standardize methods and evaluate antioxidant properties of probiotics before they can be recommended for antioxidant potential. In this paper, the literature related to known antioxidant potential of probiotics and proposing future perspectives to conduct such studies has been reviewed.

  19. Structure and antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds isolated from the edible fruits and stem bark of Harpephyllum caffrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Roshila; Koorbanally, Neil A; Shahidul Islam, Md; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant activity in edible fruits is an important characteristic in the choice of fruits for human consumption, and has profound influence on nutrition and health. Two pharmacologically active triterpenoids, β-sitosterol and lupeol, and the powerful flavan-3-ol antioxidant, (+)-catechin, were isolated from the edible fruits of Harpephyllum caffrum while a mixture of cardanols, an alkyl p-coumaric acid ester, and (+)-catechin were isolated from the stem bark. This is the first report of these compounds being isolated from this plant. The antioxidant capacity of (+)-catechin was higher than the other isolated compounds as well as the known antioxidant, ascorbic acid.

  20. Effects of an Antimutagenic 1,4-Dihydropyridine AV-153 on Expression of Nitric Oxide Synthases and DNA Repair-related Enzymes and Genes in Kidneys of Rats with a Streptozotocin Model of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ošiņa, Kristīne; Rostoka, Evita; Isajevs, Sergejs; Sokolovska, Jelizaveta; Sjakste, Tatjana; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2016-11-01

    Development of complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), including diabetic nephropathy, is a complex multi-stage process, dependent on many factors including the modification of nitric oxide (NO) production and an impaired DNA repair. The goal of this work was to study in vivo effects of 1,4-dihydropyridine AV-153, known as antimutagen and DNA binder, on the expression of several genes and proteins involved in NO metabolism and DNA repair in the kidneys of rats with a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of DM. Transcription intensity was monitored by means of real-time RT-PCR and the expression of proteins by immunohistochemistry. Development of DM significantly induced PARP1 protein expression, while AV-153 (0.5 mg/kg) administration decreased it. AV-153 increased the expression of Parp1 gene in the kidneys of both intact and diabetic animals. Expression of H2afx mRNA and γH2AX histone protein, a marker of DNA breakage, was not changed in diabetic animals, but AV-153 up-regulated the expression of the gene without any impact on the protein expression. Development of DM was followed by a significant increase in iNOS enzyme expression, while AV-153 down-regulated the enzyme expression up to normal levels. iNos gene expression was also found to be increased in diabetic animals, but unlike the protein, the expression of mRNA was found to be enhanced by AV-153 administration. Expression of both eNOS protein and eNos gene in the kidneys was down-regulated, and the administration of AV-153 normalized the expression level. The effects of the compound in the kidneys of diabetic animals appear to be beneficial, as a trend for the normalization of expression of NO synthases is observed. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  1. Antioxidant activity of potato juice

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    Przemysław Kowalczewski

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The interest in potato juice as a therapeutic agent goes back to the 19th century but its application was not supported by any knowledge about biological activity of this raw material. Factors restricting the medical application of potato juice include its inattractive sensory and functional properties. The aim of the presented investigations was preliminary evaluation of the biological activity of potato juice and the impact on it of some technological operations such as: cryoconcentration and hydrolysis in a membrane reactor. Material and methods. Experiments comprised investigations of antioxidative potentials of fresh potato juice, products of its processing as well as fractions separated because of the size of their molecules using, for this purpose, Folin-Ciocalteu methods and reactions with the ABTS cation radical. Results. The value of the antioxidative potential of fresh potato juice determined by means of the ABTS reagent corresponded to approximately 330 μmol/100 g which is in keeping with literature data. As a result of the cryoconcentration process, the value determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method was found to increase only slightly whereas the value determined by means of the ABTS reagent almost tripled. The antioxidative potential was found to grow even more strongly in the case of the application of both methods when the process of enzymatic hydrolysis was employed. The total of 5 protein fractions of molecular masses ranging from 11 000 Da to over 600 000 Da, as well as an organic non-protein fraction of the molecular mass of 600 Da, were obtained as a result of the performed separation. All the examined fractions exhibited antioxidative activities. The highest values determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method were recorded for the protein fraction of 80 000 Da mean molecular mass, while using the ABTS reagent – for the organic, non-protein fraction. Conclusions. Potato juice possesses antioxidative activity which

  2. Antioxidants, inflammation and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangge, Harald; Becker, Kathrin; Fuchs, Dietmar; Gostner, Johanna M

    2014-06-26

    Multiple factors are involved in the etiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pathological changes occur in a variety of cell types long before symptoms become apparent and diagnosis is made. Dysregulation of physiological functions are associated with the activation of immune cells, leading to local and finally systemic inflammation that is characterized by production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Patients suffering from inflammatory diseases often present with diminished levels of antioxidants either due to insufficient dietary intake or, and even more likely, due to increased demand in situations of overwhelming ROS production by activated immune effector cells like macrophages. Antioxidants are suggested to beneficially interfere with diseases-related oxidative stress, however the interplay of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants with the overall redox system is complex. Moreover, molecular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress in CVD are not fully elucidated. Metabolic dybalances are suggested to play a major role in disease onset and progression. Several central signaling pathways involved in the regulation of immunological, metabolic and endothelial function are regulated in a redox-sensitive manner. During cellular immune response, interferon γ-dependent pathways are activated such as tryptophan breakdown by the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in monocyte-derived macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial and epithelial cells. Neopterin, a marker of oxidative stress and immune activation is produced by GTP-cyclohydrolase I in macrophages and dendritic cells. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is induced in several cell types to generate nitric oxide (NO). NO, despite its low reactivity, is a potent antioxidant involved in the regulation of the vasomotor tone and of immunomodulatory signaling pathways. NO inhibits the expression and function of IDO. Function of NOS requires the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), which is produced in

  3. Matching in Vitro Bioaccessibility of Polyphenols and Antioxidant Capacity of Soluble Coffee by Boosted Regression Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, Natalia S; López-Froilán, Rebeca; Ramirez-Moreno, Esther; Bertrand, Lidwina; Baroni, María V; Pérez-Rodríguez, María L; Sánchez-Mata, María-Cortes; Wunderlin, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in polyphenol profile and antioxidant capacity of five soluble coffees throughout a simulated gastro-intestinal digestion, including absorption through a dialysis membrane. Our results demonstrate that both polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity were characteristic for each type of studied coffee, showing a drop after dialysis. Twenty-seven compounds were identified in coffee by HPLC-MS, while only 14 of them were found after dialysis. Green+roasted coffee blend and chicory+coffee blend showed the highest and lowest content of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity before in vitro digestion and after dialysis, respectively. Canonical correlation analysis showed significant correlation between the antioxidant capacity and the polyphenol profile before digestion and after dialysis. Furthermore, boosted regression trees analysis (BRT) showed that only four polyphenol compounds (5-p-coumaroylquinic acid, quinic acid, coumaroyl tryptophan conjugated, and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid) appear to be the most relevant to explain the antioxidant capacity after dialysis, these compounds being the most bioaccessible after dialysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report matching the antioxidant capacity of foods with the polyphenol profile by BRT, which opens an interesting method of analysis for future reports on the antioxidant capacity of foods.

  4. In vitro antioxidant activities of antioxidant-enriched toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, M; Ferreiro, M S; Armeni, T; Politi, A; Bompadre, S; Massoli, A; Bullon, P

    2005-03-01

    Several forms of periodontal diseases (PD) are often associated with modified phagocytosing leukocytes and contemporary free radical production. Host antioxidant defenses could benefit from toothpastes used as adjuncts to counteract plaque-associated bacteria. The aim of the present study was to determine possible antioxidant activity (AA) of 12 differently antioxidant-enriched toothpastes, regardless of their efficacy as antimicrobial agents. Toothpastes were enriched alternatively with sodium ascorbyl phosphate, alpha-tocopherol acetate, pycnogenol, allantoin and methyl salycilate or a mixture of these. AA was tested in a cell-free system with a ABTS-decolorization assay improved by means of a flow injection analysis device. Comet assay, using NCTC 2544 keratinocytes, was performed to test if it was possible to identify any protection against in vitro DNA fragmentation provoked by a challenge with H(2)O(2) in cultures pre-incubated with toothpaste extracts. Only toothpastes containing sodium ascorbyl phosphate displayed clear AA with I(50) values ranging between 50 and 80 mg of toothpaste/ml water. COMET analysis of cells challenged with H(2)O(2) in presence of toothpaste extracts revealed a limited protection exerted by sodium ascorbyl phosphate. The results described herein indicate that toothpastes containing sodium ascorbyl phosphate possess AA. All the data were obtained in systems in vitro and the demonstration of in vivo AA is desirable. These findings could be useful in the treatment and maintenance of some forms of PD and should be considered when arranging new toothpaste formulations.

  5. Antioxidant assays - consistent findings from FRAP and ORAC reveal a negative impact of organic cultivation on antioxidant potential in spinach but not watercress or rocket leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Adrienne C; Mazzer, Alice; Clarkson, Graham J J; Taylor, Gail

    2013-11-01

    Watercress (Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum), wild rocket (Diplotaxis tenuifolia), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are commercial crops reported to have high concentrations of antioxidants, possibly contributing to disease prevention following human consumption. Following analysis of supermarket-purchased salad leaves, we report the antioxidant content potential of these species using two comparable techniques assessing the consistency between the assays - by the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The leaves were harvested from both conventionally and organically managed crops, to investigate whether organic agriculture results in improved crop quality. Watercress had the highest FRAP and ability to scavenge free radicals, followed by spinach and rocket. For watercress and rocket, there was no significant effect of organic agriculture on FRAP and ORAC, but for spinach, the antioxidant potential was reduced and this was significant at the 5% level of probability for FRAP but not ORAC, although the trend was clear in both tests. We conclude that there is variation in salad crop antioxidant potential and that FRAP and ORAC are useful techniques for measuring antioxidants in these salad crops with similar ranking for each salad crop studied.

  6. Exercise and oxidative stress: potential effects of antioxidant dietary strategies in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingitore, Alessandro; Lima, Giuseppina Pace Pereira; Mastorci, Francesca; Quinones, Alfredo; Iervasi, Giorgio; Vassalle, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals are produced during aerobic cellular metabolism and have key roles as regulatory mediators in signaling processes. Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between production of reactive oxygen species and an adequate antioxidant defense. This adverse condition may lead to cellular and tissue damage of components, and is involved in different physiopathological states, including aging, exercise, inflammatory, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. In particular, the relationship between exercise and oxidative stress is extremely complex, depending on the mode, intensity, and duration of exercise. Regular moderate training appears beneficial for oxidative stress and health. Conversely, acute exercise leads to increased oxidative stress, although this same stimulus is necessary to allow an up-regulation in endogenous antioxidant defenses (hormesis). Supporting endogenous defenses with additional oral antioxidant supplementation may represent a suitable noninvasive tool for preventing or reducing oxidative stress during training. However, excess of exogenous antioxidants may have detrimental effects on health and performance. Whole foods, rather than capsules, contain antioxidants in natural ratios and proportions, which may act in synergy to optimize the antioxidant effect. Thus, an adequate intake of vitamins and minerals through a varied and balanced diet remains the best approach to maintain an optimal antioxidant status. Antioxidant supplementation may be warranted in particular conditions, when athletes are exposed to high oxidative stress or fail to meet dietary antioxidant requirements. Aim of this review is to discuss the evidence on the relationship between exercise and oxidative stress, and the potential effects of dietary strategies in athletes. The differences between diet and exogenous supplementation as well as available tools to estimate effectiveness of antioxidant intake are also reported. Finally, we advocate the need

  7. Antioxidant therapy: myth or reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Selles, Alberto J. [Center of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Havana (Cuba)]. E-mail: alberto@cqf.co.cu

    2005-07-15

    New terms such as oxidative stress, antioxidant products or pro-oxidant risks are becoming familiar and an increasing number of international scientific conferences and the publication of thousands of scientific articles is an indication of the growing interest that the subject awakens. The most publicized example is perhaps the French paradox, based on the apparent compatibility of a high fat diet with a low incidence of coronary atherosclerosis attributed to the regular consumption, by the French, of red wine and/or grape juice. Flavonoids, and other phenolic substances contained in red wine, are assigned with antioxidant properties, which lower the oxidation of low density lipoproteins and consequently, the risk of atherogenic diseases. Other examples are the aging process and its correlation with an increase of free radicals, and the correlation between the initiation and promotion of cancer and tissue injury by free radicals, which has induced the intake of antioxidant products as chemical factors that prevent the onset of the disease. Currently, the incidence of oxidative stress on the onset and evolution of more than 100 diseases is claimed by several researchers. All these are 'realities', which on the other hand, are lacking of more clinical evidence, are considered by both physicians and health regulatory bodies, either as 'myths' or of 'secondary' importance. In the attempts to destroy those myths, results of chemical, pre-clinical, and clinical works with a crude extract of mango (Mangifera indica L.) stem bark, which has been developed in Cuba, are reviewed, with a strong experimental evidence of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. (author)

  8. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by living organisms as a result of normal cellular metabolism and environmental factors, such as air pollutants or cigarette smoke. ROS are highly reactive molecules and can damage cell structures such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins and alter their functions. The shift in the balance between oxidants and antioxidants in favor of oxidants is termed “oxidative stress.” Regulation of reducing and oxidizing (redox) state i...

  9. [Antioxidant properties of essential oils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misharina, T A; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I

    2009-01-01

    By the method of capillary gas-liquid chromatography we studied antioxidant properties and stability during the storage of hexane solutions of 14 individual essential oils from black and white pepper (Piper nigrum L.), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum L.), nutmeg (Myristica fragrans Houtt.), mace (Myristica fragrans Houtt), juniperberry (Juniperus communis L.), seed of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., var. dulce Thelling), caraway (Carvum carvi L.), dry leaves of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Bl.), marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), laurel (Laurus nobilis L.), ginger (Zingiber officinale L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and clove bud (Caryophyllus aromaticus L.). We assessed the antioxidant properties by the oxidation of aliphatic aldehyde (trans-2-hexenal) into the according carbon acid. We established that essential oils of garlic, clove bud, ginger and leaves of cinnamon have the maximal efficiency of inhibition of hexenal oxidation (80-93%), while black pepper oil has the minimal (49%). Antioxidant properties of essential oils with a high content of substituted phenols depended poorly on its concentration in model systems. We studied the changes in essential oils content during the storage of its hexane solutions for 40 days in the light and out of the light and compared it with the stability of essential oils stored for a year out of the light.

  10. Systemic antioxidants and skin health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Gloria; Torres, Abel

    2012-09-01

    Most dermatologists agree that antioxidants help fight free radical damage and can help maintain healthy skin. They do so by affecting intracellular signaling pathways involved in skin damage and protecting against photodamage, as well as preventing wrinkles and inflammation. In today's modern world of the rising nutraceutical industry, many people, in addition to applying topical skin care products, turn to supplementation of the nutrients missing in their diets by taking multivitamins or isolated, man-made nutraceuticals, in what is known as the Inside-Out approach to skin care. However, ingestion of large quantities of isolated, fragmented nutrients can be harmful and is a poor representation of the kind of nutrition that can be obtained from whole food sources. In this comprehensive review, it was found that few studies on oral antioxidants benefiting the skin have been done using whole foods, and that the vast majority of current research is focused on the study of compounds in isolation. However, the public stands to benefit greatly if more research were to be devoted toward the impact that physiologic doses of antioxidants (obtained from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains) can have on skin health, and on health in general.

  11. Concepts of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoghaibi, Mohammed A

    2013-10-21

    Oxygen free radical and lipid peroxides (oxidative stress) are highly reactive and represent very damaging compounds. Oxidative stress could be a major contributing factor to the tissue injury and fibrosis that characterize Crohn's disease. An imbalance between increased reactive oxygen species levels and decreased antioxidant defenses occurs in Crohn's patients. Decreased blood levels of vitamins C and E and decreased intestinal mucosal levels of CuZn superoxide dismutase, glutathione, vitamin A, C, E, and β-carotene have been reported for Crohn's patients. Increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and -8 and tumor necrosis factor, have been detected in inflammatory bowel disease. Oxidative stress significantly increased the production of neutrophils, chemokines, and interleukin-8. These effects were inhibited by antioxidant vitamins and arachidonic acid metabolite inhibitors in human intestinal smooth muscle cells isolated from the bowels of Crohn's disease patients. The main pathological feature of Crohn's disease is an infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mononuclear cells into the affected part of the intestine. Activated neutrophils produce noxious substances that cause inflammation and tissue injury. Due to the physiological and biochemical actions of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides, many of the clinical and pathophysiological features of Crohn's disease might be explained by an imbalance of increased reactive oxygen species and a net decrease of antioxidant molecules. This review describes the general concepts of free radical, lipid peroxide and antioxidant activities and eventually illustrates their interferences in the development of Crohn's strictures.

  12. In vitro antioxidant activity of Barleria noctiflora L. f.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangilimuthu Alagar Yadav; Anitha Jabamalai Raj; R Sathishkumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant activity of defatted methanol extract of Barleria noctiflora (B. noctiflora) L.f. leaf and root using in vitro models. Methods: DPPH radical scavenging activity, ferrous reducing power, Fe2+ chelating activity assay, nitric oxide radical scavenging activity ABTS.+ radical cation decolourisation assay, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging activities were studied. Results: The extracts showed good antioxidant capacity in DPPH radical scavenging assay, when compared to other in vitro models and the IC50 value were found to be 150 μg/mL in leaf extract and 140 μg/mL in root extract. The total phenolic content using Folin's-Ciocalteu reagent indicated that 1 mg of leaf and root extracts contain 368 μg and 481 μg with gallic acid equivalent and also the total flavonoid content found to be 240 μg and 410μg respectively with quercetin equivalence. Conclusion: The results showed that the antioxidant potential of the extracts is high in root extract compared to the leaf extract. This is the first ever report of antioxidant studies in B. noctiflora L. f.

  13. Antioxidant activity and kinetics studies of eugenol and 6-bromoeugenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboub, Radia; Memmou, Faiza

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of 6-bromoeugenol and eugenol. EC50, the concentration providing 50% inhibition, is calculated and the antioxidant activity index (AAI) is evaluated. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging method. EC50 values of 6-bromoeugenol, ascorbic acid and eugenol were 34.270 μg/mL, 54.888 μg/mL and 130.485 μg/mL, respectively. 6-Bromoeugenol showed higher AAI value (1.122) followed by ascorbic acid (0.700), then by eugenol (0.295). We also investigate the kinetics of DPPH radical scavenging activity of our products to determine the useful parameter TEC50 to evaluate their antiradical efficiency (ARE). Our results have shown high ARE. This study has provided the following ARE ( × 10(-3)) order for the tested antioxidants: ascorbic acid (70.119)>6-bromoeugenol (34.842) > eugenol (21.313). Finally, we classify ascorbic acid and eugenol as fast kinetics reaction (TEC50 8.82 and 11.38 min, respectively) and 6-bromoeugenol as medium kinetics reaction (TEC50 39.24 min).

  14. In Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Deacetylasperulosidic Acid in Noni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Lu Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deacetylasperulosidic acid (DAA is a major phytochemical constituent of Morinda citrifolia (noni fruit. Noni juice has demonstrated antioxidant activity in vivo and in human trials. To evaluate the role of DAA in this antioxidant activity, Wistar rats were fed 0 (control group, 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight per day for 7 days. Afterwards, serum malondialdehyde concentration and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured and compared among groups. A dose-dependent reduction in malondialdehyde was evident as well as a dose-dependent increase in superoxide dismutase activity. DAA ingestion did not influence serum glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that DAA contributes to the antioxidant activity of noni juice by increasing superoxide dismutase activity. The fact that malondialdehyde concentrations declined with increased DAA dose, despite the lack of glutathione peroxidase-inducing activity, suggests that DAA may also increase catalase activity. It has been previously reported that noni juice increases catalase activity in vivo but additional research is required to confirm the effect of DAA on catalase. Even so, the current findings do explain a possible mechanism of action for the antioxidant properties of noni juice that have been observed in human clinical trials.

  15. Antioxidant Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jie Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Overproduction of oxidants (reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in the human body is responsible for the pathogenesis of some diseases. The scavenging of these oxidants is thought to be an effective measure to depress the level of oxidative stress of organisms. It has been reported that intake of vegetables and fruits is inversely associated with the risk of many chronic diseases, and antioxidant phytochemicals in vegetables and fruits are considered to be responsible for these health benefits. Antioxidant phytochemicals can be found in many foods and medicinal plants, and play an important role in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases caused by oxidative stress. They often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities, as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits, such as anticancer, anti-aging, and protective action for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, obesity and neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes recent progress on the health benefits of antioxidant phytochemicals, and discusses their potential mechanisms in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases.

  16. Study of Convolvulus pluricaulis for antioxidant and anticonvulsant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sristi; Sinha, Reema; Kumar, Puspendra; Amin, Faizal; Jain, Jainendra; Tanwar, Shivani

    2012-03-01

    Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy is a perennial wild herb commonly found on sandy & rocky areas under xerophytic conditions in northern India. It is a reputed drug of ayurveda and reported to posses antioxidant, brain tonic, nervine tonic, laxative and has been used in anxiety, neurosis, epilepsy, insomnia, burning sensation, oedema and urinary disorders. In the present study, methanolic extract of whole plant of Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy was evaluated for antioxidant activity by using 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl- hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging model and anticonvulsant activity by using maximal electroshock seizure model. In antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid was used as standard agent while results of anticonvulsant studies were compared with phenytoin. Results of antioxidant activity have demonstrated significant free radical scavenging effect for methanolic extract of Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy. IC50 value of methanolic extract was observed as 41.00μg/ml as compared to 2.03μg/ml of ascorbic acid. Methanolic extract of C. pluricaulis was evaluated for anticonvulsant activity at 250, 500 and 1000mg/kg. Experimental results have shown that at the dose of 500 and 1000mg/kg, C. pluricaulis didn't abolish the hind limb extension, but reduced the mean recovery time from convulsion.

  17. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatmah A Matough

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is considered to be one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. There is a growing scientific and public interest in connecting oxidative stress with a variety of pathological conditions including diabetes mellitus (DM as well as other human diseases. Previous experimental and clinical studies report that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of complications of both types of DM. However, the exact mechanism by which oxidative stress could contribute to and accelerate the development of complications in diabetic mellitus is only partly known and remains to be clarified. On the one hand, hyperglycemia induces free radicals; on the other hand, it impairs the endogenous antioxidant defense system in patients with diabetes. Endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms include both enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways. Their functions in human cells are to counterbalance toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS. Common antioxidants include the vitamins A, C, and E, glutathione (GSH, and the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and glutathione reductase (GRx. This review describes the importance of endogenous antioxidant defense systems, their relationship to several pathophysiological processes and their possible therapeutic implications in vivo.

  18. New lipophilic tyrosyl esters. Comparative antioxidant evaluation with hydroxytyrosyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Raquel; Trujillo, Mariana; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Madrona, Andrés; Cert, Arturo; Espartero, José Luis

    2008-11-26

    New lipophilic esters of tyrosol, a naturally occurring phenol with interesting biological properties, have been synthesized in good yields by a chemoselective procedure, using lipase from Candida antarctica or p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalysts. Their antioxidant activities have been evaluated by the Rancimat test in lipophilic food matrices, as well as by FRAP and ABTS assays in methanolic solutions, and compared with those of previously synthesized hydroxytyrosyl esters. Free tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, butylhydroxytoluene, and alpha-tocopherol were used as standards. All methods used for the antioxidant activity evaluation emphasized the high influence of the ortho-diphenolic structure on the antioxidant capacity, tyrosol and its derivatives being less active than hydroxytyrosol and its analogues and even less than BHT and alpha-tocopherol. In addition, the Rancimat test revealed a lower activity for ester derivatives than for their respective reference compounds (HTy or Ty), in agreement with the polar paradox. On the other hand, FRAP and ABTS methods reported an opposite behavior between the synthetic esters and their respective references. Thus, hydroxytyrosyl esters were more active than HTy, whereas tyrosyl esters were less active than Ty. The length and nature of the acyl side chain did not seem to play an important role in the antioxidant activity of either the hydroxytyrosyl or tyrosyl ester series, since no significant differences were observed among them.

  19. Apolipoprotein M binds oxidized phospholipids and increases the antioxidant effect of HDL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsøe, Sara; Ahnström, Josefin; Christoffersen, Christina;

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation of LDL plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. HDL may, in part, protect against atherosclerosis by inhibiting LDL oxidation. Overexpression of HDL-associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) protects mice against atherosclerosis through a not yet clarified mechanism. Being...... a lipocalin, apoM contains a binding pocket for small lipophilic molecules. Here, we report that apoM likely serves as an antioxidant in HDL by binding oxidized phospholipids, thus enhancing the antioxidant potential of HDL....

  20. Antioxidant Activity of Some Selected Medicinal Plants in Southern Region of India.

    OpenAIRE

    V Rathabai; C. Baskaran

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to find the antioxidant value of certain medicinal plants in Tamilnadu region. Antioxidants have been reported to prevent oxidative damage caused by free radical and can be usedin cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, diabetes and cancer diseases. The amount of total phenols, flavonoids and radical scavenging activity has been studied. Major amount of phenols were determined in Corchorusaestuans followed byroot of Coleus Forskohlii. Moreover, maximum flavonoid co...

  1. Effect of Antioxidants Supplementation on Aging and Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Sadowska-Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available If aging is due to or contributed by free radical reactions, as postulated by the free radical theory of aging, lifespan of organisms should be extended by administration of exogenous antioxidants. This paper reviews data on model organisms concerning the effects of exogenous antioxidants (antioxidant vitamins, lipoic acid, coenzyme Q, melatonin, resveratrol, curcumin, other polyphenols, and synthetic antioxidants including antioxidant nanoparticles on the lifespan of model organisms. Mechanisms of effects of antioxidants, often due to indirect antioxidant action or to action not related to the antioxidant properties of the compounds administered, are discussed. The legitimacy of antioxidant supplementation in human is considered.

  2. Effect of Antioxidants Supplementation on Aging and Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    If aging is due to or contributed by free radical reactions, as postulated by the free radical theory of aging, lifespan of organisms should be extended by administration of exogenous antioxidants. This paper reviews data on model organisms concerning the effects of exogenous antioxidants (antioxidant vitamins, lipoic acid, coenzyme Q, melatonin, resveratrol, curcumin, other polyphenols, and synthetic antioxidants including antioxidant nanoparticles) on the lifespan of model organisms. Mechanisms of effects of antioxidants, often due to indirect antioxidant action or to action not related to the antioxidant properties of the compounds administered, are discussed. The legitimacy of antioxidant supplementation in human is considered. PMID:24783202

  3. Antioxidant Activity from Various Tomato Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Sri Iswari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tomato is one of the high antioxidant potential vegetables. Nowadays, there are many techniques of tomato processings instead of fresh consumption, i.e. boiled, steamed, juiced and sauteed. Every treatment of cooking will influence the chemical compound inside the fruits and the body's nutrition intake. It is important to conduct the research on antioxidant compound especially lycopene, β-carotene, vitamin C, α-tocopherol, and its activity after processing. This research has been done using the experimental method. Tomatoes were cooked into six difference ways, and then it was extracted using the same procedure continued with antioxidant measurement. The research results showed that steaming had promoted the higher antioxidant numbers (lycopene. α-tocopherol, β-carotene and vitamin C and higher TCA and antioxidant activities in the tomatoes than other processings. It was indicated that steaming was the best way to enhance amount, capacity and activities of antioxidants of the tomatoes.

  4. Antioxidants: Enhancing oral and general health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Shetti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals and antioxidant therapy have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. Antioxidants are compounds that destroy the free radicals in the body, thereby preventing harmful oxidation-reduction reactions. Antioxidants are critical for maintaining optimum health and well-being. The best sources of antioxidants are fruits and vegetables, which provide a variety of antioxidants such as Vitamins A, C, E, and carotenoids. Currently available data are compatible with the notion that these vitamins act as chemopreventives against some important cancers, e.g., carotenoids for lung cancer, ascorbic acid for salivary gland cancer, tocopherols for head and neck cancers, etc. Thus, a greater consumption of fruits and vegetables should be encouraged as they are the natural sources of these chemopreventive antioxidants along with other protective factors packaged by nature.

  5. Antioxidants in skin ageing - Future of dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamika M Salavkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of free radicals is a widely accepted pivotal mechanism leading to skin ageing. Skin ageing is a complex, progressive, time-dependent deterioration caused by intrinsic and extrinsic factors or environmental factors. Skin is equipped with an elaborate antioxidant system that protects it from oxidative damage due to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the natural antioxidant pool can be compromised or overwhelmed by oxidative stress of excess UV exposure, as well as cigarette smoke and other airborne pollutants. Topical antioxidants have been demonstrated to protect the skin from free radical damage and its regular application can actually reverse pervious photodamage. Topical antioxidants are available in over-the-counter skin care products that are aimed at preventing the clinical signs of photoageing. The present review summarises scientific literature regarding efficacy of topical antioxidants and significance of novel delivery systems for topical antioxidant delivery for combating skin ageing.

  6. Phenolipids as antioxidants in emulsified systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Bayrasy, Christelle; Laguerre, Mickäel

    to an increase of the antioxidative effect. When the phenolic compound reaches a certain point of lipophilicity its antioxidative effect decreases. Thus, the polar paradox hypothesis is not valid when the alkyl chain length is above a certain length. Futhermore, the length of the alkyl chain for optimal...... antioxidant effect has been shown to be influenced by the specific phenolic compound and the type of emulsion. The overall aim for our work was to evaluate phenolipids with different lipophilicity as antioxidants in emulsified food. In the study presented here caffeic, ferulic and coumaric acid were selected...... along with their corresponding alkyl esters (C4-C20). The methods used to evaluate the antioxidative effect of the different phenolipids were the CAT assay (o/w emulsion), antioxidant assays (DPPH, Iron chelating and reducing power) and partitioning studies. Moreover, the results from the CAT assay...

  7. Lycopene and Its Antioxidant Role in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases-A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lars; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Lowe, Gordon; Böhm, Volker

    2016-08-17

    The present review is based mainly on papers published between 2000 and 2011 and gives information about the properties of the carotenoid lycopene in chemical and biological systems and its possible role in preventing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The main aim of this report is to highlight its role as an antioxidant, also reported are bioactive properties that may influence the development of foam cells and protection against endothelial cell damage. The paper will also examine recent observations that lycopene may improve blood flow and reduce inflammatory responses. Lycopene possesses antioxidant properties in vitro, and some epidemiological studies have reported protective effects against the progression of CVD. The oxidation of human low density lipoproteins (LDL) is a fundamental mechanism in the initiation of atherosclerosis. A beneficial role of lycopene as antioxidant in the prevention of CVD is suggested but the data are still controversial. Lycopene is believed to be the most potent carotenoid antioxidant in vitro. Tissue culture experiments and animal studies support potential cardioprotective effects for lycopene and other carotenoids in the blood. Most studies showed beneficial effects of lycopene to individuals who are antioxidant-deficient like elderly patients, or humans exposed to higher levels of oxidative stress like smokers, diabetics, hemodialysis patients and acute myocardial infarction patients. By defining the right population and combining antioxidant potentials of lycopene with vitamins and other bioactive plant compounds, the beneficial role of lycopene in CVD can be clarified in future studies.

  8. Green Tea and Its Antioxidant Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, Jason

    1999-01-01

    Green tea contains antioxidants which have been implicated to contribute to reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. This may be explained in part by the green tea's antioxidant properties. Green tea is a rich source of flavonoids with high antioxidant activity both in vitro and in vivo. This includes the ability of green tea to lower the oxidizability of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitro. In vivo lipid oxidation as measure by plasma lipid peroxides and LDL oxidizability are significantly...

  9. Assessment of some Australian red wines for price, phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and vintage in relation to functional food prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yung J; Prenzler, Paul D; Saliba, Anthony J; Ryan, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-three Cabernet Sauvignon wines from the Mudgee region and thirty-two Shiraz wines from the Hunter Valley region were analyzed for phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Concentrations of (+)-catechin, quercetin, and transresveratrol, total phenolic content, and DPPH antioxidant activity varied considerably, both within and between varieties. Individual phenols, total phenols, and antioxidant activity were correlated with price and vintage. Shiraz wines showed positive and significant correlations for catechin and quercetin concentrations with total phenols, antioxidant activity, and vintage; and for total phenols and antioxidant activity with vintage. Cabernet Sauvignon wines showed positive and significant correlations for quercetin concentration with total phenols and antioxidant activity. There was a negative and significant correlation found between price and antioxidant activity for Cabernet Sauvignon wines. Results are discussed in terms of the potential for wine to be considered a functional food. We report on potential health benefits (antioxidant activity) of 55 wines typical of 2 geographically close, but distinct, wine regions of Australia. Our results highlight the variability in functional components as an issue that needs further research and consideration in relation to wine as a functional food. The price of studied wines is not reflective of their health functionality, based on antioxidant activities. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Comparison and combination effects on antioxidant power of curcumin with gallic acid, ascorbic acid, and xanthone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; Okonogi, Siriporn

    2015-04-01

    Curcumin has been extensively reported as a potential natural antioxidant. However, there was no data on activity comparison as well as the biological interactions of curcumin with other natural antioxidants. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antioxidant power of curcumin in comparison with three important natural antioxidants; gallic acid, ascorbic acid, and xanthone on free radical scavenging action and their combination effects on this activity. The results indicated that the activities of these compounds were dose-dependent. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of curcumin was found to be 11 μg/mL. Curcumin showed significantly higher antioxidant activity than ascorbic acid and xanthone but less than gallic acid. Interestingly, curcumin revealed synergistic antioxidant effect when combined with gallic acid whereas the antagonistic effect occurred in curcumin combination with ascorbic acid or xanthone. These results suggest that curcumin-gallic acid combination is the potential antioxidant mixture to be used in place of the individual substance whereas using of curcumin in combination with ascorbic acid or xanthone should be avoid.

  11. Antioxidant capacities of phenolic compounds and tocopherols from Tunisian pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfalleh, Walid; Tlili, Nizar; Nasri, Nizar; Yahia, Yassine; Hannachi, Hédia; Chaira, Nizar; Ying, Ma; Ferchichi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to determine the phenolic, tocopherol contents, and antioxidant capacities from fruits (juices, peels, and seed oils) of 6 Tunisian pomegranate ecotypes. Total anthocyanins were determined by a differential pH method. Hydrolyzable tannins were determined with potassium iodate. The tocopherol (α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and δ-tocopherol) contents were, respectively, 165.77, 107.38, and 27.29 mg/100 g from dry seed. Four phenolic compounds were identified and quantified in pomegranate peel and pulp using the high-performance liquid chromatography/ultraviolet method: 2 hydroxybenzoic acids (gallic and ellagic acids) and 2 hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic and p-coumaric acids). Juice, peel, and seed oil antioxidants were confirmed by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) methods. The highest values were recorded in peels with 25.63 mmol trolox equivalent/100 g and 22.08 mmol TE/100 g for FRAP and ORAC assay, respectively. Results showed that the antioxidant potency of pomegranate extracts was correlated with their phenolic compound content. In particular, the highest correlation was reported in peels. High correlations were also found between peel hydroxybenzoic acids and FRAP ORAC antioxidant capacities. Identified tocopherols seem to contribute in major part to the antioxidant activity of seed oil. The results implied that bioactive compounds from the peel might be potential resources for the development of antioxidant function dietary food.

  12. Antioxidant Potential of Polyphenols and Tannins from Burs of Castanea mollissima Blume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Spiny burs of Castanea mollissima Blume (Chinese chestnut are usually discarded as industrial waste during post-harvesting processing. The objective of this study was to establish an extraction and isolation procedure for tannins from chestnut burs, and to assess their potential antioxidant activity. Aqueous ethanol solution was used as extraction solvent, and HPD 100 macroporous resin column was applied for isolation. The influence of solvent concentration in the extraction and elution process on extraction yield, tannins and polyphenols content, as well as antioxidant potential, including DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging ability, reducing power ability and cellular antioxidant ability were assessed. In both the extraction and isolation process, 50% aqueous ethanol led to superior total tannins and polyphenols content as well as significantly higher antioxidant activity. In addition, the antioxidant activity and the total tannins content in extracts and fractions had a positive linear correlation, and the predominant components responsible for antioxidant activities were characterized as hydrolysable tannins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the enrichment of tannins from burs of C. mollissim using macroporous resin chromatography, and to assess the cellular antioxidant activity of them.

  13. Antioxidant potential of polyphenols and tannins from burs of Castanea mollissima Blume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan; Liu, Jie Yuan; Chen, Si Yu; Shi, Ling Ling; Liu, Yu Jun; Ma, Chao

    2011-10-12

    Spiny burs of Castanea mollissima Blume (Chinese chestnut) are usually discarded as industrial waste during post-harvesting processing. The objective of this study was to establish an extraction and isolation procedure for tannins from chestnut burs, and to assess their potential antioxidant activity. Aqueous ethanol solution was used as extraction solvent, and HPD 100 macroporous resin column was applied for isolation. The influence of solvent concentration in the extraction and elution process on extraction yield, tannins and polyphenols content, as well as antioxidant potential, including DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging ability, reducing power ability and cellular antioxidant ability were assessed. In both the extraction and isolation process, 50% aqueous ethanol led to superior total tannins and polyphenols content as well as significantly higher antioxidant activity. In addition, the antioxidant activity and the total tannins content in extracts and fractions had a positive linear correlation, and the predominant components responsible for antioxidant activities were characterized as hydrolysable tannins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the enrichment of tannins from burs of C. mollissim using macroporous resin chromatography, and to assess the cellular antioxidant activity of them.

  14. Antioxidant potential of banana: Study using simulated gastrointestinal model and conventional extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Anjali; Patel, Vinayak

    2015-07-01

    Most reports on fruit antioxidant capacities are based on extraction of antioxidants using polar solvents. In banana, little is known about the fate of bioactive compounds during the digestion process, particularly in the food matrix under the gastric and intestinal conditions. In the present study, an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion method was used to simulate physiological conditions of the stomach and small intestine to evaluate the actual antioxidant capacity of banana. The simulated gastrointestinal extracts showed significantly higher antioxidant properties. The total phenol content of the physiological enzymatic extract was higher by almost 150% than the methanolic extract. Similarly, the flavonoid and flavonol contents were higher in the physiological enzymatic extract by 330.6 and 141.7%, respectively as compared to methanolic extract. These differences were also noticed in the antioxidant capacity measurement parameters. From the results, it can be concluded that the conventional extracts underrate the antioxidant value of banana and that they may have much higher health significance, as an antioxidant in particular.

  15. Antioxidant capacity and lipophilic content of seaweeds collected from the Qingdao coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Lan; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2004-08-11

    Lipophilic extracts from 16 species of seaweeds collected along the Qingdao coastline were screened and evaluated for their antioxidant activities (AA) using the beta-carotene-linoleate assay system. The diethyl ether soluble extracts of all selected seaweeds exhibited various degrees of antioxidative efficacy in each screen. The highest antioxidant capacities among the tested samples were observed for Rhodomela confervoides and Symphyocladia latiuscula and were comparable with that of the well-known antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene and greater than that of propyl gallate. The lipophilic content of all 16 samples and the chemical composition of 4 selected seaweeds, R. confervoidesand S. latiuscula, which had higher AA, Laminaria japonica, which had intermediate AA, and Plocamium telfairiae, which had lower AA, were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Fatty acids and alkanes were found. The present data indicated an increase in antioxidative property with increasing content of unsaturated fatty acid. The result of this study suggests that seaweeds can be considered as a potential source for the extraction of lipophilic antioxidants, which might be used as dietary supplements or in production in the food industry. This is the first report on the antioxidant activities of lipophilic extracts from seaweeds.

  16. Wild Mediterranean plants as traditional food: a valuable source of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzani, Paola; Rossetto, Monica; De Marco, Veronica; Sacchetti, Linda E; Paoletti, Maurizio G; Rigo, Adelio

    2011-01-01

    Some wild Mediterranean plants used as traditional food are an extraordinary source of antioxidants. We tested some properties of 10 of these herbaceous plants, used in Liguria (Northwest Italy) to prepare a traditional dish known as "prebuggiun." A total of 9 of them were found to have a polyphenol content and antioxidant properties similar or better than those of red chicory and blueberry, which are, in the case of vegetables and fruits, among the richest of antioxidants. Practical Application: In this article, we reported a study on wild plants growing in the Mediterranean area. These herbs have been neglected and this study aimed to revalue these plants because they are an extraordinary source of antioxidants. The increasing demand for natural antioxidants (additives in the food industry too) justifies the search for new sources of natural antioxidants. The revaluation of these plants will be interesting for: (1) consumer health, rediscovering a vegetable source of high antioxidant power; (2) possibility of producing new commercial products, such as food supplements of high quality and low cost; (3) pharmacological applications.

  17. Anti-oxidant effects of kiwi fruit in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Haruyo; Morita, Erika; Yui, Satoru; Yamazaki, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that kiwi fruit is rich in polyphenols and has immunostimulatory activity. Polyphenols are widely known for having anti-oxidant effects. We also revealed potential anti-oxidant effects of kiwi fruit in vivo by oral administration to mice. Here, we compared the anti-oxidant effects of kiwi fruit with those of other fruits in vitro. Then, we examined the inhibitory effects of kiwi fruit on oxidation in the human body. There are two varieties of kiwi fruit, green kiwi and gold kiwi. We also examined variation between these varieties. Comparison of the anti-oxidant effects in vitro demonstrated that kiwi fruit had stronger anti-oxidant effects than orange and grapefruit, which are rich in vitamin C; gold kiwi had the strongest anti-oxidant effects. Kiwi fruit inhibited oxidation of biological substances in the human body. In particular, kiwi fruit may inhibit early lipid oxidation. In this study, kiwi fruit had strong anti-oxidant effects and may prevent the development and deterioration of diseases caused by oxidative stress.

  18. Antioxidants and embryo phenotype: is there experimental evidence for strong integration of the antioxidant system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possenti, Cristina Daniela; Karadas, Filiz; Colombo, Graziano; Caprioli, Manuela; Rubolini, Diego; Milzani, Aldo; Donne, Isabella Dalle; Saino, Nicola; Parolini, Marco

    2017-02-15

    Organisms have evolved complex defense systems against oxidative stress. Bird eggs contain maternally derived antioxidants that protect embryos from oxidative damage. The antioxidant system components are thought to be integrated, but few studies have analyzed the covariation between antioxidant concentrations, embryo 'oxidative status' and morphology. In addition, no study has tested the effects of experimental change in yolk antioxidant concentration on other antioxidants, on their reciprocal relationships and on their relationships with embryo oxidative status or growth, which are expected if antioxidants defenses are integrated. In yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis) embryos, we analyzed the covariation between several antioxidants, markers of 'oxidative status' [total antioxidant capacity (TAC), concentration of pro-oxidants (TOS), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonylation (PC)] in the yolk, liver and brain, and morphology. Yolk and liver antioxidant concentrations were positively correlated reciprocally and with embryo size, and positively predicted TAC but not oxidative status. TOS and LPO were positively correlated in the liver, while TAC and LPO were negatively correlated in the brain. Weak relationships existed between antioxidants and TOS, PC and LPO. The effects of antioxidants on oxidative status and morphology were non-synergistic. An experimental physiological increase in yolk vitamin E had very weak effects on the relationships between other antioxidants or oxidative status and vitamin E concentration, the concentration of other antioxidants or oxidative status; the covariation between other antioxidants and oxidative status, and relationships between morphology or oxidative status and other antioxidants, challenging the common wisdom of strong functional relationships among antioxidants, at least for embryos in the wild. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Innate antioxidant activity of some traditional formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunpreet Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is the oldest form of healthcare known to humanity. Recently, much attention is being directed toward the use of antioxidants. There are some very commonly used Ayurvedic preparations that might have inbuilt antioxidant activity, and their therapeutic potential can be partially attributable to its antioxidant activity. Hence, it was proposed to find out antioxidant activity of such common formulations. Estimation of innate antioxidant activity of some commonly used traditional formulations. In this study, five formulations were evaluated for antioxidant activity in comparison to gallic acid (standard using the in vitro reducing power method and superoxide radical scavenging activity by dimethyl sulfoxide method followed by calculation of scavenging activity and inhibitory concentration 50% (IC 50 . The result shows that Ayurvedic drug extracts possess good reducing power and antioxidant activity. Laxmivilas Ras shows higher reducing power ranging from 117 ± 0.021 to 0.176 ± 0.012 as compared to other extracts. The drug extracts were also found to be an efficient scavenger of superoxide radical. The IC 50 values for Laxmivilas Ras, Agnitundi Vati, Ajmodadi Churna, Tribhuvankirti Rasa, gallic acid (standard and Sitopladi Churna, were found to be 50.07, 98.41, 105.13, 116.39, 176.80, and 200.17, respectively. From this study, it can be concluded that the above Ayurvedic formulations possess antioxidant property. However, work could be initiated on the isolation and identification of these antioxidant components.

  20. Soluble Antioxidant Compounds Regenerate the Antioxidants Bound to Insoluble Parts of Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celik, E.E.; Gökmen, V.; Fogliano, V.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the regeneration potential of antioxidant capacity of an insoluble food matrix. Investigations were performed in vitro with several food matrices rich in dietary fiber (DF) and bound antioxidants. After removal of the soluble fraction, the antioxidant capacity (AC) of

  1. Antioxidants and Antioxidant Capacity of Biofortified Carrots (Daucus Carota, L.) of Various Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antioxidants and antioxidant capacity of seven colored carrots were determined. Five anthocyanins, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and four carotenoids, were quantified by HPLC. Total phenolic content was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method. Antioxidant capacities of the hydrophilic and hyd...

  2. Antioxidants in Raspberry: On-line analysis links antioxidant activity to a diversity of individual metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, M.J.; Jonker, H.H.; Hall, R.D.; Meer, van der I.M.; Vos, de C.H.

    2005-01-01

    The presence of antioxidant compounds can be considered as a quality parameter for edible fruit. In this paper, we studied the antioxidant compounds in raspberry (Rubus idaeus) fruits by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to an on-line postcolumn antioxidant detection system. Both

  3. Women with endometriosis improved their peripheral antioxidant markers after the application of a high antioxidant diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casanueva Esther

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress has been identified in the peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood of women with endometriosis. However, there is little information on the antioxidant intake for this group of women. The objectives of this work were 1 to compare the antioxidant intake among women with and without endometriosis and 2 to design and apply a high antioxidant diet to evaluate its capacity to reduce oxidative stress markers and improve antioxidant markers in the peripheral blood of women with endometriosis. Methods Women with (WEN, n = 83 and without endometriosis (WWE, n = 80 were interviewed using a Food Frequency Questionnaire to compare their antioxidant intake (of vitamins and minerals. Then, the WEN participated in the application of a control (n = 35 and high antioxidant diet (n = 37 for four months. The high antioxidant diet (HAD guaranteed the intake of 150% of the suggested daily intake of vitamin A (1050 μg retinol equivalents, 660% of the recommended daily intake (RDI of vitamin C (500 mg and 133% of the RDI of vitamin E (20 mg. Oxidative stress and antioxidant markers (vitamins and antioxidant enzymatic activity were determined in plasma every month. Results Comparison of antioxidant intake between WWE and WEN showed a lower intake of vitamins A, C, E, zinc, and copper by WEN (p Conclusion WEN had a lower intake of antioxidants in comparison to WWE. Peripheral oxidative stress markers diminished, and antioxidant markers were enhanced, in WEN after the application of the HAD.

  4. Significance of melatonin in antioxidative defense system: reactions and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, D X; Manchester, L C; Reiter, R J; Qi, W B; Karbownik, M; Calvo, J R

    2000-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent endogenous free radical scavenger, actions that are independent of its many receptor-mediated effects. In the last several years, hundreds of publications have confirmed that melatonin is a broad-spectrum antioxidant. Melatonin has been reported to scavenge hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hydroxyl radical (HO(.)), nitric oxide (NO(.)), peroxynitrite anion (ONOO(-)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), superoxide anion (O(2)(-).) and peroxyl radical (LOO(.)), although the validity of its ability to scavenge O(2)(-). and LOO(.) is debatable. Regardless of the radicals scavenged, melatonin prevents oxidative damage at the level of cells, tissues, organs and organisms. The antioxidative mechanisms of melatonin seem different from classical antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione. As electron donors, classical antioxidants undergo redox cycling; thus, they have the potential to promote oxidation as well as prevent it. Melatonin, as an electron-rich molecule, may interact with free radicals via an additive reaction to form several stable end-products which are excreted in the urine. Melatonin does not undergo redox cycling and, thus, does not promote oxidation as shown under a variety of experimental conditions. From this point of view, melatonin can be considered a suicidal or terminal antioxidant which distinguishes it from the opportunistic antioxidants. Interestingly, the ability of melatonin to scavenge free radicals is not in a ratio of mole to mole. Indeed, one melatonin molecule scavenges two HO. Also, its secondary and tertiary metabolites, for example, N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine, N-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine and 6-hydroxymelatonin, which are believed to be generated when melatonin interacts with free radicals, are also regarded as effective free radical scavengers. The continuous free radical scavenging potential of the original molecule (melatonin) and its metabolites may be defined as a

  5. Antioxidants in vegan diet and rheumatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänninen; Kaartinen, K; Rauma, A L; Nenonen, M; Törrönen, R; Häkkinen, A S; Adlercreutz, H; Laakso, J

    2000-11-30

    Plants are rich natural sources of antioxidants in addition to other nutrients. Interventions and cross sectional studies on subjects consuming uncooked vegan diet called living food (LF) have been carried out. We have clarified the efficacy of LF in rheumatoid diseases as an example of a health problem where inflammation is one of the main concerns. LF is an uncooked vegan diet and consists of berries, fruits, vegetables and roots, nuts, germinated seeds and sprouts, i.e. rich sources of carotenoids, vitamins C and E. The subjects eating LF showed highly increased levels of beta and alfa carotenes, lycopen and lutein in their sera. Also the increases of vitamin C and vitamin E (adjusted to cholesterol) were statistically significant. As the berry intake was 3-fold compared to controls the intake of polyphenolic compounds like quercetin, myricetin and kaempherol was much higher than in the omnivorous controls. The LF diet is rich in fibre, substrate of lignan production, and the urinary excretion of polyphenols like enterodiol and enterolactone as well as secoisolaricirecinol were much increased in subjects eating LF. The shift of fibromyalgic subjects to LF resulted in a decrease of their joint stiffness and pain as well as an improvement of their self-experienced health. The rheumatoid arthritis patients eating the LF diet also reported similar positive responses and the objective measures supported this finding. The improvement of rheumatoid arthritis was significantly correlated with the day-to-day fluctuation of subjective symptoms. In conclusion the rheumatoid patients subjectively benefited from the vegan diet rich in antioxidants, lactobacilli and fibre, and this was also seen in objective measures.

  6. Two Phenolic Diterpenes as Antioxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹槐; 李涛洪; 李聪; 潘蓄林; 宋仲容; 谢小光

    2005-01-01

    A DFT study was carried out to investigate the structure-activity relationship of rosmanol and carnosol. The geometry, HOMO and LUMO of parent molecules, O-H bond dissociation energy (BDE), and distribution of unpaired electron obtained by B3LYP/6-31G* were used to elucidate the antioxidant properties of the two compounds. The results proved the intramolecular hydrogen bond and delocalization of the unpaired electron to be the important factors affecting the stability of phenoxyl free radical generated after the H-abstraction.

  7. Antioxidant lignans from Larrea tridentata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Gazar, Hassan; Bedir, Erdal; Takamatsu, Satoshi; Ferreira, Daneel; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2004-09-01

    Three lignans, (7S,8S,7'S,8'S)-3,3',4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-7,7'-epoxylignan, meso-(rel 7S,8S,7'R,8'R)-3,4,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-7,7'-epoxylignan, and (E)-4,4'-dihydroxy-7,7'-dioxolign-8(8')-ene, together with 10 known compounds, were isolated from the leaves of Larrea tridentata. The structures of the new compounds were determined primarily from 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis. Their antioxidant activities against intracellular reactive oxygen species were evaluated in HL-60 cells.

  8. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of plants of the ethnopharmacopeia from northwest of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-Estrada Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study, is to investigate the in vitro antioxidant activity, the total phenols content, the flavonoids content and the antiproliferative activity of methanolic extracts of the plants: Krameria erecta, Struthanthus palmeri, Phoradendron californicum, Senna covesii and Stegnosperma halimifolium, used by different ethnic groups from northwestern Mexico in the treatment and cure of various diseases. Methods The in vitro antioxidant activity was measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and Ferric Reducing/Antioxidant Power assay (FRAP, the total phenols content was measured by Folin–Ciocalteau assay, the flavonoids content by the AlCl3 colorimetric method and the antiproliferative activity (line cells HeLa, RAW 264.7, M12Ak.C3.F6 and L929 using MTT method. Results The K. erecta extract showed the higher radical scavenging activity (67.88%, antioxidant activity by FRAP (1.41 mg Trolox Eq, the highest total phenols content (598.51 mg Galic Acid Eq/g extract, the highest flavonoids content (3.80 mg Quercetin Eq/g extract and the greatest antiproliferative activity in a dose dependent manner against most Cell line evaluated. A positive correlation was found between the antioxidant activity and the flavonoids content. Conclusions This study is the first report on the antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of the five species evaluated. The results demostrate that there is a positive correlation between antioxidant activity and the flavonoids content, indicating that these type of polyphenols could be the major contributors to the observed antioxidant activity in the evaluated plant extracts. Of the extracts evaluated, that of Krameria erecta showed the greatest antioxidant and antiproliferative activities, a discovery that makes this species a promising candidate for future research.

  9. Antioxidant activity of yoghurt peptides: Part 2 – Characterisationof peptide fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Baron, Caroline; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate previous findings showing that peptide fractions isolated from yoghurt had antioxidant effects. Therefore, peptides and free amino acids released during fermentation of milk were characterised. Yoghurt samples were stripped from sugars and lactic acid...... the peptides identified contained at least one proline residue. Some of the identified peptides included the hydrophobic amino acid residues Val or Leu at the N-terminus and Pro, His or Tyr in the amino acid sequence, which is characteristic of antioxidant peptides. In addition, the yoghurt contained...... a considerable amount of free amino acids such as His, Tyr, Thr and Lys, which have been reported to have antioxidant properties. Thus, our findings confirm that the antioxidant effects of the peptide fractions from yoghurt are due to the presence of certain peptides and free amino acids with recognised...

  10. THE EFFECTS OF NICOTINE TREATMENT ON THE ANTIOXIDANT ENZIMES ACTIVITY IN THE RAT BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine has been reported to be therapeutic in some patients with certain neurodegenerative diseases and to have neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system. However, nicotine administration may result in oxidative stress by inducing the generation of reactive oxygen species in the periphery and central nervous system. There is also evidence suggesting that nicotine may have antioxidant properties in the central nervous system. The antioxidant properties of nicotine may be intracellular through the activation of the nicotinic receptors or extracellular by acting as a radical scavenger in that it binds to iron. The possibility that nicotine might be used to treat some symptoms of certain neurodegenerative diseases underlies the necessity to determine whether nicotine has pro-oxidant, antioxidant or properties of both. In the present study we evaluated the effects of nicotine treatment (0.3 mg/kg g.c., i.p., SIGMA, 7 continuous days administration, on the antioxidant enzymes activity.

  11. Dietary antioxidents and oxidative stress in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Gupta, Krishan; Sahni, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Dietary antioxidants are important in protecting against human diseases. Oxidative stress, a non- traditional risk factors of cardio-vascular disease is far more prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients than in normal subjects. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Oxidative stress could be a consequence of an increase in reactive oxygen species as well as a decrease in antioxidant defenses. Among the important factors that can be involved in triggering oxidative stress is insufficient dietary intake of antioxidants. Malnourished CKD patients are reported to have more oxidative stress than well nourished ones. Moving beyond the importance of assessment of dietary protein and energy in pre dialysis CKD patients to the assessment of dietary antioxidants is of utmost importance to help combat enhanced oxidative stress levels in such patients.

  12. Antioxidant activity and phenylpropanoids of Phlomis lychnitis L.: a traditional herbal tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Víctor; Jäger, Anna K; Akerreta, Silvia; Cavero, Rita Yolanda; Calvo, Maria Isabel

    2010-06-01

    Phlomis lychnitis L. (Lamiaceae) is consumed as a traditional herbal tea in Spain. The antioxidant-protective effects as well as its phytoconstituents have never been established. The ability of the methanolic extract to protect cells from oxidative stress was evaluated in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) using hydrogen peroxide as toxic agent. The viability of PC12 cells pre-treated with the methanolic extract of Phlomis lychnitis, determined by the MTT and LDH assays, was significantly improved at the highest dose (p antioxidant activity was confirmed evaluating the capacity of the plant to scavenge ABTS, DPPH, O(2) . (-) radicals and to inhibit XO. Bioassay guided fractionation led to antioxidant compounds. Qualitative HPLC/DAD/ESI/MS analysis reported phenylpropanoids, verbascoside being the major antioxidant constituent.

  13. Effect of drying methods on total antioxidant capacity of bitter gourd (momordica charantia) fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ee Shian; Abdullah, Aminah; Maskat, Mohammad Yusof

    2013-11-01

    The effect of thermal and non-thermal drying methods on hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidant capacities of bitter gourd fruit was investigated in this study. The bitter gourd fruits were dried by following methods: (i) oven drying 40°C, (ii) oven drying 50°C, (iii) oven drying 60°C, (iv) microwave drying (medium low power), (v) microwave drying (medium power) and (vi) freeze drying. Pure acetone and hexane were used to extract the hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidant compounds from dried bitter gourd fruits. Freeze dried extracts reported to have highest values in DPPH scavenging activity (hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions), FRAP (lipophilic fraction) and TPC (hydrophilic and lipophilic fraction). Thermal drying slightly increased the values of DPPH scavenging activity, FRAP and TPC assays for hydrophilic extracts. Results concluded bitter gourd fruit is a good source of natural antioxidants and its total antioxidant quality was most preserved by freeze drying. Additionally, the higher value reported in DPPH scavenging activity, FRAP and TPC assays for lipophilic extracts than the hydrophilic extracts suggested that the lipophilic antioxidant compounds of bitter gourd fruit might possess stronger antioxidant power than its counterpart.

  14. Total phenolic content and in-vitro antioxidant activities from methanolic extract of alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanaye, S.V.; Pise, N.M.; Pawar, A.P.; Parab, P.P.; Sreepada, R.A.; Pawar, H.B.; Murugan, A.

    Alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785) is one of the heavily traded and expensive ingredient in traditional Chinese medicines and there were no reports on its antioxidant activities Total phenolic content (TPC) and in...

  15. Antioxidant activity and inhibition of aflatoxin B1-, nifuroxazide-, and sodium azide-induced mutagenicity by extracts from Rhamnus alaternus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Rebai Ben; Sghaier, Mohamed Ben; Boubaker, Jihed; Bhouri, Wissem; Naffeti, Aicha; Skandrani, Ines; Bouhlel, Ines; Kilani, Soumaya; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2008-07-10

    The effect of extracts obtained from Rhamnus alaternus L. leaves on genotoxicity and SOS response induced by aflatoxin B(1) (10 microg/assay) as well as nifuroxazide (20 microg/assay) was investigated in a bacterial assay system, i.e., the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli PQ37. The evaluation of the mutagenic and antimutagenic actions of the same extracts against the sodium azide (1.5 microg/plate)-induced mutagenicity was assayed using the Salmonella typhimurium assay system. The R. alaternus tested extracts exhibited no genotoxicity either with or without the external S9 activation mixture. However, all the extracts, particularly aqueous extract (A) and its chloroformic fraction (A(2)) significantly decreased the genotoxicity induced by aflatoxin B(1) and nifuroxazide. Moreover, the different extracts showed no mutagenicity when tested with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535 and TA1538 either with or without the S9 mix. Aqueous extract as well as its A(2) fraction exhibited the highest level of protection towards the direct mutagen, sodium azide-induced response in TA1535 strain with mutagenicity inhibition percentages of 83.6% and 91.4%, respectively, at a dose of 250 microg/plate. The results obtained by the Ames test assay confirm those of SOS chromotest. These same active extracts exhibited high xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibiting with respective IC(50) values of 208 and 137 microg/ml, and superoxide anion-scavenging effects (IC(50) values of 132 and 117 microg/ml) when tested in the XOD enzymatic assay system. Our findings emphasize the potential of R. alaternus to prevent mutations and also its antioxidant effect.

  16. Soluble antioxidant compounds regenerate the antioxidants bound to insoluble parts of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ecem Evrim; Gökmen, Vural; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2013-10-30

    This study aimed to investigate the regeneration potential of antioxidant capacity of an insoluble food matrix. Investigations were performed in vitro with several food matrices rich in dietary fiber (DF) and bound antioxidants. After removal of the soluble fraction, the antioxidant capacity (AC) of the insoluble fraction was measured by the QUENCHER procedure using ABTS(•+) or DPPH(•) radicals. After measurement, the insoluble residue was washed out to remove the excess of radicals and treated with pure antioxidant solution or antioxidant-rich beverage to regenerate depleted antioxidants on the fiber. Results revealed that the antioxidant capacity of compounds chemically bound to the insoluble moiety could be reconstituted in the presence of other hydrogen-donating substances in the liquid phase. Regeneration efficiency was found to range between 21.5 and 154.3% depending on the type of insoluble food matrix and regeneration agent. Among the food matrices studied, cereal products were found to have slightly higher regeneration efficiency, whereas antioxidant-rich beverages were more effective than pure antioxidants as regeneration agents. Taking wheat bran as reference insoluble material, the regeneration abilities of beverages were in the following order: green tea > espresso coffee > black tea > instant coffee > orange juice > red wine. These results highlighted the possible physiological relevance of antioxidants bound to the insoluble food material in the gastrointestinal tract. During the digestion process they could react with the free radicals and at the same time they can be regenerated by other soluble antioxidant compounds present in the meal.

  17. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of Anthemis palestina essential oil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Tawaha, Khaled A; Hudaib, Mohammad M

    2014-01-01

    .... The antioxidant activity of the hydrodistilled oil was characterized using various in vitro model systems such as DPPH, ferric-reducing antioxidant power and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity...

  18. Synthesis and Antioxidant Activity of Sapriparaquinone Analogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei DENG; Fu Jun ZHANG; Ming ZHAO; Yi Ping WANG; Jin Sheng ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Twenty two sapriparaquinone derivatives were synthesized and their antioxidant activities were evaluated in vitro. Many of this kind of compounds demonstrated potent antioxidant activity against lipid peroxidation, especially compound 7 (ICs0 = 3.7 μg/mL). The preliminary structure-activity relationship of sapriparaquinone derivatives was discussed.

  19. Antioxidant activity of the microalga Spirulina maxima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Miranda

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina maxima, which is used as a food additive, is a microalga rich in protein and other essential nutrients. Spirulina contains phenolic acids, tocopherols and ß-carotene which are known to exhibit antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of a Spirulina extract. The antioxidant activity of a methanolic extract of Spirulina was determined in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro antioxidant capacity was tested on a brain homogenate incubated with and without the extract at 37oC. The IC50 (concentration which causes a 50% reduction of oxidation of the extract in this system was 0.18 mg/ml. The in vivo antioxidant capacity was evaluated in plasma and liver of animals receiving a daily dose of 5 mg for 2 and 7 weeks. Plasma antioxidant capacity was measured in brain homogenate incubated for 1 h at 37oC. The production of oxidized compounds in liver after 2 h of incubation at 37oC was measured in terms of thiobarbituric acid reactant substances (TBARS in control and experimental groups. Upon treatment, the antioxidant capacity of plasma was 71% for the experimental group and 54% for the control group. Data from liver spontaneous peroxidation studies were not significantly different between groups. The amounts of phenolic acids, a-tocopherol and ß-carotene were determined in Spirulina extracts. The results obtained indicate that Spirulina provides some antioxidant protection for both in vitro and in vivo systems.

  20. Antioxidants and vision health: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Ashok K; Samson, Sue E

    2014-03-01

    A number of nutritional supplements containing antioxidants are advertised for better vision health. Do they benefit the average consumer? The literature was examined for the effectiveness of antioxidants for human eye health, and for the intricacies in collection of such evidence. The following diseases were considered: cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, eye infections, and uveitis. The literature indicates that antioxidant supplements plus lutein have a reasonable probability of retarding AMD. For glaucoma, such supplements were ineffectual in some studies but useful in others. In some studies, antioxidant rich fruits and vegetables were also useful for protection against glaucoma. For diabetic retinopathy, antioxidant supplements may have a small benefit, if any, but only as an adjunct to glycemic control. In very high-risk premature retinopathy and retinitis pigmentosa, antioxidant supplements may be beneficial but those with excess Vitamin E should be avoided. For cataract, there is no evidence for an advantage of such nutritional supplements. However, lubricant drops containing N-acetylcarnosine may be helpful in initial stages of the disease. For eye infections and other causes of uveitis, antioxidants have not been found useful. We recommend that a diet high in antioxidant rich foods should be developed as a habit from an early age. However, when initial signs of vision health deterioration are observed, the appropriate nutritional supplement products may be recommended but only to augment the primary medical treatments.

  1. Plants as natural antioxidants for meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomović, V.; Jokanović, M.; Šojić, B.; Škaljac, S.; Ivić, M.

    2017-09-01

    The meat industry is demanding antioxidants from natural sources to replace synthetic antioxidants because of the negative health consequences or beliefs regarding some synthetic ones. Plants materials provide good alternatives. Spices and herbs, generally used for their flavouring characteristics, can be added to meat products in various forms: whole, ground, or as isolates from their extracts. These natural antioxidants contain some active compounds, which exert antioxidative potential in meat products. This antioxidant activity is most often due to phenolic acids, phenolic diterpenes, flavonoids and volatile oils. Each of these compounds often has strong H-donating activity, thus making them extremely effective antioxidants; some compounds can chelate metals and donate H to oxygen radicals, thus slowing oxidation via two mechanisms. Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of natural antioxidants when used in meat products. Based on this literature review, it can be concluded that natural antioxidants are added to fresh and processed meat and meat products to delay, retard, or prevent lipid oxidation, retard development of off-flavours (rancidity), improve colour stability, improve microbiological quality and extend shelf-life, without any damage to the sensory or nutritional properties.

  2. Rethinking Antioxidants in the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Manu

    2013-01-01

    Recently there was yet another clinical trial using antioxidants that failed in patients with critical illness. In this perspective, we suggest that antioxidants likely interfere with the normal immune response, thus contributing to the lack of efficacy in patients with critical illness. PMID:24117139

  3. Antioxidant supplements for preventing gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, G; Nikolova, D; Simonetti, R G

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory.......Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory....

  4. Antioxidant supplements for preventing gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Simonetti, Rosa G

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory.......Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory....

  5. Antioxidant supplements for prevention of gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Simonetti, Rosa G

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress can cause cancer. Our aim was to establish whether antioxidant supplements reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer and mortality.......Oxidative stress can cause cancer. Our aim was to establish whether antioxidant supplements reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer and mortality....

  6. Hydroxycinnamic Acid Antioxidants: An Electrochemical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxycinnamic acids (such as ferulic, caffeic, sinapic, and p-coumaric acids are a group of compounds highly abundant in food that may account for about one-third of the phenolic compounds in our diet. Hydroxycinnamic acids have gained an increasing interest in health because they are known to be potent antioxidants. These compounds have been described as chain-breaking antioxidants acting through radical scavenging activity, that is related to their hydrogen or electron donating capacity and to the ability to delocalize/stabilize the resulting phenoxyl radical within their structure. The free radical scavenger ability of antioxidants can be predicted from standard one-electron potentials. Thus, voltammetric methods have often been applied to characterize a diversity of natural and synthetic antioxidants essentially to get an insight into their mechanism and also as an important tool for the rational design of new and potent antioxidants. The structure-property-activity relationships (SPARs correlations already established for this type of compounds suggest that redox potentials could be considered a good measure of antioxidant activity and an accurate guideline on the drug discovery and development process. Due to its magnitude in the antioxidant field, the electrochemistry of hydroxycinnamic acid-based antioxidants is reviewed highlighting the structure-property-activity relationships (SPARs obtained so far.

  7. Antioxidants can increase melanoma metastasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, Kristell; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Wiel, Clotilde; Sayin, Volkan I; Akula, Murali K; Karlsson, Christin; Dalin, Martin G; Akyürek, Levent M; Lindahl, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Bergo, Martin O

    2015-10-07

    Antioxidants in the diet and supplements are widely used to protect against cancer, but clinical trials with antioxidants do not support this concept. Some trials show that antioxidants actually increase cancer risk and a study in mice showed that antioxidants accelerate the progression of primary lung tumors. However, little is known about the impact of antioxidant supplementation on the progression of other types of cancer, including malignant melanoma. We show that administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) increases lymph node metastases in an endogenous mouse model of malignant melanoma but has no impact on the number and size of primary tumors. Similarly, NAC and the soluble vitamin E analog Trolox markedly increased the migration and invasive properties of human malignant melanoma cells but did not affect their proliferation. Both antioxidants increased the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione in melanoma cells and in lymph node metastases, and the increased migration depended on new glutathione synthesis. Furthermore, both NAC and Trolox increased the activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RHOA, and blocking downstream RHOA signaling abolished antioxidant-induced migration. These results demonstrate that antioxidants and the glutathione system play a previously unappreciated role in malignant melanoma progression. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Combination chemoprevention with grape antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandra K; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; El-Abd, Sabah; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2016-06-01

    Antioxidant ingredients present in grape have been extensively investigated for their cancer chemopreventive effects. However, much of the work has been done on individual ingredients, especially focusing on resveratrol and quercetin. Phytochemically, whole grape represents a combination of numerous phytonutrients. Limited research has been done on the possible synergistic/additive/antagonistic interactions among the grape constituents. Among these phytochemical constituents of grapes, resveratrol, quercetin, kaempferol, catechin, epicatechin, and anthocyanins (cyanidin and malvidin) constitute more than 70% of the grape polyphenols. Therefore, these have been relatively well studied for their chemopreventive effects against a variety of cancers. While a wealth of information is available individually on cancer chemopreventive/anti-proliferative effects of resveratrol and quercetin, limited information is available regarding the other major constituents of grape. Studies have also suggested that multiple grape antioxidants, when used in combination, alone or with other agents/drugs show synergistic or additive anti-proliferative response. Based on strong rationale emanating from published studies, it seems probable that a combination of multiple grape ingredients alone or together with other agents could impart 'additive synergism' against cancer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akin Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gossypiboma (GP is a term used to express the mass resulting from forgotten cotton sponge in operations. Rarely, a transmural migration may occur into the gastrointestinal lumen without creating any defect by GP. Laparotomy or endoscopic removal may be required, by the way it can be taken out of the body itself by intestinal ways. In this study, we reported a case of mechanical intestinal obstruction causing GP. Case. The fifty-one-year-old female patient admitted to the emergency department with the complaints of mechanical intestinal obstruction and had a history of open cholecystectomy 20 years ago. There were the findings of intestinal obstruction in abdominal plain radiography and computerized tomography. The sponge that obstructed the lumen completely 40 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve was identified in the laparotomy with the diagnosis of brid ileus. The small intestine was closed over double-fold after removal of sponge. Transmural migration of abdominal-remained sponge was thought to be occurred without creating a defect after cholecystectomy. Postoperatively, the patient was discharged without having any problems at 4th day of hospitalization. Conclusion. Although it is a rare situation in routine clinical practice, GP should be considered as a differential diagnosis in the patients who had a diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction, and laparotomy was applied before. As GP may lead to situations which cause mortality, all precautions should be taken to prevent it.

  10. Antiwear and antioxidant studies of cardanol phosphate ester additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzetto, S.E.; Oliveira, L.D.M.; Lomonaco, D.; Veloso, P.A., E-mail: selma@ufc.br [Lab. de Produtos e Tecnologia em Processos (LPT), Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    In the search for new applications and products derived from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL), we report herein the synthesis and characterization (GC/MS and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 31}P NMR) of four phosphate esters derived from hydrogenated cardanol, including their applications as antiwear additives for diesel (S500) and as antioxidant additives for mineral oils, evaluated through the HFRR test and oxidative stability analyses, respectively. The results obtained showed very good to excellent performances promoted by the bioadditives evaluated, especially for the thiophosphorylated derivative, which notably reduced the sludge residue and the acidity index of the oxidized oil (0.52 mg NaOH/g sample) and also improved the diesel lubricity, reducing the wear of metal parts by more than 50% (330 {Mu}m). Keywords: Cardanol; Antiwear; Antioxidant; Diesel; Mineral oil. (author)

  11. Studies on the antioxidant activities of Desmodium gangeticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Raghavan; Rastogi, Subha; Vijayakumar, Madhavan; Shirwaikar, Annie; Rawat, Ajay Kumar Singh; Mehrotra, Shanta; Pushpangadan, Palpu

    2003-10-01

    Desmodium gangeticum is herbal species which is widely used in the indigenous system of medicine and is reported to contain flavone and isoflavanoid glycosides. In view of its wide use and it's chemical composition, this study was aimed at examining the antioxidant activity of the extract of D. gangeticum. The extract was studied for diphenyl picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide, ferryl-bipyridyl and hypochlorous acid scavenging activity along with lipid peroxidation. Nitric oxide was generated using sodium nitroprusside and was studied using Griess reagent. In order to study the iron chelating capacity of the extract, the percentage ferryl-bipyridyl inhibition was studied. Hypochlorous acid scavenging activity was tested by measuring the inhibition of 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid oxidation. The extract was also studied for lipid peroxidation assay by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) method using rat brain homogenate. The results indicate that D. gangeticum extract has potent antioxidant activity.

  12. Role of pH on antioxidants production by Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mahmoud Sami Ismaiel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Algae can tolerate a broad range of growing conditions but extreme conditions may lead to the generation of highly dangerous reactive oxygen species (ROS, which may cause the deterioration of cell metabolism and damage cellular components. The antioxidants produced by algae alleviate the harmful effects of ROS. While the enhancement of antioxidant production in blue green algae under stress has been reported, the antioxidant response to changes in pH levels requires further investigation. This study presents the effect of pH changes on the antioxidant activity and productivity of the blue green alga Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis. The algal dry weight (DW was greatly enhanced at pH 9.0. The highest content of chlorophyll a and carotenoids (10.6 and 2.4 mg/g DW, respectively was recorded at pH 8.5. The highest phenolic content (12.1 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g DW was recorded at pH 9.5. The maximum production of total phycobiliprotein (159 mg/g DW was obtained at pH 9.0. The antioxidant activities of radical scavenging activity, reducing power and chelating activity were highest at pH 9.0 with an increase of 567, 250 and 206% compared to the positive control, respectively. Variation in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and peroxidase (POD was also reported. While the high alkaline pH may favor the overproduction of antioxidants, normal cell metabolism and membrane function is unaffected, as shown by growth and chlorophyll content, which suggests that these conditions are suitable for further studies on the harvest of antioxidants from S. platensis.

  13. Role of pH on antioxidants production by Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaiel, Mostafa Mahmoud Sami; El-Ayouty, Yassin Mahmoud; Piercey-Normore, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Algae can tolerate a broad range of growing conditions but extreme conditions may lead to the generation of highly dangerous reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause the deterioration of cell metabolism and damage cellular components. The antioxidants produced by algae alleviate the harmful effects of ROS. While the enhancement of antioxidant production in blue green algae under stress has been reported, the antioxidant response to changes in pH levels requires further investigation. This study presents the effect of pH changes on the antioxidant activity and productivity of the blue green alga Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis. The algal dry weight (DW) was greatly enhanced at pH 9.0. The highest content of chlorophyll a and carotenoids (10.6 and 2.4mg/g DW, respectively) was recorded at pH 8.5. The highest phenolic content (12.1mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g DW) was recorded at pH 9.5. The maximum production of total phycobiliprotein (159mg/g DW) was obtained at pH 9.0. The antioxidant activities of radical scavenging activity, reducing power and chelating activity were highest at pH 9.0 with an increase of 567, 250 and 206% compared to the positive control, respectively. Variation in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) was also reported. While the high alkaline pH may favor the overproduction of antioxidants, normal cell metabolism and membrane function is unaffected, as shown by growth and chlorophyll content, which suggests that these conditions are suitable for further studies on the harvest of antioxidants from S. platensis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Cellular antioxidant activity of common vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Derito, Christopher M; Liu, M Keshu; He, Xiangjiu; Dong, Mei; Liu, Rui Hai

    2010-06-01

    The measurement of antioxidant activity using biologically relevant assays is important to screen fruits, vegetables, natural products, and dietary supplements for potential health benefits. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay quantifies antioxidant activity using a cell culture model and was developed to meet the need for a more biologically representative method than the popular chemistry antioxidant capacity measures. The objective of the study was to determine the CAA, total phenolic contents, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values of 27 vegetables commonly consumed in the United States. Beets, broccoli, and red pepper had the highest CAA values, whereas cucumber had the lowest. CAA values were significantly correlated to total phenolic content. Potatoes were found to be the largest contributors of vegetable phenolics and CAA to the American diet. Increased fruit and vegetable consumption is an effective strategy to increase antioxidant intake and decrease oxidative stress and may lead to reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Future Applications of Antioxidants in Premature Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer W.; Davis, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review will examine the unique susceptibility of premature infants to oxidative stress, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of common disorders of the preterm infant, and potential for therapeutic interventions using enzymatic and/or non-enzymatic antioxidants. Recent Findings Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of ROS and the ability to detoxify them with the help of antioxidants. The premature infant is especially susceptible to ROS-induced damage because of inadequate antioxidant stores at birth, as well as impaired upregulation in response to oxidant stress. Thus, the premature infant is at increased risk for the development of ROS-induced diseases of the newborn, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, necrotizing enterocolitis, and periventricular leukomalacia. Summary Potential therapies for ROS-induced disease include both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant preparations. More research is required to determine the beneficial effects of supplemental antioxidant therapy. PMID:21150443

  16. Mitochondrial Targeted Antioxidant in Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ejaz; Donovan, Tucker; Yujiao, Lu; Zhang, Quanguang

    There has been much evidence suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in mitochondria during cerebral ischemia play a major role in programming the senescence of organism. Antioxidants dealing with mitochondria slow down the appearance and progression of symptoms in cerebral ischemia and increase the life span of organisms. The mechanisms of mitochondrial targeted antioxidants, such as SKQ1, Coenzyme Q10, MitoQ, and Methylene blue, include increasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, decreasing production of ROS and increasing antioxidant defenses, providing benefits in neuroprotection following cerebral ischemia. A number of studies have shown the neuroprotective role of these mitochondrial targeted antioxidants in cerebral ischemia. Here in this short review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction, and the protective role of mitochondrial targeted antioxidants.

  17. Partitioning of selected antioxidants in mayonnaise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Schwarz, K.; Stockmann, H.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined partitioning of alpha-, beta-, and gamma- tocopherol and six polar antioxidants (Trolox, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, propyl gallate, gallic acid, and catechin) in mayonnaise. Partitioning of antioxidants between different phases was determined after separation of mayonnaise...... by either (a) centrifugation + ultracentrifugation or (b) centrifugation + dialysis. Antioxidants partitioned in accordance with their chemical structure and polarity: Tocopherols were concentrated in the oil phase (93-96%), while the proportion of polar antioxidants in the oil phase ranged from 0% (gallic...... acid and catechin) to 83% (Trolox). Accordingly, proportions of 6% (Trolox) to 80% (gallic acid and catechin) were found in the aqueous phase. Similar trends were observed after dialysis. After ultracentrifugation, large proportions of polar antioxidants were found in the "emulsion phase...

  18. Evaluation of antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of seaweed ( Sargassum sp.) extract: A study on inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase Activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patra, J.K.; Rath, S.K.; Jena, K.B.; Rathod, V.K.; Thatoi, H.

    ). Principal source of antioxidant chiefly include those of herbs, spices, and medicinal plants. There are reports that seaweeds are also rich sources of antioxidant compounds (3,4). Seaweeds provide for an excellent source of bioactive compounds such as Turk J... Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity of Seaweed (Sargassum sp.) Extract: A Study on Inhibition of Glutathione-S-Transferase Activity References 1. Halliwell B, Gutteridge JMC. Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine. Oxford: Clarendon Press...

  19. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Adriano Costa de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d' Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia, E-mail: sgcbraza@usp.b, E-mail: tvieira@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: mabra@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: macdomin@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2011-07-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a {sup 60}Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  20. Addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves as an effective way to reduce the formation of acrylamide in fried chicken wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Xu, Weizhong; Wu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Ying

    2007-03-01

    The efficiency of antioxidant from bamboo leaves on the reduction of acrylamide during thermal processing and optimization of levels of addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves applied to fried chicken wings are reported. The authors optimized the method of the addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves to fried chicken wings and the frying processing parameters, and also compared the relationship between the content of total flavonoids in three extracts (EBL(971), EBL(972) and antioxidant from bamboo leaves) and the extent of the reduction of acrylamide. The acrylamide levels were quantified by a validated liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection method and the sensory evaluation was performed in a double-blind manner. The results showed that nearly 57.8 and 59.0% of acrylamide in fried chicken wings were reduced when the antioxidant from bamboo leaves addition ratios were 0.1 and 0.5% (w/w), respectively. The maximum inhibitory rate was achieved when antioxidant from bamboo leaves was chosen as the additive with a total flavonoid content of 32% compared with other two extracts and antioxidant from bamboo leaves mixed with flour was selected as the method of addition. Sensory evaluation results showed that the odour and flavour of fried chicken wings with antioxidant from bamboo leaves treatments had no significant difference compared with normal food matrixes (p > 0.05) when the antioxidant from bamboo leaves addition ratio was Colour acceptability in the study of sensory evaluation was in good correspondence with colour formation of fried chicken wings in each test group. These results suggest that antioxidant from bamboo leaves could significantly reduce acrylamide formation in fried chicken wings and yet still retain the original flavour and odour of the fried products. This study could be regarded as a pioneer contribution to the reduction of acrylamide in various foods by natural antioxidants.

  1. Data in support of antioxidant activities of the non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Matsumura

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This data article is related to the research article entitled, “Antioxidant potential in non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.” (Matsumura et al., 2016 [1]. We investigated antioxidant activities of the non-extractable fraction of dried persimmon fruits in vitro and in vivo. We evaluated both extracted fraction and non-extractable fraction, and reported that non-extractable fraction may possess significantly antioxidant potential in vivo on the basis of the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC. We showed our experimental raw data about antioxidant capacity of dried persimmon, plasma triglycerides (TG and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, and this data article might contribute to evaluate real antioxidant capacity of other fruits and vegetables.

  2. Antioxidant activities and structural characterization of flavonol O-glycosides from seeds of Japanese horse chestnut (Aesculus turbinata BLUME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideto; Ogawa, Satoshi; Ishihara, Tomoe; Maruoka, Mahoko; Tokuyama-Nakai, Shota; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Yokota, Kazushige

    2017-08-01

    We attempted to evaluate the contents and distribution of antioxidants in the whole seeds, seed shells, and peeled seeds of the Japanese horse chestnut. The seed shells exhibited the highest antioxidant activities due to the presence of highly polymeric proanthocyanidins as we have reported recently. On the other hand, the peeled seeds predominantly contained flavonols such as quercetin and kaempferol at a high level of 66.7% of total polyphenols, also contributing to the predominant antioxidant activities. The instrumental analysis of the extract from the whole seeds revealed the identification of eight flavonol O-glycosides, including six compounds with quercetin and two species with kaempferol as aglycones. The isolated species exhibited different antioxidant activities depending on the types of aglycones, glycosides, and acylated moieties. The results indicate that the peeled seeds are a good source of flavonol O-glycosides serving as antioxidants to be used for food additives and dietary supplements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Research Advances: Nanoscale Molecular Tweezers; Cinnamon as Pesticide?; Recently Identified Dietary Sources of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2004-12-01

    This Report from Other Journals surveys articles of interest to chemists that have been recently published in other science journals. Topics surveyed include reports that receptors have been designed to act as molecular tweezers; cinnamon has potential in the fight against mosquitoes; and high levels of antioxidants are found in some surprising foods. See Featured Molecules .

  4. Surface-active properties of lipophilic antioxidants tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol fatty acid esters: a potential explanation for the nonlinear hypothesis of the antioxidant activity in oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Ricardo; Comelles, Francisco; Alcántara, David; Maldonado, Olivia S; Curcuroze, Melanie; Parra, Jose L; Morales, Juan C

    2010-07-14

    Our group has recently observed a nonlinear tendency in antioxidant capacity of different hydroxytyrosol fatty acid esters in fish oil-in-water emulsions, where a maximum of antioxidant efficiency appeared for hydroxytyrosol octanoate. These results appear to disagree with the antioxidant polar paradox. Because the physical location of the antioxidants in an oil-water interface has been postulated as an important factor in explaining this behavior, we have prepared a series of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol fatty acid esters with different chain length and studied their surface-active properties in water, because these physicochemical parameters could be directly related to the preferential placement at the interface. We have found that tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol fatty acid esters are relevant surfactants when the right hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) is attained and, in some cases, as efficient as emulsifiers commonly used in industry, such as Brij 30 or Tween 20. Moreover, a nonlinear dependency of surfactant effectiveness is observed with the increase in chain length of the lipophilic antioxidants. This tendency seems to fit quite well with the reported antioxidant activity in emulsions, and the best antioxidant of the series (hydroxytyrosol octanoate) is also a very effective surfactant. This potential explanation of the nonlinear hypothesis will help in the rational design of antioxidants used in oil-in-water emulsions.

  5. Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity from Different Plant Parts of Senduduk Herb: Extraction Conditions Optimization of Selected Plant Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaludin Nor Helya Iman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports a study on evaluation of antioxidant properties from flower of Senduduk herb. Natural occurring antioxidant was mostly preferred due to their little or no toxicity compared to the synthetic antioxidants which posses carcinogenic effects. Extraction was done on selected plant parts of Sendududk herb including leaves, stem, flower and berry parts to evaluate their antioxidant potentiality. Flower part of Sendudk herb extracted using acetonic solvent promotes highest antioxidant activity which is 93.97 ± 1.38 % as compared to leaves (92.20 ± 0.20 %, stem (47.94 ± 1.42% and berry (92.88 ± 0.63% using the same extracting solvent. Thus, Senduduk flower was chosen to be continued with screening and optimization process. Single factor experiment using the one factor at a time (OFAT method was done to study the effect of each extraction parameter that was solid to solvent ratio, temperature and solvent concentration. The extraction condition in each parametric study which results in highest antioxidant activity was used as the middle level of optimization process using Response Surface Methodology (RSM coupled with Central Composite Design (CCD. The optimum condition was at 1:20 solid to solvent ratio, 64.61°C temperature and 80.24% acetone concentration which result in antioxidant activity of 96.53%. The verification of RSM showed that the model used to predict the antioxidant activity was valid and adequate with the experimental parameters.

  6. Phytochemical Analysis and Antioxidant Activity of Salvia chloroleuca Aerial Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimikia, Iraj; Reza Monsef-Esfahani, Hamid; Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Salek, Mehrnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Background Salvia, known as Maryam Goli in the Persian language, is an important genus that includes approximately 900 species in the Lamiaceae family. There are 58 Salvia species growing naturally in Iran, including Salvia chloroleuca Rech. f. and Allen., which grows wild in the northeastern and central parts of the country. Objectives This study was designed to determine the chemical composition, in vitro antioxidant activity, and total phenol content of various extracts of S. chloroleuca. Materials and Methods Dried aerial parts of the plant were crushed, then sequentially extracted with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol. The fractions of S. chloroleuca were subjected to silica gel column chromatography and Sephedex LH-20. The antioxidant activities of these extracts were measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and the total phenolic contents of the extracts were evaluated using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Results The separation and purification processes were carried out using different chromatographic methods. Structural elucidation was on the basis 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectral data, in comparison with that reported in the literature. The isolated compounds were salvigenin (1), luteolin (2), cirsiliol (3), β-sitosterol (4), and daucosterol (5). Ethyl acetate extract displayed the highest level of total antioxidants and total polyphenols compared to the other analyzed extracts (n-hexane and methanol). In the FRAP assay, ethyl acetate extract had the highest (230.4±10.5) FRAP value, followed by methanol (211.4 ± 8.3) and n-hexane (143.4 ± 12.04). Total phenol contents were calculated to be 13.8 ± 0.3, 58.25 ± 0.05, and 43.48 ± 0.38 mg of gallic acid/100 g in the n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts, respectively. Conclusions The above-mentioned compounds were isolated for the first time from S. chloroleuca. The antioxidant activity of this plant could be in part related to isolated flavonoids and sterols. The results of this study

  7. Dendritic tellurides acting as antioxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huaping; WANG Yapei; WANG Zhiqiang; LIU Junqiu; Mario Smet; Wim Dehaen

    2006-01-01

    We have described the synthesis of a series of poly(aryl ether) dendrimers with telluride in the core and oligo(ethylene oxide) chains at the periphery which act as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics. These series of compounds were well characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESI-MS. Using different ROOH (H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide) for testing the antioxidizing properties of these compounds, we have found that from generation 0 to 2, the activity of the dendritic GPx mimics first decreased and then increased. This can be explained on the basis of a greater steric hindrance, going from generation 0 to 1, and stronger binding interactions going from generation 1 to 2. In other words, there exists a balance between binding interactions and steric hindrance that may optimize the GPx activity.

  8. Dietary polyphenols: Antioxidants or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Kevin D

    2016-04-01

    Population studies have shown a strong association between dietary intake of polyphenols and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. These associations have been confirmed to some extent by intervention studies which have shown improvements in vascular function and blood pressure with certain polyphenols or food extracts rich in polyphenols. The mechanisms involved in the bioactivity of dietary polyphenols is still under active investigation. It is unlikely that polyphenols act as antioxidants in vivo. Evidence suggests that dietary polyphenols or their metabolites act as signalling molecules and can increase nitric oxide bioavailability and induce protective enzymes. This review will outline some of the key issues in dietary polyphenol research that suggest mechanistic insights into the action of these bioactive compounds. There are a number of issues that remain to be resolved in bridging the gap between observational studies and intervention trials using food extracts or pure polyphenol compounds.

  9. Cocoa antioxidants and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Carl L; Holt, Roberta R; Oteiza, Patricia I; Fraga, César G; Schmitz, Harold H

    2005-01-01

    An increasing body of epidemiologic evidence supports the concept that diets rich in fruits and vegetables can promote health and attenuate, or delay, the onset of various diseases. Epidemiologic data support the idea that these health benefits are causally linked to the consumption of certain flavonoids present in fruit and vegetables. In the context of cardiovascular health, a particular group of flavonoids, namely, the flavan-3-ols (flavanols), has received attention. Flavanol-rich, plant-derived foods and beverages include wine, tea, and various fruits and berries, as well as cocoa and cocoa products. Numerous dietary intervention studies in humans and animals indicate that flavanol-rich foods and beverages might exert cardioprotective effects with respect to vascular function and platelet reactivity. This review discusses the bioactivity of flavanols in the context of cardiovascular health, with respect to their bioavailability, their antioxidant properties, and their vascular effects.

  10. Antioxidant activity of selected Indian spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, S; Naidu, K A

    2000-02-01

    Spices and vegetables possess antioxidant activity that can be applied for preservation of lipids and reduce lipid peroxidation in biological systems. The potential antioxidant activities of selected spices extracts (water and alcohol 1:1) were investigated on enzymatic lipid peroxidation. Water and alcoholic extract (1:1) of commonly used spices (garlic, ginger, onion, mint, cloves, cinnamon and pepper) dose-dependently inhibited oxidation of fatty acid, linoleic acid in presence of soybean lipoxygenase. Among the spices tested, cloves exhibited highest while onion showed least antioxidant activity. The relative antioxidant activities decreased in the order of cloves, cinnamon, pepper, ginger, garlic, mint and onion. Spice mix namely ginger, onion and garlic; onion and ginger; ginger and garlic showed cumulative inhibition of lipid peroxidation thus exhibiting their synergistic antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of spice extracts were retained even after boiling for 30 min at 100 degrees C, indicating that the spice constituents were resistant to thermal denaturation. The antioxidant activity of these dietary spices suggest that in addition to imparting flavor to the food, they possess potential health benefits by inhibiting the lipid peroxidation.

  11. Partitioning of selected antioxidants in mayonnaise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, C; Schwarz, K; Stöckmann, H; Meyer, A S; Adler-Nissen, J

    1999-09-01

    This study examined partitioning of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-tocopherol and six polar antioxidants (Trolox, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, propyl gallate, gallic acid, and catechin) in mayonnaise. Partitioning of antioxidants between different phases was determined after separation of mayonnaise by either (a) centrifugation + ultracentrifugation or (b) centrifugation + dialysis. Antioxidants partitioned in accordance with their chemical structure and polarity: Tocopherols were concentrated in the oil phase (93-96%), while the proportion of polar antioxidants in the oil phase ranged from 0% (gallic acid and catechin) to 83% (Trolox). Accordingly, proportions of 6% (Trolox) to 80% (gallic acid and catechin) were found in the aqueous phase. Similar trends were observed after dialysis. After ultracentrifugation, large proportions of polar antioxidants were found in the "emulsion phase" and the "precipitate" (7-34% and 2-7%, respectively). This indicated entrapment of antioxidants at the oil-water interface in mayonnaise. The results signify that antioxidants partitioning into different phases of real food emulsions may vary widely.

  12. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

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    Adriano Costa de Camargo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ. Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h, measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  13. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  14. Antioxidative activities of hydrolysates from edible birds nest using enzymatic hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Nurul Nadia; Babji, Abdul Salam; Ayub, Mohd Khan

    2015-09-01

    Edible bird's nest protein hydrolysates (EBN) were prepared via enzymatic hydrolysis to investigate its antioxidant activity. Two types of enzyme (alcalase and papain) were used in this study and EBN had been hydrolysed with different hydrolysis time (30, 60, 90 and 120 min). Antioxidant activities in EBN protein hydrolysate were measured using DPPH, ABTS+ and Reducing Power Assay. From this study, increased hydrolysis time from 30 min to 120 min contributed to higher DH, as shown by alcalase (40.59%) and papain (24.94%). For antioxidant assay, EBN hydrolysed with papain showed higher scavenging activity and reducing power ability compared to alcalase. The highest antioxidant activity for papain was at 120 min hydrolysis time with ABTS (54.245%), DPPH (49.78%) and Reducing Power (0.0680). Meanwhile for alcalase, the highest antioxidant activity was at 30 min hydrolysis time. Even though scavenging activity for EBN protein hydrolysates were high, the reducing power ability was quite low as compared to BHT and ascorbic Acid. This study showed that EBN protein hydrolysate with alcalase and papain treatments potentially exhibit high antioxidant activity which have not been reported before.

  15. Anti-oxidation activity of ethanol extracts from natural thalli of lichens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kojiro HARA; Marie ENDO; Hiroko KAWAKAMI; Masashi KOMINE; Yoshikazu YAMAMOTO

    2011-01-01

    Screening test on anti-oxidation activity using 1,1-diphenyl2-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH) was performed for 99 ethanol extracts of 85 species of natural thalli of lichens in order to find novel anti-oxidation compounds.The 17 extracts of natural thalli showed high anti-oxidation activity.Among them,the activities of extracts from Hypogymnia vittata,Peltigera aphthosa,Nephromopsis ornata,Pseudevernia furfuracea,Cladonia vulcani and Peltigera elizabethae were higher.Extracts of Peltigera spp.showed higher activity than those of other genera.The ethanol extract of P.aphthosa had been separated into ethyl acetate-soluble and water-soluble fractions.Two anti-oxidative spots were found only in the water-soluble fractions by thin-layer chromatography.The compound in the lower spot had the same Rf value,UV spectrum,and color as authentic solorinine that was previously found as a unique quaternary ammonium compound from Peltigera spp.We now report that the hydrophilic lichen substance,solorinine showed a nearly same anti-oxidation activity (EC50=120μmol/Lol/L) as standard antioxidant Trolox (EC50=150μmol/L).

  16. Effect of bacoside A on brain antioxidant status in cigarette smoke exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarasi, K; Vani, G; Balakrishna, K; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2006-02-16

    Free radicals mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of smoking-related diseases and antioxidant nutrients are reported to prevent the oxidative damage induced by smoking. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidant role of bacoside A (triterpenoid saponin isolated from Bacopa monniera) against chronic cigarette smoking induced oxidative damage in rat brain. Adult male albino rats were exposed to cigarette smoke for a period of 12 weeks and simultaneously administered with bacoside A (10 mg/kg b.w./day, p.o.). Antioxidant status of the brain was assessed from the levels of reduced glutathione, vitamin C, vitamin E, and vitamin A and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. The levels of copper, iron, zinc and selenium in brain and serum ceruloplasmin activity were also measured. Oxidative stress was evident from the diminished levels of both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Alterations in the levels of trace elements with accumulation of copper and iron, and depletion of zinc and selenium were also observed. Bacoside A administration improved the antioxidant status and maintained the levels of trace elements. These results suggest that chronic cigarette smoke exposure enhances oxidative stress, thereby disturbing the tissue defense system and bacoside A protects the brain from the oxidative damage through its antioxidant potential.

  17. Comparative analysis of the antioxidant properties of Icelandic and Hawaiian lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Kehau; Wright, Patrick R; Tabandera, Nicole K; Kelman, Dovi; Backofen, Rolf; Ómarsdóttir, Sesselja; Wright, Anthony D

    2016-09-01

    Antioxidant activity of symbiotic organisms known as lichens is an intriguing field of research because of its strong contribution to their ability to withstand extremes of physical and biological stress (e.g. desiccation, temperature, UV radiation and microbial infection). We present a comparative study on the antioxidant activities of 76 Icelandic and 41 Hawaiian lichen samples assessed employing the DPPH- and FRAP-based antioxidant assays. Utilizing this unprecedented sample size, we show that while highest individual sample activity is present in the Icelandic dataset, the overall antioxidant activity is higher for lichens found in Hawaii. Furthermore, we report that lichens from the genus Peltigera that have been described as strong antioxidant producers in studies on Chinese, Russian and Turkish lichens also show high antioxidant activities in both Icelandic and Hawaiian lichen samples. Finally, we show that opportunistic sampling of lichens in both Iceland and Hawaii will yield high numbers of lichen species that exclusively include green algae as photobiont. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Serum total oxidant and antioxidant status in earthquake survivors with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Pinar Guzel; Kaplan, İbrahim; Uysal, Cem; Bulut, Mahmut; Atli, Abdullah; Bez, Yasin; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Ozdemir, Osman

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although there are some studies on oxidative stress and PTSD, there is no report available on the serum total oxidant and antioxidant status in earthquake survivors with PTSD. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the serum total oxidant and antioxidant status in earthquake survivors with chronic PTSD. The study group included 45 earthquake survivors with PTSD and 40 earthquake survivors without PTSD. The oxidative status was determined using the total antioxidant status and total oxidant status (TOS) measurements and by calculating the oxidative stress index (OSI). There were no statistically significant differences in the total antioxidant status, TOS, or OSI when comparing individuals with and without PTSD (all, p>0.05). There were no correlations between Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale scores and oxidant and antioxidant stress markers (all, p>0.05). Our results suggest that the total oxidant and antioxidant status may not affect earthquake survivors with PTSD. This is the first study to evaluate the oxidative status in earthquake survivors with PTSD. Further studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  19. Phytochemical Composition and Antioxidant Potential of Ruta graveolens L. In Vitro Culture Lines

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    Renuka Diwan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruta graveolens L. is a medicinal plant used in traditional systems of medicine for treatment of psoriasis, vitiligo, leucoderma, and lymphomas with well-known anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Therefore antioxidant potential of R. graveolens (in planta and in vitro was investigated. As antioxidants present in plant extracts are multifunctional, their activity and mechanism depends on the composition and conditions of the test system. Therefore, the total antioxidant capacity was evaluated using assays that detect different antioxidants: free radical scavenging (DPPH and ABTS, transition metal ion reduction (phosphomolybdenum assay, reducing power, and nitric oxide reduction. Content of furanocoumarin-bergapten in the extracts showed good corelation with free radical scavenging, transition metal reduction and reducing power, while total phenolic content showed good corelation with nitric oxide reduction potential. Antioxidant activity of in vitro cultures was significantly higher compared to in vivo plant material. The present study is the first report on comprehensive study of antioxidant activity of R. graveolens and its in vitro cultures.

  20. Redox modulation of mitochondriogenesis in exercise. Does antioxidant supplementation blunt the benefits of exercise training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Cabo, Helena; Ferrando, Beatriz; Viña, Jose

    2015-09-01

    Physical exercise increases the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle, liver, and other organs. This is unlikely due to increased mitochondrial production but rather to extramitochondrial sources such as NADPH oxidase or xanthine oxidase. We have reported a xanthine oxidase-mediated increase in ROS production in many experimental models from isolated cells to humans. Originally, ROS were considered as detrimental and thus as a likely cause of cell damage associated with exhaustion. In the past decade, evidence showing that ROS act as signals has been gathered and thus the idea that antioxidant supplementation in exercise is always recommendable has proved incorrect. In fact, we proposed that exercise itself can be considered as an antioxidant because training increases the expression of classical antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and, in general, lowering the endogenous antioxidant enzymes by administration of antioxidant supplements may not be a good strategy when training. Antioxidant enzymes are not the only ones to be activated by training. Mitochondriogenesis is an important process activated in exercise. Many redox-sensitive enzymes are involved in this process. Important signaling molecules like MAP kinases, NF-κB, PGC-1α, p53, heat shock factor, and others modulate muscle adaptation to exercise. Interventions aimed at modifying the production of ROS in exercise must be performed with care as they may be detrimental in that they may lower useful adaptations to exercise.

  1. Exercise, oxidants, and antioxidants change the shape of the bell-shaped hormesis curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radak, Zsolt; Ishihara, Kazunari; Tekus, Eva; Varga, Csaba; Posa, Aniko; Balogh, Laszlo; Boldogh, Istvan; Koltai, Erika

    2017-03-03

    It is debated whether exercise-induced ROS production is obligatory to cause adaptive response. It is also claimed that antioxidant treatment could eliminate the adaptive response, which appears to be systemic and reportedly reduces the incidence of a wide range of diseases. Here we suggest that if the antioxidant treatment occurs before the physiological function-ROS dose-response curve reaches peak level, the antioxidants can attenuate function. On the other hand, if the antioxidant treatment takes place after the summit of the bell-shaped dose response curve, antioxidant treatment would have beneficial effects on function. We suggest that the effects of antioxidant treatment are dependent on the intensity of exercise, since the adaptive response, which is multi pathway dependent, is strongly influenced by exercise intensity. It is further suggested that levels of ROS concentration are associated with peak physiological function and can be extended by physical fitness level and this could be the basis for exercise pre-conditioning. Physical inactivity, aging or pathological disorders increase the sensitivity to oxidative stress by altering the bell-shaped dose response curve.

  2. Influence of Antioxidants on the Hetero-Charge Generation in Polymeric Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Sekii, Yasuo; Noguchi, Kazuo; Shimura, Koichi; Maeno, Takashi

    Generation of space charges in polymeric dielectric materials is known to be affected by such inclusions as cross-linking byproducts, antioxidants and moisture. Authors reported previously that the negative heterocharges in XLPE are generated under the existence of acetophenone and sulfur-containing antioxidants. In this research the authors performed further experiments using samples containing DCP and three kinds of antioxidants to examine the mechanism. Negative heterocharges near the positive electrode were detected in samples containing both DCP and the antioxidants when those samples were soaked in acetophenone. The negative heterocharges were not detected in samples containing either DCP or the antioxidant, even when the sample was soaked in acetophenone. These results demonstrate that the heterocharge is generated by the combined effect between acetophenone and substance produced by interaction between DCP and antioxidant. Considering results of experiments measuring the amount of heterocharges in samples that had been heat-pressed at different temperatures, the mechanism of negative heterocharge generation in polymeric dielectric material is inferred.

  3. Blood Levels of Oxidant/Antioxidant Parameters in Rats Infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Ali; Tavalla, Mehdi; Azadmanesh, Somayeh; Hamidinejat, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a common parasitic infection in the world. Since increased free radicals and oxidative stress are reported in many parasitic diseases the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative stress in acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. RH strains of Toxoplasma tachyzoites were used in the present study. Twenty-five female rats were infected with the parasite while 25 other rats were as the control group that received normal saline. Zero-, 5-, 7-, 10-, and 45-day postinfection (DPI) blood samples were taken. Some parameters related to oxidant and antioxidants such as antioxidant enzymes, malondialdehyde, and total antioxidant capacity were measured. On day 7 after infection, GPX activity and GSH level were significantly increased and in the mentioned day the amount of total antioxidant capacity was significantly reduced. In other cases, there were no significant differences between the groups in different days. Overall, based on the results it seems that, on day 7 after infection, in infected rats responses to oxidative stress were triggered and led to decrease of total antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, glutathione was increased to cope with stress. It seems that probably antioxidant defense system entered the infection to the chronic phase and changed the parasites stage. PMID:27746857

  4. Antioxidant capacity and phenolic compounds of Lonicerae macranthoides by HPLC-DAD-QTOF-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Chen, Lin; Shi, Shuyun; Cai, Ping; Liang, Xuejuan; Zhang, Shuihan

    2016-05-30

    Lonicerae macranthoides with strong antioxidant activity is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine and folk tea/beverage. However, detailed information about its antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds is limited. Then at first, we comparatively evaluated total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and antioxidant activities of water extract, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of L. macranthoides. Ethyl acetate fraction exhibited the highest level of TPC (207.38 mg GAE/g DW), TFC (53.06 mg RE/g DW) and the best DPPH scavenge activity and reducing power. n-Butanol fraction showed the best ABTS(+) and O2(-) scavenging activities. Interestingly, water extract, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions showed stronger antioxidant activities than positive control, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). After that, thirty-one antioxidant phenolic compounds, including twenty-two phenolic acids and nine flavonoids, were screened by DPPH-HPLC experiment and then identified using HPLC-DAD-QTOF-MS/MS. It is noted that twenty-one compounds (1, 3-4, 6-17, 19, 23, 26, 28-29, and 31), as far as was known, were discovered from L. macranthoide for the first time, and eleven of them (3-4, 10-17, and 23) were reported in Lonicera species for the first time. Results indicated that L. macranthoides could serve as promising source of rich antioxidants in foods, beverages and medicines for health promotion.

  5. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil and solvent extracts of Mentha pulegium L.

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    Palić Ivan R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the total phenolic (TPC; expressed as gallic acid equivalents, GAE, per milligram of dry extract weight and the total flavonoid contents (TFC; expressed as quercetin equivalents, QE, per milligram of dry extract weight and antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil and hexane, diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Mentha pulegium L. (Lamiaceae collected in Serbia. The total phenolic content was in the range of 129.43-388.29 μg GAE/mg, while TFC ranged from 57.81 to 160.94 QE/mg; the highest TPC and TFC were found in the methanol extract. The antimicrobial activity (against five bacteria and two fungi species of the essential oil and solvent extracts was assessed using disc-diffusion method. However, the studied samples demonstrated a poor antimicrobial potential. The antioxidant activity was screened using five different tests: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay (DPPH, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radical cation decolorization assay (ABTS, total reducing power (TRP, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity assay (CUPRAC; the methanol extract showed the strongest antioxidant potential. The results of the different antioxidant assays were correlated mutually and with the total flavonoid and total phenolic contents (regression analysis and agglomerative hierarchical clustering. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172047

  6. The Association between Optimism and Serum Antioxidants in the Midlife in the United States Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Julia K.; Williams, David R.; Rimm, Eric B.; Ryff, Carol; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Psychological and physical health are often conceptualized as the absence of disease, but less research addresses positive psychological and physical functioning. For example, optimism has been linked with reduced disease risk and biological dysfunction, but very little research has examined associations with markers of healthy biological functioning. Thus, we investigated the association between two indicators of positive health: optimism and serum antioxidants. Methods The cross-sectional association between optimism and antioxidant concentrations was examined in 982 men and women from the Midlife in the United States study. Primary measures included self-reported optimism (assessed with the revised Life Orientation Test) and serum concentrations of nine different antioxidants (carotenoids and Vitamin E). Regression analyses examined the relationship between optimism and antioxidant concentrations in models adjusted for demographics, health status, and health behaviors. Results For every standard deviation increase in optimism, carotenoid concentrations increased by 3–13% in age-adjusted models. Controlling for demographic characteristics and health status attenuated this association. Fruit and vegetable consumption and smoking status were identified as potential pathways underlying the association between optimism and serum carotenoids. Optimism was not significantly associated with Vitamin E. Conclusions Optimism was associated with greater carotenoid concentrations and this association was partially explained by diet and smoking status. The direction of effects cannot be conclusively determined. Effects may be bidirectional given that optimists are likely to engage in health behaviors associated with more serum antioxidants, and more serum antioxidants are likely associated with better physical health that enhances optimism. PMID:23257932

  7. The role of nutritional lipids and antioxidants in UV-induced skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Homer S

    2015-06-01

    Two dietary tenets of the free radical theory of cancer require refinement. The first was dietary reduction of vulnerable free-radical targets, e.g., polyunsaturated lipids. The second was the addition of one or more antioxidants to the diet. Further, it was reported in 1939 that high levels of dietary fat exacerbated UV-carcinogenesis. Both lines of enquiry (dietary lipid and antioxidant effects on UV-carcinogenesis) were investigated. Both dietary lipids and antioxidants modified carcinogenic expression. Increasing levels of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) exacerbated UV-carcinogenesis. However, omega-3 PUFA dramatically inhibited carcinogenic expression. It is probable that the action of omega-6 and-3 PUFA rests with differential metabolic intermediates, both tumor promoting and immune-modulating, that each PUFA generates through lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Antioxidant supplementation with butylated hydroxytoluene or beta-carotene demonstrated that each exerted its own specific antioxidant mechanism(s). When introduced into the complex milieu of the cell with its own intricate and complex antioxidant defense system, detrimental effects may ensue. These results point to oversimplification of these dietary suggestions to reduce cancer risk and the necessity to refine these dietary recommendations.

  8. Inhibition of early upstream events in prodromal Alzheimer's disease by use of targeted antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kedar N; Bondy, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    A link between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and an excess presence of oxidant free radicals in the brain has frequently been reported. It is generally assumed that such oxidative stress and related cellular damage is caused by inflammatory changes in the brain and is consequent to amyloid deposition. This review makes the argument that elevated oxidative stress in AD is an early causal event in the initiation and advancement of this disease. Oxidative stress can be decreased by enhancing antioxidant enzymes through activation of the cytoplasmic transcriptional factor (Nrf2)/ARE (antioxidant response element) pathway, and by dietary and endogenous antioxidant chemicals. Reduction in the binding ability of Nrf2 to ARE lowers antioxidant enzyme levels. Decreased levels of Nrf2 and augmentation of oxidative stress in AD suggest that the ROS-dependent mechanism of activating the Nrf2/ARE pathway has become unresponsive. A combination of agents that can either activate the Nrf2-ARE pathway by ROS-independent mechanisms, or by acting directly as antioxidant chemicals, may be necessary to reduce oxidative stress in AD. Earlier shortcomings of using individual antioxidants may be due to consideration of antioxidants as pharmacological agents, ignoring the fact that individual antioxidants can be transmuted in the highly oxidant milieu that is present in AD. Interactions between various cellular compartments may require simultaneous examination of more than one agent. The clinical utility of such a more integrative method can reveal interactive effects such as those found in nutritional research and this can compensate for any mechanistic shortcomings of simultaneous testing of more than a single agent.

  9. Direct antioxidant properties of bilirubin andbiliverdin. Is there a role for biliverdin reductase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eJansen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and signaling events are involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and represent a major contribution to vascular regulation. Molecular signaling is highly dependent on reactive oxygen species. But depending on the amount of ROS production it might have toxic or protective effects. Despite a large number of negative outcomes in large clinical trials (e.g. HOPE, HOPE-TOO, antioxidant molecules and agents are important players to influence the critical balance between production and elimination of RONS. However, chronic systemic antioxidant therapy lacks clinical efficacy, probably by interfering with important physiological redox signaling pathways. Therefore, it may be a much more promising attempt to induce intrinsic antioxidant pathways in order to increase the antioxidants not systemically but at the place of oxidative stress and complications. Among others, heme oxygenase (HO has been shown to be important for attenuating the overall production of ROS in a broad range of disease states through its ability to degrade heme and to produce carbon monoxide (CO, biliverdin/bilirubin, and the release of free iron with subsequent ferritin induction. With the present review we would like to highlight the important antioxidant role of the heme oxygenase system and especially discuss the contribution of the biliverdin, bilirubin and biliverdin reductase to these beneficial effects. The bilierdin reductase was reported to confer an antioxidant redox amplification cycle by which low, physiological bilirubin concentrations confer potent antioxidant protection via recycling of biliverdin from oxidized bilirubin by the biliverdin reductase, linking this sink for oxidants to the NADPH pool. To date the existence and role of this antioxidant redox cycle is still under debate and we present and discuss the pros and cons as well as our own findings on this topic.

  10. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Phalaenopsis Orchid Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Truong Ngoc; Khang, Do Tan; Tuyen, Phung Thi; Minh, Luong The; Anh, La Hoang; Quan, Nguyen Van; Ha, Pham Thi Thu; Quan, Nguyen Thanh; Toan, Nguyen Phu; Elzaawely, Abdelnaser Abdelghany; Xuan, Tran Dang

    2016-01-01

    Phalaenopsis spp. is the most commercially and economically important orchid, but their plant parts are often left unused, which has caused environmental problems. To date, reports on phytochemical analyses were most available on endangered and medicinal orchids. The present study was conducted to determine the total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts prepared from leaves and roots of six commercial hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. Leaf extracts of “Chian Xen Queen” contained the highest total phenolics with a value of 11.52 ± 0.43 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry weight and the highest total flavonoids (4.98 ± 0.27 mg rutin equivalent per g dry weight). The antioxidant activity of root extracts evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging assay and β-carotene bleaching method was higher than those of the leaf extracts. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified, namely, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, ferulic acid, sinapic acid, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, and ellagic acid. Ferulic, p-coumaric and sinapic acids were concentrated largely in the roots. The results suggested that the root extracts from hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. could be a potential source of natural antioxidants. This study also helps to reduce the amount of this orchid waste in industrial production, as its roots can be exploited for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27649250

  11. Derivatives of xanthic acid are novel antioxidants: application to synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderback, Christopher M; Drake, Jennifer; Zhou, Daohong; Hackett, Janna M; Castegna, Alessandra; Kanski, Jaroslaw; Tsoras, Maria; Varadarajan, Sridhar; Butterfield, D Allan

    2003-04-01

    Xanthic acids have long been known to act as reducing agents. Recently, D609, a tricyclodecanol derivative of xanthic acid, has been reported to have anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties that are attributed to specific inhibition of phosphatidyl choline phospholipase C (PC-PLC). However, because oxidative stress is involved in both of these cellular responses, the possibility that xanthates may act as antioxidants was investigated in the current study. Finding that xanthates efficiently scavenge hydroxyl radicals, the mechanism by which D609 and other xanthate derivatives may protect against oxidative damage was further examined. The xanthates studied, especially D609, mimic glutathione (GSH). Xanthates scavenge hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide, form disulfide bonds (dixanthogens), and react with electrophilic products of lipid oxidation (acrolein) in a manner similar to GSH. Further, upon disulfide formation, dixanthogens are reduced by glutathione reductase to a redox active xanthate. Supporting its role as an antioxidant, D609 significantly (p < 0.01) reduces free radical-induced changes in synaptosomal lipid peroxidation (TBARs), protein oxidation (protein carbonyls), and protein conformation. Thus, in addition to inhibitory effects on PC-PLC, D609 may prevent cellular apoptotic and inflammatory cascades by acting as antioxidants and novel GSH mimics. These results are discussed with reference to potential therapeutic application of D609 in oxidative stress conditions.

  12. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Phalaenopsis Orchid Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Ngoc Minh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phalaenopsis spp. is the most commercially and economically important orchid, but their plant parts are often left unused, which has caused environmental problems. To date, reports on phytochemical analyses were most available on endangered and medicinal orchids. The present study was conducted to determine the total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts prepared from leaves and roots of six commercial hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. Leaf extracts of “Chian Xen Queen” contained the highest total phenolics with a value of 11.52 ± 0.43 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry weight and the highest total flavonoids (4.98 ± 0.27 mg rutin equivalent per g dry weight. The antioxidant activity of root extracts evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging assay and β-carotene bleaching method was higher than those of the leaf extracts. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified, namely, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, ferulic acid, sinapic acid, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, and ellagic acid. Ferulic, p-coumaric and sinapic acids were concentrated largely in the roots. The results suggested that the root extracts from hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. could be a potential source of natural antioxidants. This study also helps to reduce the amount of this orchid waste in industrial production, as its roots can be exploited for pharmaceutical purposes.

  13. Antioxidant flavone glycosides from the leaves of Sasa borealis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Suk; Lim, Ju Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Hyun Jin; Lee, Ik-Soo

    2007-02-01

    Sasa borealis (Poaceae) is a perennial medicinal plant which is a major source of bamboo leaves in Korea. The n-BuOH extract of S. borealis leaves exhibited significant antioxidant activity against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and a cytoprotective effect against oxidative damage in HepG2 cells. Bioactivity-guided fractionation by column chromatography led to the isolation of two antioxidative flavonoid C-glycoside derivatives, isoorientin (2) and isoorientin 2"-O-alpha-L-rhamnoside (4) along with tricin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and apigenin 6-C-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-8-C-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3). Their structures were identified on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The radical scavenging activity and cytoprotective effect against oxidative damage of all the isolated compounds were also evaluated. Isoorientin (2) and isoorientin 2-O-alpha-L-rhamnoside (4) showed potent free radical scavenging activity with IC50 values of 9.5 and 34.5 microM, respectively, and strong cytoprotective effects against t-BOOH-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells, at very low concentrations of 1.1 microM isoorientin and 0.8 microM isoorientin 2-O-alpha-L-rhamnoside. This is the first report of the isolation and antioxidant activity of compounds 2 and 4 from S. borealis.

  14. Determination of phenolic antioxidants in aviation jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, M; Bocchinfuso, G; Carrozzo, P; De Angelis, C

    2000-02-25

    The world-wide aviation jet fuel used for civil and military aircraft is of a kerosene type. To avoid peroxide production after the refinery process a specific antioxidant additive should be added on fuel. The antioxidants generally used are based on hindered phenols in a range of concentration 10-20 microg/ml. In the present work a specific method to measure the concentration of phenolic antioxidants is shown. The method is based on a liquid chromatographic technique with electrochemical detection. The technique, because of its selectivity, does not require sample pre-treatments. The analysis of a 5-10 ml fuel sample can be performed in less than 10 min with a sensitivity of 0.1 microg/ml and a RSD=2.5%. A comparison with another highly selective gas chromatographic technique with mass spectrometric detection with selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM) is reported. The sensitivity of GC-MS-SIM method was 2 microg/ml with a RSD=3.1%.

  15. Morin Flavonoid Adsorbed on Mesoporous Silica, a Novel Antioxidant Nanomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, Francisco; Correa, Olosmira; Günther, Germán; Nonell, Santi; Mura, Francisco; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Morales, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Morin (2´,3, 4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several beneficial health effects. However, its poor water solubility and it sensitivity to several environmental factors avoid its use in applications like pharmaceutical and cosmetic. In this work, we synthetized morin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (AMSNPs-MOR) as useful material to be used as potential nanoantioxidant. To achieve this, we characterized its adsorption kinetics, isotherm and the antioxidant capacity as hydroxyl radical (HO•) scavenger and singlet oxygen (1O2) quencher. The experimental data could be well fitted with Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models, besides the pseudo-second order kinetics model. The total quenching rate constant obtained for singlet oxygen deactivation by AMSNPs-MOR was one order of magnitude lower than the morin rate constant reported previously in neat solvents and lipid membranes. The AMSNPs-MOR have good antioxidant properties by itself and exhibit a synergic effect with morin on the antioxidant property against hydroxyl radical. This effect, in the range of concentrations studied, was increased when the amount of morin adsorbed increased.

  16. Phospholipids in foods: prooxidants or antioxidants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Leqi; Decker, Eric A

    2016-01-15

    Lipid oxidation is one of the major causes of quality deterioration in natural and processed foods and thus a large economic concern in the food industry. Phospholipids, especially lecithins, are already widely used as natural emulsifiers and have been gaining increasing interest as natural antioxidants to control lipid oxidation. This review summarizes the fatty acid composition and content of phospholipids naturally occurring in several foods. The role of phospholipids as substrates for lipid oxidation is discussed, with a focus on meats and dairy products. Prooxidant and antioxidant mechanisms of phospholipids are also discussed to get a better understanding of the possible opportunities for using phospholipids as food antioxidants.

  17. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF BUTEA MONOSPERMA LEAF EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Darshan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are substances which help to defend the body against cell damage caused by various free radicals. Free radicals are unstable oxygen molecules containing unpaired electrons. Reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide, have a causal relationship with oxidative stress.Role of free radicals has been implicated in several diseases such as liver cirrhosis, atherosclerosis, Cancer, aging, arthritis, diabetes etc. the aim of the study was to investigate the antioxidant activity of Butea monosperma. The quantities of the Butea monosperma aqueous and benzene extracts needed for in vitro inhibition of hydroxyl radicals and lipid peroxidation were relatively similar to the known antioxidant ascorbic acid.

  18. Alkaloids with antioxidant activities from Aconitum handelianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tian-Peng; Cai, Le; Xing, Yun; Yu, Jing; Li, Xue-Jiao; Mei, Rui-Feng; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2016-06-01

    A new C20-diterpenoid alkaloid handelidine (1) and twenty-seven known alkaloids (2-28) were isolated from the roots of Aconitum handelianum. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. The study indicated that denudatine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids with vicinal-triol system and benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids exhibited significant antioxidant activities measured by three antioxidant test systems. The aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids could serve as potential secondary antioxidants for their strong binding effects to metal ions.

  19. The antioxidant activity of selected Romanian honeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina DOBRE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Four types of Apis mellifera honey collected in the eastern region of Romania were screened for their total phenolic content by the Folin-Ciocalteau method, for anti radical power as assessed by DPPHradical scavenging assay, for the FRAP assay-ferric reducing antioxidant power. The antioxidant effect over a substrate sensitive to lipid per oxidation and also the presence of some pigments with antioxidant action in honey-ABS 450 were evaluated. All assays revealed the following order of the obtained values: Lime honey>poly-flower honey>Sea buckthorn honey>Acacia honey.

  20. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in antioxidant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Mañon Rossi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are used regularly in medical practice to provide objective markers of health status of a person, as well as the physiological response of the body to a pharmacological therapeutic intervention. In the specific case of the use of antioxidant products (antioxidant therapy, it is necessary to measure both biomarkers of oxidative stress level of the person as those that are specific to a physiological or pathological progression of a disease disorder. This paper describes the main biomarkers of oxidative general and specific stress as well as laboratory techniques, which should be taken into account when measuring the effectiveness of antioxidant therapies.

  1. Antioxidant Properties of Some Dried Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Ertekin Filiz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of various dried fruits were investigated. Total phenolic content of dried fruits (apple, quince, peach, orange, grapefruit, kiwi, banana, watermelon, cantaloupe, strawberries and tomatoes were between 219-5386 mg GAE/kg in dry matter (dm. TEAC and ORAC values of the samples were between 7.01-126 µmol TE/g dm and 11.69-211 µmol TE/g dm, respectively. Dried fruits can be considered as an important source of antioxidant components in diet with the higher antioxidant properties.

  2. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano Costa de Camargo; Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza Vieira; Marisa Aparecida Bismara Regitano-D’Arce; Maria Antonia Calori-Domingues; Solange Guidolin Canniatti-Brazaca

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to...

  3. Determination of antioxidant content and antioxidant activity in foods using infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaonan; Rasco, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    Developing rapid analytical methods for bioactive components and predicting both the concentration and biological availability of nutraceutical components in foods is a topic of growing interest. Here, analysis of bioactive components and total antioxidant activity in food matrices using infrared spectroscopy coupled with chemometric predictive models is described. Infrared spectroscopy offers an alternative to wet chemistry, chromatographic determination of antioxidants, and in vitro biochemical assays for assessment of antioxidant activity. Spectroscopic methods provide a technique that can be used with biological tissues without extraction, which can often lead to degradation of the antioxidant components. Sample preparation time greatly decreases and analysis time is very short once a predictive model has been developed. Spectroscopic methods can have a high degree of precision when applied to analysis of nutraceutical compound concentration and antioxidant activity in foods. This article summarizes recent advances in vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics and applications of these methods for antioxidant detection in foods.

  4. Antioxidant effects of photodegradation product of nifedipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, Yuya; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Taoka, Chiaki; Tajima, Soichiro; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Matsuda, Yuko; Shishido, Kozo; Yoshida, Masahiro; Hamano, Shuichi; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tomita, Shuhei; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Recently, increasing evidence suggests that the antihypertensive drug nifedipine acts as a protective agent for endothelial cells, and that the activity is unrelated to its calcium channel blocking. Nifedipine is unstable under light and reportedly decomposes to a stable nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF). NO-NIF has no antihypertensive effect, and it has been recognized as a contaminant of nifedipine. The present study for the first time demonstrated that NO-NIF changed to a NO-NIF radical in a time-dependent manner when it interacted with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of NO-NIF radicals in HUVECs showed an asymmetric pattern suggesting that the radicals were located in the membrane. The NO-NIF radicals had radical scavenging activity for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, whereas neither NO-NIF nor nifedipine did. In addition, the NO-NIF radical more effectively quenched lipid peroxides than NO-NIF or nifedipine. Furthermore, NO-NIF attenuated the superoxide-derived free radicals in HUVECs stimulated with LY83583, and suppressed iron-nitrilotriacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-induced cytotoxicity in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Our findings suggest that NO-NIF is a candidate for a new class of antioxidative drugs that protect cells against oxidative stress.

  5. Carbon dots as antioxidants and prooxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ingeborg Lie; Sun, Ya-Ping; Juzenas, Petras

    2011-10-01

    In this study we report the effect of classical CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and novel spherical carbon dots on generation of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions in vitro. Free radicals were initiated either chemically using 2,2'-azodiisobutyramidine dihydrochloride (AAPH) or by radiation with a blue light source emitting 390-470 nm (peak 420 nm). Two reagents, dihydrorhodamine 123 (Dhr123) and singlet oxygen sensor green (SOSG), were used as radical probes. Quantum dots and carbon dots inhibited oxidation of the radical probes under decomposition of AAPH. However, when subjected to the blue light both the quantum dots and carbon dots induced oxidation of Dhr123 to a greater extent than SOSG in water. Generation of singlet oxygen was remarkably enhanced in deuterium oxide solutions while oxidation of Dhr123 remained unchanged. For comparison, traditional photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX mainly induced oxidation of SOSG in water. In conclusion, upon external radiation carbon dots or quantum dots generate reactive oxygen species acting as prooxidants. Carbon dots or quantum dots also scavenge free radicals that are generated chemically by an azo compound. Such dual properties of these nanoparticles can be used for photodynamic and photocatalytic or antioxidant applications.

  6. Modified Folin-Ciocalteu antioxidant capacity assay for measuring lipophilic antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berker, Kadriye Isil; Ozdemir Olgun, F Ayca; Ozyurt, Dilek; Demirata, Birsen; Apak, Resat

    2013-05-22

    The Folin-Ciocalteu (FC) method of performing a total phenolics assay, originally developed for protein determination, has recently evolved as a total antioxidant capacity assay but was found to be incapable of measuring lipophilic antioxidants due to the high affinity of the FC chromophore, that is, multivalent-charged phospho-tungsto-molybdate(V), toward water. Thus, the FC method was modified and standardized so as to enable simultaneous measurement of lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants in NaOH-added isobutanol-water medium. Optimal conditions were as follows: dilution ratio of aqueous FC reagent with iso-BuOH (1:2, v/v), final NaOH concentration of 3.5 × 10(-2) M, reaction time of 20 min, and maximum absorption wavelength of 665 nm. The modified procedure was successfully applied to the total antioxidant capacity assay of trolox, quercetin, ascorbic acid, gallic acid, catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rosmarinic acid, glutathione, and cysteine, as well as of lipophilic antioxidants such as α-tocopherol (vitamin E), butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, tertiary butylhydroquinone, lauryl gallate, and β-carotene. The modified FC method reliably quantified ascorbic acid, whereas the conventional method could not. The modified method was reproducible and additive in terms of total antioxidant capacity values of constituents of complex mixtures such as olive oil extract and herbal tea infusion. The trolox equivalent antioxidant capacities of the tested antioxidant compounds correlated well with those found by the Cupric Reducing Antioxidant Capacity reference method.

  7. Sterol superlattice affects antioxidant potency and can be used to assess adverse effects of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, Michelle; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2008-11-01

    We have developed a fluorescence method to examine how membrane sterol lateral organization affects the potency of antioxidants, and used this information to evaluate possible adverse effects of lipid-soluble antioxidants seen in recent clinical studies. In the presence of an antioxidant, the lag time (tau) produced during free radical-induced sterol oxidation in lipid vesicles reflects the potency of the antioxidant. The ascorbic acid-induced tau value varies with sterol mol% in a biphasic manner, showing a minimum at the critical sterol mole fraction for maximal superlattice formation (C r), in ascorbic acid concentrations antioxidant potency. In contrast, the biphasic change in tau at C r was observed only at doses of ascorbyl palmitate antioxidant than its water-soluble counterpart as judged by the tau value, it can easily perturb sterol lateral organization by insertion into membrane bilayers, which could impose detrimental effects on cells. The threshold antioxidant concentration (C th) to abolish biphasic change in tau at C r may vary with antioxidant and could be used to assess potential adverse effects of other lipid-soluble antioxidants.

  8. Phenolic content, antioxidant effect and cytotoxic activity of Leea indica leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Nidyaletchmy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The leaves of Leea indica (Vitaceae, commonly known as ‘Huo Tong Shu’ in Malaysia, have been traditionally used as natural remedy in folk medicine by the locals. The current study reports the outcome of antioxidant and cytotoxic investigation of L. indica leaves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of L. indica leaf crude ethanol and its fractionated extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate and water for evaluation of total phenolic content, antioxidant effect and cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cell lines. Methods In the present study, L. indica leaf crude ethanol and its fractionated extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate and water were firstly prepared prior to phenolic content, antioxidant effect and cytotoxic activity assessment. Folin-Ciocalteau’s method was used for the measurement of total phenolic content of the extracts. The antioxidant activity was measured by employing three different established testing systems, such as scavenging activity on DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals, reducing power assay and SOD (superoxide dismutase activity assay. The cytotoxic activity of the extracts were evaluated against three colon cancer cell lines with varying molecular characteristics (HT-29, HCT-15 and HCT-116 by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. Results The total phenolic content and antioxidant capabilities differed significantly among the L. indica leaf extracts. A strong correlation between total phenolic content and antioxidant properties was found, indicating that phenolic compounds are the major contributor to the antioxidant properties of these extracts. Among the crude ethanol and its fractionated extracts, fractionated water extract showed significantly the highest total phenolic content and strongest antioxidant effect in all the antioxidant testing systems employed in this study. All the four extracts exert no damage to the selected colon cancer

  9. The Importance of Antioxidant Micronutrients in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hiten D.; Williams, Paula J.

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy places increased demands on the mother to provide adequate nutrition to the growing conceptus. A number of micronutrients function as essential cofactors for or themselves acting as antioxidants. Oxidative stress is generated during normal placental development; however, when supply of antioxidant micronutrients is limited, exaggerated oxidative stress within both the placenta and maternal circulation occurs, resulting in adverse pregnancy outcomes. The present paper summarises the current understanding of selected micronutrient antioxidants selenium, copper, zinc, manganese, and vitamins C and E in pregnancy. To summarise antioxidant activity of selenium is via its incorporation into the glutathione peroxidase enzymes, levels of which have been shown to be reduced in miscarriage and preeclampsia. Copper, zinc, and manganese are all essential cofactors for superoxide dismutases, which has reduced activity in pathological pregnancy. Larger intervention trials are required to reinforce or refute a beneficial role of micronutrient supplementation in disorders of pregnancies. PMID:21918714

  10. EFFICACY OF ANTIOXIDANTS IN HUMAN HEALTH | Waling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFICACY OF ANTIOXIDANTS IN HUMAN HEALTH. ... African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... add variety to household diets and nutrients, and improve household incomes for improved food security situation.

  11. Polyphenolic profile in cider and antioxidant power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriarrain, Andoni; Zuriarrain, Juan; Puertas, Ana Isabel; Dueñas, María Teresa; Ostra, Miren; Berregi, Iñaki

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to find the effect of polyphenolic compounds in Basque ciders on the following parameters: antioxidant activity, browning, protein-precipitating capacity, turbidity and reduction potential. These five parameters are highly important, as they affect the taste, the visual aspect and the preservation of cider, and are mainly related to polyphenolic compounds. Procyanidin B1 and procyanidin B2 showed a significant positive effect on antioxidant activity. p-Coumaric acid, (-)-epicatechin and hyperin had a significant positive effect on protein-precipitating capacity. Tyrosol had a significant negative effect on reduction potential. Procyanidin B1 and procyanidin B2 are the most powerful antioxidants in Basque cider, while p-coumaric acid, (-)-epicatechin and hyperin are those with greatest capacity to precipitate proteins. Ciders with higher tyrosol concentration will have less reduction potential and higher antioxidant reservoir. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Microglia antioxidant systems and redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhardt, F; Haslund-Vinding, J; Jaquet, V

    2017-01-01

    of protein thiolation of target redox proteins the necessity for tightly localized, timed, and confined oxidant production to work in concert with antioxidant proteins to promote redox signaling. NOX2-mediated redox signaling modulate the acquisition of the classical or alternative microglia activation...... of the antioxidant response in microglia will reveal antioxidant proteins as dynamic players in redox signaling, which in concert with NOX-derived oxidants fulfill important roles in the autocrine or paracrine regulation of essential enzymes or transcriptional programs. This article is protected by copyright. All......'t stand alone however, and are not always pernicious. We discuss in general terms, and where available in microglia, GSH synthesis and relation to cystine import and glutamate export, and the thioredoxin system as the most important antioxidative defense mechanism, and further, we discuss in the context...

  13. ANTIOXIDANT BENZOPHENONES AND XANTHONES FROM THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    E-mail: dlontsi2000@yahoo.com. ANTIOXIDANT ... strong bands at 3443 (OH), 1650 (chelated CO) and 1580 (aromatic ring) cm−1, suggesting a .... Percent radical scavenging activity was determined by comparison with a DMSO containing.

  14. Antioxidants, metabolic rate and aging in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Fleming, J.; Economos, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolic rate-of-living theory of aging was investigated by determining the effect of several life-prolonging antioxidants on the metabolic rate and life span of Drosophila. The respiration rate of groups of continuously agitated flies was determined in a Gilson respirometer. Vitamin E, 2,4-dinitrophenol, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and thiazolidine carboxylic acid were employed as antioxidants. Results show that all of these antioxidants reduced the oxygen consumption rate and increased the mean life span, and a significant negative linear correlation was found between the mean life span and the metabolic rate. It is concluded that these findings indicate that some antioxidants may inhibit respiration rate in addition to their protective effect against free radical-induced cellular damage.

  15. Antioxidant effects of green tea polyphenols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The unprecedented interest in the antioxidant activity of green tea polyphenols (GTP) is due to the apparent health benefits of tea drinking and the experimental results with the polyphenols. The results suggest that the galloylated catechins show stronger antioxidant effect than that of nongalloylated catechins and the double bond in C ring also plays an important role in this effect. There are synergic effects between different catechins and the antioxidant effectof (+)-epimers is stronger than that of (-)-epimers. The active site to scavenge free radicals mainly locates in p-hydroxyl of phenol in gallic acid and hydroxyl of phenol in the pyrane also shows activity. The large π bond in chromane and benzene ring of catechin is the structure base for their antioxidant effects. The prevent effect of GTP against diseases and their redox regulation in cell signal pathway are very important to be studied in the future.

  16. The Importance of Antioxidant Micronutrients in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiten D. Mistry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy places increased demands on the mother to provide adequate nutrition to the growing conceptus. A number of micronutrients function as essential cofactors for or themselves acting as antioxidants. Oxidative stress is generated during normal placental development; however, when supply of antioxidant micronutrients is limited, exaggerated oxidative stress within both the placenta and maternal circulation occurs, resulting in adverse pregnancy outcomes. The present paper summarises the current understanding of selected micronutrient antioxidants selenium, copper, zinc, manganese, and vitamins C and E in pregnancy. To summarise antioxidant activity of selenium is via its incorporation into the glutathione peroxidase enzymes, levels of which have been shown to be reduced in miscarriage and preeclampsia. Copper, zinc, and manganese are all essential cofactors for superoxide dismutases, which has reduced activity in pathological pregnancy. Larger intervention trials are required to reinforce or refute a beneficial role of micronutrient supplementation in disorders of pregnancies.

  17. Free radicals, antioxidant defense systems, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing Qin; Kosten, Thomas R; Zhang, Xiang Yang

    2013-10-01

    The etiopathogenic mechanisms of schizophrenia are to date unknown, although several hypotheses have been suggested. Accumulating evidence suggests that excessive free radical production or oxidative stress may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia as evidenced by increased production of reactive oxygen or decreased antioxidant protection in schizophrenic patients. This review aims to summarize the basic molecular mechanisms of free radical metabolism, the impaired antioxidant defense system and membrane pathology in schizophrenia, their interrelationships with the characteristic clinical symptoms and the implications for antipsychotic treatments. In schizophrenia, there is accumulating evidence of altered antioxidant enzyme activities and increased levels of lipid peroxidation, as well as altered levels of plasma antioxidants. Moreover, free radical-mediated abnormalities may contribute to specific aspects of schizophrenic symptomatology and complications of its treatment with antipsychotic drugs, as well as the development of tardive dyskinesia (TD). Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies implicated by the accumulating data on oxidative stress mechanisms for the treatment of schizophrenia are discussed.

  18. Natural Antioxidants Against Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Munesh; Lalit, Minakshi; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic is present in water, soil, and air in organic as well as in inorganic forms. However, inorganic arsenic is more toxic than organic and can cause many diseases including cancers in humans. Its genotoxic effect is considered as one of its carcinogenic actions. Arsenic can cause DNA strand breaks, deletion mutations, micronuclei formation, DNA-protein cross-linking, sister chromatid exchange, and DNA repair inhibition. Evidences indicate that arsenic causes DNA damage by generation of reactive free radicals. Nutritional supplementation of antioxidants has been proven highly beneficial against arsenic genotoxicity in experimental animals. Recent studies suggest that antioxidants protect mainly by reducing excess free radicals via restoring the activities of cellular enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and decreasing the oxidation processes such as lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature on arsenic-induced genotoxicity and its mitigation by naturally derived antioxidants in various biological systems.

  19. Screening of antioxidant activity in microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana F.G. Assunção

    2014-06-01

    Both sets of results indicate an interesting antioxidant potential in microalgae belonging to the groups Eustigmatophyceae and Chlorophyceae. Tested species of these groups showed ABTS•+ values comparable to grape and raspberry ethanolic extracts, confirmed also by the DPPH• method.

  20. comparative proximate composition and antioxidant vitamins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    The proximate composition and antioxidant vitamins analysis of two varieties of honey (dark amber and light ... solution of inverted sugars and complex mixture of other saccharides .... Fonseca, R. M.O.,Alves, B. A. and Souza, L. C. (2009) ...