WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported inconsistent results

  1. The Interpretability of Inconsistency: Feferman's Theorem and Related Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an exposition of Feferman's Theorem concerning the interpretability of inconsistency and of further insights directly connected to this result. Feferman's Theorem is a strengthening of the Second Incompleteness Theorem. It says, in metaphorical paraphrase, that it is not just the case

  2. Children’s School-Breakfast Reports and School-Lunch Reports (in 24-hour Dietary Recalls): Conventional and Reporting-Error-Sensitive Measures Show Inconsistent Accuracy Results for Retention Interval and for Breakfast Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Guinn, Caroline H.; Smith, Albert F.; Hitchcock, David B.; Royer, Julie A.; Puryear, Megan P.; Collins, Kathleen L.; Smith, Alyssa L.

    2017-01-01

    Validation-study data were analyzed to investigate retention interval (RI) and prompt effects on accuracy of fourth-grade children’s reports of school-breakfast and school-lunch (in 24-hour recalls), and accuracy of school-breakfast reports by breakfast location (classroom; cafeteria). Randomly-selected fourth-grade children at 10 schools in four districts were observed eating school-provided breakfast and lunch, and interviewed under one of eight conditions (two RIs [short (prior-24-hour recall obtained in afternoon); long (previous-day recall obtained in morning)] crossed with four prompts [forward (distant-to-recent), meal-name (breakfast, etc.), open (no instructions), reverse (recent-to-distant)]). Each condition had 60 children (half girls). Of 480 children, 355 and 409 reported meals satisfying criteria for reports of school-breakfast and school-lunch, respectively. For breakfast and lunch separately, a conventional measure—report rate—and reporting-error-sensitive measures—correspondence rate and inflation ratio—were calculated for energy per meal-reporting child. Correspondence rate and inflation ratio—but not report rate—showed better accuracy for school-breakfast and school-lunch reports with the short than long RI; this pattern was not found for some prompts for each sex. Correspondence rate and inflation ratio showed better school-breakfast report accuracy for the classroom than cafeteria location for each prompt, but report rate showed the opposite. For each RI, correspondence rate and inflation ratio showed better accuracy for lunch than breakfast, but report rate showed the opposite. When choosing RI and prompts for recalls, researchers and practitioners should select short RIs to maximize accuracy. Recommendations for prompt selections are less clear. As report rates distort validation-study accuracy conclusions, reporting-error-sensitive measures are recommended. PMID:26865356

  3. Inconsistent self-reported mammography history: Findings from the National Population Health Survey longitudinal cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snider Judy

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-reported information has commonly been used to monitor mammography utilization across populations and time periods. However, longitudinal investigations regarding the prevalence and determinants of inconsistent responses over time and the impact of such responses on population screening estimates are lacking. Methods Based on longitudinal panel data for a representative cohort of Canadian women aged 40+ years (n = 3,537 assessed in the 1994–95 (baseline and 1996–97 (follow-up National Population Health Survey (NPHS, we examined the prevalence of inconsistent self-reports of mammography utilization. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations between women's baseline sociodemographic and health characteristics and 2 types of inconsistent responses: (i baseline reports of ever use which were subsequently contradicted by follow-up reports of never use; and (ii baseline reports of never use which were contradicted by follow-up reports of use prior to 1994–95. Results Among women who reported having a mammogram at baseline, 5.9% (95% confidence interval (CI: 4.6–7.3% reported at follow-up that they had never had one. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that women with such inconsistent responses were more often outside target age groups, from low income households and less likely to report hormone replacement therapy and Pap smear use. Among women reporting never use at baseline and ever use at follow-up, 17.4% (95%CI: 11.7–23.1% reported their most recent mammogram as occurring prior to 1994–95 (baseline and such responses were more common among women aged 70+ years and those in poorer health. Conclusions Women with inconsistent responses of type (i, i.e., ever users at baseline but never users at follow-up, appeared to exhibit characteristics typical of never users of mammography screening. Although limited by sample size, our preliminary analyses suggest that type (ii

  4. Consistent and inconsistent truncations. General results and the issue of the correct uplifting of solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Pons, J M; Pons, Josep M.; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We clarify the existence of two different types of truncations of the field content in a theory, the consistency of each type being achieved by different means. A proof is given of the conditions to have a consistent truncation in the case of dimensional reductions induced by independent Killing vectors. We explain in what sense the tracelessness condition found by Scherk and Scharwz is not only a necessary condition but also a {\\it sufficient} one for a consistent truncation. The reduction of the gauge group is fully performed showing the existence of a sector of rigid symmetries. We show that truncations originated by the introduction of constraints will in general be inconsistent, but this fact does not prevent the possibility of correct upliftings of solutions in some cases. The presence of constraints has dynamical consequences that turn out to play a fundamental role in the correctness of the uplifting procedure.

  5. Inconsistencies between Academic E-Book Platforms: A Comparison of Metadata and Search Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Gabrielle; Tovstiadi, Esta

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study of academic e-books that compared the metadata and search results from major academic e-book platforms. The authors collected data and performed a series of test searches designed to produce the same result regardless of platform. Testing, however, revealed metadata-related errors and significant…

  6. Logical inconsistency in combining counterfactual results from non-commutative operations: Deconstructing the GHZ-Bell theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Sica, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The usual interpretation of the Greenberger, Horne, Zeilinger (GHZ) theorem is that only nonlocal hidden variables are consistent with quantum mechanics. This conclusion is reasoned from the fact that combinations of results of unperformed non-commutative measurement procedures (counterfactuals) do not agree with quantum mechanical predictions taking non-commutation into account. However, it is shown from simple counter-examples, that combinations of such counterfactuals are inconsistent with classical non-commutative measurement sequences as well. There is thus no regime in which the validity of combined non-commutative counterfactuals may be depended upon. As a consequence, negative conclusions regarding local hidden variables do not follow from the GHZ and Bell theorems as historically reasoned.

  7. Are there meaningful individual differences in temporal inconsistency in self-reported personality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubelet, Andrea; Salthouse, Timothy A; Oishi, Shigehiro

    2014-11-01

    The current project had three goals. The first was to examine whether it is meaningful to refer to across-time variability in self-reported personality as an individual differences characteristic. The second was to investigate whether negative affect was associated with variability in self-reported personality, while controlling for mean levels, and correcting for measurement errors. The third goal was to examine whether variability in self-reported personality would be larger among young adults than among older adults, and whether the relation of variability with negative affect would be stronger at older ages than at younger ages. Two moderately large samples of participants completed the International Item Pool Personality questionnaire assessing the Big Five personality dimensions either twice or thrice, in addition to several measures of negative affect. Results were consistent with the hypothesis that within-person variability in self-reported personality is a meaningful individual difference characteristic. Some people exhibited greater across-time variability than others after removing measurement error, and people who showed temporal instability in one trait also exhibited temporal instability across the other four traits. However, temporal variability was not related to negative affect, and there was no evidence that either temporal variability or its association with negative affect varied with age.

  8. Inconsistent Self-Report of Delinquency by Adolescents and Young Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Babinski, Dara E.; Biswas, Aparajita

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to test the ability of adolescents and young adults with childhood ADHD to reliably self-report delinquency history. Data were examined from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS), a follow-up study of children diagnosed with ADHD between 1987 and 1996. Self-report of lifetime delinquency history was…

  9. Inconsistencies Between Physician-Reported Disclosures at the AAOS Annual Meeting and Industry-Reported Financial Disclosures in the Open Payments Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Charles P; Chalmers, Peter N; Carpiniello, Matthew F; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2016-10-19

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate and type of inconsistencies between disclosures self-reported by physicians at a major academic meeting in the United States and industry-reported disclosures in the Open Payments database for a concordant time period. Disclosures for every first and last author from the United States with a medical degree of a podium or poster presentation at the 2014 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Annual Meeting were collected and were compared with the disclosures reported in the Open Payments database to determine if any inconsistencies were present and, if so, within which category. In total, 1,925 total AAOS presenters were identified, and 1,113 met the inclusion criteria. Based on AAOS disclosures, 432 (39%) should have been listed within the Open Payments database. There were 125 presenters (11%) who reported an AAOS disclosure and thus should have been included in the Open Payments database, but were not included. An additional 259 presenters (23%) had ≥1 AAOS disclosures that were not reported or were improperly categorized in the Open Payments database. Inconsistencies were more common for authors who had significantly more poster presentations (p database (p financial relationships for presenters at the AAOS Annual Meeting and industry-reported relationships published in the Open Payments database. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  10. Microenterprise Results Reporting

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Microenterprise Results Reporting (MRR) is an annual report to the U.S. Congress providing funding and program data on USAID's microenterprise activities. The MRR...

  11. Experimental Design and Data Analysis Issues Contribute to Inconsistent Results of C-Bouton Changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihi, Aouatef

    2017-01-01

    The possible presence of pathological changes in cholinergic synaptic inputs [cholinergic boutons (C-boutons)] is a contentious topic within the ALS field. Conflicting data reported on this issue makes it difficult to assess the roles of these synaptic inputs in ALS. Our objective was to determine whether the reported changes are truly statistically and biologically significant and why replication is problematic. This is an urgent question, as C-boutons are an important regulator of spinal motoneuron excitability, and pathological changes in motoneuron excitability are present throughout disease progression. Using male mice of the SOD1-G93A high-expresser transgenic (G93A) mouse model of ALS, we examined C-boutons on spinal motoneurons. We performed histological analysis at high statistical power, which showed no difference in C-bouton size in G93A versus wild-type motoneurons throughout disease progression. In an attempt to examine the underlying reasons for our failure to replicate reported changes, we performed further histological analyses using several variations on experimental design and data analysis that were reported in the ALS literature. This analysis showed that factors related to experimental design, such as grouping unit, sampling strategy, and blinding status, potentially contribute to the discrepancy in published data on C-bouton size changes. Next, we systematically analyzed the impact of study design variability and potential bias on reported results from experimental and preclinical studies of ALS. Strikingly, we found that practices such as blinding and power analysis are not systematically reported in the ALS field. Protocols to standardize experimental design and minimize bias are thus critical to advancing the ALS field. PMID:28101533

  12. Inconsistent reports of risk behavior among Brazilian middle school students: National School Based Survey of Adolescent Health (PeNSE 2009/2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Dandara de Oliveira; Daly, Martin; Seidl-de-Moura, Maria Lucia; Jomar, Rafael Tavares; Nadanovsky, Paulo

    2017-05-18

    This study assessed the consistency of self-reports of risk behavior (overall and within four specific domains: alcohol use, tobacco use, drug use, and sexual activity) in two editions of the Brazilian National School Based Survey of Adolescent Health (PeNSE): 2009 and 2012. The overall proportion of cases with at least one inconsistent response in the two editions was 11.7% (2.7% on the alcohol items, 2.1% for drug use, 4.3% for cigarette use, 3% for sexual activity) and 22.7% (12.8% on alcohol items, 2.5% for drug use, 4.3% for cigarette use, 4.1% for sexual activity), respectively. Such inconsistency was more prevalent among males, delayed students, those who reported having experimented with drugs, and those who did not have a cellphone. Because inconsistent responses were more prevalent among the students who claimed to have engaged in risky activities, removing inconsistent responders affected the estimated prevalence of all risk behaviors in both editions of the survey. This study supports the importance of performing consistency checks of self-report surveys, following the growing body of literature on this topic.

  13. Inconsistent reports of risk behavior among Brazilian middle school students: National School Based Survey of Adolescent Health (PeNSE 2009/2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandara de Oliveira Ramos

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study assessed the consistency of self-reports of risk behavior (overall and within four specific domains: alcohol use, tobacco use, drug use, and sexual activity in two editions of the Brazilian National School Based Survey of Adolescent Health (PeNSE: 2009 and 2012. The overall proportion of cases with at least one inconsistent response in the two editions was 11.7% (2.7% on the alcohol items, 2.1% for drug use, 4.3% for cigarette use, 3% for sexual activity and 22.7% (12.8% on alcohol items, 2.5% for drug use, 4.3% for cigarette use, 4.1% for sexual activity, respectively. Such inconsistency was more prevalent among males, delayed students, those who reported having experimented with drugs, and those who did not have a cellphone. Because inconsistent responses were more prevalent among the students who claimed to have engaged in risky activities, removing inconsistent responders affected the estimated prevalence of all risk behaviors in both editions of the survey. This study supports the importance of performing consistency checks of self-report surveys, following the growing body of literature on this topic.

  14. Report on Results 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report discusses work being carried out in Norway to promote energy efficiency and the production of new renewable energy. An overall review of the quantifiable results of last year's activities at national level is available. It will serve to initiate an annual reporting tradition. The report represents a step towards an ongoing process for improved targeting and management of national efforts. During the course of the year 2000, NVE has evaluated and adjusted its activities and established a system involving indicators and reporting procedures. It is also important to take notice of the long-term work being undertaken to influence people's attitudes, even though this work is difficult to assess. NVE is investing in i.a. measures aimed at children and young people. Apart from directly influencing future energy users, this investment is also having an effect due to the children's encouragement of their parents to engage in more energy and environment-friendly behaviour. Published in 2000, the IEA report ''Trends in Norwegian Stationary Energy Use'' shows that total Norwegian energy consumption per GDP is not much higher than in other IEA countries, when adjusted for cold climate and industrial structure. However, Norwegians do stand out as intensive users of electricity. The IEA report shows a reduction of 10 TWh in energy usage when compared to the projected post 1990 figures. Energy efficiency activities have contributed towards this reduction. However, the potential for a more rational use of energy in Norway is still substantial and well documented. Based on experience most enterprises could save around 10% of energy used just by making changes to their operations, i.e. without major investments. Furthermore, the potential is growing because of massive technological developments in respect of energy usage, production and distribution. With this in mind, it is necessary to take full advantage of the extensive knowledge

  15. Classification for Inconsistent Decision Tables

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad

    2016-09-28

    Decision trees have been used widely to discover patterns from consistent data set. But if the data set is inconsistent, where there are groups of examples with equal values of conditional attributes but different labels, then to discover the essential patterns or knowledge from the data set is challenging. Three approaches (generalized, most common and many-valued decision) have been considered to handle such inconsistency. The decision tree model has been used to compare the classification results among three approaches. Many-valued decision approach outperforms other approaches, and M_ws_entM greedy algorithm gives faster and better prediction accuracy.

  16. The Inconsistent Vegetarian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, Merle E.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetarians are often charged with inconsistency. They are told that, if they refrain from meat consumption, they should also refrain from the consumption of all animal products. The central question this paper addresses is whether the requirement of consistency means that vegetarians should become

  17. The Inconsistent Vegetarian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, Merle E.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetarians are often charged with inconsistency. They are told that, if they refrain from meat consumption, they should also refrain from the consumption of all animal products. The central question this paper addresses is whether the requirement of consistency means that vegetarians should become

  18. Predictors of token-to-token inconsistency in preschool children with typical speech-language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, Toby; Sosa, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine potential concurrent predictors and replicate rates of token-to-token inconsistency (inconsistency in repeated productions of the same word) in 43 children with typical speech-language development, ages 2;6 to 4;2. A standard linear regression was used to determine which variables, if any, among age, expressive and receptive vocabulary, and speech sound production abilities predicted token-to-token inconsistency. Inconsistency rates in children from one research site, reported elsewhere, were compared to rates in children from a second research site. The results revealed that expressive vocabulary was the only significant predictor of token-to-token inconsistency in these children. Furthermore, inconsistency rates were similarly high across the two research sites. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for our theoretical understanding of token-to-token inconsistency and its role in the differential diagnosis of speech sound disorders in children.

  19. Reported treatment strategies for reflexology in cardiac patients and inconsistencies in the location of the heart reflex point: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jenny; Thomson, Patricia; Lauder, William; Leslie, Stephen J

    2012-08-01

    Reflexology texts are inconsistent with regard to the location of the heart point and contradictory with regard to the correct reflexology approach to cardiac patients. We aimed to determine the impact of these inconsistencies on the practice of Association of Reflexologists (AoR) members. Online survey of AoR members. Respondents' beliefs and practises mirror the inconsistencies in reflexology teaching literature and marked inconsistencies exist in the heart reflex point placement. Professional clarification around the heart reflex point location and further clinical research is urgently needed to establish the appropriateness of reflexology techniques for cardiac patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Leaving Inconsistency using Fuzzy Logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelloni, Francesco; Aksit, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    Current software development methods do not provide adequate means to model inconsistencies and therefore force software engineers to resolve inconsistencies whenever they are detected. Certain kinds of inconsistencies, however, are desirable and should be maintained as long as possible. For instanc

  1. Interactive Inconsistency Fixing in Feature Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王波; 熊英飞; 胡振江; 赵海燕; 张伟; 梅宏

    2014-01-01

    Feature models have been widely adopted to reuse the requirements of a set of similar products in a domain. In feature models’ construction, one basic task is to ensure the consistency of feature models, which often involves detecting and fixing of inconsistencies in feature models. While many approaches have been proposed, most of them focus on detecting inconsistencies rather than fixing inconsistencies. In this paper, we propose a novel dynamic-priority based approach to interactively fixing inconsistencies in feature models, and report an implementation of a system that not only automatically recommends a solution to fixing inconsistencies but also supports domain analysts to gradually reach the desirable solution by dynamically adjusting priorities of constraints. The key technical contribution is, as far as we are aware, the first application of the constraint hierarchy theory to feature modeling, where the degree of domain analysts’ confidence on constraints is expressed by using priority and inconsistencies are resolved by deleting one or more lower-priority constraints. Two case studies demonstrate the usability and scalability (effciency) of our new approach.

  2. The (mis)reporting of statistical results in psychology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Marjan; Wicherts, Jelte M

    2011-09-01

    In order to study the prevalence, nature (direction), and causes of reporting errors in psychology, we checked the consistency of reported test statistics, degrees of freedom, and p values in a random sample of high- and low-impact psychology journals. In a second study, we established the generality of reporting errors in a random sample of recent psychological articles. Our results, on the basis of 281 articles, indicate that around 18% of statistical results in the psychological literature are incorrectly reported. Inconsistencies were more common in low-impact journals than in high-impact journals. Moreover, around 15% of the articles contained at least one statistical conclusion that proved, upon recalculation, to be incorrect; that is, recalculation rendered the previously significant result insignificant, or vice versa. These errors were often in line with researchers' expectations. We classified the most common errors and contacted authors to shed light on the origins of the errors.

  3. Generalizations of the Kunen Inconsistency

    CERN Document Server

    Hamkins, Joel David; Perlmutter, Norman Lewis

    2011-01-01

    We present several generalizations of the well-known Kunen inconsistency that there is no nontrivial elementary embedding from the set-theoretic universe V to itself. For example, there is no elementary embedding from the universe V to a set-forcing extension V[G], or conversely from V[G] to V, or more generally from one ground model of the universe to another, or between any two models that are eventually stationary correct, or from V to HOD, or conversely from HOD to V, or indeed from any definable class to V, among many other possibilities we consider, including generic embeddings, definable embeddings and results not requiring the axiom of choice. We have aimed in this article for a unified presentation that weaves together some previously known unpublished or folklore results, several due to Woodin and others, along with our new contributions.

  4. Addressing mathematical inconsistency: Cantor and Godel refuted

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, J A

    2010-01-01

    This article critically reappraises arguments in support of Cantor's theory of transfinite numbers. The following results are reported: i) Cantor's proofs of nondenumerability are refuted by analyzing the logical inconsistencies in implementation of the reductio method of proof and by identifying errors. Particular attention is given to the diagonalization argument and to the interpretation of the axiom of infinity. ii) Three constructive proofs have been designed that support the denumerability of the power set of the natural numbers, P(N), thus implying the denumerability of the set of the real numbers R. These results lead to a Theorem of the Continuum that supersedes Cantor's Continuum Hypothesis and establishes the countable nature of the real number line, suggesting that all infinite sets are denumerable. Some immediate implications of denumerability are discussed: i) Valid proofs should not include inconceivable statements, defined as statements that can be found to be false and always lead to contradi...

  5. Partially Correct Constructs Illuminate Students' Inconsistent Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Gila; Dreyfus, Tommy; Hershkowitz, Rina

    2010-01-01

    We present a view of knowledge construction processes, focusing on partially correct constructs. Motivated by unexpected and seemingly inconsistent quantitative data based on the written reports of students working on an elementary probability task, we analyze in detail the knowledge construction processes of a representative student. We show how…

  6. Heteroresistance in Mycobacteria tuberculosis is an important factor for the inconsistency between the results of phenotype and genotype drug susceptibility tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高旭

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of heteroresistance on the results of genotype drug susceptibility test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis(M.tuberculosis).Methods A total of 80 phenotype ofloxacin-resistant M.tuberculosis isolates obtained from Shanghai Municipal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were included in the study.The mutations of gyrA and gyrB in each isolate

  7. Literature survey results: Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willson, W.G.; Ness, R.O.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Entzminger, J.A.; Jha, M.; Sinor, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    This report reviews mild gasification processes with respect to processing conditions and configurations. Special emphasis was placed on processes which could be commercialized within five years. Detailed market information was provided by J.E. Sinor concerning markets and economic considerations of the various processing steps. Processing areas studied include coal cleaning; mild gasification; and upgrading of the char, condensables, and hydrocarbon gases. Pros and cons in the different processing areas as well as ''gaps'' in pertinent data were identified and integrated into a detailed process development program. The report begins with a summary of the market assessment and an evaluation of the co-product. The impacts of feed materials and operating parameters--including coal rank, heating rate, pressure, agglomeration, temperature, and feed gas composition--on the co- products and processes were evaluated through a literature survey. Recommendations were made as to the preferred product specifications and operating parameters for a commercial plant. A literature review of mild gasification processes was conducted and evaluated with regard to product specification and operating parameters. Two candidate processes were chosen and discussed in detail with respect to scale-up feasibility. Recommendations were then made to process development needs to further consideration of the two processes. 129 refs., 33 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. Serotonin transporter gene moderates childhood maltreatment’s effects on persistent but not single-episode depression: Replications and implications for resolving inconsistent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Rudolf; Caspi, Avshalom; Houts, Renate; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors shape life-long vulnerability to depression, but most gene–environment interaction (G×E) research has focused on cross-sectional assessments rather than life-course phenotypes. This study tests the hypothesis that the G×E involving the length polymorphism in the serotonin-transporter-gene-linked-promoter-region (5-HTTLPR) and childhood maltreatment is specific to depression that runs a persistent course in adulthood. Methods The hypothesis is tested in two cohorts. Men and women in the Dunedin Study (N=847), New Zealand, followed to age 32 years with 96% retention and women in the E-Risk Study (N=930), England, followed to age 40 years with 96% retention. Diagnoses of past-year major depressive episode were established at four separate assessments. Depression diagnosed on two or more occasions was considered persistent. Results In both cohorts, statistical tests of gene–environment interactions showed positive results for persistent depression but not single-episode depression. Individuals with two short 5-HTTLPR alleles and childhood maltreatment had elevated risk of persistent but not single-episode depression. Limitations Some cases of recurrent depression may have been misclassified as single-episode due to non-contiguous assessment windows, but this would have a conservative effect on the findings. Chronic and recurrent depression could not be reliably distinguished due to non-contiguous periods of assessment. Therefore, the term persistent depression is used to describe either chronic or recurrent course. Conclusions The specific effect on persistent depression increases the significance of this G×E for public health. Research that does not distinguish persistent course may underestimate G×E effects and account for some replication failures in G×E research. PMID:21439648

  9. Analysis of Moms Across America report suggesting bioaccumulation of glyphosate in U.S. mother's breast milk: Implausibility based on inconsistency with available body of glyphosate animal toxicokinetic, human biomonitoring, and physico-chemical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, James S

    2015-12-01

    The non-peer-reviewed biomonitoring report published online by Moms Across America (MAA; Honeycutt and Rowlands, 2014) does not support the conclusion that glyphosate concentrations detected in a limited number of urine samples from women, men and children, or breast milk from nursing mothers, pose a health risk to the public, including nursing children. Systemically absorbed doses of glyphosate estimated from the MAA urine biomonitoring data and from other published biomonitoring studies indicate that daily glyphosate doses are substantially below health protective reference standards (ADIs; RfDs) established by regulatory agencies. The MAA report also suggested that detection of relatively high glyphosate concentrations in breast milk in 3 of 10 sampled women raised a concern for bioaccumulation in breast milk. However, the breast milk concentrations reported by MAA are highly implausible when considered in context to low daily systemic doses of glyphosate estimated from human urine biomonitoring data, and also are inconsistent with animal toxicokinetic data demonstrating no evidence of retention in tissues or milk after single- or multiple-dose glyphosate treatment. In addition, toxicokinetic studies in lactating goats have shown that glyphosate does not partition into milk at concentrations greater than blood, and that only a very small percentage of the total administered dose (glyphosate exposures estimated from urine biomonitoring fall thousands-of-fold short of external doses capable of producing blood concentrations sufficient to result in the breast milk concentrations described in the MAA report. Finally, in contrast to highly lipophilic compounds with bioaccumulation potential in breast milk, the physico-chemical properties of glyphosate indicate that it is highly hydrophilic (ionized) at physiological pH and unlikely to preferentially distribute into breast milk.

  10. Inconsistent Condom Use among Iranian Male Drug Injectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman eNarenjiha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of inconsistent condom use among Iranian male injection drug users (IDUs.Materials and methods: Data came from the national Iranian behavioral survey of drug dependence, which sampled 7,743 individuals with drug dependence, from medical centers, prisons and streets in 29 provinces in Iran, 2007. This study included all individuals who were male, IDUs, and were sexually active (n = 1,131. The main outcome was inconsistent condom use which was assessed using a single item. A logistic regression was used to determine the association between socio-economic data, drug use data, and high risk injection behaviors with inconsistent condom use.Result: 83.3% of sexually active IDUs (n=965 reported inconsistent condom use. Based on the logistic regression, likelihood of inconsistent condom use was higher among those with a history of syringe sharing (Odds Ratio [OR]; 1.63, 95% Confidence Interval CI; 1.13- 2.34, but lower among those with higher education levels (OR; 0.34, 95% CI; 0.14- 0.82, those who mostly inject at home (OR; 0.09, 95% CI; 0.02- 0.47 and those with a history of treatment (OR; 0.54, 95% CI; 0.31- 0.94.Conclusion: Because of the link between unsafe sex and risky injecting behaviors among Iranian IDUs, combined programs targeting both sexual and injection behavior may be more appropriate than the programs which target sexual or injection behavior. The efficacy of combined programs should be, however, compared with traditional programs that only target sexual or injection behavior of IDUs.

  11. Inconsistency in large pharmacogenomic studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; El-Hachem, Nehme; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul;

    2013-01-01

    Two large-scale pharmacogenomic studies were published recently in this journal. Genomic data are well correlated between studies; however, the measured drug response data are highly discordant. Although the source of inconsistencies remains uncertain, it has potential implications for using...

  12. Bayesian Approach for Inconsistent Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, M; Beer, M; Kreinovich, V

    2013-10-01

    In engineering situations, we usually have a large amount of prior knowledge that needs to be taken into account when processing data. Traditionally, the Bayesian approach is used to process data in the presence of prior knowledge. Sometimes, when we apply the traditional Bayesian techniques to engineering data, we get inconsistencies between the data and prior knowledge. These inconsistencies are usually caused by the fact that in the traditional approach, we assume that we know the exact sample values, that the prior distribution is exactly known, etc. In reality, the data is imprecise due to measurement errors, the prior knowledge is only approximately known, etc. So, a natural way to deal with the seemingly inconsistent information is to take this imprecision into account in the Bayesian approach - e.g., by using fuzzy techniques. In this paper, we describe several possible scenarios for fuzzifying the Bayesian approach. Particular attention is paid to the interaction between the estimated imprecise parameters. In this paper, to implement the corresponding fuzzy versions of the Bayesian formulas, we use straightforward computations of the related expression - which makes our computations reasonably time-consuming. Computations in the traditional (non-fuzzy) Bayesian approach are much faster - because they use algorithmically efficient reformulations of the Bayesian formulas. We expect that similar reformulations of the fuzzy Bayesian formulas will also drastically decrease the computation time and thus, enhance the practical use of the proposed methods.

  13. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.8 Reporting results. (a) The reported result shall be the classification before or after refurbishing, whichever is the more severe; and based on this result, the textile... results for each specimen that is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not...

  14. Examining inconsistencies in student reasoning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryjevskaia, Mila; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.

    2013-01-01

    Student-centered instruction can lead to strong gains in physics learning. However, even after targeted instruction, many students still struggle to systematically analyze unfamiliar situations. We have been identifying sequences of questions that allow for an in-depth examination of inconsistencies in student reasoning approaches. On these sequences, many students demonstrate that they possess the abilities to perform the required reasoning, yet they fail to apply this reasoning to arrive at a correct answer. In certain contexts, students tend to "abandon" suitable formal reasoning in favor of reasoning that was (perhaps) more intuitively appealing at that moment. In other cases, erroneous student reasoning approaches can be attributed to the relative salience of specific features of the problem. We present results from one sequence revealing inconsistencies in student reasoning in the context of capacitors. This sequence was administered in an introductory course in which Tutorials in Introductory Physics were implemented as interactive lectures.

  15. Inconsistency in Fermi's probability of the quantum states

    CERN Document Server

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R

    2011-01-01

    We point out an important hidden inconsistency in Fermi's probability of the quantum states that engendered inconsistent/inaccurate equations-of-state extensively used in the literature to model nonideal plasma systems. The importance of this amendment goes beyond rectifying our comprehension and foundation of an important physical problem to influencing contemporary research results.

  16. Holdridge life zone physical inconsistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, A., Sr.; Ochoa, A.

    2015-12-01

    Life zones is a very used classification system, developed by L.R. Holdridge in 1967, used to discern why plants have different adaptation mechanism to their surrounding environment. In this paper, the relation between potential evapotranspiration rate (ETr ), anual precipitation (P ) and biotemperature (Tb ) in the Holdridge triangle, is parametrized (P = (500/9)*ETr) to evaluate if the rain process is conserved in Colombia. Further, an adiabatic ascent of air with diurnal and interannual variability, and cluster analysis is view as a classification example of the advantage of using physical process to evaluate the plants adaptation mechanisms . The most inconsistency life zones are situated in the rainiest places of Colombian pacific costs in tropical latitudinal region, are non-exist places in holdridge triangle with annual biotemperature higher than 26◦ C, annual precipitation about 10.000mm and annual potential evapotranspiration rate about 0.1. The difference between Holdridge predicted precipitation and the precipitation measured with TRMM are about 5.000mm in these places. Classification systems based on an annual average, do not stablish adaptation as a function of diurnal variability, for example, the difference between valley sides vegetation could not being determined. This kind of limitations, added to a validation procces and the auscence of a physic procces in the variable interaction, make the Holdridge Life Zones a very useful tool, but physically inconsistent for caracterice vegetation as a function of precipitation. The rain process is very complex, depend of mass and energy exchanges and is still a controversial topic in atmospheric modeling, as a biotic pump.

  17. Three scenarios of ranking inconsistencies involving search tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Samuelson, Frank W.; Zeng, Rongping; Sahiner, Berkman

    2016-03-01

    Our previous work on assessment of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) image quality revealed inconsistencies in ranking the reconstruction algorithms' performances for a location-known-exactly (LKE) detection and a location-unknown searching task. Such results made us wonder that ranking inconsistencies may not be rare phenomena at all. In this work, we conducted a small literature review that involved three publications (He, Samuelson, Zeng and Sahiner SPIE 2016; Park, Kupinski, Clarkson and Barrett, IPMI 2003 and JOSA 2005). These publications compared the LKE and search performance for a variety of observers using the AUC value as the performance criterion (human observers, CHOs for detection, scanning CHOs for search, and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo ideal observer for detection and search). We categorized the experimental findings into three types of ranking inconsistencies: 1) Ranking inconsistencies in LKE and search tasks; 2) human/ideal observer ranking inconsistencies; and 3) LKE/search ranking inconsistencies in the presence of signal variability. The empirical evidence presented in this work suggested that ranking inconsistencies for imaging systems existed, but these inconsistencies often do not draw enough attention in the literature.

  18. Detecting and Characterizing Semantic Inconsistencies in Ported Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Baishakhi; Kim, Miryung; Person,Suzette; Rungta, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Adding similar features and bug fixes often requires porting program patches from reference implementations and adapting them to target implementations. Porting errors may result from faulty adaptations or inconsistent updates. This paper investigates (1) the types of porting errors found in practice, and (2) how to detect and characterize potential porting errors. Analyzing version histories, we define five categories of porting errors, including incorrect control- and data-flow, code redundancy, inconsistent identifier renamings, etc. Leveraging this categorization, we design a static control- and data-dependence analysis technique, SPA, to detect and characterize porting inconsistencies. Our evaluation on code from four open-source projects shows that SPA can detect porting inconsistencies with 65% to 73% precision and 90% recall, and identify inconsistency types with 58% to 63% precision and 92% to 100% recall. In a comparison with two existing error detection tools, SPA improves precision by 14 to 17 percentage points.

  19. Inconsistent condom use among Ugandan university students from a gender perspective: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Mehra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Feminization of the HIV/AIDS epidemic has been a prominent phenomenon in sub-Saharan Africa. Inconsistent condom use among young people is one of the major risk factors in the continued propagation of the epidemic. Therefore, it is of importance to increase knowledge of gender aspects of condom use among young people. Objective: To investigate whether gender differences regarding individual and social factors determine the association between condom efficacy and inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner, among Ugandan university students. Design: In 2010, 1954 Ugandan students participated in a cross-sectional survey, conducted at Mbarara University of Science and Technology in southwestern Uganda. A self-administered questionnaire assessed socio-demographic factors, alcohol consumption, sexual behaviors (including condom use and condom efficacy, and peer norms. The data were stratified by sex and examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 1,179 (60.3% students reported having had their sexual debut. Of these, 231 (37.4% males and 209 (49.2% females reported inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner. Students with low condom efficacy had a higher risk of inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner, even after adjusting for the potential confounders. A synergistic effect was observed between being a female and low condom efficacy with inconsistent condom use. Conclusion: The association between inconsistent condom use and low condom efficacy was found among both males and females, but females were found to be at a higher risk of inconsistent condom use compared to their male counterparts. Therefore, gender power relations should be addressed in policies and interventions aiming at increasing condom use among young people in sub-Saharan settings. Programs could be designed with intervention strategies that focus on interactive and participatory educational activities and youth

  20. A general framework for reasoning on inconsistency

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Maria Vanina; Subrahmanian, VS; Amgoud, Leila

    2013-01-01

    This SpringerBrief proposes a general framework for reasoning about inconsistency in a wide variety of logics, including inconsistency resolution methods that have not yet been studied.  The proposed framework allows users to specify preferences on how to resolve inconsistency when there are multiple ways to do so. This empowers users to resolve inconsistency in data leveraging both their detailed knowledge of the data as well as their application needs. The brief shows that the framework is well-suited to handle inconsistency in several logics, and provides algorithms to compute preferred opt

  1. A misfit function tolerating inconsistent data

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2014-08-05

    Inversion methods that do not model all of the physical events in the observed data lead to inconsistent sets of equations. This often results in serious artifacts in the inverted model. To mitigate this problem, I propose a misfit function that partly ignores the unexplainable arrivals in the data due to modeling limitation. This is tested on least squares migration of synthetic P–P arrivals, albeit P–S reflections exist in the observed data in addition, to demonstrate that in this case the new misfit is more robust than the standard L2 misfit.

  2. Format SPARQL Query Results into HTML Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Sunitha Abburu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available SPARQL is one of the powerful query language for querying semantic data. It is recognized by the W3C as a query language for RDF. As an efficient query language for RDF, it has defined several query result formats such as CSV, TSV and XML etc. These formats are not attractive, understandable and readable. The results need to be converted in an appropriate format so that user can easily understand. The above formats require additional transformations or tool support to represent the query result in user readable format. The main aim of this paper is to propose a method to build HTML report dynamically for SPARQL query results. This enables SPARQL query result display, in HTML report format easily, in an attractive understandable format without the support of any additional or external tools or transformation.

  3. A network perspective on metabolic inconsistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnenschein Nikolaus

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrating gene expression profiles and metabolic pathways under different experimental conditions is essential for understanding the coherence of these two layers of cellular organization. The network character of metabolic systems can be instrumental in developing concepts of agreement between expression data and pathways. A network-driven interpretation of gene expression data has the potential of suggesting novel classifiers for pathological cellular states and of contributing to a general theoretical understanding of gene regulation. Results Here, we analyze the coherence of gene expression patterns and a reconstruction of human metabolism, using consistency scores obtained from network and constraint-based analysis methods. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the two measures, demonstrating that a substantial part of inconsistencies between metabolic processes and gene expression can be understood from a network perspective alone. Prompted by this finding, we investigate the topological context of the individual biochemical reactions responsible for the observed inconsistencies. On this basis, we are able to separate the differential contributions that bear physiological information about the system, from the unspecific contributions that unravel gaps in the metabolic reconstruction. We demonstrate the biological potential of our network-driven approach by analyzing transcriptome profiles of aldosterone producing adenomas that have been obtained from a cohort of Primary Aldosteronism patients. We unravel systematics in the data that could not have been resolved by conventional microarray data analysis. In particular, we discover two distinct metabolic states in the adenoma expression patterns. Conclusions The methodology presented here can help understand metabolic inconsistencies from a network perspective. It thus serves as a mediator between the topology of metabolic systems and their dynamical

  4. Can inflation targeting mitigate monetary policy time-inconsistency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Caldas Montes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the adoption of inflation targeting can, on average, bring benefits to developing countries, however, adopting this scheme is not necessarily sufficient to mitigate the time-inconsistency problem of monetary policy. The present paper makes use of two theoretical models in order to analyze for the Brazilian case whether it is possible for the monetary authority to conduct time-inconsistent monetary policies even under inflation targeting. The results obtained for Brazil allow one to conjecture that the traditional argument that the adoption of inflation targeting can avoid the time-inconsistency problem is not necessarily true.

  5. 10 CFR 26.169 - Reporting Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., adulteration, or substitution that may be present; the specimen identification number assigned by the licensee or other entity; and the specimen identification number assigned by the laboratory. (b) If licensees... donor's test result can be readily inferred, the laboratory may not send a summary report if...

  6. Using Abduction to Evolve Inconsistent Requirements Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Nuseibeh

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Requirements specifications are often inconsistent. Inconsistencies may arise because multiple conflicting requirements are embodied in these specifications, or because the specifications themselves are in a transient stage of evolutionary development. In this paper we argue that such inconsistencies, rather than being undesirable, are actually useful drivers for changing the requirements specifications in which they arise. We present a formal technique to reason about inconsistency handling changes. Our technique is an adaptation of logical abduction - adapted to generate changes that address some specification inconsistencies, while leaving others. We represent our specifications in quasi-classical (QC logic - an adaptation of classical logic that allows continued reasoning in the presence of inconsistency. The paper develops a sound algorithm for automating our abductive reasoning technique and presents illustrative examples drawn from a library system case study.

  7. Adult age differences in memory for schema-consistent and schema-inconsistent objects in a real-world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prull, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined age-related differences in the inconsistency effect, in which memory is enhanced for schema-inconsistent information compared to schema-consistent information. Young and older adults studied schema-consistent and schema-inconsistent objects in an academic office under either intentional or incidental encoding instructions, and were given two recognition tests either immediately or after 48 hr: A yes/no item recognition test that included modified remember/know judgments and a token recognition test that required determining whether an original object was replaced with a different object with the same name. Young and older adults showed equivalent inconsistency effects in both item and token recognition tests, although older adults reported phenomenologically less rich memories of schema-inconsistent objects relative to young adults. These findings run counter to previous reports suggesting that aging is associated with processing declines at encoding that impair memory for details of schema-inconsistent or distinctive events. The results are consistent with a retrieval-based account in which age-related difficulties in retrieving contextual details can be offset by environmental support.

  8. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior.

  9. Parental Inconsistency: A Third Cross-Cultural Research on Parenting and Psychological Adjustment of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan

    2010-01-01

    Inconsistency in parenting is a factor that may influence children's mental health. A questionnaire, measuring three parental inconsistencies (temporal, situational, and father-mother inconsistency) was administered to adolescents in nine countries to assess its association with adolescents' psychological disorders. The results show that parental…

  10. A Variable Response Inconsistency Scale and a True Response Inconsistency Scale for the Jesness Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsoneault, Terry B.

    1998-01-01

    Inconsistent item-pair Variable Response Inconsistency (VRIN) and True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) scales were developed for the Jesness Inventory using 500 male and female delinquents to detect random and acquiescent sets. Specificities above 0.90 showed sensitivities up to 0.89 for VRIN and 0.85 and 0.62 for TRIN. Predictive power and overall…

  11. Annual report 2011. Results and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-25

    Enova is a state-owned enterprise, owned by the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. Over a period of ten years, the enterprise has worked to trigger energy efficiency measures and renewable energy production by supporting proactive players that have paved the way for others. In the period 2002-2011, Enova has contracted an energy result of 16.6 TWh, Enova's Annual Report 2011 shows. This corresponds to the annual energy end-use of more than 35 per cent of Norways 2.2 million private households. Enova has allocated NOK 9 billion in support over ten years. This has resulted in project owners and other financiers investing about Nok 45 billion in capital for environmentally friendly energy projects in Norway, says Nils Kristian Nakstad, CEO of Enova. In 2011, Enova supported projects with an overall energy result of 1.35 TWh using resources from the Energy Fund, equally distributed between energy efficiency and renewable heating. The greatest contributors in 2011 are within energy conversion to renewable heating and energy efficiency measures in buildings.The climate impact of all of the projects where Enova has entered into contracts corresponds to 9.3 million tonnes in reduced CO2 emissions annually. The latter constitutes 17 per cent of domestic greenhouse gas emissions. (au)

  12. Minimally inconsistent reasoning in Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowang

    2017-01-01

    Reasoning with inconsistencies is an important issue for Semantic Web as imperfect information is unavoidable in real applications. For this, different paraconsistent approaches, due to their capacity to draw as nontrivial conclusions by tolerating inconsistencies, have been proposed to reason with inconsistent description logic knowledge bases. However, existing paraconsistent approaches are often criticized for being too skeptical. To this end, this paper presents a non-monotonic paraconsistent version of description logic reasoning, called minimally inconsistent reasoning, where inconsistencies tolerated in the reasoning are minimized so that more reasonable conclusions can be inferred. Some desirable properties are studied, which shows that the new semantics inherits advantages of both non-monotonic reasoning and paraconsistent reasoning. A complete and sound tableau-based algorithm, called multi-valued tableaux, is developed to capture the minimally inconsistent reasoning. In fact, the tableaux algorithm is designed, as a framework for multi-valued DL, to allow for different underlying paraconsistent semantics, with the mere difference in the clash conditions. Finally, the complexity of minimally inconsistent description logic reasoning is shown on the same level as the (classical) description logic reasoning. PMID:28750030

  13. Kinematic Origins of Motor Inconsistency in Expert Pianists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Kenta; Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart; Miyazaki, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    For top performers, including athletes and musicians, even subtle inconsistencies in rhythm and force during movement production decrease the quality of performance. However, extensive training over many years beginning in childhood is unable to perfect dexterous motor performance so that it is without any error. To gain insight into the biological mechanisms underlying the subtle defects of motor actions, the present study sought to identify the kinematic origins of inconsistency of dexterous finger movements in musical performance. Seven highly-skilled pianists who have won prizes at international piano competitions played a short sequence of tones with the right hand at a predetermined tempo. Time-varying joint angles of the fingers were recorded using a custom-made data glove, and the timing and velocity of the individual keystrokes were recorded from a digital piano. Both ridge and stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated an association of the inter-trial variability of the inter-keystroke interval (i.e., rhythmic inconsistency) with both the rotational velocity of joints of the finger used for a keystroke (i.e., striking finger) and the movement independence between the striking and non-striking fingers. This indicates a relationship between rhythmic inconsistency in musical performance and the dynamic features of movements in not only the striking finger but also the non-striking fingers. In contrast, the inter-trial variability of the key-descending velocity (i.e., loudness inconsistency) was associated mostly with the kinematic features of the striking finger at the moment of the keystroke. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the rhythmic and loudness inconsistencies. The results suggest distinct kinematic origins of inconsistencies in rhythm and loudness in expert musical performance. PMID:27537686

  14. Kinematic Origins of Motor Inconsistency in Expert Pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Kenta; Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart; Miyazaki, Fumio; Furuya, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    For top performers, including athletes and musicians, even subtle inconsistencies in rhythm and force during movement production decrease the quality of performance. However, extensive training over many years beginning in childhood is unable to perfect dexterous motor performance so that it is without any error. To gain insight into the biological mechanisms underlying the subtle defects of motor actions, the present study sought to identify the kinematic origins of inconsistency of dexterous finger movements in musical performance. Seven highly-skilled pianists who have won prizes at international piano competitions played a short sequence of tones with the right hand at a predetermined tempo. Time-varying joint angles of the fingers were recorded using a custom-made data glove, and the timing and velocity of the individual keystrokes were recorded from a digital piano. Both ridge and stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated an association of the inter-trial variability of the inter-keystroke interval (i.e., rhythmic inconsistency) with both the rotational velocity of joints of the finger used for a keystroke (i.e., striking finger) and the movement independence between the striking and non-striking fingers. This indicates a relationship between rhythmic inconsistency in musical performance and the dynamic features of movements in not only the striking finger but also the non-striking fingers. In contrast, the inter-trial variability of the key-descending velocity (i.e., loudness inconsistency) was associated mostly with the kinematic features of the striking finger at the moment of the keystroke. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the rhythmic and loudness inconsistencies. The results suggest distinct kinematic origins of inconsistencies in rhythm and loudness in expert musical performance.

  15. Addressing inconsistencies in black carbon literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonkoff, S. B.; Chafe, Z.; Smith, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    The literature describing black carbon (BC) emissions, and their effect on Earth’s climate, is growing rapidly. Unfortunately, inconsistencies in definitions; data collection and characterization; system boundaries; and time horizons have led to confusion about the relative importance of BC compared to other climate-active pollutant (CAPs). We discuss three sources of confusion: 1) Currently available BC inventories are not directly comparable to those used by the IPCC to track the greenhouse gases (GHGs) considered in the Kyoto Protocol (CO2, CH4, N2O). In particular, BC inventories often include all emissions: natural and anthropogenic in origin, controllable and non-controllable. IPCC inventories include only anthropogenic emissions. This BC accounting is appropriate for atmospheric science deliberations, but risks being interpreted as an overstatement against official Kyoto GHG inventories in a policy or control context. The IPCC convention of using 1750 as the starting year for emission inventories further complicates matters: significant BC emissions were emitted previous to that date by both human and natural sources. Though none of the pre-1750 BC emissions remain in the atmosphere today, their legacy presents challenges in assigning historical responsibility for associated global warming among sectors and regional populations. 2) Inconsistencies exist in the specific emissions sources considered in atmospheric models used to predict net BC forcing often lead to widely varying climate forcing estimates. For example, while some analyses consider only fossil fuel 1, others include both open biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion 2, and yet others include sources beyond biomass and fossil fuel burning 3. 3) Inconsistencies exist in how analyses incorporate the relationship between BC emissions and the associated cooling aerosols and processes, such as organic carbon (OC), and aerosol indirect effects (AIE). Unlike Kyoto GHGs, BC is rarely emitted in pure

  16. Fast assignment reduction in inconsistent incomplete decision systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Shaobo Deng; Shengzhong Feng; Jianping Fan

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on fast algorithm for computing the assignment reduct in inconsistent incomplete decision systems. It is quite inconvenient to judge the assignment reduct directly ac-cording to its definition. We propose the judgment theorem for the assignment reduct in the inconsistent incomplete decision system, which greatly simplifies judging this type reduct. On such basis, we derive a novel attribute significance measure and construct the fast assignment reduction algorithm (F-ARA), intended for com-puting the assignment reduct in inconsistent incomplete decision systems. Final y, we make a comparison between F-ARA and the discernibility matrix-based method by experiments on 13 Univer-sity of California at Irvine (UCI) datasets, and the experimental results prove that F-ARA is efficient and feasible.

  17. Variables Related to Inconsistent Answers in a Survey About Sexual Intercourses Among Students in Santa Marta, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Campo Arias

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-reported questionnairesare the more common and reliable method toinvestigate health-related behaviors among adolescents.Often, a significant number of participantsreport inconsistencies in several relateditems, especially sensitive topics, and they mustbe omitted. Up to date, it has not extensivelycompared the demographic characteristics ofstudents that answer consistent and not consistentlya paper-pencil survey.Objective: To compare some characteristicsrelated to inconsistent answers about sexualbehavior among students of secondary school atSanta Marta, Colombia.Method: A probabilistic cluster simple of studentscompleted an anonymous survey aboutsexual relationship. Logistic regression was usedfor adjusting associated variables to answer inconsistentlyquestions about sexual behavior.Results: A total of 3813 students completedthe survey. A group of 3575 participants (93.8%reported consistent information about sexualbehavior; and 238 (6.2% did not. Studentsthat completed inconsistently the survey aboutsexual behavior were more frequently attendingto private school (OR=3.5; 95%CI 2.6-4.8 andboys (OR=2.1; 95%CI 1.6-2.8, after adjustingfor socioeconomic level.Conclusions: Approximately one out oftwenty students completed inconsistently inquiresabout sexual behavior. Inconsistent answersabout sexual behavior were higher in privateschool and male students. More investigationis needed.

  18. Inconsistency as a Touchstone for Coherence Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Siebel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The debate on probabilistic measures of coherence has focused on evaluating sets of consistent propositions. In this paper we draw attention to the largely neglected question of whether such measures concur with intuitions on test cases involving inconsistent propositions and whether they satisfy general adequacy constraints on coherence and inconsistency. While it turns out that, for the vast majority of measures in their original shape, this question must be answered in the negative, we show that it is possible to adapt many of them in order to improve their performance.

  19. Checking MSC Specifications for Timing Inconsistency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuandong(李宣东); TAN Wenkai(谭文凯); ZHENG Guoliang(郑国梁)

    2002-01-01

    Message sequence chart (MSC) is a graphical and textual language for the description and specification of the interactions between system components. MSC specifica tions allow convenient expression of multiple scenarios, and offer an intuitive and visual way of describing design requirements. Like any other aspect of the specification and design process, MSCs are amenable to errors, and their analysis is important. In this paper, the verification problem of MSC specification for timing inconsistency is studied, which means that no execu tion scenario described by an MSC specification is timing consistent. An algorithm is developed to check MSC specifications for timing inconsistency.

  20. Expert Meeting Report. Foundations Research Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojczyk, C. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Huelman, P. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carmody, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an expert meeting on Foundations–Research Results on November 15, 2011, in Minneapolis, MN. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover needs and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals. Key results were: greater understanding of the role of moisture transport through foundation and insulation materials and its potential impact on building durability; greater understanding of the role of foundation type in the process of selecting an insulation system for energy performance and building durability; need for research to quantify the risks associated with insulation processes to better enable users to weigh costs and benefits against the existing conditions of a home; need for improved performance modeling capabilities that address variations in foundation types and soil conditions.

  1. Can Partial Structures Accommodate Inconsistent Science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vickers

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The semantic approach to scientific representation is now long established as a favourite amongst philosophers of science. One of the foremost strains of this approach—the model-theoretic approach (MTA—is to represent scientific theories as families of models, all of which satisfy or ‘make true’ a given set of constraints. However some authors (Brown 2002, Frisch 2005 have criticised the approach on the grounds that certain scientific theories are logically inconsistent, and there can be no models of an inconsistent set of constraints. Thus it would seem that the MTA fails to represent inconsistent scientific theories at all, and this raises concerns about the way it represents in general. In a series of papers (1990, 1993, 1995 and a recent book (2003 da Costa and French have developed a variant of the MTA approach which they call ‘partial structures’, and which they claim can accommodate inconsistent theories. I assess this claim, looking to two theories which have been called ‘inconsistent’: Bohr’s theory of the atom and classical electrodynamics.

  2. Consistencies and Inconsistencies in Nurses' Ethical Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jeanette A.; Helm, Ann

    1987-01-01

    Examines inconsistencies in individual nurses' decisions about ethical situations and their justifications in the light of changes due to contemporary feminism and professionalization of the nursing role. Suggests empirical identification of ambiguities identified by practitioners be added as a component of professional education. (Author/DH)

  3. Annual report 2010. Results and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    In 2010, 926 G Wh of renewable heating was contracted. This is nearly on par with the record-breaking year of 2009, when Enova had extra funds to distribute through the Governments Stimulus Package in response to the financial crisis. District heating has been developed, or is in the process of being developed, in most major cities.We also expect new developments in smaller communities and extensions of existing facilities in cities. We expect this to result in an increased number of applications for smaller projects. (au)

  4. Enova results and activities report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    Enova's primary task is to utilise the Norwegian Energy Fund to contribute to environmentally friendly restructuring of energy consumption and generation. Enova's management of the Energy Fund is governed by an agreement between the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and Enova. Restructuring national energy consumption is a comprehensive task, which includes identifying barriers and fine-tuning policy instruments to achieve changes in the market. In 2007, Enova achieved contractual commitments for an energy result of about 2.4 TWh, while 10.1 TWh was contracted in the period 2001-2007. A 28 million euro wind power project received support in 2007, and counting this project, Enova has granted subsidies totalling 100 million euros for 11 different windmill parks located around Norway. A significant commitment was made in the heating area in 2007. An energy result of 751 GWh in renewable heating energy was contracted, distributed among 69 projects with total funding amounting to 40 million euros. Bio fuel processing projects received 0.6 million euros, divided among four projects totalling 163 GWh. From 2008, three new heating programs will replace the existing heating program, and the solid bio fuel production program will be discontinued. In 2007, Enova received 30 applications for the new technology program, of which 21 were connected to the joint effort with the Research Council of Norway and Innovation Norway. A total of ten projects have received pledges of support from Enova in 2007, totalling 10 million euros. The program for energy consumption in buildings achieved a contractual energy result of 365 GWh in 2007. An evaluation was carried out in 2007 that will be used as a basis for tailoring the program activities to the market. The work aimed at energy efficiency and conversion to renewable energy carriers in industry has contributed a total contracted energy result of 814 GWh in 2007. The main program has been confirmed and maintained in 2007. The

  5. Enova results and activities report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    Enova's primary task is to utilise the Norwegian Energy Fund to contribute to environmentally friendly restructuring of energy consumption and generation. Enova's management of the Energy Fund is governed by an agreement between the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and Enova. Restructuring national energy consumption is a comprehensive task, which includes identifying barriers and fine-tuning policy instruments to achieve changes in the market. In 2007, Enova achieved contractual commitments for an energy result of about 2.4 TWh, while 10.1 TWh was contracted in the period 2001-2007. A 28 million euro wind power project received support in 2007, and counting this project, Enova has granted subsidies totalling 100 million euros for 11 different windmill parks located around Norway. A significant commitment was made in the heating area in 2007. An energy result of 751 GWh in renewable heating energy was contracted, distributed among 69 projects with total funding amounting to 40 million euros. Bio fuel processing projects received 0.6 million euros, divided among four projects totalling 163 GWh. From 2008, three new heating programs will replace the existing heating program, and the solid bio fuel production program will be discontinued. In 2007, Enova received 30 applications for the new technology program, of which 21 were connected to the joint effort with the Research Council of Norway and Innovation Norway. A total of ten projects have received pledges of support from Enova in 2007, totalling 10 million euros. The program for energy consumption in buildings achieved a contractual energy result of 365 GWh in 2007. An evaluation was carried out in 2007 that will be used as a basis for tailoring the program activities to the market. The work aimed at energy efficiency and conversion to renewable energy carriers in industry has contributed a total contracted energy result of 814 GWh in 2007. The main program has been confirmed and maintained in 2007. The

  6. Enova results and activities report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    Energy was high on the agenda in 2006. The higher than normal electricity prices, Norway's strong dependence on electricity, and the increased focus on climate change resulted in a lot of interest in environmentally friendly energy solutions. For Enova this meant an exciting and demanding year. At the same time it has been important to take into account the long-term perspective of the activities. Enova is supposed to be a driving force for future oriented energy solutions and to contribute to a lasting change in Norway's generation and use of energy. During the past year better knowledge about what is happening to our world has had a positive effect on Enova's efforts. This increased attention has provided Enova with the opportunity to demonstrate that energy efficiency and renewable energy are the keys to a sustainable energy future. Moreover, the general focus on energy has enabled Enova to more effectively provide business and industry, households and the public authorities with good energy advice. refs., figs., tabs., ills

  7. Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O' Brien, Kathleen; Bebic, Jovan; Schelenz, Owen

    2011-09-28

    Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APS customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a

  8. Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O' Brien, Kathleen

    2011-09-28

    Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APS customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a

  9. Intra-word inconsistency in apraxic Hebrew-speaking children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubul-Lavy, Gila

    2012-06-01

    Intra-word inconsistency in a child is perceived as an indicator of speech impairment. Because the speech of typically developing children is highly variable, the extent and nature of the inconsistency must be defined when used as a diagnostic marker of speech impairment (McLeod, S., & Hewett, S. R. (2008). Variability in the production of words containing consonant clusters by typical 2- and 3-year-old children. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 60(4), 163-172). In this paper, we study inconsistency with reference to the prosodic hierarchy (McCarthy, J. J., & Prince, A. S. (1996). Prosodic morphology 1986. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts. Retrieved April 15, 2010, from http://ruccs.rutgers.edu/pub/papers/pm86all.pdf), suggesting a new way to describe this phenomenon in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). The prosodic hierarchy has been used in recent years to demonstrate the phonological development of typical and atypical populations. Sixteen children diagnosed with CAS (average age 3;11) participated in the study. The data, collected from each child in the course of eight weekly meetings, are drawn from naming single words. The results indicate that inconsistency is dominant for two prosodic levels, the segmental and the syllabic, while the prosodic word level was largely preserved.

  10. Uso inconsistente del condón entre trabajadoras sexuales en Ecuador: resultados de una encuesta de comportamientos Inconsistent condom use among sexual workers in Ecuador: results from a behavior survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Gutiérrez

    2006-04-01

    el uso consistente del condón en esta población.OBJECTIVE: Whilst existing data suggests that the HIV epidemic in Ecuador is concentrated amongst men who have sex with men (MSM, there is very little available information on the situation of key populations, i.e. those most at risk of HIV infection and/or transmitting the infection. In particular, there is very little known about sex workers (SWs, their rate of condom use and other behaviors and characteristics with respect to the risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs. This study presents findings from a survey carried out with SWs in eight cities in Ecuador. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, a questionnaire focusing on behaviours, attitudes and socio-economic and demographic characteristics was administered to SWs in eight cities in Ecuador. These eight cities together account for the majority of the population in the country, and they were also identified as the locations with high reported levels of HIV. RESULTS: Information from a total of 2867 SWs was obtained, the majority were captured in their workplaces. Most of SWs interviewed carry out their activities in closed settings dedicated to sex work (i.e. not in the street. The average age of respondents was 28 (95%CI 27-29, and around half of them live with a male partner (married or not. The rate of condom use with the last client was 88% (82% consistently with the last three, whilst with regular partners it was 6%. A high index of life-skills, high socio-economic status and having an official document that allows them to work, were positively associated with condom use with clients (PR [CI 95%] 1.40 [1.40-1.40], 1.37 [1.36-1.37], y 7.26 [6.87-7.46], respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Whilst condom use with clients amongst Ecuadorian SWs is high, this diminishes if one analyzes consistent condom use and is notably low with respect to regular partners. Condom use appears to be related to variables that can be linked to

  11. The inconsistency of the h-index

    CERN Document Server

    Waltman, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    The h-index is a popular bibliometric indicator for assessing individual scientists. We criticize the h-index from a theoretical point of view. We argue that for the purpose of measuring the overall scientific impact of a scientist (or some other unit of analysis) the h-index behaves in a counterintuitive way. In certain cases, the mechanism used by the h-index to aggregate publication and citation statistics into a single number leads to inconsistencies in the way in which scientists are ranked. Our conclusion is that the h-index cannot be considered an appropriate indicator of a scientist's overall scientific impact. Based on recent theoretical insights, we discuss what kind of indicators can be used as an alternative to the h-index. We pay special attention to the highly cited publications indicator. This indicator has a lot in common with the h-index, but unlike the h-index it does not produce inconsistent rankings.

  12. Detection of Tampering Inconsistencies on Mobile Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hong; Kot, Alex C.

    Fast proliferation of mobile cameras and the deteriorating trust on digital images have created needs in determining the integrity of photos captured by mobile devices. As tampering often creates some inconsistencies, we propose in this paper a novel framework to statistically detect the image tampering inconsistency using accurately detected demosaicing weights features. By first cropping four non-overlapping blocks, each from one of the four quadrants in the mobile photo, we extract a set of demosaicing weights features from each block based on a partial derivative correlation model. Through regularizing the eigenspectrum of the within-photo covariance matrix and performing eigenfeature transformation, we further derive a compact set of eigen demosaicing weights features, which are sensitive to image signal mixing from different photo sources. A metric is then proposed to quantify the inconsistency based on the eigen weights features among the blocks cropped from different regions of the mobile photo. Through comparison, we show our eigen weights features perform better than the eigen features extracted from several other conventional sets of statistical forensics features in detecting the presence of tampering. Experimentally, our method shows a good confidence in tampering detection especially when one of the four cropped blocks is from a different camera model or brand with different demosaicing process.

  13. Experimental economics' inconsistent ban on deception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersch, Gil

    2015-08-01

    According to what I call the 'argument from public bads', if a researcher deceived subjects in the past, there is a chance that subjects will discount the information that a subsequent researcher provides, thus compromising the validity of the subsequent researcher's experiment. While this argument is taken to justify an existing informal ban on explicit deception in experimental economics, it can also apply to implicit deception, yet implicit deception is not banned and is sometimes used in experimental economics. Thus, experimental economists are being inconsistent when they appeal to the argument from public bads to justify banning explicit deception but not implicit deception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Inconsistency Of Assessing Agricultural Zakat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Firdaus Abdul Rahman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The management of agricultural zakat in Malaysia is under the jurisdiction of States ReligiousCouncil. The objective of this paper is to analyze the nisab, rate and to assess the deduction ofcost before zakat is imposed. A qualitative methodology was used to analyze the data through descriptive and comparative methods. The researchers used five states as samples, namely Selangor, Penang, Perlis, Terengganu, and Sarawak. The findings showed the inconsistency indeciding the nisab for the bushel (sa` metric weight. In addition, the variability of rates was applied in all states and the deduction of cost is allowed only in the state of Perlis. It can be summarized that the occurrence of the diversity is due to inconsistency of bushel (sa’ weight in every state and there are various rates of agriculturazakat, specifically 5%, 7.5% and 10% which is set by State Islamic Religious Authority. It can be implied that fatwa issued by the State Mufti Department and Baitulmal are required to be reassessed from time to time. It is recommended that digital modern metric measurement is to be used and all costs should be deducted beforethey imposed agricultural zakat.

  15. Integrative Bioethics: A Conceptually Inconsistent Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Viktor; Savić, Lovro

    2016-06-01

    This article provides a critical evaluation of the central components of Integrative Bioethics, a project aiming at a bioethical framework reconceptualization. Its proponents claim that this new system of thought has developed a better bioethical methodology than mainstream Western bioethics, a claim that we criticize here. We deal especially with the buzz words of Integrative Bioethics - pluriperspectivism, integrativity, orientational knowledge, as well as with its underlying theory of moral truth. The first part of the paper looks at what the claims of a superior methodology consist in. The second reveals pluriperspectivism and integrativity to be underdeveloped, hazy terms, but which seem to be underpinned by two theses - the incommensurability and the inclusiveness theses. These theses we critically scrutinize. We then consider strategies the project's proponents might apply to curb these theses in order to acquire minimal consistency for their framework. This part of the article also deals with the conception of moral truth that drives the theory, a position equally burdened with inconsistencies. In the last part of the article, we observe the concept of orientational knowledge, and develop two interpretations of its possible meaning. We claim that, following the first interpretation, Integrative Bioethics is completely descriptive, in which case it is informative and important, but hardly bioethics; if it is normative, following the second interpretation, it is bioethics as we already know it, but merely clad in rhetorical embellishments. We conclude that there is nothing new about this project, and that its inconsistencies are reason enough for its abandonment.

  16. 40 CFR 141.706 - Reporting source water monitoring results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting source water monitoring... Cryptosporidium Source Water Monitoring Requirements § 141.706 Reporting source water monitoring results. (a) Systems must report results from the source water monitoring required under § 141.701 no later than 10...

  17. Inconsistency of decision-making, the Achilles heel of referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevill, Alan M; Hemingway, Alex; Greaves, Rupert; Dallaway, Alex; Devonport, Tracey J

    2017-11-01

    This study assessed whether decisions made by six qualified referees were consistent when watching the live 2016 televised Champions League Final. Referees were paired off into three separate rooms. Two referees watched the game with no supporters present. Two watched the game surrounded by Real Madrid supporters, and the remaining two watched the game surrounded by Athletic Madrid supporters. Referees were asked to decide whether each decision made by the on-field referee was either correct or incorrect. Results identified two types of refereeing inconsistency. The first type was a systematic tendency of the supporting crowds (both rooms) to influence the adjudicating referees to make fewer incorrect (disagree with the on-field referee) decisions (8 and 5) than referees in the "no supporters" room (19) (χ(2) = 11.22 [df = 2], P = 0.004). The second type of inconsistency was the home advantage "bias", where the surrounding crowd influenced the adjudicating referees to favour their team, by disagreeing with the decision made by the on-field referee (χ(2) = 6.0 [df = 2], P = 0.0498). One explanation for these inconsistencies is that referees adopt a coping strategy of "avoidance", i.e., when faced with difficult decisions, referees simply avoid making unpopular decisions by waving "play on".

  18. Report of analytical results from fish and salvaged eaglets

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These results summarized in this report are for fish that were collected from Crab Orchard Lake and are cross-checks with Illinois EPA. This memorandum report also...

  19. Content-Related Repairing of Inconsistencies in Distributed Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Feng Du; De-Rong Shen; Tie-Zheng Nie; Yue Kou; Ge Yu

    2016-01-01

    Conditional functional dependencies (CFDs) are a critical technique for detecting inconsistencies while they may ignore some potential inconsistencies without considering the content relationship of data. Content-related conditional functional dependencies (CCFDs) are a type of special CFDs, which combine content-related CFDs and detect potential inconsistencies by putting content-related data together. In the process of cleaning inconsistencies, detection and repairing are interactive: 1) detection catches inconsistencies, 2) repairing corrects caught inconsistencies while may bring new incon-sistencies. Besides, data are often fragmented and distributed into multiple sites. It consequently costs expensive shipment for inconsistencies cleaning. In this paper, our aim is to repair inconsistencies in distributed content-related data. We propose a framework consisting of an inconsistencies detection method and an inconsistencies repairing method, which work iteratively. The detection method marks the violated CCFDs for computing the inconsistencies which should be repaired preferentially. Based on the repairing-cost model presented in this paper, we prove that the minimum-cost repairing using CCFDs is NP-complete. Therefore, the repairing method heuristically repairs the inconsistencies with minimum cost. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of repairing, we propose distinct values and rules sequences. Distinct values make less data shipments than real data for communication. Rules sequences determine appropriate repairing sequences to avoid some incorrect repairs. Our solution is proved to be more effective than CFDs by empirical evaluation on two real-life datasets.

  20. Inconsistency of Minkowski higher-derivative theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglietti, Ugo G.; Anselmi, Damiano

    2017-02-01

    We show that Minkowski higher-derivative quantum field theories are generically inconsistent, because they generate nonlocal, non-hermitian ultraviolet divergences, which cannot be removed by means of standard renormalization procedures. By "Minkowski theories" we mean theories that are defined directly in Minkowski spacetime. The problems occur when the propagators have complex poles, so that the correlation functions cannot be obtained as the analytic continuations of their Euclidean versions. The usual power counting rules fail and are replaced by much weaker ones. Self-energies generate complex divergences proportional to inverse powers of D'Alembertians. Three-point functions give more involved nonlocal divergences, which couple to infrared effects. We illustrate the violations of the locality and hermiticity of counterterms in scalar models and higher-derivative gravity.

  1. Equilibrium policies when preferences are time inconsistent

    CERN Document Server

    Ekeland, Ivar

    2008-01-01

    This paper characterizes differentiable and subgame Markov perfect equilibria in a continuous time intertemporal decision problem with non-constant discounting. Capturing the idea of non commitment by letting the commitment period being infinitesimally small, we characterize the equilibrium strategies by a value function, which must satisfy a certain equation. The equilibrium equation is reminiscent of the classical Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation of optimal control, but with a non-local term leading to differences in qualitative behavior. As an application, we formulate an overlapping generations Ramsey model where the government maximizes a utilitarian welfare function defined as the discounted sum of successive generations' lifetime utilities. When the social discount rate is different from the private discount rate, the optimal command allocation is time inconsistent and we retain subgame perfection as a principle of intergenerational equity. Existence of multiple subgame perfect equilibria is establishe...

  2. Inconsistency of Minkowski higher-derivative theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglietti, Ugo G. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Anselmi, Damiano [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' Enrico Fermi' ' , Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    We show that Minkowski higher-derivative quantum field theories are generically inconsistent, because they generate nonlocal, non-hermitian ultraviolet divergences, which cannot be removed by means of standard renormalization procedures. By ''Minkowski theories'' we mean theories that are defined directly in Minkowski spacetime. The problems occur when the propagators have complex poles, so that the correlation functions cannot be obtained as the analytic continuations of their Euclidean versions. The usual power counting rules fail and are replaced by much weaker ones. Self-energies generate complex divergences proportional to inverse powers of D'Alembertians. Three-point functions give more involved nonlocal divergences, which couple to infrared effects. We illustrate the violations of the locality and hermiticity of counterterms in scalar models and higher-derivative gravity. (orig.)

  3. Inconsistencies in the hypophagic action of intracerebroventricular insulin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Allister, Eugenia; Pacheco-Lopez, Gustavo; Woods, Stephen C; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Insulin inhibits eating after its intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration in multiple species and under a variety of conditions. Nevertheless, the results across reports are inconsistent in that ICV insulin does not always reduce food intake. The reasons for this variability are largely unknown. Using mice as a model, we performed several crossover trials with insulin vs. vehicle when infused into the third cerebral ventricle (i3vt) to test the hypothesis that recent experience with the i3vt procedure contributes to the variability in the effect of ICV insulin on food intake. Using a cross-over design with two days between injections, we found that insulin (0.4 μU/mouse) significantly reduced food intake relative to vehicle in mice that received vehicle on the first and insulin on the second trial, whereas this effect was absent in mice that received insulin on the first and vehicle on the second trial. Higher doses (i3vt 4.0 and 40.0 μU/mouse) had no effect on food intake in this paradigm. When injections were spaced 7 days apart, insulin reduced food intake with no crossover effect. Mice that did not reduce food intake in response to higher doses of i3vt insulin did so in response to i3vt infusion of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan-II (MT-II), indicating that the function of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, which mediates the effect of insulin on eating, was not impaired by whatever interfered with the insulin effect, and that this interference occurred upstream of the melanocortin receptors. Overall, our findings suggest that associative effects based on previous experience with the experimental situation can compromise the eating inhibition elicited by i3vt administered insulin.

  4. Analysis and research on inconsistency problem between section state reported by interlock and train location reported by on board equipment%对联锁报告区段状态和车载报告列车位置信息不一致问题的分析与研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张友兵; 张波; 刘志刚

    2012-01-01

    CTCS-3级列控系统的列车走行累计误差如果过大,有可能造成联锁设备向RBC报告区段占用状态与车载设备向RBC报告列车位置之间存在信息不一致问题,导致列车运行效率降低,影响行车安全.本文针对该问题进行了数学建模,通过对模型的分析研究,说明了问题发生的原因,并提出了降低问题发生概率的方法.%In the CTCS-3, the accumulated error of the train running distance was inevitable when the train was running. If the accumulated error was too large, it was probable to cause the inconsistency problem between section state reported by interlock equipment and train location reported by on board equipment, reduce the train running efficiency and impact the traffic safety. In this paper, the mathematical model was built. With the theoretical analysis to the model, the occurrence reason of the problem was illustrated, the method of reducing the occurrence probability of this problem was put forward.

  5. 7 CFR 1205.206 - Reporting results of referendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting results of referendum. 1205.206 Section... RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Procedures for the Conduct of Referenda in Connection With Cotton Research and Promotion Order § 1205.206 Reporting results of referendum. (a) Each FSA county office shall transmit a...

  6. A Heuristic Process for Local Inconsistency Diagnosis in Firewall Rule Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Pozo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Writing and managing firewall ACLs are hard and error-prone tasks for a wide range of reasons. During these tasks, inconsistent rules can be introduced. An inconsistent firewall ACL implies in general a design error, and indicates that the firewall is accepting traffic that should be denied or vice versa. However, the administrator is who ultimately decides if an inconsistent rule is a fault or not. Although many algorithms to diagnose inconsistencies in firewall ACLs have been proposed, they have different drawbacks regarding many aspects of the consistency management problem, which can prevent their use in a wide range of real-life situations. The most important one is that they give complete and minimal results, but their algorithmic complexity is too high, making the problem intractable for even reasonably-sized ACLs. In this paper we present an analysis of the consistency diagnosis problem in firewall ACLs. Based on this analysis, we propose to split the process in several parts that can be solved sequentially: inconsistency detection and isolation, inconsistent rules identification, and inconsistency characterization. Our algorithms are the first which can solve the detection, isolation, and identification problems in quadratic time complexity, giving complete but not necessarily minimal results. A theoretical complexity analysis as well as experimental results with real ACLs is given.

  7. Structural fire resistance: Rating system manifests crude, inconsistent design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eoin O’Loughlin

    2015-05-01

    Although the concept of standard fire resistance, benchmarked against performance under normalised furnace test heating regimes, is useful in that it allows for the comparison necessary to safeguard consistency across products, design methods and geographies, the historic 15-min fire resistance increments (for example 60, 75, 90 min result in inconsistent levels of safety. Refined grades, as in fact already allowed under fire resistance testing standards, would yield significant benefits for reliability and design efficiency. The paper uses hypothetical case studies to exhibit the merits of refined fire resistance grades and explains how implementing the enhanced classification system may be readily achievable.

  8. From protocol to published report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Louise; Callréus, Torbjörn; Petersen, Lene Grejs

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unacknowledged inconsistencies in the reporting of clinical trials undermine the validity of the results of the trials. Little is known about inconsistency in the reporting of academic clinical drug trials. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of consistency between protocols and...

  9. 48 CFR 1245.508-2 - Reporting results of inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... inventories. 1245.508-2 Section 1245.508-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... 1245.508-2 Reporting results of inventories. The inventory report shall also include the following: (a) Name and title of the individual(s) that performed the physical inventory; (b) An itemized,...

  10. Final Report on SSD2 pilot results in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Hinge; Jørgensen, Kevin; Jensen, Louise Grønhøj Hørbye

    This document is the “Report on SSD2 pilot results” of the project OC/EFSA/DCM/2013/05: “Pilot project on the implementation of SSD2 in the frame of the electronic transmission of harmonised data collection of analytical results to EFSA”. The report includes a description of the software and tool...

  11. VIPER: a visualisation tool for exploring inheritance inconsistencies in genotyped pedigrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pedigree genotype datasets are used for analysing genetic inheritance and to map genetic markers and traits. Such datasets consist of hundreds of related animals genotyped for thousands of genetic markers and invariably contain multiple errors in both the pedigree structure and in the associated individual genotype data. These errors manifest as apparent inheritance inconsistencies in the pedigree, and invalidate analyses of marker inheritance patterns across the dataset. Cleaning raw datasets of bad data points (incorrect pedigree relationships, unreliable marker assays, suspect samples, bad genotype results etc.) requires expert exploration of the patterns of exposed inconsistencies in the context of the inheritance pedigree. In order to assist this process we are developing VIPER (Visual Pedigree Explorer), a software tool that integrates an inheritance-checking algorithm with a novel space-efficient pedigree visualisation, so that reported inheritance inconsistencies are overlaid on an interactive, navigable representation of the pedigree structure. Methods and results This paper describes an evaluation of how VIPER displays the different scales and types of dataset that occur experimentally, with a description of how VIPER's display interface and functionality meet the challenges presented by such data. We examine a range of possible error types found in real and simulated pedigree genotype datasets, demonstrating how these errors are exposed and explored using the VIPER interface and we evaluate the utility and usability of the interface to the domain expert. Evaluation was performed as a two stage process with the assistance of domain experts (geneticists). The initial evaluation drove the iterative implementation of further features in the software prototype, as required by the users, prior to a final functional evaluation of the pedigree display for exploring the various error types, data scales and structures. Conclusions The VIPER display was

  12. Topological Relations-Based Detection of Spatial Inconsistency in GLOBELAND30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S.; Chen, J.; Peng, S.

    2017-09-01

    Land cover is one of the fundamental data sets on environment assessment, land management and biodiversity protection, etc. Hence, data quality control of land cover is extremely critical for geospatial analysis and decision making. Due to the similar remote-sensing reflectance for some land cover types, omission and commission errors occurred in preliminary classification could result to spatial inconsistency between land cover types. In the progress of post-classification, this error checking mainly depends on manual labour to assure data quality, by which it is time-consuming and labour intensive. So a method required for automatic detection in post-classification is still an open issue. From logical inconsistency point of view, an inconsistency detection method is designed. This method consist of a grids extended 4-intersection model (GE4IM) for topological representation in single-valued space, by which three different kinds of topological relations including disjoint, touch, contain or contained-by are described, and an algorithm of region overlay for the computation of spatial inconsistency. The rules are derived from universal law in nature between water body and wetland, cultivated land and artificial surface. Through experiment conducted in Shandong Linqu County, data inconsistency can be pointed out within 6 minutes through calculation of topological inconsistency between cultivated land and artificial surface, water body and wetland. The efficiency evaluation of the presented algorithm is demonstrated by Google Earth images. Through comparative analysis, the algorithm is proved to be promising for inconsistency detection in land cover data.

  13. Inter-Method Discrepancies in Brain Volume Estimation May Drive Inconsistent Findings in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuwal, Gajendra J.; Baum, Stefi A.; Cahill, Nathan D.; Dougherty, Chase C.; Evans, Eli; Evans, David W.; Moore, Gregory J.; Michael, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies applying automatic preprocessing methods on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI) report inconsistent neuroanatomical abnormalities in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In this study we investigate inter-method differences as a possible cause behind these inconsistent findings. In particular, we focus on the estimation of the following brain volumes: gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and total intra cranial volume (TIV). T1-weighted sMRIs of 417 ASD subjects and 459 typically developing controls (TDC) from the ABIDE dataset were estimated using three popular preprocessing methods: SPM, FSL, and FreeSurfer (FS). Brain volumes estimated by the three methods were correlated but had significant inter-method differences; except TIVSPM vs. TIVFS, all inter-method differences were significant. ASD vs. TDC group differences in all brain volume estimates were dependent on the method used. SPM showed that TIV, GM, and CSF volumes of ASD were larger than TDC with statistical significance, whereas FS and FSL did not show significant differences in any of the volumes; in some cases, the direction of the differences were opposite to SPM. When methods were compared with each other, they showed differential biases for autism, and several biases were larger than ASD vs. TDC differences of the respective methods. After manual inspection, we found inter-method segmentation mismatches in the cerebellum, sub-cortical structures, and inter-sulcal CSF. In addition, to validate automated TIV estimates we performed manual segmentation on a subset of subjects. Results indicate that SPM estimates are closest to manual segmentation, followed by FS while FSL estimates were significantly lower. In summary, we show that ASD vs. TDC brain volume differences are method dependent and that these inter-method discrepancies can contribute to inconsistent neuroimaging findings in general. We suggest cross-validation across methods and emphasize the

  14. Dispelling the myth: Exploring associations between the HPV vaccine and inconsistent condom use among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Otero, Coralia; Thompson, Erika L; Daley, Ellen M; Griner, Stacey B; Logan, Rachel; Vamos, Cheryl A

    2016-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is safe and effective in preventing anogenital cancers and warts. However, myths have surrounded the HPV vaccine since its approval, including the possibility that HPV vaccinated young people are more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between HPV vaccination and engaging in inconsistent condom use in a sample of U.S. college students. A secondary data analysis of the National College Health Assessment-II (Fall 2013) was conducted in 2015. Risky sexual activity was operationalized as inconsistent condom use for oral, vaginal or anal sexual activity. Logistic regression models were stratified by sexual activity and gender, and controlled for socio-demographics and history of STIs. Inconsistent condom use was reported among females for vaginal (47%), oral (94%), and anal sex (75%); while males reported levels of inconsistency for vaginal (38%), oral (94%), and anal sex (58%). Sixty-nine percent of females reported receiving the HPV vaccine compared to 43% of males. Among females, there was no significant association between HPV vaccination and inconsistent condom use in any of the sexual activities. Among males, there was no significant association between HPV vaccination and inconsistent condom use in oral or vaginal sex. HPV-vaccinated males were less likely to report inconsistent condom use during anal sexual activity. This study contributes to the increasing evidence that HPV vaccination is not associated with risky sexual behavior. Dispelling this myth is important to facilitate uptake and completion of the HPV vaccine in the U.S.

  15. Inconsistent Student Responses in TIMSS Questionnaire Items on Mathematics Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Yıldırım

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated consistency among Turkish students’ responses to TIMSS 2007 questionnaire items on frequency of certain activities in mathematics classrooms. In Turkey, 4476 students from 143 schools participated in the study. Analyses have revealed the existence of inconsistencies in student responses as indicated by high proportion of within-class variance components. That is, students in same class specified fluctuating frequencies to certain classroom activities, showing that some factors had an affect on perception of individuals. Further analyses showed that students at different levels of mathematics achievement reported differently on frequency of classroom activities, and precise items were answered more consistently compared to items containing vague terms. Using factor scores instead of individual item responses contributed consistency of responses within classes but only to a small extent. Based on the findings, this study also provided implications for questionnaire design.

  16. Inconsistency in precipitation measurements across Alaska and Yukon border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Scaff

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study quantifies the inconsistency in gauge precipitation observations across the border of Alaska and Yukon. It analyses the precipitation measurements by the national standard gauges (NWS 8-in gauge and Nipher gauge, and the bias-corrected data to account for wind effect on the gauge catch, wetting loss and trace events. The bias corrections show a significant amount of errors in the gauge records due to the windy and cold environment in the northern areas of Alaska and Yukon. Monthly corrections increase solid precipitation by 135 % in January, 20 % for July at the Barter Island in Alaska, and about 31 % for January and 4 % for July at the Yukon stations. Regression analyses of the monthly precipitation data show a stronger correlation for the warm months (mainly rainfall than for cold month (mainly snowfall between the station pairs, and small changes in the precipitation relationship due to the bias corrections. Double mass curves also indicate changes in the cumulative precipitation over the study periods. This change leads to a smaller and inverted precipitation gradient across the border, representing a significant modification in the precipitation pattern over the northern region. Overall, this study discovers significant inconsistency in the precipitation measurements across the US and Canada border. This discontinuity is greater for snowfall than for rainfall, as gauge snowfall observations have large errors in the windy and cold conditions. This result will certainly impact regional, particularly cross borders, climate and hydrology investigations.

  17. School Counselors: Closing Achievement Gaps and Writing Results Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartline, Julie; Cobia, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Charged with closing the achievement gap for marginalized students, school counselors need to be able to identify gaps, develop interventions, evaluate effectiveness, and share results. This study examined 100 summary results reports submitted by school counselors after having received four days of training on the ASCA National Model. Findings…

  18. Compliance with results reporting at ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L; Chiswell, Karen; Peterson, Eric D; Tasneem, Asba; Topping, James; Califf, Robert M

    2015-03-12

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) mandates timely reporting of results of applicable clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov. We characterized the proportion of applicable clinical trials with publicly available results and determined independent factors associated with the reporting of results. Using an algorithm based on input from the National Library of Medicine, we identified trials that were likely to be subject to FDAAA provisions (highly likely applicable clinical trials, or HLACTs) from 2008 through 2013. We determined the proportion of HLACTs that reported results within the 12-month interval mandated by the FDAAA or at any time during the 5-year study period. We used regression models to examine characteristics associated with reporting at 12 months and throughout the 5-year study period. From all the trials at ClinicalTrials.gov, we identified 13,327 HLACTs that were terminated or completed from January 1, 2008, through August 31, 2012. Of these trials, 77.4% were classified as drug trials. A total of 36.9% of the trials were phase 2 studies, and 23.4% were phase 3 studies; 65.6% were funded by industry. Only 13.4% of trials reported summary results within 12 months after trial completion, whereas 38.3% reported results at any time up to September 27, 2013. Timely reporting was independently associated with factors such as FDA oversight, a later trial phase, and industry funding. A sample review suggested that 45% of industry-funded trials were not required to report results, as compared with 6% of trials funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and 9% of trials that were funded by other government or academic institutions. Despite ethical and legal obligations to disclose findings promptly, most HLACTs did not report results to ClinicalTrials.gov in a timely fashion during the study period. Industry-funded trials adhered to legal obligations more often than did trials funded by the NIH or other government or academic

  19. Automatic Detection and Processing of Attributes Inconsistency for Fuzzy Ontologies Merging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Luo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Semantic fusion of multiple data sources and semantic interoperability between heterogeneous systems in distributed environment can be implemented through integrating multiple fuzzy local ontologies. However, ontology merging is one of the valid ways for ontology integration. In order to solve the problem of attributes inconsistency for concept mapping in fuzzy ontology merging system, we present an automatic detection algorithm of inconsistency for the range, number and membership grade of attributes between mapping concepts, and adopt corresponding processing strategy during the fuzzy ontologies merging according to the different types of attributes inconsistency. Experiment results show that with regard to merging accuracy, the fuzzy ontology merging system in which the automatic detection algorithm and processing strategy of attributes inconsistency is embedded is better than those traditional ontology merging systems like GLUE, PROMPT and Chimaera.    

  20. Computing autocatalytic sets to unravel inconsistencies in metabolic network reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, R.; Waschina, S.; Boettger-Schmidt, D.

    2015-01-01

    by inherent inconsistencies and gaps. RESULTS: Here we present a novel method to validate metabolic network reconstructions based on the concept of autocatalytic sets. Autocatalytic sets correspond to collections of metabolites that, besides enzymes and a growth medium, are required to produce all biomass......MOTIVATION: Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions have been established as a powerful tool for the prediction of cellular phenotypes and metabolic capabilities of organisms. In recent years, the number of network reconstructions has been constantly increasing, mostly because...... of the availability of novel (semi-)automated procedures, which enabled the reconstruction of metabolic models based on individual genomes and their annotation. The resulting models are widely used in numerous applications. However, the accuracy and predictive power of network reconstructions are commonly limited...

  1. MaxReport: An Enhanced Proteomic Result Reporting Tool for MaxQuant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhou

    Full Text Available MaxQuant is a proteomic software widely used for large-scale tandem mass spectrometry data. We have designed and developed an enhanced result reporting tool for MaxQuant, named as MaxReport. This tool can optimize the results of MaxQuant and provide additional functions for result interpretation. MaxReport can generate report tables for protein N-terminal modifications. It also supports isobaric labelling based relative quantification at the protein, peptide or site level. To obtain an overview of the results, MaxReport performs general descriptive statistical analyses for both identification and quantification results. The output results of MaxReport are well organized and therefore helpful for proteomic users to better understand and share their data. The script of MaxReport, which is freely available at http://websdoor.net/bioinfo/maxreport/, is developed using Python code and is compatible across multiple systems including Windows and Linux.

  2. 49 CFR 199.229 - Reporting of alcohol testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.229 Reporting of alcohol testing results. (a) Each... 49 CFR part 40 (at § 40.25 and appendix H to part 40), not later than March 15 of each year for the...

  3. Do Declining Discount Rates lead to Time Inconsistent Economic Advice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Chr.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the risk of time inconsistency in economic appraisals related to the use of hyperbolic discounting (declining discount rates) instead of exponential discounting (constant discount rate). Many economists are uneasy about the prospects of potential time inconsistency. The paper...

  4. Differentiating Normal Variability from Inconsistency in Children's Speech: Normative Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Alison; Crosbie, Sharon; Dodd, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Background: In young, typically developing children, some word production variability is expected, but highly inconsistent speech is considered a clinical marker for disorder. Speech-language pathologists need to identify variability versus inconsistency, yet these terms are not clearly differentiated. Not only is it important to identify…

  5. Intra-Word Inconsistency in Apraxic Hebrew-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubul-Lavy, Gila

    2012-01-01

    Intra-word inconsistency in a child is perceived as an indicator of speech impairment. Because the speech of typically developing children is highly variable, the extent and nature of the inconsistency must be defined when used as a diagnostic marker of speech impairment (McLeod, S., & Hewett, S. R. (2008). Variability in the production of words…

  6. Adult Regularization of Inconsistent Input Depends on Pragmatic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfors, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of domains, adults who are given input that is only partially consistent do not discard the inconsistent portion (regularize) but rather maintain the probability of consistent and inconsistent portions in their behavior (probability match). This research investigates the possibility that adults probability match, at least in part,…

  7. 19 CFR 177.13 - Inconsistent customs decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inconsistent customs decisions. 177.13 Section 177.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ADMINISTRATIVE RULINGS General Ruling Procedure § 177.13 Inconsistent...

  8. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree information of sibs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calus Mario PL

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype information are not in agreement. Methods Straightforward tests to detect Mendelian inconsistencies exist that count the number of opposing homozygous marker (e.g. SNP genotypes between parent and offspring (PAR-OFF. Here, we develop two tests to identify Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs. The first test counts SNP with opposing homozygous genotypes between sib pairs (SIBCOUNT. The second test compares pedigree and SNP-based relationships (SIBREL. All tests iteratively remove animals based on decreasing numbers of inconsistent parents and offspring or sibs. The PAR-OFF test, followed by either SIB test, was applied to a dataset comprising 2,078 genotyped cows and 211 genotyped sires. Theoretical expectations for distributions of test statistics of all three tests were calculated and compared to empirically derived values. Type I and II error rates were calculated after applying the tests to the edited data, while Mendelian inconsistencies were introduced by permuting pedigree against genotype data for various proportions of animals. Results Both SIB tests identified animal pairs for which pedigree and genomic relationships could be considered as inconsistent by visual inspection of a scatter plot of pairwise pedigree and SNP-based relationships. After removal of 235 animals with the PAR-OFF test, SIBCOUNT (SIBREL identified 18 (22 additional inconsistent animals. Seventeen animals were identified by both methods. The numbers of incorrectly deleted animals (Type I error, were equally low for both methods, while the numbers of incorrectly non-deleted animals (Type II error, were considerably higher for SIBREL compared to SIBCOUNT. Conclusions

  9. Advancing Multi-Context Systems by Inconsistency Management

    CERN Document Server

    Weinzierl, Antonius

    2011-01-01

    Multi-Context Systems are an expressive formalism to model (possibly) non-monotonic information exchange between heterogeneous knowledge bases. Such information exchange, however, often comes with unforseen side-effects leading to violation of constraints, making the system inconsistent, and thus unusable. Although there are many approaches to assess and repair a single inconsistent knowledge base, the heterogeneous nature of Multi-Context Systems poses problems which have not yet been addressed in a satisfying way: How to identify and explain a inconsistency that spreads over multiple knowledge bases with different logical formalisms (e.g., logic programs and ontologies)? What are the causes of inconsistency if inference/information exchange is non-monotonic (e.g., absent information as cause)? How to deal with inconsistency if access to knowledge bases is restricted (e.g., companies exchange information, but do not allow arbitrary modifications to their knowledge bases)? Many traditional approaches solely a...

  10. Using PPT to correct for inconsistency in a speeded task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen; Trafimow, David; Keller, David; Hunt, Gayle; Geels, Kasha

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments employed Potential Performance Theory (PPT) to correct for inconsistency in a speeded task. In Experiment 1, a search task was employed whereby participants searched for a target letter among distracters. In Experiment 2, the search task was more complex and naturalistic-participants searched for enemy weapons in aerial photographs. Not surprisingly, the results revealed that longer search times led to greater accuracy. However, this improvement was due only in part to improved search strategies. Much, if not most, of the improvement was due to increased consistency. The authors demonstrate and discuss some of the advantages to be gained by considering a speeded task within the context of a clear and mathematically precise theory (PPT).

  11. A new manner of reporting pressure results after glaucoma surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordeianu CD

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Constantin-Dan Bordeianu1, Cristina-Eugenia Ticu21Department of Ophthalmology, Emergency Hospital, Ploiesti, Romania; 2Provisional Candidate for PhD, Edmonton, AB, CanadaPurpose: To evaluate to what extent contemporary glaucoma abstracts offer complete information and to suggest a new manner of pressure results reporting.Materials, methods, and results: Most of the 36 relevant surgical glaucoma abstracts found in one issue of International Glaucoma Review contain insufficient data-supported statements. Such abstracts cannot offer a clear picture of the study essence if economic, linguistic, or political barriers prevent access to the full text. In order to enrich abstract content and to avoid typographic space waste, a formula is suggested to provide, in one single line of symbols and figures, all the necessary data for statistical interpretation at two evolution moments: the first significative control (6 months and the final one.Conclusion: The current manner of results reporting in surgical glaucoma abstracts is subject to too little standardization, allowing insufficiently data-supported statements. Abstracts, especially those printed in small-circulation language journals, should be conceived and standardized in such a manner that any abstract review reader is capable of grasping the essence of the study at first glance. The suggested manner of reporting results would bring satisfaction to all areas of the process. Publishers would save typographic space, readers would find all the necessary data for statistical analysis and comparison with other studies, and authors would be convinced that the essence of their work would penetrate in spite of any economic, linguistic, or political barriers.Keywords: glaucoma, reporting results, IOP, abstract construction, standardization formula

  12. Foothill Transit Battery Electric Bus Demonstration Results: Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-06-28

    This report summarizes results of a battery electric bus (BEB) evaluation at Foothill Transit, located in the San Gabriel and Pomona Valley region of Los Angeles County, California. Foothill Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate its fleet of Proterra BEBs in revenue service. The focus of this evaluation is to compare performance of the BEBs to that of conventional technology and to track progress over time toward meeting performance targets. This project has also provided an opportunity for DOE to conduct a detailed evaluation of the BEBs and charging infrastructure. This is the second report summarizing the results of the BEB demonstration at Foothill Transit and it provides data on the buses from August 2015 through December 2016. Data are provided on a selection of compressed natural gas buses as a baseline comparison.

  13. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  14. Reducing Inconsistent Rules Based on Irregular Decision Table

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰轶东; 张霖; 刘连臣

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of rule extraction from data sets using the rough set method. For inconsistent rules due to improper selection of split-points during discretization, and/or to lack of information, we propose two methods to remove their inconsistency based on irregular decision tables.By using these methods, inconsistent rules are eliminated as far as possible, without affecting the remaining consistent rules. Experimental test indicates that use of the new method leads to an improvement in the mean accuracy of the extracted rules.

  15. A NOTE ON INCONSISTENCY OF THE SCORE TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumathi K

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The score test proposed by Rao (1947 has been widely used in the recent years for data analysis and model building because of its simplicity. However, at the time of its computation, it has been found that the value of the score test statistic becomes negative. Freedman (2007 discussed some of the theoretical reasons for this inconsistency of the score test and observed that the test was inconsistent when the observed Fisher information matrix was used rather than the expected Fisher information matrix. The present paper is an attempt to demonstrate the inconsistency of the score test in terms of the power function.

  16. Discrepancias entre los datos ofrecidos por la Secretaría de Salud y la Organización Mundial de la Salud sobre tuberculosis en México, 1981-1998 Inconsistencies between reports from the World Health Organization and the Ministry of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Báez-Saldaña

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Describir las tendencias de la morbilidad y mortalidad de la tuberculosis en México, entre 1981 y 1998, comparando datos de la Secretaría de Salud y de la Organización Mundial de la Salud. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizó el número de casos y tasas notificados y la tendencia de la enfermedad en los últimos años. Se calculó la incidencia de casos nuevos de tuberculosis bacilíferos mediante el riesgo anual de infección tuberculosa, con lo que se estimó el porcentaje de detección de casos bacilíferos en 1997-1998. RESULTADOS: El número de casos de tuberculosis emitido por la Organización Mundial de la Salud supera al notificado por la Secretaría de Salud, discrepancia que se ha reducido. Los casos bacilíferos se han mantenido entre 1993-1998 y se estimó una detección de 66 y de 26% en 1997 y 1998, respectivamente (para un Riesgo Anual de Infección Tuberculosa de 0.5%. La mortalidad se redujo 6.7% cada año entre 1990 y 1998 mientras que se observó un aumento de casos nuevos, lo que implica la persistencia de la transmisión de la infección entre la población. CONCLUSIONES: Hay discrepancia entre el número de casos de tuberculosis ofrecido por la Secretaría de Salud y la Organización Mundial de la Salud. De acuerdo con las estimaciones por el Riesgo Anual de Infección Tuberculosa se deja de detectar un número considerable de casos bacilíferos.OBJECTIVE: To describe the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality trends in Mexico, by comparing the data reported by the Ministry of Health (MH and the World Health Organization (WHO between 1981 and 1998. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The number of cases notified in the past few years, their rates, and the trends of the disease in Mexico were analyzed. The incidence of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was estimated for 1997 and 1998 with the annual tuberculosis infection risk (ATIR, to estimate the percentage of bacilliferous cases in 1997-1998. RESULTS: WHO reported more

  17. Inconsistent Discipline as a Mediator between Maternal Distress and Aggression in Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Tammy D.; Dunlap, Sarah T.; Lochman, John E.; Wells, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examines inconsistent discipline as a mediator in the association between maternal distress and child aggression and attention problems. Participants were 215 boys, ranging in age from 9 to 12 years, and their mothers. Mothers provided self-report data on socioeconomic status (SES), parenting stress, maternal distress (depression…

  18. Are studies reporting significant results more likely to be published?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi, Despina; Karagianni, Anthi; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore

    2009-11-01

    Our objective was to assess the hypothesis that there are variations of the proportion of articles reporting a significant effect, with a higher percentage of those articles published in journals with impact factors. The contents of 5 orthodontic journals (American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Angle Orthodontist, European Journal of Orthodontics, Journal of Orthodontics, and Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research), published between 2004 and 2008, were hand-searched. Articles with statistical analysis of data were included in the study and classified into 4 categories: behavior and psychology, biomaterials and biomechanics, diagnostic procedures and treatment, and craniofacial growth, morphology, and genetics. In total, 2622 articles were examined, with 1785 included in the analysis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied with statistical significance as the dependent variable, and whether the journal had an impact factor, the subject, and the year were the independent predictors. A higher percentage of articles showed significant results relative to those without significant associations (on average, 88% vs 12%) for those journals. Overall, these journals published significantly more studies with significant results, ranging from 75% to 90% (P = 0.02). Multivariate modeling showed that journals with impact factors had a 100% increased probability of publishing a statistically significant result compared with journals with no impact factor (odds ratio [OR], 1.99; 95% CI, 1.19-3.31). Compared with articles on biomaterials and biomechanics, all other subject categories showed lower probabilities of significant results. Nonsignificant findings in behavior and psychology and diagnosis and treatment were 1.8 (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.51-2.67) and 3.5 (OR, 3.50; 95% CI, 2.27-5.37) times more likely to be published, respectively. Journals seem to prefer reporting significant results; this might be because of authors

  19. Summary of the most significant results reported in this session

    CERN Document Server

    Sens, J C

    1980-01-01

    D1e most interesting although speculative result is the observation of a 4 standard deviation effect at 5. 3 GeV in the l)JK 0TI - and lj!K- 'ff+ mass plots (SPS Exp. WJ\\11) with a crosssection of 180 nb (assuming 1 % branching ratio). This is a cancliclatc bare b-state. + Tiw next most significant experimental result is the observation of Ac at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). TI1is state was discovered at BNL by Samios et al. and has since been seen in several neutrino experiments. It was seen at the ISR by Lockman ct al. about a year ago (reported at Budapest) but not in a convincing way. The analysis has now been improved, and the result shows a peak which is most clearly present in the stnnmed A(31T)+ and K-p1T+ mass spectra. 'TI1e signal has furthennore been seen in Exp. R606 (reported - + by F. Muller in this parallel session) in both A3TI and pK TI . 111e most convincing signal comes from the Spli t-Ficlcl Magnet (SFM) in K-pn + 'TI1e three observations together, all at the ISR, make this an...

  20. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks.

  1. Exploratory visualization software for reporting environmental survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, P; Arnot, C; Bastin, L; Dykes, J

    2001-08-01

    Environmental surveys yield three principal products: maps, a set of data tables, and a textual report. The relationships between these three elements, however, are often cumbersome to present, making full use of all the information in an integrated and systematic sense difficult. The published paper report is only a partial solution. Modern developments in computing, particularly in cartography, GIS, and hypertext, mean that it is increasingly possible to conceive of an easier and more interactive approach to the presentation of such survey results. Here, we present such an approach which links map and tabular datasets arising from a vegetation survey, allowing users ready access to a complex dataset using dynamic mapping techniques. Multimedia datasets equipped with software like this provide an exciting means of quick and easy visual data exploration and comparison. These techniques are gaining popularity across the sciences as scientists and decision-makers are presented with increasing amounts of diverse digital data. We believe that the software environment actively encourages users to make complex interrogations of the survey information, providing a new vehicle for the reader of an environmental survey report.

  2. The clinical significance on the inconsistent results of antinuclear antibody and specific auto antibody determinations%抗核抗体与特异性自身抗体检测结果不一致的临床意义分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董晓微; 胡朝军; 张道强; 李丽君; 张蜀澜; 董晓娟; 李永哲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the inconsistent results of the indirect immunofluorescence ( IIF ) assay screening for antinuclear antibodyv ANA) and linear immunoblot assay( LIA) for antinuclear antibody spectrum ( ANAs ) specific antibody, and evaluate the relationship and clinical significance. Methods The samples were determined for ANA screening by IIF and for ANAs by LIA. The patients with the results of IIF-ANA+ and LIA-ANAs and IIF-ANA' and LIA-ANAs+ were classified into autoimmune disease ( AID ) group and non-AID group. Results In the 216 cases with IIF-ANA" of AID group, The LIA-ANAs + rate was 46. 30% , and the positive rate was higher than that of non-AID group ( 20. 00% , P =0. 00 ). The ratios of LIA-ANAs( + ) and LIA-ANAs( ± ) of AID group were higher than those of non-AID group( P 0. 05 ). However, when the fluorescence titer was 2e 1: 1 280, the difference between 2 groups was statistically significant ( P 0. 05 ). Conclusions In the diagnosis of AID, besides the screening determination by IIF, it is necessary to detect the specific auto antibodies in AID patients in order to avoid the missed detection of AID.%目的 比较间接免疫荧光法(IIF)筛查抗核抗体(ANA)与线性免疫印迹法(LIA)检测抗核抗体谱(ANAs)特异性抗体结果不一致性,分析二者的相互关系及临床意义.方法 采用IIF筛查ANA和LIA检测ANAs特异性抗体,将IIF-ANA阳性/LIA-ANAs阴性和IIF-ANA阴性/LIA-ANAs阳性患者分为自身免疫性疾病(AID)组和非AID组进行比较分析.结果 216例IIF-ANA阴性AID组中,LIA-ANAs阳性率为46.30%,高于非AID组(20.00%,P=0.00);AID组LIA-ANAs(+)、LIA-ANAs(±)的比率均高于非AID组(P 0.05);而荧光滴度为≥1:1280时,2组间的差异有统计学意义(P0.05).结论 在AID的临床诊断中,除进行IIF筛查ANA外,还需根据具体情况进行特异性自身抗体的检测,避免单一方法检测导致AID患者的漏诊.

  3. Inconsistency of residents' communication performance in challenging consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, Jan C.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Communication performance inaonsistency between consultations is usually regarded as a measurement error that jeopardizes the reliability of assessments. However, inconsistency is an important phenomenon, since it indicates that physicians' communication may be below standard in some cons

  4. Spelling and Phonetic Inconsistencies in English: A Problem for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    this problem; areas of these inconsistencies and make some suggestions to ease ... these problems with examples from both the consonants and vowel sounds of ..... Composition and Correspondence (12th Ed.) Reading: Donnington Press.

  5. Governance implications of nanomaterials companies' inconsistent risk perceptions and safety practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engeman, Cassandra D. [University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Sociology (United States); Baumgartner, Lynn; Carr, Benjamin M.; Fish, Allison M.; Meyerhofer, John D. [UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Satterfield, Terre A. [University of California, Santa Barbara, NSF Center for Nanotechnology and Society (United States); Holden, Patricia A. [UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Harthorn, Barbara Herr, E-mail: harthorn@cns.ucsb.edu [University of California, Santa Barbara, NSF Center for Nanotechnology and Society (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Current research on the nanotechnology industry indicates its downstream expansion at a rapid pace, while toxicological research and best practices for environmental health and safety are still being developed. Companies that use and/or produce engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have enormous potential to influence safe-handling practices for ENMs across the product life cycle. Knowledge of both industry practices and leaders' perceptions of risk is vital for understanding how companies will act to control potential environmental and health risks. This article reports results from a new international survey of nanomaterials companies in 14 countries. In this survey, company participants reported relatively high levels of uncertainty and/or perceived risk with regard to ENMs. However, these perspectives were not accompanied by expected risk-avoidant practices or preferences for regulatory oversight. A majority of companies indicated 'lack of information' as a significant impediment to implementing nano-specific safety practices, but they also reported practices that were inconsistent with widely available guidance. Additionally, in the absence of safe-handling regulations, companies reported nano-specific health and safety programs that were narrow in scope. Taken together, these findings indicate that health and safety guidance is not reaching industry. While industry leaders' reluctance toward regulation might be expected, their own reported unsafe practices and recognition of possible risks suggest a more top-down approach from regulators is needed to protect workers and the environment.

  6. Governance implications of nanomaterials companies' inconsistent risk perceptions and safety practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeman, Cassandra D.; Baumgartner, Lynn; Carr, Benjamin M.; Fish, Allison M.; Meyerhofer, John D.; Satterfield, Terre A.; Holden, Patricia A.; Harthorn, Barbara Herr

    2012-03-01

    Current research on the nanotechnology industry indicates its downstream expansion at a rapid pace, while toxicological research and best practices for environmental health and safety are still being developed. Companies that use and/or produce engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have enormous potential to influence safe-handling practices for ENMs across the product life cycle. Knowledge of both industry practices and leaders' perceptions of risk is vital for understanding how companies will act to control potential environmental and health risks. This article reports results from a new international survey of nanomaterials companies in 14 countries. In this survey, company participants reported relatively high levels of uncertainty and/or perceived risk with regard to ENMs. However, these perspectives were not accompanied by expected risk-avoidant practices or preferences for regulatory oversight. A majority of companies indicated "lack of information" as a significant impediment to implementing nano-specific safety practices, but they also reported practices that were inconsistent with widely available guidance. Additionally, in the absence of safe-handling regulations, companies reported nano-specific health and safety programs that were narrow in scope. Taken together, these findings indicate that health and safety guidance is not reaching industry. While industry leaders' reluctance toward regulation might be expected, their own reported unsafe practices and recognition of possible risks suggest a more top-down approach from regulators is needed to protect workers and the environment.

  7. Study on consistent query answering in inconsistent databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Dong; YANG Luming

    2007-01-01

    Consistent query answering is an approach to retrieving consistent answers over databases that might be inconsistent with respect to some given integrity constraints The approach is based on a concept of repair.This paper surveys several recent researches on obtaining consistent information from inconsistent databases,such as the underlying semantic model,a number of approaches to computing consistent query answers and the computational complexity of this problem.Furthermore,the work outlines potential research directions in this area.

  8. Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Detailed Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-09-01

    independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these

  9. Profiles of inconsistent knowledge in children's pathways of conceptual change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael; Hardy, Ilonca

    2013-09-01

    Conceptual change requires learners to restructure parts of their conceptual knowledge base. Prior research has identified the fragmentation and the integration of knowledge as 2 important component processes of knowledge restructuring but remains unclear as to their relative importance and the time of their occurrence during development. Previous studies mostly were based on the categorization of answers in interview studies and led to mixed empirical results, suggesting that methodological improvements might be helpful. We assessed 161 third-graders' knowledge about floating and sinking of objects in liquids at 3 measurement points by means of multiple-choice tests. The tests assessed how strongly the children agreed with commonly found but mutually incompatible statements about floating and sinking. A latent profile transition analysis of the test scores revealed 5 profiles, some of which indicated the coexistence of inconsistent pieces of knowledge in learners. The majority of students (63%) were on 1 of 7 developmental pathways between these profiles. Thus, a child's knowledge profile at a point in time can be used to predict further development. The degree of knowledge integration decreased on some individual developmental paths, increased on others, and remained stable on still others. The study demonstrates the usefulness of explicit quantitative models of conceptual change. The results support a constructivist perspective on conceptual development, in which developmental changes of a learner's knowledge base result from idiosyncratic, yet systematic knowledge-construction processes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. [Report on threatened premature labor: etiology, management, results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzibahcian, J J; Mida, M; David, E; Weber, L; Boulanger, J C; Vitse, M

    1990-12-01

    The studies on the aetiological factors of a premature delivery constitute an old fear of obstetricians and epidemiologists. However, they remain confused and the very definition of prematurity is among the first sources of confusion. There are many therapeutic methods considered as preventive. Their efficacy is debatable whilst their secondary effects are obvious. In this article, the authors report the results of a retrospective study of observations of patients who presented threats of premature labour and analyzed the epidemiological aspects, the aetiological factors and the therapeutic methods. It seems important to consider the risk factors in order to prevent premature labour. A decrease in the use of betamimetics and an increase in that of therapies said to be of replacement does not seem to be accompanied by a relative increase in the incidence of prematurity.

  11. Report of Galeazzi fracture resulting from a ballistic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, Yale; Hellman, Michael; Haughom, Bryan; Erickson, Brandon; Szatkowski, Jan

    2014-03-10

    Galeazzi fractures are a rare injury to occur in adults, which are typically associated with high energy trauma. To our knowledge, the reported cases in the literature have only been associated with motor vehicle accidents, falls from a height, or athletic endeavors. The application of the force in the setting of a Galeazzi fracture has been disputed, but it is believed to occur with the wrist in hyperextension and pronation. We describe a 27-year-old male who presented with multiple gunshot wounds that included his right forearm. The injury sustained to his right forearm resulted in a Galeazzi fracture, which after open reduction and internal fixation, demonstrated subluxation of the distal radioulnar joint in pronation. We provide a novel mechanism of a Galeazzi fracture that demonstrates a method for sustaining the fracture pattern without the wrist in the typical position of hyperextension and pronation.

  12. An X Window system for statlab results reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, R. C.; Allen, B.; Fink, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a system that receives "stat" results encoded in Health Level Seven from the Laboratory Information System, prints a report in destination Intensive Care Units (ICUs), and captures the data for review in a custom spreadsheet format at color X-terminals located in ICUs. Available services include a reference nomogram plot of arterial blood gas data, printed summaries, automated access to the Clinical Information System and a Medline database, electronic mail, a simulated electronic calculator, and general news and information. Security mechanisms include an audit trail of user activities on the system. Noteworthy technical aspects and non-technical factors impacting success are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8130490

  13. Inconsistency measurement between two branches of LiNbO3 integrated optic Y-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuang; Yuan, Yonggui; Yang, Jun; Yu, Zhangjun; Peng, Feng; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Yu; Yuan, Libo; Hua, Yong; Shu, Ping

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the inconsistency of the polarization related performance between two branches of a packaged LiNbO3 integrated optic Y-junction. An optical path tracking method is proposed to simplify the description of polarization light transmission behavior in packaged Y-junction. By developing a simple but practical fiber test system based on white light interferometry, the interferograms representing different branches of Y-junction are detected and distinguished accurately. The inconsistencies of performance including not only conventional parameters such as polarization extinction ratio of LiNbO3 chip and crosstalk at the joint points between polarization-maintaining pigtails and chip, but also birefringence of LiNbO3 chip and power ratio of Y-junction are obtained with only one-time measurement. It is analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally for complete parameters of a packaged Y-junction. Besides, the static and dynamic measurement results reveal that performance inconsistency for both branches of Y-junction can be effectively evaluated with high accuracy. The inconsistency investigation is highly beneficial in real-time monitoring the inconsistency between two branches of Y-junction and to filtrate qualified Y-junctions.

  14. Inconsistencies among secondary sources of Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar introductions to the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Moulton

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The propagule pressure hypothesis asserts that the number of individuals released is the key determinant of whether an introduction will succeed or not. It remains to be shown whether propagule pressure is more important than either species-level or site-level factors in determining the fate of an introduction. Studies claiming to show that propagule pressure is the primary determinant of introduction success must assume that the historical record as reported by secondary sources is complete and accurate. Here, examine a widely introduced game bird, the Chukar (Alectoris chukar, to the USA. We compare the records reported by two secondary sources (Long, 1981; Lever, 1987 to those in a primary source (Christensen, 1970 and to a recent study by Sol et al. (2012. Numerous inconsistencies exist in the records reported by Sol et al. (2012, Long (1981 and Lever (1987 when compared to the primary record of Christensen (1970. As reported by Christensen (1970, very large numbers of Chukars were released unsuccessfully in some states. Our results strongly imply that factors other than sheer numbers are more important. Site-to-site differences are the most likely explanation for the variation in success.

  15. 异质性耐药对结核分枝杆菌表型和基因型耐药检测结果的影响%Heteroresistance in Mycobacteria tuberculosis is an important factor for the inconsistency between the results of phenotype and genotype drug susceptibility tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高旭; 李静; 柳清云; 沈鑫; 梅建; 高谦

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of heteroresistance on the results of genotype drug susceptibility test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis).Methods A total of 80 phenotype ofloxacin-resistant M.tuberculosis isolates obtained from Shanghai Municipal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were included in the study.The mutations of gyrA and gyrB in each isolate were identified by gene sequencing.Molecular cloning and multiplex real-time PCR melting curve assay were applied to analyze the presence of heteroresistance in those isolates that had showed no mutations by gene sequencing.Results The sequencing results showed that 15 of these 80 isolates had no mutations in gyrA or gyrB.By analyzing the sequencing chromatogram,we found that 7 of the 15 isolates had gyrA mutations.By molecular cloning and melting curve assay,we identified another 7 isolates with low frequency mutations in gyrA that had been previously identified.In total,14 isolates with heteroresistance were detected in these 15 isolates.The consistency between the results of phenotype and genotype drug susceptibility tests was increased from 81.3% (65/80) to 98.8% (79/80).Conclusions Heteroresistance is an important factor for the inconsistency between the results of phenotype and genotype drug susceptibility tests.For improving the rapid detection of drug resistant tuberculosis,novel genotypic drug susceptibility test methods with higher sensitivity should be developed and applied.%目的 研究异质性耐药对MTB基因型耐药检测结果的影响.方法 选择上海市疾病预防控制中心在2009年收集的80株氧氟沙星临床耐药菌株,利用基因测序检测菌株在gyrA和gyrB耐药决定区的基因突变情况,再用分子克隆和荧光定量PCR探针熔解曲线法,分析经基因测序未检测到耐药突变的菌株中是否存在异质性耐药现象.结果 基因测序报告显示,80株氧氟沙星耐药菌株中有15株未发现已知gyrA或gyrB耐药决

  16. On the inconsistencies related to prediction of flow into an enclosing hood obstructed by a worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaismail, Ertan; Celik, Ismail

    2010-06-01

    The recirculating flow structures formed in the wake of a worker standing in front of an enclosing fume hood were numerically investigated. Two- and three-dimensional, unsteady, laminar/turbulent computations were performed for a Reynolds number (Re) range of 1.0 x 10(3)-1.0 x 10(5). The standard k-epsilon, Renormalization group (RNG) k-epsilon, and Shear Stress Transport (SST) k-omega models were used in Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations, and the results were compared with each other and also with the previous predictions reported in the literature. Numerical issues regarding the grid convergence and the inadequacies of turbulence models that may come into play at low Reynolds numbers were addressed. On the whole, SST k-omega model was found to be promising for qualitatively accurate prediction of both steady and unsteady recirculatory flow patterns in the wake of the worker. On the other hand, the standard and RNG k-epsilon models failed in prediction of anticipated unsteadiness at low Reynolds numbers. In a more realistic three-dimensional simulation with SST k-omega model, the anticipated unsteady and recirculating flow field in the wake of the worker was captured. Present results seem to qualitatively agree with the deductions made from experimental analyses in the literature while conflicting with some aspects of the previously reported numerical results. The apparent inconsistencies observed between the current results and those published in the literature were elucidated.

  17. A Component-Based Debugging Approach for Detecting Structural Inconsistencies in Declarative Equation Based Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wan Ding; Li-Ping Chen; Fan-Li Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Object-oriented modeling with declarative equation based languages often unconsciously leads to structural inconsistencies. Component-based debugging is a new structural analysis approach that addresses this problem by analyzing the structure of each component in a model to separately locate faulty components. The analysis procedure is performed recursively based on the depth-first rule. It first generates fictitious equations for a component to establish a debugging environment, and then detects structural defects by using graph theoretical approaches to analyzing the structure of the system of equations resulting from the component. The proposed method can automatically locate components that cause the structural inconsistencies, and show the user detailed error messages. This information can be a great help in finding and localizing structural inconsistencies, and in some cases pinpoints them immediately.

  18. Inconsistency in opinions of forensic odontologists when considering bite mark evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesu, Gowri Vijay; Brown, Nathan Lee

    2016-09-01

    There has been controversy surrounding the principles of bite mark analysis, and also the opinions reached by forensic odontologists. The purpose of this study was to assess the consistency of opinions formed by forensic odontologists, both for individual odontologists after a period of time, and between odontologists. 23 forensic odontologists participated, and opinions on 4 cases per member were requested. The request was then repeated after a 8 week period. Results highlighted an inconsistency in opinions between odontologists, and also an inconsistency in opinion for individual members over time, even for experienced odontologists. Inconsistencies varied from whether the mark could be from human or animal, and also from adult or child. In conclusion, the authors recommend that bite mark evidence should be treated with caution.

  19. Canadian geothermal code for public reporting: reporting of exploration results, geothermal resources and geothermal reserves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibert, Lee [Meridian Environmental Consulting Ltd. (Canada); Hjartarson, Arnar [Mannvit Engineering (Canada); McDonald, Ian; Toohey, Brian [Nexen Inc. (Canada); McIlveen, John [Jacob Securities, (Canada); Thompson, Alison [Magma Energy Corp. (Canada); Yang, Daniel [Borealis Geopower Inc. (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    In December 2008, the Canadian geothermal code committee sponsored by the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association (CanGEA) was created with the intention of developing a code for public reporting of geothermal resources and reserves. The code was based on key elements of the Australian code which was developed in 2008 by the Australian Geothermal Energy Association in collaboration with the Australian Geothermal Energy Group. The Canadian Code was developed with the purpose of being applicable to both Canadian and international geothermal plays and to offer a reporting basis which satisfies investors, shareholders and capital markets. The Canadian Geothermal Reporting Code for Public Reporting is provided herein, it is intended for all Canadian companies and their competitors. Since reporting of geothermal results is a recent activity, this Code will require further input during its implementation.

  20. How inconsistency between attitude and behavior persists through cultural transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Takuya; Nakamaru, Mayuko

    2011-02-21

    Individuals tend to conform their behavior to that of the majority. Consequently, an individual's behavior is not always consistent with his or her attitude, and such inconsistency sometimes causes mental distress. Understanding the mechanism of sustaining inconsistency between attitude and behavior is a challenging problem from the viewpoint of evolutionary theory. We constructed an evolutionary game theory model in which each player has an attitude and behavior toward a single social norm, and the players' attitudes and behaviors are affected by three types of cultural transmission: vertical, oblique, and horizontal. We assumed that strategy is a combination of attitude and behavior and that the process of learning or transmitting the social norm depends on the life stage of each player. Adults play a coordination game in which players whose behaviors match those of the majority obtain a high payoff, which is diminished by any inconsistency between attitude and behavior. The adults' strategies are passed to newborns via vertical transmission, and the frequency of a newborn's replication of strategy is proportional to the corresponding adult's payoff. Newborns imitate behaviors of unrelated adults via oblique transmission. Juveniles change their attitudes or behaviors by observing other juveniles' behaviors or inferring other juveniles' attitudes (horizontal transmission). We conclude that the key factor for sustaining inconsistency between attitude and behavior is the ability of players to infer and imitate others' attitudes, and that oblique transmission promotes inconsistency.

  1. Inconsistent handers show higher psychopathy than consistent handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobe, Elizabeth; Desimone, Kailey

    2016-01-01

    Three hundred and forty-two university students completed the Short Dark Triad (SD3) and the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (EHI). Inconsistent handers showed higher psychopathy scores than consistent handers, and no handedness differences were observed for narcissism or Machiavellianism. Participants were further subdivided by quartile into low, moderately low, moderately high, and high psychopathy groups (non-clinical). Absolute EHI scores were equally distributed among low and moderate groups, but were significantly lower for the high psychopathy group. These findings suggest that inconsistent handedness is only associated with the upper quartile of psychopathy scores. Also, males showed significantly higher psychopathy scores than females, and the ratio of male to female inconsistent handers decreased as psychopathy score increased. No gender × handedness interaction indicated that both female and male inconsistent handers have higher psychopathy scores than consistent handers. Although significant, the effects were small and 99.6% of participants were not in the range of a potential clinical diagnosis. The reader, therefore, is strongly cautioned against equating inconsistent handedness with psychopathy.

  2. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-09-01

    Second report evaluating a fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL published its first report on the demonstration in February 2014. This report is an update to the previous report; it covers 3 full years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2014 and focuses on the final experiences and lessons learned.

  3. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  4. Small power systems study. Volume. Study results. Technical summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitney, L.R.

    1978-05-31

    The Division of Solar Technology of the Department of Energy is currently examining the market potential of a number of dispersed solar energy systems, including the small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) solar thermal power system. Small fossil-fueled generating units in the United States utility system, (i.e., investor-owned, municipal, and cooperatives) have a current capacity of approximately 8000 MW/sub e/ or about 1.5 percent of the total US electrical capacity, and provide a large potential market for small solar thermal power systems. The Small Power Systems Study has as its objective the determination of conditions under which small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) solar thermal power units can provide cost-effective electrical power to a variety of users. Potential users, in addition to the utility systems; include Department of Defense installations and applications, remote mining and/or lumbering operations, and other industrial power systems with and without cogeneration. The first year's results on the Small Power Systems Study are summarized. The data base used and the breakeven cost analysis are discussed. Information on both small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) generating units and the utility systems using them is presented as well as data on fossil fuel costs, solar plant costs, and solar insolation values. The results of a survey of Department of Defense (DOD) worldwide electrical generating capacity at its military bases and on a potential DOD application are presented. Information on a potential small solar power system experiment in the interior of Alaska is given, and a limited amount of information on a remote application which would provide power or a large open pit copper mine is presented. Volume II of this Technical Summary Report contains an inventory, by state, of the small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) generating units in the US utility system. (WHK)

  5. A General Theory of Markovian Time Inconsistent Stochastic Control Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björk, Tomas; Murgochi, Agatha

    We develop a theory for stochastic control problems which, in various ways, are time inconsistent in the sense that they do not admit a Bellman optimality principle. We attach these problems by viewing them within a game theoretic framework, and we look for Nash subgame perfect equilibrium points...... examples of time inconsistency in the literature are easily seen to be special cases of the present theory. We also prove that for every time inconsistent problem, there exists an associated time consistent problem such that the optimal control and the optimal value function for the consistent problem....... For a general controlled Markov process and a fairly general objective functional we derive an extension of the standard Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation, in the form of a system of on-linear equations, for the determination for the equilibrium strategy as well as the equilibrium value function. All known...

  6. The (mis)reporting of statistical results in psychology journals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Wicherts, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the prevalence, nature (direction), and causes of reporting errors in psychology, we checked the consistency of reported test statistics, degrees of freedom, and p values in a random sample of high- and low-impact psychology journals. In a second study, we established the generalit

  7. Accounting for Results: How Conservation Organizations Report Performance Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, Adena R.; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council—US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  8. Accounting for results: how conservation organizations report performance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, Adena R; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council-US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  9. Dimensions of poverty and inconsistent condom use among youth in urban Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff-Gore, Alena; Luke, Nancy; Wawire, Salome

    2011-10-01

    To date, research on the link between poverty and unsafe sexual behaviors has utilized limited measures of socioeconomic status and has overlooked key dimensions of poverty at the individual level. This study explored how various dimensions of socioeconomic status are associated with inconsistent condom use and how these associations vary by gender. We analyzed unique life history survey data from 261 young men and women in Kisumu, Kenya, and conducted analyses based on 959 person-months in which respondents had been sexually active in nonmarital relationships. Dependent variables were inconsistent condom use (not always using a condom) and never use of condoms. Condoms were used inconsistently in 57% of months and were never used in 31%. Corroborating existing literature, lower household wealth and lower educational attainment were associated with inconsistent condom use. Lower individual economic status (lower earned income, food insufficiency, and larger material transfers from partners) were also important determinants of inconsistent condom use. There were no significant differences in these associations by gender, with the exception of food insufficiency, which increased the risk of inconsistent condom use for young women but not for young men. None of these individual measures of socioeconomic status were associated with never use of a condom. The findings suggest that both household- and individual-level measures of socioeconomic status are important correlates of condom use and that individual economic resources play a crucial role in negotiations over the highest level of usage. The results highlight the importance of poverty in shaping sexual behavior, and, in particular, that increasing individual access to resources beyond the household, including ensuring access to food and providing educational and work opportunities, could prove to be effective strategies for decreasing the risk of HIV among youth.

  10. Handling Data Uncertainty and Inconsistency Using Multisensor Data Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed A. Abdulhafiz

    2013-01-01

    paper presents an approach to multisensor data fusion in order to decrease data uncertainty with ability to identify and handle inconsistency. The proposed approach relies on combining a modified Bayesian fusion algorithm with Kalman filtering. Three different approaches, namely, prefiltering, postfiltering and pre-postfiltering are described based on how filtering is applied to the sensor data, to the fused data or both. A case study to find the position of a mobile robot by estimating its x and y coordinates using four sensors is presented. The simulations show that combining fusion with filtering helps in handling the problem of uncertainty and inconsistency of the data.

  11. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-02-01

    This report evaluates a fuel cell electric bus demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This evaluation report covers two years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2013.

  12. Untangling inconsistent magnetic polarity records through an integrated rock magnetic analysis: A case study on Neogene sections in East Timor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, F.M.; Dekkers, M.J.; Bakker, R.R.; van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.; Zachariasse, W.J.; Tate, G.W.; McQuarrie, N.; Harris, R.; Duffy, B.

    2014-01-01

    Inconsistent polarity patterns in sediments are a common problem in magnetostratigraphic and paleomagnetic research. Multiple magnetic mineral generations result in such remanence "haystacks." Here we test whether end-member modeling of isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves as a basis

  13. Need for cognition moderates paranormal beliefs and magical ideation in inconsistent-handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Eric C; Christman, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature suggests that degree of handedness predicts gullibility and magical ideation. Inconsistent-handers (people who use their non-dominant hand for at least one common manual activity) report more magical ideation and are more gullible. The current study tested whether this effect is moderated by need for cognition. One hundred eighteen university students completed questionnaires assessing handedness, self-reported paranormal beliefs, and self-reported need for cognition. Handedness (Inconsistent vs. Consistent Right) and Need for Cognition (High vs. Low) were treated as categorical predictors. Both paranormal beliefs and magical ideation served as dependent variable's in separate analyses. Neither set of tests yielded main effects for handedness or need for cognition. However, there were a significant handedness by need for cognition interactions. Post-hoc comparisons revealed that low, but not high, need for cognition inconsistent-handers reported relatively elevated levels of paranormal belief and magical ideation. A secondary set of tests treating the predictor variables as continuous instead of categorical obtained the same overall pattern.

  14. Language Learning from Inconsistent Input: Bilingual and Monolingual Toddlers Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bree, Elise; Verhagen, Josje; Kerkhoff, Annemarie; Doedens, Willemijn; Unsworth, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines novel language learning from inconsistent input in monolingual and bilingual toddlers. We predicted an advantage for the bilingual toddlers on the basis of the structural sensitivity hypothesis. Monolingual and bilingual 24-month-olds performed two novel language learning experiments. The first contained consistent input, and…

  15. The hyperbolic factor: A measure of time inconsistency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.I.M. Rohde (Kirsten)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMany studies have found that discounting is hyperbolic rather than constant. Hyperbolic discounting induces time-inconsistent behavior and is becoming increasingly popular in economic applications. Most studies that provide evidence in favor of hyperbolic discounting either are merely

  16. Crisis in the Southwest: Bilingual Education Program Inconsistencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Yadira; Garcia, Martha; Pinuelas, Lucia; Youngs, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Staff development is too often inadequate or overlooked in bilingual education. Rather, bilingual educators are forced to seek outside resources and strategies because of inconsistencies in school district bilingual programs. These authors offer a "crash" course for other teachers who may be looking for solid information about bilingual…

  17. Legislation and Lifelong Learning in Canada: Inconsistencies in Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings-Magnusson, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    This review of Canadian government policy as expressed in legislation revealed inconsistencies between rhetorical and actual support for a lifelong learning agenda; the absence of the protection and sense of permanence that legislation provides to policy implementation means that any actions taken or programs created may be easily changed,…

  18. Inconsistent use of oral contraceptives in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Asaduzzaman; Trottier, Dorace A; Islam, M Ataharul

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore predictors of inconsistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) in rural Bangladesh. A total of 801 rural OC users were included in the study, about half of them (49%) missed one or more active pill(s) during the 6 months before the survey.Multivariate analysis revealed that Muslim women were 60% more likely to be inconsistent OC users compared to their non-Muslim counterparts. Women who lacked knowledge about contraindications were 60% more likely to take the pill inconsistently than were women who had the knowledge. Women who were not visited by family planning workers or did not have access to mass media were 40% more likely to be inconsistent OC users.OC users need increased information about correct OC use, which could be provided via improved access to mass media with specific messages on how to use OCs properly. Better access to the community clinics could improve the pill-taking behaviors of rural Bangladeshi women.

  19. Camera calibration correction in shape from inconsistent silhouette

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of shape from silhouette for reconstruction tasks is plagued by two types of real-world errors: camera calibration error and silhouette segmentation error. When either error is present, we call the problem the Shape from Inconsistent Silhouette (SfIS) problem. In this paper, we show how sm...

  20. The hyperbolic factor: A measure of time inconsistency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.I.M. Rohde (Kirsten)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMany studies have found that discounting is hyperbolic rather than constant. Hyperbolic discounting induces time-inconsistent behavior and is becoming increasingly popular in economic applications. Most studies that provide evidence in favor of hyperbolic discounting either are merely qu

  1. Guidelines for Reporting Quantitative Methods and Results in Primary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John M.; Plonsky, Luke; Ross, Steven J.; Schoonen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Adequate reporting of quantitative research about language learning involves careful consideration of the logic, rationale, and actions underlying both study designs and the ways in which data are analyzed. These guidelines, commissioned and vetted by the board of directors of "Language Learning," outline the basic expectations for…

  2. Guidelines for reporting quantitative methods and results in primary research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, J.M.; Plonsky, L.; Ross, S.J.; Schoonen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate reporting of quantitative research about language learning involves careful consideration of the logic, rationale, and actions underlying both study designs and the ways in which data are analyzed. These guidelines, commissioned and vetted by the board of directors of Language Learning, out

  3. Guidelines for reporting quantitative methods and results in primary research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, J.M.; Plonsky, L.; Ross, S.J.; Schoonen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate reporting of quantitative research about language learning involves careful consideration of the logic, rationale, and actions underlying both study designs and the ways in which data are analyzed. These guidelines, commissioned and vetted by the board of directors of Language Learning,

  4. Guidelines for Reporting Quantitative Methods and Results in Primary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John M.; Plonsky, Luke; Ross, Steven J.; Schoonen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Adequate reporting of quantitative research about language learning involves careful consideration of the logic, rationale, and actions underlying both study designs and the ways in which data are analyzed. These guidelines, commissioned and vetted by the board of directors of "Language Learning," outline the basic expectations for…

  5. 48 CFR 3045.508-2 - Reporting results of inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... inventories. 3045.508-2 Section 3045.508-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... inventories. The inventory report shall also include the following: (a) Name and title of the individual(s) that performed the physical inventory; (b) An itemized, categorized listing of all property...

  6. The not so unique Global Trade Identification Number : Exploring inconsistencies in online product information sources

    OpenAIRE

    Karpischek, Stephan; Michahelles, Florian; Fleisch, Elgar

    2011-01-01

    Mobile shopping apps for consumers often identify retail products by Global Trade Identification Number (GTIN) using barcodes or RFID technology and rely on online data sources to provide basic product information. Several different sources exist, and reports show that the available product information in them is often inconsistent with implications for both retail businesses and consumers. In this paper we compare the product information provided by 10 different online sources for more than ...

  7. Report on results of current and future metal casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carlson, Neil N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-28

    New modeling capabilities needed to simulate the casting of metallic fuels are added to Truchas code. In this report we summarize improvements we made in FY2015 in three areas; (1) Analysis of new casting experiments conducted with BCS and EFL designs, (2) the simulation of INL’s U-Zr casting experiments with Flow3D computer program, (3) the implementation of surface tension model into Truchas for unstructured mesh required to run U-Zr casting.

  8. Inconsistent Responding on the MMPI-2-RF and Uncooperative Attitude: Evidence From Cognitive Performance Validity Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Roger O; Tarescavage, Anthony M; Greiffenstein, Manfred F; Wygant, Dustin B; Deslauriers, Cheryl; Arends, Patricia

    2017-06-19

    It is generally well understood that possible reasons for inconsistent responding on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF), as measured by the Variable Response Inconsistency (VRIN-r) and True Response Inconsistency (TRIN-r) scales, include reading or language limitations, cognitive impairment, and intentional random responding; however, the interpretive recommendations for the test suggest that higher scores on these scales can also result from an uncooperative test-taking approach. This study utilized a sample of 3,457 predominately non-head injury disability claimants to examine the association between inconsistent responding on the MMPI-2-RF and performance on cognitive tests as well performance validity tests (PVTs), an independent indicator of uncooperative test-taking attitude. Analysis of variance found that both VRIN-r and TRIN-r were associated with statistically lower cognitive test scores. These analyses also supported that TRIN-r was associated with poor performance on collaterally administered PVTs in a subsample of individuals with average reading levels. Illustrating the practical effects of these results, in follow-up relative risk ratio analyses, individuals with elevations on TRIN-r were at up to five times greater risk of PVT failure than those without elevations. Overall, the results of this study provide some support for the interpretation that inconsistent responding on the MMPI-2-RF is associated not only with cognitive/reading problems or limitations but also an uncooperative test-taking approach, particularly for elevated TRIN-r scores. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Automated generation of node-splitting models for assessment of inconsistency in network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Valkenhoef, Gert; Dias, Sofia; Ades, A E; Welton, Nicky J

    2016-03-01

    Network meta-analysis enables the simultaneous synthesis of a network of clinical trials comparing any number of treatments. Potential inconsistencies between estimates of relative treatment effects are an important concern, and several methods to detect inconsistency have been proposed. This paper is concerned with the node-splitting approach, which is particularly attractive because of its straightforward interpretation, contrasting estimates from both direct and indirect evidence. However, node-splitting analyses are labour-intensive because each comparison of interest requires a separate model. It would be advantageous if node-splitting models could be estimated automatically for all comparisons of interest. We present an unambiguous decision rule to choose which comparisons to split, and prove that it selects only comparisons in potentially inconsistent loops in the network, and that all potentially inconsistent loops in the network are investigated. Moreover, the decision rule circumvents problems with the parameterisation of multi-arm trials, ensuring that model generation is trivial in all cases. Thus, our methods eliminate most of the manual work involved in using the node-splitting approach, enabling the analyst to focus on interpreting the results.

  10. Report - Results of survey on child care needs - 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, Genevieve; Weymaere, Emeline; Trilhe, Philippe; Palluel, Stephanie; Mangiorou, Maria-Anna; Mondlane, Bruna; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2017-01-01

    In June 2016, a working group reporting to the Director for Finance and Human Resources was established to study the sustainability of CERN nursery and school services. Among actions taken by the working group, a survey was carried out to achieve a better understanding of the needs of CERN families for child care and educational structures, to identify which services are in highest demand (e.g. crèche or early years, primary schooling) and to understand the expectations and preferences of CERN families regarding these services.

  11. Biases in judging victims and suspects whose statements are inconsistent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Lindsay C; Lamb, Michael E

    2010-02-01

    In this commentary, we point to similarities in characteristics of suspect and victim/witness statements and the underlying motivations of these individuals. Despite the similarities, there are differences in how such statements are evaluated by fact-finders and investigators. Retractions, for example, cast serious doubt on the credibility of victims/witnesses but appear not to diminish the power of confessions. Investigators need to recognize the wide range of motivations behind statements made to the authorities and be mindful of biased dispositions to doubt victims and believe confessors, especially when their statements are inconsistent or retracted. An investigative process that was entirely transparent would help ensure that inconsistencies and retractions, whether in statements from victims, witnesses, or suspects, are viewed in the context of other statements and eliciting circumstances.

  12. Time-Inconsistent Stochastic Linear--Quadratic Control

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ying; Zhou, Xun Yu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate a general time-inconsistent stochastic linear--quadratic (LQ) control problem. The time-inconsistency arises from the presence of a quadratic term of the expected state as well as a state-dependent term in the objective functional. We define an equilibrium, instead of optimal, solution within the class of open-loop controls, and derive a sufficient condition for equilibrium controls via a flow of forward--backward stochastic differential equations. When the state is one dimensional and the coefficients in the problem are all deterministic, we find an explicit equilibrium control. As an application, we then consider a mean-variance portfolio selection model in a complete financial market where the risk-free rate is a deterministic function of time but all the other market parameters are possibly stochastic processes. Applying the general sufficient condition, we obtain explicit equilibrium strategies when the risk premium is both deterministic and stochastic.

  13. Correlates of Inconsistent Refusal of Unprotected Sex among Armenian Female Sex Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Markosyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence and correlates of inconsistent refusal of unprotected sex among female sex workers (FSWs in Armenia. One hundred and eighteen street-based FSWs between the ages of 20 and 52 completed a questionnaire assessing FSWs’ demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics. A total of 52.5% (n=62 of FSWs reported inconsistent refusal of unprotected sex with clients in the past 3 months. Logistic regression analysis controlling for participants’ age and education revealed that perceiving more barriers toward condom use (AOR = 1.1; P<0.01, reporting more types of abuse (AOR = 2.1; P<0.01, and setting lower fees for service (AOR = 0.9; P=0.02 significantly predicted inconsistent refusal of unprotected sex. HIV-risk-reduction behavioral interventions tailored to FSWs working in Yerevan Armenia should address the factors identified in this study toward the goal of enhancing refusal of unprotected sex and ultimately preventing acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs including HIV.

  14. @tComment: Testing Javadoc Comments to Detect Comment-Code Inconsistencies

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Shin Hwei; Tan, Lin; Leavens, Gary T

    2012-01-01

    Code comments are important artifacts in software. Javadoc comments are widely used in Java for API specifications. API developers write Javadoc comments, and API users read these comments to understand the API, e.g., reading a Javadoc comment for a method instead of reading the method body. An inconsistency between the Javadoc comment and body for a method indicates either a fault in the body or, effectively, a fault in the comment that can mislead the method callers to introduce faults in their code. We present a novel approach, called @TCOMMENT, for testing Javadoc comments, specifically method properties about null values and related exceptions. Our approach consists of two components. The first component takes as input source files for a Java project and automatically analyzes the English text in Javadoc comments to infer a set of likely properties for a method in the files. The second component generates random tests for these methods, checks the inferred properties, and reports inconsistencies. We eval...

  15. A report on the psychological test results of battering parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, C A

    1977-09-01

    The short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Cattell's 16PF test have been given to patients attending the National Advisory Centre on the Battered Child (NSPCC) and in the case of the personality questionnaire the results compared to non-battering control adults' scores. The intelligence levels of battering parents conform to normal expectation although there is a non-significant trend to marginally lower than normal results especially in verbal tests. The 16PF test reveals immature impetuosity on the part of the mothers as a main finding and introversion in the fathers. The relevance of these findings to battering is discussed.

  16. Chordoma. Report on treatment results in eighteen cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybeert, M.L.M.; Meerwaldt, J.H.

    1986-01-15

    Eighteen patients with a proven histologic diagnosis of chordoma were treated between 1949 and 1982. Four patients received only surgery, 4 patients only radiation therapy, and 10 patients received surgery and postoperative radiation therapy to a varying dose. The results suggest that a higher radiation dose gives longer recurrence-free survival, and that the best long term results can be achieved by combining surgery - as radically as possible - with radiation therapy to a dose level of 60 to 65 Gy. In view of the number of marginal recurrences (2 out of the 14 patients who received radiation therapy), the importance of choosing the right treatment volume is stressed.

  17. Summary of the most significant results reported in this session

    CERN Document Server

    Van De Walle, R T

    1980-01-01

    In the following a summary is presented of five parallel sessions on light quark had- ron spectroscopy. In general all topics which were discussed in the plenary sessions, and for which the proceedings contain separate (invited) papers, will be left out; only occa- sionally (and for reasons of completeness) will we make a reference to these presentations. Several other restrictions can be made. Nearly all papers submitted to the (parallel) hadron spectroscopy sessions were experimenta1 1 ), the only exceptions being a series of four theoretical papers on the baryonium problem. Furthermore, there was virtually no new information concerning the 'classical' baryons. In particular, no new facts were submitted on the problem of the possible existence of baryon states outside the so-called minimal spectrum, i.e. outside {56,L+ } and {70,L-dd}, the existence of the {ZO}'s, and the exis- even o tence of (baryon) exotic states. There was one contribution on a 'possible' new:".* 2 ), and a report on the final measureme...

  18. Mortality resulting from head injury in professional boxing: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lissa C; Newman, C Benjamin; Volk, Hunter; Svinth, Joseph R; Conklin, Jordan; Levy, Michael L

    2010-08-01

    The majority of boxing-related fatalities result from traumatic brain injury. Biomechanical forces in boxing result in rotational acceleration with resultant subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injury. Given the inherent risk and the ongoing criticism boxing has received, we evaluated mortalities associated with professional boxing. We used the Velazquez Fatality Collection of boxing injuries and supplementary sources to analyze mortality from 1950 to 2007. Variables evaluated included age at time of death, association with knockout or other outcome of match, rounds fought, weight class, location of fight, and location of preterminal event. There were 339 mortalities between 1950 and 2007 (mean age, 24 +/- 3.8 years); 64% were associated with knockout and 15% with technical knockout. A higher percentage occurred in the lower weight classes. The preterminal event occurred in the ring (61%), in the locker room (17%), and outside the arena (22%). We evaluated for significant changes after 1983 when championship bouts were reduced from 15 to 12 rounds. There was a significant decline in mortality after 1983. We found no significant variables to support that this decline is related to a reduction in rounds. Rather, we hypothesize the decline to be the result of a reduction in exposure to repetitive head trauma (shorter careers and fewer fights), along with increased medical oversight and stricter safety regulations. Increased efforts should be made to improve medical supervision of boxers. Mandatory central nervous system imaging after a knockout could lead to a significant reduction in associated mortality.

  19. Enova results and activities report 2008; Resultat- og aktivitetsrapport 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Enova's results in 2008 was 2,15 TWh in saved and produces renewable energy. Totally Enova has contributed by activate environmental friendly energy projects equivalent 11,6 TWh up to 2009. This is a good step towards Enova's long-term goal and corresponding to an amount of approximately 10 % of Norway's united consumption of energy throughout a year. (AG). refs., figs., tabs., ills

  20. Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, John M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Dongsheng [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-03-31

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  1. TMED-4 INTERIM REPORT PURE ZR EQUILIBRIUM TEST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P.; Morgan, G.

    2010-12-17

    Due to higher than expected permeation rates in the production of tritium in the TVA, a development and testing program was implemented to develop the understanding of why the higher rates were occurring. In addition, improved data are needed for both the design as well as the predictive models. One part of the program was to determine the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen and tritium over NPZ (1). During the course of this testing, some curious results were discovered (2) compared to the published literature data (3). Due to these apparently results, a follow-on task was undertaken to determine the equilibrium pressure of protium and deuterium over pure zirconium. A series of experiments were conducted to determine equilibrium pressures and isotherm data for the zirconium - protium and zirconium - deuterium systems. The data match the published literature data reasonably well with the plateau extending to loadings of about 1.4. There is a significant pressure rise for loadings greater than 1.7.

  2. Systematic testing of literature reported genetic variation associated with coronary restenosis: results of the GENDER Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J W Verschuren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coronary restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention still remains a significant problem, despite all medical advances. Unraveling the mechanisms leading to restenosis development remains challenging. Many studies have identified genetic markers associated with restenosis, but consistent replication of the reported markers is scarce. The aim of the current study was to analyze the joined effect of previously in literature reported candidate genes for restenosis in the GENetic DEterminants of Restenosis (GENDER databank. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Candidate genes were selected using a MEDLINE search including the terms 'genetic polymorphism' and 'coronary restenosis'. The final set included 36 genes. Subsequently, all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomic region of these genes were analyzed in GENDER using set-based analysis in PLINK. The GENDER databank contains genotypic data of 2,571,586 SNPs of 295 cases with restenosis and 571 matched controls. The set, including all 36 literature reported genes, was, indeed, significantly associated with restenosis, p = 0.024 in the GENDER study. Subsequent analyses of the individual genes demonstrated that the observed association of the complete set was determined by 6 of the 36 genes. CONCLUSION: Despite overt inconsistencies in literature, with regard to individual candidate gene studies, this is the first study demonstrating that the joint effect of all these genes together, indeed, is associated with restenosis.

  3. Dot Hill reports third quarter 2001 results operating results continue to improve

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Dot Hill Systems Corp., a leading supplier of carrier-class data storage and storage area network solutions announced slighly improved financial results for the period ending Sept. 30, 2001. Of their products, SANnet Axis and the SANnet 7100 Fibre Channel storage system were selected as the essential storage components for the GRID demonstration at the High Performance Networking Forum Conference at CERN.

  4. Neural mechanisms of selective exposure: an EEG study on the processing of decision-consistent and inconsistent information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Reinweber, Matthias; Vogrincic, Claudia; Schäfer, Axel; Schienle, Anne; Volberg, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Decision makers tend to prefer decision-consistent information and/or neglect decision-inconsistent information (selective exposure). In the present EEG study the neural mechanisms of the classic selective exposure effect were examined by investigating oscillatory brain responses to consistent vs. inconsistent information. Twenty participants made an economic decision and subsequently were exposed to 45 consistent and 45 inconsistent images concerning their decision. EEG was recorded from 31 electrodes and differences between oscillatory brain responses towards consistent and inconsistent information were examined. The main result was an increase of induced theta power (5-8Hz, 0-0.7s) in the consistent compared to the inconsistent condition at right temporo-parietal electrodes, as well as a corresponding increase of evoked theta power at frontal electrodes. Since theta oscillations are often observed during memory formation, we conclude that decision-consistent information triggers memory formation, whereas decision-inconsistent information seems not to do so. This finding supports the classic motivational perspective of Leon Festinger on the selective exposure effect.

  5. Final Technical Report. Results of Phases 2-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, David [Arizona Public Service Company (APS), Phoenix, AZ (United States); Ayyanar, Raja [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Gemin, Paul [General Electric, Fairfield, CT (United States); Baggu, Murali [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Srinivasan, Devarajan [ViaSol Energy Solutions, LLC, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-02-27

    APS’s renewable energy portfolio, driven in part by Arizona’s Renewable Energy Standard (RES) currently includes more than 1100 MW of installed capacity, equating to roughly 3000 GWh of annual production. Overall renewable production is expected to grow to 6000 GWh by 2025. It is expected that distributed photovoltaics, driven primarily by lower cost, will contribute to much of this growth and that by 2025, distributed installations will account for half of all renewable production (3000GHW). As solar penetration increases, additional analysis may be required for routine utility processes to ensure continued safe and reliable operation of the electric distribution network. Such processes include residential or commercial interconnection requests and load shifting during normal feeder operations. Circuits with existing high solar penetration will also have to be studied and results will need to be evaluated for adherence to utility practices or strategy. Increased distributed PV penetration may offer benefits such as load offsetting, but it also has the potential to adversely impact distribution system operation. These effects may be exacerbated by the rapid variability of PV production. Detailed effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications continue to be studied. Comprehensive, high-resolution electrical models of the distribution system were developed to analyze the impacts of PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including coordination and anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/VAr control schemes. Modeling methods were refined by validating against field measurements. To augment the field measurements, methods were developed to synthesize high resolution load and PV generation data to facilitate quasi-static time series simulations. The models were then extended to explore boundary conditions for PV hosting capability of the feeder and to simulate common utility practices such as feeder

  6. COMPARISON BETWEEN ULTRASONOGRAPHY RESULTS AND RESULTS OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN SHOULDER PATHOLOGY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmela Filipović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The common pathological condition of the shoulder joint is rotator cuff diseases. Patient, 68 years, had pain in the shoulder with limited joint mobility. After clinical examination, blood tests (SE >100 nmol/L, CSF normal, hypergamma- globulinemia and radiographic examination (bone dilution with deformities of the humeral head, a solitary plasmocytoma was suspected. This diagnosis was excluded after biopsy. Patient was referred to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the shoulder, so ultrasonographic (US examination was performed. Our case study points to comparability between US and MRI results regarding tendinitis of muscles in the rotator cuff. By applying both diagnostic methods, calcifications within muscle tendons were evident. Sonography is faster, cheaper, more accessible and readily available method that certainly is a valuable tool for clinicians when it comes to rotator cuff lesions.

  7. 18- and 24-month-olds' discrimination of gender-consistent and inconsistent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sara E; Flom, Ross

    2007-02-01

    18- and 24-month-olds' ability to discriminate gender-stereotyped activities was assessed. Using a preferential looking paradigm, toddlers viewed male and female actors performing masculine and feminine-stereotyped activities. Consistent with our predictions, and previous research, 24-month-olds, but not 18-month-olds, looked longer at the gender-inconsistent activities than the gender-consistent activities. Results are discussed in terms of toddlers emerging gender stereotypes and perception of everyday events.

  8. The inconsistent definitions for tuberculosis currently used in the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W X Shandera

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: There is much confusion in the categorization of clinical tuberculosis. The standardized WHO, CDC, and ATS definitions are not always adhered to in collating and analyzing tuberculosis data by authors studying extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The recommendation that pleural disease be considered extrapulmonary is not adhered to in a sizable percentage (32% of studies and the exclusion of disseminated or miliary disease in a subset of patients is also inconsistent. More restrictive guidelines are needed in the definitions used for tuberculosis so that studies and meta-analyses can be performed with greater validity.

  9. The inconsistent definitions used for tuberculosis in the medical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Xavier Shandera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the confusion attendant with current definitions of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, pleural and miliary disease, a set of 37 papers published which analyzed disease states were assessed for how the terms adhered to official definitions of the American Thoracic Society, the World Health Organization, and the Centers for Disease Control. The findings showed uncertainties in the classification of extrapulmonary disease, a frequent inconsistency in the inclusion of pleural disease within pulmonary rather than extrapulmonary disease, and the ambivalent use of the terms pleural and disseminated tuberculosis. Further attention by editors and authors is needed in the use of tuberculosis definitions.

  10. On Anne Bradstreet’s Inconsistency with Puritanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玲玲

    2014-01-01

    Anne Bradstreet, the first American poet, is popular among the puritan community. Yet a close examination of her po⁃etry reveals her belying inconsistency with the Puritan values. While Puritan community devoted itself to the religious, disliked virtually every kind of recreation including literature and prejudiced against the female, Anne Bradstreet passionately expresses the secular pains and joys and firmly asserts the role of the poetry and the female. Her popularity among the Puritans both proves a success of her strategy and indicates Puritan society’s certain flexibility and tolerance.

  11. Phonological awareness, reading accuracy and spelling ability of children with inconsistent phonological disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Alison; Farrier, Faith; Dodd, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Although children with speech disorder are at increased risk of literacy impairments, many learn to read and spell without difficulty. They are also a heterogeneous population in terms of the number and type of speech errors and their identified speech processing deficits. One problem lies in determining which preschool children with speech disorder will have difficulties acquiring literacy skills. Two studies are presented that investigate the relationship between speech disorders and literacy. The first examined the phonological awareness abilities of children with different types of speech difficulties. The second study investigated the literacy skills of children with a history of inconsistent speech disorder. Experiment 1 measured the syllable segmentation, rhyme awareness and alliteration awareness of 61 preschool children: 46 with speech disorder (14 with delayed development, 17 who made consistent non-developmental errors, and 15 who made inconsistent errors) and 15 typically developing controls. Experiment 2 assessed the reading accuracy, spelling and phonological awareness abilities of nine 7-year-old children with a history of inconsistent phonological errors. The first study indicated unexpected patterns of performance. While the Delayed group performed less well than controls on all tasks, the Consistent group showed poor performance on rhyme and alliteration but appropriate performance on syllable segmentation. The Inconsistent group performed most poorly on syllable segmentation but no differently from controls on the other two tasks. The second study indicated that children with a history of inconsistent phonological disorder performed no differently from controls on measures of phonological awareness and reading, but less well on measures of spelling ability. The results support classification of speech disorders and show a differentiation of phonological awareness skills across groups. Children with consistent atypical speech errors have poor

  12. Some difficulties and inconsistencies when using habit strength and reasoned action variables in models of metered household water conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Bradley S; Martin, John F; Pearce, Meryl; Willis, Eileen

    2013-01-30

    Research employing household water consumption data has sought to test models of water demand and conservation using variables from attitude theory. A significant, albeit unrecognised, challenge has been that attitude models describe individual-level motivations while consumption data is recorded at the household level thereby creating inconsistency between units of theory and measurement. This study employs structural equation modelling and moderated regression techniques to addresses the level of analysis problem, and tests hypotheses by isolating effects on water conservation in single-person households. Furthermore, the results question the explanatory utility of habit strength, perceived behavioural control, and intentions for understanding metered water conservation in single-person households. For example, evidence that intentions predict water conservation or that they interact with habit strength in single-person households was contrary to theoretical expectations. On the other hand, habit strength, self-reports of past water conservation, and perceived behavioural control were good predictors of intentions to conserve water.

  13. Selection of effective EEG channels in brain computer interfaces based on inconsistencies of classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huijuan; Guan, Cuntai; Ang, Kai Keng; Phua, Kok Soon; Wang, Chuanchu

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel method to select the effective Electroencephalography (EEG) channels for the motor imagery tasks based on the inconsistencies from multiple classifiers. The inconsistency criterion for channel selection was designed based on the fluctuation of the classification accuracies among different classifiers when the noisy channels were included. These noisy channels were then identified and removed till a required number of channels was selected or a predefined classification accuracy with reference to baseline was obtained. Experiments conducted on a data set of 13 healthy subjects performing hand grasping and idle revealed that the EEG channels from the motor area were most frequently selected. Furthermore, the mean increases of 4.07%, 3.10% and 1.77% of the averaged accuracies in comparison with the four existing channel selection methods were achieved for the non-feedback, feedback and calibration sessions, respectively, by selecting as low as seven channels. These results further validated the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  14. Poisson׳s ratio of arterial wall - Inconsistency of constitutive models with experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skacel, Pavel; Bursa, Jiri

    2016-02-01

    Poisson׳s ratio of fibrous soft tissues is analyzed in this paper on the basis of constitutive models and experimental data. Three different up-to-date constitutive models accounting for the dispersion of fibre orientations are analyzed. Their predictions of the anisotropic Poisson׳s ratios are investigated under finite strain conditions together with the effects of specific orientation distribution functions and of other parameters. The applied constitutive models predict the tendency to lower (or even negative) out-of-plane Poisson׳s ratio. New experimental data of porcine arterial layer under uniaxial tension in orthogonal directions are also presented and compared with the theoretical predictions and other literature data. The results point out the typical features of recent constitutive models with fibres concentrated in circumferential-axial plane of arterial layers and their potential inconsistence with some experimental data. The volumetric (in)compressibility of arterial tissues is also discussed as an eventual and significant factor influencing this inconsistency.

  15. Sensitivity of alpine glacial change detection and mass balance to sampling and datum inconsistencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Goulden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glacial mass balance estimated through the geodetic method requires glacial surface coordinate observations from historical and contemporary sources. Contemporary observations and historical topographic maps are typically referenced to separate horizontal and vertical datums and observed with different sampling intervals. This research demonstrates the sensitivity of glacial change detection to the datum considerations and sampling schemes through case studies of Andrei, Bridge and Peyto glaciers in Western Canada. To simulate the procedure of observing the glacial surfaces, profile lines were sampled from Digital Elevation Model (DEMs on contour intervals for historical data and horizontal intervals for contemporary data. Profile lines from the following scenarios were compared: (1 different horizontal and vertical sampling schemes; (2 the horizontal datum was correctly reconciled but the vertical datum was not; (3 the vertical datum was correctly reconciled but the horizontal datum was not; (4 both the horizontal and vertical datums were correctly reconciled; and (5 both the horizontal and vertical datums were incorrectly reconciled. Vertical errors of up to 6.9 m, 6.0 m and 5.0 m were observed due to sampling effects and vertical errors of 22.2 m, 9.9 m and 55.0 m were observed due to datum inconsistencies on Bridge, Andrei and Peyto glacier respectively. Horizontal datum inconsistencies manifested as erratic levels of growth or downwasting along the glacial surface profile and vertical datum errors manifested as a consistent vertical offset. Datum inconsistencies were identified to contribute errors of up to 257.2 × 106 m3 (or 87% and 54.6 × 106 m3 (or 580% of estimated volume change below and above the equilibrium line respectively on Peyto Glacier. The results of this study provide an estimate of typical errors due to sampling constraints or datum inconsistencies as well as guidance for

  16. Divergent hemispheric reasoning strategies: reducing uncertainty versus resolving inconsistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinsek, Nicole; Turner, Benjamin O.; Gazzaniga, Michael; Miller, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence from diverse research domains suggest that the left and right hemispheres play distinct, yet complementary, roles in inferential reasoning. Here, we review research on split-brain patients, brain-damaged patients, delusional patients, and healthy individuals that suggests that the left hemisphere tends to create explanations, make inferences, and bridge gaps in information, while the right hemisphere tends to detect conflict, update beliefs, support mental set-shifts, and monitor and inhibit behavior. Based on this evidence, we propose that the left hemisphere specializes in creating hypotheses and representing causality, while the right hemisphere specializes in evaluating hypotheses, and rejecting those that are implausible or inconsistent with other evidence. In sum, we suggest that, in the domain of inferential reasoning, the left hemisphere strives to reduce uncertainty while the right hemisphere strives to resolve inconsistency. The hemispheres’ divergent inferential reasoning strategies may contribute to flexible, complex reasoning in the healthy brain, and disruption in these systems may explain reasoning deficits in the unhealthy brain. PMID:25374526

  17. Alternative Conditions to Time Inconsistency Equilibrium of an International Monetary Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Bastanifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monetary policy rule is an approach to avoid time inconsistency problem as regarded by new classical economist to choose a time plan for policy making in order to maximize households’ well-being. The foundation of time inconsistency problem is not coincidence of expectations as an ex-ante variable, which is expected variable, with actual variable as an ex-post variable. Expectations in Finn Kydland and Edward Prescott as the 2004 laureates of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, is rational and formed only by a representative agent because of the discretionary policy of benevolent planner. However the benevolent planner may be as an international planner. In this paper, we develop the model of Kydland and Prescott, by substituting the assumption of heterogeneous households (a domestic household and foreign household instead of a representative agent and using heterogeneous beliefs. The recent assumption helps us to have an alternative time inconsistency equilibrium with at least two different sources of expectations, which is called Dichotomy Sources of Expectations (DSE as the main contribution of this paper .We then use expectations-adjusted Phillips curve to see the conditions of time inconsistency of k percent monetary rule of Friedman in a framework of DSE’s Model. The results show that expectations-adjusted Phillips curve in a society with DSE is not vertical and Friedman's k-percent rule may not be optimal. We find out that, not only an international benevolent planner but also a foreign household must set a rule to maximize the well-being of the world. Indeed, we need a multi-dimensional rule for any international monetary policy.

  18. A Stylistic and Proficiency-based Approach to EFL Learners’ Performance Inconsistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam-Reza Abbasian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance deficiencies and inconsistencies among SLA or FL learners can be attributed to variety of sources including both systemic (i.e., language issues and individual variables.  Contrary to a rich background, the literature still suffers from a gap as far as delving into the issue from language proficiency and learning style is concerned. To fill the gap, this study addressed EFL learners’ interlanguage performance (i.e., error types in the light of their learning styles and language proficiency levels.  Participants were 73 Iranian graduate EFL learners, who received the Michigan proficiency tests along with the Perceptual Learning-Style Preference Questionnaire (of Reid in order to measure their language proficiency level and learning style types. For the purpose of the study they were divided into pre-intermediate, intermediate and upper-intermediate levels. To explore their performance inconsistencies, both oral data from an semi-structured (SST interview and written data based on an on-the-spot piece of writing were used and then classified based on Corder’s (1971 scheme into pre-systematic, systematic and post-systematic errors.   The results revealed significant relationships among the target variables, if not predictor-predicted relationships. The non-linear relationship among the variable underscores significance of an integrative approach to EFL learner’s performance inconsistencies and the importance of stylistic instruction in EFL contexts.

  19. The Voice of Exit - Towards a Theory of Democratic Inconsistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Goli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The international armed conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan are only the most apparent manifestation of the dilemmas that challenge the European liberal democracy. A much more crucial paradox, as far as certain European countries are concerned, is produced by the inertia of the democratic game it self. That is the construction of religious and ethnic affiliation as the very entrance ticket for immigrant populations to political participation. Taking departure in populism as the common denominator for major actors, as well as the characterising feature of the very arena for political competition between elites, e.g. media, the tendency becomes more and more obvious. Based on empirical evidences with Denmark as a critical case, that is both with regard to democracy and participation, this article introduces a “Theoretical proposition of Democratic Inconsistency”, arguing for the emergence of a new development in liberal democracy, addressing a situation characterised by a growing ethnic division of specific European counties.

  20. Science Column: Measuring Inconsistency Methods for Evidentiary Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Cohen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many inconsistency analysis methods may be used to detect altered records or statements. But for admission as evidence, the reliability of the method has to be determined and measured. For example, in China, for evidence to be admitted, it has to have 95% certainty of being correct, and that certainty must be shown to the court, while in the US, evidence is admitted if it is more probative than prejudicial (a >50% standard. In either case, it is necessary to provide a measurement of some sort in order to pass muster under challenges from the other side. And in most cases, no such measurement has been undertaken.The question of how to undertake a scientific measurement to make such a determination, or at least to claim such a metric, is not well defined for digital forensics, but perhaps we can bring some light to the subject this issue.(see PDF for full column

  1. Twisted trees and inconsistency of tree estimation when gaps are treated as missing data - The impact of model mis-specification in distance corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Steel, Mike; Holder, Mark T

    2015-12-01

    Statistically consistent estimation of phylogenetic trees or gene trees is possible if pairwise sequence dissimilarities can be converted to a set of distances that are proportional to the true evolutionary distances. Susko et al. (2004) reported some strikingly broad results about the forms of inconsistency in tree estimation that can arise if corrected distances are not proportional to the true distances. They showed that if the corrected distance is a concave function of the true distance, then inconsistency due to long branch attraction will occur. If these functions are convex, then two "long branch repulsion" trees will be preferred over the true tree - though these two incorrect trees are expected to be tied as the preferred true. Here we extend their results, and demonstrate the existence of a tree shape (which we refer to as a "twisted Farris-zone" tree) for which a single incorrect tree topology will be guaranteed to be preferred if the corrected distance function is convex. We also report that the standard practice of treating gaps in sequence alignments as missing data is sufficient to produce non-linear corrected distance functions if the substitution process is not independent of the insertion/deletion process. Taken together, these results imply inconsistent tree inference under mild conditions. For example, if some positions in a sequence are constrained to be free of substitutions and insertion/deletion events while the remaining sites evolve with independent substitutions and insertion/deletion events, then the distances obtained by treating gaps as missing data can support an incorrect tree topology even given an unlimited amount of data.

  2. The advantages of being unpredictable: How emotional inconsistency extracts concessions in negotiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinaceur, M.; Adam, H.; van Kleef, G.A.; Galinsky, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrating recent work on emotional communication with social science theories on unpredictability, we investigated whether communicating emotional inconsistency and unpredictability would affect recipients' concession-making in negotiation. We hypothesized that emotional inconsistency and

  3. The advantages of being unpredictable: How emotional inconsistency extracts concessions in negotiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinaceur, M.; Adam, H.; van Kleef, G.A.; Galinsky, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrating recent work on emotional communication with social science theories on unpredictability, we investigated whether communicating emotional inconsistency and unpredictability would affect recipients' concession-making in negotiation. We hypothesized that emotional inconsistency and unpredic

  4. Gender Differences in Emotional Response: Inconsistency between Experience and Expressivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yaling; Chang, Lei; Yang, Meng; Huo, Meng

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated gender differences in both emotional experience and expressivity. Heart rate (HR) was recorded as an indicator of emotional experience while the participants watched 16 video clips that induced eight types of emotion (sadness, anger, horror, disgust, neutrality, amusement, surprise, and pleasure). We also asked the participants to report valence, arousal, and motivation as indicators of emotional expressivity. Overall, the results revealed gender differences in emotional experience and emotional expressivity. When watching videos that induced anger, amusement, and pleasure, men showed larger decreases in HR, whereas women reported higher levels of arousal. There was no gender difference in HR when the participants watched videos that induced horror and disgust, but women reported lower valence, higher arousal, and stronger avoidance motivation than did men. Finally, no gender difference was observed in sadness or surprise, although there was one exception—women reported higher arousal when watching videos that induced sadness. The findings suggest that, when watching videos that induce an emotional response, men often have more intense emotional experiences, whereas women have higher emotional expressivity, particularly for negative emotions. In addition, gender differences depend on the specific emotion type but not the valence. PMID:27362361

  5. CheShift-2 resolves a local inconsistency between two X-ray crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, Jorge A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Sue, Shih-Che [Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology (United States); Fraser, James S. [University of California, California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3) and Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Scheraga, Harold A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Dyson, H. Jane, E-mail: dyson@scripps.edu [Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Since chemical shifts provide important and relatively accessible information about protein structure in solution, a Web server, CheShift-2, was developed for structure interrogation, based on a quantum mechanics database of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. We report the application of CheShift-2 to a local inconsistency between two X-ray crystal structures (PDB IDs 1IKN and 1NFI) of the complex between the p65/p50 heterodimer of NF{kappa}B and its inhibitor I{kappa}B{alpha}. The availability of NMR resonance assignments that included the region of the inconsistency provided an opportunity for independent validation of the CheShift-2 server. Application of the server showed that the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts measured for the Gly270-Pro281 sequence close to the C-terminus of I{kappa}B{alpha} were unequivocally consistent with the backbone structure modeled in the 1IKN structure, and were inconsistent with the 1NFI structure. Previous NOE measurements had demonstrated that the position of a tryptophan ring in the region immediately N-terminal in this region was not consistent with either structure. Subsequent recalculation of the local structure in this region, based on the electron density of the deposited structure factors for 1IKN, confirmed that the local backbone structure was best modeled by 1IKN, but that the rotamer of Trp258 is consistent with the 1NFI structure, including the presence of a hydrogen bond between the ring N{epsilon}H of Trp258 and the backbone carbonyl group of Gln278. The consensus between all of these measures suggests that the CheShift-2 server operates well under circumstances in which backbone chemical shifts are available but where local plasticity may render X-ray structural data ambiguous.

  6. Self-functioning and perceived parenting: relations of parental empathy and love inconsistency with narcissism, depression, and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpeter, Nevelyn N; Watson, P J; O'Leary, Brian J; Weathington, Bart L

    2008-03-01

    In Heinz Kohut's (1977, 1984) theory of the psychology of the self, good parenting provides a child with optimal frustration and just the right amount of loving empathic concern. In the present study, the authors examined the relations of perceived parental empathy and love inconsistency with measures of narcissism, self-esteem, and depression. In a sample of university undergraduates (N=232; 78 men, 153 women, and 1 nonresponder), perceived parental empathy predicted more adaptive self-functioning, whereas parental love inconsistency was related to psychological maladjustment. These results support the theoretical assumption that perceived parental empathy is associated with healthy self-development.

  7. Development and Validation of Culture-Specific Variable Response Inconsistency and True Response Inconsistency Scales for Use with the Korean MMPI-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterer, Holly L.; Han, Kyunghee; Hur, Jaehong; Moon, Kyungjoo

    2010-01-01

    In response to the concern that Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; J. N. Butcher, W. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989; J. N. Butcher et al., 2001) Variable Response Inconsistency (VRIN) and True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) score invalidity criteria recommended for use with American samples results…

  8. Development and Validation of Culture-Specific Variable Response Inconsistency and True Response Inconsistency Scales for Use with the Korean MMPI-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterer, Holly L.; Han, Kyunghee; Hur, Jaehong; Moon, Kyungjoo

    2010-01-01

    In response to the concern that Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; J. N. Butcher, W. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989; J. N. Butcher et al., 2001) Variable Response Inconsistency (VRIN) and True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) score invalidity criteria recommended for use with American samples results…

  9. 12 CFR 550.480 - How do I report the results of the audit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How do I report the results of the audit? 550... report the results of the audit? (a) Annual audit. If you conduct an annual audit, you must note the results of the audit (including significant actions taken as a result of the audit) in the minutes of the...

  10. Firewalls as artefacts of inconsistent truncations of quantum geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germani, Cristiano [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Muenchen (Germany); Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Sarkar, Debajyoti [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper we argue that a firewall is simply a manifestation of an inconsistent truncation of non-perturbative effects that unitarize the semiclassical black hole. Namely, we show that a naive truncation of quantum corrections to the Hawking spectrum at order O(e{sup -S}), inexorably leads to a ''localised'' divergent energy density near the black hole horizon. Nevertheless, in the same approximation, a distant observer only sees a discretised spectrum and concludes that unitarity is achieved by (e{sup -S}) effects. This is due to the fact that instead, the correct quantum corrections to the Hawking spectrum go like (g{sup tt}e{sup -S}). Therefore, while at a distance far away from the horizon, where g{sup tt} ∼ 1, quantum corrections are perturbative, they do diverge close to the horizon, where g{sup tt} → ∞. Nevertheless, these ''corrections'' nicely re-sum so that correlations functions are smooth at the would-be black hole horizon. Thus, we conclude that the appearance of firewalls is just a signal of the breaking of the semiclassical approximation at the Page time, even for large black holes. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. CONSISTENCY VERSUS INCONSISTENCY IN THE CURRENT ACADEMIC ECONOMIC PARADIGM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru MIRON

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The current academic economic paradigm is shaped by the actual economic schools of thoughts and the systems of generating economic knowledge – universities, research institutions, academic publishing actors and business elites. The cumulated contributions of these actors have transformed economics into a mature science whose practical and governance implications were tested by the 2008 world financial crisis. The challenges faced in these times by governments, households and businesses have severely questioned both orthodox and non orthodox economic wisdom and the legitimacy of the economist as a professional. Irrespective of their economic orientation, most economists have agreed that the models of socio-economic development should be revisited, with a high need of a focus on the moral and ethical standards of the human, economic and political actions. The purpose of this paper is to analyse some of the major inconsistencies that the current academic economic paradigm is perpetuating through its systems of generating economic knowledge, mainly universities and research institutions. From the methodological point of view this paper uses a qualitative analysis, based on a conceptual and highly explorative approach.

  12. Artificial grammar learning of melody is constrained by melodic inconsistency: Narmour's principles affect melodic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmeier, Martin; Cross, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that people acquire artificial grammars incidentally and implicitly, an indispensable capacity for the acquisition of music or language. However, less research has been devoted to exploring constraints affecting incidental learning. Within the domain of music, the extent to which Narmour's (1990) melodic principles affect implicit learning of melodic structure was experimentally explored. Extending previous research (Rohrmeier, Rebuschat & Cross, 2011), the identical finite-state grammar is employed having terminals (the alphabet) manipulated so that melodies generated systematically violated Narmour's principles. Results indicate that Narmour-inconsistent melodic materials impede implicit learning. This further constitutes a case in which artificial grammar learning is affected by prior knowledge or processing constraints.

  13. Inconsistencies in pedigree symbols in human genetics publications: A need for standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhaus, K.A.; Bennett, R.L.; Resta, R.G. [Univ. of California at Irvine, Orange, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    To determine consistency in usage of pedigree symbols by genetics professionals, we reviewed pedigrees printed in 10 human genetic and medical journals and 24 medical genetics textbooks. We found no consistent symbolization for common situations such as pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, death, or test results. Inconsistency in pedigree design can create difficulties in the interpretation of family studies and detract from the pedigree`s basic strength of simple and accurate communication of medical information. We recommend the development of standard pedigree symbols, and their incorporation into genetic publications, professional genetics training programs, pedigree software programs, and genetic board examinations. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. SCEGRAM: An image database for semantic and syntactic inconsistencies in scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlschläger, Sabine; Võ, Melissa Le-Hoa

    2016-10-31

    Our visual environment is not random, but follows compositional rules according to what objects are usually found where. Despite the growing interest in how such semantic and syntactic rules - a scene grammar - enable effective attentional guidance and object perception, no common image database containing highly-controlled object-scene modifications has been publically available. Such a database is essential in minimizing the risk that low-level features drive high-level effects of interest, which is being discussed as possible source of controversial study results. To generate the first database of this kind - SCEGRAM - we took photographs of 62 real-world indoor scenes in six consistency conditions that contain semantic and syntactic (both mild and extreme) violations as well as their combinations. Importantly, always two scenes were paired, so that an object was semantically consistent in one scene (e.g., ketchup in kitchen) and inconsistent in the other (e.g., ketchup in bathroom). Low-level salience did not differ between object-scene conditions and was generally moderate. Additionally, SCEGRAM contains consistency ratings for every object-scene condition, as well as object-absent scenes and object-only images. Finally, a cross-validation using eye-movements replicated previous results of longer dwell times for both semantic and syntactic inconsistencies compared to consistent controls. In sum, the SCEGRAM image database is the first to contain well-controlled semantic and syntactic object-scene inconsistencies that can be used in a broad range of cognitive paradigms (e.g., verbal and pictorial priming, change detection, object identification, etc.) including paradigms addressing developmental aspects of scene grammar. SCEGRAM can be retrieved for research purposes from http://www.scenegrammarlab.com/research/scegram-database/ .

  15. Is inconsistent pre-treatment bedtime related to CPAP non-adherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Amy M; King, Tonya S; Sawyer, Douglas A; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-12-01

    Lack of adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) limits the effectiveness of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We hypothesized that an irregular bedtime would be negatively related to regular use of CPAP treatment. If so, modifying bedtime schedule may address the persistent problem of inconsistent CPAP use in adults with OSA. In a prospective longitudinal study, we examined whether inconsistent self-reported bedtime before initiation of CPAP treatment, operationalized as bedtime variability, was (1) different among those adherent (≥4 hours per night) and non-adherent to CPAP treatment at 1 week and 1 month; and/or (2) was related to 1-week and 1-month CPAP use when other variables were accounted for. Consecutively recruited newly diagnosed OSA adults (n = 79) completed sleep diaries prior to CPAP treatment. One-week and 1-month objective CPAP use data were collected. Pre-treatment bedtime variability was different among CPAP non-adherers and adherers at 1 month and was a significant predictor of non-adherence at 1 month in multi-variable analyses. The odds of 1-month CPAP non-adherence were 3.5 times greater in those whose pre-treatment bedtimes varied by >75 minutes. Addressing sleep schedule prior to CPAP initiation may be an opportunity to improve CPAP adherence.

  16. Inconsistencies in the work of P Maraner (reply to comment [Usp. Fiz. Nauk 186 795 (2016)] on the paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect - the influence of gravitational potential of Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921-1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)])

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykin, G. B.; Pozdnyakova, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the distributions of the scalar gravitational potential of Coriolis forces in different parts of the shoulder of a rotating equal-arms Michelson interferometer. It results in a view of the very small difference between the phases of light in the shoulders of the Michelson interferometer, in comparison with the phase difference due to the quadratic Sagnac effect. It has been shown that there is an effect, discussed earlier by P Maraner, which is a higher approximation to quadratic Sagnac effect.

  17. Understanding and Reducing Inconsistency in Seatbelt-Use Decisions: Findings from a Cardinal Decision Issue Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alattar, Laith; Yates, J Frank; Eby, David W; LeBlanc, David J; Molnar, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    This article has two aims. The first is to present results that partly explain why some automobile drivers choose to use their seatbelts only part time, thereby exposing themselves to unnecessary risk. The second is to offer and illustrate the "cardinal decision issue perspective"((1)) as a tool for guiding research and development efforts that focus on complex real-life decision behaviors that can entail wide varieties of risk, including but not limited to inconsistent seatbelt use. Each of 24 young male participants drove an instrumented vehicle equipped to record continuously seatbelt use as well as other driving data. After all trips were finished, each participant completed an interview designed to reconstruct how he made randomly selected seatbelt-use decisions under specified conditions. The interview also examined whether and how drivers established "decision policies" regarding seatbelt use. Such policies were good predictors of inconsistent seatbelt use. Drivers who had previously adopted policies calling for consistent seatbelt use were significantly more likely than others to actually drive belted. Meta-decisions about seatbelt policy adoption appeared to rest on factors such as whether the driver had ever been asked to consider selecting a policy. Whether a driver made an ad hoc, on-the-spot seatbelt-use decision was associated with a perceived need to make such a decision. Finally, participants with full-time policies were especially likely to deploy their seatbelts by default, without recognizing the need to decide about belt use on a trip-by-trip basis. We end with recommendations for reducing inconsistencies in seatbelt use in actual practice.

  18. Duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies in the primary nucleotide databases: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-01

    GenBank, the EMBL European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA DataBank of Japan, known collectively as the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration or INSDC, are the three most significant nucleotide sequence databases. Their records are derived from laboratory work undertaken by different individuals, by different teams, with a range of technologies and assumptions and over a period of decades. As a consequence, they contain a great many duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies, but neither the prevalence nor the characteristics of various types of duplicates have been rigorously assessed. Existing duplicate detection methods in bioinformatics only address specific duplicate types, with inconsistent assumptions; and the impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases has not been carefully assessed, making it difficult to judge the value of such methods. Our goal is to assess the scale, kinds and impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases, through a retrospective analysis of merged groups in INSDC databases. Our outcomes are threefold: (1) We analyse a benchmark dataset consisting of duplicates manually identified in INSDC-a dataset of 67 888 merged groups with 111 823 duplicate pairs across 21 organisms from INSDC databases - in terms of the prevalence, types and impacts of duplicates. (2) We categorize duplicates at both sequence and annotation level, with supporting quantitative statistics, showing that different organisms have different prevalence of distinct kinds of duplicate. (3) We show that the presence of duplicates has practical impact via a simple case study on duplicates, in terms of GC content and melting temperature. We demonstrate that duplicates not only introduce redundancy, but can lead to inconsistent results for certain tasks. Our findings lead to a better understanding of the problem of duplication in biological databases.Database URL: the merged records are available at https

  19. Factors Associated with Inconsistent Condom Use among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyan Yi

    Full Text Available Compared to the general population, men who have sex with men (MSM are at greater risk for HIV and less understood due to their more hidden and stigmatized nature. Moreover, the discrepancy in findings in the literature merits further investigations in MSM populations from different cultures and settings. We therefore conducted this study to explore factors associated with inconsistent condom use among high-risk MSM in Cambodia.This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 among 367 MSM randomly selected from Battembang and Siem Reap using a two-stage cluster sampling method. A structured questionnaire was used for face-to-face interviews to collect information on characteristics of respondents, HIV testing history, self-perception of HIV risk, substance use, sexual behaviors, mental disorders, and HIV knowledge. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors independently associated with inconsistent condom use.On average, 62.3% of respondents reported that they always used condoms over the past three months. The rates varied with types of sexual partners; the proportion of respondents who reported always using condoms was 55.1%, 64.2%, 75.9%, 73.0%, 78.1%, and 70.3%, for sexual partners who were girlfriends, boyfriends, female sex workers, male sex workers, female clients, or male clients, respectively. After adjustment, inconsistent condom use was significantly associated with age of ≥25 (AOR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.09-2.86, self-rated quality of life as good or very good (AOR = 4.37, 95% CI = 1.79-5.67, self-perception of higher HIV risk compared to the general population (AOR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.35-4.17, illicit drug use in the past three months (AOR = 5.76, 95% CI = 1.65-10.09, and reported consistent lubricant use when selling anal sex to men in the past three months (AOR = 2.85, 95% CI = 1.07-8.12.We found risky sexual behaviors to be considerably high among MSM in this study, especially among those who used

  20. Effects of using the GlobalFiler™ multiplex system on parent-child analyses of cases with single locus inconsistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Eriko; Osawa, Motoki; Tamura, Tomonori; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Miyashita, Keiko; Matsushima, Yutaka; Kakimoto, Yu; Satoh, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Parent-child analyses sometimes reveal inconsistency of shared alleles at only one locus. This is conventionally called "single locus exclusion", which results from mutational events and the presence of null alleles. Here, in parent-child analyses of the Japanese population, we detected exclusions by using the GlobalFiler™ system comprising 21 short tandem repeat loci. One- or two-step mutations resulting from strand slippage causing gain or loss were observed in seven of 221 parent-child transmissions. The incidences of single locus inconsistency of alleles were 5.88×10(-2) and 8.40×10(-3) for paternal and maternal relationships, respectively. With calculation using a set of 15 loci in the Identifiler® multiplex system, the combined likelihood ratio (CLR) values were limited to less than 100 in all five cases accompanied by single inconsistency. The addition of six loci recovered the CLR values to over 10,000 in three cases. Application of this advanced system may increase the detected occurrence of mutational events, but it should be beneficial for inference in parent-child analyses, particularly in cases accompanied by genetic inconsistency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Classification and Optimization of Decision Trees for Inconsistent Decision Tables Represented as MVD Tables

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad

    2015-10-11

    Decision tree is a widely used technique to discover patterns from consistent data set. But if the data set is inconsistent, where there are groups of examples (objects) with equal values of conditional attributes but different decisions (values of the decision attribute), then to discover the essential patterns or knowledge from the data set is challenging. We consider three approaches (generalized, most common and many-valued decision) to handle such inconsistency. We created different greedy algorithms using various types of impurity and uncertainty measures to construct decision trees. We compared the three approaches based on the decision tree properties of the depth, average depth and number of nodes. Based on the result of the comparison, we choose to work with the many-valued decision approach. Now to determine which greedy algorithms are efficient, we compared them based on the optimization and classification results. It was found that some greedy algorithms Mult\\\\_ws\\\\_entSort, and Mult\\\\_ws\\\\_entML are good for both optimization and classification.

  2. Reduction of image-based ADI-to-AEI overlay inconsistency with improved algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Liang; Lin, Shu-Hong; Chen, Kai-Hsiung; Ke, Chih-Ming; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    In image-based overlay (IBO) measurement, the measurement quality of various measurement spectra can be judged by quality indicators and also the ADI-to-AEI similarity to determine the optimum light spectrum. However we found some IBO measured results showing erroneous indication of wafer expansion from the difference between the ADI and the AEI maps, even after their measurement spectra were optimized. To reduce this inconsistency, an improved image calculation algorithm is proposed in this paper. Different gray levels composed of inner- and outer-box contours are extracted to calculate their ADI overlay errors. The symmetry of intensity distribution at the thresholds dictated by a range of gray levels is used to determine the particular gray level that can minimize the ADI-to-AEI overlay inconsistency. After this improvement, the ADI is more similar to AEI with less expansion difference. The same wafer was also checked by the diffraction-based overlay (DBO) tool to verify that there is no physical wafer expansion. When there is actual wafer expansion induced by large internal stress, both the IBO and the DBO measurements indicate similar expansion results. The scanning white-light interference microscope was used to check the variation of wafer warpage during the ADI and AEI stages. It predicts a similar trend with the overlay difference map, confirming the internal stress.

  3. The Relation of Recent Tampon Use, Douching, Coitus, and Vaginal Medications for Reported Cervical Cytology Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) on the pathology report. Assumptions Tampon use is drying to the vaginal epithelium and has been...SUBTITLE 5, FUNDING NUMBERS The Relation of Recent Tamplon Use, Douching, Coitus, and Vaginal Medications for Reported Cervical Cytology Results. 6. AUTHOR...11¾ .. ?j’ 󈧎 U..- THE RELATION OF RECENT TAMPON USE, DOUCHING, COITUS, AND VAGINAL MEDICATIONS TO REPORTED CERVICAL CYTOLOGY RESULTS By MARYANN

  4. 75 FR 32484 - Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and Interpretation. The purpose of the public meeting is to seek input on challenges related to performance evaluation, determination of clinical significance, result... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on...

  5. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claustres, Mireille; Kozich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J.; Barton, David E.

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report

  6. 49 CFR 199.119 - Reporting of anti-drug testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of anti-drug testing results. 199.119... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.119 Reporting of anti-drug testing results. (a) Each large operator...

  7. Reporting of positive results in randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-based mental health interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronado-Montoya, S.; Levis, A.W.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Steele, R.J.; Turner, E.H.; Thombs, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A large proportion of mindfulness-based therapy trials report statistically significant results, even in the context of very low statistical power. The objective of the present study was to characterize the reporting of "positive" results in randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-bas

  8. 49 CFR 382.403 - Reporting of results in a management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Confidentiality § 382.403 Reporting of results in a management information system. (a) An employer shall prepare... that the FMCSA specifies in its request. The employer must use the Management Information System (MIS... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of results in a management...

  9. 49 CFR 40.183 - What information do laboratories report to MROs regarding split specimen results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What information do laboratories report to MROs regarding split specimen results? 40.183 Section 40.183 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... § 40.183 What information do laboratories report to MROs regarding split specimen results? (a) As...

  10. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: CERCLA BDAT SARM PREPARATION AND RESULTS OF PHYSICAL SOILS WASHING EXPERIMENTS (FINAL REPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study reports on the results of work preparing 30,000 Ibs of SARM or synthetic analytical reference matrix, a surrogate Superfund soil containing a vide range of contaminants. It also reports the results ©f bench scale treatability experiments designed to simulate the EP...

  11. Predictors of inconsistent condom use among a hard to reach population of young women with multiple sexual partners in peri-urban South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanga Z Zembe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that multiple concurrent sexual partnering may be a key driver of the high HIV prevalence among young women in South Africa. However, little is known about whether and to what extent women who have multiple sexual partners also engage in other high risk sexual behaviors such as inconsistent condom use. And yet, multiple concurrent sexual partnering is of little epidemiological relevance if all partners in these sexual networks use condoms consistently. This study assesses the prevalence of sexual risk behaviors and HIV, and predictors of inconsistent condom use among women aged 16-24 with multiple sexual partners in a peri-urban setting in South Africa. METHODS: We used Respondent Driven Sampling, a sampling strategy for hard-to-reach populations to recruit 259 women aged 16-24 in a bio-behavioral cross-sectional survey in the Western Cape province. Estimates of population proportions and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using the Respondent-Driven Sampling Analysis Tool 5.6 (RDSAT. The primary outcome was inconsistent condom use in the past three months. RESULTS: Young women reported an average of 7 partners in the past 3 months and a high prevalence of sexual risk behaviors: concurrency (87%, transactional sex (91% and age mixing (59%. Having >5 sexual partners in the last 3 months doubled the risk of unprotected sex (OR 2.43, CI 1.39-4.25. HIV prevalence was 4% among 16-19 year olds, increasing threefold (12% at age 20-24. DISCUSSION: Multiple sexual partnering, where a high number of partners are acquired in a short space of time, is a fertile context for unprotected and risky sexual behavior. The young women featured in this survey present with a constellation of high-risk sexual behaviors that cluster to form a risk syndrome. Carefully tailored repeat bio-behavioral surveillance surveys are recommended for this sub-population.

  12. Inconsistencies between long-term trends in storminess derived from the 20CR reanalysis and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Krueger, Oliver; Feser, Frauke; Weisse, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Global atmospheric reanalyses have become a common tool for both the validation of climate models and diagnostic studies, such as assessing climate variability and long-term trends. Presently, the 20th Century Reanalysis (20CR), which assimilates only surface pressure reports, sea-ice, and sea surface temperature distributions, represents the longest global reanalysis dataset available covering the period from 1871 to the present. Currently, the 20CR dataset is extensively used for the assessment of climate variability and trends. Here, we compare the variability and long-term trends in Northeast Atlantic storminess derived from 20CR and from observations. A well established storm index derived from pressure observations over a relatively densely monitored marine area is used. It is found that both, variability and long-term trends derived from 20CR and from observations, are inconsistent. In particular, both time series show opposing trends during the first half of the 20th century. Only for the more recent ...

  13. Religious variations in perceived infertility and inconsistent contraceptive use among unmarried young adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Amy M; Haynes, Stacy H; Hill, Terrence D; Bartkowski, John P

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we examine associations among personal religiosity, perceived infertility, and inconsistent contraceptive use among unmarried young adults (ages 18-29). The data for this investigation came from the National Survey of Reproductive and Contraceptive Knowledge (n = 1,695). We used multinomial logistic regression to model perceived infertility, adjusted probabilities to model rationales for perceived infertility, and binary logistic regression to model inconsistent contraceptive use. Evangelical Protestants were more likely than non-affiliates to believe that they were infertile. Among the young women who indicated some likelihood of infertility, evangelical Protestants were also more likely than their other Protestant or non-Christian faith counterparts to believe that they were infertile because they had unprotected sex without becoming pregnant. Although evangelical Protestants were more likely to exhibit inconsistent contraception use than non-affiliates, we were unable to attribute any portion of this difference to infertility perceptions. Whereas most studies of religion and health emphasize the salubrious role of personal religiosity, our results suggest that evangelical Protestants may be especially likely to hold misconceptions about their fertility. Because these misconceptions fail to explain higher rates of inconsistent contraception use among evangelical Protestants, additional research is needed to understand the principles and motives of this unique religious community. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inconsistent Definitions of the Pressure-Coupled Response and the Admittance of Solid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, Eric H.

    2003-01-01

    When an acoustic wave is present in a solid propellant combustion environment, the mass flux from the combustion zone oscillates at the same frequency as the acoustics. The acoustic wave is either amplified or attenuated by the response of the combustion to the acoustic disturbance. When the acoustic wave is amplified, this process is called combustion instability. The amplification is quantitatively measured by a response function. The ability to predict combustion stability for a solid propellant formulation is essential to the formulator to prevent or minimize the effects of instabilities, such as an oscillatory thrust. Unfortunately, the prediction of response values for a particular propellant remains a technical challenge. Most predictions of the response of propellants are based on test data, but there are a number of questions about the reliability of the standard test method, the T-burner. Alternate methods have been developed to measure the response of a propellant, including the ultrasound burner, the magnetic flowmeter and the rotating valve burner, but there are still inconsistencies between the results obtained by these different methods. Aside from the experimental differences, the values of the pressure-coupled responses obtained by different researchers are often compared erroneously, for the simple reason that inconsistencies in the definitions of the responses and admittances are not considered. The use of different definitions has led to substantial confusion since the first theoretical treatments of the problem by Hart and McClure in 1959. The definitions and relations derived here seek to alleviate this problem.

  15. Formalization of taxon-based constraints to detect inconsistencies in annotation and ontology development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungall Christopher J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gene Ontology project supports categorization of gene products according to their location of action, the molecular functions that they carry out, and the processes that they are involved in. Although the ontologies are intentionally developed to be taxon neutral, and to cover all species, there are inherent taxon specificities in some branches. For example, the process 'lactation' is specific to mammals and the location 'mitochondrion' is specific to eukaryotes. The lack of an explicit formalization of these constraints can lead to errors and inconsistencies in automated and manual annotation. Results We have formalized the taxonomic constraints implicit in some GO classes, and specified these at various levels in the ontology. We have also developed an inference system that can be used to check for violations of these constraints in annotations. Using the constraints in conjunction with the inference system, we have detected and removed errors in annotations and improved the structure of the ontology. Conclusions Detection of inconsistencies in taxon-specificity enables gradual improvement of the ontologies, the annotations, and the formalized constraints. This is progressively improving the quality of our data. The full system is available for download, and new constraints or proposed changes to constraints can be submitted online at https://sourceforge.net/tracker/?atid=605890&group_id=36855.

  16. BAHAMAS: new SNIa analysis reveals inconsistencies with standard cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Shariff, H; Trotta, R; van Dyk, D A

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained by applying our BAyesian HierArchical Modeling for the Analysis of Supernova cosmology (BAHAMAS) software package to the 740 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae type Ia (SNIa) from the "Joint Light-curve Analysis" (JLA) dataset. We simultaneously determine cosmological parameters and standardization parameters, including host galaxy mass corrections, residual scatter and object-by-object intrinsic magnitudes. Combining JLA and Planck Cosmic Microwave Background data, we find significant discrepancies in cosmological parameter constraints with respect to the standard analysis: we find Omega_M = 0.399+/-0.027, 2.8\\sigma\\ higher than previously reported and w = -0.910+/-0.045, 1.6\\sigma\\ higher than the standard analysis. We determine the residual scatter to be sigma_res = 0.104+/-0.005. We confirm (at the 95% probability level) the existence of two sub-populations segregated by host galaxy mass, separated at log_{10}(M/M_solar) = 10, differing in mean intrinsic magnitude by 0.055+...

  17. A PRIORITY-BASED NEGOTIATIONS APPROACH FOR HANDLING INCONSISTENCIES IN MULTI-PERSPECTIVE SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Inconsistency of multi-perspective requirements specifications is a pervasive issue during the requirements process.However,managing inconsistency is not just a pure technical problem.It is always associated with a process of interactions and competitions among corresponding stakeholders.The main contribution of this paper is to present a negotiations approach to handling inconsistencies in multi-perspective software requirements.In particular,the priority of requirements relative to each perspective plays an important role in proceeding negotiation over resolving inconsistencies among different stakeholders.An algorithm of generating negotiation proposals and an approach to evaluating proposals are also presented in this paper,respectively.

  18. Uncertainties of legend conversion and inconsistency analysis of global land cover products---A case study in Heihe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Ma, M.; Luo, G.; Maeyer, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the spatial and areal inconsistencies of the most recent global land cover datasets were analyzed quantitatively with widely used common thematic legends (IGBP-17, modified IGBP-9, IPCC-5 and 3 classes) in Heihe River Basin. These products included Finer Resolution Observation and Monitoring of Global Land Cover (hereafter abbreviated as GLC30), Global Land Cover Map (hereafter abbreviated as GlobCover2009) and the IGBP layer of MODIS Collection 5.1 land cover (hereafter abbreviated as MODISLC_IGBP). Before areal and spatial inconsistencies were assessed, uncertainty caused by legend conversion was also discussed quantitatively. Majority filtering and statistical methods were adopted to upscale from high to low spatial resolution classifications and to compute inconsistencies respectively. The results indicated that IGBP-17 and "3 classes" were not suitable as common legends to compare land cover products using LCCS and FAO, because IGBP-17 itself included ambiguous type and too much aggregation in "3 classes" was less meaningful for users due to less information. In general, 5 - 12 kinds of land cover type were suitable quantity to compare different land cover products. In the IGBP-9 and IPCC-5 legend conversion, GLC30 also had "zero" uncertainties, and the GlobCover2009 had the largest uncertainties, the values were 17.3%, 7.44%, 0.46% and 16.2%, 5.95%, 0.40% in the mountainous, oasis and desert area respectively. The hierarchical classification system with explicit attribution information was suggested to global land cover producers by authors, because it can be used to reduce effectively uncertainty of legend conversion caused by arbitrary errors. The order of areal inconsistency showed opposite to overall spatial inconsistency. Areal inconsistency between GLC30 and GlobCover2009 was the least among the three groups comparison, with values less than 19.71%, 8.10%, 1.58% and 27.20%, 8.05% and 1.53% in mountainous, oasis and desert areas

  19. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claustres, Mireille; Kožich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J; Barton, David E

    2014-02-01

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report should therefore provide a clear, concise, accurate, fully interpretative and authoritative answer to the clinical question. The need for harmonizing reporting practice of genetic tests has been recognised by the External Quality Assessment (EQA), providers and laboratories. The ESHG Genetic Services Quality Committee has produced reporting guidelines for the genetic disciplines (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic). These guidelines give assistance on report content, including the interpretation of results. Selected examples of genetic test reports for all three disciplines are provided in an annexe.

  20. Correcting Inconsistencies and Errors in Bacterial Genome Metadata Using an Automated Curation Tool in Excel (AutoCurE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome data are invaluable for large-scale comparative genomic studies. Current sequencing technologies have made it feasible to sequence entire bacterial genomes with relative ease and time with a substantially reduced cost per nucleotide, hence cost per genome. More than 3,000 bacterial genomes have been sequenced and are available at the finished status. Publically available genomes can be readily downloaded; however, there are challenges to verify the specific supporting data contained within the download and to identify errors and inconsistencies that may be present within the organizational data content and metadata. AutoCurE, an automated tool for bacterial genome database curation in Excel, was developed to facilitate local database curation of supporting data that accompany downloaded genomes from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. AutoCurE provides an automated approach to curate local genomic databases by flagging inconsistencies or errors by comparing the downloaded supporting data to the genome reports to verify genome name, RefSeq accession numbers, the presence of archaea, BioProject/UIDs, and sequence file descriptions. Flags are generated for nine metadata fields if there are inconsistencies between the downloaded genomes and genomes reports and if erroneous or missing data are evident. AutoCurE is an easy-to-use tool for local database curation for large-scale genome data prior to downstream analyses.

  1. Communication About Problematic Drinking Between Young Adults and their Parents: An Application of Inconsistent Nurturing as Control Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 80% of college students drink, half of whom consume alcohol in the form of binge drinking. The current study applies Inconsistent Nurturing as Control Theory to examine the communication about excessive drinking that takes place between parents and their young adult children. Forty college students were asked to report on a moment or incident that led their parents to label their drinking as concerning and were then asked to report on how their parents acted towards the drinking before and after the moment of labeling. Interviews were transcribed and coded. The findings suggest that parents act with inconsistency when attempting to manage their children's drinking by enacting both reinforcing and punishing behaviors. Parents' reinforcing behaviors included drinking with their children and buying them alcohol, even after labeling the drinking as problematic. Parents' punishment behaviors included expressing concern about their children's sense of responsibility and making their children feel regretful about their drinking. Nearly 88% of the participants were able to recall the moment at which their parents labeled their drinking as problematic. Implications for using inconsistent messages in conversations about alcohol are discussed.

  2. Community survey results for Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge : Completion report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a summary of results for the survey of residents of communities adjacent to Rappahannock River Valley NWR conducted from the spring through the...

  3. THE ORDER OF CALCULATION OF THE TOTAL FINANCIAL RESULT OF THE ACCOUNTING REPORTING OF THE ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashkatov V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes which have happened in the structure and the contents of accounting reports are presented in the article, and the procedure of payments indicator "Cumu-lative financial result of the period" is considered in detail

  4. Hybrid transvaginal cholecystectomy, clinical results and patient-reported outcomes of 50 consecutive cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boezem, P.B. van den; Velthuis, S.; Lourens, H.J.; Samlal, R.A.; Cuesta, M.A.; Sietses, C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the clinical and cosmetic results of transvaginal hybrid cholecystectomy (TVC). BACKGROUND: Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has been developed as a minimal invasive alternative for conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Altho

  5. RECRUITING, RETAINING, AND REPORTING EXPOSURE STUDY RESULTS TO PARTICIPANTS AND THE PUBLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing techniques and capabilities to recruit and retain participants in exposure measurement studies and to effectively report study results to participants and the public. These techniques are being applied in three N...

  6. Visitor and community survey results for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Completion report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a summary of results for the community and visitor surveys conducted at Prime Hook NWR from the fall of 2004 through fall of 2005. The purpose...

  7. 'Misclassification error' greedy heuristic to construct decision trees for inconsistent decision tables

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    A greedy algorithm has been presented in this paper to construct decision trees for three different approaches (many-valued decision, most common decision, and generalized decision) in order to handle the inconsistency of multiple decisions in a decision table. In this algorithm, a greedy heuristic ‘misclassification error’ is used which performs faster, and for some cost function, results are better than ‘number of boundary subtables’ heuristic in literature. Therefore, it can be used in the case of larger data sets and does not require huge amount of memory. Experimental results of depth, average depth and number of nodes of decision trees constructed by this algorithm are compared in the framework of each of the three approaches.

  8. The (in)consistency of changes in brain macrostructure in male paedophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerwinn, Hannah; Pohl, Alexander; Granert, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Thus far, four studies have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to test for differences in brain structure between paedophilic (i.e. sexually attracted to pre-pubescent children) and teleiophilic (i.e. sexually attracted to adults) men, revealing divergent results. To re-examine this issue, we...... matter differences between groups. In contrast to previous studies, less than half of the individuals in our paedophilic group had a record of sexual offences against children, as subjects were partially recruited from two outpatient facilities of a child sexual abuse prevention project for self......-acknowledged paedophiles. After adjustment for multiple comparisons and controlling for important confounding factors, we did not find any significant grey or white matter differences between the paedophilic and teleiophilic subjects. Together with the inconsistencies in the literature, these results argue against...

  9. Inconsistencies among European Union pharmaceutical regulator safety communications: a cross-country comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-David Zeitoun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The European Medicines Agency (EMA and national regulators share the responsibility to communicate to healthcare providers postmarketing safety events but little is known about the consistency of this process. We aimed to compare public availability of safety-related communications and drug withdrawals from the EMA and European Union member countries for novel medicines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis using public Dear Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs for all novel medicines authorized between 2001 and 2010 by the EMA and available for use in France, Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Between 2001 and 2010, the EMA approved 185 novel medicines. DHPCs could not be ascertained for the EMA. Among the 4 national regulators, as of April 30, 2013, at least one safety DHPC or withdrawal occurred for 53 (28.6% medicines, totaling 90 DHPCs and 5 withdrawals. Among these 53 medicines, all 4 national agencies issued at least one communication for 17 (32.1%, three of the four for 25 (47.2%, two of the four for 6 (11.3%, and one of the four for 5 (9.4%. Five drugs were reported to be withdrawn, three by all four countries, one by three and one by two. Among the 95 DHPCs and withdrawals, 20 (21.1% were issued by all 4 national regulators, 37 (38.9% by 3 of the 4, 22 (23.2% by 2 of the 4, and 16 (16.8% by one. Consistency of making publicly available all identified safety DHPC or withdrawal across regulator pairs varied from 33% to 73% agreement. CONCLUSIONS: Safety communications were not made publicly available by the EMA. Among the 4 European member countries with national regulators that make DHPCs publicly available since at least 2001, there were substantial inconsistencies in safety communications for novel medicines. The impact of those inconsistencies in terms of public health remains to be determined.

  10. Reliability assessment of null allele detection: inconsistencies between and within different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, M J; Pilot, M; Kruczyk, M; Żmihorski, M; Umer, H M; Gliwicz, J

    2014-03-01

    Microsatellite loci are widely used in population genetic studies, but the presence of null alleles may lead to biased results. Here, we assessed five methods that indirectly detect null alleles and found large inconsistencies among them. Our analysis was based on 20 microsatellite loci genotyped in a natural population of Microtus oeconomus sampled during 8 years, together with 1200 simulated populations without null alleles, but experiencing bottlenecks of varying duration and intensity, and 120 simulated populations with known null alleles. In the natural population, 29% of positive results were consistent between the methods in pairwise comparisons, and in the simulated data set, this proportion was 14%. The positive results were also inconsistent between different years in the natural population. In the null-allele-free simulated data set, the number of false positives increased with increased bottleneck intensity and duration. We also found a low concordance in null allele detection between the original simulated populations and their 20% random subsets. In the populations simulated to include null alleles, between 22% and 42% of true null alleles remained undetected, which highlighted that detection errors are not restricted to false positives. None of the evaluated methods clearly outperformed the others when both false-positive and false-negative rates were considered. Accepting only the positive results consistent between at least two methods should considerably reduce the false-positive rate, but this approach may increase the false-negative rate. Our study demonstrates the need for novel null allele detection methods that could be reliably applied to natural populations.

  11. Why prudence is needed when interpreting articles reporting clinical trial results in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Bobes, Julio; Cuijpers, Pim

    2017-03-28

    Clinical trial results' reliability is impacted by reporting bias. This is primarily manifested as publication bias and outcome reporting bias. Mental health trials are prone to two methodological deficiencies: (1) using small numbers of participants that facilitates false positive findings and exaggerated size effects, and (2) the obligatory use of psychometric scales that require subjective assessments. These two deficiencies contribute to the publication of unreliable results. Considerable reporting bias has been found in safety and efficacy findings in psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy trials. Reporting bias can be carried forward to meta-analyses, a key source for clinical practice guidelines. The final result is the frequent overestimation of treatment effects that could impact patients and clinician-informed decisions. Prospective registration of trials and publication of results are the two major methods to reduce reporting bias. Prospective trial registration will allow checking whether they are published (so it will help to prevent publication bias) and, if published, whether those outcomes and analyses that were deemed as appropriate before trial commencement are actually published (hence helping to find out selective reporting of outcomes). Unfortunately, the rate of registered trials in mental health interventions is low and, frequently, of poor quality. Clinicians should be prudent when interpreting the results of published trials and some meta-analyses - such as those conducted by scientists working for the sponsor company or those that only include published trials. Prescribers, however, should be confident when prescribing drugs following the summary of product characteristics, since regulatory agencies have access to all clinical trial results.

  12. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Fifth Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 13 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published four previous reports describing operation of these buses. This report presents new and updated results covering data from January 2015 through December 2015.

  13. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Sixth Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew B [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-11

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 13 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published five previous reports describing operation of these buses. This report presents new and updated results covering data from January 2016 through December 2016.

  14. Inconsistencies within Attachment Teaching Practice in Zimbabwe: Call for a Participatory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikunda, Charles

    2008-01-01

    This article raises some inconsistencies observed in attachment teaching practice in Zimbabwe. The argument made is that these inconsistencies are caused by the different philosophical approaches informing attachment teaching practice and its delivery, which is largely visible in teaching practice supervision. The discussion shows that while…

  15. Recall of Information Separating Two Inconsistent Propositions: An Experimental Test of the "Cognitive Dumping" Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Henry T., III

    A study investigated free recall of information bounded by internally inconsistent sentences compared to the same information in consistent text versions. Data were elicited from 40 undergraduate students enrolled in classes in educational psychology. Subjects were instructed to read one consistent and one inconsistent (containing two propositions…

  16. 48 CFR 52.225-14 - Inconsistency between English Version and Translation of Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... English Version and Translation of Contract. 52.225-14 Section 52.225-14 Federal Acquisition Regulations... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.225-14 Inconsistency between English Version and Translation of... and Translation of Contract (FEB 2000) In the event of inconsistency between any terms of...

  17. Empirical evidence about inconsistency among studies in a pair-wise meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Kirsty M; Turner, Rebecca M; Higgins, Julian P T

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates how inconsistency (as measured by the I(2) statistic) among studies in a meta-analysis may differ, according to the type of outcome data and effect measure. We used hierarchical models to analyse data from 3873 binary, 5132 continuous and 880 mixed outcome meta-analyses within the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Predictive distributions for inconsistency expected in future meta-analyses were obtained, which can inform priors for between-study variance. Inconsistency estimates were highest on average for binary outcome meta-analyses of risk differences and continuous outcome meta-analyses. For a planned binary outcome meta-analysis in a general research setting, the predictive distribution for inconsistency among log odds ratios had median 22% and 95% CI: 12% to 39%. For a continuous outcome meta-analysis, the predictive distribution for inconsistency among standardized mean differences had median 40% and 95% CI: 15% to 73%. Levels of inconsistency were similar for binary data measured by log odds ratios and log relative risks. Fitted distributions for inconsistency expected in continuous outcome meta-analyses using mean differences were almost identical to those using standardized mean differences. The empirical evidence on inconsistency gives guidance on which outcome measures are most likely to be consistent in particular circumstances and facilitates Bayesian meta-analysis with an informative prior for heterogeneity. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Word Production Inconsistency of Singaporean-English-Speaking Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Betty; Brebner, Chris; McCormack, Paul; Butcher, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nature of speech disorders in individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) remains controversial despite various explanations put forth in the literature to account for the observed speech profiles. A high level of word production inconsistency in children with DS has led researchers to query whether the inconsistency continues into…

  19. Analyzing inconsistent cases in management fsQCA studies: A methodological manifesto

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balachandran Nair, L.; Gibbert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cases inconsistent with theoretical expectations are by default indicators for a lack of theory-data fit, and as such are prime candidates for theory building. However, the conventional tendency is to ignore inconsistent cases in Management research. The current article focuses on the theory-buildin

  20. Inconsistencies in TTO and VAS Values for EQ-5D Health States.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, L.M.; Stalmeier, P.F.M.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Busschbach, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most EQ-5D health states can be ordered logically. When people assign values to different health states, they may violate this logical order, which can be seen as inconsistencies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of inconsistently valued EQ-5D health states on me

  1. Phonological inconsistency in word naming: Determinants of the interference effect between languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, E.M.G.; Sandra, D.M.J.; Martensen, H.E.; Dijkstra, A.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch-English participants named words and nonwords having a between-language phonologically inconsistent rime, e.g., GREED and PREED, and control words with a language-typical rime, e.g., GROAN, in a monolingual stimulus list or in a mixed list containing Dutch words. Inconsistent items had longer

  2. Reporting individual results for biomonitoring and environmental exposures: lessons learned from environmental communication case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Julia Green; Dunagan, Sarah C; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Brown, Phil; Patton, Sharyle; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2014-05-26

    Measurement methods for chemicals in biological and personal environmental samples have expanded rapidly and become a cornerstone of health studies and public health surveillance. These measurements raise questions about whether and how to report individual results to study participants, particularly when health effects and exposure reduction strategies are uncertain. In an era of greater public participation and open disclosure in science, researchers and institutional review boards (IRBs) need new guidance on changing norms and best practices. Drawing on the experiences of researchers, IRBs, and study participants, we discuss ethical frameworks, effective methods, and outcomes in studies that have reported personal results for a wide range of environmental chemicals. Belmont Report principles and community-based participatory research ethics imply responsibilities to report individual results, and several recent biomonitoring guidance documents call for individual reports. Meaningful report-back includes contextual information about health implications and exposure reduction strategies. Both narrative and graphs are helpful. Graphs comparing an individual's results with other participants in the study and benchmarks, such as the National Exposure Report, are helpful, but must be used carefully to avoid incorrect inferences that higher results are necessarily harmful or lower results are safe. Methods can be tailored for specific settings by involving participants and community members in planning. Participants and researchers who have participated in report-back identified benefits: increasing trust in science, retention in cohort studies, environmental health literacy, individual and community empowerment, and motivation to reduce exposures. Researchers as well as participants gained unexpected insights into the characteristics and sources of environmental contamination. Participants are almost universally eager to receive their results and do not regret getting

  3. An Approach for Detecting Inconsistencies between Behavioral Models of the Software Architecture and the Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciraci, Selim; Sozer, Hasan; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2012-07-16

    In practice, inconsistencies between architectural documentation and the code might arise due to improper implementation of the architecture or the separate, uncontrolled evolution of the code. Several approaches have been proposed to detect the inconsistencies between the architecture and the code but these tend to be limited for capturing inconsistencies that might occur at runtime. We present a runtime verification approach for detecting inconsistencies between the dynamic behavior of the architecture and the actual code. The approach is supported by a set of tools that implement the architecture and the code patterns in Prolog, and support the automatic generation of runtime monitors for detecting inconsistencies. We illustrate the approach and the toolset for a Crisis Management System case study.

  4. Patient-reported speech in noise difficulties and hyperacusis symptoms and correlation with test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridakou, Chrysa; Luxon, Linda M; Bamiou, Doris E

    2012-07-01

    To compare self-reported symptoms of difficulty hearing speech in noise and hyperacusis in adults with auditory processing disorders (APDs) and normal controls; and to compare self-reported symptoms to objective test results (speech in babble test, transient evoked otoacoustic emission [TEOAE] suppression test using contralateral noise). A prospective case-control pilot study. Twenty-two participants were recruited in the study: 10 patients with reported hearing difficulty, normal audiometry, and a clinical diagnosis of APD; and 12 normal age-matched controls with no reported hearing difficulty. All participants completed the validated Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability questionnaire, a hyperacusis questionnaire, a speech in babble test, and a TEOAE suppression test using contralateral noise. Patients had significantly worse scores than controls in all domains of the Amsterdam Inventory questionnaire (with the exception of sound detection) and the hyperacusis questionnaire (P correction. Strong correlations were observed between self-reported symptoms of difficulty hearing speech in noise and speech in babble test results in the right ear (ρ = 0.624, P = .002), and between self-reported symptoms of hyperacusis and TEOAE suppression test results in the right ear (ρ = -0.597 P = .003). There was no significant correlation between the two tests. A strong correlation was observed between right ear speech in babble and patient-reported intelligibility of speech in noise, and right ear TEOAE suppression by contralateral noise and hyperacusis questionnaire. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Heterogeneity in Choice Inconsistencies Among the Elderly: Evidence from Prescription Drug Plan Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaluck, Jason; Gruber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the degree to which choice inconsistencies documented in the context of Medicare Part D plan choice vary across consumers and geographic regions. Our main finding is that there is surprisingly little variation: regardless of age, gender, predicted drug expenditures or the predictability of drug demand consumers underweight out of pocket costs relative to premiums and fail to consider the individualized consequences of plan characteristics; as a result, they frequently choose plans which are dominated in the sense that an alternative plan provides better risk protection at a lower cost. We find limited evidence that the sickest individuals had more difficulty with plan choice, and we document that much of the variation in potential cost savings across states comes from variation in choice sets, not variation in consumers’ ability to choose. PMID:25663708

  6. Artificial grammar learning of melody is constrained by melodic inconsistency: Narmour's principles affect melodic learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rohrmeier

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence suggests that people acquire artificial grammars incidentally and implicitly, an indispensable capacity for the acquisition of music or language. However, less research has been devoted to exploring constraints affecting incidental learning. Within the domain of music, the extent to which Narmour's (1990 melodic principles affect implicit learning of melodic structure was experimentally explored. Extending previous research (Rohrmeier, Rebuschat & Cross, 2011, the identical finite-state grammar is employed having terminals (the alphabet manipulated so that melodies generated systematically violated Narmour's principles. Results indicate that Narmour-inconsistent melodic materials impede implicit learning. This further constitutes a case in which artificial grammar learning is affected by prior knowledge or processing constraints.

  7. Three approaches to deal with inconsistent decision tables - Comparison of decision tree complexity

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In inconsistent decision tables, there are groups of rows with equal values of conditional attributes and different decisions (values of the decision attribute). We study three approaches to deal with such tables. Instead of a group of equal rows, we consider one row given by values of conditional attributes and we attach to this row: (i) the set of all decisions for rows from the group (many-valued decision approach); (ii) the most common decision for rows from the group (most common decision approach); and (iii) the unique code of the set of all decisions for rows from the group (generalized decision approach). We present experimental results and compare the depth, average depth and number of nodes of decision trees constructed by a greedy algorithm in the framework of each of the three approaches. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Inconsistencies of the magnetostatic approximation in the description of a bi-component magnonic slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano, Z.; Ordóñez-Romero, C. L.; Monsivais, G.

    2017-09-01

    A complete theoretical analysis of inconsistencies of the magnetostatic model when applied to describe the propagation of spin waves through a bi-component system is presented. The standard magnetostatic theory, widely used to study propagation in a single homogenous magnetic media, has been used incorrectly in some recent papers to describe the spin wave propagation in bi-component systems. Our results demonstrate, in fact, that the application of the standard magnetostatic theory applied to this kind of system leads exclusively to a trivial solution. We discuss the boundary conditions to be fulfilled when two ferromagnetic media with different magnetic properties are coupled, as occurs at each interface of a bi-component magnonic crystal.

  9. Reporting genetic results in research studies: summary and recommendations of an NHLBI working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, Ebony B; Langehorne, Aleisha A; Eckfeldt, John H; Glass, Kathleen C; Jarvik, Gail P; Klag, Michael; Koski, Greg; Motulsky, Arno; Wilfond, Benjamin; Manolio, Teri A; Fabsitz, Richard R; Luepker, Russell V

    2006-05-15

    Prospective epidemiologic studies aid in identifying genetic variants associated with diseases, health risks, and physiologic traits. These genetic variants may eventually be measured clinically for purposes of diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. As evidence of the potential clinical value of such information accrues, research studies face growing pressure to report these results to study participants or their physicians, even before sufficient evidence is available to support widespread screening of asymptomatic persons. There is thus a need to begin to develop consensus on whether and when genetic findings should be reported to participants in research studies. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a Working Group on Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies to discuss if, when, and how genetic information should be reported to study participants. The Working Group concluded that genetic test results should be reported to study participants when the associated risk for the disease is significant; the disease has important health implications such as premature death or substantial morbidity or has significant reproductive implications; and proven therapeutic or preventive interventions are available. Finally, the Working Group recommended procedures for reporting genetic research results and encouraged increased efforts to create uniform guidelines for this activity.

  10. Risk of bias and brand explain the observed inconsistency in trials on glucosamine for symptomatic relief of osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Patrick; Bartels, Else M; Altman, Roy D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether study sponsor, chemical formulation, brand of glucosamine, and/or risk of bias explain observed inconsistencies in trials of glucosamine's efficacy for treating pain in osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: A systematic review and stratified meta-analysis of randomized......)]) served as effect size. RESULTS: The inclusion criteria yielded 25 trials (3,458 patients). Glucosamine moderately reduced pain (SMD -0.51 [95% CI -0.72, -0.30]), although a high level of between-trial inconsistency was observed (I(2) = 88%). The single most important explanation (i.e., covariate......) was brand, reducing heterogeneity by 41% (P = 0.00032). Twelve trials (1,437 patients) using the Rottapharm/Madaus product resulted in significant pain reduction (SMD -1.07 [95% CI -1.47, -0.67]), although a sensitivity analysis of 3 low risk of bias trials using the Rottapharm/Madaus product showed less...

  11. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

  12. Sex with sweethearts: Exploring factors associated with inconsistent condom use among unmarried female entertainment workers in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Siyan; Tuot, Sovannary; Chhoun, Pheak; Pal, Khuondyla; Ngin, Chanrith; Chhim, Kolab; Brody, Carinne

    2017-01-05

    Despite the success in promoting condom use in commercial relationships, condom use with regular, noncommercial partners remains low among key populations in Cambodia. This study explores factors associated inconsistent condom use with sweethearts among unmarried sexually active female entertainment workers (FEWs). In 2014, the probability proportional to size sampling method was used to randomly select 204 FEWs from entertainment venues in Phnom Penh and Siem Reap for face-to-face interviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine independent determinants of inconsistent condom use. Of total, 31.4% of the respondents reported consistent condom use with sweethearts in the past three months. After adjustment, respondents who reported inconsistent condom use with sweethearts remained significantly less likely to report having received any form of sexual and reproductive health education (AOR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.22-0.99), but more likely to report having been tested for HIV in the past six months (AOR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.03-4.65). They were significantly more likely to report having used higher amount of alcohol in the past three months (AOR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.01-1.99) and currently using a contraceptive method other than condoms such as pills (AOR = 4.46, 95% CI = 1.34-10.52) or other methods (AOR = 9.75, 95% CI = 2.07-9.86). The rate of consistent condom use in romantic relationships among unmarried FEWs in this study is considerably low. The importance of consistent condom use with regular, non-commercial partners should be emphasized in the education sessions and materials, particularly for FEWs who use non-barrier contraceptive methods.

  13. Recommendations for reporting results of diagnostic genetic testing (biochemical, cytogenetic and molecular genetic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claustres, Mireille; Kozich, Viktor; Dequeker, Els; Fowler, Brain; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Miller, Konstantin; Oosterwijk, Cor; Peterlin, Borut; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Zimmermann, Uwe; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Hastings, Ros J.; Barton, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic test results can have considerable importance for patients, their parents and more remote family members. Clinical therapy and surveillance, reproductive decisions and genetic diagnostics in family members, including prenatal diagnosis, are based on these results. The genetic test report sho

  14. Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test results in European countries: an ESCMID cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Céline; Tebano, Gianpiero; Mutters, Nico T; Tacconelli, Evelina; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jarlier, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results is one possible laboratory-based antibiotic stewardship intervention. The primary aim of this study was to identify where and how selective reporting of AST results is implemented in Europe both in inpatient and in outpatient settings. An ESCMID cross-sectional, self-administered, internet-based survey was conducted among all EUCIC (European Committee on Infection Control) or EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) national representatives in Europe and Israel. Of 38 countries, 36 chose to participate in the survey. Selective reporting of AST results was implemented in 11/36 countries (31%), was partially implemented in 4/36 (11%) and was limited to local initiatives or was not adopted in 21/36 (58%). It was endorsed as standard of care by health authorities in only three countries. The organisation of selective reporting was everywhere discretionally managed by each laboratory, with a pronounced intra- and inter-country variability. The most frequent application was in uncomplicated community-acquired infections, particularly urinary tract and skin and soft-tissue infections. The list of reported antibiotics ranged from a few first-line options, to longer reports where only last-resort antibiotics were hidden. Several barriers to implementation were reported, mainly lack of guidelines, poor system support, insufficient resources, and lack of professionals' capability. In conclusion, selective reporting of AST results is poorly implemented in Europe and is applied with a huge heterogeneity of practices. Development of an international framework, based on existing initiatives and identified barriers, could favour its dissemination as one important element of antibiotic stewardship programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Tank 241-A-101, cores 154 and 156 analytical results for the 45 day report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, F.H.

    1996-10-18

    This document is the 45-day laboratory report for tank 241 -A-101 push mode core segments collected between July II, 1996 and July 25, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-A-101 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Field, 1996) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity (AT) or Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded notification limits as stated in the Safety Screening DQO (Dukelow, et al., 1995). Statistical evaluation on results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. Primary safety screening results and the raw data from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and DSC analyses are included in this report.

  16. Tank 241-AN-105, cores 152 and 153, analytical results for the 45 day report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, F.H.

    1996-09-20

    This document is the 45-day laboratory report for tank 241-AN-105 push mode core segments collected between June 10, 1996 and June 28, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AN-105 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity or Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded notification limits as stated in the Safety Screening DQO. Statistical evaluation on results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. Primary safety screening results and the raw data from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and DSC analyses are included in this report.

  17. Multiculturalism and inconsistency in the perception of sex education in Australian society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahbobi, Ghanim

    2012-01-01

    A group of individuals who share common beliefs form a culture in which they communicate their values and attributes about certain aspects of society. Sex education remains one of the early teachings that humans experience irrespective of the race or level of development of a given society. However, different cultures perceive sex education differently due to differences in attitudes and beliefs, leading to significant diversity in the management of sex education among different societies across the globe. Many studies have found that in a traditional society with a homogeneous culture, the foremost reason for the different approaches to sex education is related to traditional values, in addition to other factors such as religion and political belief. In order to improve sex education, and consequently, sexual health in a modern multicultural society such as Australia, it becomes imperative to identify the inconsistency in beliefs about sex education among individuals with different cultural backgrounds in the Australian population. In this report, the author highlights similarities and differences in the methods employed by certain cultures of the Australian population. The report considers the different cultural environments of specific societies, the prevalence of sex education in these societies and how culture influences the prevalence. The concluding thoughts reflect on the success of the education programs in Australia, based on the idea that resolving the problems of sex education needs support from a number of bodies within Australian society.

  18. The Belgian Health System Performance Report 2012: snapshot of results and recommendations to policy makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijens, France; Renard, Françoise; Jonckheer, Pascale; Van den Heede, Koen; Desomer, Anja; Van de Voorde, Carine; Walckiers, Denise; Dubois, Cécile; Camberlin, Cécile; Vlayen, Joan; Van Oyen, Herman; Léonard, Christian; Meeus, Pascal

    2013-09-01

    Following the commitments of the Tallinn Charter, Belgium publishes the second report on the performance of its health system. A set of 74 measurable indicators is analysed, and results are interpreted following the five dimensions of the conceptual framework: accessibility, quality of care, efficiency, sustainability and equity. All domains of care are covered (preventive, curative, long-term and end-of-life care), as well as health status and health promotion. For all indicators, national/regional values are presented with their evolution over time. Benchmarking to results of other EU-15 countries is also systematic. The policy recommendations represent the most important output of the report.

  19. Prevalence of Inconsistencies in the Recorded Outcomes of Clinical Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Zola; Spirko, Blake; Smithline, Howard; Garb, Jane

    2017-04-01

    The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of variations in the recorded outcomes of clinical evaluations by 2 different physicians during a single patient visit and to comment on observations of physician practices regarding history taking and physical examination. Structured interviews were conducted with both junior and supervising physicians after they had evaluated patients in a pediatric emergency department who presented with complaints of fever (temperature, >100.4°F) in infants younger than 3 months, fever (temperature, >102.2°F) in infants aged 3 to 12 months, headache in patients older than 5 years, abdominal pain in patients older than 5 years, and head injury in patients younger than 18 years. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Most of the data reported by both junior and supervising physicians showed response disagreement. The questions on fever (temperature, >102.2°F) in infants aged 3 to 12 months showed 29% (10/34) disagreement on fever duration and 45% (5/11) on fever height. Questions on abdominal pain in children older than 5 years showed 24% (24/100) disagreement on reporting right lower quadrant pain and 10% (11/106) on right lower quadrant tenderness on examination; however, the discrepancy rates were 56% (56/100) when considering less than complete agreement on all painful sites and 53% (56/106) on all tender sites. Supervising physicians questioned and examined patients presenting with abdominal pain more often than those presenting with other complaints. There are significant variations in the recorded outcome of clinical evaluations by 2 different physicians during a single patient visit. Supervising physicians are more cautious to question and examine patients presenting with abdominal pain compared with other chief complaints.

  20. International consensus on ANA patterns (ICAP): the bumpy road towards a consensus on reporting ANA results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, Jan; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; Andrade, Luis E C; Chan, Edward K L; Conrad, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) was initiated as a workshop aiming to thoroughly discuss and achieve consensus regarding the morphological patterns observed in the indirect immunofluorescence assay on HEp-2 cells. One of the topics discussed at the second ICAP workshop, and addressed in this paper, was the harmonization of reporting ANA test results. This discussion centered on the issue if cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns should be reported as positive or negative. This report outlines the issues that impact on two major different reporting methods. Although it was appreciated by all participants that cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns are clinically relevant, implications for existing diagnostic/classification criteria for ANA-associated diseases in particular hampered a final consensus on this topic. Evidently, a more concerted action of all relevant stakeholders is required. Future ICAP workshops may help to facilitate this action.

  1. Reporting of results of interventional studies by the information service of the National Institutes of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamliyan, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 mandated that sponsors of applicable studies must provide results within one year of study completion. We aimed to analyze the factors associated with reporting of results from interventional studies registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. On May 20, 2010, we retrieved 20 available fields from 57,233 closed studies on the website and identified 31,161 interventional studies that were required to post results. We compared the proportion of studies with results versus studies without results by age, gender, and disease status of participants, by interventions, sponsors, phase of clinical trials, and completion dates. The results of studies were reported for 4.7% of applicable studies, 8% of industry-sponsored studies, 7.5% of Phase II and 6.5% of Phase IV clinical trials, 4.9% of drug studies, and 0% of genetic studies. Withdrawn (n = 486) and suspended (n = 414) interventions did not provide results. The percentage of studies with results varied from 0% to 21% among different sponsors. The first studies with results were completed in 1992. The proportion of studies with results increased over time. Completion dates were not available for 7446 studies. The database does not have fields available to facilitate routine analysis of the rate of compliance with federal law for posting results. The analysis of accuracy of the protocols in relation to the results and publications is not possible without time-consuming evaluation of individual postings and individual publications. PMID:22291502

  2. Better living through transparency: improving the reproducibility of fMRI results through comprehensive methods reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carp, Joshua

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that a greater proportion of published scientific findings than expected cannot be replicated. The field of functional neuroimaging research is no exception to this trend, with estimates of false positive results ranging from 10 % to 40 %. While false positive results in neuroimaging studies stem from a variety of causes, incomplete methodological reporting is perhaps the most obvious: Most published reports of neuroimaging studies provide ambiguous or incomplete descriptions of their methods and results. If neuroimaging researchers do not report methods and results in adequate detail, independent scientists can neither check their work for errors nor accurately replicate their efforts. Thus, I argue that comprehensive methods reporting is essential for reproducible research. I recommend three strategies for improving transparency and reproducibility in neuroimaging research: improving natural language descriptions of research protocols; sharing source code for data collection and analysis; and sharing formal, machine-readable representations of methods and results. Last, I discuss the technological and cultural barriers to implementing these recommendations and suggest steps toward overcoming those barriers.

  3. Inconsistent year-to-year fluctuations limit the conclusiveness of global higher education rankings for university management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Sorz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Backround. University rankings are getting very high international media attention, this holds particularly true for the Times Higher Education Ranking (THE and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Academic Ranking of World Universities Ranking (ARWU. We therefore aimed to investigate how reliable the rankings are, especially for universities with lower ranking positions, that often show inconclusive year-to-year fluctuations in their rank, and if these rankings are thus a suitable basis for management purposes.Methods. We used the public available data from the web pages of the THE and the ARWU ranking to analyze the dynamics of change in score and ranking position from year to year, and we investigated possible causes for inconsistent fluctuations in the rankings by the means of regression analyses.Results. Regression analyses of results from the THE and ARWU from 2010–2014 show inconsistent fluctuations in the rank and score for universities with lower rank positions (below position 50 which lead to inconsistent “up and downs” in the total results, especially in the THE and to a lesser extent also in the ARWU. In both rankings, the mean year-to-year fluctuation of universities in groups of 50 universities aggregated by descending rank increases from less than 10% in the group of the 50 highest ranked universities to up to 60% in the group of the lowest ranked universities. Furthermore, year-to-year results do not correspond in THES- and ARWU-Rankings for universities below rank 50.Discussion. We conclude that the observed fluctuations in the THE do not correspond to actual university performance and ranking results are thus of limited conclusiveness for the university management of universities below a rank of 50. While the ARWU rankings seems more robust against inconsistent fluctuations, its year to year changes in the scores are very small, so essential changes from year to year could not be expected. Furthermore, year

  4. Inconsistent year-to-year fluctuations limit the conclusiveness of global higher education rankings for university management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorz, Johannes; Wallner, Bernard; Seidler, Horst; Fieder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Backround. University rankings are getting very high international media attention, this holds particularly true for the Times Higher Education Ranking (THE) and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University's Academic Ranking of World Universities Ranking (ARWU). We therefore aimed to investigate how reliable the rankings are, especially for universities with lower ranking positions, that often show inconclusive year-to-year fluctuations in their rank, and if these rankings are thus a suitable basis for management purposes. Methods. We used the public available data from the web pages of the THE and the ARWU ranking to analyze the dynamics of change in score and ranking position from year to year, and we investigated possible causes for inconsistent fluctuations in the rankings by the means of regression analyses. Results. Regression analyses of results from the THE and ARWU from 2010-2014 show inconsistent fluctuations in the rank and score for universities with lower rank positions (below position 50) which lead to inconsistent "up and downs" in the total results, especially in the THE and to a lesser extent also in the ARWU. In both rankings, the mean year-to-year fluctuation of universities in groups of 50 universities aggregated by descending rank increases from less than 10% in the group of the 50 highest ranked universities to up to 60% in the group of the lowest ranked universities. Furthermore, year-to-year results do not correspond in THES- and ARWU-Rankings for universities below rank 50. Discussion. We conclude that the observed fluctuations in the THE do not correspond to actual university performance and ranking results are thus of limited conclusiveness for the university management of universities below a rank of 50. While the ARWU rankings seems more robust against inconsistent fluctuations, its year to year changes in the scores are very small, so essential changes from year to year could not be expected. Furthermore, year-to-year results do not correspond

  5. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2013-01-01

    SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

  6. Adverse event reporting for herbal medicines: a result of market forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walji, Rishma; Boon, Heather; Barnes, Joanne; Austin, Zubin; Baker, G Ross; Welsh, Sandy

    2009-05-01

    Herbal products are readily available over the counter in health food stores and are often perceived to be without risk. The current Canadian adverse event reporting system suffers from severe underreporting, resulting in a scarcity of safety data on herbal products. Twelve health food store personnel in the Greater Toronto Area were interviewed about their responses to herbal product-related adverse reactions. They generally fostered customer loyalty by offering generous return policies, which included collecting contact information to be sent to the manufacturers with the returned product. Thus, despite the public's lack of knowledge about the formal reporting system, adverse reaction information was directed to manufacturers whenever it resulted in a product return. The relationship between health food stores, industry and Health Canada provides a new opportunity to facilitate adverse event reporting. Additional information could be collected during the return process, and educational initiatives could be implemented to augment current post-market surveillance procedures for herbal products.

  7. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Third Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-05-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published two previous reports, in August 2011 and July 2012, describing operation of these buses. New results in this report provide an update covering eight months through October 2013.

  8. A Graphical Exposition of the Inconsistency of Optimal Monetary Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindl, Frank G.

    2007-01-01

    The author presents a geometrical framework in which the inability of discretionary policy (consistent policy in the sense of Kydland and Prescott) to be socially optimal is demonstrated. Policy based on a rule results in a higher level of utility. The author extends the model to demonstrate that policy of a Rogoff conservative central banker…

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy in heavy fermions: Inconsistencies with the Kondo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Blyth, R.R.; Canfield, P.C.; Thompson, J.D.; Bartlett, R.J.; Fisk, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lawrence, J.; Tang, J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States); Riseborough, P. [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    1992-09-01

    We have investigated a number of Ce and Yb heavy fermion compounds via photoelectron spectroscopy and compared the results to the predictions of the Imurity Anderson Hamiltonian within the Gunnarson-Schonhammer approach. For the low T{sub K} materials investigated we find little or no correlation with T{sub K}, the only parameter that can be determined independent of photoemission.

  10. 49 CFR 655.72 - Reporting of results in a management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... management information system. (a) Each recipient shall annually prepare and maintain a summary of the... recipient's or employer's behalf. (d) As an employer, you must use the Management Information System (MIS... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of results in a management...

  11. Exploring the Effectiveness of a Measurement Error Tutorial in Helping Teachers Understand Score Report Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Rivera, Diego; Zwick, Rebecca; Vezzu, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effectiveness of a short web-based tutorial in helping teachers to better understand the portrayal of measurement error in test score reports. The short video tutorial included both verbal and graphical representations of measurement error. Results showed a significant difference in comprehension scores…

  12. 40 CFR 205.57-5 - Reporting of the test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting of the test results. 205.57-5 Section 205.57-5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks §...

  13. Annual inventory report for Pennsylvania's forests: results from the first two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; Carol A. Alerich; Daniel A. Devlin; Tonya W. Lister; Stephen L. Sterner; James A. Westfall

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program implemented a new system for inventory and monitoring Pennsylvania?s forest resources. The most salient benefit of the new inventory process will be a nearly threefold improvement in timeliness. This report summarizes the results of the first 2 years of annual inventory measurements...

  14. Tank 241-BY-109, cores 201 and 203, analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-11-20

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-BY-109 push mode core segments collected between June 6, 1997 and June 17, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (Bell, 1997), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow, et al, 1995). The analytical results are included.

  15. Exploring the Effectiveness of a Measurement Error Tutorial in Helping Teachers Understand Score Report Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Rivera, Diego; Zwick, Rebecca; Vezzu, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effectiveness of a short web-based tutorial in helping teachers to better understand the portrayal of measurement error in test score reports. The short video tutorial included both verbal and graphical representations of measurement error. Results showed a significant difference in comprehension scores…

  16. Consistency and Inconsistency Among Romantic Partners Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwick, Paul W; Harden, K Paige; Shukusky, Jennifer A; Morgan, Taylor Anne; Joel, Samantha

    2017-03-02

    Theoretical perspectives on mating differentially emphasize whether (and why) romantic partner selection and maintenance processes derive from stable features of individuals (e.g., mate value, mate preferences, relationship aptitude) and their environments (e.g., social homogamy) rather than adventitious, dyad-specific, or unpredictable factors. The current article advances our understanding of this issue by assessing how people's actual romantic partners vary on constructs commonly assessed in evolutionary psychology (Study 1), sociology (Study 2), and close relationships (Study 3). Specifically, we calculated the extent to which the past and present partners of a focal person (i.e., the person who dated all of the partners) cluster on various measures. Study 1 investigated consistency in the observable qualities of the romantic partners, revealing substantial evidence for clustering on coder-rated attributes like attractiveness and masculinity. Study 2 examined qualities self-reported by romantic partners themselves in a demographically diverse sample and found modest evidence for clustering on attributes such as IQ and educational aspirations; however, clustering in this study was largely due to demographic stratification. Study 3 explored target-specific ratings by partners about the focal person and found little evidence for clustering: The ability to elicit high romantic desirability/sexual satisfaction ratings from partners was not a stable individual difference. The variables that affect mating may differ considerably in the extent to which they serve as stable versus unpredictable factors; thus, the fields of evolutionary psychology, sociology, and close relationships may reveal distinct depictions of mating because the constructs and assessment strategies in each differ along this underappreciated dimension. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Exploratory and heuristic investigation into the impact of inconsistent accounting practices in the coal-extraction industry - a survey approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffee, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of these inconsistent accounting practices and to consider the relative significance of the basic accounting conventions of matching and realization in producing the inconsistent accounting practices. An expert opinion survey is employed as a measurement instrument. A purposive sampling plan is developed, using judgment to obtain a representative group of individuals who are expert in the financial accounting practices of coal-extraction companies. This group consists of the chief financial officers of 183 coal-producing companies and 54 representatives of national accounting firms. Included in the group are representatives from the 99 largest coal-producing companies in the United States and 54 individuals in public accounting from each of the traditional big eight national accounting firms. An overall response rate of 53% was obtained, including a 79% response from the national accounting firm personnel. The findings of the expert opinion survey support the conclusion that inconsistent accounting practices in the coal industry may seriously impair users' ability to compare financial results of coal producers. The findings support the need for authoritative or quasi-authoritative accounting standards.

  18. Inconsistent Effect of Arousal on Early Auditory Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolders, Anna C; Band, Guido P H; Stallen, Pieter Jan M

    2017-01-01

    Mood has been shown to influence cognitive performance. However, little is known about the influence of mood on sensory processing, specifically in the auditory domain. With the current study, we sought to investigate how auditory processing of neutral sounds is affected by the mood state of the listener. This was tested in two experiments by measuring masked-auditory detection thresholds before and after a standard mood-induction procedure. In the first experiment (N = 76), mood was induced by imagining a mood-appropriate event combined with listening to mood inducing music. In the second experiment (N = 80), imagining was combined with affective picture viewing to exclude any possibility of confounding the results by acoustic properties of the music. In both experiments, the thresholds were determined by means of an adaptive staircase tracking method in a two-interval forced-choice task. Masked detection thresholds were compared between participants in four different moods (calm, happy, sad, and anxious), which enabled differentiation of mood effects along the dimensions arousal and pleasure. Results of the two experiments were analyzed both in separate analyses and in a combined analysis. The first experiment showed that, while there was no impact of pleasure level on the masked threshold, lower arousal was associated with lower threshold (higher masked sensitivity). However, as indicated by an interaction effect between experiment and arousal, arousal did have a different effect on the threshold in Experiment 2. Experiment 2 showed a trend of arousal in opposite direction. These results show that the effect of arousal on auditory-masked sensitivity may depend on the modality of the mood-inducing stimuli. As clear conclusions regarding the genuineness of the arousal effect on the masked threshold cannot be drawn, suggestions for further research that could clarify this issue are provided.

  19. Detecting Inconsistencies in the Gene Ontology Using Ontology Databases with Not-gadgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lependu, Paea; Dou, Dejing; Howe, Doug

    We present ontology databases with not-gadgets, a method for detecting inconsistencies in an ontology with large numbers of annotated instances by using triggers and exclusion dependencies in a unique way. What makes this work relevant is the use of the database itself, rather than an external reasoner, to detect logical inconsistencies given large numbers of annotated instances. What distinguishes this work is the use of event-driven triggers together with the introduction of explicit negations. We applied this approach toward the serotonin example, an open problem in biomedical informatics which aims to use annotations to help identify inconsistencies in the Gene Ontology. We discovered 75 inconsistencies that have important implications in biology, which include: (1) methods for refining transfer rules used for inferring electronic annotations, and (2) highlighting possible biological differences across species worth investigating.

  20. The Inconsistency Between The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Wen-hua

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares Mark Twain’s The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and The Man That Corrupted Had⁃leyburg, in terms of their stylistic and semantic inconsistency, specifically, their narrative technique and moral vision.

  1. A theory of Markovian time-inconsistent stochastic control in discrete time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjork, Tomas; Murgoci, Agatha

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theory for a general class of discrete-time stochastic control problems that, in various ways, are time-inconsistent in the sense that they do not admit a Bellman optimality principle. We attack these problems by viewing them within a game theoretic framework, and we look for subgame...... function. Most known examples of time-inconsistent stochastic control problems in the literature are easily seen to be special cases of the present theory. We also prove that for every time-inconsistent problem, there exists an associated time-consistent problem such that the optimal control...... and the optimal value function for the consistent problem coincide with the equilibrium control and value function, respectively for the time-inconsistent problem. To exemplify the theory, we study some concrete examples, such as hyperbolic discounting and mean–variance control....

  2. A design-by-treatment interaction model for network meta-analysis with random inconsistency effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dan; Barrett, Jessica K; Rice, Stephen; White, Ian R; Higgins, Julian P T

    2014-09-20

    Network meta-analysis is becoming more popular as a way to analyse multiple treatments simultaneously and, in the right circumstances, rank treatments. A difficulty in practice is the possibility of 'inconsistency' or 'incoherence', where direct evidence and indirect evidence are not in agreement. Here, we develop a random-effects implementation of the recently proposed design-by-treatment interaction model, using these random effects to model inconsistency and estimate the parameters of primary interest. Our proposal is a generalisation of the model proposed by Lumley and allows trials with three or more arms to be included in the analysis. Our methods also facilitate the ranking of treatments under inconsistency. We derive R and I(2) statistics to quantify the impact of the between-study heterogeneity and the inconsistency. We apply our model to two examples.

  3. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: First Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This report provides the early data results and implementation experience of the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service.

  4. A transfection reporter for the prevention of false-negative results in molecular beacon experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Tatsuya; Kuraoka, Isao; Yasui, Akira; Iwai, Shigenori

    2013-09-01

    We previously developed a molecular beacon-type probe to detect the strand scission in cellular base excision repair and found that the phosphodiester linkages in the fluorophore/quencher linkers were cleaved. This reaction was applied to a transfection reporter, which contained the unmodified phosphodiester in the linker to another type of fluorophore. After cotransfection of cells with the probe and the reporter, the signals were used to detect the incision and to confirm the proper transfection, respectively. This method will contribute to the prevention of false-negative results in experiments using molecular beacon-type probes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. General practitioners′ attitudes toward reporting and learning from adverse events: results from a survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Thorbjørn H.; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate GPs' attitudes to and willingness to report and learn from adverse events and to study how a reporting system should function. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: General practice in Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: GPs' attitudes to exchange of experience with colleagues and others......, and circumstances under which such exchange is accepted. SUBJECTS: A structured questionnaire sent to 1198 GPs of whom 61% responded. RESULTS. GPs had a positive attitude towards discussing adverse events in the clinic with colleagues and staff and in their continuing medical education groups. The GPs had...

  6. Comment on "Multidimensional results reporting to participants in genomic studies: getting it right".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, Ebony B; Langehorne, Aleisha A; Eckfeldt, John H; Glass, Kathleen C; Jarvik, Gail P; Klag, Michael; Koski, Greg; Motulsky, Arno; Wilfond, Benjamin; Manolio, Teri A; Fabsitz, Richard R; Luepker, Russell V

    2011-02-16

    Bookman et al. write to correct the impression given in the Commentary by Kohane and Taylor that the recommendations of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Working Group "Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies" included advice to return genetic information to research subjects only in cases where there is a proven or preventative intervention for the identified disorder. In fact, the report does recommend that genetic information be returned to subjects when there is an intervention available, but it does not recommend against giving this kind of information to subjects if there is no available intervention.

  7. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree information of sibs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calus, Mario P L; Mulder, Han A; Bastiaansen, John W M

    2011-10-11

    Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype information are not in agreement. Straightforward tests to detect Mendelian inconsistencies exist that count the number of opposing homozygous marker (e.g. SNP) genotypes between parent and offspring (PAR-OFF). Here, we develop two tests to identify Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs. The first test counts SNP with opposing homozygous genotypes between sib pairs (SIBCOUNT). The second test compares pedigree and SNP-based relationships (SIBREL). All tests iteratively remove animals based on decreasing numbers of inconsistent parents and offspring or sibs. The PAR-OFF test, followed by either SIB test, was applied to a dataset comprising 2,078 genotyped cows and 211 genotyped sires. Theoretical expectations for distributions of test statistics of all three tests were calculated and compared to empirically derived values. Type I and II error rates were calculated after applying the tests to the edited data, while Mendelian inconsistencies were introduced by permuting pedigree against genotype data for various proportions of animals. Both SIB tests identified animal pairs for which pedigree and genomic relationships could be considered as inconsistent by visual inspection of a scatter plot of pairwise pedigree and SNP-based relationships. After removal of 235 animals with the PAR-OFF test, SIBCOUNT (SIBREL) identified 18 (22) additional inconsistent animals.Seventeen animals were identified by both methods. The numbers of incorrectly deleted animals (Type I error), were equally low for both methods, while the numbers of incorrectly non-deleted animals (Type II error), were considerably higher for SIBREL compared to SIBCOUNT. Tests to remove Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs should

  8. Replication of Psycholinguistic Experiments and the Resolution of Inconsistencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rákosi, Csilla

    2017-05-05

    Non-exact replications are regarded as effective tools of problem solving in psycholinguistic research because they lead to more plausible experimental results; however, they are also ineffective tools of problem solving because they trigger cumulative contradictions among different replications of an experiment. This paper intends to resolve this paradox by putting forward a metatheoretical model that clarifies the criteria with the help of which various aspects of the effectiveness of the problem solving process can be differentiated and evaluated. The key point is the reconstruction of the relationship between original experiments and their non-exact replications by introducing the concept of 'experimental complex' and analysing the problem solving strategies that the researchers apply. The workability of the proposed metatheoretical model is illustrated with the help of three case studies.

  9. Post-stroke rehabilitation in Italy: inconsistencies across regional strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, D; Spallazzi, M; Baldereschi, M; Di Carlo, A; Ferro, S; Rota E Morelli, N; Immovilli, P; Toni, D; Polizzi, B M; Inzitari, D

    2014-06-01

    Remarkable differences among European countries have been found in stroke rehabilitation models, owing to the fact that stroke rehabilitation services are embedded in health care systems. Comprehensive data on service utilization by stroke survivors in Italy are lacking, but would be instrumental in improving efficiency and effectiveness of post-acute stroke care, and consequently, in containing costs and improving outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to survey the Italian regional legislations in order to examine the provision of rehabilitation services for stroke survivors in Italy. This is a cross-sectional, observational study. Post-stroke intra- and extra-hospital rehabilitation. All decrees and resolutions as to post-acute stroke rehabilitation were collected from each Italian region. All decrees and resolutions were examined by the means of a check list including quantitative and qualitative characteristics, selected in accordance with national official recommendations. Each completed check list was then sent to each regional reference person, who filled in the section on the implementation of the indications and compliance. The study was carried out from November 2009 to September 2010. The documents were collected from 19 out of the 20 Italian regions. The results of the study indicate that there are many, remarkable regional variations in health policies concerning post-stroke care. Instruments for evaluation and criteria for allocating stroke patients to proper rehabilitation setting vary across regions, but data on the potential impact of these variations on clinical outcomes are still lacking. The study highlights the issue that, in Italy, delivery of post-stroke rehabilitation services is not uniform nation-wide and varies substantially across regions. The lack of a comprehensive post-acute stroke strategy is a major obstacle to service availability. The study results advocate the need for a consistent and comprehensive strategic planning of

  10. Inconsistency and non-additive Choquet integration in the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We propose to extend the aggregation scheme of Saaty's AHP, from the standard weighted averaging to the more general Choquet integration. In our model, a measure of inconsistency between criteria is derived from the main pairwise comparison matrix and it is used to construct a non-additive capacity, whose associated Choquet integral reduces to the standard weighted mean in the consistency case. In the general inconsistency case, however, the new aggregation scheme based on Choquet integration...

  11. Human (InConsistencies in Ian McEwan’s Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anghel Florentina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ian McEwan’s Amsterdam has supplied its readers with psychological, moral and social topical issues presented in an easy flowing and exhilarating style. Starting from the assumption that life consists of a series of inconsistencies which are inherent and bring their contribution to the individual’s formation, the paper aims at demonstrating that the protagonists’ judgmental and moral inconsistencies, which are used as a plot generator and are environmentally determined, reveal features of their personality.

  12. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2012-05-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

  13. The results of early operation in talipes quino-varus. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, B J; Crider, R J; Polk, M; Lloyd-Roberts, G C; Swann, M; Kamdar, B A

    1977-08-01

    The results of operation performed within the first six months of life upon seventy-seven resistant club feet are presented. The indications for and the rationale of early operation are discussed. Particular attention has been paid to the relationship between the age at operation and the outcome more than four years later; the results were greatly superior when operation was undertaken early. Two surgical techniques are compared, the postero-medial release proving better than a simple posterior release. The relationship between clinical and radiological assessment is discussed, and also the influence of the results reported upon future practice.

  14. New distances for a selected set of visual binaries with inconsistent dynamical masses

    CERN Document Server

    Tamazian, V S; Docobo, J A; Chulkov, D A; Campo, P P

    2016-01-01

    We have selected a set of 17 visual binaries that demonstrate great inconsistency between the systemic mass obtained through Kepler's Third Law as compared to that calculated through standard mass-luminosity and mass-spectrum relationships. A careful inspection of orbital data and parallaxes showed that the current orbits of nine binaries (WDS 00155-1608, WDS 00174+0853, WDS 05017+2050, WDS 06410+0954, WDS 16212-2536, WDS 17336-3706, WDS 19217-1557, WDS 20312+1116, and WDS 21118+5959) do not need to be improved, instead we recommend different parallax (distance) value for them. On the other hand, we considered that eight orbits (WDS 02366+1227, WDS 02434-6643, WDS 03244-1539, WDS 08507+1800, WDS 09128-6055, WDS 11532-1540, WDS 17375+2419, and WDS 22408-0333) had to be improved. Due to various reasons mentioned in this paper, their distances should most likely be corrected unless better orbital solutions and/or more precise parallaxes are reported. To obtain consistent mass values, the use of the dynamical par...

  15. Preprocessing in Matlab Inconsistent Linear System for a Meaningful Least Squares Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Symal K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical models of many physical/statistical problems are systems of linear equations Due to measurement and possible human errors/mistakes in modeling/data, as well as due to certain assumptions to reduce complexity, inconsistency (contradiction) is injected into the model, viz. the linear system. While any inconsistent system irrespective of the degree of inconsistency has always a least-squares solution, one needs to check whether an equation is too much inconsistent or, equivalently too much contradictory. Such an equation will affect/distort the least-squares solution to such an extent that renders it unacceptable/unfit to be used in a real-world application. We propose an algorithm which (i) prunes numerically redundant linear equations from the system as these do not add any new information to the model, (ii) detects contradictory linear equations along with their degree of contradiction (inconsistency index), (iii) removes those equations presumed to be too contradictory, and then (iv) obtain the . minimum norm least-squares solution of the acceptably inconsistent reduced linear system. The algorithm presented in Matlab reduces the computational and storage complexities and also improves the accuracy of the solution. It also provides the necessary warning about the existence of too much contradiction in the model. In addition, we suggest a thorough relook into the mathematical modeling to determine the reason why unacceptable contradiction has occurred thus prompting us to make necessary corrections/modifications to the models - both mathematical and, if necessary, physical.

  16. Vection Induced by Consistent and Inconsistent Multisensory Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April E. Ash

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined physical and simulated self-motion along the horizontal and depth axes. Subjects viewed optic flow which consisted of: (i a component that simulated constant velocity self-motion; and (ii a component that simulated oscillation of their viewpoint. In active self-motion conditions, the latter flow component was either in- or out-of-phase with the observer's own (tracked oscillatory head movements. In passive self-motion conditions, stationary subjects simply viewed playbacks of the oscillating displays generated in previous physical self-motion conditions. We found that adding active in-phase horizontal oscillation to radial flow resulted in a modest vection advantage compared to active out-of-phase horizontal oscillation and passive horizontal display oscillation conditions. By contrast, when actively generated fore-aft display oscillation was added to either radial or lamellar flow we found similar vection strength ratings for both in-phase and out-of-phase depth oscillation. We conclude that multisensory input can enhance the visual perception of self-motion in some situations, but may not have to be consistent (i.e., ecological to generate compelling vection in depth.

  17. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo John

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome measures that were used in the trials – the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, the Psoriasis Symptom Assessment (PSA Scale, and two itch measures, a Visual Analog Scale (VAS and the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF itch measure. Methods Subjects aged 18 to 70 years with moderate to severe psoriasis for at least 6 months were recruited into the two clinical trials (n = 1095. Internal consistency reliability was evaluated for all patient reported outcomes at baseline and at 12 weeks. Construct validity was evaluated by relations among the different patient reported outcomes and between the patient reported outcomes and the clinical assessments (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index; Overall Lesion Severity Scale; Physician's Global Assessment of Change assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks, as was the change over the course of the 12 week portion of the trial. Results Internal consistency reliability ranged from 0.86 to 0.95 for the patient reported outcome measures. The patient reported outcome measures were all shown to have significant construct validity with respect to each other and with respect to the clinical assessments. The four measures also demonstrated significant responsiveness to change in underlying clinical status of the patients over the course of the trial, as measured by the independently assessed clinical outcomes. Conclusions The DLQI, the PSA, VAS, and the NPF are considered useful tools for the measurement of dermatology

  18. Tank 241-AX-103, cores 212 and 214 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, F.H.

    1998-02-05

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AX-103 push mode core segments collected between July 30, 1997 and August 11, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AX-103 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Comer, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT), plutonium 239 (Pu239), and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Conner, 1997). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report.

  19. Tank 241-T-105, cores 205 and 207 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, R. A.

    1997-10-21

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-T-105 push mode core segments collected between June 24, 1997 and June 30, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the {ital Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan} (TSAP) (Field,1997), the {ital Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective} (Safety DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995) and {ital Tank 241-T-105 Sample Analysis} (memo) (Field, 1997a). The analytical results are included in Table 1. None of the subsamples submitted for the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis or total alpha activity (AT) exceeded the notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Field, 1997). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report.

  20. Long-term results of complex left ventricular reconstruction surgery: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsou, George V; Forrester, Matthew; Frazier, O H

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular reconstruction is advocated as a surgical option for patients with severe congestive heart failure. Despite initial enthusiasm for this procedure, reports of long-term results are sparse. Herein, we describe a particularly gratifying case of left ventricular reconstruction in a 43-year-old man, who continues to have excellent left ventricular function 10 years postoperatively. This approach may be a reasonable alternative to cardiac transplantation in patients who lack other treatment options.

  1. A proximal femur aneurysmal bone cyst resulting in amputation: a rare case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC is blood filled expansile cystic lesion that most commonly occurs in patients during the second decade of their lives. Traditionally it has been described as a benign lesion but can be locally aggressive and result in the destruction of the involved bone. Treatment methods include surgical excision and curettage with or without bone grafting. We report a proximal femur aneurysmal bone cyst, which resulted in the amputation of the lower extremity, even though all available classic methods of treatment were applied for it.

  2. Results Without Authority Controlling a Project When the Team Doesn't Report to You

    CERN Document Server

    KENDRICK, Tom

    2012-01-01

    It's tricky enough to spearhead a big project when you're the boss. But when you're the leader of a team of people who don't report to you, the obstacles are even greater. Results Without Authority is the definitive book for project managers looking to establish credibility and control. A groundbreaker in the field, it supplies a start-to-finish system for getting successful project results from cross-functional, outsourced, and other types of teams. The completely updated second edition includes new information on: * Agile methods and evolving project management tools * Strategies for working

  3. Interim Report on Heuristics about Inspection Parameters: Updates to Heuristics Resulting from Refinement on Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Forrest; Seaman, Carolyn; Feldman, Raimund; Haingaertner, Ralf; Regardie, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, we have continued analyzing the inspection data in an effort to better understand the applicability and effect of the inspection heuristics on inspection outcomes. Our research goals during this period are: 1. Investigate the effect of anomalies in the dataset (e.g. the very large meeting length values for some inspections) on our results 2. Investigate the effect of the heuristics on other inspection outcome variables (e.g. effort) 3. Investigate whether the recommended ranges can be modified to give inspection planners more flexibility without sacrificing effectiveness 4. Investigate possible refinements or modifications to the heuristics for specific subdomains (partitioned, e.g., by size, domain, or Center) This memo reports our results to date towards addressing these goals. In the next section, the first goal is addressed by describing the types of anomalies we have found in our dataset, how we have addressed them, and the effect of these changes on our previously reported results. In the following section, on "methodology", we describe the analyses we have conducted to address the other three goals and the results of these analyses are described in the "results" section. Finally, we conclude with future plans for continuing our investigation.

  4. Inconsistent Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær; Riis, Morten S.

    2017-01-01

    with the objects in question on their own premises. Therefore, tuning into the “not-knowing” requires expanding the perspective to encompass non-human forms of knowledge incorporated through an object-oriented ontological line of thinking. By switching the focus from the human perspective to that of the objects...... of translations within and between objects. As a consequence, the aesthetic dimension and the knowledge derived from artistic research struggle to position themselves as more than candy on the surface of the scientific field unless considered within alternative knowledge paradigms that acknowledge...

  5. Inconsistent Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær; Riis, Morten S.

    2017-01-01

    argue that, to manifest the conditions hidden in knowledge and the unconscious transferences that accompany the need to be scientific, one must be critical of traditional understandings of knowledge production. Therefore, it is crucial to explore understandings of knowledge production that are directed...... of translations within and between objects. As a consequence, the aesthetic dimension and the knowledge derived from artistic research struggle to position themselves as more than candy on the surface of the scientific field unless considered within alternative knowledge paradigms that acknowledge...

  6. Use of adjectives in abstracts when reporting results of randomized, controlled trials from industry and academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Berlin, Jesse A; Glasser, Susan C; Battisti, Wendy P; Schuemie, Martijn J

    2015-03-01

    Accurate representation of study findings is crucial to preserve public trust. The language used to describe results could affect perceptions of the efficacy or safety of interventions. We sought to compare the adjectives used in clinical trial reports of industry-authored and non-industry-authored research. We included studies in PubMed that were randomized trials and had an abstract. Studies were classified as "non-industry-authored" when all authors had academic or governmental affiliations, or as "industry-authored" when any of the authors had industry affiliations. Abstracts were analyzed using a part-of-speech tagger to identify adjectives. To reduce the risk of false positives, the analysis was restricted to adjectives considered relevant to "coloring" (influencing interpretation) of trial results. Differences between groups were determined using exact tests, stratifying by journal. A total of 306,007 publications met the inclusion criteria. We were able to classify 16,789 abstracts; 9,085 were industry-authored research, and 7,704 were non-industry-authored research. We found a differential use of adjectives between industry-authored and non-industry-authored reports. Adjectives such as "well tolerated" and "meaningful" were more commonly used in the title or conclusion of the abstract by industry authors, while adjectives such as "feasible" were more commonly used by non-industry authors. There are differences in the adjectives used when study findings are described in industry-authored reports compared with non-industry-authored reports. Authors should avoid overusing adjectives that could be inaccurate or result in misperceptions. Editors and peer reviewers should be attentive to the use of adjectives and assess whether the usage is context appropriate.

  7. Costs and Benefits of Orthographic Inconsistency in Reading: Evidence from a Cross-Linguistic Comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Valeria Marinelli

    Full Text Available We compared reading acquisition in English and Italian children up to late primary school analyzing RTs and errors as a function of various psycholinguistic variables and changes due to experience. Our results show that reading becomes progressively more reliant on larger processing units with age, but that this is modulated by consistency of the language. In English, an inconsistent orthography, reliance on larger units occurs earlier on and it is demonstrated by faster RTs, a stronger effect of lexical variables and lack of length effect (by fifth grade. However, not all English children are able to master this mode of processing yielding larger inter-individual variability. In Italian, a consistent orthography, reliance on larger units occurs later and it is less pronounced. This is demonstrated by larger length effects which remain significant even in older children and by larger effects of a global factor (related to speed of orthographic decoding explaining changes of performance across ages. Our results show the importance of considering not only overall performance, but inter-individual variability and variability between conditions when interpreting cross-linguistic differences.

  8. Costs and Benefits of Orthographic Inconsistency in Reading: Evidence from a Cross-Linguistic Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Chiara Valeria; Romani, Cristina; Burani, Cristina; McGowan, Victoria A; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    We compared reading acquisition in English and Italian children up to late primary school analyzing RTs and errors as a function of various psycholinguistic variables and changes due to experience. Our results show that reading becomes progressively more reliant on larger processing units with age, but that this is modulated by consistency of the language. In English, an inconsistent orthography, reliance on larger units occurs earlier on and it is demonstrated by faster RTs, a stronger effect of lexical variables and lack of length effect (by fifth grade). However, not all English children are able to master this mode of processing yielding larger inter-individual variability. In Italian, a consistent orthography, reliance on larger units occurs later and it is less pronounced. This is demonstrated by larger length effects which remain significant even in older children and by larger effects of a global factor (related to speed of orthographic decoding) explaining changes of performance across ages. Our results show the importance of considering not only overall performance, but inter-individual variability and variability between conditions when interpreting cross-linguistic differences.

  9. Costs and Benefits of Orthographic Inconsistency in Reading: Evidence from a Cross-Linguistic Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Chiara Valeria; Romani, Cristina; Burani, Cristina; McGowan, Victoria A.; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    We compared reading acquisition in English and Italian children up to late primary school analyzing RTs and errors as a function of various psycholinguistic variables and changes due to experience. Our results show that reading becomes progressively more reliant on larger processing units with age, but that this is modulated by consistency of the language. In English, an inconsistent orthography, reliance on larger units occurs earlier on and it is demonstrated by faster RTs, a stronger effect of lexical variables and lack of length effect (by fifth grade). However, not all English children are able to master this mode of processing yielding larger inter-individual variability. In Italian, a consistent orthography, reliance on larger units occurs later and it is less pronounced. This is demonstrated by larger length effects which remain significant even in older children and by larger effects of a global factor (related to speed of orthographic decoding) explaining changes of performance across ages. Our results show the importance of considering not only overall performance, but inter-individual variability and variability between conditions when interpreting cross-linguistic differences. PMID:27355364

  10. Tank 241-T-203, core 190 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-08-05

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-203 push mode core segments collected on April 17, 1997 and April 18, 1997. The segments were subsainpled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-203 Push Mode Core Sampling andanalysis Plan (TSAP) (Schreiber, 1997a), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Leffer oflnstructionfor Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI)(Hall, 1997). The analytical results are included in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Schreiber, 1997a). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997b) and not considered in this report.

  11. HIV transmission as a result of drug market violence: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While unprotected sexual intercourse and the use of contaminated injection equipment account for the majority of HIV infections worldwide, other routes of HIV transmission have received less attention. We report on a case of HIV transmission attributable to illicit drug market violence involving a participant in a prospective cohort study of injection drug users. Data from a qualitative interview was used in addition to questionnaire data and nursing records to document an episode of violence which likely resulted in this individual acquiring HIV infection. The case report demonstrates that the dangers of drug market violence go beyond the immediate physical trauma associated with violent altercations to include the possibility for infectious disease transmission. The case highlights the need to consider antiretroviral post-exposure prophylaxis in cases of drug market violence presenting to the emergency room, as well strategies to reduce violence associated with street-based drug markets.

  12. Significant ELCAP analysis results: Summary report. [End-use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, R.G.; Conner, C.C.; Drost, M.K.; Miller, N.E.; Cooke, B.A.; Halverson, M.A.; Lebaron, B.A.; Lucas, R.G.; Jo, J.; Richman, E.E.; Sandusky, W.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Ritland, K.G. (Ritland Associates, Seattle, WA (USA)); Taylor, M.E. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (USA)); Hauser, S.G. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The evolution of the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) since 1983 at Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has been eventful and somewhat tortuous. The birth pangs of a data set so large and encompassing as this have been overwhelming at times. The early adolescent stage of data set development and use has now been reached and preliminary results of early analyses of the data are becoming well known. However, the full maturity of the data set and the corresponding wealth of analytic insights are not fully realized. This document is in some sense a milestone in the brief history of the program. It is a summary of the results of the first five years of the program, principally containing excerpts from a number of previous reports. It is meant to highlight significant accomplishments and analytical results, with a focus on the principal results. Many of the results have a broad application in the utility load research community in general, although the real breadth of the data set remains largely unexplored. The first section of the document introduces the data set: how the buildings were selected, how the metering equipment was installed, and how the data set has been prepared for analysis. Each of the sections that follow the introduction summarize a particular analytic result. A large majority of the analyses to date involve the residential samples, as these were installed first and had highest priority on the analytic agenda. Two exploratory analyses using commercial data are included as an introduction to the commercial analyses that are currently underway. Most of the sections reference more complete technical reports which the reader should refer to for details of the methodology and for more complete discussion of the results. Sections have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Consumer-reported handling of raw poultry products at home: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosa, Katherine M; Cates, Sheryl C; Bradley, Samantha; Chambers, Edgar; Godwin, Sandria

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter cause an estimated combined total of 1.8 million foodborne infections each year in the United States. Most cases of salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis are associated with eating raw or undercooked poultry or with cross-contamination. Between 1998 and 2008, 20% of Salmonella and 16% of Campylobacter foodborne disease outbreaks were associated with food prepared inside the home. A nationally representative Web survey of U.S. adult grocery shoppers (n = 1,504) was conducted to estimate the percentage of consumers who follow recommended food safety practices when handling raw poultry at home. The survey results identified areas of low adherence to current recommended food safety practices: not washing raw poultry before cooking, proper refrigerator storage of raw poultry, use of a food thermometer to determine doneness, and proper thawing of raw poultry in cold water. Nearly 70% of consumers reported washing or rinsing raw poultry before cooking it, a potentially unsafe practice because "splashing" of contaminated water may lead to the transfer of pathogens to other foods and other kitchen surfaces. Only 17.5% of consumers reported correctly storing raw poultry in the refrigerator. Sixty-two percent of consumers own a food thermometer, and of these, 26% or fewer reported using one to check the internal temperature of smaller cuts of poultry and ground poultry. Only 11% of consumers who thaw raw poultry in cold water reported doing so correctly. The study results, coupled with other research findings, will inform the development of science-based consumer education materials that can help reduce foodborne illness from Salmonella and Campylobacter.

  14. Ethical considerations about reporting research results with potential for further stigmatization of undocumented immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Macklin, Ruth

    2009-05-01

    A broad spectrum of infectious diseases is studied in vulnerable populations. However, ethical considerations of reporting research results that could increase stigmatization of socially marginalized and vulnerable populations are not often discussed in the medical literature, particularly not in the context of transmissible diseases. This article addresses ethical considerations that arose when one of us (J.M.A.) recently published the results of a study in Clinical Infectious Diseases that imply that undocumented persons are more likely to transmit tuberculosis than are documented foreign-born persons or persons born in the United States. These study results have the potential to further fuel the often fierce debate regarding undocumented immigrants in the United States. To our knowledge, such ethical considerations have not been discussed previously in the medical literature.

  15. Results of a research study on the impact of active daylighting on operating results of a retail business. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    In preliminary evaluations of So-Luminaire`s (SI) product in 1985 and 1986, DOE concluded that it warranted further research and evaluation and was worthy of receiving governmental financial and structural support therefor. SI, along with Safeway, had known intuitively that the So-Luminaire systems which had been previously installed in several of their Phoenix-area stores had resulted in a marked reduction in electrical energy consumption. However, a definitive determination of energy savings had been utilized in previous installations. Further, SI and Safeway both hypothesized that the high quality of natural light provided by these systems displayed goods to greater advantage and contributed to an overall increase in store sales, all other factors being held constant. A study to attempt to objectively determine these two presumed benefits of active daylighting in a commercial application was begun.

  16. How does the mass media report and interpret radiation data? The results of media content analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perko, T. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK.CEN, Institute for Environment Health and Safety (Belgium); Cantone, M.C. [University of Milano, Faculty of Medicine (Italy); Tomkiv, Y. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway); Prezelj, I. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Social Sciences (Slovenia); Gallego, E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Melekhova, E. [Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    In communication with the general population, experts often provide quantitative information related to ionizing radiation, expressed with different units of radioactivity. However, quantitative information about radiation risks may be meaningful only to people who have the ability to comprehend basic numerical concepts and possess knowledge related to radiation. Thus, the media, as a bridge between experts and the general population, has to 'translate' quantitative information into a qualitative one. How successful and accurate are the mass media in this transformation of scientific results into publicly understandable information? Our research investigates media reporting on the concept of ionizing radiation in a case of nuclear emergencies. The presentation is focused on summarizing the 'lessons learned' from the use of radiation data in media reporting about the Fukushima nuclear accident. The in-depth media content analysis was conducted in twelve quality newspapers in Belgium, Slovenia, Italy, Spain, Norway and Russia using the same scientific methodology and analyzing the same time period. Preliminary results identified miss concepts of radiation data by media and even within emergency responders and decision makers. The research is a result of FP7 project Innovative integrated tools and platforms for radiological emergency preparedness and post-accident response in Europe - PREPARE and upgraded with a Russian experience. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  17. 7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinge, Dennis C. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Michael E. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

    2011-04-01

    The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

  18. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D; Kuss, Daria J; Billieux, Joël

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games.

  19. Rapid reporting of urine culture results: impact of the uro-quick screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilki, Arzu; Bekdemir, Pinar; Ulger, Nurver; Soyletir, Guner

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the impact of the Uro-Quick (UQ) screening system (Alifax, Italy) for a rapid and accurate reporting of urine cultures, and whether it can provide bacterial yield to be used in identification and susceptibility testing. A total of 1480 urine samples collected between October 2006 and July 2008 were tested by conventional culture (CC) methods and UQ simultaneously. Sediments of positive UQ vials were used as bacterial yields for identification and susceptibility testing procedures. Of the 1480 samples, 999 revealed bacteria and/or leukocytes in direct microscopy. Among these 999 samples, positive growth was detected in 420 (42%) and 433 (43.3%) by UQ and CC, respectively. However, only 0.6% of samples without bacteria and leukocytes exhibited positive growth. When compared to CC, UQ demonstrated high levels of positive predictive value (95.9%), negative predictive value (94.8%), sensitivity (93%) and specificity (96.9%). Both CC isolates and UQ bacteria showed 81.3% concordance in identification results. Susceptibility testing of UQ bacteria displayed >90% agreement, when compared with standardized disk diffusion test. Our results indicate that UQ can reliably be used in routine laboratories giving microbial growth results in 3 hours. The most significant part of the study is that bacterial yields of UQ positive samples can be used in identification and susceptibility testing, allowing a rapid, same-day reporting of urine cultures.

  20. Tank 241-S-106, cores 183, 184 and 187 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-06-30

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-S-106 push mode core segments collected between February 12, 1997 and March 21, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Safety DQO), the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO). The analytical results are included in Table 1. Six of the twenty-four subsamples submitted for the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis exceeded the notification limit of 480 Joules/g stated in the DQO. Appropriate notifications were made. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyses were performed on all samples that produced exotherms during the DSC analysis. All results were less than the notification limit of three weight percent TOC. No cyanide analysis was performed, per agreement with the Tank Safety Program. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. Statistical evaluation of results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. No core composites were created because there was insufficient solid material from any of the three core sampling events to generate a composite that would be representative of the tank contents.

  1. Vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2008 benefits analysis, methodology and results --- final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

    2008-02-29

    This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Vehicle Technologies (VT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, and (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 08 the Heavy Vehicles program continued its involvement with various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. These changes are the result of a planning effort that first occurred during FY 04 and was updated in the past year. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY08 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the VT program for internal project management purposes.

  2. Making Sense of Inconsistencies in Psycho-Educational Assessment: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Miller, Robyn; Ward, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The case is presented of an 8-year-old boy who was referred for psycho-educational assessment because of difficulties with writing. The article provides an example of the way in which a case unfolds as further assessment data become available, and describes a number of challenging aspects of the assessment process. In this case, dilemmas arose…

  3. Dysphagia evaluation practices: inconsistencies in clinical assessment and instrumental examination decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers-Schmidt, Barbara A; Kurlinski, Mary

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of swallowing evaluation practices in western Washington, specifically in terms of (a) components of the clinical examination most commonly used, (b) consistency of clinical examination practices across clinicians, and (c) consistency of clinical decision-making (instrumental vs. noninstrumental) given specific patient scenarios. A 21-question survey was sent to 150 speech-language pathologists who provide services to dysphagia patients. Of the 72 (48%) surveys that were returned, 64 provided the data for the study. The results revealed that clinicians who responded to the survey differ somewhat regarding which components they include in a clinical examination of swallowing. There was a high degree of consistency for 11 of the 19 components. Inconsistency across clinicians was revealed in four areas: assessment of sensory function, assessment of the gag reflex, cervical auscultation, and assessment of trial swallows using compensatory techniques. Clinicians agreed in their recommendations on two of the six clinical case scenarios. In general, participating clinicians varied widely in their clinical decision-making. These findings are compared with other studies where variability in clinical practice has raised concerns.

  4. Learning from redundant but inconsistent reference data: anatomical views and measurements for fetal brain screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waechter-Stehle, I.; Klinder, T.; Rouet, J.-M.; Roundhill, D.; Andrews, G.; Cavallaro, A.; Molloholli, M.; Norris, T.; Napolitano, R.; Papageorghiou, A.; Lorenz, C.

    2016-03-01

    In a fetal brain screening examination, a standardized set of anatomical views is inspected and certain biometric measurements are taken in these views. Acquisition of recommended planes requires a certain level of operator expertise. 3D ultrasound has the potential to reduce the manual task to only capture a volume containing the head and to subsequently determine the standard 2D views and measurements automatically. For this purpose, a segmentation model of the fetal brain was created and trained with expert annotations. It was found that the annotations show a considerable intra- and inter-observer variability. To handle the variability, we propose a method to train the model with redundant but inconsistent reference data from many expert users. If the outlier-cleaned average of all reference annotations is considered as ground truth, errors of the automatic view detection are lower than the errors of all individual users and errors of the measurements are in the same range as user error. The resulting functionality allows the completely automated estimation of views and measurements in 3D fetal ultrasound images.

  5. Inconsistent food safety pressures complicate environmental conservation for California produce growers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Controlling human pathogens on fresh vegetables, fruits and nuts is imperative for California growers. A range of rules and guidelines have been developed since 2006, when a widespread outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 was linked to bagged spinach grown in California. Growers face pressure from industry and government sources to adopt specific control measures on their farms, resulting in a complex, shifting set of demands, some of which conflict with environmental stewardship. We surveyed 588 California produce growers about on-farm practices related to food safety and conservation. Nearly all respondents considered both food safety and environmental protection to be important responsibilities for their farms. Responses indicate that clearing vegetation to create buffers around cropped fields, removing vegetation from ditches and ponds, and using poison bait and wildlife fences are commonly used practices intended to reduce wildlife movements onto farm fields. The survey also revealed that on-farm practices vary substantially even among farms with similar characteristics. This variability suggests inconsistencies in food safety requirements, auditors' interpretations or growers' perception of the demands of their buyers. Although site-specific considerations are important and practices should be tailored to local conditions, our findings suggest growers, natural resources and food safety would benefit from clearer, more consistent requirements.

  6. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results. Fourth Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-02

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 12 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The FCEBs in service at AC Transit are 40-foot, low-floor buses built by Van Hool with a hybrid electric propulsion system that includes a US Hybrid fuel cell power system and EnerDel lithium-based energy storage system. The buses began revenue service in May 2010.

  7. An unusual occurrence of bilaterally geminated mandibular second premolars resulting in premolar molarization: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Rajesh Ebenezar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemination refers to an attempt by a single tooth bud to divide, with a resultant formation of either a large tooth with a bifid crown or two completely divided teeth throughout the crown and root. This report describes a rare case of bilateral gemination of permanent mandibular second premolar tooth giving rise to molarization of premolars. The mesiodistal width of these teeth is similar to mandibular molars, but the cervicoocclusal width is lesser than that of the molar tooth. This paper also discusses the potential orthodontic, periodontal, and endodontic complications of premolar molarization.

  8. Status report on education in the economics of animal health: results from a European survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waret-Szkuta, Agnès; Raboisson, Didier; Niemi, Jarkko; Aragrande, Maurizio; Gethmann, Jörn; Martins, Sara Babo; Hans, Lucie; Höreth-Böntgen, Detlef; Sans, Pierre; Stärk, Katharina D; Rushton, Jonathan; Häsler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Education on the use of economics applied to animal health (EAH) has been offered since the 1980s. However, it has never been institutionalized within veterinary curricula, and there is no systematic information on current teaching and education activities in Europe. Nevertheless, the need for economic skills in animal health has never been greater. Economics can add value to disease impact assessments; improve understanding of people's incentives to participate in animal health measures; and help refine resource allocation for public animal health budgets. The use of economics should improve animal health decision making. An online questionnaire was conducted in European countries to assess current and future needs and expectations of people using EAH. The main conclusion from the survey is that education in economics appears to be offered inconsistently in Europe, and information about the availability of training opportunities in this field is scarce. There is a lack of harmonization of EAH education and significant gaps exist in the veterinary curricula of many countries. Depending on whether respondents belonged to educational institutions, public bodies, or private organizations, they expressed concerns regarding the limited education on decision making and impact assessment for animal diseases or on the use of economics for general management. Both public and private organizations recognized the increasing importance of EAH in the future. This should motivate the development of teaching methods and materials that aim at developing the understanding of animal health problems for the benefit of students and professional veterinarians.

  9. Delayed spinal extradural hematoma following thoracic spine surgery and resulting in paraplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban Chandra JKB

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Postoperative spinal extradural hematomas are rare. Most of the cases that have been reported occured within 3 days of surgery. Their occurrence in a delayed form, that is, more than 72 hours after surgery, is very rare. This case is being reported to enhance awareness of delayed postoperative spinal extradural hematomas. Case presentation We report a case of acute onset dorsal spinal extradural hematoma from a paraspinal muscular arterial bleed, producing paraplegia 72 hours following surgery for excision of a spinal cord tumor at T8 level. The triggering mechanism was an episode of violent twisting movement by the patient. Fresh blood in the postoperative drain tube provided suspicion of this complication. Emergency evacuation of the clot helped in regaining normal motor and sensory function. The need to avoid straining of the paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period is emphasized. Conclusion Most cases of postoperative spinal extradural hematomas occur as a result of venous bleeding. However, an arterial source of bleeding from paraspinal muscular branches causing extradural hematoma and subsequent neurological deficit is underreported. Undue straining of paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period after major spinal surgery should be avoided for at least a few days.

  10. Production Facility Prototype Blower Installation Report with 1000 Hour Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The roots blower in use at ANL for in-beam experiments and also at LANL for flow tests was sized for 12 mm diameter disks and significantly less beam heating. Currently, the disks are 29 mm in diameter, with a 12 mm FWHM Gaussian beam spot at 42 MeV and 2.86 μA on each side of the target, 5.72 μA total. The target design itself is reported elsewhere. With the increased beam heating, the helium flow requirement increased so that a larger blower was needed for a mass flow rate of 400 g/s at 2.76 MPa (400 psig). An Aerzen GM 12.4 blower was selected, and is currently being installed at the LANL facility for target and component flow testing. This report describes this blower/motor/pressure vessel package and the status of the facility preparations. The blower has been operated for 1000 hours as a preliminary investigation of long term performance, operation and possible maintenance issues. The blower performed well, with no significant change in blower head or mass flow rate developed under the operating conditions. Upon inspection, some oil had leaked out of the shaft seal of the blower. The shaft seal and bearing race have been replaced. Test results and conclusions are reported.

  11. Results From Mexico's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaviz, Karla I; Arroyo, Mabel Aguilar; González-Casanova, Inés; Villalobos, Martín Francisco González; Jáuregui, Alejandra; Ulloa, Edtna Jáuregui; Miranda, Selene Pacheco; Rodríguez, Marcela Pérez; Pelayo, Ricardo Alejandro Retano; López-Taylor, Juan Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    The 2016 Mexican Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth aims to assess how Mexico is doing in terms of providing physical activity (PA) opportunities for Mexican children and youth. The purpose of this article is to summarize results from the Mexican 2016 Report Card. A literature search was conducted in Spanish and English languages using major databases, and complemented with a review of government/nongovernment documents, websites, and national health surveys. Information on the 9 indicators outlined in the Global Matrix of Report Card Grades was extracted. A team of Mexican experts met to discuss and assign a grade on each indicator based on the best available evidence and established benchmarks. Daily behaviors grades were Overall PA (C), Organized Sport Participation (D), Active Play (D-), Active Transportation (C), and Sedentary Behavior (D). For Settings and Sources of Influence, grades were Family and Peers (INC), School (D-), and Community and Environment (D). Strategies and Investments grades were Government Strategies (C) and Non-Government (F). PA and sedentary behaviors among Mexican children and youth remain below the recommended levels. Government and communities are far from providing appropriate and sufficient physical activity opportunities for children and youth.

  12. The Role of Indian Caste Identity and Caste Inconsistent Norms on Status Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Sekerdej, Maciek; von Hecker, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The Indian caste system is a complex social structure wherein social roles like one's profession became 'hereditary,' resulting in restricted social mobility and fixed status hierarchies. Furthermore, we argue that the inherent property of caste heightens group identification with one's caste. Highly identified group members would protect the identity of the group in situations when group norms are violated. In this paper, we were interested in examining the consequence of caste norm violation and how an individual's status is mentally represented. High caste norms are associated with moral values while the lower caste norms are associated with immorality. We predicted a 'black sheep effect,' that is, when high caste individuals' group identity (caste norm violation condition) is threatened their salient high caste identity would increase, thereby resulting in devaluing the status of their fellow in-group member if the latter is perceived as perpetrator. We presented participants with a social conflict situation of a victim and a perpetrator that is 'Caste norm consistent' (Lower caste individual as a perpetrator and higher caste individual as a victim) and vice versa 'Caste norm inconsistent' condition (higher caste individual as perpetrator and lower caste individual as a victim). Then, participants had to choose from nine pictorial depictions representing the protagonists in the story on a vertical line, with varying degrees of status distance. Results showed evidence for the black sheep effect and, furthermore, revealed that no other identity (religious, national, and regional) resulted in devaluing the status of fellow in-group member. These results help us understand the 'black sheep' effect in the context of moral norms and status representation and are discussed in the framework of the Indian society.

  13. Patient-reported multiple drug reactions: Clinical profile and results of challenge testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramam M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some patients report hypersensitivity reactions to many drugs making it difficult to prescribe medications when they fall ill. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of multiple drug hypersensitivity and the results of challenge testing in a large teaching hospital.Methods: We performed a five-year retrospective review of the records of patients who complained of reactions to two or more unrelated drugs and avoided medication because of a fear of developing reactions. Oral challenge testing was carried out in hospital with drugs suspected by the patient to cause reactions and/or commonly prescribed medications. A positive reaction was diagnosed when symptoms and signs resembled previously experienced episodes and there was no such reaction with placebo. Results: Twenty three patients (aged 14-65 years; 19 females underwent challenge testing. Their complaints had been present for 1-30 years, with 2-40 drug reaction episodes reported. Antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were most commonly implicated, and urticaria/angioedema were the most often reported manifestations. The patients underwent 3-27 challenges with 1-24 drugs. Three had positive challenge reactions with various NSAIDs, 13 developed symptoms and signs that were judged not to be true reactions, and 7 had no reactions. None of our patients qualified for a diagnosis of true multiple drug hypersensitivity. Conclusion: Patients who believe they are allergic to multiple, pharmacologically unrelated drugs are usually mistaken. Challenge testing is a reliable way of demonstrating this and providing patients with a list of safe drugs.

  14. Inconsistency of the interactions between pseudoscalar, spinor and Rarita-Schwinger fields

    CERN Document Server

    Badagnani, D; Barbero, C

    2016-01-01

    We perform the Dirac quantization of RS fields interacting with a spinor and the first derivative of a pseudoscalar field. We achieve the calculations for two forms of this interaction: first we review the conventional coupling of lowest derivative order, reproducing the well known inconsistencies in its anticommutator algebra. Then, we perform the analysis on the next order term popularly known as spin 3/2 gauge invariant interaction, which is claimed to be free of these inconsistencies. Nevertheless we find that the direct application of the Dirac formalism leads to inconsistencies in complete analogy to the previous case. This is of high relevance in the particle phenomenology field, where these interactions are used to interpret experimental data involving Delta(1232) resonances.

  15. Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic systems. Volume II. Study results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirpich, A.

    1977-03-19

    This investigation of terrestrial PV systems considered the technical and economic feasibility for systems in three size categories: a small system of about 12 kW peak output for on-site residential use; a large 1500 MW central power plant contributing to the bulk energy of a utility system power grid; and an intermediate size system of about 250 kW for use on public or commercial buildings. In each category, conceptual designs were developed, performance was analyzed for a range of climatic regions, economic analyses were performed, and assessments were made of pertinent institutional issues. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I contains a Study Summary of the major study results. This volume contains the detailed results pertaining to on-site residential photovoltaic systems, central power plant photovoltaic systems, and intermediate size systems applied to commercial and public buildings. Volume III contains supporting appendix material. (WHK)

  16. Reporting Results from Structural Equation Modeling Analyses in Archives of Scientific Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Rick H; Isherwood, Jennifer C

    2013-02-01

    Psychological research typically involves the analysis of data (e.g., questionnaire responses, records of behavior) using statistical methods. The description of how those methods are used and the results they produce is a key component of scholarly publications. Despite their importance, these descriptions are not always complete and clear. In order to ensure the completeness and clarity of these descriptions, the Archives of Scientific Psychology requires that authors of manuscripts to be considered for publication adhere to a set of publication standards. Although the current standards cover most of the statistical methods commonly used in psychological research, they do not cover them all. In this manuscript, we propose adjustments to the current standards and the addition of additional standards for a statistical method not adequately covered in the current standards-structural equation modeling (SEM). Adherence to the standards we propose would ensure that scholarly publications that report results of data analyzed using SEM are complete and clear.

  17. Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ESCH, R.A.

    1998-11-19

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

  18. Feminism, status inconsistency, and women's intimate partner victimization in heterosexual relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Cortney A; Menaker, Tasha A

    2014-07-01

    This study used a random community sample of 303 women in romantic relationships to investigate the role of educational and employment status inconsistency and patriarchal family ideology as risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization, while considering demographic factors and relationship context variables. Sequential multivariate logistic regression models demonstrated a decrease in the odds of IPV victimization for Hispanic women and women who were older as compared with their counterparts. In addition, increased relationship distress, family-of-origin violence, and employment status inconsistency significantly increased the odds of IPV. Clinical intervention strategies and future research directions are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Institutions, credibility and crisis: the inconsistencies of Argentine exchange rate policy (1991-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLÁS CHERNY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is twofold. The first is to explain the time inconsistencies of the convertibility regime that led to the 2001 crisis. The argument suggests that the credibility requirements for convertibility induced a dynamic of legal, fiscal, financial and external commitments that increased exit costs and time inconsistencies. The second objective is to explain the tensions of the floating regime that replaced convertibility in 2002. We describe the effects of a floating exchange rate on macroeconomic imbalance and the growing tension between competitiveness and inflation.

  20. Inconsistency of speech in children with childhood apraxia of speech, phonological disorders, and typical speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuzzini, Jenya

    There is a lack of agreement on the features used to differentiate Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) from Phonological Disorders (PD). One criterion which has gained consensus is lexical inconsistency of speech (ASHA, 2007); however, no accepted measure of this feature has been defined. Although lexical assessment provides information about consistency of an item across repeated trials, it may not capture the magnitude of inconsistency within an item. In contrast, segmental analysis provides more extensive information about consistency of phoneme usage across multiple contexts and word-positions. The current research compared segmental and lexical inconsistency metrics in preschool-aged children with PD, CAS, and typical development (TD) to determine how inconsistency varies with age in typical and disordered speakers, and whether CAS and PD were differentiated equally well by both assessment levels. Whereas lexical and segmental analyses may be influenced by listener characteristics or speaker intelligibility, the acoustic signal is less vulnerable to these factors. In addition, the acoustic signal may reveal information which is not evident in the perceptual signal. A second focus of the current research was motivated by Blumstein et al.'s (1980) classic study on voice onset time (VOT) in adults with acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) which demonstrated a motor impairment underlying AOS. In the current study, VOT analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between age and group with the voicing distribution for bilabial and alveolar plosives. Findings revealed that 3-year-olds evidenced significantly higher inconsistency than 5-year-olds; segmental inconsistency approached 0% in 5-year-olds with TD, whereas it persisted in children with PD and CAS suggesting that for child in this age-range, inconsistency is a feature of speech disorder rather than typical development (Holm et al., 2007). Likewise, whereas segmental and lexical inconsistency were

  1. LIPAEMIC report: results of clinical use of intravenous lipid emulsion in drug toxicity reported to an online lipid registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Grant; Harvey, Martyn; Willers, Johann; Uncles, David; Meek, Tim; Picard, John; Weinberg, Guy

    2014-06-01

    The use of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) as an antidote has prompted significant academic and clinical interest. Between August 2009 and August 2012, data from cases of ILE use in intoxicated patients in different hospitals on different continents were voluntarily entered into a registry based on the world wide web (www.lipidregistry.org). Here, we report data from this project. Participating centers were given access to the registry following institutional subscription. Specifically sought were details of the individual patients' presenting condition, indications for ILE use, ILE administration regimen, potential complications, and of clinical outcome. Forty-eight uses of ILE were reported from 61 participating centers. Ten cases of local anesthetic systemic toxicity were reported; all (10/10) survived. Thirty-eight cases of intoxication by other agents were reported [30 decreased conscious state, 8 cardiovascular collapse (3 deaths)]. There was an elevation in GCS (p adverse effects of ILE use were recorded in 48 reported cases (one case of bronchospastic reaction, one case of hyperamylasemia and one case of interference with laboratory testing). In this series of cases reported to the registry, improvements were seen for GCS in patients with central nervous system toxicity and in systolic blood pressure in shocked patients over a short time frame after the injection of ILE. Few adverse effects were recorded. Clinical trials and the reporting of drug concentrations after ILE use are necessary to further elucidate the role of ILE in clinical toxicology.

  2. James Bay air quality study : report on the results of field monitoring in 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-02-08

    An air quality study in James Bay was conducted, in order to establish general levels of pollutants in outdoor air in the James Bay area of Victoria, British Columbia. The primary sources of air pollution in the area include light duty and heavy duty vehicle traffic, helicopters, floatplanes, and marine vessels such as cruise ships, passenger ferries, commercial fishing and whale watching boats, and recreation motorboats. Air quality monitoring represented the first phase of the project. The second phase involved a detailed pollutant dispersion model including all emission sources. This report described the use of sampling equipment and the measurement of nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, fine particulate matter and contributing sources, and volatile organic compounds, specifically benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene/xylene and naphthalene. Supporting data, including traffic counts, wind speed and direction, precipitation, and cruise ship schedules were collected to assist in the interpretation of the field monitoring results. For each of these pollutants, the report provided responses to several questions, such as defining each pollutant; describing the sources of each pollutant in the James Bay neighbourhood; presenting the results of the field monitoring; discussing the limitations of the monitoring equipment and sampling design; interpreting the results; comparing monitored levels to those measured at other times or locations; and comparing monitored levels to air quality standards or guidelines. Conclusions about each pollutant were presented. It was concluded that phase 2 pollutant dispersion modelling should include estimates of 1-hour, 24-hour, and seasonal average pollutant levels at varying elevations above ground level, with a focus on residential apartment buildings in the study area. 5 tabs., 52 figs., 7 appendices.

  3. Evaluation of Environmental Sample Analysis Methods and Results Reporting in the National Children's Study Vanguard Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Maire S A; Khalaf, Abdisalam; Beard, Barbara; Viet, Susan M; Dellarco, Michael

    2016-05-01

    During the initial Vanguard phase of the U.S. National Children's Study (NCS), about 2000 tap water, surface wipe, and air samples were collected and analyzed immediately. The shipping conditions, analysis methods, results, and laboratory performance were evaluated to determine the best approaches for use in the NCS Main Study. The main conclusions were (1) to employ established sample analysis methods, when possible, and alternate methodologies only after careful consideration with method validation studies; (2) lot control and prescreening sample collection materials are important quality assurance procedures; (3) packing samples correctly requires careful training and adjustment of shipping conditions to local conditions; (4) trip blanks and spiked samples should be considered for samplers with short expiration times and labile analytes; (5) two study-specific results reports should be required: laboratory electronic data deliverables (EDD) of sample results in a useable electronic format (CSV or SEDD XML/CSV) and a data package with sample results and supporting information in PDF format. These experiences and lessons learned can be applied to any long-term study.

  4. Tank 241-T-201, core 192 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-08-07

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-201. Push mode core segments were removed from Riser 3 between April 24, 1997, and April 25, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-201 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997), Letter of Instruction for Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI) (Bell, 1997), Additional Core Composite Sample from Drainable Liquid Samples for Tank 241-T-2 01 (ACC) (Hall, 1997), and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report.

  5. 2015 Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results Report for Project Rulison, Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, Rick [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kautsky, Mark [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 20–22 and 27, 2015. Several of the land owners were not available to allow access to their respective properties, which created the need for several sample collection trips. This report documents the analytical results of the Rulison monitoring event and includes the trip report and the data validation package (Appendix A). The groundwater and surface water monitoring were shipped to the GEL Group Inc. laboratories for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high- resolution gamma spectrometry. Tritium was analyzed using two methods, the conventional tritium method, which has a detection limit on the order of 400 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), and the enriched method (for selected samples), which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L.

  6. SeqReporter: automating next-generation sequencing result interpretation and reporting workflow in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Somak; Durso, Mary Beth; Wald, Abigail; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2014-01-01

    A wide repertoire of bioinformatics applications exist for next-generation sequencing data analysis; however, certain requirements of the clinical molecular laboratory limit their use: i) comprehensive report generation, ii) compatibility with existing laboratory information systems and computer operating system, iii) knowledgebase development, iv) quality management, and v) data security. SeqReporter is a web-based application developed using ASP.NET framework version 4.0. The client-side was designed using HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript. The server-side processing (VB.NET) relied on interaction with a customized SQL server 2008 R2 database. Overall, 104 cases (1062 variant calls) were analyzed by SeqReporter. Each variant call was classified into one of five report levels: i) known clinical significance, ii) uncertain clinical significance, iii) pending pathologists' review, iv) synonymous and deep intronic, and v) platform and panel-specific sequence errors. SeqReporter correctly annotated and classified 99.9% (859 of 860) of sequence variants, including 68.7% synonymous single-nucleotide variants, 28.3% nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants, 1.7% insertions, and 1.3% deletions. One variant of potential clinical significance was re-classified after pathologist review. Laboratory information system-compatible clinical reports were generated automatically. SeqReporter also facilitated quality management activities. SeqReporter is an example of a customized and well-designed informatics solution to optimize and automate the downstream analysis of clinical next-generation sequencing data. We propose it as a model that may envisage the development of a comprehensive clinical informatics solution. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Anterior dislocation of the fibula resulting from surgical malreduction: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z Y; Wu, X B

    2016-04-18

    Ankle joint fracture is one of the most common types of fracture. There are many researches on the injury mechanism, treatment principles and surgical techniques. A type of injury which combines posterior dislocation of fibula, known as the Bosworth injury, is relatively rare. In 1947, Bosworth first described this type of injury as an unusual ankle fracture dislocation with fixed posterior fracture dislocation of the distal part of the fibula. In this type of fracture, the proximal fibular shaft fragment locks behind the tibialis posterior tubercle. This rare ankle fracture variant is often not recognized in initial radiographs and requires a computed tomographic (CT) scan for verification. But there are already many reports, discussing the injury mechanism, treatment principles and surgical techniques. However, there are few reports of anterior dislocation of the fibula, caused by either injury or surgery. The mechanism of the injury is still not clear. This article reports a case of anterior dislocation of the fibula. We report a patient with left ankle open fracture (Lauge-Hansen pronation-external rotation stage III, Gustilo IIIA). Open reduction and internal fixation was done in the initial surgery, but ended up with poor reduction, resulting in fibula anterior dislocation, anterior dislocation of talus and tibia fibular dislocation. The fibula was dislocated anteriorly of the tibia, which rarely happened. The patient suffered severe ankle joint dysfunction. The second operation took out the original internal fixation, reduced the fracture, and reset the internal fixation. The function of ankle joint was improved obviously after operation. But because of the initial injury and the two operations, the soft tissue around the fracture was greatly damaged. 6 months after the second operation, and the fracture still not healed, so the bone graft was carried out in the third surgery. Two months after the third surgery, the function of the ankle was significantly

  8. Analysis on the capacity degradation mechanism of a series lithium-ion power battery pack based on inconsistency of capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhen-Po; Liu Peng; Wang Li-Fang

    2013-01-01

    The lithium-ion battery has been widely used as an energy source.Charge rate,discharge rate,and operating temperature are very important factors for the capacity degradations of power batteries and battery packs.Firstly,in this paper we make use of an accelerated life test and a statistical analysis method to establish the capacity accelerated degradation model under three constant stress parameters according to the degradation data,which are charge rate,discharge rate,and operating temperature,and then we propose a capacity degradation model according to the current residual capacity of a Li-ion cell under dynamic stress parameters.Secondly,we analyze the charge and discharge process of a series power battery pack and interpret the correlation between the capacity degradations of the battery pack and its charge/discharge rate.According to this cycling condition,we establish a capacity degradation model of a series power battery pack under inconsistent capacity of cells,and analyze the degradation mechanism with capacity variance and operating temperature difference.The comparative analysis of test results shows that the inconsistent operating temperatures of cells in the series power battery pack are the main cause of its degradation; when the difference between inconsistent temperatures is narrowed by 5 ℃,the cycle life can be improved by more than 50%.Therefore,it effectively improves the cycle life of the series battery pack to reasonably assemble the batteries according to their capacities and to narrow the differences in operating temperature among cells.

  9. Cobalamin deficiency resulting in a rare haematological disorder: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapuis Thomas M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present the case of a patient with a cobalamin deficiency resulting in pancytopaenia, emphasizing the importance to define, diagnose and treat cobalamin deficiency. Case presentation A 52-year-old man from the Democratic Republic of Congo presented to the emergency department with shortness of breath and a sore tongue. Physical examination was unremarkable. His haemoglobin was low and the peripheral blood smear revealed pancytopaenia with a thrombotic microangiopathy. The findings were low cobalamin and folate levels, and high homocysteine and methylmalonate levels. Pernicious anaemia with chronic atrophic gastritis was confirmed by gastric biopsy and positive antiparietal cell and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Cobalamin with added folate was given. Six months later, the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion Cobalamin deficiency should always be ruled out in a patient with pancytopaenia. Our case report highlights a life-threatening cobalamin deficiency completely reversible after treatment.

  10. Numerical Studies of Magnetohydrodynamic Activity Resulting from Inductive Transients Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl R.

    2005-08-29

    This report describes results from numerical studies of transients in magnetically confined plasmas. The work has been performed by University of Wisconsin graduate students James Reynolds and Giovanni Cone and by the Principal Investigator through support from contract DE-FG02-02ER54687, a Junior Faculty in Plasma Science award from the DOE Office of Science. Results from the computations have added significantly to our knowledge of magnetized plasma relaxation in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and spheromak. In particular, they have distinguished relaxation activity expected in sustained configurations from transient effects that can persist over a significant fraction of the plasma discharge. We have also developed the numerical capability for studying electrostatic current injection in the spherical torus (ST). These configurations are being investigated as plasma confinement schemes in the international effort to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for environmentally benign energy production. Our numerical computations have been performed with the NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) using local computing resources and massively parallel computing hardware at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. Direct comparisons of simulation results for the spheromak with laboratory measurements verify the effectiveness of our numerical approach. The comparisons have been published in refereed journal articles by this group and by collaborators at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (see Section 4). In addition to the technical products, this grant has supported the graduate education of the two participating students for three years.

  11. Proximal femoral fracture in a man resulting from modern clipless pedals: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Neil

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The use of clipless pedals amongst recreational cyclists has become increasingly popular in recent years. We describe a hip fracture, that was sustained due to inadequate set up of such pedals. To the best of our knowledge, this has only been described once before, and this was in the non-English language medical literature. Case Report A 38-year-old Caucasian man who was a club cyclist sustained a displaced intracapsular fracture of the hip whilst cycling. As a direct result of the incorrect set-up of his clipless pedals he was unable to release his feet whilst slowing to a halt. This resulted in a loss of balance and subsequent fall with a direct impact onto his left hip. The resulting fracture was managed successfully with early closed reduction and fixation. At six month review he was walking unaided without pain but, as yet, has been unable to return to cycling. Conclusion This case highlights the dangers of clipless pedals even in experienced cyclists, and underlines the importance of proper information for their correct setup to minimise the risk of potentially serious injuries, especially in the region of the hip.

  12. Irradiation Effects Test Series: Test IE-2. Test results report. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, C. M.; Croucher, D. W.; Ploger, S. A.; Mehner, A. S.

    1977-08-01

    The report describes the results of a test using four 0.97-m long PWR-type fuel rods with differences in diametral gap and cladding irradiation. The objective of this test was to provide information about the effects of these differences on fuel rod behavior during quasi-equilibrium and film boiling operation. The fuel rods were subjected to a series of preconditioning power cycles of less than 30 kW/m. Rod powers were then increased to 68 kW/m at a coolant mass flux of 4900 kg/s-m/sup 2/. After one hour at 68 kW/m, a power-cooling-mismatch sequence was initiated by a flow reduction at constant power. At a flow of 2550 kg/s-m/sup 2/, the onset of film boiling occurred on one rod, Rod IE-011. An additional flow reduction to 2245 kg/s-m/sup 2/ caused the onset of film boiling on the remaining three rods. Data are presented on the behavior of fuel rods during quasiequilibrium and during film boiling operation. The effects of initial gap size, cladding irradiation, rod power cycling, a rapid power increase, and sustained film boiling are discussed. These discussions are based on measured test data, preliminary postirradiation examination results, and comparisons of results with FRAP-T3 computer model calculations.

  13. Impact of Negative Quality Inconsistency on Brand Loyalty – Case of Croatian Food Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ferenčić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Attracting and keeping consumers’ loyalty in Fast Moving Consumer Goods segment became the main concern for all producing companies and retailers, too. Many marketing researchers argue that product or service quality perception is one of the key elements in brand loyalty building process. When talking about food market, one has to be aware that food consumption has direct impact on human health and, in that context, process of building brand loyalty for food brands is not possible, or it can be hard, if the product quality of food brands is not on the expected level and according to defined food quality standards. The goal of this paper was to understand aspects of connection between food product quality and brand loyalty process better and to explore how problems with negative quality inconsistency in different food categories can influence brand loyalty. An empirical research (on-line survey was conducted to prove and explain the connection between food product quality and food brand loyalty. The research results shows that the main reasons for being loyal to a certain food brand or product are related mostly to positive brand experience, high and stabile product quality, and recognizable taste. In the context of these research results, it can be concluded that long term consumer satisfaction as a factor in food brand loyalty process depends on stabile product quality, so food manufacturers or food brand owners should be focused on preventing or minimizing the aspect of negative quality issues. Regarding research limitations, the study was conducted only on users from Croatian market; so broadening the survey to other markets should give a clearer view on the connection between food product quality and brand loyalty process.

  14. Interpretation of coagulation test results using a web-based reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Andres E; Jabcuga, Christine E; Nguyen, Alex; Wahed, Amer; Nedelcu, Elena; Nguyen, Andy N D

    2014-01-01

    Web-based synoptic reporting has been successfully integrated into diverse fields of pathology, improving efficiency and reducing typographic errors. Coagulation is a challenging field for practicing pathologists and pathologists-in-training alike. To develop a Web-based program that can expedite the generation of a individualized interpretive report for a variety of coagulation tests. We developed a Web-based synoptic reporting system composed of 119 coagulation report templates and 38 thromboelastography (TEG) report templates covering a wide range of findings. Our institution implemented this reporting system in July 2011; it is currently used by pathology residents and attending pathologists. Feedback from the users of these reports have been overwhelmingly positive. Surveys note the time saved and reduced errors. Our easily accessible, user-friendly, Web-based synoptic reporting system for coagulation is a valuable asset to our laboratory services. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  15. MAFFRA. Report for first years results of screening of antibacterial plant products for replacing antibiotica

    OpenAIRE

    Højberg, Ole; Canibe, Nuria; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    This is the first year internal work report by AU ANIS reporting on the experiments in 2016 with screening of selected antibacterial plant products against E coli, using a piglet stomach and ileum model.

  16. Parental Inconsistency versus Parental Authoritarianism: Associations with Symptoms of Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan Adeeb

    2008-01-01

    While in western countries, such as the US and Europe, authoritarian parenting is associated with negative psycho-social outcomes. Studies have indicated that this is not the case in collective/authoritarian cultures. It has been hypothesized that inconsistency in parenting style and culture contributes to these negative outcomes. In this study a…

  17. An Evaluation of the MMPI-2 and MMPI-A True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Richard W.; Arnau, Randolph C.; Archer, Robert P.; Dandy, Kristina L.

    2006-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--Adolescent (MMPI-A) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--2 (MMPI-2) True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) scales are measures of acquiescence and nonacquiescence included among the standard validity scales on these instruments. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of…

  18. 36 CFR 223.40 - Cancellation for environmental protection or inconsistency with plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974, as amended. Such provision shall provide for reasonable... environmental protection or inconsistency with plans. 223.40 Section 223.40 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Contracts Contract Conditions and Provisions § 223.40 Cancellation for environmental protection or...

  19. Preference-Inconsistent Recommendations: An Effective Approach for Reducing Confirmation Bias and Stimulating Divergent Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwind, Christina; Buder, Jurgen; Cress, Ulrike; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2012-01-01

    The Web is a perfect backdrop for opinion formation as a multitude of different opinions is publicly available. However, the different opinions often remain unexploited: Learners prefer preference-consistent over preference-inconsistent information, a phenomenon called confirmation bias. Two experiments were designed to test whether technologies…

  20. An Evaluation of the MMPI-2 and MMPI-A True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Richard W.; Arnau, Randolph C.; Archer, Robert P.; Dandy, Kristina L.

    2006-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--Adolescent (MMPI-A) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--2 (MMPI-2) True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) scales are measures of acquiescence and nonacquiescence included among the standard validity scales on these instruments. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of…

  1. Dispelling the Notion of Inconsistencies in Teachers' Mathematics Beliefs and Practices: A 3-Year Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross Francis, Dionne I.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in the field of mathematics education have focused on beliefs as a significant area of study because of the influence of beliefs on what is taught and learned. Much of the research in this area speaks about inconsistency between teachers' beliefs about mathematics teaching and learning and their classroom practices. In this case study,…

  2. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree Information of Sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Mulder, H.A.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype info

  3. Exploring the Inconsistent Labels and Definitions of Texts Used in Informational Reading and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Naomi M.; Liang, Lauren Aimonette

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the various labels and definitions given for texts used for informational reading and writing and the confusion caused by the inconsistency of terms. An EBSCO search on articles published from 2006 to 2011 in the three largest literacy-related professional organizations' journals produced a total of 59 articles.…

  4. The Belief that Alcohol Use Is Inconsistent with Personal Autonomy: A Promotive Factor for Younger Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kimberly L.; Shtivelband, Annette; Comello, Maria Leonora G.; Slater, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored an understudied promotive factor, a belief that alcohol use is inconsistent with personal autonomy, which may reduce adolescent intention to drink and subsequent alcohol use. Autonomy was examined as an attitudinal construct within the Theory of Reasoned Action. Longitudinal data from 2,493 seventh grade students nested in 40…

  5. Parental Inconsistency versus Parental Authoritarianism: Associations with Symptoms of Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan Adeeb

    2008-01-01

    While in western countries, such as the US and Europe, authoritarian parenting is associated with negative psycho-social outcomes. Studies have indicated that this is not the case in collective/authoritarian cultures. It has been hypothesized that inconsistency in parenting style and culture contributes to these negative outcomes. In this study a…

  6. Using Cumulative Sum Statistics to Detect Inconsistencies in Unproctored Internet Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendeiro, Jorge N.; Meijer, Rob R.; Schakel, Lolle; Maij-de Meij, Annette M.

    2013-01-01

    Unproctored Internet Testing (UIT) is becoming more popular in personnel recruitment and selection. A drawback of UIT is that cheating is easy and, therefore, a proctored test is often administered after an UIT procedure. To detect inconsistent test scores from UIT, a cumulative sum procedure (CUSUM

  7. Strategic manoeuvring in a political interview: the case of responding to an accusation of inconsistency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Andone

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the author analyses the way in which politicians manoeuver strategically in a political interview in response to an interviewer’s accusation that their position is inconsistent with a position they advanced before. This analysis is carried out by making use of the pragma-dialectical in

  8. Exploring the Inconsistent Labels and Definitions of Texts Used in Informational Reading and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Naomi M.; Liang, Lauren Aimonette

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the various labels and definitions given for texts used for informational reading and writing and the confusion caused by the inconsistency of terms. An EBSCO search on articles published from 2006 to 2011 in the three largest literacy-related professional organizations' journals produced a total of 59 articles.…

  9. A cognitive dissonance interpretation of consistencies and inconsistencies in environmentally responsible behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    2004-01-01

    The issue of consistency and inconsistency in environmentally responsible behavior (ERB), as reflected in the correlations between different ERBs, is discussed in the light of social psychological theories suggesting that most people desire to behave consistently. It is ar-gued that except in cases...

  10. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree Information of Sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Mulder, H.A.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype

  11. Results of titanium elastic nailing in paediatric femoral diaphyseal fractures-report of 30 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalan Divesh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Fractures of the femur are the most incapacitating fractures. For children aged 6-14 years, there is no clear consensus as to the preferred treatment. The conventional treatment of traction and cast-ing is no longer recommended. We report our experience in titanium elastic nailing for treatment of paediatric femoral diaphyseal fractures. Methods: Thirty patients in the age group of 6-16 years with displaced diaphyseal femoral fractures were sta-bilized with titanium elastic nails. Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for a minimum period of 1 year. The final results were evaluated using Flynn’s criteria. Tech-nical difficulties and complications associated with the pro-cedure were also analysed. Results: Overall results were excellent in 20 cases and satisfactory in 10 cases. No patient had poor result. The average hospital stay was 9 days. All the fractures healed with an average time to union of 6.86 weeks. The most com-mon complication encountered was soft tissue irritation at the nail entry site seen in 6 cases. Clinically, lengthening was noticed in 4 cases, while no patient had shortening. Malalignment was seen in only 6 cases. Perioperative diffi-culties encountered were failure of closed reduction seen in 6 cases and corkscrewing of nails in one case. Conclusion: Titanium elastic nails are a relatively easy to use, minimally invasive, physeal-protective implant sys-tem with high rate of good and excellent outcomes in chil-dren aged 6-16 years. Technical pitfalls can be eliminated by adhering to the basic principles. Key words: Titanium; Nails; Fractures, bone; Femur; Paediatrics

  12. Results of titanium elastic nailing in paediatric femoral diaphyseal fractures— report of 30 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Divesh Jalan; Rajesh Chandra; VK Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Fractures of the femur are the most incapacitating fractures.For children aged 6-14 years,there is no clear consensus as to the preferred treatment.The conventional treatment of traction and casting is no longer recommended.We report our experience in titanium elastic nailing for treatment of paediatric femoral diaphyseal fractures.Methods:Thirty patients in the age group of 6-16 years with displaced diaphyseal femoral fractures were stabilized with titanium elastic nails.Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for a minimum period of 1 year.The final results were evaluated using Flynn's criteria.Technical difficulties and complications associated with the procedure were also analysed.Results:Overall results were excellent in 20 cases and satisfactory in 10 cases.No patient had poor result.The average hospital stay was 9 days.All the fractures healed with an average time to union of 6.86 weeks.The most common complication encountered was soft tissue irritation at the nail entry site seen in 6 cases.Clinically,lengthening was noticed in 4 cases,while no patient had shortening.Malalignment was seen in only 6 cases.Perioperative difficulties encountered were failure of closed reduction seen in 6 cases and corkscrewing of nails in one case.Conclusion:Titanium elastic nails are a relatively easy to use,minimally invasive,physeal-protective implant system with high rate of good and excellent outcomes in children aged 6-16 years.Technical pitfalls can be eliminated by adhering to the basic principles.

  13. A configuration space toolkit for automated spatial reasoning: Technical results and LDRD project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, P.G.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1997-02-01

    A robot`s configuration space (c-space) is the space of its kinematic degrees of freedom, e.g., the joint-space of an arm. Sets in c-space can be defined that characterize a variety of spatial relationships, such as contact between the robot and its environment. C-space techniques have been fundamental to research progress in areas such as motion planning and physically-based reasoning. However, practical progress has been slowed by the difficulty of implementing the c-space abstraction inside each application. For this reason, we proposed a Configuration Space Toolkit of high-performance algorithms and data structures meeting these needs. Our intent was to develop this robotics software to provide enabling technology to emerging applications that apply the c-space abstraction, such as advanced motion planning, teleoperation supervision, mechanism functional analysis, and design tools. This final report presents the research results and technical achievements of this LDRD project. Key results and achievements included (1) a hybrid Common LISP/C prototype that implements the basic C-Space abstraction, (2) a new, generic, algorithm for constructing hierarchical geometric representations, and (3) a C++ implementation of an algorithm for fast distance computation, interference detection, and c-space point-classification. Since the project conclusion, motion planning researchers in Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center have been using the CSTk libcstk.so C++ library. The code continues to be used, supported, and improved by projects in the ISRC.

  14. Acute direct inguinal hernia resulting from blunt abdominal trauma: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hipkins Gabrielle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of traumatic inguinal hernia following blunt abdominal trauma after a road traffic accident and describe the circumstances and technique of repair. The patient suffered multiple upper limb fractures and developed acute swelling of the right groin and scrotum. CT scan confirmed the acute formation of a traumatic inguinal hernia. Surgical repair was deferred until resolution of the acute swelling and subcutaneous haematoma. The indication for surgery was the potential for visceral strangulation or ischaemia with the patient describing discomfort on coughing. At surgery there was complete obliteration of the inguinal canal with bowel and omentum lying immediately beneath the attenuated external oblique aponeurosis. A modified prolene mesh hernia repair was performed after reconstructing the inguinal ligament and canal in layers. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of the formation of an acute direct inguinal hernia caused as a result of blunt abdominal trauma with complete disruption of the inguinal canal. Surgical repair outlines the principles of restoration of normal anatomy in a patient who is physiologically recovered from the acute trauma and whose anatomy is distorted as a result of his injuries.

  15. Structural determinants of inconsistent condom use with clients among migrant sex workers: findings of longitudinal research in an urban canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sou, Julie; Shannon, Kate; Li, Jane; Nguyen, Paul; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Shoveller, Jean; Goldenberg, Shira M

    2015-06-01

    Migrant women in sex work experience unique risks and protective factors related to their sexual health. Given the dearth of knowledge in high-income countries, we explored factors associated with inconsistent condom use by clients among migrant female sex workers over time in Vancouver, BC. Questionnaire and HIV/sexually transmitted infection testing data from a longitudinal cohort, An Evaluation of Sex Workers Health Access, were collected from 2010 to 2013. Logistic regression using generalized estimating equations was used to model correlates of inconsistent condom use by clients among international migrant sex workers over a 3-year study period. Of 685 participants, analyses were restricted to 182 (27%) international migrants who primarily originated from China. In multivariate generalized estimating equations analyses, difficulty accessing condoms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-12.47) independently correlated with increased odds of inconsistent condom use by clients. Servicing clients in indoor sex work establishments (e.g., massage parlors) (AOR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.15-0.77), and high school attainment (AOR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.09-0.50) had independent protective effects on the odds of inconsistent condom use by clients. Findings of this longitudinal study highlight the persistent challenges faced by migrant sex workers in terms of accessing and using condoms. Migrant sex workers who experienced difficulty in accessing condoms were more than 3 times as likely to report inconsistent condom use by clients. Laws, policies, and programs promoting access to safer, decriminalized indoor work environments remain urgently needed to promote health, safety, and human rights for migrant workers in the sex industry.

  16. Results From South Africa's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Monika; Bassett, Susan; Draper, Catherine E; Micklesfield, Lisa; Monyeki, Andries; de Villiers, Anniza; Lambert, Estelle V

    2016-11-01

    We present results of the 2016 Healthy Active Kids South Africa (HAKSA) Report Card on the current status of physical activity (PA) and nutrition in South African youth. The context in which we interpret the findings is that participation in PA is a fundamental human right, along with the right to "attainment of the highest standard of health." The HAKSA 2016 Writing Group was comprised of 33 authorities in physical education, exercise science, nutrition, public health, and journalism. The search strategy was based on peer-reviewed manuscripts, dissertations, and 'gray' literature. The core PA indicators are Overall Physical Activity Level; Organized Sport Participation; Active and Outdoor Play; Active Transportation; Sedentary Behaviors; Family and Peer Influences; School; Community and the Built Environment; and National Government Policy, Strategies, and Investment. In addition, we reported on Physical Fitness and Motor Proficiency separately. We also reported on nutrition indicators including Overweight and Under-nutrition along with certain key behaviors such as Fruit and Vegetable Intake, and policies and programs including School Nutrition Programs and Tuck Shops. Data were extracted and grades assigned after consensus was reached. Grades were assigned to each indicator ranging from an A, succeeding with a large majority of children and youth (81% to 100%); B, succeeding with well over half of children and youth (61% to 80%); C, succeeding with about half of children and youth (41% to 60%); D, succeeding with less than half but some children and youth (21% to 40%); and F, succeeding with very few children and youth (0% to 20%); INC is inconclusive. Overall PA levels received a C grade, as we are succeeding with more than 50% of children meeting recommendations. Organized Sports Participation also received a C, and Government Policies remain promising, receiving a B. Screen time and sedentary behavior were a major concern. Under- and over-weight were

  17. Report on recent results of the PERCIVAL soft X-ray imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khromova, A.; Cautero, G.; Giuressi, D.; Menk, R.; Pinaroli, G.; Stebel, L.; Correa, J.; Marras, A.; Wunderer, C. B.; Lange, S.; Tennert, M.; Niemann, M.; Hirsemann, H.; Smoljanin, S.; Reza, S.; Graafsma, H.; Göttlicher, P.; Shevyakov, I.; Supra, J.; Xia, Q.; Zimmer, M.; Guerrini, N.; Marsh, B.; Sedgwick, I.; Nicholls, T.; Turchetta, R.; Pedersen, U.; Tartoni, N.; Hyun, H. J.; Kim, K. S.; Rah, S. Y.; Hoenk, M. E.; Jewell, A. D.; Jones, T. J.; Nikzad, S.

    2016-11-01

    The PERCIVAL (Pixelated Energy Resolving CMOS Imager, Versatile And Large) soft X-ray 2D imaging detector is based on stitched, wafer-scale sensors possessing a thick epi-layer, which together with back-thinning and back-side illumination yields elevated quantum efficiency in the photon energy range of 125-1000 eV. Main application fields of PERCIVAL are foreseen in photon science with FELs and synchrotron radiation. This requires high dynamic range up to 105 ph @ 250 eV paired with single photon sensitivity with high confidence at moderate frame rates in the range of 10-120 Hz. These figures imply the availability of dynamic gain switching on a pixel-by-pixel basis and a highly parallel, low noise analog and digital readout, which has been realized in the PERCIVAL sensor layout. Different aspects of the detector performance have been assessed using prototype sensors with different pixel and ADC types. This work will report on the recent test results performed on the newest chip prototypes with the improved pixel and ADC architecture. For the target frame rates in the 10-120 Hz range an average noise floor of 14e- has been determined, indicating the ability of detecting single photons with energies above 250 eV. Owing to the successfully implemented adaptive 3-stage multiple-gain switching, the integrated charge level exceeds 4 · 106 e- or 57000 X-ray photons at 250 eV per frame at 120 Hz. For all gains the noise level remains below the Poisson limit also in high-flux conditions. Additionally, a short overview over the updates on an oncoming 2 Mpixel (P2M) detector system (expected at the end of 2016) will be reported.

  18. An iterative approach to case study analysis: insights from qualitative analysis of quantitative inconsistencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain J Barnett

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-N comparative studies have helped common pool resource scholars gain general insights into the factors that influence collective action and governance outcomes. However, these studies are often limited by missing data, and suffer from the methodological limitation that important information is lost when we reduce textual information to quantitative data. This study was motivated by nine case studies that appeared to be inconsistent with the expectation that the presence of Ostrom’s Design Principles increases the likelihood of successful common pool resource governance. These cases highlight the limitations of coding and analysing Large-N case studies. We examine two issues: 1 the challenge of missing data and 2 potential approaches that rely on context (which is often lost in the coding process to address inconsistencies between empirical observations theoretical predictions.  For the latter, we conduct a post-hoc qualitative analysis of a large-N comparative study to explore 2 types of inconsistencies: 1 cases where evidence for nearly all design principles was found, but available evidence led to the assessment that the CPR system was unsuccessful and 2 cases where the CPR system was deemed successful despite finding limited or no evidence for design principles.  We describe inherent challenges to large-N comparative analysis to coding complex and dynamically changing common pool resource systems for the presence or absence of design principles and the determination of “success”.  Finally, we illustrate how, in some cases, our qualitative analysis revealed that the identity of absent design principles explained inconsistencies hence de-facto reconciling such apparent inconsistencies with theoretical predictions.  This analysis demonstrates the value of combining quantitative and qualitative analysis, and using mixed-methods approaches iteratively to build comprehensive methodological and theoretical approaches to understanding

  19. Tank 241-AN-103, cores 166 and 167 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-05-15

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AN-103 [Hydrogen Watch Listed] push mode core segments collected between September 13, 1996 and September 23, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AN-103 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) and the Flammable Gas Data Quality Objective (DQO). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. The raw data are included in this document. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity (AT), Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Plutonium analyses exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. One sample submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis exceeded the notification limit of 480 Joules/g (dry weight basis) as stated in the Safety Screening DQO. Appropriate notifications were made. Statistical evaluation of results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Attachment 1 is a cross reference to relate the tank farm identification numbers to the 222-S Laboratory LabCore/LIMS sample numbers. The subsamples generated in the laboratory for analyses are identified in these diagrams with their sources shown. The diagrams identifying the core composites are also included. Core 166 Nineteen push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-AN-103 riser 12A between September 13, 1996 and September 17, 1996. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory between September 20, 1996 and September 30, 1996. Table 2 summarizes the extrusion information. Selected segments (2, 5 and 14) were sampled using the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) and extruded by the Process Chemistry and Statistical Analysis Group. Core 167 Eighteen push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-AN-103 riser 21A between September 18, 1996 and September 23, 1996. Tank Farm Operations were

  20. INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE IN THE ANNUAL REPORTS OF ROMANIAN MANUFACTURING LISTED COMPANIES – METHODOLOGY AND DISCUSSION OF RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Victoria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In our study we have proposed to measure the extent of intellectual capital disclosure using annual reports as the source of our documentation. The empirical analysis is twofold: firstly we are interested in analyzing the value of intellectual capital using a value-based approach, through the evolution of market to book value ratio over the selected period and secondly we carry out a content-based analysis of the complete annual reports of the selected companies over the five year period and calculate an intellectual capital disclosure index. Looking at the figures we can conclude that only 50% of Romanian manufacturing companies hold intellectual capital assets for the period analysed and also they are mostly disclose information that refers to relational capital. The intellectual capital voluntary disclosure index for the 2005-2009 years for the sampled companies is on average almost 19%, considered very low.

  1. DILEMMAS OF FINANCIAL REPORTING AS THE RELIABLE INFORMATION SOURCE OF AN ENTITY PERFORMANCE RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Zuchewicz

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the hereby paper is to indicate, on the one hand, the need for transformations in financial reporting as the basic source of information about the financial situation of an economic entity indispensable in the decision making process by its users, and on the other to provide the analysis of the adopted report-ing reconstruction directions validity, as suggested by international financial community. On the basis of comments and reservations presented by practitioners and the a...

  2. Project Deep Drilling KLX02 - Phase 2. Methods, scope of activities and results. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekman, L. [GEOSIGMA AB/LE Geokonsult AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2001-04-01

    Geoscientific investigations performed by SKB, including those at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, have so far comprised the bedrock horizon down to about 1000 m. The primary purposes with the c. 1700 m deep, {phi}76 mm, sub vertical core borehole KLX02, drilled during the autumn 1992 at Laxemar, Oskarshamn, was to test core drilling technique at large depths and with a relatively large diameter and to enable geoscientific investigations beyond 1000 m. Drilling of borehole KLX02 was fulfilled very successfully. Results of the drilling commission and the borehole investigations conducted in conjunction with drilling have been reported earlier. The present report provides a summary of the investigations made during a five year period after completion of drilling. Results as well as methods applied are described. A variety of geoscientific investigations to depths exceeding 1600 m were successfully performed. However, the investigations were not entirely problem-free. For example, borehole equipment got stuck in the borehole at several occasions. Special investigations, among them a fracture study, were initiated in order to reveal the mechanisms behind this problem. Different explanations seem possible, e.g. breakouts from the borehole wall, which may be a specific problem related to the stress situation in deep boreholes. The investigation approach for borehole KLX02 followed, in general outline, the SKB model for site investigations, where a number of key issues for site characterization are studied. For each of those, a number of geoscientific parameters are investigated and determined. One important aim is to erect a lithological-structural model of the site, which constitutes the basic requirement for modelling mechanical stability, thermal properties, groundwater flow, groundwater chemistry and transport of solutes. The investigations in borehole KLX02 resulted in a thorough lithological-structural characterization of the rock volume near the borehole. In order

  3. Results From Hong Kong's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wendy Yajun; Wong, Stephen Heung-Sang; Wong, Martin Chi-Sang; Sit, Cindy Hui-Ping; Sum, Raymond Kim-Wai; He, Gang

    2016-11-01

    Hong Kong's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity (PA) for Children and Youth is the first evidence-based synthesis of various indicators related to individual behaviors that contribute to overall PA levels, settings and sources of influence, and strategies and investments in Hong Kong. Following a standardized protocol, currently best available data for Hong Kong youth were collated and evaluated by an expert consensus panel on 9 indicators (5 activity behaviors and 4 influences on these behaviors). Less than half of the children and youth met the recommended PA level. As a result, a D grade was given for Overall PA levels. Organized Sport Participation and Active Transportation received grades of C- and B, respectively. Sedentary Behaviors and School scored a C grade. Community and the Built Environment scored a grade of B. Family Influence received as low a score as Overall PA (D). Active Play and Government were not graded due to incomplete data. PA levels are low and sedentary behaviors are high for children and youth in Hong Kong. Promising policies exist in schools and features of community and the built environment are favorable. Increasing family support should be emphasized for future PA promotion.

  4. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2000-03-14

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

  5. Report on the results of the ninth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors in South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Michiya [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital (Japan); Hiyama, Keiko; Matsuo, Kakaru; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Nishida, Masashi; Sasaki, Yoshinobu

    2001-06-01

    The results of the ninth medical examination are reported. Atomic bomb survivors who had emigrated to South America as of November 2000 totaled 180 (153 to Brazil, 4 to Paraguay, 7 to Bolivia, 13 to Argentina, and 3 to Peru). Eighty persons (44.4%) were examined (62 in Brazil, 2 in Paraguay, 6 in Bolivia, 7 in Argentina, and 3 in Peru). The mean age of the males was 71.3 years, and the mean age of the females was 69.7 years. They had hypertension (24.1%), diabetes (10.1%), cancer (8.9%), heart disease (7.6%), and thyroid disease (2.5%). The most common manifestations of illness were fatigue (69.6%), loss of vigor (65.8%), taking medicine (55.7%), and heat intolerance (53.2%). The incident rates of electrocardiographic abnormalities and urine, blood, and biochemical tests abnormalities were almost the same as at the previous examination, and there was no change in the percentage of those who required detailed tests and treatment. When independence in daily life was judged by the criteria of the nursing care insurance system, 68 persons were judged ''independent'', and 7 persons ''handicapped.'' (K.H.)

  6. Otic Barotrauma Resulting from Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Justin P.; Hildrew, Douglas M.; Lawlor, Claire M.; Guittard, Jesse A.; Worley, N. Knight

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a growing problem affecting millions of people in the United States. The prevalence of OSA has risen drastically in the past few decades concurrently with the increasing prevalence of obesity. Subsequently, there has been an ever-increasing rise in the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices. While using CPAP devices may lead to many adverse effects, the majority of these effects are described as relatively benign. Case Report: We describe the detailed clinical course and outcome for a patient with otic barotrauma as a result of excessive self-titration of CPAP therapy in an in-home setting. We also discuss the pathophysiology of otic barotrauma and present a review of current literature on the topic. Conclusion: While the benefits of CPAP are clear, we must take into account the rare but possible effects on ear structure and function. Many studies describe an increase in middle ear pressure with the use of CPAP, but few describe the effects of this increased pressure on the middle ear, such as the otic barotrauma described in this case. Given the increased prevalence of OSA, it is important to understand the risks associated with CPAP therapy. PMID:27303224

  7. Guide for Accredited Private School Education Planning and Results Reporting. Requirements for Three-Year Education Plans for 2007/08-2009/10 and Annual Education Results Reports for November 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Submission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Guide to Accredited Private School Education Planning and Results Reporting, 2007-2010 provides the provincial requirements for: 1) Private school authority three-year education plans for 2007-2010. These plans cover the 2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/10 school years. 2) Private school authority annual education results report for the 2006/07…

  8. Effects of implicit theories of ability and stereotype-inconsistent information on handgrip strength in older adults: A regulatory fit perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Mélanie; Chalabaev, Aina; Colson, Serge S; Vaulerin, Jerome; Falzon, Charlene; D'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2017-03-01

    This study examined whether stereotype-inconsistent information interacts with implicit theories of ability to affect handgrip strength in older adults. Eighty-two retired older adults (13 men and 69 women) from 61 to 89 years old (Mage = 75.8 years; SD = 6.9) performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) during a handgrip task in a design manipulating implicit theories of ability and stereotype-inconsistent information related to physical decline with aging. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: incremental condition, entity condition, or control group. The results showed that in the incremental condition the stereotype-inconsistent information improved the peak MVC, the average MVC, the peak rate of force development (RFD), and RFD in the initial 50 ms of the MVC. This study therefore demonstrated that individuals with an incremental mindset who are exposed to stereotype-inconsistent information can boost their physical performance. These findings are discussed from the perspective of regulatory fit (i.e., when task framing is congruent with the individual's goal). © 2016 The Authors. Psychophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. The forest health monitoring national technical reports: examples of analyses and results from 2001-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Ambrose; Barbara L. Conkling; Kurt H. Riitters; John W. Coulston

    2008-01-01

    This brochure presents examples of analyses included in the first four Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) national technical reports. Its purpose is to introduce the reader to the kinds of information available in these and subsequent FHM national technical reports. Indicators presented here include drought, air pollution, forest fragmentation, and tree mortality. These...

  10. Consensus of microbiology reporting of ear swab results to primary care clinicians in patients with otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, M; Howell-Jones, R; Cunningham, R; McNulty, C

    2011-01-01

    Otitis externa is a ubiquitous inflammatory disease; although it arises most commonly from an infection, there is no consensus in the UK for the reporting of ear swab culture results. This study aims to review current microbiology laboratory reporting of ear swab specimens to primary care and reach an evidence-based consensus for a reporting policy. Fifty consecutive ear swab reports were reviewed from each of 12 laboratories in the South West region to determine and discuss reporting practice. The Health Protection Agency (HPA) GP Microbiology Laboratory Use Group reviewed the underlying evidence and worked towards a consensus of expert microbiology opinion for laboratory reporting of ear swab results using a modified version of the Delphi technique. A total of 487 reports from primary care were reviewed (54% female; 46% male). Cultures most commonly yielded Pseudomonas species (36%), Staphylococcus species (21%), Streptococcus species (15%) and fungi (11%). Five reporting policies were agreed: Policy 1: Common pathogens such as group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus - Always reported by name with antibiotic susceptibilities. Policy 2: Pseudomonas species - Always reported, but antibiotic susceptibilities only reported in severe disease. Policy 3: Aspergillus, Candida, coliforms and Proteus species, as well as non-group A streptococci and anaerobes - Only reported if moderate numbers of colonies and it is the predominant organism present; if appropriate report antibiotic susceptibilities. Policy 4: Coagulase-negative staphylococci, diphtheroids and enterococci - Not reported by name; generic terms used and antibiotic susceptibilities not reported. Policy 5: When antibiotic susceptibilities reported these must include susceptibility to a topical antibiotic. It is suggested that laboratories should consider adopting this evidence-based reporting consensus for ear swab culture results from primary care patients with

  11. Bariatric surgery results: reporting clinical characteristics and adverse outcomes from an integrated healthcare delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Robert A; Fisher, David P; Dutta, Sanjoy; O'Brien, Rebecca M; Ackerson, Lynn M; Sorel, Michael E; Sidney, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Limited data have been reported on bariatric surgery within a large, high-volume regional multicenter integrated healthcare delivery system. Review clinical characteristics and short- and intermediate-term outcomes and adverse events from a bariatric surgery program within an integrated healthcare delivery system. Single high-volume, multicenter regional integrated healthcare delivery system. Adult patients who underwent primary bariatric surgery during 2010-2011 were reviewed. Clinical characteristics, outcomes, and weight loss results were extracted from the electronic medical record. A total of 2399 patients were identified within the study period. The 30-day rates of clinical outcomes for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB; n = 1313) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG; n = 1018) were 2.9% for readmission, 3.0% for major complications, .8% for reoperation, and 0% for mortality. One-year and 2-year weight loss results were as follows: percent weight loss (%WL) was 31.4 (±SD 8.5) and 34.2±12.0% for SG and 34.1±9.3 and 39.1±11.9 for RYGB; percent excess weight loss (%EBWL) was 64.2±18.0 and 69.8±23.7 for SG and 68.0±19.3 and 77.8±23.7 for RYGB; percent excess body mass index loss (%EBMIL) was 72.9±21.0 and 77.7±22.4 for SG and 76.6±22.1% and 85.6±21.6 for RYGB. Follow-up for each procedure at 1 year was 76% for SG (n = 778) and 80% for RYGB (n = 1052) and at 2 years was 65% for SG (n = 659) and 67% for RYGB (n = 875). A large regional high-volume multicenter bariatric program within an integrated healthcare delivery system can produce excellent short-term results with low rates of short- and intermediate-term adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inconsistent Deliberations or Deliberate Inconsistencies?The Consistency of the ECtHR’s Assessment of Convictions based on International Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Booms

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most controversial cases before the European Court of Human Rights are those that deal with the conviction of applicants for international crimes on the basis of international law. In each case, the Court takes a seven-step approach to assess whether the international legal basis on which defendants are convicted is in conformity with Article 7(1 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Six such cases have come before the Court so far. This article analyzes the degree to which the case law of the Court is consistent with the default approach of applying these seven steps. It finds that there are several inconsistencies, most of which are detrimental to the applicants. The ambiguity thus created leads to uncertainty for all the parties involved.

  13. Quality Assessment of Colonoscopy Reporting: Results from a Statewide Cancer Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to assess quality of colonoscopy reports and determine if physicians in practice were already documenting recommended quality indicators, prior to the publication of a standardized Colonoscopy Reporting and Data System (CO-RADS in 2007. We examined 110 colonoscopy reports from 2005-2006 through Maryland Colorectal Cancer Screening Program. We evaluated 25 key data elements recommended by CO-RADS, including procedure indications, risk/comorbidity assessments, procedure technical descriptions, colonoscopy findings, specimen retrieval/pathology. Among 110 reports, 73% documented the bowel preparation quality and 82% documented specific cecal landmarks. For the 177 individual polyps identified, information on size and morphology was documented for 87% and 53%, respectively. Colonoscopy reporting varied considerately in the pre-CO-RADS period. The absence of key data elements may impact the ability to make recommendations for recall intervals. This paper provides baseline data to assess if CO-RADS has an impact on reporting and how best to improve the quality of reporting.

  14. Does electronic clinical microbiology results reporting influence medical decision making: a pre- and post-interview study of medical specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloembergen Peter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians view the accuracy of test results and the turnaround time as the two most important service aspects of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Because of the time needed for the culturing of infectious agents, final hardcopy culture results will often be available too late to have a significant impact on early antimicrobial therapy decisions, vital in infectious disease management. The clinical microbiologist therefore reports to the clinician clinically relevant preliminary results at any moment during the diagnostic process, mostly by telephone. Telephone reporting is error prone, however. Electronic reporting of culture results instead of reporting on paper may shorten the turnaround time and may ensure correct communication of results. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the implementation of electronic reporting of final microbiology results on medical decision making. Methods In a pre- and post-interview study using a semi-structured design we asked medical specialists in our hospital about their use and appreciation of clinical microbiology results reporting before and after the implementation of an electronic reporting system. Results Electronic reporting was highly appreciated by all interviewed clinicians. Major advantages were reduction of hardcopy handling and the possibility to review results in relation to other patient data. Use and meaning of microbiology reports differ significantly between medical specialties. Most clinicians need preliminary results for therapy decisions quickly. Therefore, after the implementation of electronic reporting, telephone consultation between clinician and microbiologist remained the key means of communication. Conclusions Overall, electronic reporting increased the workflow efficiency of the medical specialists, but did not have an impact on their decision-making.

  15. Vehicle technologies program Government Performance and Results Act (GPA) report for fiscal year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.; Stephens, T. S.; Birky, A. K. (Energy Systems); (DOE-EERE); (TA Engineering)

    2012-08-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has defined milestones for its Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP). This report provides estimates of the benefits that would accrue from achieving these milestones relative to a base case that represents a future in which there is no VTP-supported vehicle technology development. Improvements in the fuel economy and reductions in the cost of light- and heavy-duty vehicles were estimated by using Argonne National Laboratory's Autonomie powertrain simulation software and doing some additional analysis. Argonne also estimated the fraction of the fuel economy improvements that were attributable to VTP-supported development in four 'subsystem' technology areas: batteries and electric drives, advanced combustion engines, fuels and lubricants, and materials (i.e., reducing vehicle mass, called 'lightweighting'). Oak Ridge National Laboratory's MA{sup 3}T (Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies) tool was used to project the market penetration of light-duty vehicles, and TA Engineering's TRUCK tool was used to project the penetrations of medium- and heavy-duty trucks. Argonne's VISION transportation energy accounting model was used to estimate total fuel savings, reductions in primary energy consumption, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions that would result from achieving VTP milestones. These projections indicate that by 2030, the on-road fuel economy of both light- and heavy-duty vehicles would improve by more than 20%, and that this positive impact would be accompanied by a reduction in oil consumption of nearly 2 million barrels per day and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of more than 300 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. These benefits would have a significant economic value in the U.S. transportation sector and reduce its dependency on oil and its vulnerability to oil price shocks.

  16. FInal Report: Site Investigation Results, 2009-2011, at Inman, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    2015-05-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at the southern edge of the city of Inman, Kansas, from 1954 to 1965. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In 1997, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contamination level [MCL] of 5.0 μg/L) were detected in three private wells near the former grain storage facility at Inman, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. No public water supply wells were identified in 1998 by the KDHE within 1 mi of the town. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with grain storage operations. To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA agreed to conduct investigations at Inman. The investigations were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. Argonne, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, developed a Work Plan (Argonne 2007) and subsequently a Summary of Investigation Results and Proposed Work Plan (Appendix A) for a phased site investigation. The proposed work was approved by the KDHE (2007, 2011). The investigations were conducted from November 2009 to September 2011, as proposed in the two work plans. This report presents the findings of the 2009-2011 investigations at Inman.

  17. Only fixation for cervical spondylosis: Report of early results with a preliminary experience with 6 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The author reports early post-operative outcome and preliminary experience with an alternative form of treatment of cervical degenerative or spondylotic disease leading to spinal canal stenosis that involves fixation-arthrodesis of the affected spinal segment using one or two (double insurance transarticular screws for each joint. Materials and Methods: During the period of months from March 2013 to July 2013, six patients having cervical spondylotic cord compression were treated with transarticular method of screw fixation of the involved segments. The operation involved section of the spinous process at its base, opening up of the facet joint, denuding of articular cartilage, placement of intraarticular cavity bone graft chips and insertion of either a single or two transarticular screws at each level. The fixation was done in four levels in four patients and at two levels in two patients. Japanese Orthopedic Association score, visual analog scale (neck pain and Odom′s criteria were used to monitor the clinical status of the patients before and after the surgery and at follow-up. Results: Immediate post-operative and a relatively short-term post-operative outcome was remarkably gratifying. During the average period of follow-up of 6 months (range: 3-8 months; there was varying degree of recovery of symptoms. The procedure resulted in firm stabilization and fixation of the spinal segment and provided a ground for arthrodesis. No patient worsened after treatment. During the period of follow-up, all patients showed remarkable and progressive recovery in symptoms. Conclusions: Vertical instability and telescoping, listhesis or overriding of the facets on physical activity seems to be the defining phenomenon in pathogenesis of cervical spondylotic disease. The clinical outcome in our patients suggest that only fixation of the spinal segment can be a rationale form of treatment. Transarticular method of treatment is a simple, safe and

  18. CODES AND PRACTICES OF IMPLEMENTATION OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN ROMANIA AND RESULTS REPORTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GROSU MARIA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance refers to the manner in which companies are directed and controlled. Business management was always guided by certain principles, but the current meaning of corporate governance concerns and the contribution that companies must have the overall development of modern society. Romania used quite late in adopting a code of good practice in corporate governance, being driven, in particular, the privatization process, but also the transfer of control and surveillance of political organizations by the Board of Directors (BD. Adoption of codes of corporate governance is necessary to harmonize internal business requirements of a functioning market economy. In addition, the CEE countries, the European Commission adopted an action plan announcing measures to modernize company law and enhance corporate governance. Romania takes steps in this direction by amending the Company Law, and other regulations, although the practice does not necessarily keep pace with the requirements. This study aims on the one hand, an analysis of the evolution of corporate governance codes adopted in Romania, but also an empirical research of the implementation of corporate governance principles of a representative sample of companies listed on the Bucharest Stock Exchange (BSE. Consider relevant research methodology, because the issuer of the Codes of CG in Romania is BSE listed companies requesting their voluntary implementation. Implementation results are summarized and interpreted at the expense of public reports of the companies studied. Most studies undertaken in this direction have been made on multinational companies which respects the rule of corporate governance codes of countries of origin. In addition, many studies also emphasize the fair treatment of stakeholders rather than on models of governance adopted (monist/dualist with implications for optimizing economic objectives but also social. Undertaken research attempts to highlight on the one

  19. Validity and reliability of patient reported outcomes used in Psoriasis: results from two randomized clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Koo John; Thompson Christine; Stone Stephen P; Bresnahan Brian W; Shikiar Richard; Revicki Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Two Phase III randomized controlled clinical trials were conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of weekly subcutaneous administration of efalizumab for the treatment of psoriasis. Patient reported measures of psoriasis-related functionality and health-related quality of life and of psoriasis-related symptom assessments were included as part of the trials. Objective To assess the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the patient reported outcome m...

  20. Legal Guarantees and Inconsistency of State Recognition to the Right of Religion/Belief in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadarudin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The right to freedom of religion/belief has been guaranteed by law in Indonesia, but there are still going on some violations of the right to freedom of religion/belief in the various regions. The purpose of this study was to determine the form of the legal guarantee of the right to freedom of religion/belief in Indonesia, shape inconsistencies state recognition of the right to religion/belief in Indonesia, and efforts to improve the rights of religion/belief in Indonesia. This paper uses a normative study. It was found that there are some rules that apply in Indonesia, which may hinder the implementation of the right of religion/belief, thus causing the occurrence of cases of rights violations religion/belief in some areas, should therefore rules should be immediately revoked. The conclusions of this paper are contained inconsistent state recognition of the right to religion/ belief in Indonesia.

  1. TIME INCONSISTENCY AND REPUTATION IN MONETARY POLICY: A STRATEGIC MODELLING IN CONTINUOUS TIME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jingyuan; Tian Guoqiang

    2008-01-01

    This article develops a model to examine the equilibrium behavior of the time inconsistency problem in a continuous time economy with stochastic and endogenized dis-tortion. First, the authors introduce the notion of sequentially rational equilibrium, and show that the time inconsistency problem may be solved with trigger reputation strategies for stochastic setting. The conditions for the existence of sequentially rational equilibrium are provided. Then, the concept of sequentially rational stochastically stable equilibrium is introduced. The authors compare the relative stability between the cooperative behavior and uncooperative behavior, and show that the cooperative equilibrium in this monetary policy game is a sequentially rational stochastically stable equilibrium and the uncooper-ative equilibrium is sequentially rational stochastically unstable equilibrium. In the long run, the zero inflation monetary policies are inherently more stable than the discretion rules, and once established, they tend to persist for longer periods of the time.

  2. Familiar faces rendered strange: Why inconsistent realism drives characters into the uncanny valley

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Computer-modeled characters resembling real people sometimes elicit cold, eerie feelings. This effect, called the uncanny valley, has been attributed to uncertainty about whether the character is human or living or real. Uncertainty, however, neither explains why anthropomorphic characters lie in the uncanny valley nor their characteristic eeriness. We propose that realism inconsistency causes anthropomorphic characters to appear unfamiliar, despite their physical similarity to real people, o...

  3. Inconsistency of the judgement matrix in the AHP method and decision maker's knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Szczypinska, Anna

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method of quantitative estimation of the decision maker's knowledge in the context of the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) in case, when the judgement matrix is inconsistent. We show that the matrix of deviation from the transitivity condition corresponds to the rate matrix for transaction costs in the financial market. For the quantity estimation of the decision maker's professionalism we apply the Ising model and the thermodynamics tools.

  4. The Belief that Alcohol Use is Inconsistent with Personal Autonomy: A Promotive Factor for Younger Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Kimberly L.; Shtivelband, Annette; Comello, Maria Leonora G.; Slater, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored an understudied promotive factor, a belief that alcohol use is inconsistent with personal autonomy, which may reduce adolescent intention to drink and subsequent alcohol use. Autonomy was examined as an attitudinal construct within the Theory of Reasoned Action. Longitudinal data from 2,493 seventh grade students nested in 40 schools were analyzed using a structural equation model. Autonomy was negatively correlated with intention to use alcohol and subsequent alcohol use ...

  5. Paule-Mandel estimators for network meta-analysis with random inconsistency effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dan; Veroniki, Areti Angeliki; Law, Martin; Tricco, Andrea C; Baker, Rose

    2017-06-05

    Network meta-analysis is used to simultaneously compare multiple treatments in a single analysis. However, network meta-analyses may exhibit inconsistency, where direct and different forms of indirect evidence are not in agreement with each other, even after allowing for between-study heterogeneity. Models for network meta-analysis with random inconsistency effects have the dual aim of allowing for inconsistencies and estimating average treatment effects across the whole network. To date, two classical estimation methods for fitting this type of model have been developed: a method of moments that extends DerSimonian and Laird's univariate method and maximum likelihood estimation. However, the Paule and Mandel estimator is another recommended classical estimation method for univariate meta-analysis. In this paper, we extend the Paule and Mandel method so that it can be used to fit models for network meta-analysis with random inconsistency effects. We apply all three estimation methods to a variety of examples that have been used previously and we also examine a challenging new dataset that is highly heterogenous. We perform a simulation study based on this new example. We find that the proposed Paule and Mandel method performs satisfactorily and generally better than the previously proposed method of moments because it provides more accurate inferences. Furthermore, the Paule and Mandel method possesses some advantages over likelihood-based methods because it is both semiparametric and requires no convergence diagnostics. Although restricted maximum likelihood estimation remains the gold standard, the proposed methodology is a fully viable alternative to this and other estimation methods. © 2017 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Time-Inconsistent Optimal Control Problems and the Equilibrium HJB Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Yong, Jiongmin

    2012-01-01

    A general time-inconsistent optimal control problem is considered for stochastic differential equations with deterministic coefficients. Under suitable conditions, a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman type equation is derived for the equilibrium value function of the problem. Well-posedness and some properties of such an equation is studied, and time-consistent equilibrium strategies are constructed. As special cases, the linear-quadratic problem and a generalized Merton's portfolio problem are investigated.

  7. Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

    2012-04-05

    A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market

  8. Inconsistency in the average hydraulic models used in nuclear reactor design and safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    One of important inconsistencies in the six-equation model predictions has been found to be the force experienced by a single bubble placed in a convergent stream of liquid. Various sets of governing equations yield different amount of forces to hold the bubble stationary in a convergent nozzle. By using the first order potential flow theory, it is found that the six-equation model can not be used to estimate the force experienced by a deformed bubble. The theoretical value of the particle stress of a bubble in a convergent nozzle flow has been found to be a function of the Weber number when bubble distortion is allowed. This force has been calculated by using different sets of governing equations and compared with the theoretical value. It is suggested in this study that the bubble size distribution function can be used to remove the presented inconsistency by relating the interfacial variables with different moments of the bubble size distribution function. This study also shows that the inconsistencies in the thermal-hydraulic governing equation can be removed by mechanistic modeling of the phasic interface. 11 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  9. Problems and benefits reported by stroke family caregivers: results from a prospective epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E; Allen, Jessica Y; Grant, Joan S; Clay, Olivio J; Perkins, Martinique; Roth, David L

    2009-06-01

    Stroke symptoms can be very stressful for family caregivers, but most knowledge about the prevalence and stressfulness of stroke-related patient problems is derived from convenience samples. In addition, little is known about perceived benefits of the stroke caregiving experience. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and stressfulness of stroke-related problems, and perceived benefits of caregiving, as reported by an epidemiologically derived sample of caregivers of stroke survivors. Stroke survivors (N=75) from a prospective epidemiological study of stroke, the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, and their family caregivers were followed. Caregivers were given a comprehensive telephone interview 8 to 12 months after the stroke, using measures of stroke patient problems, caregiver appraisals of the stressfulness of these problems, and perceived benefits of caregiving. Caregivers rated patient problems with mood (depression, loneliness and anxiety), memory, and physical care (bowel control), as the most stressful, but reported prevalence of these problems was lower than those reported previously in studies using clinical samples. Caregivers also reported many benefits from caregiving, with over 90% reporting that caregiving enabled them to appreciate life more. Epidemiologically based studies of stroke caregiving provide a unique picture of caregiver strains and benefits compared with clinical studies, which tend to over-represent more impaired patients. Support for caregivers should include interventions to aid their coping with highly stressful mood, physical care, and cognitive problems of stroke patients, but should also attend to perceived benefits of caregiving.

  10. Appropriateness of reporting statistical results in orthodontics: the dominance of P values over confidence intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronopoulou, Argy; Pandis, Nikolaos; Eliades, Theodore

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to search the orthodontic literature and determine the frequency of reporting of confidence intervals (CIs) in orthodontic journals with an impact factor. The six latest issues of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, the European Journal of Orthodontics, and the Angle Orthodontist were hand searched and the reporting of CIs, P values, and implementation of univariate or multivariate statistical analyses were recorded. Additionally, studies were classified according to the type/design as cross-sectional, case-control, cohort, and clinical trials, and according to the subject of the study as growth/genetics, behaviour/psychology, diagnosis/treatment, and biomaterials/biomechanics. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics followed by univariate examination of statistical associations, logistic regression, and multivariate modelling. CI reporting was very limited and was recorded in only 6 per cent of the included published studies. CI reporting was independent of journal, study area, and design. Studies that used multivariate statistical analyses had a higher probability of reporting CIs compared with those using univariate statistical analyses. Misunderstanding of the use of P values and CIs may have important implications in implementation of research findings in clinical practice.

  11. Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-29

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in

  12. Can Patient Safety Incident Reports Be Used to Compare Hospital Safety? Results from a Quantitative Analysis of the English National Reporting and Learning System Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie Howell

    significantly negatively associated with incident reports. Patient satisfaction and mortality outcomes were not significantly associated with reporting rates. Staff survey responses revealed that keeping reports confidential, keeping staff informed about incidents and giving feedback on safety initiatives increased reporting rates [r = 0.26 (p<0.01, r = 0.17 (p = 0.04, r = 0.23 (p = 0.01, r = 0.20 (p = 0.02].The NRLS is the largest patient safety reporting system in the world. This study did not demonstrate many hospital characteristics to significantly influence overall reporting rate. There were no association between size of hospital, number of staff, mortality outcomes or patient satisfaction outcomes and incident reporting rate. The study did show that hospitals where staff reported more incidents had reduced litigation claims and when clinician staffing is increased fewer incidents reporting patient harm are reported, whilst near misses remain the same. Certain specialties report more near misses than others, and doctors report more harm incidents than near misses. Staff survey results showed that open environments and reduced fear of punitive response increases incident reporting. We suggest that reporting rates should not be used to assess hospital safety. Different healthcare professionals focus on different types of safety incidents and focusing on these areas whilst creating a responsive, confidential learning environment will increase staff engagement with error disclosure.

  13. Recommendations for reporting outcome results in abdominal wall repair: results of a Consensus meeting in Palermo, Italy, 28-30 June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muysoms, F E; Deerenberg, E B; Peeters, E; Agresta, F; Berrevoet, F; Campanelli, G; Ceelen, W; Champault, G G; Corcione, F; Cuccurullo, D; DeBeaux, A C; Dietz, U A; Fitzgibbons, R J; Gillion, J F; Hilgers, R-D; Jeekel, J; Kyle-Leinhase, I; Köckerling, F; Mandala, V; Montgomery, A; Morales-Conde, S; Simmermacher, R K J; Schumpelick, V; Smietański, M; Walgenbach, M; Miserez, M

    2013-08-01

    The literature dealing with abdominal wall surgery is often flawed due to lack of adherence to accepted reporting standards and statistical methodology. The EuraHS Working Group (European Registry of Abdominal Wall Hernias) organised a consensus meeting of surgical experts and researchers with an interest in abdominal wall surgery, including a statistician, the editors of the journal Hernia and scientists experienced in meta-analysis. Detailed discussions took place to identify the basic ground rules necessary to improve the quality of research reports related to abdominal wall reconstruction. A list of recommendations was formulated including more general issues on the scientific methodology and statistical approach. Standards and statements are available, each depending on the type of study that is being reported: the CONSORT statement for the Randomised Controlled Trials, the TREND statement for non randomised interventional studies, the STROBE statement for observational studies, the STARLITE statement for literature searches, the MOOSE statement for metaanalyses of observational studies and the PRISMA statement for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. A number of recommendations were made, including the use of previously published standard definitions and classifications relating to hernia variables and treatment; the use of the validated Clavien-Dindo classification to report complications in hernia surgery; the use of "time-to-event analysis" to report data on "freedom-of-recurrence" rather than the use of recurrence rates, because it is more sensitive and accounts for the patients that are lost to follow-up compared with other reporting methods. A set of recommendations for reporting outcome results of abdominal wall surgery was formulated as guidance for researchers. It is anticipated that the use of these recommendations will increase the quality and meaning of abdominal wall surgery research.

  14. Report of results of benchmarking survey of central heating operations at NASA centers and various corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, Total Quality Management has swept across the country. Many companies and the Government have started looking at every aspect on how business is done and how money is spent. The idea or goal is to provide a service that is better, faster and cheaper. The first step in this process is to document or measure the process or operation as it stands now. For Lewis Research Center, this report is the first step in the analysis of heating plant operations. This report establishes the original benchmark that can be referred to in the future. The report also provides a comparison to other organization's heating plants to help in the brainstorming of new ideas. The next step is to propose and implement changes that would meet the goals as mentioned above. After the changes have been implemented the measuring process starts over again. This provides for a continuous improvement process.

  15. Results of SEI Independent Research and Development Projects and Report on Emerging Technologies and Technology Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    University of Southern California, U.S. Steve Meyers Software Process Group, U.S. Translation of Nets within Nets in Cross-organizational...Cobleigh, Kim Freder- ick, Elizabeth A. Henneman , and Leon J. Osterweil University of Massachusetts, U.S. Experience Report Experience in Discovering

  16. Results From England's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Hannah; Standage, Martyn; Sherar, Lauren; Cumming, Sean; Parnell, Caley; Davis, Adrian; Foster, Charlie; Jago, Russ

    2016-11-01

    Regular physical activity improves physical and mental health, yet children's physical activity levels were low in England's 2014 Report Card. Within this paper, we update the 2014 Report Card to assess current information for the 9 indicators of physical activity. A search for nationally representative data on 9 indicators of physical activity was conducted and the data were assessed by an expert panel. The panel assigned grades [ie, A, B, C, D, F, or INC (incomplete)] to each indicator based on whether children across England were achieving specific benchmarks. The 2016 Report Card was produced and disseminated. The following grades were awarded: Overall Physical Activity Levels: D-; Organized Sport Participation: D; Active Play: INC; Active Transportation: C-; Sedentary Behaviors: INC; Family and Peers: INC; School: B+; Community and the Built Environment: B; Government Strategies and Investment: INC. The grades have not improved since the 2014 Report Card and several gaps in the literature are still present. While children's physical activity levels remain low alongside competing sedentary choices, further national plans and investment with local actions are urgently needed to promote physical activity especially via active play, active transport, and family support.

  17. Crafting an Incoming Law School Class: Preliminary Results. LSAC Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, Peter J.; Thornton, Andrea E.

    This report proposes an approach to formalize the law school admission process by first requiring law schools to delineate the characteristics they want their incoming classes to possess (e.g., types of undergraduate major, percent of in-state versus out-of-state residents, and levels of cultural diversity). These are then used as constraints on…

  18. Army Synthetic Validity Project. Report of Phase 3 Results. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    distribution of reports to: U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, ATTN: PERI- POX , 5001 Eisenhower Ave., Alexandria...L PRATE Rating Re"Mtion Figure 5.11. Task-Basned test score cutoff. for each rating repetition. 5-56 100- 80- 40 140 ------------ 4, ...... MVA

  19. Urban-rural health differences: primary care data and self reported data render different results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroneman, M.; Verheij, R.; Tacken, M.; Zee, J. van der

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Assessing the usefulness of GP electronic medical records for assessing the health of rural populations by comparing these data with data from health interview surveys. Data: Data from electronic medical records routinely recorded in general practices in 2000–2002. Data on self- reported health

  20. Urban-rural health differences: primary care data and self reported data render different results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroneman, M.; Verheij, R.; Tacken, M.A.J.B.; Zee, Jvan der

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Assessing the usefulness of GP electronic medical records for assessing the health of rural populations by comparing these data with data from health interview surveys. DATA: Data from electronic medical records routinely recorded in general practices in 2000-2002. Data on self-reported health

  1. Case Report: Chronic Recurrent Unilateral Pulmonary Infection: Result of Congenital Unilateral Agenesis of Pulmonary Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Abu Saleh, Walid K; Ramchandani, Mahesh; Scheinin, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral agenesis of the pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a 52-year-old female who gave a long history of chronic, recurrent, left-sided pulmonary infections related to UAPA. For many years, she was managed medically but the infection continued to recur. She eventually underwent left pneumonectomy and made a good recovery.

  2. 40 CFR 141.35 - Reporting for unregulated contaminant monitoring results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to the State and EPA, at the Web address specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section. If you do not...) Reporting by small systems. If you serve a population of 10,000 or fewer people, and you are notified that... or, at the State's discretion, by the PWS, following the format of a 5-digit number unique...

  3. An Initial Test of Inconsistent Nurturing as Control Theory: How Partners of Drug Abusers Assist Their Partners' Sobriety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Poire, Beth A.; Hallett, Jennifer S.; Erlandson, Karen T.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how inconsistent nurturing as control theory asserts that because of competing goals of nurturing and controlling, partners of drug-dependent individuals will unintentionally encourage the very behavior they are trying to extinguish through inconsistent manifestations of reinforcement and punishment. Finds that partners of substance…

  4. Can Patient Safety Incident Reports Be Used to Compare Hospital Safety? Results from a Quantitative Analysis of the English National Reporting and Learning System Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Ann-Marie; Burns, Elaine M; Bouras, George; Donaldson, Liam J; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    reporting system in the world. This study did not demonstrate many hospital characteristics to significantly influence overall reporting rate. There were no association between size of hospital, number of staff, mortality outcomes or patient satisfaction outcomes and incident reporting rate. The study did show that hospitals where staff reported more incidents had reduced litigation claims and when clinician staffing is increased fewer incidents reporting patient harm are reported, whilst near misses remain the same. Certain specialties report more near misses than others, and doctors report more harm incidents than near misses. Staff survey results showed that open environments and reduced fear of punitive response increases incident reporting. We suggest that reporting rates should not be used to assess hospital safety. Different healthcare professionals focus on different types of safety incidents and focusing on these areas whilst creating a responsive, confidential learning environment will increase staff engagement with error disclosure.

  5. Report on FY15 Alloy 617 SMT Creep-Fatigue Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jetter, Robert I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baird, Seth T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pu, Chao [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-22

    , guidance has been received from ASME Code committees that the proposed EPP methodology for evaluation of creep-fatigue damage should be extended to the other Subsection NH materials to the extent feasible. Thus, the scope of testing has been expanded to include SS304H and SS316H. This report describes the SMT approach and the development of testing capability to conduct SMT experiments on Alloy 617 and 304H and 316H and stainless steels. These SMT specimen data are also representative of component loading conditions and have been used as part of the verification of the proposed elastic-perfectly plastic Code Cases. Results from the SMT tests on both Alloy 617 and SS316H were compared to the predictions from the EPP Creep-Fatigue Code Case. Two different comparisons were made; one based on design life equal to the test duration and the other with an acceptable design life determined from the EPP Code Case procedure. The latter approach permits the determination of...

  6. Report on FY15 Two-Bar Thermal Ratcheting Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jetter, Robert I [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baird, Seth T [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pu, Chao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-22

    ASME Code committees that the proposed EPP methodology should also apply to other Subsection NH materials throughout their allowed temperature range. To support these objectives, two suites of tests have been accomplished during this reporting period. One suite addresses the issue of the response of Alloy 617 at a lower temperature with tests in range of 500 800oC and a few at 350 650°C. The other suite addresses the response of SS316H up to its current maximum allowed temperature of 1500°F (815°C) In the two-bar test methodology, the two bars can be viewed as specimens taken out of a tubular component across the wall thickness representing the inner wall element and the outer wall element respectively. The two bars are alternately heated and cooled under sustained axial loading to generate ratcheting. A sustained hold time is introduced at the hot extreme of the cycle to capture the accelerated ratcheting and strain accumulation due to creep. Since the boundary conditions are a combination of strain control and load control it is necessary to use two coupled servo-controlled testing machines to achieve the key features of the two-bar representation of actual component behavior. Two-bar thermal ratcheting test results with combinations of applied mean stresses, transient temperature difference and heating and cooling rates were recorded. Tests performed at heating and cooling rates of 30°C/min are comparable to a strain rate of 10 ⁻⁵/sec. At high mean stresses in tension the direction of ratcheting was in-phase with the load, e.g. tensile strain ratcheting under high tensile loading; however, at lower loads, strain ratcheting in compression was observed under net tensile mean stresses. The strain accumulation was proportional to the applied thermal load. However, there was a narrow range of applied load in which the high applied thermal loading did not result in significant strain accumulation. Unfortunately, when the proposed EPP strain limit evaluation rules

  7. Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

    2012-04-05

    A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market

  8. Vignettes and differential health reporting: results from the Japanese World Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ismail Tareque

    Full Text Available We examined the factors associated with the evaluation of health description vignettes and how Japanese people make decisions related to the eight health dimensions (mobility, emotions, pain, relationship with others, sleep and energy, vision, recognition/remembering abilities, and self-care. We investigated a dataset of 4,959 respondents (≥ 18 years from the Japanese World Health Survey. Ordered probit models were used to identify factors associated with all health dimensions. On all dimensions, older people appraised extreme problems as less problematic than young people did. Compared with men, women reported greater severity in the case of extreme problems on three health dimensions: emotion, pain, and sleep/energy. The study also found negative effects of alcohol consumption in almost all dimensions. Doctors and other health care workers should be careful when assessing severity of health problems in older individuals; in this population, health problems may be more severe than reported.

  9. Effect of deep planting black spruce: Fifth-year field results. Technical report No. 92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whaley, R.E.; Buse, L.J.; Niznowski, G.

    1995-12-31

    This report summarizes the findings of a trial established in 1990 in northern Ontario to examine the practice of deep planting black spruce seedlings. The investigators studied the effects of three planting depths on the survival and growth of overwintered black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.)BSP) at a site with deep, moist, fine loamy-clayey soil and a vegetation type V31/32 (black spruce-jack pine/tall shrub/feathermoss) that had been full-tree harvested and Bracke site prepared. The report includes data on fifth-year percent survival, total height, height increment, and diameter at ground level for seedling stock planted normally (0-5 centimeters deep), at medium depth (5-9 centimeters below root collar), and deep (9 centimeters or deeper below root collar).

  10. Production Facility Prototype Blower Installation Report with 1000 Hr Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olivas, Eric Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The roots blower in use at ANL for in-beam experiments and also at LANL for flow tests was sized for 12 mm diameter disks and significantly less beam heating. Currently, the disks are 29 mm in diameter, with a 12 mm FWHM Gaussian beam spot at 42 MeV and 2.86 μA on each side of the target, 5.72 μA total. The target design itself is reported elsewhere. With the increased beam heating, the helium flow requirement increased so that a larger blower was need for a mass flow rate of 400 g/s at 2.76 MPa (400 psig). An Aerzen GM 12.4 blower was selected, and is currently being installed at the LANL facility for target and component flow testing. This report describes this blower/motor/pressure vessel package and the status of the facility preparations.

  11. Asymptomatic pneumomediastinum resulting from air in the epidural space -a case report-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Kyoung; Cha, Young Deog; Song, Jang Ho; Park, Ji Woong; Lee, Mi Hyeon

    2013-09-01

    There are no reports regarding pneumomediastinum caused by thoracic epidural block complications. We believe that it is possible to experience an occurrence of pneumomediastinum caused by air in the epidural space after performing a thoracic epidural block using the loss of resistance (LOR) technique with air. We report a witnessed case where pneumomediastinum appeared after a thoracic epidural block. Pneumorrrhachis, paravertebral muscle emphysema, and pneumomediastinum were diagnosed by Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography. Although extremely rare, pneumomediastinum can be caused by an epidural block using LOR technique with air. In order to avoid the above danger, the use of saline or very minimal amount of air is required during a careful LOR technique.

  12. Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Resulting in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chao Hsu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute carbon monoxide (CO poisoning with cardiac complications is well documented in the literature. However, ST segment elevation is a rare presentation, and most of these cases with ST elevation have revealed non-occlusive or normal coronary arteries. We report a case of CO poisoning complicated with ST elevation myocardial infarction. Emergency coronary angiography revealed total occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and primary percutaneous coronary intervention was performed. This report of a rare case should remind physicians that cardiovascular investigations, including electrocardiography, must be performed in cases with CO poisoning because mortality might increase if reperfusion therapy or appropriate medical treatments are not performed in patients with acute coronary artery occlusion.

  13. Sea urchin puncture resulting in PIP joint synovial arthritis: case report and MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liram, N; Gomori, M; Perouansky, M

    2000-01-01

    Of the 600 species of sea urchins, approximately 80 may be venomous to humans. The long spined or black sea urchin, Diadema setosum may cause damage by the breaking off of its brittle spines after they penetrate the skin. Synovitis followed by arthritis may be an unusual but apparently not a rare sequel to such injury, when implantation occurs near a joint. In this case report, osseous changes were not seen by plain x-rays. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to expose the more salient features of both soft tissue and bone changes of black sea urchin puncture injury 30 months after penetration. In all likelihood, this type of injury may be more common than the existing literature at present suggests. It is believed to be the first reported case in this part of the world as well as the first MRI study describing this type of joint pathology. Local and systemic reactions to puncture injuries from sea urchin spines have been described previously. These may range from mild, local irritation lasting a few days to granuloma formation, infection and on occasions systemic illness. The sea urchin spines are composed of calcium carbonate with proteinaceous covering. The covering tends to cause immune reactions of variable presentation. There are only a handful of reported cases with sea urchin stings on record, none of them from the Red Sea. However, this condition is probably more common than is thought and can present difficulty in diagnosis. In this case report, the inflammation responded well to heat treatment, mobilization and manipulation of the joint in its post acute and chronic stages. As some subtle changes in soft tissues and the changes in bone were not seen either on plain x-rays or ultrasound scan, gadolinium-enhanced MRI was used to unveil the marked changes in the joint.

  14. Continuing Assessment of Cleared Personnel in the Military Services. Report 2. Methodology, Analysis, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    contrast, the sources least likely to report information directly to the security office are dropboxes , chaplains, non-law enforcement databases...the polygraph, informants, subjects, family members, and dropboxes . Respondents were asked whether any additional sources of security-relevant...and Mean Ratings by Collateral Installation Security Managers of the Usefulness of These Sources Mean Source N Rating Dropboxes 1 10.0 Chaplains 1 10.0

  15. Draft report: Results of stainless steel canister corrosion studies and environmental sample investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. The work involves both characterization of the potential physical and chemical environment on the surface of the storage canisters and how it might evolve through time, and testing to evaluate performance of the canister materials under anticipated storage conditions.

  16. Go Team Experimentation Results: Research, Train and Sustain. Human Dimensions of NCW Sub-Task Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    dynamics, Cooperative /competitive behaviour Messages between players, de- brief Text content of messages and de- brief Team roles , leadership...simulating a valid team experience, allows team roles to emerge rather than be mandated. This supports the use of Go*Team as a tool for research...report. After the games some players made comments such as “we needed to discuss the team strategy prior to playing and assign team roles ” and “it

  17. Association of Poultry Processing Industry Exposures With Reports of Occupational Finger Amputations: Results of an Analysis of OSHA Severe Injury Report (SIR) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Remington L; Bernt, Jon; Hodgson, Michael

    2017-08-17

    This analysis was conducted to identify industry exposures strongly associated with reports of finger amputation. Reports of severe occupational injuries in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Severe Injury Report (SIR) database were analyzed in relation to U.S. Census Bureau industry employment data. Industries with significantly elevated reporting odds ratios (RORs) and relative reporting risks (RRRs) were identified. Multiple population association measures including population attributable fraction (PAF) were calculated by industry. Among industries with statistically significant RRR and ROR, the poultry processing industry (RRR = 12.60, ROR = 3.37) accounted for the highest PAF by RRR (2.34%) and ROR (1.65%) CONCLUSION:: The results of this analysis identify the poultry processing industry as a leading source of reports of occupational finger amputations and substantiate the need for further collaboration with this industry.

  18. Osteomyelitis and pyoarthritis resulting from local paracoccidioidomycosis in an immunocompetent patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelan Michel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Paracoccidioidomycosis is a type of mycosis that is endemic to Brazil and is triggered by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Isolated bone involvement in this disease is very rare, especially in children. To the best of our knowledge this report documents the first case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient in which paracoccidioidomycosis of the hip articulation was the sole manifestation of the disease (that is, there were no pulmonary or skin lesions. Case presentation An 11-year-old Brazilian Caucasian boy from a rural area was examined in the orthopedic ward of our emergency department. Our patient reported a three-month history of pain in the right hip with intermittent claudication and also complained of recurring episodes of intense pain and an inability to walk, which he had been experiencing for the previous five days. He additionally presented with a fever that had persisted for two days. Our patient’s medical history did not include any clinical respiratory manifestations, skin lesions, history of trauma or immunosuppression risk factors. Conclusions This is one of the very few reported cases of isolated articular involvement in osteomyelitis in a pediatric immunocompetent patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis should be considered among the differential diagnoses in such cases, especially in cases of patients who reside in rural areas where the condition is considered to be endemic, in order to administer the proper course of treatment in a timely fashion and improve the chances of a favorable prognosis.

  19. Lichen planus-like eruption resulting from a jellyfish sting: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sudip Kumar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Contact with a jellyfish can cause a wide variety of conditions, ranging from cutaneous eruption to fatal cardiovascular and respiratory collapse. Cutaneous features can be both acute and chronic. We report a case of persistent lichen planus-like eruption in a young boy after a jellyfish sting, a hitherto unreported occurrence. Case presentation A 15-year-old boy presented with multiple lichen planus-like violaceous papules over the lower part of his left thigh on the anterior aspect and also over the patellar region. He had a history of a jellyfish sting over his lower limbs incurred while bathing in the sea four weeks prior to presentation. Histopathology revealed a predominantly perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrate immediately beneath the dermoepidermal junction underneath the hyperplastic epidermis. The lesions significantly subsided with topical corticosteroid application. Conclusion This case report demonstrates a new variant of chronic cutaneous change following a jellyfish sting. We report it because of its uniqueness and we believe that physicians should be aware of the possibility of an aquatic animal-induced disease when dealing with lesions with lichen planus-like morphology.

  20. Results From Spain's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Viñas, Blanca; Marin, Jorge; Sánchez-López, Mairena; Aznar, Susana; Leis, Rosaura; Aparicio-Ugarriza, Raquel; Schroder, Helmut; Ortiz-Moncada, Rocío; Vicente, German; González-Gross, Marcela; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2016-11-01

    The first Active Healthy Kids Spanish Report Card aims to gather the most robust information about physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior of children and adolescents. A Research Working Group of experts on PA and sport sciences was convened. A comprehensive data search, based on a review of the literature, dissertations, gray literature, and experts' nonpublished data, was conducted to identify the best sources to grade each indicator following the procedures and methodology outlined by the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card model. Overall PA (based on objective and self-reported methods) was graded as D-, Organized Sports Participation as B, Active Play as C+, Active Transportation as C, Sedentary Behavior as D, School as C, and Family and Peers as Incomplete, Community and the Built Environment as Incomplete, and Government as Incomplete. Spanish children and adolescents showed low levels of adherence to PA and sedentary behavior guidelines, especially females and adolescents. There is a need to achieve consensus and harmonize methods to evaluate PA and sedentary behavior to monitor changes over time and to evaluate the effectiveness of policies to promote PA.

  1. Usage of structured reporting in radiological practice: results from an Italian online survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo [University of Pisa, UO Radiodiagnostica 1, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Coppola, Francesca [Sant' Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Malpighi Radiology Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Preventive Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, Riccardo [Urgenza Emergenza, UOC Diagnostica per Immagini 1, Rome (Italy); Neri, Emanuele [Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale, Universita di Pisa, Sezione Dipartimentale Radiodiagnostica 3, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana, Pisa (Italy); Regge, Daniele [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Candiolo (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    To assess the opinion on structured reporting (SR) and its usage by radiologist members of the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) via an online survey. All members received an email invitation to join the survey as an initiative by the SIRM Imaging Informatics Chapter. The survey included 10 questions about demographic information, definition of radiological SR, its usage in everyday practice, perceived advantages and disadvantages over conventional reporting and overall opinion about SR. 1159 SIRM members participated in the survey. 40.3 % of respondents gave a correct definition of radiological SR, but as many as 56 % of them never used it at work. Compared with conventional reporting, the most appreciated advantages of SR were higher reproducibility (70.5 %), better interaction with referring clinicians (58.3 %) and the option to link metadata (36.7 %). Risk of excessive simplification (59.8 %), template rigidity (56.1 %) and poor user compliance (42.1 %) were the most significant disadvantages. Overall, most respondents (87.0 %) were in favour of the adoption of radiological SR. Most radiologists were interested in radiological SR and in favour of its adoption. However, concerns about semantic, technical and professional issues limited its diffusion in real working life, encouraging efforts towards improved SR standardisation and engineering. (orig.)

  2. Adequacy of Reporting Results of School Surveys and Nonresponse Effects: A Review of the Literature and a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Megumi; Franke, Todd; Afifi, Abdelmonem A.; Bourque, Linda B.

    2008-01-01

    To ensure accurate interpretation of research findings, researchers should report details about their research design, data collection method, and response rates when presenting findings from survey research. A review of 100 peer-reviewed articles reporting the results of survey research on K-12 schools with principals as the designated…

  3. Pooled results from five validation studies of dietary self-report instruments using recovery biomarkers for potassium and sodium intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have pooled data from five large validation studies of dietary self-report instruments that used recovery biomarkers as referents to assess food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and 24-hour recalls. We reported on total potassium and sodium intakes, their densities, and their ratio. Results were...

  4. Reinforcement and punishment of substance abuse during ongoing interactions: a conversational test of inconsistent nurturing as control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Ashley P; Dailey, Rene M; Le Poire, Beth A

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first to examine inconsistent nurturing as control (INC) theory during ongoing interpersonal influence episodes between substance-abusive individuals and their romantic partners. This study sought to determine how nonverbal (i.e., kinesic and vocalic) and verbal reinforcement and punishment of substance-abusive behavior during actual interactions influenced substance-abusive individuals' recidivism and perceptions of non-using partners' persuasive effectiveness. The findings reveal that consistent verbal punishment of substance abuse (e.g., threats, nagging) predicted lower relapse, while verbal reinforcement (e.g., telling the partner they are more fun when they use) predicted higher relapse. With regard to nonverbal communication, vocalic punishment and vocalic reinforcement predicted relapse and persuasive effectiveness. Results suggest the combination of behaviors resemble intermittent reinforcement and punishment and should actually strengthen the substance-abusive behavior the partner is trying to curtail.

  5. Complete Complimentary Results Report of the MARF's NLP Approach to the DEFT 2010 Competition

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Serguei A

    2010-01-01

    This paper complements the main DEFT'10 article describing the MARF approach to the DEFT'10 NLP competition. This paper is aimed to present the complete result sets of all the conducted experiments and their settings in the resulting tables highlighting the approach and the best results, but also showing the worse and the worst and their analysis. This is the first iteration of the initial release of the results.

  6. Epidemiology of allergies in Austria. Results of the first Austrian allergy report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Thomas; Lawrence, Kitty; Rieder, Anita; Kunze, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The first Austrian Allergy Report is a compilation of all available epidemiological data relating to allergies in Austria. According to this report the cumulative prevalence of allergies in the Viennese population is 27.6% for men and 32.2% for women and the period prevalence in the year before questioning 19.6% and 22.4% respectively. 20.8% of men and 23.1% of women reported about allergies at health examinations. However, an allergy sensitivity to at least one inhalation allergen, verifiable by means of a prick test, is detectable in 50.8% of the general population and in 39.3% of those free from ailments. Analysis of the hospital discharge statistics of all Austrian hospitals shows that around 12,000 people per year were admitted on grounds of an allergy. In accordance with international studies some population sub groups are more often affected than others. Women suffer from allergies somewhat more frequently than men, although the sex difference is reversed among children. Allergies occur in all age groups, with most studies showing that people in their twenties are most frequently affected. People with higher levels of education, in more highly qualified jobs and living in urban areas are more commonly affected by allergies than people from lower socio-economic levels and rural communities. The internationally identified increase in trend can also be identified in Austria with a 2fold, 3.6fold, and 4.6fold increase in the prevalence of hay fever, asthma and atopic eczema respectively, determined from the military health examinations of all recruits for national service between 1986 and 2003/04, although a clear decline in allergy prevalence was registered between 2003/04 and 2005. Health reports like the first Austrian Allergy Report provide the basis for international comparison of basic data. These data also enable the evaluation of the impact of different diseases on the health system as well as the development of public health strategies.

  7. The impact of perception of consistency and inconsistency in parenting style on pro-social motives of adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmakar R.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is the most dynamic and eventful period of human development. During this crucial period of life, adolescents encounter challenges in life and constantly adapting to the relationship dynamics with friends, family, school and society. There is tendency of adolescents to engage in antisocial or pro-social behaviour. Adolescents’ relationship with parents and guardian significantly influence their antisocial and prosocial behavior. Pro-social behavior is defined as a behavior that is primarily aimed at benefiting others. Some pro-social behaviour is extrinsically motivated whereas some are intrinsically motivated. The present study investigated the nature of prosocial behaviour among adolescents and impact of consistency and inconsistency of parenting style on prosocial behaviour. A group of 610 adolescents (310 boys and 300 girls aged between 16—18 years (mean = 17.07 and standard deviation = 1.02 was selected for the present study. Pro-social Motivation Questionnaire and Parental Authority Questionnaire were used to measure pro-social motive and parenting style, respectively. The results indicate that adolescents generally show higher level of intrinsic pro-social motive. Adolescent girls prefer to display internalised and empathetic pro-social motives whereas adolescent boys tend to gain others’ approval by displaying heroic activities. Consistency in parenting style facilitates intrinsic pro-social motive only when both parents are authoritative in nature. The result interestingly reveals that inconsistent parenting style is not always bad. Authoritative and permissive dyad facilitates intrinsic pro-social motive among adolescents. Implications for parental socialisation in families and pro-social motive among adolescents are discussed.

  8. Results of hair analyses for drugs of abuse and comparison with self-reports and urine tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musshoff, F; Driever, F; Lachenmeier, K; Lachenmeier, D W; Banger, M; Madea, B

    2006-01-27

    Urine as well as head and pubic hair samples from drug abusers were analysed for opiates, cocaine and its metabolites, amphetamines, methadone and cannabinoids. Urine immunoassay results and the results of hair tests by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were compared to the self-reported data of the patients in an interview protocol. With regard to the study group, opiate abuse was claimed from the majority in self-reports (89%), followed by cannabinoids (55%), cocaine (38%), and methadone (32%). Except for opiates the comparison between self-reported drug use and urinalysis at admission showed a low correlation. In contrast to urinalysis, hair tests revealed consumption in more cases. There was also a good agreement between self-reports of patients taking part in an official methadone maintenance program and urine test results concerning methadone. However, hair test results demonstrated that methadone abuse in general was under-reported by people who did not participate in a substitution program. Comparing self-reports and the results of hair analyses drug use was dramatically under-reported, especially cocaine. Cocaine hair tests appeared to be highly sensitive and specific in identifying past cocaine use even in settings of negative urine tests. In contrast to cocaine, hair lacks sensitivity as a detection agent for cannabinoids and a proof of cannabis use by means of hair analysis should include the sensitive detection of the metabolite THC carboxylic acid in the lower picogram range.

  9. Adult patient perspectives on clinical trial result reporting: A survey of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, Kate E; Khan, Omar F; Tang, Andrew R; Fernandez, Conrad V; Elzinga, Christine L; Heng, Daniel Yc; Vickers, Michael M; Truong, Tony H; Tang, Patricia A

    2016-12-01

    The provision of study results to research participants is supported by pediatric and adult literature. This study assessed adult cancer patient preferences surrounding aggregate result disclosure to study participants. A 46-item questionnaire was given to 250 adult cancer patients who had participated in oncology trials at a single center. Respondents answered questions surrounding their preferences for timing, content, and modality of communication for dissemination of study results. Questionnaire completion rate was 76% (189/250). Most patients (92%) strongly felt a right to know study results. Patients preferred result dissemination via letter for trials with positive outcomes, but preferred in-person clinic visits for negative outcomes. Despite this, a majority of participants (59%) found letters acceptable to inform participants of negative results. Only a minority (36%) of the participants found Internet-based disclosure acceptable for negative trial results. Unfortunately, very few patients (8%) recalled having received the results for a study they participated in, and of these patients, less than half fully understood the results they were given. Most clinical trial participants feel they have a right to study result disclosure, regardless of trial outcome. In-person visits are preferred for negative results, but more feasible alternatives such as letters were still acceptable for the majority of participants. However, Internet-based disclosure was not acceptable to most participants in oncology trials. Time and cost allocations for result disclosure should be considered during grant and ethics board applications, and clear guidelines are required to help researchers share the results with patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2011-08-01

    This report documents the early implementation experience for the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, the largest fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States. The ZEBA Demonstration group includes five participating transit agencies: AC Transit (lead transit agency), Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Golden Gate Transit (GGT), San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), and San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service.

  11. Overview of the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report Process, results and next steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Najjar, R.; Romero-Lankao, P.; Mayes, M. A.; Reed, S.; Birdsey, R.; Zhu, Z.; Shrestha, G.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Shrestha, G.

    2016-12-01

    With official kick-off in public engagement and writing in the early Spring of 2016, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is now set to be completed and published by the U.S. Government as a Highly Influential Scientific (Interagency) Assessment, a product of the Sustained National Climate Assessment, in late 2017. This presentation will highlight the planning process, the achievements so far, public engagement needs and the scientific community's contribution in the production of SOCCR-2.

  12. Job stress and coping strategies among nurses: results of a self report survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAbee, R

    1994-10-01

    1. Many employers do not have the resources for sophisticated investigation, development, and implementation of stress reduction programs for employee health. This does not eliminate the need for such programs. 2. Occupational health nurses can develop stress reduction programs building on individual coping strategies used by workers. A simple survey of workers could provide baseline information for the development of these programs. 3. Exercise, open atmosphere for discussion, relaxation, and taking a break were the top four coping strategies reported by nurses and non-nurse female employees. Employers could easily support stress reduction programs built on these strategies.

  13. Emulytics for Cyber-Enabled Physical Attack Scenarios: Interim LDRD Report of Year One Results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clem, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Urias, Vincent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Atkins, William Dee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Symonds, Christopher J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-08

    Sandia National Laboratories has funded the research and development of a new capability to interactively explore the effects of cyber exploits on the performance of physical protection systems. This informal, interim report of progress summarizes the project’s basis and year one (of two) accomplishments. It includes descriptions of confirmed cyber exploits against a representative testbed protection system and details the development of an emulytics capability to support live, virtual, and constructive experiments. This work will support stakeholders to better engineer, operate, and maintain reliable protection systems.

  14. Results From Denmark's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lisbeth Runge; Troelsen, Jens; Kirkegaard, Kasper Lund

    2016-01-01

    ; incomplete), 4) Active Transportation (B), 5) Sedentary Behaviors (INC), 6) Family and Peers (INC), 7) School (B), 8) Community and the Built Environment (B+), and 9) Government strategies and investments (A-). CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of children in Denmark do not meet the recommendations for PA...... strategies identified by the Report Card Research Committee consisting of a wide presentation of researchers and experts within PA health behaviors and policy development. The work was coordinated by Research and Innovation Centre for Human Movement and Learning situated at the University of Southern Denmark...

  15. Production Facility Prototype Blower Installation Report with 1000 Hr Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olivas, Eric Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The roots blower in use at ANL for in-beam experiments and also at LANL for flow tests was sized for 12 mm diameter disks and significantly less beam heating. Currently, the disks are 29 mm in diameter, with a 12 mm FWHM Gaussian beam spot at 42 MeV and 2.86 μA on each side of the target, 5.72 μA total. The target design itself is reported elsewhere. With the increased beam heating, the helium flow requirement increased so that a larger blower was needed for a mass flow rate of 400 g/s at 2.76 MPa (400 psig). An Aerzen GM 12.4 blower was selected, and is currently being installed at the LANL facility for target and component flow testing. This report describes this blower/motor/pressure vessel package and the status of the facility preparations. The blower has been operated for 1000 hours as a preliminary investigation of long-term performance, operation and possible maintenance issues. The blower performed well, with no significant change in blower head or mass flow rate developed under the operating conditions. Upon inspection, some oil had leaked out of the shaft seal of the blower. The shaft seal and bearing race have been replaced.

  16. Explaining inconsistent results in cancer quality of life studies : the role of the stress-response system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wiel, Harry; Geerts, Erwin; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette

    2008-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that avoidance and intrusion play different roles in health-related quality of life (QoL) in women who have undergone breast cancer surgery. We assessed QoL (RAND-36), avoidance, intrusion, and total cancer-related distress (Impact of Event Scale) in 83 women at 3, 6,

  17. Explaining inconsistent results in cancer quality of life studies : the role of the stress-response system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wiel, Harry; Geerts, Erwin; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette

    This study tests the hypothesis that avoidance and intrusion play different roles in health-related quality of life (QoL) in women who have undergone breast cancer surgery. We assessed QoL (RAND-36), avoidance, intrusion, and total cancer-related distress (Impact of Event Scale) in 83 women at 3, 6,

  18. Is inconsistency of α-fetoprotein level a good prognosticator for hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To identify the clinical outcomes of hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with inconsistent α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels which were initially high and then low at recurrence.METHODS: We retrospectively included 178 patients who underwent liver resection with high preoperative AFP levels (≥ 200 ng/dL). Sixty-nine HCC patients had recurrence during follow-up and were grouped by their AFP levels at recurrence: group Ⅰ, AFP ≤ 20 ng/dL (n = 16); group Ⅱ, AFP 20-200 ng/dL (n = 24); and group Ⅲ, AFP ≥ 200 n...

  19. A cognitive dissonance interpretation of consistencies and inconsistencies in environmentally responsible behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    2004-01-01

    The issue of consistency and inconsistency in environmentally responsible behavior (ERB), as reflected in the correlations between different ERBs, is discussed in the light of social psychological theories suggesting that most people desire to behave consistently. It is ar-gued that except in cases......" in this context) and measurement error and it is moderated by perceived dissimilarity between the behaviors and by the (moral) importance of behaving in a responsible way towards the environment. These propositions are tested (and confirmed) by means of a mall-intercept survey of ordinary Danish shop...

  20. Temperature-invariant photoelectron spectra in cerium heavy-fermion compounds: Inconsistencies with the Kondo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, J.J.; Arko, A.J.; Lawrence, J.; Canfield, P.C.; Fisk, Z.; Bartlett, R.J.; Thompson, J.D. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1992-01-13

    4{ital f} levels in Ce heavy-fermion compounds are examined using resonant photoemission. We find the following inconsistencies with the predictions of the Kondo model: (a) All temperature dependence can be accounted for simply by phonon broadening and the Fermi function; (b) the spectral weights of the features near {ital E}{sub {ital F}} do not scale with {ital T}{sub {ital K}}; and (c) the line shape of the feature previously identified as the Kondo resonance is Lorentzian and about an order of magnitude broader than predictions. Instrument resolution is not a limiting factor.

  1. On distribution reduction and algorithm implementation in inconsistent ordered information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqin

    2014-01-01

    As one part of our work in ordered information systems, distribution reduction is studied in inconsistent ordered information systems (OISs). Some important properties on distribution reduction are studied and discussed. The dominance matrix is restated for reduction acquisition in dominance relations based information systems. Matrix algorithm for distribution reduction acquisition is stepped. And program is implemented by the algorithm. The approach provides an effective tool for the theoretical research and the applications for ordered information systems in practices. For more detailed and valid illustrations, cases are employed to explain and verify the algorithm and the program which shows the effectiveness of the algorithm in complicated information systems.

  2. Investigation of inconsistent ENDF/B-VII.1 independent and cumulative fission product yields with proposed revisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigni, Marco T [ORNL; Francis, Matthew W [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    A recent implementation of ENDF/B-VII. independent fission product yields and nuclear decay data identified inconsistencies in the data caused by the use of updated nuclear scheme in the decay sub-library that is not reflected in legacy fission product yield data. Recent changes in the decay data sub-library, particularly the delayed neutron branching fractions, result in calculated fission product concentrations that are incompatible with the cumulative fission yields in the library, and also with experimental measurements. A comprehensive set of independent fission product yields was generated for thermal and fission spectrum neutron induced fission for 235,238U and 239,241Pu in order to provide a preliminary assessment of the updated fission product yield data consistency. These updated independent fission product yields were utilized in the ORIGEN code to evaluate the calculated fission product inventories with experimentally measured inventories, with particular attention given to the noble gases. An important outcome of this work is the development of fission product yield covariance data necessary for fission product uncertainty quantification. The evaluation methodology combines a sequential Bayesian method to guarantee consistency between independent and cumulative yields along with the physical constraints on the independent yields. This work was motivated to improve the performance of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library in the case of stable and long-lived cumulative yields due to the inconsistency of ENDF/B-VII.1 fission p;roduct yield and decay data sub-libraries. The revised fission product yields and the new covariance data are proposed as a revision to the fission yield data currently in ENDF/B-VII.1.

  3. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  4. Results From Ghana's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocansey, Reginald; Aryeetey, Richmond; Sofo, Seidu; Nazzar, Alex; Delali, Margaret; Pambo, Prince; Nyawornota, Vida; Nartey, John; Sarkwa, Rachel

    2016-11-01

    Currently, there is limited evidence on estimates for physical activity (PA) behavior and sedentary behavior (SB) in Ghana. This report card (RC) is intended to increase awareness and sensitivity about issues surrounding PA and SB in Ghana. Data were collected from peer-reviewed literature, graduate students' theses, physical education and sports documents, and a survey of opinions of stakeholders covering the 10 key RC indicators and benchmarks. The principal investigator harmonized all grades. A consensus meeting of the RC team was held to assign the final grades. School and Community grades declined from a D in 2014 to an F in 2016. SB declined from B to D. Family and Active Play were not graded in 2014 and now received an F and a B, respectively. Family and Built Environment were graded F, Active Transportation received a C, and Government and Overall PA were graded D. A conscious national investment effort can increase overall PA among children.

  5. WP 2 Report: Integrated Status Quo and Trends Assessment in Wuxi. Overview of WP 2 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dienst, Carmen; Hoeller, Samuel; Saurat, Mathieu; Schneider, Clemens; Xia-Bauer, Chun (Wuppertal Institute (Germany)); Oberheitmann, Andreas (China Environmental Research (China)); Fischer, Tom; Gemmer, Marco; Jiang Tong (China Meteorological Administration, National Climate Centre (China)); Wang Can; Wang Haoping (Tsinghua University, Research Centre for International Environmental Policy (China)); Ren Hongyan; Sui Xinying (Wuxi Low Carbon Development Research Centre (China))

    2013-04-01

    The overall project will scientifically explore the Low Carbon Future City (LCFC) concept in two case studies: the German region of Dusseldorf and the Chinese city of Wuxi, Jiangsu Province. The Wuppertal Institute together with a consortium of Chinese scientific institutes is developing integrated low carbon city strategies for the two pilot regions. The project is funded by the German Stiftung Mercator. Provided in this report, as part of the scientific analysis of the Chinese pilot region, is a comprehensive status quo and trends assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, climate change and resource use in Wuxi. It includes a GHG inventory, a business-as-usual scenario for GHG emissions, scenarios for future climate change and its impacts as well as an analysis of future resource use in the energy and buildings sector of Wuxi. Based on this assessment, the authors have selected key sectors for which low carbon scenarios as well as policy strategies will be finalised.

  6. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  7. Recurrent hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus resulting from intensive academic activity: an illustrative case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyiriuka Alphonsus N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a common diabetes management problem illustrated by an adolescent female university student with recurrent episodes of hypoglycaemia on Tuesdays when she has intensive academic activity lasting most of the day. Steps taken to reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia were patient education and empowerment, frequent self monitoring of blood glucose, reduction in insulin dose on Tuesdays and emphasizing availability of ongoing professional guidance and support anytime she may need it. One of the challenges encountered in the management of this patient was her family’s inability to afford the cost of basal-bolus regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion via insulin pump; the two insulin regimens that best fit into university lifestyle. Conclusion: Adolescents with diabetes mellitus attending tertiary educational institutions may be at increased risk of hypoglycaemia, particularly on days when they have intensive academic activities.

  8. Triple pelvic osteotomy: Report of our mid-term results and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Tomohiro; Mori, Kanji; Kawasaki, Taku; Imai, Shinji; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of pelvic osteotomies have been developed for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). In the present paper, we present a detailed review of previous studies of triple osteotomy as an alternative treatment for DDH. We also report our experience treating 6 adult cases of DDH by triple osteotomy in order to highlight the various aspects of this procedure.The mean age of our patients was 31.2 years with a mean follow-up period of 6 years. We assessed range of motion, center-edge angle, acetabular index angle, Sharp angle, acetabulum head index, head lateralization index, Japanese Orthopedic Association score, Harris hip score, patient satisfaction, and the difference between lower limb lengths before and after the procedure. At final follow-up, clinical scores were significantly improved and radiographic parameters also showed good correction of acetabulum. PMID:24649410

  9. Molecular engineering of polymer alloys: A final report of results obtained on CRADA No. 1078

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curro, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schweizer, K.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Honeycutt, J.D. [BIOSYM Technologies, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made in the past three years on CRADA No. 1078, Molecular Engineering of Polymer Alloys. The thrust of this CRADA was to start with the basic ideas of PRISM theory and develop it to the point where it could be applied to modeling of polymer alloys. In this program, BIOSYM, Sandia and the University of Illinois worked jointly to develop the theoretical techniques and numerical formalisms necessary to implement the theoretical ideas into commercial software aimed at molecular engineering of polymer alloys. This CRADA focused on developing the techniques required to make the transition from theory to practice. These techniques were then used by BIOSYM to incorporate PRISM theory and other new developments into their commercial software.

  10. Treatment of inflammatory external root resorption resulting from dental avulsion and pulp necrosis: clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Abe, Flavia Casale; Araujo, Roberta Aranha; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveiro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to present a treatment for severe inflammatory external root resorption. The condition developed due to the patient's neglect to seek adequate treatment following replantation of an avulsed maxillary left central incisor. Following diagnosis, treatment consisted of conventional endodontic therapy with calcium hydroxide dressings and definitive filling of the root canal after the resorption was controlled radiographically. A 24-month follow-up showed that the resorption process had stabilized and the patient was free of symptoms. Successful tooth replantation requires following the indicated therapy effectively. Nevertheless, when an inflammatory external root resorption occurs, adequate endodontic treatment to remove the necrotic content and bacteria is required, as is the use of calcium hydroxide dressings.

  11. Mobile spinal enterogenous cyst resulting in intermittent paraplegia in a child: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Satoko; Yoshimura, Junichi; Takao, Tetsuro; Tamura, Tetsuro; Nishiyama, Kenichi; Maruyama, Shigeru; Suda, Masashi; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2016-10-01

    The authors report the case of a mobile spinal enterogenous cyst in a 2-year-old boy, who was admitted to the hospital several times for intermittent paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT revealed an isolated cyst in the lumbar spinal canal. The symptoms were caused by transient myelopathy of the conus medullaris and radiculopathy of the cauda equina due to the changing size and location of the cyst. The cyst was surgically extirpated, after which the symptoms resolved. The histopathological diagnosis was enterogenous cyst. The clinical history of intraspinal enterogenous cyst is usually progressive. Mobility and changes in size are rare pathophysiological findings. The authors speculate that the cyst wall did not adhere to the surrounding structures and had ruptured and quickly reformed. Enterogenous cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal intradural cysts in children with radiculomyelopathy.

  12. Retroperitoneal Abscess Formation as a Result of Spilled Gallstones during Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: An Unusual Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoris Chatzimavroudis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallstone disease that seems to exceed that of the traditional open method is the gallbladder perforation and gallstone spillage. Its incidence can occur in up to 40% of patients, and in most cases its course is uneventful. However in few cases an abdominal abscess can develop, which may lead to significant morbidity. Rarely an abscess formation due to spilled and lost gallstones may occur in the retroperitoneal space. We herein report the case of a female patient who presented with clinical symptoms of sepsis six months following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Imaging investigations revealed the presence of a retroperitoneal abscess due to retained gallstones. Due to patient’s decision to refuse abscess’s surgical drainage, she underwent CT-guided drainage. The 24-month followup of the patient has been uneventful, and the patient remains in good general condition.

  13. Latent trajectory studies: the basics, how to interpret the results, and what to report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rens van de Schoot

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In statistics, tools have been developed to estimate individual change over time. Also, the existence of latent trajectories, where individuals are captured by trajectories that are unobserved (latent, can be evaluated (Muthén & Muthén, 2000. The method used to evaluate such trajectories is called Latent Growth Mixture Modeling (LGMM or Latent Class Growth Modeling (LCGA. The difference between the two models is whether variance within latent classes is allowed for (Jung & Wickrama, 2008. The default approach most often used when estimating such models begins with estimating a single cluster model, where only a single underlying group is presumed. Next, several additional models are estimated with an increasing number of clusters (latent groups or classes. For each of these models, the software is allowed to estimate all parameters without any restrictions. A final model is chosen based on model comparison tools, for example, using the BIC, the bootstrapped chi-square test, or the Lo-Mendell-Rubin test. Method: To ease the use of LGMM/LCGA step by step in this symposium (Van de Schoot, 2015 guidelines are presented which can be used for researchers applying the methods to longitudinal data, for example, the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD after trauma (Depaoli, van de Schoot, van Loey, & Sijbrandij, 2015; Galatzer-Levy, 2015. The guidelines include how to use the software Mplus (Muthén & Muthén, 1998–2012 to run the set of models needed to answer the research question: how many latent classes exist in the data? The next step described in the guidelines is how to add covariates/predictors to predict class membership using the three-step approach (Vermunt, 2010. Lastly, it described what essentials to report in the paper. Conclusions: When applying LGMM/LCGA models for the first time, the guidelines presented can be used to guide what models to run and what to report.

  14. Final Report - Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Hematite Decommissioning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.N. Bailey

    2009-03-18

    The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensee’s procedures and survey results.

  15. Validity of self-reported weight, height and resultant body mass index in Chinese adolescents and factors associated with errors in self-reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouyang Xue

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Validity of self-reported height and weight has not been adequately evaluated in diverse adolescent populations. In fact there are no reported validity studies conducted in Asian children and adolescents. This study aims to examine the accuracy of self-reported weight, height, and resultant BMI values in Chinese adolescents, and of the adolescents' subsequent classification into overweight categories. Methods Weight and height were self-reported and measured in 1761 adolescents aged 12-16 years in a cross-sectional survey in Xi'an city, China. BMI was calculated from both reported values and measured values. Bland-Altman plots with 95% limits of agreement, Pearson's correlation and Kappa statistics were calculated to assess the agreement. Results The 95% limits of agreement were -11.16 and 6.46 kg for weight, -4.73 and 7.45 cm for height, and -4.93 and 2.47 kg/m2 for BMI. Pearson correlation between measured and self-reported values was 0.912 for weight, 0.935 for height and 0.809 for BMI. Weighted Kappa was 0.859 for weight, 0.906 for height and 0.754 for BMI. Sensitivity for detecting overweight (includes obese in adolescents was 56.1%, and specificity was 98.6%. Subjects' area of residence, age and BMI were significant factors associated with the errors in self-reporting weight, height and relative BMI. Conclusions Reported weight and height does not have an acceptable agreement with measured data. Therefore, we do not recommend the application of self-reported weight and height to screen for overweight adolescents in China. Alternatively, self-reported data could be considered for use, with caution, in surveillance systems and epidemiology studies.

  16. XIAP Deficiency and MEFV Variants Resulting in Severe Manifestations – A Case Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing identified variants in the MEFV gene (c.1223G>A; p.R408Q) indicating Familial Mediterranean Fever. Importantly, a hemizygous mutation in the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-gene (c.1026delT; I342fs) resulting in a frameshift was identified by whole exome sequencing in the patient......Background Heterozygous dominant or homozygous recessive MEFV mutations result in recurrent fever and abdominal pain, while XIAP deficiency is characterized by a high susceptibility to develop haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis triggered by EBV infection, recurrent splenomegaly and inflammatory...

  17. LETTER REPORT SUMMARY RESULTS OF THE NRC TEAM INTERACTION SKILLS STUDY AT DIABLO CANYON POWER PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauth, J. T.; Toquam, J. L.; Bramwell, A. T.; Fleming, T. E.

    1990-12-01

    This report presents information to participants in the Team Interaction Skills study conducted at Diablo Canyon Power Plant from September to November 1989. A study was conducted to develop and assess measures of team interaction skills of nuclear power plant control room crews in simulated emergency conditions. Data were collected at a boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWA) using three sets of rating scales; Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS), Behavioral Frequency rating scales, and Technical Performance rating scales. Diablo Canyon Power Plant agreed to serve as the PWR plant in the study. Obse!Vers consisting of contract license examiners, Diablo Canyon Power Plant training instructors, and project staff used the rating scales to provide assessments of team interaction skills and technical skills of control room crews during emerg-3ncy scenarios as part of license requalification training. Crew members were also asked to providH self-ratings of their performance to gather information regarding crew responses to the Team Interactions Skills rating scales.

  18. Ulnar Nerve Injury as a Result of Galeazzi Fracture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettges, Paul; Turker, Tolga

    2017-09-01

    Sparse documentation of Galeazzi fracture with associated nerve injury exists in the medical literature. The purpose of this report is to review the available literature in regard to incidence, nerve injury type, treatment strategies, and expected outcomes. We present a classic Galeazzi fracture dislocation with associated complete ulnar nerve transection injury at the level of the wrist. After rigid internal bony stabilization, allograft nerve repair was performed. The patient's presentation, operative management, recovery, and a thorough literature review are discussed. Fracture union was attained with near full wrist and elbow range of motion. Despite lack of ulnar nerve function return, the patient was able to resume manual labor occupation. Despite its close proximity to the dislocating distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), thorough review reveals rare associated ulnar nerve palsy. If there is suspicion for nerve injury in the setting of open DRUJ dislocation, the nerve should be explored to identify possible entrapment or transection. Literature supports likely return of nerve function in cases of intact nerve; however, management of nerve transection remains debatable.

  19. Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-08-24

    The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.

  20. Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-08-24

    The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.