WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported inconsistent results

  1. Statistical reporting inconsistencies in experimental philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Matteo; Duev, Georgi; Nuijten, Michèle B; Sprenger, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Experimental philosophy (x-phi) is a young field of research in the intersection of philosophy and psychology. It aims to make progress on philosophical questions by using experimental methods traditionally associated with the psychological and behavioral sciences, such as null hypothesis significance testing (NHST). Motivated by recent discussions about a methodological crisis in the behavioral sciences, questions have been raised about the methodological standards of x-phi. Here, we focus on one aspect of this question, namely the rate of inconsistencies in statistical reporting. Previous research has examined the extent to which published articles in psychology and other behavioral sciences present statistical inconsistencies in reporting the results of NHST. In this study, we used the R package statcheck to detect statistical inconsistencies in x-phi, and compared rates of inconsistencies in psychology and philosophy. We found that rates of inconsistencies in x-phi are lower than in the psychological and behavioral sciences. From the point of view of statistical reporting consistency, x-phi seems to do no worse, and perhaps even better, than psychological science.

  2. Statistical reporting inconsistencies in experimental philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Matteo; Duev, Georgi; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Sprenger, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Experimental philosophy (x-phi) is a young field of research in the intersection of philosophy and psychology. It aims to make progress on philosophical questions by using experimental methods traditionally associated with the psychological and behavioral sciences, such as null hypothesis significance testing (NHST). Motivated by recent discussions about a methodological crisis in the behavioral sciences, questions have been raised about the methodological standards of x-phi. Here, we focus on one aspect of this question, namely the rate of inconsistencies in statistical reporting. Previous research has examined the extent to which published articles in psychology and other behavioral sciences present statistical inconsistencies in reporting the results of NHST. In this study, we used the R package statcheck to detect statistical inconsistencies in x-phi, and compared rates of inconsistencies in psychology and philosophy. We found that rates of inconsistencies in x-phi are lower than in the psychological and behavioral sciences. From the point of view of statistical reporting consistency, x-phi seems to do no worse, and perhaps even better, than psychological science. PMID:29649220

  3. Inconsistencies between alcohol screening results based on AUDIT-C scores and reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions: prevalence in two US national samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The AUDIT-C is an extensively validated screen for unhealthy alcohol use (i.e. drinking above recommended limits or alcohol use disorder), which consists of three questions about alcohol consumption. AUDIT-C scores ≥4 points for men and ≥3 for women are considered positive screens based on US validation studies that compared the AUDIT-C to “gold standard” measures of unhealthy alcohol use from independent, detailed interviews. However, results of screening—positive or negative based on AUDIT-C scores—can be inconsistent with reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions. For example, individuals can screen positive based on the AUDIT-C score while reporting drinking below US recommended limits on the same AUDIT-C. Alternatively, they can screen negative based on the AUDIT-C score while reporting drinking above US recommended limits. Such inconsistencies could complicate interpretation of screening results, but it is unclear how often they occur in practice. Methods This study used AUDIT-C data from respondents who reported past-year drinking on one of two national US surveys: a general population survey (N = 26,610) and a Veterans Health Administration (VA) outpatient survey (N = 467,416). Gender-stratified analyses estimated the prevalence of AUDIT-C screen results—positive or negative screens based on the AUDIT-C score—that were inconsistent with reported drinking (above or below US recommended limits) on the same AUDIT-C. Results Among men who reported drinking, 13.8% and 21.1% of US general population and VA samples, respectively, had screening results based on AUDIT-C scores (positive or negative) that were inconsistent with reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions (above or below US recommended limits). Among women who reported drinking, 18.3% and 20.7% of US general population and VA samples, respectively, had screening results that were inconsistent with reported drinking. Limitations This study did not include an

  4. Differences in delineation guidelines for head and neck cancer result in inconsistent reported dose and corresponding NTCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, Charlotte L.; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Gort, Elske; Kamphuis, Marije E.; Laan, Hans Paul van der; Veld, Aart A. van’t; Sijtsema, Nanna M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that delineation of swallowing organs at risk (SWOARs) based on different guidelines results in differences in dose–volume parameters and subsequent normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values for dysphagia-related endpoints. Materials and methods: Nine different SWOARs were delineated according to five different delineation guidelines in 29 patients. Reference delineation was performed according to the guidelines and NTCP-models of Christianen et al. Concordance Index (CI), dosimetric consequences, as well as differences in the subsequent NTCPs were calculated. Results: The median CI of the different delineation guidelines with the reference guidelines was 0.54 for the pharyngeal constrictor muscles, 0.56 for the laryngeal structures and 0.07 for the cricopharyngeal muscle and esophageal inlet muscle. The average difference in mean dose to the SWOARs between the guidelines with the largest difference (maxΔD) was 3.5 ± 3.2 Gy. A mean ΔNTCP of 2.3 ± 2.7% was found. For two patients, ΔNTCP exceeded 10%. Conclusions: The majority of the patients showed little differences in NTCPs between the different delineation guidelines. However, large NTCP differences >10% were found in 7% of the patients. For correct use of NTCP models in individual patients, uniform delineation guidelines are of great importance

  5. Self-reported cognitive inconsistency in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhill, Susan; Hultsch, David F; Hunter, Michael A; Strauss, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Insight into one's own cognitive abilities, or metacognition, has been widely studied in developmental psychology. Relevance to the clinician is high, as memory complaints in older adults show an association with impending dementia, even after controlling for likely confounds. Another candidate marker of impending dementia under study is inconsistency in cognitive performance over short time intervals. Although there has been a recent proliferation of studies of cognitive inconsistency in older adults, to date, no one has examined adults' self-perceptions of cognitive inconsistency. Ninety-four community-dwelling older adults (aged 70-91) were randomly selected from a parent longitudinal study of short-term inconsistency and long-term cognitive change in aging. Participants completed a novel 40-item self-report measure of everyday cognitive inconsistency, including parallel scales indexing perceived inconsistency 5 years ago and at present, yielding measures of past, present, and 5-year change in inconsistency. The questionnaire showed acceptable psychometric characteristics. The sample reported an increase in perceived inconsistency over time. Higher reported present inconsistency and greater 5-year increase in inconsistency were associated with noncognitive (e.g., older age, poorer ADLs, poorer health, higher depression), metacognitive (e.g., poorer self-rated memory) and neuropsychological (e.g., poorer performance and greater 5-year decline in global cognitive status, vocabulary, and memory) measures. Correlations between self-reported inconsistency and neuropsychological performance were attenuated, but largely persisted when self-rated memory and age were controlled. Observed relationships between self-reported inconsistency and measures of neuropsychological (including memory) status and decline suggest that self-perceived inconsistency may be an area of relevance in evaluating older adults for memory disorders.

  6. The Interpretability of Inconsistency: Feferman's Theorem and Related Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    This paper is an exposition of Feferman's Theorem concerning the interpretability of inconsistency and of further insights directly connected to this result. Feferman's Theorem is a strengthening of the Second Incompleteness Theorem. It says, in metaphorical paraphrase, that it is not just the case

  7. The Interpretability of Inconsistency: Feferman's Theorem and Related Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an exposition of Feferman's Theorem concerning the interpretability of inconsistency and of further insights directly connected to this result. Feferman's Theorem is a strengthening of the Second Incompleteness Theorem. It says, in metaphorical paraphrase, that it is not just the case

  8. Journal Data Sharing Policies and Statistical Reporting Inconsistencies in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle B. Nuijten

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present three retrospective observational studies that investigate the relation between data sharing and statistical reporting inconsistencies. Previous research found that reluctance to share data was related to a higher prevalence of statistical errors, often in the direction of statistical significance (Wicherts, Bakker, & Molenaar, 2011. We therefore hypothesized that journal policies about data sharing and data sharing itself would reduce these inconsistencies. In Study 1, we compared the prevalence of reporting inconsistencies in two similar journals on decision making with different data sharing policies. In Study 2, we compared reporting inconsistencies in psychology articles published in PLOS journals (with a data sharing policy and Frontiers in Psychology (without a stipulated data sharing policy. In Study 3, we looked at papers published in the journal Psychological Science to check whether papers with or without an Open Practice Badge differed in the prevalence of reporting errors. Overall, we found no relationship between data sharing and reporting inconsistencies. We did find that journal policies on data sharing seem extremely effective in promoting data sharing. We argue that open data is essential in improving the quality of psychological science, and we discuss ways to detect and reduce reporting inconsistencies in the literature.

  9. Journal data sharing policies and statistical reporting inconsistencies in psychology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijten, M.B.; Borghuis, J.; Veldkamp, C.L.S.; Dominguez Alvarez, L.; van Assen, M.A.L.M.; Wicherts, J.M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present three retrospective observational studies that investigate the relation between data sharing and statistical reporting inconsistencies. Previous research found that reluctance to share data was related to a higher prevalence of statistical errors, often in the direction of

  10. Reliability of self-reported childhood physical abuse by adults and factors predictive of inconsistent reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Christy M; Harris, T Robert; Caetano, Raul

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the reliability of self-reported child physical abuse (CPA) or CPA reporting practices. We estimated reliability and prevalence of self-reported CPA and identified factors predictive of inconsistent CPA reporting among 2,256 participants using surveys administered in 1995 and 2000. Reliability of CPA was fair to moderate (kappa = 0.41). Using a positive report from either survey, the prevalence of moderate (61.8%) and severe (12.0%) CPA was higher than at either survey alone. Compared to consistent reporters of having experienced CPA, inconsistent reporters were less likely to be > or = 30 years old (vs. 18-29) or Black (vs. White) and more likely to have report one type (vs. > or = 2) of CPA. These findings may assist researchers conducting and interpreting studies of CPA.

  11. Status inconsistency in groups : How discrepancies between instrumental and expressive status result in symptoms of stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Brake, Hendrik; Grow, André; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis

    This study examines whether a mismatch between the positions that individuals hold in different status hierarchies results in symptoms of stress. Prior research has focused on inconsistencies between socioeconomic status dimensions (e.g., education and income) and did not find a significant relation

  12. Response inconsistency of patient-reported symptoms as a predictor of discrepancy between patient and clinician reported depression severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conijn, J.M.; Emons, W.H.M.; Page, B.F.; Sijtsma, K.; van der Does, W.; Carlier, I.V.; Giltay, E.J.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which discrepancy between self-reported and clinician-rated severity of depression are due to inconsistent self-reports. Response inconsistency threatens the validity of the test score. We used data from a large sample of outpatients (N = 5,959) who

  13. Inconsistency in Reporting Abstention and Heavy Drinking Frequency: Associations with Sex and Socioeconomic Status, and Potential Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Robyn M.; Connor, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To describe inconsistencies in reporting past-year drinking status and heavy drinking occasions (HDOs) on single questions from two different instruments, and to identify associated characteristics and impacts. Methods: We compared computer-presented Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) with categorical response options, and mental health interview (MHI) with open-ended consumption questions, completed on the same day. Participants were 464 men and 459 women aged 38 (91.7% of surviving birth cohort members). Differences in dichotomous single-item measures of abstention and HDO frequency, associations of inconsistent reporting with sex, socioeconomic status (SES) and survey order, and impacts of instrument choice on associations of alcohol with sex and SES were examined. Results: The AUDIT-C drinking frequency question estimated higher past-year abstention prevalence (AUDIT = 7.6%, MHI = 5.4%), with one-third of AUDIT-C abstainers being MHI drinkers. Only AUDIT-C produced significant sex differences in abstainer prevalence. Inconsistencies in HDO classifications were bidirectional, but with fewer HDOs reported on the MHI than AUDIT-C question. Lower SES was associated with inconsistency in abstention and weekly+ HDOs. Abstention and higher HDO frequency were associated with lower SES overall, but sex-specific associations differed by instrument. Conclusions: In this context, data collection method affected findings, with inconsistencies in abstention reports having most impact. Future studies should: (a) confirm self-reported abstention; (b) consider piloting data collection methods in target populations; (c) expect impacts of sex and SES on measurements and analyses. PMID:25648932

  14. WACC Calculations in Practice : Incorrect Results due to Inconsistent Assumptions - Status Quo and Improvements

    OpenAIRE

    Grüninger, Matthias C.; Kind, Axel H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that in practical applications the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) is often incorrectly estimated due to the simultaneous use of two inconsistent input parameters: (i) a beta of debt equal to zero when transforming asset betas into equity betas (beta levering) and (ii) a cost of debt above the risk-free interest rate when calculating the WACC. The paper discusses and quantifies the consequences of this inconsistency and offers viable solutions. By replacing the cost ...

  15. Identifying Inconsistencies and Reporting Deficits in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (TMB) Case Reports Authored by TMB Practitioners: a TMB-Adapted CAse REport (CARE) Guidelines Audit Through 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Niki; Shue, Sarah; Freeland, Emilee; Ralston, Rick; Boulanger, Karen T

    2016-09-01

    Case reports are a fundamental tool through which therapeutic massage and bodywork (TMB) practitioners can inform research and impact their field by detailing the presentation, treatment, and follow-up of a single individual encountered in practice. Inconsistencies in case reporting limit their impact as fundamental sources of clinical evidence. Using the TMB-adapted CAse REport (CARE) guidelines, the current study sought to provide a rich description regarding the reporting quality of TMB practitioner authored TMB case reports in the literature. 1) Systematic identification of published, peer-reviewed TMB case reports authored by TMB practitioners following PRISMA recommendations; 2) audit development based on TMB-adapted CARE guidelines; 3) audit implementation; and 4) descriptive analysis of audit scores. Our search identified 977 articles and 35 met study inclusion criteria. On average, TMB case reports included approximately 58% of the total items identified as necessary by the TMB-adapted CARE guidelines. Introduction sections of case reports had the best item reporting (80% on average), while Case Presentation (54%) and Results (52%) sections scored moderately overall, with only 20% of necessary Practitioner Description items included on average. Audit scores revealed inconsistent abstract reporting and few audited case reports including client race (20%), perspective (26%), and occupation/activities (40%); practitioner practice setting (12%), training (12%), scope-of-practice (29%), and credentialing (20%); adverse events or lack thereof (17%); and some aspect of informed consent (34%). Treatment descriptor item reporting varied from high to low. Various implications of concern are discussed. The current audit and descriptive analysis highlight several reporting inconsistencies in TMB case reports prior to 2015. Reporting guidelines for case reports are important if standards for, and impact of, TMB case reports are desired. Adherence to reporting

  16. Demographic and clinical characteristics of consistent and inconsistent longitudinal reporters of lifetime suicide attempts in adolescence through young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Shelley R; Musci, Rashelle J; Ialongo, Nicholas; Ballard, Elizabeth D; Wilcox, Holly C

    2013-10-01

    Within the context of the recent release of the 2012 National Suicide Prevention Strategy, and as the third leading cause of death for individuals 10- to 24-years-old, suicide prevention is a national priority. A consistently reported and robust risk factor for suicide is a prior suicide attempt; however few studies have investigated the consistency of self-reported lifetime suicide attempts. The goal of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of inconsistent reporting of suicide attempt in a longitudinal cohort of participants annually assessed in 12 waves of data collected from middle school (age 12) to early adulthood (age 22). Among this cohort (n = 678), we compared those who consistently, inconsistently, and never reported a suicide attempt according to demographic and clinical variables. Almost 90% (88.5%) of our sample inconsistently reported a lifetime suicide attempt. Consistent and inconsistent reporters of lifetime suicide attempt did not differ on demographic or clinical variables with the exception of higher rates of lifetime suicidal ideation among consistent reporters (P adolescents. Inconsistent and consistent reporters of suicide attempt differ on few demographic or clinical variables; further prospective research should investigate the reasons for inconsistent reporting as well as the validity and stability of reporting in predicting future suicidal behavior. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Inconsistencies between Academic E-Book Platforms: A Comparison of Metadata and Search Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Gabrielle; Tovstiadi, Esta

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study of academic e-books that compared the metadata and search results from major academic e-book platforms. The authors collected data and performed a series of test searches designed to produce the same result regardless of platform. Testing, however, revealed metadata-related errors and significant…

  18. A Measure for Pupils' Inconsistency of Response to a Self-Report Instrument of Attitudes toward School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darom, Efraim; Rich, Yisrael

    1983-01-01

    To measure pupils' inconsistency in replying to a self-report questionnaire regarding attitudes toward school, 6,000 elementary and secondary school students participated in a nation-wide project to construct and validate the Israeli Quality of School Life Questionnaire (IQSL). (PN)

  19. Inconsistent results in the analysis of ALK rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, Johanna S. M.; Brunnström, Hans; Jabs, Verena; Edlund, Karolina; Jirström, Karin; Mindus, Stephanie; Fleur, Linnéa la; Pontén, Fredrik; Karlsson, Mats G.; Karlsson, Christina; Koyi, Hirsh; Brandén, Eva; Botling, Johan; Helenius, Gisela; Micke, Patrick; Svensson, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of targetable EML4-ALK fusion proteins has revolutionized the treatment of a minor subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Although fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is regarded as the gold standard for detection of ALK rearrangements, ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) is often used as screening tool in clinical practice. In order to unbiasedly analyze the diagnostic impact of such a screening strategy, we compared ALK IHC with ALK FISH in three large representative Swedish NSCLC cohorts incorporating clinical parameters and gene expression data. ALK rearrangements were detected using FISH on tissue microarrays (TMAs), including tissue from 851 NSCLC patients. In parallel, ALK protein expression was detected using IHC, applying the antibody clone D5F3 with two different protocols (the FDA approved Ventana CDx assay and our in house Dako IHC protocol). Gene expression microarray data (Affymetrix) was available for 194 patients. ALK rearrangements were detected in 1.7 % in the complete cohort and 2.0 % in the non-squamous cell carcinoma subgroup. ALK protein expression was observed in 1.8 and 1.4 % when applying the Ventana assay or the in house Dako protocol, respectively. The specificity and accuracy of IHC was high (> 98 %), while the sensitivity was between 69 % (Ventana) and 62 % (in house Dako protocol). Furthermore, only 67 % of the ALK IHC positive cases were positive with both IHC assays. Gene expression analysis revealed that 6/194 (3 %) tumors showed high ALK gene expression (≥ 6 AU) and of them only three were positive by either FISH or IHC. The overall frequency of ALK rearrangements based on FISH was lower than previously reported. The sensitivity of both IHC assays was low, and the concordance between the FISH and the IHC assays poor, questioning current strategies to screen with IHC prior to FISH or completely replace FISH by IHC. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2646-x) contains

  20. Measuring Competition: Inconsistent Definitions, Inconsistent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linick, Matthew Allen

    2014-01-01

    There is a developing literature examining how charter schools, through the effects of competition, impact performance in public school districts and district-run public schools, also known as the second-level effects of competition. What follows is an examination of how competition is measured in this literature that offers a critique of existing…

  1. Are there meaningful individual differences in temporal inconsistency in self-reported personality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubelet, Andrea; Salthouse, Timothy A; Oishi, Shigehiro

    2014-11-01

    The current project had three goals. The first was to examine whether it is meaningful to refer to across-time variability in self-reported personality as an individual differences characteristic. The second was to investigate whether negative affect was associated with variability in self-reported personality, while controlling for mean levels, and correcting for measurement errors. The third goal was to examine whether variability in self-reported personality would be larger among young adults than among older adults, and whether the relation of variability with negative affect would be stronger at older ages than at younger ages. Two moderately large samples of participants completed the International Item Pool Personality questionnaire assessing the Big Five personality dimensions either twice or thrice, in addition to several measures of negative affect. Results were consistent with the hypothesis that within-person variability in self-reported personality is a meaningful individual difference characteristic. Some people exhibited greater across-time variability than others after removing measurement error, and people who showed temporal instability in one trait also exhibited temporal instability across the other four traits. However, temporal variability was not related to negative affect, and there was no evidence that either temporal variability or its association with negative affect varied with age.

  2. Identifying Inconsistencies and Reporting Deficits in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (TMB) Case Reports Authored by TMB Practitioners: a TMB-Adapted CAse REport (CARE) Guidelines Audit Through 2014†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Niki; Shue, Sarah; Freeland, Emilee; Ralston, Rick; Boulanger, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Case reports are a fundamental tool through which therapeutic massage and bodywork (TMB) practitioners can inform research and impact their field by detailing the presentation, treatment, and follow-up of a single individual encountered in practice. Inconsistencies in case reporting limit their impact as fundamental sources of clinical evidence. Using the TMB-adapted CAse REport (CARE) guidelines, the current study sought to provide a rich description regarding the reporting quality of TMB practitioner authored TMB case reports in the literature. Methods 1) Systematic identification of published, peer-reviewed TMB case reports authored by TMB practitioners following PRISMA recommendations; 2) audit development based on TMB-adapted CARE guidelines; 3) audit implementation; and 4) descriptive analysis of audit scores. Results Our search identified 977 articles and 35 met study inclusion criteria. On average, TMB case reports included approximately 58% of the total items identified as necessary by the TMB-adapted CARE guidelines. Introduction sections of case reports had the best item reporting (80% on average), while Case Presentation (54%) and Results (52%) sections scored moderately overall, with only 20% of necessary Practitioner Description items included on average. Audit scores revealed inconsistent abstract reporting and few audited case reports including client race (20%), perspective (26%), and occupation/activities (40%); practitioner practice setting (12%), training (12%), scope-of-practice (29%), and credentialing (20%); adverse events or lack thereof (17%); and some aspect of informed consent (34%). Treatment descriptor item reporting varied from high to low. Various implications of concern are discussed. Conclusion The current audit and descriptive analysis highlight several reporting inconsistencies in TMB case reports prior to 2015. Reporting guidelines for case reports are important if standards for, and impact of, TMB case reports are

  3. Inconsistent Self-Report of Delinquency by Adolescents and Young Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Babinski, Dara E.; Biswas, Aparajita

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to test the ability of adolescents and young adults with childhood ADHD to reliably self-report delinquency history. Data were examined from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS), a follow-up study of children diagnosed with ADHD between 1987 and 1996. Self-report of lifetime delinquency history was…

  4. On the statistical evaluation of inconsistent measurement results illustrated on the example of the 90Sr half-life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijp, W.L.

    1985-12-01

    The problem how to make an objective evaluation of inconsistent numerical observations made by different authors or laboratories on the same physical quantity is dealt with. The problem is treated in a practical way in the light of the example on the half-life of 90 Sr, and it is to some extent a response to a document by Gray (1985) on the same topic

  5. Patterns and risk factors of inconsistent condom use among men who have sex with men in Viet Nam: Results from an Internet-based cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Macarena C; Duong, Quyen L; Mercer, Licelot C Eralte; Meyer, Samantha B; Koppenhaver, Todd; Ward, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Survey data from men who have sex with men (MSM) in Asian cities indicate drastic increases in HIV prevalence. It is unknown which factors are most important in driving these epidemics. The objective of this study was to identify patterns of condom use among MSM Internet users living in Viet Nam, as well as risk factors associated with inconsistent condom use and non-condom use. A national Internet-based survey of sexual behaviours was administered in 2011. Results showed that 44.9% of MSM reported not using a condom during their last anal sex encounter with a male partner. MSM were less likely to report condom use during anal sex with long-term partners than with casual partners. Twenty-three and a half per cent of MSM surveyed had ever taken an HIV test and received the results. Study findings highlight the urgent need for targeted strategies focused on increasing the rate of consistent condom use during anal sex with male partners among MSM in Viet Nam.

  6. Inconsistent reports of risk behavior among Brazilian middle school students: National School Based Survey of Adolescent Health (PeNSE 2009/2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandara de Oliveira Ramos

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study assessed the consistency of self-reports of risk behavior (overall and within four specific domains: alcohol use, tobacco use, drug use, and sexual activity in two editions of the Brazilian National School Based Survey of Adolescent Health (PeNSE: 2009 and 2012. The overall proportion of cases with at least one inconsistent response in the two editions was 11.7% (2.7% on the alcohol items, 2.1% for drug use, 4.3% for cigarette use, 3% for sexual activity and 22.7% (12.8% on alcohol items, 2.5% for drug use, 4.3% for cigarette use, 4.1% for sexual activity, respectively. Such inconsistency was more prevalent among males, delayed students, those who reported having experimented with drugs, and those who did not have a cellphone. Because inconsistent responses were more prevalent among the students who claimed to have engaged in risky activities, removing inconsistent responders affected the estimated prevalence of all risk behaviors in both editions of the survey. This study supports the importance of performing consistency checks of self-report surveys, following the growing body of literature on this topic.

  7. Scientific results - report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    During the year under report 1981, five working groups were active in the field of nuclear chemistry: neutron diffraction, radiation damage in solids, reactor chemistry, trace element research in bio-medicine and geo-chemistry. The objectives of the R+D projects ranged from the more basic research to the development of technological processes. Nuclear inspection methodes that have already been developed (e.g. neutron diffraction, trace element analysis) have increasingly been used in an interdisciplinary way. Besides these R+D projects the project of increase of power of the BER II was pursued also in 1981, and further planning documents on the extension of the BER II have been established. The report informs about the most important results of the single sections. A list of the publications (with abstracts) and lectures, also by guest scientists, is attached. (RB) [de

  8. A commercially available immunoglobulin E-based test for food allergy gives inconsistent results in healthy ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, S; De Spiegeleer, A; Liu, D J X; Lefère, L; van Doorn, D A; Hesta, M

    2016-01-01

    Commercial immunoglobulin E (IgE)-based tests are available for diagnosis of food allergies and are commonly used in equine practice. However, these tests have been proven unreliable as a screening method in man and other species, but not critically evaluated in equids. Therefore, a commercially available IgE-based test for horses was evaluated. To evaluate the consistency of the results obtained with a commercially available IgE-based test for food allergy diagnosis in ponies (Phase I) and to subject ponies to a provocation trial with the presumed allergens (Phase II). Allergen screening followed by experimental food provocation trials in healthy ponies. Blood samples of 17 healthy Shetland ponies were taken at 2 different time points, sent blinded to a commercial laboratory for screening of common food allergens and the results were evaluated for consistency (Phase I). Ponies that were positive for food allergens were consecutively challenged orally with each allergen separately for 14 days (Phase II). A washout period of one week was applied in ponies with multiple positive results. Clinical parameters and serum amyloid A were monitored during the provocation trial. Only 7/17 ponies were negative on the IgE-based test at the 2 time points, 3 had positive results twice but only one tested positive twice for the same food allergen. No abnormalities were noted during the provocation trials. This study demonstrated that this IgE-based test is not a reliable screening tool for food allergy in healthy equids. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  9. Scientific results report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The report describes in concise form the research tasks and results of the work groups pulsed irradiation, reaction kinematics and insulators and plastics in the field of 'radiation chemistry' of the Hahn-Meitner Institute, Berlin. The main topic of investigation was the kinetics and dynamics of fast chemical processes, the setting-up of chemical reaction mechanisms and research of chemical physical properties of highly reactive species (radicals, ions, electrons). A list of publications and lectures as well as teaching contributions of the institute's scientists, diploma and doctor theses performed in the institute and guest lectures held there is also given. (RB) [de

  10. Report on Results 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report discusses work being carried out in Norway to promote energy efficiency and the production of new renewable energy. An overall review of the quantifiable results of last year's activities at national level is available. It will serve to initiate an annual reporting tradition. The report represents a step towards an ongoing process for improved targeting and management of national efforts. During the course of the year 2000, NVE has evaluated and adjusted its activities and established a system involving indicators and reporting procedures. It is also important to take notice of the long-term work being undertaken to influence people's attitudes, even though this work is difficult to assess. NVE is investing in i.a. measures aimed at children and young people. Apart from directly influencing future energy users, this investment is also having an effect due to the children's encouragement of their parents to engage in more energy and environment-friendly behaviour. Published in 2000, the IEA report ''Trends in Norwegian Stationary Energy Use'' shows that total Norwegian energy consumption per GDP is not much higher than in other IEA countries, when adjusted for cold climate and industrial structure. However, Norwegians do stand out as intensive users of electricity. The IEA report shows a reduction of 10 TWh in energy usage when compared to the projected post 1990 figures. Energy efficiency activities have contributed towards this reduction. However, the potential for a more rational use of energy in Norway is still substantial and well documented. Based on experience most enterprises could save around 10% of energy used just by making changes to their operations, i.e. without major investments. Furthermore, the potential is growing because of massive technological developments in respect of energy usage, production and distribution. With this in mind, it is necessary to take full advantage of the extensive knowledge

  11. Double-Checking the Race Box: Examining Inconsistency between Survey Measures of Observed and Self-Reported Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperstein, Aliya

    2006-01-01

    Social constructivist theories of race suggest no two measures of race will capture the same information, but the degree of "error" this creates for quantitative research on inequality is unclear. Using unique data from the General Social Survey, I find observed and self-reported measures of race yield substantively different results when used to…

  12. Learning from moral inconsistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Richmond

    2017-10-01

    Moral inconsistency is an understudied phenomenon in cognitive moral psychology and deserves in depth empirical study. Moral inconsistency, as understood here, is not formal inconsistency but inconsistency in moral emotion and belief in response to particular cases. It occurs when persons treat cases as morally different that are really morally the same, even from their moral perspective. Learning to recognize and avoid such moral inconsistency in non-trivial but is a form of moral learning that complements and enhances other psychological and social mechanisms through which persons learn how to apply shared moral norms when their applications are uncertain and threaten to lapse into moral inconsistency. The same psychological process also can function to revise current moral norms when their straightforward applications are morally inconsistent with more basic moral commitments. Through this moral learning and related kinds, people can learn how to identify issues of moral priority when moral norms conflict and, when necessary, how to revise their moral norms. The recent revolution in dominant moral norms around gay sex and gay marriage in Europe and North America provides a possible illustration. When coupled with other modes of moral learning in the context of ambiguous but deeply rooted moral norms, such as those of sanctity and authority, reflection on moral inconsistency can help to justify this large-scale moral change, even among those who find gay sex, by its nature, morally repugnant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploring reasons for the observed inconsistent trial reports on intra-articular injections with hyaluronic acid in the treatment of osteoarthritis: Meta-regression analyses of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette; Bahrt, Henriette; Altman, Roy D; Bartels, Else M; Juhl, Carsten B; Bliddal, Henning; Lund, Hans; Christensen, Robin

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to identify factors explaining inconsistent observations concerning the efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid compared to intra-articular sham/control, or non-intervention control, in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis, based on randomized clinical trials (RCTs). A systematic review and meta-regression analyses of available randomized trials were conducted. The outcome, pain, was assessed according to a pre-specified hierarchy of potentially available outcomes. Hedges׳s standardized mean difference [SMD (95% CI)] served as effect size. REstricted Maximum Likelihood (REML) mixed-effects models were used to combine study results, and heterogeneity was calculated and interpreted as Tau-squared and I-squared, respectively. Overall, 99 studies (14,804 patients) met the inclusion criteria: Of these, only 71 studies (72%), including 85 comparisons (11,216 patients), had adequate data available for inclusion in the primary meta-analysis. Overall, compared with placebo, intra-articular hyaluronic acid reduced pain with an effect size of -0.39 [-0.47 to -0.31; P hyaluronic acid. Based on available trial data, intra-articular hyaluronic acid showed a better effect than intra-articular saline on pain reduction in osteoarthritis. Publication bias and the risk of selective outcome reporting suggest only small clinical effect compared to saline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Classification for Inconsistent Decision Tables

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad; Moshkov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Decision trees have been used widely to discover patterns from consistent data set. But if the data set is inconsistent, where there are groups of examples with equal values of conditional attributes but different labels, then to discover the essential patterns or knowledge from the data set is challenging. Three approaches (generalized, most common and many-valued decision) have been considered to handle such inconsistency. The decision tree model has been used to compare the classification results among three approaches. Many-valued decision approach outperforms other approaches, and M_ws_entM greedy algorithm gives faster and better prediction accuracy.

  15. Classification for Inconsistent Decision Tables

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad

    2016-09-28

    Decision trees have been used widely to discover patterns from consistent data set. But if the data set is inconsistent, where there are groups of examples with equal values of conditional attributes but different labels, then to discover the essential patterns or knowledge from the data set is challenging. Three approaches (generalized, most common and many-valued decision) have been considered to handle such inconsistency. The decision tree model has been used to compare the classification results among three approaches. Many-valued decision approach outperforms other approaches, and M_ws_entM greedy algorithm gives faster and better prediction accuracy.

  16. Measuring inconsistency in research ethics committee review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trace, Samantha; Kolstoe, Simon Erik

    2017-11-28

    The review of human participant research by Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) is a complex multi-faceted process that cannot be reduced to an algorithm. However, this does not give RECs/ IRBs permission to be inconsistent in their specific requirements to researchers or in their final opinions. In England the Health Research Authority (HRA) coordinates 67 committees, and has adopted a consistency improvement plan including a process called "Shared Ethical Debate" (ShED) where multiple committees review the same project. Committee reviews are compared for consistency by analysing the resulting minutes. We present a description of the ShED process. We report an analysis of minutes created by research ethics committees participating in two ShED exercises, and compare them to minutes produced in a published "mystery shopper" exercise. We propose a consistency score by defining top themes for each exercise, and calculating the ratio between top themes and total themes identified by each committee for each ShED exercise. Our analysis highlights qualitative differences between the ShED 19, ShED 20 and "mystery shopper" exercises. The quantitative measure of consistency showed only one committee across the three exercises with more than half its total themes as top themes (ratio of 0.6). The average consistency scores for the three exercises were 0.23 (ShED19), 0.35 (ShED20) and 0.32 (mystery shopper). There is a statistically significant difference between the ShED 19 exercise, and the ShED 20 and mystery shopper exercises. ShED exercises are effective in identifying inconsistency between ethics committees and we describe a scoring method that could be used to quantify this. However, whilst a level of inconsistency is probably inevitable in research ethics committee reviews, studies must move beyond the ShED methodology to understand why inconsistency occurs, and what an acceptable level of inconsistency might be.

  17. The Inconsistent Vegetarian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, Merle E.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetarians are often charged with inconsistency. They are told that, if they refrain from meat consumption, they should also refrain from the consumption of all animal products. The central question this paper addresses is whether the requirement of consistency means that vegetarians should become

  18. Inconsistency between Self-Reported Energy Intake and Body Mass Index among Urban, African-American Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available To prevent obesity, it is important to assess dietary habits through self-reported energy intake (EI in children. We investigated how EI is associated with body mass index and which elements of dietary habits and status are associated with EI among African-American (AA children.We assessed and included data from 218 10-14-year-old AA children in Baltimore, MD, USA. EI was calculated using a food frequency questionnaire. The basal metabolic rate (BMR was used as the predicted minimal rate of energy expenditure of children. A fully adjusted multiple logistic regression was used to determine the prevalence of obesity (≥ 95th BMI-for-age percentile among the quartiles of EI/BMR ratio using the third quartile for the reference. The differences in the age-adjusted mean EI/BMR among the categories of dietary habits, social support, and socio economic status were analyzed using a general linear model.Children with the lowest EI/BMR had significantly higher adjusted odds ratio (aOR of obesity as compared to those in the third quartile of EI/BMR (boys aOR 4.3; 95% confidence interval 1.08, 20 and girls aOR 4.1; 1.02, 21. In girls, the adjusted mean EI/BMR in the group that prepared food less than the means (3.8 times/week was significantly lower than the group that prepared food over the means (P = 0.03. Further, the group that reported eating breakfast under 4 times/week indicated an adjusted mean EI/BMR lower than the group that ate breakfast over 5 times/week in both sexes.When EI was under-reported with reference to BMR, we may observe high prevalence of obesity. Further, food preparation by children and frequent consumption of breakfast may instill food cognition with usual dietary habits. Therefore, holistic assessments including dietary habits are required to examine self-reported food intake especially among overweight/obese children.

  19. Inconsistency between Self-Reported Energy Intake and Body Mass Index among Urban, African-American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Miwa; Steeves, Elizabeth Anderson; Shipley, Cara; Hopkins, Laura C; Cheskin, Lawrence J; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2016-01-01

    To prevent obesity, it is important to assess dietary habits through self-reported energy intake (EI) in children. We investigated how EI is associated with body mass index and which elements of dietary habits and status are associated with EI among African-American (AA) children. We assessed and included data from 218 10-14-year-old AA children in Baltimore, MD, USA. EI was calculated using a food frequency questionnaire. The basal metabolic rate (BMR) was used as the predicted minimal rate of energy expenditure of children. A fully adjusted multiple logistic regression was used to determine the prevalence of obesity (≥ 95th BMI-for-age percentile) among the quartiles of EI/BMR ratio using the third quartile for the reference. The differences in the age-adjusted mean EI/BMR among the categories of dietary habits, social support, and socio economic status were analyzed using a general linear model. Children with the lowest EI/BMR had significantly higher adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of obesity as compared to those in the third quartile of EI/BMR (boys aOR 4.3; 95% confidence interval 1.08, 20 and girls aOR 4.1; 1.02, 21). In girls, the adjusted mean EI/BMR in the group that prepared food less than the means (3.8 times/week) was significantly lower than the group that prepared food over the means (P = 0.03). Further, the group that reported eating breakfast under 4 times/week indicated an adjusted mean EI/BMR lower than the group that ate breakfast over 5 times/week in both sexes. When EI was under-reported with reference to BMR, we may observe high prevalence of obesity. Further, food preparation by children and frequent consumption of breakfast may instill food cognition with usual dietary habits. Therefore, holistic assessments including dietary habits are required to examine self-reported food intake especially among overweight/obese children.

  20. Computing autocatalytic sets to unravel inconsistencies in metabolic network reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, R.; Waschina, S.; Boettger-Schmidt, D.

    2015-01-01

    , the method we report represents a powerful tool to identify inconsistencies in large-scale metabolic networks. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The method is available as source code on http://users.minet.uni-jena.de/ approximately m3kach/ASBIG/ASBIG.zip. CONTACT: christoph.kaleta@uni-jena.de SUPPLEMENTARY...... by inherent inconsistencies and gaps. RESULTS: Here we present a novel method to validate metabolic network reconstructions based on the concept of autocatalytic sets. Autocatalytic sets correspond to collections of metabolites that, besides enzymes and a growth medium, are required to produce all biomass...... components in a metabolic model. These autocatalytic sets are well-conserved across all domains of life, and their identification in specific genome-scale reconstructions allows us to draw conclusions about potential inconsistencies in these models. The method is capable of detecting inconsistencies, which...

  1. Gradient phonological inconsistency affects vocabulary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, Kristin L; Creel, Sarah C

    2013-09-01

    Learners frequently experience phonologically inconsistent input, such as exposure to multiple accents. Yet, little is known about the consequences of phonological inconsistency for language learning. The current study examines vocabulary acquisition with different degrees of phonological inconsistency, ranging from no inconsistency (e.g., both talkers call a picture /vig/) to mild but detectable inconsistency (e.g., one talker calls a picture a /vig/, and the other calls it a /vIg/), up to extreme inconsistency (e.g., the same picture is both a /vig/ and a /dIdʒ/). Previous studies suggest that learners readily extract consistent phonological patterns, given variable input. However, in Experiment 1, adults acquired phonologically inconsistent vocabularies more slowly than phonologically consistent ones. Experiment 2 examined whether word-form inconsistency alone, without phonological competition, was a source of learning difficulty. Even without phonological competition, listeners learned faster in 1 accent than in 2 accents, but they also learned faster in 2 accents (/vig/ = /vIg/) than with completely different labels (/vig/ = /dIdʒ/). Overall, results suggest that learners exposed to multiple accents may experience difficulty learning when 2 forms mismatch by more than 1 phonological feature, plus increased phonological competition due to a greater number of word forms. Implications for learning from variable input are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Report of scientific results 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The scientific progress report of the HMI for 1977 gives a survey of the main results of HMI research in the fields of neutron scattering, radiation damage in solids, reactor chemistry, trace element research in biomedicine, geochemistry, reactor operation, and radionuclide production. After this, short summaries are given of HMI publications and papers in the above fields. (HK) [de

  3. A misfit function tolerating inconsistent data

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2014-01-01

    Inversion methods that do not model all of the physical events in the observed data lead to inconsistent sets of equations. This often results in serious artifacts in the inverted model. To mitigate this problem, I propose a misfit function

  4. Reporting of Diagnostic Cytogenetic Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersch, Anne B S; Bieber, Frederick R; Dubuc, Adrian M; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Ligon, Azra H; Mason-Suares, Heather; Morton, Cynthia C; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Xiao, Sheng; Dal Cin, Paola

    2016-04-01

    This appendix, developed by the staff at the Center for Advanced Molecular Diagnostics in the Department of Pathology at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, includes a comprehensive list of current "macros" or standardized statements used to facilitate reporting of cytogenetic results. These are provided as a useful reference for other laboratories. The statements are organized under the general categories of constitutional or acquired abnormalities and subdivided into analysis type (GTG-banding, FISH, or chromosomal microarray). Multi-specimen usage macros are included that can be applied to two or more specimen types. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. The (mis)reporting of statistical results in psychology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Marjan; Wicherts, Jelte M

    2011-09-01

    In order to study the prevalence, nature (direction), and causes of reporting errors in psychology, we checked the consistency of reported test statistics, degrees of freedom, and p values in a random sample of high- and low-impact psychology journals. In a second study, we established the generality of reporting errors in a random sample of recent psychological articles. Our results, on the basis of 281 articles, indicate that around 18% of statistical results in the psychological literature are incorrectly reported. Inconsistencies were more common in low-impact journals than in high-impact journals. Moreover, around 15% of the articles contained at least one statistical conclusion that proved, upon recalculation, to be incorrect; that is, recalculation rendered the previously significant result insignificant, or vice versa. These errors were often in line with researchers' expectations. We classified the most common errors and contacted authors to shed light on the origins of the errors.

  6. Was Newtonian cosmology really inconsistent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Peter

    This paper follows up a debate as to the consistency of Newtonian cosmology. Whereas Malament [(1995). Is Newtonian cosmology really inconsistent? Philosophy of Science 62, 489-510] has shown that Newtonian cosmology is not inconsistent, to date there has been no analysis of Norton's claim [(1995). The force of Newtonian cosmology: Acceleration is relative. Philosophy of Science 62, 511-522.] that Newtonian cosmology was inconsistent prior to certain advances in the 1930s, and in particular prior to Seeliger's seminal paper of Seeliger [(1895). Über das Newton'sche Gravitationsgesetz. Astronomische Nachrichten 137 (3273), 129-136.] In this paper I agree that there are assumptions, Newtonian and cosmological in character, and relevant to the real history of science, which are inconsistent. But there are some important corrections to make to Norton's account. Here I display for the first time the inconsistencies-four in total-in all their detail. Although this extra detail shows there to be several different inconsistencies, it also goes some way towards explaining why they went unnoticed for 200 years.

  7. 1999 Annual report -- Generating results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Athabasca Oil Sands Trust was created in 1995 by Athabasca Oil Sand Investments Inc. acquiring the Province of Alberta's 11.74 per cent working interest in the Syncrude Project, providing the first modern day opportunity for direct public investment in Syncrude and oil sands development in northern Alberta. Syncrude operates major oil sands mines, a utilities plant and bitumen extraction and upgrading facilities at Mildred Lake, near Fort McMurray. In 1999, Syncrude produced a record 81.4 million barrels of Syncrude Sweet Blend (SSB), a light 32 degree API sweet crude oil, meeting about 12 per cent of Canada's crude oil requirements. The average 1999 price received by the Trust for Syncrude Sweet Blend was $ 26.04 ber barrel. More robust oil prices, record annual volumes of production averaging 26,000 barrels per day (The Trust's share of Syncrude production) and the lowest ever operating costs ($ 12.55 per barrel) combined to produce record earnings for the Trust of $ 82.6 million, or 60 cents per unit for the year. In 1997, Syncrude owners announced a $ 6.0 billion expansion plan that would double production to more than 150 million barrels per year by 2007. In October 1999, the owners reaffirmed their commitment to continue working toward the four-stage expansion plan and propose to increase production in 2000 to 92 million barrels per year and to 165 million barrels per year by 2008. With the anticipated start-up of the Aurora Mine in late May of 2000, the Trust expects Syncrude volumes in excess of 90 million barrels at an average cost of $12.25 per barrel in 2000. The Trust's share of the projected volume is 10.6 million barrels or 29,000 barrels per day. Based on commitment to continuing the expansion, and assuming that oil prices remain buoyant, the Trust expects to maintain distributions at or above 1999 levels. The annual report contains a detailed discussion of the expansion plans, management's discussion and analysis of operational and financial

  8. Inconsistency in large pharmacogenomic studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; El-Hachem, Nehme; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul

    2013-01-01

    Two large-scale pharmacogenomic studies were published recently in this journal. Genomic data are well correlated between studies; however, the measured drug response data are highly discordant. Although the source of inconsistencies remains uncertain, it has potential implications for using...

  9. Cantor, God, and Inconsistent Multiplicities*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas-Bolduc Aaron R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Georg Cantor’s religious convictions is often neglected in discussions of his mathematics and metaphysics. Herein I argue, pace Jané (1995, that due to the importance of Christianity to Cantor, he would have never thought of absolutely infinite collections/inconsistent multiplicities, as being merely potential, or as being purely mathematical entities. I begin by considering and rejecting two arguments due to Ignacio Jané based on letters to Hilbert and the generating principles for ordinals, respectively, showing that my reading of Cantor is consistent with that evidence. I then argue that evidence from Cantor’s later writings shows that he was still very religious later in his career, and thus would not have given up on the reality of the absolute, as that would imply an imperfection on the part of God.

  10. Does Status Inconsistency Matter for Marital Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Min

    2007-01-01

    This study tests status inconsistency theory by examining the associations between wives' and husbands' relative statuses--that is, earnings, work-time, occupational, and educational inconsistencies--and marital quality and global happiness. The author asks three questions: (a) Is status inconsistency associated with marital quality and overall…

  11. A general framework for reasoning on inconsistency

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Maria Vanina; Subrahmanian, VS; Amgoud, Leila

    2013-01-01

    This SpringerBrief proposes a general framework for reasoning about inconsistency in a wide variety of logics, including inconsistency resolution methods that have not yet been studied.  The proposed framework allows users to specify preferences on how to resolve inconsistency when there are multiple ways to do so. This empowers users to resolve inconsistency in data leveraging both their detailed knowledge of the data as well as their application needs. The brief shows that the framework is well-suited to handle inconsistency in several logics, and provides algorithms to compute preferred opt

  12. A misfit function tolerating inconsistent data

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2014-08-05

    Inversion methods that do not model all of the physical events in the observed data lead to inconsistent sets of equations. This often results in serious artifacts in the inverted model. To mitigate this problem, I propose a misfit function that partly ignores the unexplainable arrivals in the data due to modeling limitation. This is tested on least squares migration of synthetic P–P arrivals, albeit P–S reflections exist in the observed data in addition, to demonstrate that in this case the new misfit is more robust than the standard L2 misfit.

  13. Inconsistent condom use among Ugandan university students from a gender perspective: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Mehra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Feminization of the HIV/AIDS epidemic has been a prominent phenomenon in sub-Saharan Africa. Inconsistent condom use among young people is one of the major risk factors in the continued propagation of the epidemic. Therefore, it is of importance to increase knowledge of gender aspects of condom use among young people. Objective: To investigate whether gender differences regarding individual and social factors determine the association between condom efficacy and inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner, among Ugandan university students. Design: In 2010, 1954 Ugandan students participated in a cross-sectional survey, conducted at Mbarara University of Science and Technology in southwestern Uganda. A self-administered questionnaire assessed socio-demographic factors, alcohol consumption, sexual behaviors (including condom use and condom efficacy, and peer norms. The data were stratified by sex and examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 1,179 (60.3% students reported having had their sexual debut. Of these, 231 (37.4% males and 209 (49.2% females reported inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner. Students with low condom efficacy had a higher risk of inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner, even after adjusting for the potential confounders. A synergistic effect was observed between being a female and low condom efficacy with inconsistent condom use. Conclusion: The association between inconsistent condom use and low condom efficacy was found among both males and females, but females were found to be at a higher risk of inconsistent condom use compared to their male counterparts. Therefore, gender power relations should be addressed in policies and interventions aiming at increasing condom use among young people in sub-Saharan settings. Programs could be designed with intervention strategies that focus on interactive and participatory educational activities and youth

  14. Day-to-Day Inconsistency in Parent Knowledge: Links with Youth Health and Parents’ Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Melissa A.; McHale, Susan M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Kossek, Ellen Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Considerable evidence documents the linkages between higher levels of parental knowledge about youth activities and positive youth outcomes. This study investigated how day-to-day inconsistency in parental knowledge of youth activities was linked to youth behavioral, psychological, and physical health as well as parents’ stress. Methods Participants were employees in the Information Technology division of a Fortune 500 company and their children (N =129, Mean age youth = 13.39 years, 55% female). Data were collected from parents and youth via separate workplace and in-home surveys as well as telephone diary surveys on 8 consecutive evenings. We assessed day-to-day inconsistency in parental knowledge across these eight calls. Results Parents differed in their knowledge from day to day almost as much as their average knowledge scores differed from those of other parents. Controlling for mean levels of knowledge, youth whose parents exhibited more knowledge inconsistency reported more physical health symptoms (e.g., colds, flu). Knowledge inconsistency was also associated with more risky behavior for girls but greater psychological well-being for older adolescents. Parents who reported more stressors also had higher knowledge inconsistency. Conclusions Assessing only average levels of parental knowledge does not fully capture how this parenting dimension is associated with youth health. Consistent knowledge may promote youth physical health and less risky behavior for girls. Yet knowledge inconsistency also may reflect normative increases in autonomy as it was positively associated with psychological well-being for older adolescents. Given the linkages between parental stress and knowledge inconsistency, parent interventions should include stress-management components. PMID:25703318

  15. 10 CFR 26.169 - Reporting Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting Results. 26.169 Section 26.169 Energy NUCLEAR... specific gravity test. (4) For a specimen that has an invalid result, the laboratory shall contact the MRO... transmission and ensure only authorized access to any data transmission, storage, and retrieval system. (f) For...

  16. Documenting Penicillin Allergy: The Impact of Inconsistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirav S.; Ridgway, Jessica P.; Pettit, Natasha; Fahrenbach, John; Robicsek, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergy documentation is frequently inconsistent and incomplete. The impact of this variability on subsequent treatment is not well described. Objective To determine how allergy documentation affects subsequent antibiotic choice. Design Retrospective, cohort study. Participants 232,616 adult patients seen by 199 primary care providers (PCPs) between January 1, 2009 and January 1, 2014 at an academic medical system. Main Measures Inter-physician variation in beta-lactam allergy documentation; antibiotic treatment following beta-lactam allergy documentation. Key Results 15.6% of patients had a reported beta-lactam allergy. Of those patients, 39.8% had a specific allergen identified and 22.7% had allergic reaction characteristics documented. Variation between PCPs was greater than would be expected by chance (all ppenicillins”) (24.0% to 58.2%) and documentation of the reaction characteristics (5.4% to 51.9%). After beta-lactam allergy documentation, patients were less likely to receive penicillins (Relative Risk [RR] 0.16 [95% Confidence Interval: 0.15–0.17]) and cephalosporins (RR 0.28 [95% CI 0.27–0.30]) and more likely to receive fluoroquinolones (RR 1.5 [95% CI 1.5–1.6]), clindamycin (RR 3.8 [95% CI 3.6–4.0]) and vancomycin (RR 5.0 [95% CI 4.3–5.8]). Among patients with beta-lactam allergy, rechallenge was more likely when a specific allergen was identified (RR 1.6 [95% CI 1.5–1.8]) and when reaction characteristics were documented (RR 2.0 [95% CI 1.8–2.2]). Conclusions Provider documentation of beta-lactam allergy is highly variable, and details of the allergy are infrequently documented. Classification of a patient as beta-lactam allergic and incomplete documentation regarding the details of the allergy lead to beta-lactam avoidance and use of other antimicrobial agents, behaviors that may adversely impact care quality and cost. PMID:26981866

  17. Reporting Statistical Results in Medical Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Wan Nor; Sarimah, Abdullah; Norsa’adah, Bachok; Najib Majdi, Yaacob; Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Kamarul Imran, Musa; Aniza, Abd Aziz; Naing, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Statistical editors of the Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences (MJMS) must go through many submitted manuscripts, focusing on the statistical aspect of the manuscripts. However, the editors notice myriad styles of reporting the statistical results, which are not standardised among the authors. This could be due to the lack of clear written instructions on reporting statistics in the guidelines for authors. The aim of this editorial is to briefly outline reporting methods for several important and common statistical results. It will also address a number of common mistakes made by the authors. The editorial will serve as a guideline for authors aiming to publish in the MJMS as well as in other medical journals. PMID:27904419

  18. Avoiding inconsistencies over time and tracking difficulties in Applied Biosystems AB1700™/Panther™ probe-to-gene annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benecke Arndt

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant inconsistencies between probe-to-gene annotations between different releases of probe set identifiers by commercial microarray platform solutions have been reported. Such inconsistencies lead to misleading or ambiguous interpretation of published gene expression results. Results We report here similar inconsistencies in the probe-to-gene annotation of Applied Biosystems AB1700 data, demonstrating that this is not an isolated concern. Moreover, the online information source PANTHER does not provide information required to track such inconsistencies, hence, even correctly annotated datasets, when resubmitted after PANTHER was updated to a new probe-to-gene annotation release, will generate differing results without any feedback on the origin of the change. Conclusion The importance of unequivocal annotation of microarray experiments can not be underestimated. Inconsistencies greatly diminish the usefulness of the technology. Novel methods in the analysis of transcriptome profiles often rely on large disparate datasets stemming from multiple sources. The predictive and analytic power of such approaches rapidly diminishes if only least-common subsets can be used for analysis. We present here the information that needs to be provided together with the raw AB1700 data, and the information required together with the biologic interpretation of such data to avoid inconsistencies and tracking difficulties.

  19. Annual report on electricity quality - 2013 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Every year, RTE, The French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2013 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  20. Annual report on electricity quality - 2008 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Every year, RTE, The French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2008 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  1. Annual report on electricity quality - 2009 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Every year, RTE, The French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2009 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  2. Annual report on electricity quality - 2011 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Every year, RTE, The French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2011 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  3. Annual report on electricity quality - 2016 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Every year, RTE, The French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2016 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  4. Annual report on electricity quality - 2014 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Every year, RTE, The French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2014 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  5. Annual report on electricity quality - 2015 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Every year, RTE, The French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2015 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  6. Annual report on electricity quality - 2012 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Every year, RTE, the French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2012 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  7. Annual report on electricity quality - 2010 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Every year, RTE, The French transmission system operator, evaluates the electricity quality of the French grid. Quality covers two aspects: the continuity of supply (percentage of outages) and the voltage wave quality (temporary or continuous disturbances). This report presents: the 2010 key figures and highlights, RTE's electricity quality commitments, RTE's technical results and quality assurance, and RTE's action for grid performances improvement

  8. Dialogue Games for Inconsistent and Biased Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebbink, H.J.; Witteman, C.L.M.; Meyer, J.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, a dialogue game is presented in which coherent conversational sequences with inconsistent and biased information are described at the speech act level. Inconsistent and biased information is represented with bilattice structures, and based on these bilattice structures, a

  9. Inconsistencies in Models for RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, K; Ostapchenko, S; Pierog, T

    2002-01-01

    The interpretation of experimental results at RHIC and in the future also at LHC requires very reliable and realistic models. Considerable effort has been devoted to the development of such models during the past decade, many of them being heavily used in order to analyze data. It is the purpose of this paper to point out serious inconsistencies in the above-mentioned approaches. We will demonstrate that requiring theoretical self-consistency reduces the freedom in modeling high energy nuclear scattering enormously. We will introduce a fully self-consistent formulation of the multiple-scattering scheme in the framework of a Gribov-Regge type effective theory. In addition, we develop new computational techniques which allow for the first time a satisfactory solution of the problem in the sense that calculations of observable quantities can be done strictly within a self-consistent formalism.

  10. Adult age differences in memory for schema-consistent and schema-inconsistent objects in a real-world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prull, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined age-related differences in the inconsistency effect, in which memory is enhanced for schema-inconsistent information compared to schema-consistent information. Young and older adults studied schema-consistent and schema-inconsistent objects in an academic office under either intentional or incidental encoding instructions, and were given two recognition tests either immediately or after 48 hr: A yes/no item recognition test that included modified remember/know judgments and a token recognition test that required determining whether an original object was replaced with a different object with the same name. Young and older adults showed equivalent inconsistency effects in both item and token recognition tests, although older adults reported phenomenologically less rich memories of schema-inconsistent objects relative to young adults. These findings run counter to previous reports suggesting that aging is associated with processing declines at encoding that impair memory for details of schema-inconsistent or distinctive events. The results are consistent with a retrieval-based account in which age-related difficulties in retrieving contextual details can be offset by environmental support.

  11. IMO Fireball report form: results and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, M.; Perlerin, V.

    2015-01-01

    At the 2014 IMC, we presented the new IMO (International Meteor Organization) online, Fireball report (available at fireballs.imo.net). This fireball report form was specifically designed for use by people with no astronomy experience who witnessed a fireball, a bolide or a suspected similar phenomenon. The IMO version of the form has been officially launched in February 2015. Since then, the form has been translated in different languages and customized for organizations around the world. In this paper, we will present preliminary results of the form and provide tips to improve the online presence of local organizations, in order to promote usage. We will also highlight procedures to be followed by local organizations to get a custom version of the form.

  12. Minimally inconsistent reasoning in Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowang

    2017-01-01

    Reasoning with inconsistencies is an important issue for Semantic Web as imperfect information is unavoidable in real applications. For this, different paraconsistent approaches, due to their capacity to draw as nontrivial conclusions by tolerating inconsistencies, have been proposed to reason with inconsistent description logic knowledge bases. However, existing paraconsistent approaches are often criticized for being too skeptical. To this end, this paper presents a non-monotonic paraconsistent version of description logic reasoning, called minimally inconsistent reasoning, where inconsistencies tolerated in the reasoning are minimized so that more reasonable conclusions can be inferred. Some desirable properties are studied, which shows that the new semantics inherits advantages of both non-monotonic reasoning and paraconsistent reasoning. A complete and sound tableau-based algorithm, called multi-valued tableaux, is developed to capture the minimally inconsistent reasoning. In fact, the tableaux algorithm is designed, as a framework for multi-valued DL, to allow for different underlying paraconsistent semantics, with the mere difference in the clash conditions. Finally, the complexity of minimally inconsistent description logic reasoning is shown on the same level as the (classical) description logic reasoning.

  13. Minimally inconsistent reasoning in Semantic Web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowang Zhang

    Full Text Available Reasoning with inconsistencies is an important issue for Semantic Web as imperfect information is unavoidable in real applications. For this, different paraconsistent approaches, due to their capacity to draw as nontrivial conclusions by tolerating inconsistencies, have been proposed to reason with inconsistent description logic knowledge bases. However, existing paraconsistent approaches are often criticized for being too skeptical. To this end, this paper presents a non-monotonic paraconsistent version of description logic reasoning, called minimally inconsistent reasoning, where inconsistencies tolerated in the reasoning are minimized so that more reasonable conclusions can be inferred. Some desirable properties are studied, which shows that the new semantics inherits advantages of both non-monotonic reasoning and paraconsistent reasoning. A complete and sound tableau-based algorithm, called multi-valued tableaux, is developed to capture the minimally inconsistent reasoning. In fact, the tableaux algorithm is designed, as a framework for multi-valued DL, to allow for different underlying paraconsistent semantics, with the mere difference in the clash conditions. Finally, the complexity of minimally inconsistent description logic reasoning is shown on the same level as the (classical description logic reasoning.

  14. Is special relativity logically inconsistent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhovnik, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The author gives his view that Special Relativity is logically and mathematically consistent, as well as physically comprehensible if, and only if, it is firmly based on the single assumption of a unique fundamental reference frame for light propagation. The theory and all its results are derivable from this assumption; the Relativity and Light Principles become intelligible consequences of this assumption; the physical significance and source of time dilation and length contraction are made manifest thereby. (Auth.)

  15. Kinematic Origins of Motor Inconsistency in Expert Pianists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Tominaga

    Full Text Available For top performers, including athletes and musicians, even subtle inconsistencies in rhythm and force during movement production decrease the quality of performance. However, extensive training over many years beginning in childhood is unable to perfect dexterous motor performance so that it is without any error. To gain insight into the biological mechanisms underlying the subtle defects of motor actions, the present study sought to identify the kinematic origins of inconsistency of dexterous finger movements in musical performance. Seven highly-skilled pianists who have won prizes at international piano competitions played a short sequence of tones with the right hand at a predetermined tempo. Time-varying joint angles of the fingers were recorded using a custom-made data glove, and the timing and velocity of the individual keystrokes were recorded from a digital piano. Both ridge and stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated an association of the inter-trial variability of the inter-keystroke interval (i.e., rhythmic inconsistency with both the rotational velocity of joints of the finger used for a keystroke (i.e., striking finger and the movement independence between the striking and non-striking fingers. This indicates a relationship between rhythmic inconsistency in musical performance and the dynamic features of movements in not only the striking finger but also the non-striking fingers. In contrast, the inter-trial variability of the key-descending velocity (i.e., loudness inconsistency was associated mostly with the kinematic features of the striking finger at the moment of the keystroke. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the rhythmic and loudness inconsistencies. The results suggest distinct kinematic origins of inconsistencies in rhythm and loudness in expert musical performance.

  16. Kinematic Origins of Motor Inconsistency in Expert Pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Kenta; Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart; Miyazaki, Fumio; Furuya, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    For top performers, including athletes and musicians, even subtle inconsistencies in rhythm and force during movement production decrease the quality of performance. However, extensive training over many years beginning in childhood is unable to perfect dexterous motor performance so that it is without any error. To gain insight into the biological mechanisms underlying the subtle defects of motor actions, the present study sought to identify the kinematic origins of inconsistency of dexterous finger movements in musical performance. Seven highly-skilled pianists who have won prizes at international piano competitions played a short sequence of tones with the right hand at a predetermined tempo. Time-varying joint angles of the fingers were recorded using a custom-made data glove, and the timing and velocity of the individual keystrokes were recorded from a digital piano. Both ridge and stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated an association of the inter-trial variability of the inter-keystroke interval (i.e., rhythmic inconsistency) with both the rotational velocity of joints of the finger used for a keystroke (i.e., striking finger) and the movement independence between the striking and non-striking fingers. This indicates a relationship between rhythmic inconsistency in musical performance and the dynamic features of movements in not only the striking finger but also the non-striking fingers. In contrast, the inter-trial variability of the key-descending velocity (i.e., loudness inconsistency) was associated mostly with the kinematic features of the striking finger at the moment of the keystroke. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the rhythmic and loudness inconsistencies. The results suggest distinct kinematic origins of inconsistencies in rhythm and loudness in expert musical performance.

  17. Annual report 2011. Results and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-25

    Enova is a state-owned enterprise, owned by the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. Over a period of ten years, the enterprise has worked to trigger energy efficiency measures and renewable energy production by supporting proactive players that have paved the way for others. In the period 2002-2011, Enova has contracted an energy result of 16.6 TWh, Enova's Annual Report 2011 shows. This corresponds to the annual energy end-use of more than 35 per cent of Norways 2.2 million private households. Enova has allocated NOK 9 billion in support over ten years. This has resulted in project owners and other financiers investing about Nok 45 billion in capital for environmentally friendly energy projects in Norway, says Nils Kristian Nakstad, CEO of Enova. In 2011, Enova supported projects with an overall energy result of 1.35 TWh using resources from the Energy Fund, equally distributed between energy efficiency and renewable heating. The greatest contributors in 2011 are within energy conversion to renewable heating and energy efficiency measures in buildings.The climate impact of all of the projects where Enova has entered into contracts corresponds to 9.3 million tonnes in reduced CO2 emissions annually. The latter constitutes 17 per cent of domestic greenhouse gas emissions. (au)

  18. Annual report 2011. Results and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Enova is a state-owned enterprise, owned by the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. Over a period of ten years, the enterprise has worked to trigger energy efficiency measures and renewable energy production by supporting proactive players that have paved the way for others. In the period 2002-2011, Enova has contracted an energy result of 16.6 TWh, Enova's Annual Report 2011 shows. This corresponds to the annual energy end-use of more than 35 per cent of Norways 2.2 million private households. Enova has allocated NOK 9 billion in support over ten years. This has resulted in project owners and other financiers investing about Nok 45 billion in capital for environmentally friendly energy projects in Norway, says Nils Kristian Nakstad, CEO of Enova. In 2011, Enova supported projects with an overall energy result of 1.35 TWh using resources from the Energy Fund, equally distributed between energy efficiency and renewable heating. The greatest contributors in 2011 are within energy conversion to renewable heating and energy efficiency measures in buildings.The climate impact of all of the projects where Enova has entered into contracts corresponds to 9.3 million tonnes in reduced CO2 emissions annually. The latter constitutes 17 per cent of domestic greenhouse gas emissions. (au)

  19. Comparison of reporting phase I trial results in ClinicalTrials.gov and matched publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepshelovich, D; Goldvaser, H; Wang, L; Abdul Razak, A R; Bedard, P L

    2017-12-01

    Background Data on completeness of reporting of phase I cancer clinical trials in publications are lacking. Methods The ClinicalTrials.gov database was searched for completed adult phase I cancer trials with reported results. PubMed was searched for matching primary publications published prior to November 1, 2016. Reporting in primary publications was compared with the ClinicalTrials.gov database using a 28-point score (2=complete; 1=partial; 0=no reporting) for 14 items related to study design, outcome measures and safety profile. Inconsistencies between primary publications and ClinicalTrials.gov were recorded. Linear regression was used to identify factors associated with incomplete reporting. Results After a review of 583 trials in ClinicalTrials.gov , 163 matching primary publications were identified. Publications reported outcomes that did not appear in ClinicalTrials.gov in 25% of trials. Outcomes were upgraded, downgraded or omitted in publications in 47% of trials. The overall median reporting score was 23/28 (interquartile range 21-25). Incompletely reported items in >25% publications were: inclusion criteria (29%), primary outcome definition (26%), secondary outcome definitions (53%), adverse events (71%), serious adverse events (80%) and dates of study start and database lock (91%). Higher reporting scores were associated with phase I (vs phase I/II) trials (ppublication in journals with lower impact factor (p=0.004). Conclusions Reported results in primary publications for early phase cancer trials are frequently inconsistent or incomplete compared with ClinicalTrials.gov entries. ClinicalTrials.gov may provide more comprehensive data from new cancer drug trials.

  20. Development of an Inconsistent Responding Scale for the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowle, Elyse N; Kelley, Shannon E; Edens, John F; Donnellan, M Brent; Smith, Shannon Toney; Wygant, Dustin B; Sellbom, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Inconsistent or careless responding to self-report measures is estimated to occur in approximately 10% of university research participants and may be even more common among offender populations. Inconsistent responding may be a result of a number of factors including inattentiveness, reading or comprehension difficulties, and cognitive impairment. Many stand-alone personality scales used in applied and research settings, however, do not include validity indicators to help identify inattentive response patterns. Using multiple archival samples, the current study describes the development of an inconsistent responding scale for the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (TriPM; Patrick, 2010), a widely used self-report measure of psychopathy. We first identified pairs of correlated TriPM items in a derivation sample (N = 2,138) and then created a total score based on the sum of the absolute value of the differences for each item pair. The resulting scale, the Triarchic Assessment Procedure for Inconsistent Responding (TAPIR), strongly differentiated between genuine TriPM protocols and randomly generated TriPM data (N = 1,000), as well as between genuine protocols and those in which 50% of the original data were replaced with random item responses. TAPIR scores demonstrated fairly consistent patterns of association with some theoretically relevant correlates (e.g., inconsistency scales embedded in other personality inventories), although not others (e.g., measures of conscientiousness) across our cross-validation samples. Tentative TAPIR cut scores that may discriminate between attentively and carelessly completed protocols are presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Expressive Dissonance: When Emotional Inconsistency Arouses Dissonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Pelt

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the two studies was to explore a new dissonance paradigm–expressive dissonance–based on the inconsistency between what people feel and what people express behaviorally. Expressive dissonance was aroused by asking participants to watch a film with a high emotional content, either positive (joy or negative (sadness. In the no-dissonance condition, they received the instruction to naturally watch the film. In the expressive dissonance condition, they received the instruction to facially express emotions that were the opposite of what they felt. We expected that the expressive dissonance situation would: 1 require cognitive resources leading to a decrease in cognitive performance (studies 1 and 2; 2 be accompanied by emotional regulation strategies (study 1; 3 be accompanied by an increase in dissonance-related affects (study 2. Although our results (studies 1 and 2 corroborated those obtained previously in terms of performance, they also showed that participants in the expressive dissonance situation use emotional regulation strategies: exaggeration and suppression (study 1, and that they felt self-directed negative affects (study 2, just like the participants in a cognitive dissonance situation. These first results allowed us to establish a theoretical bridge between the theories of emotions–particularly those related to the emotional regulation processes–and to widen the scope of relevance of the dissonance theory.

  2. EDF - 2007 results, 2007 Financial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadonneix, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    As the world's biggest electricity generator, the EDF Group covers every sector of expertise, from generation to trading and transmission grids. EDF builds on the expertise of its people, its R and D and engineering skills, its experience as a leading industry operator and the attentive support of its customers to deliver competitive solutions that successfully reconcile economic growth with climate protection. This document presents the 2007 annual results and Consolidated financial statements of the Group at 31 December 2007: Consolidated income statements; Consolidated balance sheets; Consolidated cash flow statements; Changes in consolidated equity; Notes to the consolidated financial statements: Group accounting standards; Summary of the principal accounting and valuation methods; Public electricity distribution concessions in France and concession agreements for other activities; Comparability; Significant events and transactions of 2007 and 2006; Changes in the scope of consolidation; Segment reporting; Sales; Fuel and energy purchases; Other external expenses; Contractual obligations and commitments; Personnel expenses; Other operating income and expenses; Impairments / reversals; Other operating income and expenses; Financial result; Income taxes; Goodwill; Other intangible assets; Property, plant and equipment operated under French public electricity distribution concessions; Property, plant and equipment operated under concessions for other activities; Property, plant and equipment used in generation and other tangible assets owned by the Group; Investments in companies accounted for under the equity method; Current and non-current financial assets; Inventories, including work-in-process; Trade receivables; Other receivables; Cash and cash equivalents; Held-for-sale assets and liabilities; Equity; Provisions; Specific French public electricity distribution concession liabilities for existing assets and assets to be replaced; Current and non

  3. Framing and time-inconsistent preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsma, P.; Keren, G.; Caverni, J.-P.; Bar-Hillel, M.; Hutton Barron, F.; Jungermann, H.

    1995-01-01

    Recent research on intertemporal choice (e.g., Ainslie, 1991; Herrnstein, 1990; Loewenstein & Elster, 1992) exhibits several pervasive effects that are Incompatible with the basic tenets of the "rational’ or "normative" economic theory. In particular, people show time-inconsistent preferences when

  4. Status inconsistency and return to work among foreign-born and native Swedes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Ranjbar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated potential differences in status inconsistency and time to return to work (RTW from sickness absence between foreign-born and native Swedes, whether inconsistency was associated with RTW, and if this association was stronger for foreign-borns than natives. Significantly fewer native than foreign-born Swedes reported negative status inconsistency, but RTW did not differ between the groups and inconsistency was not associated with RTW. A positive selection of individuals to the Swedish labour market might help explain the findings. This first study of status inconcistency and RTW requires follow-ups in different settings of labour markets and insurance regulations.

  5. Enova results report 2005; Enova resultatrapport 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 Enova entered into agreements with 186 projects that together provided an energy result of 2 TWh. The result is almost evenly divided between projects providing higher energy production and projects that reduce energy use. The energy production consists of 585 GWh in new wind power and 409 GWh in new heat energy in 2005. Overall for the period 2001 to 2005, Enova contracted for energy results of well over 6.6 TWh. Enova is doing well in relation to the objectives set for its activities.

  6. Organizational results : annual report, fiscal year 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    What can you do in five years? Pay off a car? Send your kid to college? How about change an : organizations culture? Over the past five years thats what Organizational Results has attempted to do. : By placing business process experts and resea...

  7. Report of the scientific results 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The activities and results in research, development and education are shown in the following fields: 1) HMI-computer-network; 2) Mathematical software and computer graphics; 3) Software development for process control; 4) Real time computer systems - hardware, measurement and control; 5) On-line data processing in medicine; 6) Research on semiconductor devices and irradiation tests. A list of the publication of the staff is given. (WB) [de

  8. Annual report 2010. Results and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    In 2010, 926 G Wh of renewable heating was contracted. This is nearly on par with the record-breaking year of 2009, when Enova had extra funds to distribute through the Governments Stimulus Package in response to the financial crisis. District heating has been developed, or is in the process of being developed, in most major cities.We also expect new developments in smaller communities and extensions of existing facilities in cities. We expect this to result in an increased number of applications for smaller projects. (au)

  9. Annual report 2010. Results and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, 926 G Wh of renewable heating was contracted. This is nearly on par with the record-breaking year of 2009, when Enova had extra funds to distribute through the Governments Stimulus Package in response to the financial crisis. District heating has been developed, or is in the process of being developed, in most major cities.We also expect new developments in smaller communities and extensions of existing facilities in cities. We expect this to result in an increased number of applications for smaller projects. (au)

  10. Uso inconsistente del condón entre trabajadoras sexuales en Ecuador: resultados de una encuesta de comportamientos Inconsistent condom use among sexual workers in Ecuador: results from a behavior survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Gutiérrez

    2006-04-01

    el uso consistente del condón en esta población.OBJECTIVE: Whilst existing data suggests that the HIV epidemic in Ecuador is concentrated amongst men who have sex with men (MSM, there is very little available information on the situation of key populations, i.e. those most at risk of HIV infection and/or transmitting the infection. In particular, there is very little known about sex workers (SWs, their rate of condom use and other behaviors and characteristics with respect to the risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs. This study presents findings from a survey carried out with SWs in eight cities in Ecuador. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, a questionnaire focusing on behaviours, attitudes and socio-economic and demographic characteristics was administered to SWs in eight cities in Ecuador. These eight cities together account for the majority of the population in the country, and they were also identified as the locations with high reported levels of HIV. RESULTS: Information from a total of 2867 SWs was obtained, the majority were captured in their workplaces. Most of SWs interviewed carry out their activities in closed settings dedicated to sex work (i.e. not in the street. The average age of respondents was 28 (95%CI 27-29, and around half of them live with a male partner (married or not. The rate of condom use with the last client was 88% (82% consistently with the last three, whilst with regular partners it was 6%. A high index of life-skills, high socio-economic status and having an official document that allows them to work, were positively associated with condom use with clients (PR [CI 95%] 1.40 [1.40-1.40], 1.37 [1.36-1.37], y 7.26 [6.87-7.46], respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Whilst condom use with clients amongst Ecuadorian SWs is high, this diminishes if one analyzes consistent condom use and is notably low with respect to regular partners. Condom use appears to be related to variables that can be linked to

  11. Measuring inconsistency in research ethics committee review

    OpenAIRE

    Trace, Samantha; Kolstoe, Simon Erik

    2017-01-01

    Background The review of human participant research by Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) is a complex multi-faceted process that cannot be reduced to an algorithm. However, this does not give RECs/ IRBs permission to be inconsistent in their specific requirements to researchers or in their final opinions. In England the Health Research Authority (HRA) coordinates 67 committees, and has adopted a consistency improvement plan including a process called “Sha...

  12. How students deal with inconsistencies in health knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bientzle, Martina; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    In their work, health care professionals have to deal daily with inconsistent health information and are confronted with differing therapeutic health concepts. Medical education should prepare students to handle these challenges adequately. The aim of this study was to contribute to a better understanding of how students deal with inconsistencies in health knowledge when they are presented with either a therapeutic concept they accept or one they reject. Seventy-six students of physiotherapy participated in this 2 × 2 experiment with health information (consistent versus inconsistent information) and therapeutic concept (congruent versus contradictory therapeutic concept) as between-group factors. The participants' task was to improve the quality of a text about the effectiveness of stretching; participants were randomly assigned to one of four texts. Knowledge acquisition and text modification were measured as dependent variables. Students acquired more knowledge when they worked with a text containing inconsistent information. Medical information that was presented in agreement with a student's therapeutic concept was also more readily acquired than the same information presented posing a contradictory therapeutic concept. Participants modified the contradictory text in order to adapt it to their own point of view. Disagreement resulted in a disregard or devaluation of the information itself, which in turn was detrimental to learning. It is a problem when prospective health care professionals turn a blind eye to discrepancies that do not fit their view of the world. It may be useful for educational purposes to include a knowledge conflict caused by a combination of conviction and inconsistent information to facilitate learning processes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Detection of Tampering Inconsistencies on Mobile Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hong; Kot, Alex C.

    Fast proliferation of mobile cameras and the deteriorating trust on digital images have created needs in determining the integrity of photos captured by mobile devices. As tampering often creates some inconsistencies, we propose in this paper a novel framework to statistically detect the image tampering inconsistency using accurately detected demosaicing weights features. By first cropping four non-overlapping blocks, each from one of the four quadrants in the mobile photo, we extract a set of demosaicing weights features from each block based on a partial derivative correlation model. Through regularizing the eigenspectrum of the within-photo covariance matrix and performing eigenfeature transformation, we further derive a compact set of eigen demosaicing weights features, which are sensitive to image signal mixing from different photo sources. A metric is then proposed to quantify the inconsistency based on the eigen weights features among the blocks cropped from different regions of the mobile photo. Through comparison, we show our eigen weights features perform better than the eigen features extracted from several other conventional sets of statistical forensics features in detecting the presence of tampering. Experimentally, our method shows a good confidence in tampering detection especially when one of the four cropped blocks is from a different camera model or brand with different demosaicing process.

  14. Age and inconsistency in driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, David; Young, Mark S; Blane, Alison; Khugputh, Priya

    2012-11-01

    Research in cognitive neuropsychology suggests that investigation of the within-person variability, or inconsistency, of cognitive performance may provide valuable insights into ageing mental processes. It is rare though, for this interest in intraindividual variability to extend to everyday activities. As this may provide important information about driving behaviour, we therefore assessed age differences in driving inconsistency in younger (n=24, M age=21.29 years) and older (n=21, M age=71.24 years) persons who drove in residential, urban and motorway conditions in a fully immersive driving simulator. In measures of headway (maintaining a safe distance to a preceding vehicle) and lateral lane position, older drivers exhibited significantly greater performance inconsistency, and this was particularly marked in the faster motorway condition. Older drivers also recorded greater perceived mental demands associated with driving, and greater within-person variability across a range of cognitive measures. The findings suggest that age-related deficits in attentional and executive control may affect the consistency of driving performance in older persons. Discussion considers interventions to introduce in-vehicle systems to help maintain attention in older drivers, and to intervene when safety-critical boundaries are exceeded. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enova results and activities report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    Enova's primary task is to utilise the Norwegian Energy Fund to contribute to environmentally friendly restructuring of energy consumption and generation. Enova's management of the Energy Fund is governed by an agreement between the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and Enova. Restructuring national energy consumption is a comprehensive task, which includes identifying barriers and fine-tuning policy instruments to achieve changes in the market. In 2007, Enova achieved contractual commitments for an energy result of about 2.4 TWh, while 10.1 TWh was contracted in the period 2001-2007. A 28 million euro wind power project received support in 2007, and counting this project, Enova has granted subsidies totalling 100 million euros for 11 different windmill parks located around Norway. A significant commitment was made in the heating area in 2007. An energy result of 751 GWh in renewable heating energy was contracted, distributed among 69 projects with total funding amounting to 40 million euros. Bio fuel processing projects received 0.6 million euros, divided among four projects totalling 163 GWh. From 2008, three new heating programs will replace the existing heating program, and the solid bio fuel production program will be discontinued. In 2007, Enova received 30 applications for the new technology program, of which 21 were connected to the joint effort with the Research Council of Norway and Innovation Norway. A total of ten projects have received pledges of support from Enova in 2007, totalling 10 million euros. The program for energy consumption in buildings achieved a contractual energy result of 365 GWh in 2007. An evaluation was carried out in 2007 that will be used as a basis for tailoring the program activities to the market. The work aimed at energy efficiency and conversion to renewable energy carriers in industry has contributed a total contracted energy result of 814 GWh in 2007. The main program has been confirmed and maintained in 2007. The

  16. Enova results and activities report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    Energy was high on the agenda in 2006. The higher than normal electricity prices, Norway's strong dependence on electricity, and the increased focus on climate change resulted in a lot of interest in environmentally friendly energy solutions. For Enova this meant an exciting and demanding year. At the same time it has been important to take into account the long-term perspective of the activities. Enova is supposed to be a driving force for future oriented energy solutions and to contribute to a lasting change in Norway's generation and use of energy. During the past year better knowledge about what is happening to our world has had a positive effect on Enova's efforts. This increased attention has provided Enova with the opportunity to demonstrate that energy efficiency and renewable energy are the keys to a sustainable energy future. Moreover, the general focus on energy has enabled Enova to more effectively provide business and industry, households and the public authorities with good energy advice. refs., figs., tabs., ills

  17. Enova results and activities report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    Enova's primary task is to utilise the Norwegian Energy Fund to contribute to environmentally friendly restructuring of energy consumption and generation. Enova's management of the Energy Fund is governed by an agreement between the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy and Enova. Restructuring national energy consumption is a comprehensive task, which includes identifying barriers and fine-tuning policy instruments to achieve changes in the market. In 2007, Enova achieved contractual commitments for an energy result of about 2.4 TWh, while 10.1 TWh was contracted in the period 2001-2007. A 28 million euro wind power project received support in 2007, and counting this project, Enova has granted subsidies totalling 100 million euros for 11 different windmill parks located around Norway. A significant commitment was made in the heating area in 2007. An energy result of 751 GWh in renewable heating energy was contracted, distributed among 69 projects with total funding amounting to 40 million euros. Bio fuel processing projects received 0.6 million euros, divided among four projects totalling 163 GWh. From 2008, three new heating programs will replace the existing heating program, and the solid bio fuel production program will be discontinued. In 2007, Enova received 30 applications for the new technology program, of which 21 were connected to the joint effort with the Research Council of Norway and Innovation Norway. A total of ten projects have received pledges of support from Enova in 2007, totalling 10 million euros. The program for energy consumption in buildings achieved a contractual energy result of 365 GWh in 2007. An evaluation was carried out in 2007 that will be used as a basis for tailoring the program activities to the market. The work aimed at energy efficiency and conversion to renewable energy carriers in industry has contributed a total contracted energy result of 814 GWh in 2007. The main program has been confirmed and maintained in 2007. The program

  18. Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O' Brien, Kathleen

    2011-09-28

    Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APS customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a

  19. The GRIM Test : A Simple Technique Detects Numerous Anomalies in the Reporting of Results in Psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Nicholas J. L.; Heathers, James A. J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a simple mathematical technique that we call granularity-related inconsistency of means (GRIM) for verifying the summary statistics of research reports in psychology. This technique evaluates whether the reported means of integer data such as Likert-type scales are consistent with the

  20. The Time-Inconsistency of Alternative Energy Policy

    OpenAIRE

    D'ARTIGUES, Agnès; PERCEBOIS, Jacques; VIGNOLO, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Time-inconsistency can arise when a government attempts to convince private sector to use a particular alternative energy (gas, green electricity...) rather than petroleum products. By introducing taxes and feed-in prices, a government would encourage firms and households to switch to an alternative energy rather than use petroleum products. However, even if a government is in favor of increasing alternative energy consumption, it can benefit from considerable financial resources resulting fr...

  1. Experimental economics' inconsistent ban on deception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersch, Gil

    2015-08-01

    According to what I call the 'argument from public bads', if a researcher deceived subjects in the past, there is a chance that subjects will discount the information that a subsequent researcher provides, thus compromising the validity of the subsequent researcher's experiment. While this argument is taken to justify an existing informal ban on explicit deception in experimental economics, it can also apply to implicit deception, yet implicit deception is not banned and is sometimes used in experimental economics. Thus, experimental economists are being inconsistent when they appeal to the argument from public bads to justify banning explicit deception but not implicit deception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using noise inconsistencies for blind image forensics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saic, Stanislav; Mahdian, Babak

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 10 (2009), s. 1497-1503 ISSN 0262-8856 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/0470 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Image forensics * Digital forgery * Image tampering * Image segmentation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.474, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/ZOI/saic-using%20noise%20inconsistencies%20for%20blind%20image%20forensics.pdf

  3. Drug and alcohol testing results 2009 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This is the 15th annual report of the results of the Federal Transit Administrations (FTA) Drug and Alcohol Testing Program. This report summarizes the reporting requirements for calendar year 2009, the requirements of the overall drug and alcohol...

  4. Drug and alcohol testing results 2007 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This is the 13th annual report of the results of the Federal Transit Administrations (FTA) Drug and Alcohol Testing Program. This report summarizes the reporting requirements for calendar year 2007, the requirements of the overall drug and alcohol...

  5. Drug and Alcohol Testing Results 2008 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This is the 14th annual report of the results of the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) Drug and Alcohol Testing : Program. This report summarizes the reporting requirements for calendar year 2008, the requirements of the overall : drug and alcoh...

  6. Drug and alcohol testing results 2006 annual report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This is the 12th annual report of the results of the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) Drug and Alcohol Testing Program. This report summarizes the reporting requirements for calendar year 2006, the requirements of the overall drug and alcohol t...

  7. Integrative Bioethics: A Conceptually Inconsistent Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Viktor; Savić, Lovro

    2016-06-01

    This article provides a critical evaluation of the central components of Integrative Bioethics, a project aiming at a bioethical framework reconceptualization. Its proponents claim that this new system of thought has developed a better bioethical methodology than mainstream Western bioethics, a claim that we criticize here. We deal especially with the buzz words of Integrative Bioethics - pluriperspectivism, integrativity, orientational knowledge, as well as with its underlying theory of moral truth. The first part of the paper looks at what the claims of a superior methodology consist in. The second reveals pluriperspectivism and integrativity to be underdeveloped, hazy terms, but which seem to be underpinned by two theses - the incommensurability and the inclusiveness theses. These theses we critically scrutinize. We then consider strategies the project's proponents might apply to curb these theses in order to acquire minimal consistency for their framework. This part of the article also deals with the conception of moral truth that drives the theory, a position equally burdened with inconsistencies. In the last part of the article, we observe the concept of orientational knowledge, and develop two interpretations of its possible meaning. We claim that, following the first interpretation, Integrative Bioethics is completely descriptive, in which case it is informative and important, but hardly bioethics; if it is normative, following the second interpretation, it is bioethics as we already know it, but merely clad in rhetorical embellishments. We conclude that there is nothing new about this project, and that its inconsistencies are reason enough for its abandonment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Inconsistency Of Assessing Agricultural Zakat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Firdaus Abdul Rahman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The management of agricultural zakat in Malaysia is under the jurisdiction of States ReligiousCouncil. The objective of this paper is to analyze the nisab, rate and to assess the deduction ofcost before zakat is imposed. A qualitative methodology was used to analyze the data through descriptive and comparative methods. The researchers used five states as samples, namely Selangor, Penang, Perlis, Terengganu, and Sarawak. The findings showed the inconsistency indeciding the nisab for the bushel (sa` metric weight. In addition, the variability of rates was applied in all states and the deduction of cost is allowed only in the state of Perlis. It can be summarized that the occurrence of the diversity is due to inconsistency of bushel (sa’ weight in every state and there are various rates of agriculturazakat, specifically 5%, 7.5% and 10% which is set by State Islamic Religious Authority. It can be implied that fatwa issued by the State Mufti Department and Baitulmal are required to be reassessed from time to time. It is recommended that digital modern metric measurement is to be used and all costs should be deducted beforethey imposed agricultural zakat.

  9. Inconsistency of Minkowski higher-derivative theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglietti, Ugo G. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Anselmi, Damiano [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' Enrico Fermi' ' , Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    We show that Minkowski higher-derivative quantum field theories are generically inconsistent, because they generate nonlocal, non-hermitian ultraviolet divergences, which cannot be removed by means of standard renormalization procedures. By ''Minkowski theories'' we mean theories that are defined directly in Minkowski spacetime. The problems occur when the propagators have complex poles, so that the correlation functions cannot be obtained as the analytic continuations of their Euclidean versions. The usual power counting rules fail and are replaced by much weaker ones. Self-energies generate complex divergences proportional to inverse powers of D'Alembertians. Three-point functions give more involved nonlocal divergences, which couple to infrared effects. We illustrate the violations of the locality and hermiticity of counterterms in scalar models and higher-derivative gravity. (orig.)

  10. Content-Related Repairing of Inconsistencies in Distributed Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Feng Du; De-Rong Shen; Tie-Zheng Nie; Yue Kou; Ge Yu

    2016-01-01

    Conditional functional dependencies (CFDs) are a critical technique for detecting inconsistencies while they may ignore some potential inconsistencies without considering the content relationship of data. Content-related conditional functional dependencies (CCFDs) are a type of special CFDs, which combine content-related CFDs and detect potential inconsistencies by putting content-related data together. In the process of cleaning inconsistencies, detection and repairing are interactive: 1) detection catches inconsistencies, 2) repairing corrects caught inconsistencies while may bring new incon-sistencies. Besides, data are often fragmented and distributed into multiple sites. It consequently costs expensive shipment for inconsistencies cleaning. In this paper, our aim is to repair inconsistencies in distributed content-related data. We propose a framework consisting of an inconsistencies detection method and an inconsistencies repairing method, which work iteratively. The detection method marks the violated CCFDs for computing the inconsistencies which should be repaired preferentially. Based on the repairing-cost model presented in this paper, we prove that the minimum-cost repairing using CCFDs is NP-complete. Therefore, the repairing method heuristically repairs the inconsistencies with minimum cost. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of repairing, we propose distinct values and rules sequences. Distinct values make less data shipments than real data for communication. Rules sequences determine appropriate repairing sequences to avoid some incorrect repairs. Our solution is proved to be more effective than CFDs by empirical evaluation on two real-life datasets.

  11. Reliability and validity of the Parenting Scale of Inconsistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Takahiro; Murase, Satomi; Murakami, Takashi; Takai, Jiro

    2006-08-01

    The purposes of the present study were to develop a Parenting Scale of Inconsistency and to evaluate its initial reliability and validity. The 12 items assess the inconsistency among parents' moods, behaviors, and attitudes toward children. In the primary study, 517 participants completed three measures: the new Parenting Scale of Inconsistency, the Parental Bonding Instrument, and the Depression Scale of the General Health Questionnaire. The Parenting Scale of Inconsistency had good test-retest reliability of .85 and internal consistency of .88 (Cronbach coefficient alpha). Construct validity was good as Inconsistency scores were significantly correlated with the Care and Overprotection scores of the Parental Bonding Instrument and with the Depression scores. Moreover, Inconsistency scores' relation with a dimension of parenting style distinct from Care and Overprotection suggested that the Parenting Scale of Inconsistency had factorial validity. This scale seems a potential measure for examining the relationships between inconsistent parenting and the mental health of children.

  12. 40 CFR 141.706 - Reporting source water monitoring results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... systems serving at least 10,000 people must report the results from the initial source water monitoring... reporting monitoring results that EPA approves. (c) Systems serving fewer than 10,000 people must report.... PWS ID. 2. Facility ID. 3. Sample collection date. 4. Analytical method number. 5. Method type. 6...

  13. Effects of Inconsistent Behaviors on Person Impressions: A Multidimensional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Roos

    1995-01-01

    Examined effects of unexpected behavioral information on person impressions. Inconsistency was manipulated with respect to Implicit Personality Theory. Found that behaviors with inconsistent evaluation implications did not affect impressions and that effects of inconsistent information depended on dimension of contrast, valence of initial…

  14. 19 CFR 177.13 - Inconsistent customs decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... inconsistent with decisions being made by Customs officials at another location may be brought to the attention...) Inconsistent decisions subject to petition. The decisions which may be the subject of a petition include: (i... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inconsistent customs decisions. 177.13 Section 177...

  15. Environmental catastrophes under time-inconsistent preference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michielsen, T.

    2013-02-15

    I analyze optimal natural resource use in an intergenerational model with the risk of a catastrophe. Each generation maximizes a weighted sum of discounted utility (positive) and the probability that a catastrophe will occur at any point in the future (negative). The model generates time inconsistency as generations disagree on the relative weights on utility and catastrophe prevention. As a consequence, future generations emit too much from the current generation's perspective and a dynamic game ensues. I consider a sequence of models. When the environmental problem is related to a scarce exhaustible resource, early generations have an incentive to reduce emissions in Markov equilibrium in order to enhance the ecosystem's resilience to future emissions. When the pollutant is expected to become obsolete in the near future, early generations may however increase their emissions if this reduces future emissions. When polluting inputs are abundant and expected to remain essential, the catastrophe becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy and the degree of concern for catastrophe prevention has limited or even no effect on equilibrium behaviour.

  16. Inconsistent selection and definition of local and regional endpoints in breast cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moossdorff, M; van Roozendaal, L M; Schipper, R-J; Strobbe, L J A; Voogd, A C; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G; Smidt, M L

    2014-12-01

    Results in breast cancer research are reported using study endpoints. Most are composite endpoints (such as locoregional recurrence), consisting of several components (for example local recurrence) that are in turn composed of specific events (such as skin recurrence). Inconsistent endpoint selection and definition might lead to unjustified conclusions when comparing study outcomes. This study aimed to determine which locoregional endpoints are used in breast cancer studies, and how these endpoints and their components are defined. PubMed was searched for breast cancer studies published in nine leading journals in 2011. Articles using endpoints with a local or regional component were included and definitions were compared. Twenty-three different endpoints with a local or regional component were extracted from 44 articles. Most frequently used were disease-free survival (25 articles), recurrence-free survival (7), local control (4), locoregional recurrence-free survival (3) and event-free survival (3). Different endpoints were used for similar outcomes. Of 23 endpoints, five were not defined and 18 were defined only partially. Of these, 16 contained a local and 13 a regional component. Included events were not specified in 33 of 57 (local) and 27 of 50 (regional) cases. Definitions of local components inconsistently included carcinoma in situ and skin and chest wall recurrences. Regional components inconsistently included specific nodal sites and skin and chest wall recurrences. Breast cancer studies use many different endpoints with a locoregional component. Definitions of endpoints and events are either not provided or vary between trials. To improve transparency, facilitate trial comparison and avoid unjustified conclusions, authors should report detailed definitions of all endpoints. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Reporting Newborn Audiologic Results to State EHDI Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Winnie; Beauchaine, Kathryn L; Grimes, Alison; O'Hollearn, Tammy; Mason, Craig; Ringwalt, Sharon

    All US states and territories have an Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) program to facilitate early hearing evaluation and intervention for infants who are deaf or hard of hearing. To ensure efficient coordination of care, the state EHDI programs rely heavily on audiologists' prompt reporting of a newborn's hearing status. Several states have regulations requiring mandatory reporting of a newborn's hearing status. This is an important public health responsibility of pediatric audiologists. Reasons for failing to report vary. The Early Hearing Detection and Intervention-Pediatric Audiology Links to Services (EHDI) facility survey was used to inform reporting compliance of audiology facilities throughout the United States. The survey was disseminated via articles, newsletters, and call-to-action notices to audiologists. Among 1024 facilities surveyed, 88 (8.6%) reported that they did not report newborn's hearing findings to their state EHDI program. Not knowing how to report to the state EHDI program was the most frequently chosen reason (60%). However, among the 936 facilities that were compliant with the reporting requirements, 51 estimated that they reported less than two-third of all hearing evaluation results (5.4%). Some facilities did not report a normal-hearing result and some failed to report because they assumed another facility would report the hearing results. Survey results indicated that audiologists were compliant reporting hearing results to the state EHDI programs. However, there is room for improvement. Regular provider outreach and training by the state EHDI program is necessary to ensure those who are not reporting will comply and to clarify reporting requirements for those who are already compliant.

  18. The (mis)reporting of statistical results in psychology journals

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, Marjan; Wicherts, Jelte M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the prevalence, nature (direction), and causes of reporting errors in psychology, we checked the consistency of reported test statistics, degrees of freedom, and p values in a random sample of high- and low-impact psychology journals. In a second study, we established the generality of reporting errors in a random sample of recent psychological articles. Our results, on the basis of 281 articles, indicate that around 18% of statistical results in the psychological literature...

  19. Search for Expectancy-Inconsistent Information Reduces Uncertainty Better: The Role of Cognitive Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strojny, Paweł; Kossowska, Małgorzata; Strojny, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Motivation and cognitive capacity are key factors in people's everyday struggle with uncertainty. However, the exact nature of their interplay in various contexts still needs to be revealed. The presented paper reports on two experimental studies which aimed to examine the joint consequences of motivational and cognitive factors for preferences regarding incomplete information expansion. In Study 1 we demonstrate the interactional effect of motivation and cognitive capacity on information preference. High need for closure resulted in a stronger relative preference for expectancy-inconsistent information among non-depleted individuals, but the opposite among cognitively depleted ones. This effect was explained by the different informative value of questions in comparison to affirmative sentences and the potential possibility of assimilation of new information if it contradicts prior knowledge. In Study 2 we further investigated the obtained effect, showing that not only questions but also other kinds of incomplete information are subject to the same dependency. Our results support the expectation that, in face of incomplete information, motivation toward closure may be fulfilled efficiently by focusing on expectancy-inconsistent pieces of data. We discuss the obtained effect in the context of previous assumptions that high need for closure results in a simple processing style, advocating a more complex approach based on the character of the provided information.

  20. Minimal solution for inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nikuie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The fuzzy matrix equations $Ailde{X}=ilde{Y}$ is called a singular fuzzy matrix equations while the coefficients matrix of its equivalent crisp matrix equations be a singular matrix. The singular fuzzy matrix equations are divided into two parts: consistent singular matrix equations and inconsistent fuzzy matrix equations. In this paper, the inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations is studied and the effect of generalized inverses in finding minimal solution of an inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations are investigated.

  1. Misleading Children: Causal Attributions of Inconsistency under Repeated Questioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four studies investigated whether inconsistency of children aged four to six on developmental tasks may reflect a misinterpretation of the experimenter's intent in communication under repeated questioning. (SKC)

  2. Inconsistency of residents' communication performance in challenging consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouda, Jan C; van de Wiel, Harry B M

    2013-12-01

    Communication performance inconsistency between consultations is usually regarded as a measurement error that jeopardizes the reliability of assessments. However, inconsistency is an important phenomenon, since it indicates that physicians' communication may be below standard in some consultations. Fifty residents performed two challenging consultations. Residents' communication competency was assessed with the CELI instrument. Residents' background in communication skills training (CST) was also established. We used multilevel analysis to explore communication performance inconsistency between the two consultations. We also established the relationships between inconsistency and average performance quality, the type of consultation, and CST background. Inconsistency accounted for 45.5% of variance in residents' communication performance. Inconsistency was dependent on the type of consultation. The effect of CST background training on performance quality was case specific. Inconsistency and average performance quality were related for those consultation combinations dissimilar in goals, structure, and required skills. CST background had no effect on inconsistency. Physician communication performance should be of high quality, but also consistent regardless of the type and complexity of the consultation. In order to improve performance quality and reduce performance inconsistency, communication education should offer ample opportunities to practice a wide variety of challenging consultations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Report on results in research and development 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This presentation of results of R and D work represents for the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre its scientific annual report for the year 1990, as required by its constitution. This report is divided according to the main areas of work of the KfK in a similar manner to the R and D planning. The indivudual reports were prepared by the participating institutes and main departments and were then grouped thematically with a note of their origin. This report shows the progress of studies on each project named in the KfK R and D program. The correlation to the R and D programme is meant to facilitate the comparison of aims with achievements and explain the complete context of what are often individual tasks carried out by several institutes. Detailed results can be found in the quoted scientific-technical publications on internal preliminary reports. (orig./HP) [de

  4. The Common Technique for Analyzing the Financial Results Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasternak Maria M.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at generalizing the theoretical approaches to the structure and elements of the technique for analysis of the Financial results report (Cumulative income report and providing suggestions for its improvement. The current methods have been analyzed, relevance of the application of a common technique for such analysis has been substantiated. A common technique for analyzing the Financial results report has been proposed, which includes definition of the objectives and tasks of analysis, subjects and objects of analysis, sources of its information. Stages of such an analysis were allocated and described. The findings of the article can be used to theoretically substantiate and to practically develop a technique for analyzing the Financial results report in the branches of Ukrainian economy.

  5. Disentangling the effects of spatial inconsistency of targets and distractors when searching in realistic scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotorno, Sara; Malcolm, George L; Tatler, Benjamin W

    2015-02-10

    Previous research has suggested that correctly placed objects facilitate eye guidance, but also that objects violating spatial associations within scenes may be prioritized for selection and subsequent inspection. We analyzed the respective eye guidance of spatial expectations and target template (precise picture or verbal label) in visual search, while taking into account any impact of object spatial inconsistency on extrafoveal or foveal processing. Moreover, we isolated search disruption due to misleading spatial expectations about the target from the influence of spatial inconsistency within the scene upon search behavior. Reliable spatial expectations and precise target template improved oculomotor efficiency across all search phases. Spatial inconsistency resulted in preferential saccadic selection when guidance by template was insufficient to ensure effective search from the outset and the misplaced object was bigger than the objects consistently placed in the same scene region. This prioritization emerged principally during early inspection of the region, but the inconsistent object also tended to be preferentially fixated overall across region viewing. These results suggest that objects are first selected covertly on the basis of their relative size and that subsequent overt selection is made considering object-context associations processed in extrafoveal vision. Once the object was fixated, inconsistency resulted in longer first fixation duration and longer total dwell time. As a whole, our findings indicate that observed impairment of oculomotor behavior when searching for an implausibly placed target is the combined product of disruption due to unreliable spatial expectations and prioritization of inconsistent objects before and during object fixation. © 2015 ARVO.

  6. Inconsistent condom use among public primary care patients with tuberculosis in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matseke, Gladys; Peltzer, Karl; Louw, Julia; Naidoo, Pamela; McHunu, Gugu; Tutshana, Bomkazi

    2012-01-01

    The high rate of HIV infections among tuberculosis (TB) patients in South Africa calls for urgent HIV reduction interventions in this subpopulation. While correct and consistent condom use is one of the effective means of HIV prevention among sexually active people, there is insufficient research on condom use among TB patients in South Africa. The aim of this paper was to determine the prevalence of inconsistent condom use among public primary care TB patients and its associated factors using a sample of 4900 TB patients from a cross-sectional survey in three health districts in South Africa. Results indicated that when asked about their consistency of condom use in the past 3 months, 63.5% of the participants reported that they did not always use condoms. In the multivariable analysis, being married (OR = 1.66; 95% CI 1.25-2.20) or cohabitating or separated, divorced, or widowed (OR = 3.67; 1.85-7.29), lower educational level (OR = 0.66; 0.46-0.94), greater poverty (OR = 1.60; 1.25-2.20), not having HIV status disclosed (OR = 0.34; 0.25-0.48), sexual partner on antiretroviral treatment (OR = 0.38; 0.23-0.60), and partner alcohol use before sex (OR = 1.56; 1.30-1.90) were significantly associated with inconsistent condom use in the past 3 months. The low proportion of consistent condom use among TB patients needs to be improved.

  7. School Counselors: Closing Achievement Gaps and Writing Results Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartline, Julie; Cobia, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Charged with closing the achievement gap for marginalized students, school counselors need to be able to identify gaps, develop interventions, evaluate effectiveness, and share results. This study examined 100 summary results reports submitted by school counselors after having received four days of training on the ASCA National Model. Findings…

  8. Do Declining Discount Rates lead to Time Inconsistent Economic Advice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Chr.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the risk of time inconsistency in economic appraisals related to the use of hyperbolic discounting (declining discount rates) instead of exponential discounting (constant discount rate). Many economists are uneasy about the prospects of potential time inconsistency. The paper...

  9. 17 CFR 250.28 - Inconsistent financial statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Accounts § 250.28 Inconsistent financial statements. Except as otherwise authorized or required by the..., financial statements which are inconsistent with the book accounts of such company or financial statements... prevent the distribution or publication of reasonable condensations or of unaudited financial statements...

  10. Using semantic distances for reasoning with inconsistent ontologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Zhisheng; van Harmelen, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Re-using and combining multiple ontologies on the Web is bound to lead to inconsistencies between the combined vocabularies. Even many of the ontologies that are in use today turn out to be inconsistent once some of their implicit knowledge is made explicit. However, robust and efficient methods to

  11. Inconsistent condom use among Ugandan university students from a gender perspective: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Devika; Östergren, Per-Olof; Ekman, Björn; Agardh, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Feminization of the HIV/AIDS epidemic has been a prominent phenomenon in sub-Saharan Africa. Inconsistent condom use among young people is one of the major risk factors in the continued propagation of the epidemic. Therefore, it is of importance to increase knowledge of gender aspects of condom use among young people. To investigate whether gender differences regarding individual and social factors determine the association between condom efficacy and inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner, among Ugandan university students. In 2010, 1954 Ugandan students participated in a cross-sectional survey, conducted at Mbarara University of Science and Technology in southwestern Uganda. A self-administered questionnaire assessed socio-demographic factors, alcohol consumption, sexual behaviors (including condom use and condom efficacy), and peer norms. The data were stratified by sex and examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 1,179 (60.3%) students reported having had their sexual debut. Of these, 231 (37.4%) males and 209 (49.2%) females reported inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner. Students with low condom efficacy had a higher risk of inconsistent condom use with a new sex partner, even after adjusting for the potential confounders. A synergistic effect was observed between being a female and low condom efficacy with inconsistent condom use. The association between inconsistent condom use and low condom efficacy was found among both males and females, but females were found to be at a higher risk of inconsistent condom use compared to their male counterparts. Therefore, gender power relations should be addressed in policies and interventions aiming at increasing condom use among young people in sub-Saharan settings. Programs could be designed with intervention strategies that focus on interactive and participatory educational activities and youth-friendly counseling of young people, which in turn may improve their interpersonal

  12. Day-to-day inconsistency in parent knowledge: links with youth health and parents' stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Melissa A; McHale, Susan M; Davis, Kelly D; Kossek, Ellen Ernst

    2015-03-01

    Considerable evidence documents the linkages between higher levels of parental knowledge about youth activities and positive youth outcomes. This study investigated how day-to-day inconsistency in parental knowledge of youth activities was linked to youth behavioral, psychological, and physical health and parents' stress. Participants were employees in the Information Technology Division of a Fortune 500 company and their children (N = 129, mean age of youth = 13.39 years, 55% female). Data were collected from parents and youth via separate workplace and in-home surveys as well as telephone diary surveys on eight consecutive evenings. We assessed day-to-day inconsistency in parental knowledge across these eight calls. Parents differed in their knowledge from day to day almost as much as their average knowledge scores differed from those of other parents. Controlling for mean levels of knowledge, youth whose parents exhibited more knowledge inconsistency reported more physical health symptoms (e.g., colds and flu). Knowledge inconsistency was also associated with more risky behavior for girls but greater psychological well-being for older adolescents. Parents who reported more stressors also had higher knowledge inconsistency. Assessing only average levels of parental knowledge does not fully capture how this parenting dimension is associated with youth health. Consistent knowledge may promote youth physical health and less risky behavior for girls. Yet knowledge inconsistency also may reflect normative increases in autonomy as it was positively associated with psychological well-being for older adolescents. Given the linkages between parental stress and knowledge inconsistency, parent interventions should include stress management components. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inconsistency in reaction time across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin R; Hultsch, David F; Strauss, Esther H; Hunter, Michael A; Tannock, Rosemary

    2005-01-01

    Inconsistency in latency across trials of 2-choice reaction time data was analyzed in 273 participants ranging in age from 6 to 81 years. A U-shaped curve defined the relationship between age and inconsistency, with increases in age associated with lower inconsistency throughout childhood and higher inconsistency throughout adulthood. Differences in inconsistency were independent of practice, fatigue, and age-related differences in mean level of performance. Evidence for general and specific variability-producing processes was found in those aged less than 21 years, whereas only a specific process, such as attentional blocks, was evident for those 21 years and older. The findings highlight the importance of considering moment-to-moment changes in performance in psychological research. 2005 APA

  14. Compensating Injury to Autonomy in English Negligence Law: Inconsistent Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren-Paz, Tsachi

    2018-04-10

    Recently in Shaw v Kovac, the Court of Appeal seemed to have rejected a standalone injury to autonomy (ITA) as actionable in negligence, in an informed consent case. In this article, I argue that Shaw can be explained away, and that English law recognizes ITA as actionable in a series of cases, some of which-Bhamra, Tracey, and Yearworth-were not hitherto understood to do so. However, the under-theorization in the cases leads to inconsistencies. Like cases (Rees/Yearworth; Chester/Tracey) are not treated alike; ITA is misunderstood to be about 'religious offence' (Bhamra) and property loss (Yearworth) and worse still, the more serious type 2 ITA (Rees) gives rise to a weaker remedy (of exceptional nature aside) than the less serious type 1 injury (Chester). A better understanding of the different manifestations of ITA will lead to results which are both more consistent and more justified on the merit.

  15. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree information of sibs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calus Mario PL

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype information are not in agreement. Methods Straightforward tests to detect Mendelian inconsistencies exist that count the number of opposing homozygous marker (e.g. SNP genotypes between parent and offspring (PAR-OFF. Here, we develop two tests to identify Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs. The first test counts SNP with opposing homozygous genotypes between sib pairs (SIBCOUNT. The second test compares pedigree and SNP-based relationships (SIBREL. All tests iteratively remove animals based on decreasing numbers of inconsistent parents and offspring or sibs. The PAR-OFF test, followed by either SIB test, was applied to a dataset comprising 2,078 genotyped cows and 211 genotyped sires. Theoretical expectations for distributions of test statistics of all three tests were calculated and compared to empirically derived values. Type I and II error rates were calculated after applying the tests to the edited data, while Mendelian inconsistencies were introduced by permuting pedigree against genotype data for various proportions of animals. Results Both SIB tests identified animal pairs for which pedigree and genomic relationships could be considered as inconsistent by visual inspection of a scatter plot of pairwise pedigree and SNP-based relationships. After removal of 235 animals with the PAR-OFF test, SIBCOUNT (SIBREL identified 18 (22 additional inconsistent animals. Seventeen animals were identified by both methods. The numbers of incorrectly deleted animals (Type I error, were equally low for both methods, while the numbers of incorrectly non-deleted animals (Type II error, were considerably higher for SIBREL compared to SIBCOUNT. Conclusions

  16. Correlates of HIV and Inconsistent Condom Use Among Female Sex Workers in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakunchykova, Olena P; Burlaka, Viktor

    2017-08-01

    While female sex workers (FSWs) carry one of the highest risks of HIV transmission, little is known about predictors of HIV and risky behavior of FSWs in Ukraine. In this study of 4806 Ukrainian FSWs, the prevalence of HIV was 5.6 %. FSWs had higher odds to be HIV infected if they had lower income, were older, injected drugs, experienced violence, and solicited clients on highways. Inconsistent condom use with clients was reported by 34.5 % of FSWs. FSWs who solicited clients at railway stations, via media, through previous clients and other FSWs, and on highways reported lower consistency of condom use. Furthermore, inconsistent condom use was related to younger age, alcohol use, having fewer clients, not being covered with HIV prevention, and experiences of violence. The present study expands on the rather limited knowledge of correlates of the HIV and inconsistent condom use among FSWs in Ukraine.

  17. On reporting results from randomized controlled trials with recurrent events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobolev Boris G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based medicine has been advanced by the use of standards for reporting the design and methodology of randomized controlled trials (RCT. Indeed, without this information it is difficult to assess the quality of evidence from an RCT. Although a variety of statistical methods are available for the analysis of recurrent events, reporting the effect of an intervention on outcomes that recur is an area that remains poorly understood in clinical research. The purpose of this paper is to outline guidelines for reporting results from RCTs where the outcome of interest is a recurrent event. Methods We used a simulation study to relate an event process and results from analyses of the gamma-Poisson, independent-increment, conditional, and marginal Cox models. We reviewed the utility of regression models for the rate of a recurrent event by articulating the associated study questions, preenting the risk sets, and interpreting the regression coefficients. Results Based on a single data set produced by simulation, we reported and contrasted results from statistical methods for evaluating treatment effect from an RCT with a recurrent outcome. We showed that each model has different study questions, assumptions, risk sets, and rate ratio interpretation, and so inferences should consider the appropriateness of the model for the RCT. Conclusion Our guidelines for reporting results from an RCT involving a recurrent event suggest that the study question and the objectives of the trial, such as assessing comparable groups and estimating effect size, should determine the statistical methods. The guidelines should allow clinical researchers to report appropriate measures from an RCT for understanding the effect of intervention on the occurrence of a recurrent event.

  18. Preferences on technical report format - Results of a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Cordle, V. M.; Glassman, M.; Vondran, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of 513 engineers and scientists employed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center and 600 engineers and scientists from three professional/technical societies solicited the opinions of report users concerning the format of NASA technical reports. The results indicate that a summary as well as an abstract should be included, that the definitions of symbols and glossary of terms should be located in the front of the report, and that the illustrative material should be integrated with the text rather than grouped at the end of the report. Citation of references by number, one-column, ragged-right-margin layout, and third-person writing style are also preferred by a majority of the respondents.

  19. Nuclear Power Safety Reporting System. Final evaluation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, F.C.; Newton, R.D.

    1986-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission of an unobtrusive, voluntary, anonymous third-party managed, nonpunitive human factors data gathering system (the Nuclear power Safety Reporting System - NPSRS) for the nuclear electric power production industry. The data to be gathered by the NPSRS are intended for use in identifying and quantifying the factors that contribute to the occurrence of significant safety incidents involving humans in nuclear power plants. The NPSRS has been designed to encourage participation in the System through guarantees of reporter anonymity provided by a third-party organization that would be responsible for NPSRS management. As additional motivation to reporters for contributing data to the NPSRS, conditional waivers of NRC disciplinary action would be provided to individuals. These conditional waivers of immunity would apply to potential violations of NRC regulations that might be disclosed through reports submitted to the System about inadvertent, noncriminal incidents in nuclear plants. This document summarizes the overall results of the study of the NPSRS concept. In it, a functional description of the NPSRS is presented together with a review and assessment of potential problem areas that might be met if the System were implemented. Conclusions and recommendations resulting from the study are also presented. A companion volume (NUREG/CR-4133, Nuclear Power Safety Reporting System: Implementation and Operational Specifications'') presented in detail the elements, requirements, forms, and procedures for implementing and operating the System. 13 refs

  20. Inconsistent Knowledge as a Natural Phenomenon : The Ranking of Reasonable Inferences as a Computational Approach to Naturally Inconsistent (Legal) Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vey Mestdagh, C.N.J. de; Hoepman, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The perspective-bound character of information and information processing gives rise to natural inconsistency. Natural inconsistency poses a problem if a common perspective is needed, for example when a shared (consistent) decision has to be made (by humans, within logics or by computers). There are

  1. KEEP Motivational Research: Strategy and Results. Technical Report #24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Ronald; Tharp, Roland G.

    This report briefly summarizes the motivation research strategy and results from the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). The rationale behind KEEP's use of on-task behavior to measure student motivation is discussed and the two strategies of motivation enhancement researched are described. These two strategies were: (1) staff training in…

  2. Report of scientific results 1976. Section nuclear chemistry and reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The report of the section Nuclear Chemistry and Reactor presents the results of R and D in the fields of neutron scattering, radiation damage in solids, reactor chemistry, trace elements research in biomedicine, geochemistry, reactor operation, radioisotope production, and gives a survey of publications and lectures. (HK) [de

  3. Scientific report of results No. 4/1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    In this report, the HMI Berlin for nuclear research describes the results of work done in the data processing and electronics section, the general scientific-technical facilities of this section, as well as cooperative work, publications and lectures together with the names of the participants. (HK) [de

  4. 7 CFR 91.24 - Reports of test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports of test results. 91.24 Section 91.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS...

  5. 7 CFR 1205.206 - Reporting results of referendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting results of referendum. 1205.206 Section 1205.206 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON...

  6. Looking Ahead: A Report on the Latest Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology & Learning, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Reports on the results of a survey of software publishers and market researchers for educators that was conducted to determine development, purchasing, and upgrading plans for educational computer technology. Highlights include operating systems, including Macintosh, DOS, and Windows; equipment needs, including memory, monitors, and special…

  7. 48 CFR 3045.508-2 - Reporting results of inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: (1) Land and rights therein; (2) Other real property; (3) Plant equipment; (4) Special test equipment... SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Management of Government Property in the Possession of Contractors 3045.508-2 Reporting results of...

  8. "Good job, you're so smart": The effects of inconsistency of praise type on young children's motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentall, Shannon R; Morris, Bradley J

    2010-10-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that generic praise ("good drawer") is related to children giving up after failure because failure implies the lack of a critical trait (e.g., drawing ability). Conversely, nongeneric praise ("good job drawing") is related to mastery motivation because it implies that success is related to effort. Yet children may receive a mixture of these praise types (i.e., inconsistent praise), the effects of which are unclear. We tested how inconsistent praise influenced two components of motivation: self-evaluation and persistence. Kindergarteners (N=135) were randomly assigned to one of five conditions in which consistency of praise type was varied. After two failure scenarios, children reported self-evaluations and persistence. Results indicated that more nongeneric praise related linearly to greater motivation, yet self-evaluation and persistence were impacted differently by inconsistent praise types. Hearing even a small amount of generic praise reduced persistence, whereas hearing a small amount of nongeneric praise preserved self-evaluation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Publication Rates and Inconsistencies of the Abstracts Presented at the National Anatomy Congresses in 2007 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlke Ali Gürses

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite significant efforts made for, most abstracts presented during a meeting do not proceed and publish as a manuscript in scientific journals. Aims: To investigate publication rates of national anatomy congresses. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: All abstracts presented at two annual meetings in 2007 and 2008 were extracted. PubMed and Google Scholar database search used for publication history. Presentation and study types, publication rates and mean publishing times were evaluated. Inconsistency rates between meeting abstract and final published article were also considered. Results: Among 342 abstracts, 195 (57% were followed by a full-text article. Publication rates for oral and poster presentations were 75% and 52.2%, respectively. The mean publication time was 23.7±23 months. Overall, 89.2% of the articles were published within 5 years. There were no inconsistencies in 50 (25.6% articles, while 145 (74.4% had inconsistencies compared to the abstracts presented at the congress. Getting adequate information for 45 (23.1% articles was not possible. There was no standard reporting format for the abstracts. Conclusion: Our study shows that, overall publication rates for abstracts presented at national anatomy meetings were higher than those presented at national meetings for clinical specialties

  10. Report on results in research and development 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This presentation of results of R and D work represents for the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre its scientific annual report for the year 1989, as required by its constitution. The report is divided according to the main areas of work of the KfK in a similar manner to the R and D planning. The individual reports were prepared by the participating institutes and main departments and were then grouped thematically with a note of their origins. The main areas of work are the Fast Breeder Project, the separation nozzle method, the Nuclear Fusion Project, the Reprocessing and Waste Treatment Project, terminal storage, environment and safety solids and matter research, nuclear and particle physics, microtechnology, handling and other research plans (for example, the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor). This report shows the progress of studies on each project named in the KfK R and D programme. The correlation to the R and D programme is meant to facilitate the comparison of aims with achievements and explain the complete context of what are often individual tasks carried out by several institutes. Detailed results can be found in the quoted scientific-technical publications on internal preliminary reports. (orig./HK) [de

  11. Final Report on SSD2 pilot results in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Hinge; Jørgensen, Kevin; Jensen, Louise Grønhøj Hørbye

    This document is the “Report on SSD2 pilot results” of the project OC/EFSA/DCM/2013/05: “Pilot project on the implementation of SSD2 in the frame of the electronic transmission of harmonised data collection of analytical results to EFSA”. The report includes a description of the software and tools...... used, a description of the challenges encountered in migrating data structure from SSD1/XML to SSD2 in the national data repositories, a summary of the experience gained in testing SSD2 and recommendations for EFSA on effectiveness and suitability of the SSD2 in the different domains. The following...

  12. Report of joint utilization results in fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Joint utilization seems to aim at the effective use of limited funds by concentrating facilities. There is a demerit that for doing experiment, it is necessary to take a trouble of going to the place. However by utilizing jointly one facility, there is the possibility of the occurrence of sympathizing phenomena directly connected to new ideas among researchers, and it is just the state joint utilization should be in. In fiscal year 1994, the Yayoi and the linac were put to joint utilization as expected, and many results of researches were obtained by the users. In this book, in addition to the report of the results of joint utilization, the report of the Yayoi research meetings held in fiscal year 1994 is included. Eight lectures on fast neutron science, the reports of joint utilization results of 15 Yayoi on-pile studies, 9 Yayoi off-pile studies and 16 linac studies, and the reports of 11 Yayoi research meetings are included in this book. The list of the events held in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in fiscal year 1994, the list of the names of various committee members, and the list of the names of the persons in charge of joint utilization experiments are attached. (K.I.)

  13. Word production inconsistency of Singaporean-English-speaking adolescents with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Betty; Brebner, Chris; McCormack, Paul; Butcher, Andy

    2015-01-01

    The nature of speech disorders in individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) remains controversial despite various explanations put forth in the literature to account for the observed speech profiles. A high level of word production inconsistency in children with DS has led researchers to query whether the inconsistency continues into adolescence, and if the inconsistency stems from inconsistent phonological disorder (IPD) or childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Of the studies that have been published, most suggest that the speech profile of individuals with DS is delayed, while a few recent studies suggest a combination of delayed and disordered patterns. However, no studies have explored the nature of word production inconsistency in this population, and the relationship between word production inconsistency, receptive vocabulary and severity of speech disorder. To investigate in a pilot study the extent of word production inconsistency in adolescents with DS and to examine the correlations between word production inconsistency, measures of receptive vocabulary, severity of speech disorder and oromotor skills in adolescents with DS. The participants were 32 native speakers of Singaporean-English adolescents, comprising 16 participants with DS and 16 typically developing (TD) participants. The participants completed a battery of standardized speech and language assessments, including The Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology (DEAP) assessment. Results from each test were correlated to determine relationships. Qualitative analyses were also carried out on all the data collected. In this study, seven out of 16 participants with DS scored above 40% on word production inconsistency, a diagnostic criterion for IPD. In addition, all participants with DS performed poorly on the oromotor assessment of DEAP. The overall speech profile observed did not exactly correspond with the cluster symptoms observed in children with IPD or CAS. Word production inconsistency is a

  14. Status report on geochemical field results from Atlantic study sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.R.S.; Thomson, J.; Hydes, D.J.; Colley, S.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarises the results of preliminary geochemical investigations at three North Atlantic study areas. The two eastern sites, on the Cape Verde abyssal plain (CV2) and east of Great Meteor Seamount (GME) were visited during 1982. The results presented are preliminary. Studies in the western Atlantic, close to the Nares Abyssal Plain study site are more detailed and are presented in a separate paper. The report shows for the first time the relative redox status of the three sites. The differences are unexpectedly large, the most reduced cores being recovered at GME and the most oxidised at CV2. The sporadic nature of Recent sediment accumulation at these sites is also emphasised. In order to place these preliminary results in context their relevance to the production of mathematical system models is discussed in a closing section. The necessity for such models to rest on sound foundations of geochemical understanding is noted. Suggestions on future research priorities are offered for discussion. (author)

  15. Evidence of inconsistency among laboratory technicians collecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unsupervised samples yielded 37.50% (15/40) of visible bands, and 62.50% (25/40) of no visible bands (Binomial test p= 0.15). The overall difference between supervised and unsupervised samples was significant (x2= 21.33, df= 1, p< 0.001). These results reveal that without some form of supervision, some laboratory ...

  16. A General Theory of Markovian Time Inconsistent Stochastic Control Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björk, Tomas; Murgochi, Agatha

    We develop a theory for stochastic control problems which, in various ways, are time inconsistent in the sense that they do not admit a Bellman optimality principle. We attach these problems by viewing them within a game theoretic framework, and we look for Nash subgame perfect equilibrium points...... examples of time inconsistency in the literature are easily seen to be special cases of the present theory. We also prove that for every time inconsistent problem, there exists an associated time consistent problem such that the optimal control and the optimal value function for the consistent problem...

  17. On inconsistency in frictional granular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alart, Pierre; Renouf, Mathieu

    2018-04-01

    Numerical simulation of granular systems is often based on a discrete element method. The nonsmooth contact dynamics approach can be used to solve a broad range of granular problems, especially involving rigid bodies. However, difficulties could be encountered and hamper successful completion of some simulations. The slow convergence of the nonsmooth solver may sometimes be attributed to an ill-conditioned system, but the convergence may also fail. The prime aim of the present study was to identify situations that hamper the consistency of the mathematical problem to solve. Some simple granular systems were investigated in detail while reviewing and applying the related theoretical results. A practical alternative is briefly analyzed and tested.

  18. Discrepancias entre los datos ofrecidos por la Secretaría de Salud y la Organización Mundial de la Salud sobre tuberculosis en México, 1981-1998 Inconsistencies between reports from the World Health Organization and the Ministry of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Báez-Saldaña

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Describir las tendencias de la morbilidad y mortalidad de la tuberculosis en México, entre 1981 y 1998, comparando datos de la Secretaría de Salud y de la Organización Mundial de la Salud. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizó el número de casos y tasas notificados y la tendencia de la enfermedad en los últimos años. Se calculó la incidencia de casos nuevos de tuberculosis bacilíferos mediante el riesgo anual de infección tuberculosa, con lo que se estimó el porcentaje de detección de casos bacilíferos en 1997-1998. RESULTADOS: El número de casos de tuberculosis emitido por la Organización Mundial de la Salud supera al notificado por la Secretaría de Salud, discrepancia que se ha reducido. Los casos bacilíferos se han mantenido entre 1993-1998 y se estimó una detección de 66 y de 26% en 1997 y 1998, respectivamente (para un Riesgo Anual de Infección Tuberculosa de 0.5%. La mortalidad se redujo 6.7% cada año entre 1990 y 1998 mientras que se observó un aumento de casos nuevos, lo que implica la persistencia de la transmisión de la infección entre la población. CONCLUSIONES: Hay discrepancia entre el número de casos de tuberculosis ofrecido por la Secretaría de Salud y la Organización Mundial de la Salud. De acuerdo con las estimaciones por el Riesgo Anual de Infección Tuberculosa se deja de detectar un número considerable de casos bacilíferos.OBJECTIVE: To describe the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality trends in Mexico, by comparing the data reported by the Ministry of Health (MH and the World Health Organization (WHO between 1981 and 1998. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The number of cases notified in the past few years, their rates, and the trends of the disease in Mexico were analyzed. The incidence of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was estimated for 1997 and 1998 with the annual tuberculosis infection risk (ATIR, to estimate the percentage of bacilliferous cases in 1997-1998. RESULTS: WHO reported more

  19. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  20. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  1. Foothill Transit Battery Electric Bus Demonstration Results: Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-06-28

    This report summarizes results of a battery electric bus (BEB) evaluation at Foothill Transit, located in the San Gabriel and Pomona Valley region of Los Angeles County, California. Foothill Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate its fleet of Proterra BEBs in revenue service. The focus of this evaluation is to compare performance of the BEBs to that of conventional technology and to track progress over time toward meeting performance targets. This project has also provided an opportunity for DOE to conduct a detailed evaluation of the BEBs and charging infrastructure. This is the second report summarizing the results of the BEB demonstration at Foothill Transit and it provides data on the buses from August 2015 through December 2016. Data are provided on a selection of compressed natural gas buses as a baseline comparison.

  2. Trauma and dissociation in treatment-seeking alcoholics: Towards a resolution of inconsistent findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeland, Willie; Draijer, Nel; van den Brink, Wim

    2002-01-01

    There is consistent empirical evidence for a trauma-dissociation relation in general population samples and in psychiatric patients. However, contradictory findings have been reported on this relation among substance abusers. The present study attempts to resolve these inconsistencies by testing a

  3. Inconsistent Discipline as a Mediator between Maternal Distress and Aggression in Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Tammy D.; Dunlap, Sarah T.; Lochman, John E.; Wells, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examines inconsistent discipline as a mediator in the association between maternal distress and child aggression and attention problems. Participants were 215 boys, ranging in age from 9 to 12 years, and their mothers. Mothers provided self-report data on socioeconomic status (SES), parenting stress, maternal distress (depression…

  4. Is the special theory of relativity logically inconsistent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, W.

    1980-01-01

    The author's aim is to illustrate that the controversial subject of the logical inconsistency of STR is capable of two interpretations. If one retains a fidelity to the Einstein operational assumptions and methods then one may conclude that logical inconsistencies cannot be derived. If however, one wishes to base a theory upon a single world view with a single set of consistent assumptions, then STR is logically inconsistent. This inconsistency is at the present time not operationally evident. The usefulness of this second view is in its heuristic and future usefulness in the elucidation of natural phenomena. It is hoped that this discussion may somewhat reduce the contention and emotion in this field. (Auth.)

  5. Inconsistency of residents' communication performance in challenging consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, Jan C.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Communication performance inaonsistency between consultations is usually regarded as a measurement error that jeopardizes the reliability of assessments. However, inconsistency is an important phenomenon, since it indicates that physicians' communication may be below standard in some

  6. Counterfactual Reasoning: resolving inconsistency before your eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Revlin

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Belief revision has invariably been studied with abstract relationships using paper-and-pencil tasks. The present study asks whether people employ the same procedures in revising their beliefs when they concern concrete situations rather than arbitrary, abstract ones. Students listened to a narrative and then verified that selected statements from it were true and consistent. They then needed to revise their beliefs as a result of confronting a belief-contravening assumption that they had to accept as true even though it was false of the narrative. There are two main findings. First, when the artificial beliefs were part of an integrated, narrative structure, participants treated them as they do natural semantic categories and not as arbitrary relations. Second, when reasoning about concrete situations in front of them, reasoners readily changed the properties of the objects in order to retain the belief structure of the narrative. This suggests that college students act as if they were Platonists who view the observable world as fallible reflections of the idealized world.

  7. Governance implications of nanomaterials companies' inconsistent risk perceptions and safety practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeman, Cassandra D.; Baumgartner, Lynn; Carr, Benjamin M.; Fish, Allison M.; Meyerhofer, John D.; Satterfield, Terre A.; Holden, Patricia A.; Harthorn, Barbara Herr

    2012-03-01

    Current research on the nanotechnology industry indicates its downstream expansion at a rapid pace, while toxicological research and best practices for environmental health and safety are still being developed. Companies that use and/or produce engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have enormous potential to influence safe-handling practices for ENMs across the product life cycle. Knowledge of both industry practices and leaders' perceptions of risk is vital for understanding how companies will act to control potential environmental and health risks. This article reports results from a new international survey of nanomaterials companies in 14 countries. In this survey, company participants reported relatively high levels of uncertainty and/or perceived risk with regard to ENMs. However, these perspectives were not accompanied by expected risk-avoidant practices or preferences for regulatory oversight. A majority of companies indicated "lack of information" as a significant impediment to implementing nano-specific safety practices, but they also reported practices that were inconsistent with widely available guidance. Additionally, in the absence of safe-handling regulations, companies reported nano-specific health and safety programs that were narrow in scope. Taken together, these findings indicate that health and safety guidance is not reaching industry. While industry leaders' reluctance toward regulation might be expected, their own reported unsafe practices and recognition of possible risks suggest a more top-down approach from regulators is needed to protect workers and the environment.

  8. Governance implications of nanomaterials companies' inconsistent risk perceptions and safety practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engeman, Cassandra D. [University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Sociology (United States); Baumgartner, Lynn; Carr, Benjamin M.; Fish, Allison M.; Meyerhofer, John D. [UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Satterfield, Terre A. [University of California, Santa Barbara, NSF Center for Nanotechnology and Society (United States); Holden, Patricia A. [UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Harthorn, Barbara Herr, E-mail: harthorn@cns.ucsb.edu [University of California, Santa Barbara, NSF Center for Nanotechnology and Society (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Current research on the nanotechnology industry indicates its downstream expansion at a rapid pace, while toxicological research and best practices for environmental health and safety are still being developed. Companies that use and/or produce engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have enormous potential to influence safe-handling practices for ENMs across the product life cycle. Knowledge of both industry practices and leaders' perceptions of risk is vital for understanding how companies will act to control potential environmental and health risks. This article reports results from a new international survey of nanomaterials companies in 14 countries. In this survey, company participants reported relatively high levels of uncertainty and/or perceived risk with regard to ENMs. However, these perspectives were not accompanied by expected risk-avoidant practices or preferences for regulatory oversight. A majority of companies indicated 'lack of information' as a significant impediment to implementing nano-specific safety practices, but they also reported practices that were inconsistent with widely available guidance. Additionally, in the absence of safe-handling regulations, companies reported nano-specific health and safety programs that were narrow in scope. Taken together, these findings indicate that health and safety guidance is not reaching industry. While industry leaders' reluctance toward regulation might be expected, their own reported unsafe practices and recognition of possible risks suggest a more top-down approach from regulators is needed to protect workers and the environment.

  9. Governance implications of nanomaterials companies’ inconsistent risk perceptions and safety practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engeman, Cassandra D.; Baumgartner, Lynn; Carr, Benjamin M.; Fish, Allison M.; Meyerhofer, John D.; Satterfield, Terre A.; Holden, Patricia A.; Harthorn, Barbara Herr

    2012-01-01

    Current research on the nanotechnology industry indicates its downstream expansion at a rapid pace, while toxicological research and best practices for environmental health and safety are still being developed. Companies that use and/or produce engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have enormous potential to influence safe-handling practices for ENMs across the product life cycle. Knowledge of both industry practices and leaders’ perceptions of risk is vital for understanding how companies will act to control potential environmental and health risks. This article reports results from a new international survey of nanomaterials companies in 14 countries. In this survey, company participants reported relatively high levels of uncertainty and/or perceived risk with regard to ENMs. However, these perspectives were not accompanied by expected risk-avoidant practices or preferences for regulatory oversight. A majority of companies indicated “lack of information” as a significant impediment to implementing nano-specific safety practices, but they also reported practices that were inconsistent with widely available guidance. Additionally, in the absence of safe-handling regulations, companies reported nano-specific health and safety programs that were narrow in scope. Taken together, these findings indicate that health and safety guidance is not reaching industry. While industry leaders’ reluctance toward regulation might be expected, their own reported unsafe practices and recognition of possible risks suggest a more top-down approach from regulators is needed to protect workers and the environment.

  10. Some deficiencies in analyzing leachates and reporting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sill, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    Determination of the leachability of elements from various radioactive waste forms for long-term retention requires chemical analysis of both the leachate and waste form. Neither the precision of the leaching procedure nor the accuracy of the results can be determined unambiguously if gross uncertainties exist. It should be demonstrated beforehand that all participating laboratories can obtain the same analytical result within some stated uncertainty. Special precautions must be taken to ensure that all material leached from the waste form is recovered from the leaching container and that all refractory particles are dissolved completely before analysis is begun. The actual results obtained should be reported, including negative signs if present, avoiding all subjective and quantitatively nondescriptive statements such as nil, none, not detected, etc. Each result must be accompanied by an estimate of its uncertainty. Problems involved in interlaboratory comparisons are discussed

  11. Language model: Extension to solve inconsistency, incompleteness, and short query in cultural heritage collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kian Lam; Lim, Chen Kim

    2017-10-01

    With the explosive growth of online information such as email messages, news articles, and scientific literature, many institutions and museums are converting their cultural collections from physical data to digital format. However, this conversion resulted in the issues of inconsistency and incompleteness. Besides, the usage of inaccurate keywords also resulted in short query problem. Most of the time, the inconsistency and incompleteness are caused by the aggregation fault in annotating a document itself while the short query problem is caused by naive user who has prior knowledge and experience in cultural heritage domain. In this paper, we presented an approach to solve the problem of inconsistency, incompleteness and short query by incorporating the Term Similarity Matrix into the Language Model. Our approach is tested on the Cultural Heritage in CLEF (CHiC) collection which consists of short queries and documents. The results show that the proposed approach is effective and has improved the accuracy in retrieval time.

  12. [Gene method for inconsistent hydrological frequency calculation. 2: Diagnosis system of hydrological genes and method of hydrological moment genes with inconsistent characters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ping; Zhao, Jiang Yan; Wu, Zi Yi; Sang, Yan Fang; Chen, Jie; Li, Bin Bin; Gu, Hai Ting

    2018-04-01

    The analysis of inconsistent hydrological series is one of the major problems that should be solved for engineering hydrological calculation in changing environment. In this study, the diffe-rences of non-consistency and non-stationarity were analyzed from the perspective of composition of hydrological series. The inconsistent hydrological phenomena were generalized into hydrological processes with inheritance, variability and evolution characteristics or regulations. Furthermore, the hydrological genes were identified following the theory of biological genes, while their inheritance bases and variability bases were determined based on composition of hydrological series under diffe-rent time scales. To identify and test the components of hydrological genes, we constructed a diagnosis system of hydrological genes. With the P-3 distribution as an example, we described the process of construction and expression of the moment genes to illustrate the inheritance, variability and evolution principles of hydrological genes. With the annual minimum 1-month runoff series of Yunjinghong station in Lancangjiang River basin as an example, we verified the feasibility and practicability of hydrological gene theory for the calculation of inconsistent hydrological frequency. The results showed that the method could be used to reveal the evolution of inconsistent hydrological series. Therefore, it provided a new research pathway for engineering hydrological calculation in changing environment and an essential reference for the assessment of water security.

  13. Estimating nonrigid motion from inconsistent intensity with robust shape features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wenyang; Ruan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a nonrigid motion estimation method that is robust to heterogeneous intensity inconsistencies amongst the image pairs or image sequence. Methods: Intensity and contrast variations, as in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, present a considerable challenge to registration methods based on general discrepancy metrics. In this study, the authors propose and validate a novel method that is robust to such variations by utilizing shape features. The geometry of interest (GOI) is represented with a flexible zero level set, segmented via well-behaved regularized optimization. The optimization energy drives the zero level set to high image gradient regions, and regularizes it with area and curvature priors. The resulting shape exhibits high consistency even in the presence of intensity or contrast variations. Subsequently, a multiscale nonrigid registration is performed to seek a regular deformation field that minimizes shape discrepancy in the vicinity of GOIs. Results: To establish the working principle, realistic 2D and 3D images were subject to simulated nonrigid motion and synthetic intensity variations, so as to enable quantitative evaluation of registration performance. The proposed method was benchmarked against three alternative registration approaches, specifically, optical flow, B-spline based mutual information, and multimodality demons. When intensity consistency was satisfied, all methods had comparable registration accuracy for the GOIs. When intensities among registration pairs were inconsistent, however, the proposed method yielded pronounced improvement in registration accuracy, with an approximate fivefold reduction in mean absolute error (MAE = 2.25 mm, SD = 0.98 mm), compared to optical flow (MAE = 9.23 mm, SD = 5.36 mm), B-spline based mutual information (MAE = 9.57 mm, SD = 8.74 mm) and mutimodality demons (MAE = 10.07 mm, SD = 4.03 mm). Applying the proposed method on a real MR image sequence also provided

  14. Profiles of inconsistent knowledge in children's pathways of conceptual change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael; Hardy, Ilonca

    2013-09-01

    Conceptual change requires learners to restructure parts of their conceptual knowledge base. Prior research has identified the fragmentation and the integration of knowledge as 2 important component processes of knowledge restructuring but remains unclear as to their relative importance and the time of their occurrence during development. Previous studies mostly were based on the categorization of answers in interview studies and led to mixed empirical results, suggesting that methodological improvements might be helpful. We assessed 161 third-graders' knowledge about floating and sinking of objects in liquids at 3 measurement points by means of multiple-choice tests. The tests assessed how strongly the children agreed with commonly found but mutually incompatible statements about floating and sinking. A latent profile transition analysis of the test scores revealed 5 profiles, some of which indicated the coexistence of inconsistent pieces of knowledge in learners. The majority of students (63%) were on 1 of 7 developmental pathways between these profiles. Thus, a child's knowledge profile at a point in time can be used to predict further development. The degree of knowledge integration decreased on some individual developmental paths, increased on others, and remained stable on still others. The study demonstrates the usefulness of explicit quantitative models of conceptual change. The results support a constructivist perspective on conceptual development, in which developmental changes of a learner's knowledge base result from idiosyncratic, yet systematic knowledge-construction processes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Misleading reporting and interpretation of results in major infertility journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glujovsky, Demian; Sueldo, Carlos E; Borghi, Carolina; Nicotra, Pamela; Andreucci, Sara; Ciapponi, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the proportion of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in top infertility journals indexed on PubMed that reported their results with proper effect estimates and their precision estimation, while correctly interpreting both measures. Cross-sectional study evaluating all the RCTs published in top infertility journals during 2014. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. Proportion of RCTs that reported both relative and absolute effect size measures and its precision. Among the 32 RCTs published in 2014 in the top infertility journals reviewed, 37.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.1-56.3) did not mention in their abstracts whether the difference among the study arms was statistically or clinically significant, and only 6.3% (95% CI, 0.8-20.8) used a CI of the absolute difference. Similarly, in the results section, these elements were observed in 28.2% (95% CI, 13.7-46.7) and 15.6% (95% CI, 5.3-32.8), respectively. Only one study clearly expressed the minimal clinically important difference in their methods section, but we found related proxies in 53% (95% CI, 34.7-70.9). None of the studies used CIs to draw conclusions about the clinical or statistical significance. We found 13 studies where the interpretation of the findings could be misleading. Recommended reporting items are underused in top infertility journals, which could lead to misleading interpretations. Authors, reviewers, and editorial boards should emphasize their use to improve reporting quality. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergency medicine summary code for reporting CT scan results: implementation and survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Joanne; Coughlin, Ryan; Buhl, Luce; Herbst, Meghan; Herbst, Timothy; Martillotti, Jared; Coughlin, Bret

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the emergency department (ED) providers' interest and satisfaction with ED CT result reporting before and after the implementation of a standardized summary code for all CT scan reporting. A summary code was provided at the end of all CTs ordered through the ED from August to October of 2016. A retrospective review was completed on all studies performed during this period. A pre- and post-survey was given to both ED and radiology providers. A total of 3980 CT scans excluding CTAs were ordered with 2240 CTs dedicated to the head and neck, 1685 CTs dedicated to the torso, and 55 CTs dedicated to the extremities. Approximately 74% CT scans were contrast enhanced. Of the 3980 ED CT examination ordered, 69% had a summary code assigned to it. Fifteen percent of the coded CTs had a critical or diagnostic positive result. The introduction of an ED CT summary code did not show a definitive improvement in communication. However, the ED providers are in consensus that radiology reports are crucial their patients' management. There is slightly increased satisfaction with the providers with less than 5 years of experience with the ED CT codes compared to more seasoned providers. The implementation of a user-friendly summary code may allow better analysis of results, practice improvement, and quality measurements in the future.

  17. Are studies reporting significant results more likely to be published?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi, Despina; Karagianni, Anthi; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Eliades, Theodore

    2009-11-01

    Our objective was to assess the hypothesis that there are variations of the proportion of articles reporting a significant effect, with a higher percentage of those articles published in journals with impact factors. The contents of 5 orthodontic journals (American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Angle Orthodontist, European Journal of Orthodontics, Journal of Orthodontics, and Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research), published between 2004 and 2008, were hand-searched. Articles with statistical analysis of data were included in the study and classified into 4 categories: behavior and psychology, biomaterials and biomechanics, diagnostic procedures and treatment, and craniofacial growth, morphology, and genetics. In total, 2622 articles were examined, with 1785 included in the analysis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied with statistical significance as the dependent variable, and whether the journal had an impact factor, the subject, and the year were the independent predictors. A higher percentage of articles showed significant results relative to those without significant associations (on average, 88% vs 12%) for those journals. Overall, these journals published significantly more studies with significant results, ranging from 75% to 90% (P = 0.02). Multivariate modeling showed that journals with impact factors had a 100% increased probability of publishing a statistically significant result compared with journals with no impact factor (odds ratio [OR], 1.99; 95% CI, 1.19-3.31). Compared with articles on biomaterials and biomechanics, all other subject categories showed lower probabilities of significant results. Nonsignificant findings in behavior and psychology and diagnosis and treatment were 1.8 (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.51-2.67) and 3.5 (OR, 3.50; 95% CI, 2.27-5.37) times more likely to be published, respectively. Journals seem to prefer reporting significant results; this might be because of authors

  18. Neuroimaging studies of word and pseudoword reading: consistencies, inconsistencies, and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechelli, Andrea; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Price, Cathy J

    2003-02-15

    Several functional neuroimaging studies have compared words and pseudowords to test different cognitive models of reading. There are difficulties with this approach, however, because cognitive models do not make clear-cut predictions at the neural level. Therefore, results can only be interpreted on the basis of prior knowledge of cognitive anatomy. Furthermore, studies comparing words and pseudowords have produced inconsistent results. The inconsistencies could reflect false-positive results due to the low statistical thresholds applied or confounds from nonlexical aspects of the stimuli. Alternatively, they may reflect true effects that are inconsistent across subjects; dependent on experimental parameters such as stimulus rate or duration; or not replicated across studies because of insufficient statistical power. In this fMRI study, we investigate consistent and inconsistent differences between word and pseudoword reading in 20 subjects, and distinguish between effects associated with increases and decreases in activity relative to fixation. In addition, the interaction of word type with stimulus duration is explored. We find that words and pseudowords activate the same set of regions relative to fixation, and within this system, there is greater activation for pseudowords than words in the left frontal operculum, left posterior inferior temporal gyrus, and the right cerebellum. The only effects of words relative to pseudowords consistent over subjects are due to decreases in activity for pseudowords relative to fixation; and there are no significant interactions between word type and stimulus duration. Finally, we observe inconsistent but highly significant effects of word type at the individual subject level. These results (i) illustrate that pseudowords place increased demands on areas that have previously been linked to lexical retrieval, and (ii) highlight the importance of including one or more baselines to qualify word type effects. Furthermore, (iii

  19. Summary of the most significant results reported in this session

    CERN Document Server

    Sens, J C

    1980-01-01

    D1e most interesting although speculative result is the observation of a 4 standard deviation effect at 5. 3 GeV in the l)JK 0TI - and lj!K- 'ff+ mass plots (SPS Exp. WJ\\11) with a crosssection of 180 nb (assuming 1 % branching ratio). This is a cancliclatc bare b-state. + Tiw next most significant experimental result is the observation of Ac at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). TI1is state was discovered at BNL by Samios et al. and has since been seen in several neutrino experiments. It was seen at the ISR by Lockman ct al. about a year ago (reported at Budapest) but not in a convincing way. The analysis has now been improved, and the result shows a peak which is most clearly present in the stnnmed A(31T)+ and K-p1T+ mass spectra. 'TI1e signal has furthennore been seen in Exp. R606 (reported - + by F. Muller in this parallel session) in both A3TI and pK TI . 111e most convincing signal comes from the Spli t-Ficlcl Magnet (SFM) in K-pn + 'TI1e three observations together, all at the ISR, make this an...

  20. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks

  1. Neurocognitive markers of cognitive impairment: exploring the roles of speed and inconsistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Roger A; Garrett, Douglas D; Lentz, Tanya L; MacDonald, Stuart W S; Strauss, Esther; Hultsch, David F

    2007-05-01

    A well-known challenge for research in the cognitive neuropsychology of aging is to distinguish between the deficits and changes associated with normal aging and those indicative of early cognitive impairment. In a series of 2 studies, the authors explored whether 2 neurocognitive markers, speed (mean level) and inconsistency (intraindividual variability), distinguished between age groups (64-73 and 74-90+ years) and cognitive status groups (nonimpaired, mildly impaired, and moderately impaired). Study 1 (n = 416) showed that both level and inconsistency distinguished between the age and 2 cognitive status (not impaired, mildly impaired) groups, with a modest tendency for inconsistency to predict group membership over and above mean level. Study 2 (n = 304) replicated these results but extended them because of the qualifying effects associated with the unique moderately impaired oldest group. Specifically, not only were the groups more firmly distinguished by both indicators of speed, but evidence for the differential contribution of performance inconsistency was stronger. Neurocognitive markers of speed and inconsistency may be leading indicators of emerging cognitive impairment. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  2. Global cue inconsistency diminishes learning of cue validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel two-stage probabilistic learning task that examines the participants’ ability to learn and utilize valid cues across several levels of probabilistic feedback. In the first stage, participants sample from one of three cues that gives predictive information about the outcome of the second stage. Participants are rewarded for correct prediction of the outcome in stage two. Only one of the three cues gives valid predictive information and thus participants can maximise their reward by learning to sample from the valid cue. The validity of this predictive information, however, is reinforced across several levels of probabilistic feedback. A second manipulation involved changing the consistency of the predictive information in stage one and the outcome in stage two. The results show that participants, with higher probabilistic feedback, learned to utilise the valid cue. In inconsistent task conditions, however, participants were significantly less successful in utilising higher validity cues. We interpret this result as implying that learning in probabilistic categorization is based on developing a representation of the task that allows for goal-directed action.

  3. Inconsistencies among secondary sources of Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar introductions to the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Moulton

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The propagule pressure hypothesis asserts that the number of individuals released is the key determinant of whether an introduction will succeed or not. It remains to be shown whether propagule pressure is more important than either species-level or site-level factors in determining the fate of an introduction. Studies claiming to show that propagule pressure is the primary determinant of introduction success must assume that the historical record as reported by secondary sources is complete and accurate. Here, examine a widely introduced game bird, the Chukar (Alectoris chukar, to the USA. We compare the records reported by two secondary sources (Long, 1981; Lever, 1987 to those in a primary source (Christensen, 1970 and to a recent study by Sol et al. (2012. Numerous inconsistencies exist in the records reported by Sol et al. (2012, Long (1981 and Lever (1987 when compared to the primary record of Christensen (1970. As reported by Christensen (1970, very large numbers of Chukars were released unsuccessfully in some states. Our results strongly imply that factors other than sheer numbers are more important. Site-to-site differences are the most likely explanation for the variation in success.

  4. Principal scientific and technical results. Scientific report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On January, 1, 1994, the French Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres has developed a new organization to carry out its scientific research in applied geosciences. With the exception of cartography and geologic synthesis which are dependent on the Direction of the National Geologic Service, a research management has been created with 90 engineers-searchers and 20 technicians for the execution of the research program. This report comprises two parts. The first part is a summary of the objectives and principal results for each research project of 1994, and the second part is a more detailed presentation of the main results for about a third of the projects. (J.S.). 568 refs., 54 figs., 2 tabs., 3 photos

  5. Computer and compiler effects on code results: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of the international effort on the assessment of computer codes, which are designed to describe the overall reactor coolant system (RCS) thermalhydraulic response, core damage progression, and fission product release and transport during severe accidents, there has been a continuous debate as to whether the code results are influenced by different code users or by different computers or compilers. The first aspect, the 'Code User Effect', has been investigated already. In this paper the other aspects will be discussed and proposals are given how to make large system codes insensitive to different computers and compilers. Hardware errors and memory problems are not considered in this report. The codes investigated herein are integrated code systems (e. g. ESTER, MELCOR) and thermalhydraulic system codes with extensions for severe accident simulation (e. g. SCDAP/RELAP, ICARE/CATHARE, ATHLET-CD), and codes to simulate fission product transport (e. g. TRAPMELT, SOPHAEROS). Since all of these codes are programmed in Fortran 77, the discussion herein is based on this programming language although some remarks are made about Fortran 90. Some observations about different code results by using different computers are reported and possible reasons for this unexpected behaviour are listed. Then methods are discussed how to avoid portability problems

  6. Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Detailed Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-09-01

    independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these

  7. Valence instabilities as a source of actinide system inconsistencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandenaw, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    Light actinide elements alone, and in some of their alloys, may exist as a static or dynamic mixture of two configurations. Such a state can explain both a resistivity maximum and lack of magnetic order observed in so many actinide materials, and still be compatible with the existence of f-electrons in narrow bands. Impurity elements may stabilize slightly different intermediate valence states in U, Np, and Pu, thus contributing to inconsistencies in published results. The physical property behavior of mixed-valence, rare-earth compounds is very much like that observed in development of antiphase (martensitic) structures. Martensitic transformations in U, Np, and Pu, from high-temperature b. c. c. to alpha phase, may be a way of ordering an alloy-like metal of mixed or intermediate valence. The relative stability of each phase structure may depend upon its electron-valence ratio. A Hubbard model for electron correlations in a narrow energy band has been invoked in most recent theories for explaining light actinide behavior. Such a model may also be applicable to crystal symmetry changes in martensitic transformations in actinides

  8. Inconsistent Condom Use among Public Primary Care Patients with Tuberculosis in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Matseke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high rate of HIV infections among tuberculosis (TB patients in South Africa calls for urgent HIV reduction interventions in this subpopulation. While correct and consistent condom use is one of the effective means of HIV prevention among sexually active people, there is insufficient research on condom use among TB patients in South Africa. The aim of this paper was to determine the prevalence of inconsistent condom use among public primary care TB patients and its associated factors using a sample of 4900 TB patients from a cross-sectional survey in three health districts in South Africa. Results indicated that when asked about their consistency of condom use in the past 3 months, 63.5% of the participants reported that they did not always use condoms. In the multivariable analysis, being married (OR=1.66; 95% CI 1.25–2.20 or cohabitating or separated, divorced, or widowed (OR=3.67; 1.85–7.29, lower educational level (OR=0.66; 0.46–0.94, greater poverty (OR=1.60; 1.25–2.20, not having HIV status disclosed (OR=0.34; 0.25–0.48, sexual partner on antiretroviral treatment (OR=0.38; 0.23–0.60, and partner alcohol use before sex (OR=1.56; 1.30–1.90 were significantly associated with inconsistent condom use in the past 3 months. The low proportion of consistent condom use among TB patients needs to be improved.

  9. Inconsistency effects in source memory and compensatory schema-consistent guessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küppers, Viviane; Bayen, Ute J

    2014-10-01

    The attention-elaboration hypothesis of memory for schematically unexpected information predicts better source memory for unexpected than expected sources. In three source-monitoring experiments, the authors tested the occurrence of an inconsistency effect in source memory. Participants were presented with items that were schematically either very expected or very unexpected for their source. Multinomial processing tree models were used to separate source memory, item memory, and guessing bias. Results show an inconsistency effect in source memory accompanied by a compensatory schema-consistent guessing bias when expectancy strength is high, that is, when items are very expected or very unexpected for their source.

  10. Node-Splitting Generalized Linear Mixed Models for Evaluation of Inconsistency in Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Kang, Tu

    2016-12-01

    Network meta-analysis for multiple treatment comparisons has been a major development in evidence synthesis methodology. The validity of a network meta-analysis, however, can be threatened by inconsistency in evidence within the network. One particular issue of inconsistency is how to directly evaluate the inconsistency between direct and indirect evidence with regard to the effects difference between two treatments. A Bayesian node-splitting model was first proposed and a similar frequentist side-splitting model has been put forward recently. Yet, assigning the inconsistency parameter to one or the other of the two treatments or splitting the parameter symmetrically between the two treatments can yield different results when multi-arm trials are involved in the evaluation. We aimed to show that a side-splitting model can be viewed as a special case of design-by-treatment interaction model, and different parameterizations correspond to different design-by-treatment interactions. We demonstrated how to evaluate the side-splitting model using the arm-based generalized linear mixed model, and an example data set was used to compare results from the arm-based models with those from the contrast-based models. The three parameterizations of side-splitting make slightly different assumptions: the symmetrical method assumes that both treatments in a treatment contrast contribute to inconsistency between direct and indirect evidence, whereas the other two parameterizations assume that only one of the two treatments contributes to this inconsistency. With this understanding in mind, meta-analysts can then make a choice about how to implement the side-splitting method for their analysis. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Irradiation effects test series, test IE-5. Test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croucher, D.W.; Yackle, T.R.; Allison, C.M.; Ploger, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Test IE-5, conducted in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, employed three 0.97-m long pressurized water reactor type fuel rods, fabricated from previously irradiated zircaloy-4 cladding and one similar rod fabricated from unirradiated cladding. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the influence of simulated fission products, cladding irradiation damage, and fuel rod internal pressure on pellet-cladding interaction during a power ramp and on fuel rod behavior during film boiling operation. The four rods were subjected to a preconditioning period, a power ramp to an average fuel rod peak power of 65 kW/m, and steady state operation for one hour at a coolant mass flux of 4880 kg/s-m 2 for each rod. After a flow reduction to 1800 kg/s-m 2 , film boiling occurred on one rod. Additional flow reductions to 970 kg/s-m 2 produced film boiling on the three remaining fuel rods. Maximum time in film boiling was 80s. The rod having the highest initial internal pressure (8.3 MPa) failed 10s after the onset of film boiling. A second rod failed about 90s after reactor shutdown. The report contains a description of the experiment, the test conduct, test results, and results from the preliminary postirradiation examination. Calculations using a transient fuel rod behavior code are compared with the test results

  12. Irradiation Effects Test Series: Test IE-2. Test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, C.M.; Croucher, D.W.; Ploger, S.A.; Mehner, A.S.

    1977-08-01

    The report describes the results of a test using four 0.97-m long PWR-type fuel rods with differences in diametral gap and cladding irradiation. The objective of this test was to provide information about the effects of these differences on fuel rod behavior during quasi-equilibrium and film boiling operation. The fuel rods were subjected to a series of preconditioning power cycles of less than 30 kW/m. Rod powers were then increased to 68 kW/m at a coolant mass flux of 4900 kg/s-m 2 . After one hour at 68 kW/m, a power-cooling-mismatch sequence was initiated by a flow reduction at constant power. At a flow of 2550 kg/s-m 2 , the onset of film boiling occurred on one rod, Rod IE-011. An additional flow reduction to 2245 kg/s-m 2 caused the onset of film boiling on the remaining three rods. Data are presented on the behavior of fuel rods during quasiequilibrium and during film boiling operation. The effects of initial gap size, cladding irradiation, rod power cycling, a rapid power increase, and sustained film boiling are discussed. These discussions are based on measured test data, preliminary postirradiation examination results, and comparisons of results with FRAP-T3 computer model calculations

  13. Irradiation effects test series test IE-1 test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Allison, C.M.; Farrar, L.C.; Mehner, A.S.

    1977-03-01

    The report describes the results of the first programmatic test in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Irradiation Effects Test Series. This test (IE-1) used four 0.97m long PWR-type fuel rods fabricated from previously irradiated Saxton fuel. The objectives of this test were to evaluate the effect of fuel pellet density on pellet-cladding interaction during a power ramp and to evaluate the influence of the irradiated state of the fuel and cladding on rod behavior during film boiling operation. Data are presented on the behavior of irradiated fuel rods during steady-state operation, a power ramp, and film boiling operation. The effects of as-fabricated gap size, as-fabricated fuel density, rod power, and power ramp rate on pellet-cladding interaction are discussed. Test data are compared with FRAP-T2 computer model predictions, and comments on the consequences of sustained film boiling operation on irradiated fuel rod behavior are provided

  14. Auditing hierarchical cycles to locate other inconsistencies in the UMLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halper, Michael; Morrey, C Paul; Chen, Yan; Elhanan, Gai; Hripcsak, George; Perl, Yehoshua

    2011-01-01

    A cycle in the parent relationship hierarchy of the UMLS is a configuration that effectively makes some concept(s) an ancestor of itself. Such a structural inconsistency can easily be found automatically. A previous strategy for disconnecting cycles is to break them with the deletion of one or more parent relationships-irrespective of the correctness of the deleted relationships. A methodology is introduced for auditing of cycles that seeks to discover and delete erroneous relationships only. Cycles involving three concepts are the primary consideration. Hypotheses about the high probability of locating an erroneous parent relationship in a cycle are proposed and confirmed with statistical confidence and lend credence to the auditing approach. A cycle may serve as an indicator of other non-structural inconsistencies that are otherwise difficult to detect automatically. An extensive auditing example shows how a cycle can indicate further inconsistencies.

  15. Auditing Hierarchical Cycles to Locate Other Inconsistencies in the UMLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halper, Michael; Morrey, C. Paul; Chen, Yan; Elhanan, Gai; Hripcsak, George; Perl, Yehoshua

    2011-01-01

    A cycle in the parent relationship hierarchy of the UMLS is a configuration that effectively makes some concept(s) an ancestor of itself. Such a structural inconsistency can easily be found automatically. A previous strategy for disconnecting cycles is to break them with the deletion of one or more parent relationships—irrespective of the correctness of the deleted relationships. A methodology is introduced for auditing of cycles that seeks to discover and delete erroneous relationships only. Cycles involving three concepts are the primary consideration. Hypotheses about the high probability of locating an erroneous parent relationship in a cycle are proposed and confirmed with statistical confidence and lend credence to the auditing approach. A cycle may serve as an indicator of other non-structural inconsistencies that are otherwise difficult to detect automatically. An extensive auditing example shows how a cycle can indicate further inconsistencies. PMID:22195107

  16. TOWARDS A PHILOSOPHICAL UNDERSTANDING OF THE LOGICS OF FORMAL INCONSISTENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WALTER CARNIELLI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this paper we present a philosophical motivation for the logics of formal inconsistency, a family of paraconsistent logics whose distinctive feature is that of having resources for expressing the notion of consistency within the object language in such a way that consistency may be logically independent of non-contradiction. We defend the view according to which logics of formal inconsistency may be interpreted as theories of logical consequence of an epistemological character. We also argue that in order to philosophically justify paraconsistency there is no need to endorse dialetheism, the thesis that there are true contradictions. Furthermore, we show that mbC, a logic of formal inconsistency based on classical logic, may be enhanced in order to express the basic ideas of an intuitive interpretation of contradictions as conflicting evidence.

  17. Dimensions of poverty and inconsistent condom use among youth in urban Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff-Gore, Alena; Luke, Nancy; Wawire, Salome

    2011-10-01

    To date, research on the link between poverty and unsafe sexual behaviors has utilized limited measures of socioeconomic status and has overlooked key dimensions of poverty at the individual level. This study explored how various dimensions of socioeconomic status are associated with inconsistent condom use and how these associations vary by gender. We analyzed unique life history survey data from 261 young men and women in Kisumu, Kenya, and conducted analyses based on 959 person-months in which respondents had been sexually active in nonmarital relationships. Dependent variables were inconsistent condom use (not always using a condom) and never use of condoms. Condoms were used inconsistently in 57% of months and were never used in 31%. Corroborating existing literature, lower household wealth and lower educational attainment were associated with inconsistent condom use. Lower individual economic status (lower earned income, food insufficiency, and larger material transfers from partners) were also important determinants of inconsistent condom use. There were no significant differences in these associations by gender, with the exception of food insufficiency, which increased the risk of inconsistent condom use for young women but not for young men. None of these individual measures of socioeconomic status were associated with never use of a condom. The findings suggest that both household- and individual-level measures of socioeconomic status are important correlates of condom use and that individual economic resources play a crucial role in negotiations over the highest level of usage. The results highlight the importance of poverty in shaping sexual behavior, and, in particular, that increasing individual access to resources beyond the household, including ensuring access to food and providing educational and work opportunities, could prove to be effective strategies for decreasing the risk of HIV among youth.

  18. Developing a workflow to identify inconsistencies in volunteered geographic information: a phenological case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipoor, Hamed; Zurita-Milla, Raul; Rosemartin, Alyssa; Gerst, Katharine L.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in online information communication and mobile location-aware technologies have led to the production of large volumes of volunteered geographic information. Widespread, large-scale efforts by volunteers to collect data can inform and drive scientific advances in diverse fields, including ecology and climatology. Traditional workflows to check the quality of such volunteered information can be costly and time consuming as they heavily rely on human interventions. However, identifying factors that can influence data quality, such as inconsistency, is crucial when these data are used in modeling and decision-making frameworks. Recently developed workflows use simple statistical approaches that assume that the majority of the information is consistent. However, this assumption is not generalizable, and ignores underlying geographic and environmental contextual variability that may explain apparent inconsistencies. Here we describe an automated workflow to check inconsistency based on the availability of contextual environmental information for sampling locations. The workflow consists of three steps: (1) dimensionality reduction to facilitate further analysis and interpretation of results, (2) model-based clustering to group observations according to their contextual conditions, and (3) identification of inconsistent observations within each cluster. The workflow was applied to volunteered observations of flowering in common and cloned lilac plants (Syringa vulgaris and Syringa x chinensis) in the United States for the period 1980 to 2013. About 97% of the observations for both common and cloned lilacs were flagged as consistent, indicating that volunteers provided reliable information for this case study. Relative to the original dataset, the exclusion of inconsistent observations changed the apparent rate of change in lilac bloom dates by two days per decade, indicating the importance of inconsistency checking as a key step in data quality

  19. Developing a Workflow to Identify Inconsistencies in Volunteered Geographic Information: A Phenological Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipoor, Hamed; Zurita-Milla, Raul; Rosemartin, Alyssa; Gerst, Katharine L; Weltzin, Jake F

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in online information communication and mobile location-aware technologies have led to the production of large volumes of volunteered geographic information. Widespread, large-scale efforts by volunteers to collect data can inform and drive scientific advances in diverse fields, including ecology and climatology. Traditional workflows to check the quality of such volunteered information can be costly and time consuming as they heavily rely on human interventions. However, identifying factors that can influence data quality, such as inconsistency, is crucial when these data are used in modeling and decision-making frameworks. Recently developed workflows use simple statistical approaches that assume that the majority of the information is consistent. However, this assumption is not generalizable, and ignores underlying geographic and environmental contextual variability that may explain apparent inconsistencies. Here we describe an automated workflow to check inconsistency based on the availability of contextual environmental information for sampling locations. The workflow consists of three steps: (1) dimensionality reduction to facilitate further analysis and interpretation of results, (2) model-based clustering to group observations according to their contextual conditions, and (3) identification of inconsistent observations within each cluster. The workflow was applied to volunteered observations of flowering in common and cloned lilac plants (Syringa vulgaris and Syringa x chinensis) in the United States for the period 1980 to 2013. About 97% of the observations for both common and cloned lilacs were flagged as consistent, indicating that volunteers provided reliable information for this case study. Relative to the original dataset, the exclusion of inconsistent observations changed the apparent rate of change in lilac bloom dates by two days per decade, indicating the importance of inconsistency checking as a key step in data quality

  20. Load monitoring program: Status and results report. Volume 1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    British Columbia Hydro conducts a monitoring program to provide information on customer needs and values for planning; to measure customer response, energy savings impacts, and load shape impacts due to changes in rate level, rate restructuring, and Power Smart programs; to estimate end-use consumption and load shapes by customer class; and to provide load information for distribution and system load studies. To achieve these objectives, the monitoring program tracks the characteristics and energy use patterns of a sample of BC Hydro residential, commercial, and industrial customers over a period of several years. The entire sample will be surveyed periodically to obtain information on changes in building characteristics, equipment stocks, and energy-use behavior and attitudes. A report is provided on the status of monitoring program activities and some results obtained in 1993/94. For the residential sector, the results include typical load profiles, end-user demographics, and extent of electric space heating and water heating. In the commercial sector, customers were divided into two main groups. The large-building group was relatively well organized in terms of energy needs and participated in Power Smart programs. The small-building group was relatively energy-inefficient and relatively unaware of Power Smart programs. 43 figs., 15 tabs

  1. Irradiation effects test Series Scoping Test 1: test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Allison, C.M.; Farrar, L.C.

    1977-09-01

    The report describes the results of the first scoping test in the Irradiation Effects Test Series conducted by the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program, which is part of the Water Reactor Research Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc. The research is sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This test used an unirradiated, three-foot-long, PWR-type fuel rod. The objective of this test was to thoroughly evaluate the remote fabrication procedures to be used for irradiated rods in future tests, handling plans, and reactor operations. Additionally, selected fuel behavior data were obtained. The fuel rod was subjected to a series of preconditioning power cycles followed by a power increase which brought the fuel rod power to about 20.4 kW/ft peak linear heat rating at a coolant mass flux of 1.83 x 10 6 lb/hr-ft 2 . Film boiling occurred for a period of 4.8 minutes following flow reductions to 9.6 x 10 5 and 7.5 x 10 5 lb/hr-ft 2 . The test fuel rod failed following reactor shutdown as a result of heavy internal and external cladding oxidation and embrittlement which occurred during the film boiling operation

  2. EDF - 2006 full-year results, 2006 Financial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadonneix, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    As the world's biggest electricity generator, the EDF Group covers every sector of expertise, from generation to trading and transmission grids. EDF builds on the expertise of its people, its R and D and engineering skills, its experience as a leading industry operator and the attentive support of its customers to deliver competitive solutions that successfully reconcile economic growth with climate protection. This document presents the 2006 annual results and Consolidated financial statements of the Group at 31 December 2006: Consolidated income statements, Consolidated balance sheets, Consolidated cash flow statements, Changes in consolidated equity, Notes: Group accounting policies, Summary of accounting and valuation methods, Public distribution concessions in France, Comparability, Significant events and transactions of 2006 and 2005, Changes in the scope of consolidation, Segment reporting, Sales, Fuel and energy purchases, Other external expenses, Contractual obligations and commitments, Personnel expenses, Other operating income and expenses, Impairments / reversals, Other income and expenses, Financial result, Income taxes, Goodwill, Other intangible assets, Property, plant and equipment, Investments in companies accounted for under the equity method, Financial assets, Inventories including work-in-process, Trade receivables, Other receivables, Cash and cash equivalents, Held-for-sale assets and liabilities, Equity, Provisions, Special concession liabilities, Current and non-current financial liabilities, Derivatives, Other liabilities, Contribution of joint ventures, Related parties, Environment, Subsequent events, Transition to standards IAS 32 and 39 concerning financial instruments, Scope of consolidation

  3. 30 CFR 62.175 - Notification of results; reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standard threshold shift or reportable hearing loss; and (2) The need and reasons for any further testing... reportable hearing loss as defined in this part, the mine operator must report such loss to MSHA as a noise-induced hearing loss in accordance with part 50 of this title, unless a physician or audiologist has...

  4. EDF - Annual results 2015. Consolidated financial statements at 31 December 2015. 2015 Management report - Group results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Jean-Bernard

    2016-01-01

    As the world's biggest electricity generator, the EDF Group covers every sector of expertise, from generation to trading and transmission grids. EDF builds on the expertise of its people, its R and D and engineering skills, its experience as a leading industry operator and the attentive support of its customers to deliver competitive solutions that successfully reconcile economic growth with climate protection. This document presents the 2015 annual results, management report and Consolidated financial statements of the Group at 31 December 2015, as well as the 2015 activity report: Group results: Key figures; economic environment; significant events of 2015; subsequent events; analysis of the business and the consolidated income statements for 2014 and 2015; net indebtedness, cash flows and investments; management and control of market risks; transactions with related parties; scope of consolidation; principal risks and uncertainties; financial outlook. consolidated financial statements: group accounting standards; comparability; significant events and transactions; regulatory events in France; changes in the scope of consolidation; segment reporting; sales; fuel and energy purchases; other external expenses; personnel expenses; taxes other than income taxes; other operating income and expenses; impairment/reversals; other income and expenses; financial result; income taxes; basic earnings per share and diluted earnings per share; operating assets and liabilities, equity; goodwill; other intangible assets; property, plant and equipment operated under French public electricity distribution concessions; property, plant and equipment operated under concessions for other activities; property, plant and equipment used in generation and other tangible assets owned by the group; investments in associates and joint ventures; inventories; trade receivables; other receivables; equity; provisions; provisions related to nuclear generation - back-end of the nuclear cycle

  5. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical correlates of inconsistent condom use in HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchacz, K; van der Straten, A; Saul, J; Shiboski, S C; Gomez, C A; Padian, N

    2001-11-01

    We examined sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics associated with inconsistent condom use in a cross-sectional analysis of 145 sexually active HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples who participated in the California Partners Study II. All couples were aware of their HIV-serodiscordant status. Forty-five percent of couples reported having had unprotected vaginal or anal sex in the previous 6 months. In the multivariate couple-level analyses, factors independently associated with inconsistent (i.e., <100%) condom use in the previous 6 months included lower educational level, unemployment, African-American ethnicity, and practice of anal sex by the couple. Injection drug use was associated with inconsistent condom use among couples with younger HIV-infected partners. In addition, couples with HIV-infected partners who had higher CD4 cell counts and couples in which the HIV-infected male partner ever had sex with a man were more likely to use condoms inconsistently. Consistency of condom use did not depend on the gender of the HIV-infected partner or duration of sexual relationship. The findings suggest that many HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples remain at high risk of HIV transmission and may benefit not only from behavioral interventions but also from structural interventions aimed at improving their social and economic conditions.

  6. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  7. Irradiation Effects Test Series: Test IE-3. Test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, L.C.; Allison, C.M.; Croucher, D.W.; Ploger, S.A.

    1977-10-01

    The objectives of the test reported were to: (a) determine the behavior of irradiated fuel rods subjected to a rapid power increase during which the possibility of a pellet-cladding mechanical interaction failure is enhanced and (b) determine the behavior of these fuel rods during film boiling following this rapid power increase. Test IE-3 used four 0.97-m long pressurized water reactor type fuel rods fabricated from previously irradiated fuel. The fuel rods were subjected to a preconditioning period, followed by a power ramp to 69 kW/m at a coolant mass flux of 4920 kg/s-m 2 . After a flow reduction to 2120 kg/s-m 2 , film boiling occurred on the fuel rods. One rod failed approximately 45 seconds after the reactor was shut down as a result of cladding embrittlement due to extensive cladding oxidation. Data are presented on the behavior of these irradiated fuel rods during steady-state operation, the power ramp, and film boiling operation. The effects of a power ramp and power ramp rates on pellet-cladding interaction are discussed. Test data are compared with FRAP-T3 computer model calculations and data from a previous Irradiation Effects test in which four irradiated fuel rods of a similar design were tested. Test IE-3 results indicate that the irradiated state of the fuel rods did not significantly affect fuel rod behavior during normal, abnormal (power ramp of 20 kW/m per minute), and accident (film boiling) conditions

  8. Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg. Report on scientific results 2002-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (DKFZ, German Cancer Research Center) publishes alternating every year the ''Wissenschaftlicher Ergebnisbericht'' (in German) and the ''Research Report'' (in English). Both volumes are reports on the present state of research activities of the DKFZ as a National Research Center to the funding federal and state authorities [Federal Republic of Germany, Land (state) Baden-Wuerttemberg]. The report is structured according to the center's six research programs

  9. Spelling and Phonetic Inconsistencies in English: A Problem for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But it is not the case in English. English spelling is defective. It is a poor reflection of English pronunciation as we have not enough symbols to represent all the sounds of English. The problems of these inconsistencies to foreign and second language learners can not be overemphasized. This study will look at the historical ...

  10. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-09-01

    Second report evaluating a fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL published its first report on the demonstration in February 2014. This report is an update to the previous report; it covers 3 full years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2014 and focuses on the final experiences and lessons learned.

  11. Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg. Report on scientific results 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, H.

    2002-01-01

    The Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (DKFZ, German Cancer Research Center) publishes alternating every year the ''Wissenschaftlicher Ergebnisbericht'' (in German) and the ''Research Report'' (in English). Both volumes are reports on the present state of research activities of the DKFZ as a National Research Center to the funding federal and state authorities [Federal Republic of Germany, Land (state) Baden-Wuerttemberg]. Furthermore they shall inform colleagues and the scientifically interested public. Both reports are structured according to the center's eight research programs. The last Research Report was published in 2001. In Germany a new orthography has been accepted. Some authors used the new form others the traditional one. The orthography was not standardized. (orig.)

  12. Need for cognition moderates paranormal beliefs and magical ideation in inconsistent-handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Eric C; Christman, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature suggests that degree of handedness predicts gullibility and magical ideation. Inconsistent-handers (people who use their non-dominant hand for at least one common manual activity) report more magical ideation and are more gullible. The current study tested whether this effect is moderated by need for cognition. One hundred eighteen university students completed questionnaires assessing handedness, self-reported paranormal beliefs, and self-reported need for cognition. Handedness (Inconsistent vs. Consistent Right) and Need for Cognition (High vs. Low) were treated as categorical predictors. Both paranormal beliefs and magical ideation served as dependent variable's in separate analyses. Neither set of tests yielded main effects for handedness or need for cognition. However, there were a significant handedness by need for cognition interactions. Post-hoc comparisons revealed that low, but not high, need for cognition inconsistent-handers reported relatively elevated levels of paranormal belief and magical ideation. A secondary set of tests treating the predictor variables as continuous instead of categorical obtained the same overall pattern.

  13. Accounting for results: how conservation organizations report performance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, Adena R; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council-US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  14. The (mis)reporting of statistical results in psychology journals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Wicherts, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the prevalence, nature (direction), and causes of reporting errors in psychology, we checked the consistency of reported test statistics, degrees of freedom, and p values in a random sample of high- and low-impact psychology journals. In a second study, we established the

  15. Predicting impending death: inconsistency in speed is a selective and early marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Stuart W S; Hultsch, David F; Dixon, Roger A

    2008-09-01

    Among older adults, deficits in both level and variability of speeded performance are linked to neurological impairment. This study examined whether and when speed (rate), speed (inconsistency), and traditional accuracy-based markers of cognitive performance foreshadow terminal decline and impending death. Victoria Longitudinal Study data spanning 12 years (5 waves) of measurement were assembled for 707 adults aged 59 to 95 years. Whereas 442 survivors completed all waves and relevant measures, 265 decedents participated on at least 1 occasion and subsequently died. Four main results were observed. First, Cox regressions evaluating the 3 cognitive predictors of mortality replicated previous results for cognitive accuracy predictors. Second, level (rate) of speeded performance predicted survival independent of demographic indicators, cardiovascular health, and cognitive performance level. Third, inconsistency in speed predicted survival independent of all influences combined. Fourth, follow-up random-effects models revealed increases in inconsistency in speed per year closer to death, with advancing age further moderating the accelerated growth. Hierarchical prediction patterns support the view that inconsistency in speed is an early behavioral marker of neurological dysfunction associated with impending death. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Inconsistencies in authoritative national paediatric workforce data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Amy R; Doherty, Richard; Hilton, Andrew M; Freed, Gary L

    2017-12-01

    Objective National health workforce data are used in workforce projections, policy and planning. If data to measure the current effective clinical medical workforce are not consistent, accurate and reliable, policy options pursued may not be aligned with Australia's actual needs. The aim of the present study was to identify any inconsistencies and contradictions in the numerical count of paediatric specialists in Australia, and discuss issues related to the accuracy of collection and analysis of medical workforce data. Methods This study compared respected national data sources regarding the number of medical practitioners in eight fields of paediatric speciality medical (non-surgical) practice. It also counted the number of doctors listed on the websites of speciality paediatric hospitals and clinics as practicing in these eight fields. Results Counts of medical practitioners varied markedly for all specialties across the data sources examined. In some fields examined, the range of variability across data sources exceeded 450%. Conclusions The national datasets currently available from federal and speciality sources do not provide consistent or reliable counts of the number of medical practitioners. The lack of an adequate baseline for the workforce prevents accurate predictions of future needs to provide the best possible care of children in Australia. What is known about the topic? Various national data sources contain counts of the number of medical practitioners in Australia. These data are used in health workforce projections, policy and planning. What does this paper add? The present study found that the current data sources do not provide consistent or reliable counts of the number of practitioners in eight selected fields of paediatric speciality practice. There are several potential issues in the way workforce data are collected or analysed that cause the variation between sources to occur. What are the implications for practitioners? Without accurate

  17. Inconsistencies in quality of life data collection in clinical trials: a potential source of bias? Interviews with research nurses and trialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, Derek; Ives, Jonathan; Draper, Heather; Keeley, Thomas; Calvert, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as health-related quality of life (HRQL) are increasingly used to evaluate treatment effectiveness in clinical trials, are valued by patients, and may inform important decisions in the clinical setting. It is of concern, therefore, that preliminary evidence, gained from group discussions at UK-wide Medical Research Council (MRC) quality of life training days, suggests there are inconsistent standards of HRQL data collection in trials and appropriate training and education is often lacking. Our objective was to investigate these reports, to determine if they represented isolated experiences, or were indicative of a potentially wider problem. We undertook a qualitative study, conducting 26 semi-structured interviews with research nurses, data managers, trial coordinators and research facilitators involved in the collection and entry of HRQL data in clinical trials, across one primary care NHS trust, two secondary care NHS trusts and two clinical trials units in the UK. We used conventional content analysis to analyze and interpret our data. Our study participants reported (1) inconsistent standards in HRQL measurement, both between, and within, trials, which appeared to risk the introduction of bias; (2), difficulties in dealing with HRQL data that raised concern for the well-being of the trial participant, which in some instances led to the delivery of non-protocol driven co-interventions, (3), a frequent lack of HRQL protocol content and appropriate training and education of trial staff, and (4) that HRQL data collection could be associated with emotional and/or ethical burden. Our findings suggest there are inconsistencies in the standards of HRQL data collection in some trials resulting from a general lack of HRQL-specific protocol content, training and education. These inconsistencies could lead to biased HRQL trial results. Future research should aim to develop HRQL guidelines and training programmes aimed at supporting

  18. Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Update for LLNL: PSHA Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Alfredo [Fugro Consultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Altekruse, Jason [Fugro Consultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Menchawi, Osman El [Fugro Consultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report presents the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) performed for Building 332 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), near Livermore, CA by Fugro Consultants, Inc. (FCL). This report is specific to Building 332 only and not to other portions of the Laboratory. The study performed for the LLNL site includes a comprehensive review of recent information relevant to the LLNL regional tectonic setting and regional seismic sources in the vicinity of the site and development of seismic wave transmission characteristics. The Seismic Source Characterization (SSC), documented in Project Report No. 2259-PR-02 (FCL, 2015a), and Ground Motion Characterization (GMC), documented in Project Report No. 2259-PR-06 (FCL, 2015c) were developed in accordance with ANS/ANSI 2.29-2008 Level 2 PSHA guidelines. The ANS/ANSI 2.29-2008 Level 2 PSHA framework is documented in Project Report No. 2259-PR-05 (FCL, 2016a). The Hazard Input Document (HID) for input into the PSHA developed from the SSC is presented in Project Report No. 2259-PR-04 (FCL, 2016b). The site characterization used as input for development of the idealized site profiles including epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability is presented in Project Report No. 2259-PR-03 (FCL, 2015b).

  19. 7 CFR 52.22 - Report of inspection results prior to issuance of formal report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report of inspection results prior to issuance of... MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, PROCESSED PRODUCTS...

  20. 7 CFR 51.23 - Report of inspection results prior to issuance of formal report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report of inspection results prior to issuance of... MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2...

  1. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This report evaluates a fuel cell electric bus demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This evaluation report covers two years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2013.

  2. Automated generation of node-splitting models for assessment of inconsistency in network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Valkenhoef, Gert; Dias, Sofia; Ades, A E; Welton, Nicky J

    2016-03-01

    Network meta-analysis enables the simultaneous synthesis of a network of clinical trials comparing any number of treatments. Potential inconsistencies between estimates of relative treatment effects are an important concern, and several methods to detect inconsistency have been proposed. This paper is concerned with the node-splitting approach, which is particularly attractive because of its straightforward interpretation, contrasting estimates from both direct and indirect evidence. However, node-splitting analyses are labour-intensive because each comparison of interest requires a separate model. It would be advantageous if node-splitting models could be estimated automatically for all comparisons of interest. We present an unambiguous decision rule to choose which comparisons to split, and prove that it selects only comparisons in potentially inconsistent loops in the network, and that all potentially inconsistent loops in the network are investigated. Moreover, the decision rule circumvents problems with the parameterisation of multi-arm trials, ensuring that model generation is trivial in all cases. Thus, our methods eliminate most of the manual work involved in using the node-splitting approach, enabling the analyst to focus on interpreting the results. © 2015 The Authors Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Baseline correlates of inconsistent and incorrect condom use among sexually active women in the contraceptive CHOICE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shirley L; Kebodeaux, Chelsea A; Secura, Gina M; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Madden, Tessa; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2011-11-01

    : To provide protection against sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy, condoms must be used consistently and correctly. However, a significant proportion of couples in the United States fail to do so. Our objective was to determine the demographic and behavioral correlates of inconsistent and incorrect condom use among sexually active, condom-using women. : Analysis of baseline data from a prospective cohort of sexually active, condom-using women in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project (n = 2087) using self-reported demographic and behavioral characteristics. Poisson regression was used to determine the relative risk of inconsistent and incorrect condom use after adjusting for variables significant in the univariate analysis. : Inconsistent and incorrect condom use was reported by 41% (n = 847) and 36% (n = 757) of women, respectively. A greater number of unprotected acts was most strongly associated with reporting 10 or more sex acts in the past 30 days, younger age at first intercourse, less perceived partner willingness to use condoms, and lower condom use self-efficacy. Incorrect condom use was associated with reporting 10 or more sex acts in the past 30 days, greater perceived risk for future STIs, and inconsistent condom use. : Inconsistent and incorrect condom use is common among sexually active women. Targeted educational efforts and prevention strategies should be implemented among women at highest risk for STIs and unintended pregnancies to increase consistent and correct condom use.

  4. A municipal forest report card: Results for California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.Gregory McPherson; Louren Kotow

    2013-01-01

    This study integrates two existing computer programs, the Pest Vulnerability Matrix and i-Tree Streets, into a decision-support tool for assessing municipal forest stability and recommending strategies to mitigate risk of loss. A report card concept was developed to communicate levels of performance in terms that managers and the public easily understand. Grades were...

  5. Report on the results of research and development work 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    In this annual report the work performed at the named institute is described. This work concerns experiments with fast neutrons, studies of the e + e - interaction at PETRA, and the development of the spallation neutron source of the Rutherford Laboratory. Furthermore a list at publications is added. (HSI) [de

  6. Guidelines for Reporting Quantitative Methods and Results in Primary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John M.; Plonsky, Luke; Ross, Steven J.; Schoonen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Adequate reporting of quantitative research about language learning involves careful consideration of the logic, rationale, and actions underlying both study designs and the ways in which data are analyzed. These guidelines, commissioned and vetted by the board of directors of "Language Learning," outline the basic expectations for…

  7. Thermodynamic inconsistency of the modified Saha equation at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The inclusion of a pressure ionization term in the Saha equation violates the thermodynamic Maxwell identities if corresponding changes are not made to the expressions for entropy and pressure. It is demonstrated that the usual application of the Rouse and Stewart-Pyatt modesl suffers from this limitation. Negative values of the adiabatic gradient in the degenerate dwarf models of Boehm and Straka are explained in terms of this thermodynamic inconsistency

  8. Accelerating deep neural network training with inconsistent stochastic gradient descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linnan; Yang, Yi; Min, Renqiang; Chakradhar, Srimat

    2017-09-01

    Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) updates Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) with a noisy gradient computed from a random batch, and each batch evenly updates the network once in an epoch. This model applies the same training effort to each batch, but it overlooks the fact that the gradient variance, induced by Sampling Bias and Intrinsic Image Difference, renders different training dynamics on batches. In this paper, we develop a new training strategy for SGD, referred to as Inconsistent Stochastic Gradient Descent (ISGD) to address this problem. The core concept of ISGD is the inconsistent training, which dynamically adjusts the training effort w.r.t the loss. ISGD models the training as a stochastic process that gradually reduces down the mean of batch's loss, and it utilizes a dynamic upper control limit to identify a large loss batch on the fly. ISGD stays on the identified batch to accelerate the training with additional gradient updates, and it also has a constraint to penalize drastic parameter changes. ISGD is straightforward, computationally efficient and without requiring auxiliary memories. A series of empirical evaluations on real world datasets and networks demonstrate the promising performance of inconsistent training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fixed drug eruption resulting from fluconazole use: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavallaee Mahkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fluconazole is a widely used antifungal agent with a possible side effect of fixed drug eruption. However, this adverse drug effect is absent from the reported list of possible side effects of fluconazole. We are presenting a rare case in our report. Case presentation A 25-year-old Iranian woman developed fixed drug eruptions on different sites of her body after taking five doses of fluconazole to treat vaginal candidiasis. A positive patch test, positive oral challenge test and skin biopsy were all found to be consistent with fixed drug eruption. Conclusion Fluconazole is a widely prescribed drug, used mainly to treat candidiasis. Fixed drug eruption as a possible side effect of Fluconazole is not well known and thus, the lesions may be misdiagnosed and mistreated. Based on our findings, which are consistent with a number of other practitioners, we recommend adding fixed drug eruption to the list of possible side effects of fluconazole.

  10. Correlates of Inconsistent Refusal of Unprotected Sex among Armenian Female Sex Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Markosyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence and correlates of inconsistent refusal of unprotected sex among female sex workers (FSWs in Armenia. One hundred and eighteen street-based FSWs between the ages of 20 and 52 completed a questionnaire assessing FSWs’ demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics. A total of 52.5% (n=62 of FSWs reported inconsistent refusal of unprotected sex with clients in the past 3 months. Logistic regression analysis controlling for participants’ age and education revealed that perceiving more barriers toward condom use (AOR = 1.1; P<0.01, reporting more types of abuse (AOR = 2.1; P<0.01, and setting lower fees for service (AOR = 0.9; P=0.02 significantly predicted inconsistent refusal of unprotected sex. HIV-risk-reduction behavioral interventions tailored to FSWs working in Yerevan Armenia should address the factors identified in this study toward the goal of enhancing refusal of unprotected sex and ultimately preventing acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs including HIV.

  11. Report on results of current and future metal casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Cetin; Carlson, Neil N.

    2015-01-01

    New modeling capabilities needed to simulate the casting of metallic fuels are added to Truchas code. In this report we summarize improvements we made in FY2015 in three areas; (1) Analysis of new casting experiments conducted with BCS and EFL designs, (2) the simulation of INL's U-Zr casting experiments with Flow3D computer program, (3) the implementation of surface tension model into Truchas for unstructured mesh required to run U-Zr casting.

  12. Laser fusion study. Final report, volume I, study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The primary goal of this study was to devise, evaluate, and conceptually design a complete, end-to-end, alignment system capable of handling 30 to 32 Shiva amplifier chains to specified accuracies in space and time. A secondary goal was to accomplish the primary goal with an acceptably low development and procurement cost and with an acceptably high day-after-day performance reliability. This report presents such a system: it is comprised of sensors, actuating mechanisms, controls, and displays that perform well within the current art-state. (U.S.)

  13. Proposing application of results in sport and exercise research reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane; Elliott, Bruce; Hamill, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The application of sport and exercise research findings to practice requires careful interpretation and integration of evidence. This paper reviews principles of evidence-based practice and the application of research in sports and exercise, in order to provide recommendations on developing appropriate application sections in research reports for sport and exercise journals. The strength of recommendations for application fall into one of four levels, with potential applications qualified as strong, limited, preliminary, or hypothesized. Specific limitations that should be discussed in framing recommendations for practice are also noted for each of these levels that should be useful for authors, and for practitioners and clinicians in interpreting these recommendations.

  14. Report - Results of survey on child care needs - 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, Genevieve; Weymaere, Emeline; Trilhe, Philippe; Palluel, Stephanie; Mangiorou, Maria-Anna; Mondlane, Bruna; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2017-01-01

    In June 2016, a working group reporting to the Director for Finance and Human Resources was established to study the sustainability of CERN nursery and school services. Among actions taken by the working group, a survey was carried out to achieve a better understanding of the needs of CERN families for child care and educational structures, to identify which services are in highest demand (e.g. crèche or early years, primary schooling) and to understand the expectations and preferences of CERN families regarding these services.

  15. 1999 Annual report: On course and seeing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    NS Power Holdings is a diversified energy and services company in Nova Scotia. It has a customer base of 440,000, assets of $ 2.8 billion. Its primary subsidiary, Nova Scotia Power, is the dominant electricity supplier in the province. The company's product line also includes bunker oil, diesel fuel and light fuel oil. NS Holdings also has a 12.5 per cent interest in the Maritimes and Northeast Pipeline. In 1999 the company earned $ 100.4 million, or $1.16 per share, an 18 per cent increase over 1998. Electrical energy sales totalled $ 790 million, for a return of 10.8 per cent on equity in the electric utility, near the top of the allowed range, and without an increase in electricity prices for the third year in a row. Home heating and light fuel oil deliveries were just over 100 million litres. The Maritimes and Northeast Pipeline began deliveries in December. Completion of the Halifax lateral, expected late in 2000, will provide customers in the most densely populated area of the province with the option to use natural gas for heating and other uses for the first time. The annual report provides details of operations, the requisite financial report and supplementary documentation

  16. Social inequalities in patient-reported outcomes among older multimorbid patients--results of the MultiCare cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von dem Knesebeck, Olaf; Bickel, Horst; Fuchs, Angela; Gensichen, Jochen; Höfels, Susanne; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; König, Hans-Helmut; Mergenthal, Karola; Schön, Gerhard; Wegscheider, Karl; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wiese, Birgitt; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Schäfer, Ingmar

    2015-02-07

    In this article three research questions are addressed: (1) Is there an association between socioeconomic status (SES) and patient-reported outcomes in a cohort of multimorbid patients? (2) Does the association vary according to SES indicator used (income, education, occupational position)? (3) Can the association between SES and patient-reported outcomes (self-rated health, health-related quality of life and functional status) be (partly) explained by burden of disease? Analyses are based on the MultiCare Cohort Study, a German multicentre, prospective, observational cohort study of multimorbid patients from general practice. We analysed baseline data and data from the first follow-up after 15 months (N = 2,729). To assess burden of disease we used the patients' morbidity data from standardized general practitioner (GP) interviews based on a list of 46 groups of chronic conditions including the GP's severity rating of each chronic condition ranging from marginal to very severe. In the cross-sectional analyses SES was significantly associated with the patient-reported outcomes at baseline. Associations with income were more consistent and stronger than with education and occupational position. Associations were partly explained (17% to 44%) by burden of disease. In the longitudinal analyses only income (but not education and occupational position) was significantly related to the patient-reported outcomes at follow-up. Associations between income and the outcomes were reduced by 18% to 27% after adjustment for burden of disease. Results indicate social inequalities in self-rated health, functional status and health related quality of life among older multimorbid patients. As associations with education and occupational position were inconsistent, these inequalities were mainly due to income. Inequalities were partly explained by burden of disease. However, even among patients with a similar disease burden, those with a low income were worse off in terms of the

  17. Cooperative biogas plants. Economic results and analyses. Status report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjort-Gregersen, K.

    1998-11-01

    The years 1995 - 1998 have been characterised by stabilisation of operation and economy of the Danish co-operative biogas plants. Most of the plants have obtained increasingly better economic results although the increase has been less significant than during earlier periods. There are several reasons for the increase. Most of the plants have been able to increase the sales income because of larger amounts of biomass available resulting in an increased biogas production. Furthermore it has been possible to contain the income level for biomass receipt. Several plants have established gas collection in storage tanks, which has resulted in increased gas yield. The operational stability related to both technique and processes have improved. The operational costs have been stabilised and are under control at most of the plants. The improved economic results have resulted in most of the plants having a satisfactory operation and economy. However, it must be stressed that some of the oldest plants have not been able to settle the investment dept at normal conditions. Also some, even rather new plants, still are in a difficult economic situation. Most of the plants established in the 90'ies have had a good start both operationally and economically. Thus the economic risk of establishing a plant has been reduced compared to earlier years. Generally the prerequisites for establishing a biogas plant are favourable economic conditions and quality assurance of the project. (LN)

  18. Open pneumothorax resulting from blunt thoracic trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintick, Colleen M

    2008-01-01

    Cases of open pneumothorax have been documented as early as 326 BC. Until the last 50 years, understanding of the epidemiology and treatment of penetrating chest trauma has arisen from military surgery. A better understanding of cardiopulmonary dynamics, advances in ventilatory support, and improvement in surgical technique have drastically improved treatment and increased the survival rate of patients with penetrating thoracic trauma. Open pneumothorax is rare in blunt chest trauma, but can occur when injury results in a substantial loss of the chest wall. This case study presents an adolescent who sustained a large open pneumothorax as a result of being run over by a car. Early and appropriate surgical intervention coupled with coordinated efforts by all members of the trauma team resulted in a positive outcome for this patient.

  19. Nuclear data and the effects of its inconsistency on instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Y.A.; Ewa, I.O.B.; Umar, I.M.

    2006-04-01

    In this study, we examine the role of nuclear data in Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) particularly as it affects determination of reactor flux parameters and application of comparator methods. The work reviewed the available sources of nuclear data, the variations that exist from one source to the other and the effects of such variations on INAA. Measurement of Neutron flux parameters in inner and outer irradiation channel of a miniature neutron source reactor was carried out using two independent nuclear data sources to investigate the effects of inconsistency of nuclear data on the precision of analytical result. The result obtained shows a slight variation of flux parameters with nuclear data source. It was also observed that modification of the earlier compiled basic nuclear data lead to inconsistencies in the secondary data that applies it. (author)

  20. Mortality resulting from head injury in professional boxing: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lissa C; Newman, C Benjamin; Volk, Hunter; Svinth, Joseph R; Conklin, Jordan; Levy, Michael L

    2010-08-01

    The majority of boxing-related fatalities result from traumatic brain injury. Biomechanical forces in boxing result in rotational acceleration with resultant subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injury. Given the inherent risk and the ongoing criticism boxing has received, we evaluated mortalities associated with professional boxing. We used the Velazquez Fatality Collection of boxing injuries and supplementary sources to analyze mortality from 1950 to 2007. Variables evaluated included age at time of death, association with knockout or other outcome of match, rounds fought, weight class, location of fight, and location of preterminal event. There were 339 mortalities between 1950 and 2007 (mean age, 24 +/- 3.8 years); 64% were associated with knockout and 15% with technical knockout. A higher percentage occurred in the lower weight classes. The preterminal event occurred in the ring (61%), in the locker room (17%), and outside the arena (22%). We evaluated for significant changes after 1983 when championship bouts were reduced from 15 to 12 rounds. There was a significant decline in mortality after 1983. We found no significant variables to support that this decline is related to a reduction in rounds. Rather, we hypothesize the decline to be the result of a reduction in exposure to repetitive head trauma (shorter careers and fewer fights), along with increased medical oversight and stricter safety regulations. Increased efforts should be made to improve medical supervision of boxers. Mandatory central nervous system imaging after a knockout could lead to a significant reduction in associated mortality.

  1. Summary of the most significant results reported in this session

    CERN Document Server

    Van De Walle, R T

    1980-01-01

    In the following a summary is presented of five parallel sessions on light quark had- ron spectroscopy. In general all topics which were discussed in the plenary sessions, and for which the proceedings contain separate (invited) papers, will be left out; only occa- sionally (and for reasons of completeness) will we make a reference to these presentations. Several other restrictions can be made. Nearly all papers submitted to the (parallel) hadron spectroscopy sessions were experimenta1 1 ), the only exceptions being a series of four theoretical papers on the baryonium problem. Furthermore, there was virtually no new information concerning the 'classical' baryons. In particular, no new facts were submitted on the problem of the possible existence of baryon states outside the so-called minimal spectrum, i.e. outside {56,L+ } and {70,L-dd}, the existence of the {ZO}'s, and the exis- even o tence of (baryon) exotic states. There was one contribution on a 'possible' new:".* 2 ), and a report on the final measureme...

  2. Government Performance and Results Act Reporting on Defense Working Capital Funds Net Operating Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... The overall objective of the audit was to determine whether the net operating results for the activity groups of the Defense Working Capital Fund were consistently and accurately compiled. We also assessed internal controls to determine whether management complied with the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993.

  3. Enova results and activities report 2008; Resultat- og aktivitetsrapport 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Enova's results in 2008 was 2,15 TWh in saved and produces renewable energy. Totally Enova has contributed by activate environmental friendly energy projects equivalent 11,6 TWh up to 2009. This is a good step towards Enova's long-term goal and corresponding to an amount of approximately 10 % of Norway's united consumption of energy throughout a year. (AG). refs., figs., tabs., ills

  4. 18- and 24-month-olds' discrimination of gender-consistent and inconsistent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sara E; Flom, Ross

    2007-02-01

    18- and 24-month-olds' ability to discriminate gender-stereotyped activities was assessed. Using a preferential looking paradigm, toddlers viewed male and female actors performing masculine and feminine-stereotyped activities. Consistent with our predictions, and previous research, 24-month-olds, but not 18-month-olds, looked longer at the gender-inconsistent activities than the gender-consistent activities. Results are discussed in terms of toddlers emerging gender stereotypes and perception of everyday events.

  5. Tumescent liposuction report performance measurement initiative: national survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, William; Cox, Sue Ellen; Kuznets, Naomi; Coleman, William P

    2004-07-01

    This study was created by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement to measure clinical performance and improvement opportunities for physicians and ambulatory health-care organizations. Data were collected prospectively between February 2001 and August 2002. Thirty-nine study centers participated, and 688 patients who had tumescent liposuction were surveyed and followed for 6 months. The objective was to determine patient satisfaction with tumescent liposuction and examine current liposuction practice and the safety of tumescent liposuction in a representative cohort of patients. The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement collected prospective data from February 2001 to August 2002 from 68 organizations registered for this study. Ultimately 39 organizations submitted 688 useable cases performed totally with local anesthesia, "tumescent technique." The overall clinical complication rate found in the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement study was 0.7% (5 of 702). There was a minor complication rate of 0.57%. The major complication rate was 0.14% with one patient requiring hospitalization. Seventy-five percent of the patients reported no discomfort during their procedures. Of the 59% of patients who responded to a 6-month postoperative survey, 91% were positive about their decision to have liposuction (rating of 4 or 5 on a scale of 1-5) and 84% had high levels (4 or 5 on a scale of 1-5) of overall satisfaction with the procedure. Our findings are consistent with others in that tumescent liposuction is a safe procedure with a low complication rate and high patient satisfaction.

  6. PROMECE - Research Results Transfer - Collection of technology trends reports (ICT)

    OpenAIRE

    ITI

    2016-01-01

    Instituto Tecnológico de Informática has a non-economic Activities Plan (PROMECE) whose general objective is to strengthen the research lines in which the Institute works, within the scope of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Through this plan of activities a work is carried out to transfer the results obtained in the execution of R+D+I projects within these lines or areas of action. The transfer actions are aimed at companies and the industrial sector and society as a who...

  7. Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, John M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Dongsheng [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-03-31

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  8. 1980 Annual status report: utilization of research results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Patents and licences were part of normal JRC activity since its origin: the new feature of this programme is that through an increased JRC activity in this field as well as a structured support to D.G. XIII, the process of utilization can be started at an earlier stage, with the deliberate purpose of achieving practical results as early as possible, through an adequate R and D effort. Key element of this process is the systematic identification, within JRC programme, of those research areas, concepts, ideas, that might present interest for industry and for the public sector. In this respect D.G. XIII by its market survey and contacts with industry is providing JRC with the essential information to carry out this programme

  9. Transportation safety aspects of ore and related material - inconsistencies in current exemption values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawl, R.R.; Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Cook, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA's system for exemption of material from the transport regulations is based on the fundamental principle that exemption values should be commensurate with the risk posed by the material, as represented by effective dose and skin dose. Important departures from that principle as well as inconsistencies between exemption values for different radionuclides have resulted from special provisions for natural materials that depend on their intended use, and from exposure scenarios and other assumptions and rules used in the derivation of exemption values. This paper examines the sources and extent of inconsistencies in exemption values for transport, particularly as they relate to naturally occurring radionuclides, and suggests ways to achieve greater internal consistency in exemption values as well as greater consistency with the fundamental principle underlying the current system

  10. The Belief that Alcohol Use is Inconsistent with Personal Autonomy: A Promotive Factor for Younger Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kimberly L.; Shtivelband, Annette; Comello, Maria Leonora G.; Slater, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored an understudied promotive factor, a belief that alcohol use is inconsistent with personal autonomy, which may reduce adolescent intention to drink and subsequent alcohol use. Autonomy was examined as an attitudinal construct within the Theory of Reasoned Action. Longitudinal data from 2,493 seventh grade students nested in 40 schools were analyzed using a structural equation model. Autonomy was negatively correlated with intention to use alcohol and subsequent alcohol use at a later wave, and intention to use fully mediated the effect of autonomy on subsequent alcohol use. These results are consistent with the proposition that when personal autonomy is perceived as inconsistent with alcohol use among younger adolescents, students indicate a lower intention to use alcohol and use less alcohol during the following school year. PMID:23519434

  11. The Belief that Alcohol Use is Inconsistent with Personal Autonomy: A Promotive Factor for Younger Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kimberly L; Shtivelband, Annette; Comello, Maria Leonora G; Slater, Michael D

    2011-08-01

    This study explored an understudied promotive factor, a belief that alcohol use is inconsistent with personal autonomy, which may reduce adolescent intention to drink and subsequent alcohol use. Autonomy was examined as an attitudinal construct within the Theory of Reasoned Action. Longitudinal data from 2,493 seventh grade students nested in 40 schools were analyzed using a structural equation model. Autonomy was negatively correlated with intention to use alcohol and subsequent alcohol use at a later wave, and intention to use fully mediated the effect of autonomy on subsequent alcohol use. These results are consistent with the proposition that when personal autonomy is perceived as inconsistent with alcohol use among younger adolescents, students indicate a lower intention to use alcohol and use less alcohol during the following school year.

  12. Enova results report 2006; Enovas resultat- og aktivitetsrapport for 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    Energy was high on the agenda in 2006. The higher than normal electricity prices, Norway's strong dependence on electricity, and the increased focus on climate change resulted in a lot of interest in environmentally friendly energy solutions. For Enova this meant an exciting and demanding year. At the same time it has been important to take into account the long-term perspective of the activities. Enova is supposed to be a driving force for future oriented energy solutions and to contribute to a lasting change in Norway's generation and use of energy. During the past year better knowledge about what is happening to our world has had a positive effect on our efforts. This increased attention has provided Enova with the opportunity to demonstrate that energy efficiency and renewable energy are the keys to a sustainable energy future. Moreover, the general focus on energy has enabled Enova to more effectively provide business and industry, households and the public authorities with good energy advice. refs., figs., tabs., ills

  13. NOx Abatement Pilot Plant 90-day test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCray, J.A.; Boardman, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant are calcined in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to provide both volume reduction and a more stable waste form. Because a large component of the HLW is nitric acid, high levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) are produced in the process and discharged to the environment via the calciner off-gas. The NO x abatement program is required by the new Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) project permit to construct to reduce NO x emissions from the NWCF. Extensive research and development has indicated that the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process is the most promising technology for treating the NWCF off-gas. Pilot plant tests were performed to determine the compatibility of the SCR process with actual NWCF off-gas. Test results indicate that the SCR process is a viable method for abating the NO x from the NWCF off-gas. Reduction efficiencies over 95% can be obtained, with minimal amounts of ammonia slip, provided favorable operating conditions exist. Two reactors operated with series flow will provide optimum reduction capabilities. Typical operation should be performed with a first reactor stage gas space velocity of 20,000 hr -1 and an inlet temperature of 320 degrees C. The first stage exhaust NO x concentration will then dictate the parameter settings for the second stage. Operation should always strive for a peak reactor temperature of 520 degrees C in both reactors, with minimal NH 3 slip from the second reactor. Frequent fluctuations in the NWCF off-gas NO x concentration will require a full-scale reduction facility that is versatile and quick-responding. Sudden changes in NWCF off-gas NO x concentrations will require quick detection and immediate response to avoid reactor bed over-heating and/or excessive ammonia slip

  14. [Results evaluation in cervical vertigo kinesitherapy--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielińska, Marzena; Olszewski, Jurek

    2009-09-01

    The work aimed at analyzing results of kinesitherapeutic procedures in patients with cervical vertigo as well as evaluating a mobility range of the cervical spine. The study was conducted on 23 people, including 17 women and 6 men suffering from cervical vertigo, at the age of 23-73 (the average age of 49.5). All the patients had an individually selected cycle of kinesitherapeutic exercises through the period of 2 months. The objective efficiency evaluation of the applied therapy was made on the grounds of the videonystagmographic examination (VNG). Additionally, the range of active mobility of the cervical spine was analyzed and the evaluation of vertigo according to Silvoniemi's criteria was performed. After a 2-month therapy 4 patients (17.4%) out of the examined material showed a total lack of vertigo, 15 patients (65.2%) demonstrated a meaningful decrease in the vertigo intensity, also in the frequency of their occurrence in 14 cases (60.8%). Only 3 patients did not show any decrease in vertigo whereas in 1 patient a slight increase in the intensity was indicated. On the basis of a subjective evaluation of the vertigo increase according to the 5-stage Silvoniemi's scale it was proved that a mean point assessment claimed by the patients at the beginning of the therapy amounts to 3.0 points whereas after the therapy it was as follows: 1.43 pt after 2 weeks, 1.17 pt after 1 month and 1.13 pt after 2 months of kinesitherapy. It is extremely difficult to fully eliminate the symptoms of cervical vertigo (in the studied material in 4 cases--17.3%) because the causes of their occurrence, which are connected with excessive tension and degeneration in the cervical spine, cannot usually be eradicated. Additionally, as a diagnostic means, the videonystagmographic examination (VNG) accompanied by the positioning tests and the cervical rotation test facilitates precise and objective monitoring of the progress in treatment and rehabilitation of vertigo.

  15. Analysis of inconsistent source sampling in monte carlo weight-window variance reduction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Griesheimer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of Monte Carlo (MC to large-scale fixed-source problems has recently become possible with new hybrid methods that automate generation of parameters for variance reduction techniques. Two common variance reduction techniques, weight windows and source biasing, have been automated and popularized by the consistent adjoint-driven importance sampling (CADIS method. This method uses the adjoint solution from an inexpensive deterministic calculation to define a consistent set of weight windows and source particles for a subsequent MC calculation. One of the motivations for source consistency is to avoid the splitting or rouletting of particles at birth, which requires computational resources. However, it is not always possible or desirable to implement such consistency, which results in inconsistent source biasing. This paper develops an original framework that mathematically expresses the coupling of the weight window and source biasing techniques, allowing the authors to explore the impact of inconsistent source sampling on the variance of MC results. A numerical experiment supports this new framework and suggests that certain classes of problems may be relatively insensitive to inconsistent source sampling schemes with moderate levels of splitting and rouletting.

  16. Final Technical Report. Results of Phases 2-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, David [Arizona Public Service Company (APS), Phoenix, AZ (United States); Ayyanar, Raja [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Gemin, Paul [General Electric, Fairfield, CT (United States); Baggu, Murali [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Srinivasan, Devarajan [ViaSol Energy Solutions, LLC, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-02-27

    APS’s renewable energy portfolio, driven in part by Arizona’s Renewable Energy Standard (RES) currently includes more than 1100 MW of installed capacity, equating to roughly 3000 GWh of annual production. Overall renewable production is expected to grow to 6000 GWh by 2025. It is expected that distributed photovoltaics, driven primarily by lower cost, will contribute to much of this growth and that by 2025, distributed installations will account for half of all renewable production (3000GHW). As solar penetration increases, additional analysis may be required for routine utility processes to ensure continued safe and reliable operation of the electric distribution network. Such processes include residential or commercial interconnection requests and load shifting during normal feeder operations. Circuits with existing high solar penetration will also have to be studied and results will need to be evaluated for adherence to utility practices or strategy. Increased distributed PV penetration may offer benefits such as load offsetting, but it also has the potential to adversely impact distribution system operation. These effects may be exacerbated by the rapid variability of PV production. Detailed effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications continue to be studied. Comprehensive, high-resolution electrical models of the distribution system were developed to analyze the impacts of PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including coordination and anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/VAr control schemes. Modeling methods were refined by validating against field measurements. To augment the field measurements, methods were developed to synthesize high resolution load and PV generation data to facilitate quasi-static time series simulations. The models were then extended to explore boundary conditions for PV hosting capability of the feeder and to simulate common utility practices such as feeder

  17. COMPARISON BETWEEN ULTRASONOGRAPHY RESULTS AND RESULTS OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN SHOULDER PATHOLOGY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmela Filipović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The common pathological condition of the shoulder joint is rotator cuff diseases. Patient, 68 years, had pain in the shoulder with limited joint mobility. After clinical examination, blood tests (SE >100 nmol/L, CSF normal, hypergamma- globulinemia and radiographic examination (bone dilution with deformities of the humeral head, a solitary plasmocytoma was suspected. This diagnosis was excluded after biopsy. Patient was referred to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the shoulder, so ultrasonographic (US examination was performed. Our case study points to comparability between US and MRI results regarding tendinitis of muscles in the rotator cuff. By applying both diagnostic methods, calcifications within muscle tendons were evident. Sonography is faster, cheaper, more accessible and readily available method that certainly is a valuable tool for clinicians when it comes to rotator cuff lesions.

  18. 49 CFR 40.163 - How does the MRO report drug test results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... How does the MRO report drug test results? (a) As the MRO, it is your responsibility to report all... copy of that report in a format suitable for inspection and auditing by a DOT representative. (f) You...

  19. Twisted trees and inconsistency of tree estimation when gaps are treated as missing data - The impact of model mis-specification in distance corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Steel, Mike; Holder, Mark T

    2015-12-01

    Statistically consistent estimation of phylogenetic trees or gene trees is possible if pairwise sequence dissimilarities can be converted to a set of distances that are proportional to the true evolutionary distances. Susko et al. (2004) reported some strikingly broad results about the forms of inconsistency in tree estimation that can arise if corrected distances are not proportional to the true distances. They showed that if the corrected distance is a concave function of the true distance, then inconsistency due to long branch attraction will occur. If these functions are convex, then two "long branch repulsion" trees will be preferred over the true tree - though these two incorrect trees are expected to be tied as the preferred true. Here we extend their results, and demonstrate the existence of a tree shape (which we refer to as a "twisted Farris-zone" tree) for which a single incorrect tree topology will be guaranteed to be preferred if the corrected distance function is convex. We also report that the standard practice of treating gaps in sequence alignments as missing data is sufficient to produce non-linear corrected distance functions if the substitution process is not independent of the insertion/deletion process. Taken together, these results imply inconsistent tree inference under mild conditions. For example, if some positions in a sequence are constrained to be free of substitutions and insertion/deletion events while the remaining sites evolve with independent substitutions and insertion/deletion events, then the distances obtained by treating gaps as missing data can support an incorrect tree topology even given an unlimited amount of data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gender Differences in Emotional Response: Inconsistency between Experience and Expressivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yaling; Chang, Lei; Yang, Meng; Huo, Meng

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated gender differences in both emotional experience and expressivity. Heart rate (HR) was recorded as an indicator of emotional experience while the participants watched 16 video clips that induced eight types of emotion (sadness, anger, horror, disgust, neutrality, amusement, surprise, and pleasure). We also asked the participants to report valence, arousal, and motivation as indicators of emotional expressivity. Overall, the results revealed gender differences in emotional experience and emotional expressivity. When watching videos that induced anger, amusement, and pleasure, men showed larger decreases in HR, whereas women reported higher levels of arousal. There was no gender difference in HR when the participants watched videos that induced horror and disgust, but women reported lower valence, higher arousal, and stronger avoidance motivation than did men. Finally, no gender difference was observed in sadness or surprise, although there was one exception—women reported higher arousal when watching videos that induced sadness. The findings suggest that, when watching videos that induce an emotional response, men often have more intense emotional experiences, whereas women have higher emotional expressivity, particularly for negative emotions. In addition, gender differences depend on the specific emotion type but not the valence. PMID:27362361

  1. Gender Differences in Emotional Response: Inconsistency between Experience and Expressivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yaling; Chang, Lei; Yang, Meng; Huo, Meng; Zhou, Renlai

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated gender differences in both emotional experience and expressivity. Heart rate (HR) was recorded as an indicator of emotional experience while the participants watched 16 video clips that induced eight types of emotion (sadness, anger, horror, disgust, neutrality, amusement, surprise, and pleasure). We also asked the participants to report valence, arousal, and motivation as indicators of emotional expressivity. Overall, the results revealed gender differences in emotional experience and emotional expressivity. When watching videos that induced anger, amusement, and pleasure, men showed larger decreases in HR, whereas women reported higher levels of arousal. There was no gender difference in HR when the participants watched videos that induced horror and disgust, but women reported lower valence, higher arousal, and stronger avoidance motivation than did men. Finally, no gender difference was observed in sadness or surprise, although there was one exception-women reported higher arousal when watching videos that induced sadness. The findings suggest that, when watching videos that induce an emotional response, men often have more intense emotional experiences, whereas women have higher emotional expressivity, particularly for negative emotions. In addition, gender differences depend on the specific emotion type but not the valence.

  2. Gender Differences in Emotional Response: Inconsistency between Experience and Expressivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling Deng

    Full Text Available The present study investigated gender differences in both emotional experience and expressivity. Heart rate (HR was recorded as an indicator of emotional experience while the participants watched 16 video clips that induced eight types of emotion (sadness, anger, horror, disgust, neutrality, amusement, surprise, and pleasure. We also asked the participants to report valence, arousal, and motivation as indicators of emotional expressivity. Overall, the results revealed gender differences in emotional experience and emotional expressivity. When watching videos that induced anger, amusement, and pleasure, men showed larger decreases in HR, whereas women reported higher levels of arousal. There was no gender difference in HR when the participants watched videos that induced horror and disgust, but women reported lower valence, higher arousal, and stronger avoidance motivation than did men. Finally, no gender difference was observed in sadness or surprise, although there was one exception-women reported higher arousal when watching videos that induced sadness. The findings suggest that, when watching videos that induce an emotional response, men often have more intense emotional experiences, whereas women have higher emotional expressivity, particularly for negative emotions. In addition, gender differences depend on the specific emotion type but not the valence.

  3. Report of the research results for the peaceful uses of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In this report, the results of the test and research on the peaceful uses of atomic energy, performed in national test and research institutes in fiscal year 1979, are summarized. This is the 20th report, since the first report was published in 1961, and was compiled by the Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology Agency. 7 reports on nuclear fusion, 9 reports on technological safety research, 9 reports on environmental radioactivity and safety research, 13 reports on food irradiation, 5 reports on the countermeasures against cancers, 16 reports on fertilized soils, 11 reports on the improvement of plant species, 12 reports on the protection of farm products, 14 reports on the improvement of cattle breeding, 11 reports on diagnosis and treatment, 5 reports on medicines, 7 reports on environmental hygiene, 28 reports on the application to living body pathology, 9 reports on radiochemistry, 9 reports on radiation measurement, 1 report on process analysis, 3 reports on nuclear reactor materials, 3 reports on nuclear-powered ships, 4 reports on civil engineering, 3 reports on radioactivation analysis and 2 reports on injury prevention research are summarized. (Kako, I.)

  4. 26 CFR 1.1311(b)-1 - Maintenance of an inconsistent position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., or nonrecognition, as the case may be, in the year of the error, and (ii) such inconsistent position... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Maintenance of an inconsistent position. 1.1311....1311(b)-1 Maintenance of an inconsistent position. (a) In general. Under the circumstances stated in...

  5. CheShift-2 resolves a local inconsistency between two X-ray crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, Jorge A.; Sue, Shih-Che; Fraser, James S.; Scheraga, Harold A.; Dyson, H. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Since chemical shifts provide important and relatively accessible information about protein structure in solution, a Web server, CheShift-2, was developed for structure interrogation, based on a quantum mechanics database of 13 C α chemical shifts. We report the application of CheShift-2 to a local inconsistency between two X-ray crystal structures (PDB IDs 1IKN and 1NFI) of the complex between the p65/p50 heterodimer of NFκB and its inhibitor IκBα. The availability of NMR resonance assignments that included the region of the inconsistency provided an opportunity for independent validation of the CheShift-2 server. Application of the server showed that the 13 C α chemical shifts measured for the Gly270-Pro281 sequence close to the C-terminus of IκBα were unequivocally consistent with the backbone structure modeled in the 1IKN structure, and were inconsistent with the 1NFI structure. Previous NOE measurements had demonstrated that the position of a tryptophan ring in the region immediately N-terminal in this region was not consistent with either structure. Subsequent recalculation of the local structure in this region, based on the electron density of the deposited structure factors for 1IKN, confirmed that the local backbone structure was best modeled by 1IKN, but that the rotamer of Trp258 is consistent with the 1NFI structure, including the presence of a hydrogen bond between the ring NεH of Trp258 and the backbone carbonyl group of Gln278. The consensus between all of these measures suggests that the CheShift-2 server operates well under circumstances in which backbone chemical shifts are available but where local plasticity may render X-ray structural data ambiguous.

  6. Development and Validation of Culture-Specific Variable Response Inconsistency and True Response Inconsistency Scales for Use with the Korean MMPI-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterer, Holly L.; Han, Kyunghee; Hur, Jaehong; Moon, Kyungjoo

    2010-01-01

    In response to the concern that Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; J. N. Butcher, W. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989; J. N. Butcher et al., 2001) Variable Response Inconsistency (VRIN) and True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) score invalidity criteria recommended for use with American samples results…

  7. Cassandra - D7.3.5 - M30 status : Report dissemination results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    This deliverable is a status report on the dissemination activities and results in the CASSANDRA project. These status reports are made regularly, with one more to come at the project’s finish. Together, these make up deliverable D7.3 – Dissemination results. In this report, the results of the

  8. Cassandra - D7.3.4 - M24 status report dissemination results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This deliverable is a status report on the dissemination activities and results in the CASSANDRA project. These status reports are made regularly, with two more to come. Together, these make up deliverable D7.3 – Dissemination results. In this fifth report, the results of the dissemination

  9. Spontaneous indices are inconsistent with arterial baroreflex gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Ruth D; Salisbury, Julie K; Taylor, J Andrew

    2003-10-01

    Spontaneously occurring, parallel fluctuations in arterial pressure and heart period are frequently used as indices of baroreflex function. Despite the convenience of spontaneous indices, their relation to the arterial baroreflex remains unclear. Therefore, in 97 volunteers, we derived 5 proposed indices (sequence method, alpha-index, transfer function, low-frequency transfer function, and impulse response function), compared them with arterial baroreflex gain (by the modified Oxford pharmacologic technique), and examined their relation to carotid distensibility and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The subjects comprised men and women (n=41) aged 25 to 86 years, 30% of whom had established coronary artery disease. Generally, the indices were correlated with each other (except alpha-index and low-frequency transfer function) and with baroreflex gain. However, the Bland-Altman method demonstrated that the spontaneous indices had limits of agreement as large as the baroreflex gain itself. Even in individuals within the lowest tertile of baroreflex gain for whom baroreflex gain appears to be the most clinically relevant, spontaneous indices failed to relate to baroreflex gain. In fact, for these individuals, there was no correlation between any index and baroreflex gain. Forward stepwise linear regression showed that all spontaneous indices and baroreflex gain were related to respiratory sinus arrhythmia, but only baroreflex gain was related to carotid distensibility. Therefore, these data suggest that spontaneous indices are inadequate estimates of gain and are inconsistent with arterial baroreflex function.

  10. Firewalls as artefacts of inconsistent truncations of quantum geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germani, Cristiano [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Muenchen (Germany); Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Sarkar, Debajyoti [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper we argue that a firewall is simply a manifestation of an inconsistent truncation of non-perturbative effects that unitarize the semiclassical black hole. Namely, we show that a naive truncation of quantum corrections to the Hawking spectrum at order O(e{sup -S}), inexorably leads to a ''localised'' divergent energy density near the black hole horizon. Nevertheless, in the same approximation, a distant observer only sees a discretised spectrum and concludes that unitarity is achieved by (e{sup -S}) effects. This is due to the fact that instead, the correct quantum corrections to the Hawking spectrum go like (g{sup tt}e{sup -S}). Therefore, while at a distance far away from the horizon, where g{sup tt} ∼ 1, quantum corrections are perturbative, they do diverge close to the horizon, where g{sup tt} → ∞. Nevertheless, these ''corrections'' nicely re-sum so that correlations functions are smooth at the would-be black hole horizon. Thus, we conclude that the appearance of firewalls is just a signal of the breaking of the semiclassical approximation at the Page time, even for large black holes. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Firewalls as artefacts of inconsistent truncations of quantum geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germani, Cristiano; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we argue that a firewall is simply a manifestation of an inconsistent truncation of non-perturbative effects that unitarize the semiclassical black hole. Namely, we show that a naive truncation of quantum corrections to the Hawking spectrum at order ${\\cal O}(e^{-S})$, inexorably leads to a "localised'' divergent energy density near the black hole horizon. Nevertheless, in the same approximation, a distant observer only sees a discretised spectrum and concludes that unitarity is achieved by ${\\cal O}(e^{-S})$ effects. This is due to the fact that instead, the correct quantum corrections to the Hawking spectrum go like ${\\cal O}( g^{tt} e^{-S})$. Therefore, while at a distance far away from the horizon, where $g^{tt}\\approx 1$, quantum corrections {\\it are} perturbative, they {\\it do} diverge close to the horizon, where $g^{tt}\\rightarrow \\infty$. Nevertheless, these "corrections" nicely re-sum so that correlations functions are smooth at the would-be black hole horizon. Thus, we conclude that the appearance of firewalls is just a signal of the breaking of the semiclassical approximation at the Page time, even for large black holes.

  12. Firewalls as artefacts of inconsistent truncations of quantum geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germani, Cristiano; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we argue that a firewall is simply a manifestation of an inconsistent truncation of non-perturbative effects that unitarize the semiclassical black hole. Namely, we show that a naive truncation of quantum corrections to the Hawking spectrum at order O(e -S ), inexorably leads to a ''localised'' divergent energy density near the black hole horizon. Nevertheless, in the same approximation, a distant observer only sees a discretised spectrum and concludes that unitarity is achieved by (e -S ) effects. This is due to the fact that instead, the correct quantum corrections to the Hawking spectrum go like (g tt e -S ). Therefore, while at a distance far away from the horizon, where g tt ∼ 1, quantum corrections are perturbative, they do diverge close to the horizon, where g tt → ∞. Nevertheless, these ''corrections'' nicely re-sum so that correlations functions are smooth at the would-be black hole horizon. Thus, we conclude that the appearance of firewalls is just a signal of the breaking of the semiclassical approximation at the Page time, even for large black holes. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Inconsistency prevents the valuable synergism of explanatory and pragmatic trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Luis C L; Correia, Vitor C A; Souza, Thiago M B; Cerqueira, Antonio Maurício S; Alexandre, Felipe K B; Garcia, Guilherme; Ferreira, Felipe R M; Lopes, Fernanda O A

    2018-05-01

    To assess review articles on pragmatic trials in order to describe how authors define the aim of this type of study, how comprehensive methodological topics are covered, and which topics are most valued by authors. Review articles were selected from Medline Database, based on the expression "pragmatic trial" in the titles. Five trained medical students evaluated the articles, based on a list of 15 self-explanatory methodological topics. Each article was evaluated regarding topics covered. Baseline statements on the aim of pragmatic trials were derived. Among 22 articles identified, there was general agreement that the aim of a pragmatic trial is to evaluate if the intervention works under real-world conditions. The mean number of methodological topics addressed by each article was 7.6 ± 3.1. Only one article covered all 15 topics, three articles (14%) responded to at least 75% of topics and 13 articles (59%) mentioned at least 50% of the topics. The relative frequency each of the 15 topics was cited by articles had a mean of 50% ± 25%. No topic was addressed by all articles, only three (20%) were addressed by more than 75% of articles. There is agreement on the different aims of explanatory and pragmatic trials. But there is a large variation on methodological topics used to define a pragmatic trial, which led to inconsistency in defining the typical methodology of a pragmatic trial. © 2018 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Quality controls in integrative approaches to detect errors and inconsistencies in biological databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisalberti Giorgio

    2010-12-01

    different biological databases and integrated in the GFINDer data warehouse. By doing so, we identified in these data a variety of different types of errors and inconsistencies; this enables us to ensure good quality of the data in the GFINDer data warehouse. We reported all identified data errors and inconsistencies to the curators of the original databases from where the data were retrieved, who mainly corrected them in subsequent updating of the original database. This contributed to improve the quality of the data available, in the original databases, to the whole scientific community.

  15. Factors associated with inconsistent condom use with clients among female sex workers in Podgorica, Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laušević Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Female sex workers (FSWs are a group at increased risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, and inconsistent condom use with clients is a known risk factor for infection in this group. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine factors associated with inconsistent condom use with clients among female sex workers in Podgorica, Montenegro. Methods. We conducted an HIV bio-behavioral cross-sectional study in a sample of female sex workers recruited by snowball sampling. Results. A total of 142 FSWs were recruited. Eighty-one (57.0% of them used condoms consistently with clients. HIV prevalence was 0.0%. In the multivariate analysis inconsistent condom use with clients in the previous month was associated with clients’ negative personal attitude [age-adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 22.7, 95% confidence interval (CI = 2.3-228.0] or client’s indifference (AOR = 13.0, 95% CI = 1.4-118.9 towards using condom during sex with sexual workers, decision making by clients or by mutual agreement with client about using a condom (AOR = 10.2, 95% CI = 3.7-28.0, and early age of first sex (AOR = 5.4, 95% CI = 1.6-18.5. Conclusion. Our results suggest not only the need for further promotion of condom use, information and education for FSW but also the need to strengthen negotiation skills of FSWs with clients on regular use of condoms, as well as the need to extend prevention programs to clients of FSWs.

  16. SCEGRAM: An image database for semantic and syntactic inconsistencies in scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlschläger, Sabine; Võ, Melissa Le-Hoa

    2017-10-01

    Our visual environment is not random, but follows compositional rules according to what objects are usually found where. Despite the growing interest in how such semantic and syntactic rules - a scene grammar - enable effective attentional guidance and object perception, no common image database containing highly-controlled object-scene modifications has been publically available. Such a database is essential in minimizing the risk that low-level features drive high-level effects of interest, which is being discussed as possible source of controversial study results. To generate the first database of this kind - SCEGRAM - we took photographs of 62 real-world indoor scenes in six consistency conditions that contain semantic and syntactic (both mild and extreme) violations as well as their combinations. Importantly, always two scenes were paired, so that an object was semantically consistent in one scene (e.g., ketchup in kitchen) and inconsistent in the other (e.g., ketchup in bathroom). Low-level salience did not differ between object-scene conditions and was generally moderate. Additionally, SCEGRAM contains consistency ratings for every object-scene condition, as well as object-absent scenes and object-only images. Finally, a cross-validation using eye-movements replicated previous results of longer dwell times for both semantic and syntactic inconsistencies compared to consistent controls. In sum, the SCEGRAM image database is the first to contain well-controlled semantic and syntactic object-scene inconsistencies that can be used in a broad range of cognitive paradigms (e.g., verbal and pictorial priming, change detection, object identification, etc.) including paradigms addressing developmental aspects of scene grammar. SCEGRAM can be retrieved for research purposes from http://www.scenegrammarlab.com/research/scegram-database/ .

  17. Inconsistencies and open questions regarding low-dose health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, R.H.; Koehnlein, W.

    1994-01-01

    The state of knowledge of health effects from low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation has recently been reviewed in extensive reports by three prestigious national and international commissions of scientific and medical experts with partially overlapping membership, known by their acronyms UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation), BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation), and ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). Publication of these reports was followed by a number of summaries in scientific journals, authored by recognized radiation experts, that purport to present a scientific consensus of low-dose effects in a more accessible format for health professionals. A critical comparison between various presentations of accepted views, however, reveals inconsistencies regarding open-quotes establishedclose quotes facts and unsettled questions

  18. Is Inconsistent Pre-treatment Bedtime Related to CPAP Non-Adherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Amy M.; King, Tonya S.; Sawyer, Douglas A.; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Lack of adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) limits the effectiveness of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We hypothesized that an irregular bedtime would be negatively related to regular use of CPAP treatment. If so, modifying bedtime schedule may address the persistent problem of inconsistent CPAP use in adults with OSA. In a prospective longitudinal study, we examined whether inconsistent self-reported bedtime before initiation of CPAP treatment, operationalized as bedtime variability, was (1) different among those adherent (≥ 4 hours per night) and non-adherent to CPAP treatment at one week and one month; and/or (2) was related to one-week and one-month CPAP use when other variables were accounted for. Consecutively-recruited newly-diagnosed OSA adults (N=79) completed sleep diaries prior to CPAP treatment. One-week and one-month objective CPAP use data were collected. Pre-treatment bedtime variability was different among CPAP non-adherers and adherers at one month and was a significant predictor of non-adherence at one month in multivariate analyses. The odds of one-month CPAP non-adherence were 3.5 times greater in those whose pre-treatment bedtimes varied by >75 minutes. Addressing sleep schedule prior to CPAP initiation may be an opportunity to improve CPAP adherence. PMID:25353159

  19. Inconsistencies In Croatian Strategy Of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, A.; Levanat, I.; Lokner, V.; Saponja-Milutinovic, D.

    2015-01-01

    The paper addresses inconsistencies appearing in the new Croatian Strategy of radioactive waste, spent sources and spent nuclear fuel management. These appear both at the conceptual level as well as at the level of justification: 1) New Croatian Strategy is planning unconditional and hasty establishment of a Croatian dry storage for the Croatian half of the spent fuel from the Krsko nuclear power plant (in about 10 years), although the plant itself is planning establishment of dry storage for its spent fuel on its own site in Slovenia by 2019 - which is noted in the same Strategy. 2) The Croatian Strategy provides false arguments for establishment of radioactive waste storage and repository in Croatia (based on invented 'interpretations' of the Bilateral agreement with Slovenia), although true arguments, legitimate and convincing, are obvious and sufficient for such strategic planning. One author of this paper communicated suggestions, based on above arguments, to the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety, who had drafted the Strategy and was coordinating preparation of the final proposal during the document adoption procedure. Croatian Radiation Protection Association and Croatian Nuclear Society also provided comments aimed at improving the draft. The authors here suggest that only clear and honest arguments can maintain public confidence in the competence of the State, which is a prerequisite for establishing radioactive waste management facilities. The authors propose that the State office should engage Croatian professional associations and societies already in the process of strategic documents drafting, whereas they should most seriously focus on the conceptual aspects of such documents. (author).

  20. 12 CFR 550.480 - How do I report the results of the audit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How do I report the results of the audit? 550... report the results of the audit? (a) Annual audit. If you conduct an annual audit, you must note the results of the audit (including significant actions taken as a result of the audit) in the minutes of the...

  1. The closed-mindedness that wasn’t: Need for structure and expectancy-inconsistent information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eKemmelmeier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Social-cognitive researchers have typically assumed that individuals high in need for structure or need for closure tend to be closed-minded: they are motivated to resist or ignore information that is inconsistent with existing beliefs but instead they rely on category-based expectancies. The present paper argues that this conclusion is not necessarily warranted because previous studies did not allow individual differences in categorical processing to emerge and did not consider different distributions of category-relevant information. Using a person memory paradigm, Experiments 1 and 2 show that, when categorical processing is optional, high need-for-structure individuals are especially likely to use this type processing to reduce uncertainty, which results in superior recall for expectancy-inconsistent information. Experiment 2 demonstrates that such information is also more likely to be used in judgment making, leading to judgmental moderation among high need-for-structure individuals. Experiments 3 and 4 used a person memory paradigm which requires categorical processing regardless of levels of need for structure. Experiment 3 and 4 demonstrate that, whether expectancy-consistent or -inconsistent information is recalled better is a function of whether the majority of available information is compatible or incompatible with an initial category-based expectancy. Experiment 4 confirmed that the extent to which high need-for-structure individuals attend to different types of information varies with their distribution. The discussion highlights that task affordances have a critical influences on the consequences of categorical processing for memory and social judgment. Thus, high need for structure does not necessarily equate closed-mindedness.

  2. The closed-mindedness that wasn't: need for structure and expectancy-inconsistent information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmelmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Social-cognitive researchers have typically assumed that individuals high in need for structure or need for closure tend to be closed-minded: they are motivated to resist or ignore information that is inconsistent with existing beliefs but instead they rely on category-based expectancies. The present paper argues that this conclusion is not necessarily warranted because previous studies did not allow individual differences in categorical processing to emerge and did not consider different distributions of category-relevant information. Using a person memory paradigm, Experiments 1 and 2 shows that, when categorical processing is optional, high need-for-structure individuals are especially likely to use this type processing to reduce uncertainty, which results in superior recall for expectancy-inconsistent information. Experiment 2 demonstrates that such information is also more likely to be used in judgment making, leading to judgmental moderation among high need-for-structure individuals. Experiments 3 and 4 used a person memory paradigm which requires categorical processing regardless of levels of need for structure. Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrate that, whether expectancy-consistent or -inconsistent information is recalled better is a function of whether the majority of available information is compatible or incompatible with an initial category-based expectancy. Experiment 4 confirmed that the extent to which high need-for-structure individuals attend to different types of information varies with their distribution. The discussion highlights that task affordances have a critical influence on the consequences of categorical processing for memory and social judgment. Thus, high need for structure does not necessarily equate closed-mindedness.

  3. Factors Associated with Inconsistent Condom Use among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyan Yi

    Full Text Available Compared to the general population, men who have sex with men (MSM are at greater risk for HIV and less understood due to their more hidden and stigmatized nature. Moreover, the discrepancy in findings in the literature merits further investigations in MSM populations from different cultures and settings. We therefore conducted this study to explore factors associated with inconsistent condom use among high-risk MSM in Cambodia.This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 among 367 MSM randomly selected from Battembang and Siem Reap using a two-stage cluster sampling method. A structured questionnaire was used for face-to-face interviews to collect information on characteristics of respondents, HIV testing history, self-perception of HIV risk, substance use, sexual behaviors, mental disorders, and HIV knowledge. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors independently associated with inconsistent condom use.On average, 62.3% of respondents reported that they always used condoms over the past three months. The rates varied with types of sexual partners; the proportion of respondents who reported always using condoms was 55.1%, 64.2%, 75.9%, 73.0%, 78.1%, and 70.3%, for sexual partners who were girlfriends, boyfriends, female sex workers, male sex workers, female clients, or male clients, respectively. After adjustment, inconsistent condom use was significantly associated with age of ≥25 (AOR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.09-2.86, self-rated quality of life as good or very good (AOR = 4.37, 95% CI = 1.79-5.67, self-perception of higher HIV risk compared to the general population (AOR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.35-4.17, illicit drug use in the past three months (AOR = 5.76, 95% CI = 1.65-10.09, and reported consistent lubricant use when selling anal sex to men in the past three months (AOR = 2.85, 95% CI = 1.07-8.12.We found risky sexual behaviors to be considerably high among MSM in this study, especially among those who used

  4. Classification and Optimization of Decision Trees for Inconsistent Decision Tables Represented as MVD Tables

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad

    2015-10-11

    Decision tree is a widely used technique to discover patterns from consistent data set. But if the data set is inconsistent, where there are groups of examples (objects) with equal values of conditional attributes but different decisions (values of the decision attribute), then to discover the essential patterns or knowledge from the data set is challenging. We consider three approaches (generalized, most common and many-valued decision) to handle such inconsistency. We created different greedy algorithms using various types of impurity and uncertainty measures to construct decision trees. We compared the three approaches based on the decision tree properties of the depth, average depth and number of nodes. Based on the result of the comparison, we choose to work with the many-valued decision approach. Now to determine which greedy algorithms are efficient, we compared them based on the optimization and classification results. It was found that some greedy algorithms Mult\\\\_ws\\\\_entSort, and Mult\\\\_ws\\\\_entML are good for both optimization and classification.

  5. The Ups and Downs of Cognitive Function: Neuroticism and Negative Affect Drive Performance Inconsistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Elizabeth; Stawski, Robert S; Sliwinski, Martin J; Smyth, Joshua M; MacDonald, Stuart W S

    2018-03-26

    Response time inconsistency (RTI)-or trial-to-trial variability in speeded performance-is increasingly recognized as an indicator of transient lapses of attention, cognitive health status, and central nervous system integrity, as well as a potential early indicator of normal and pathological cognitive aging (Hultsch, Strauss, Hunter, & MacDonald, 2008; MacDonald, Li, & Bäckman, 2009). Comparatively, little research has examined personality predictors of RTI across adulthood. We evaluated the association between the personality trait neuroticism and RTI in a community-dwelling sample of 317 adults between the ages of 19 to 83 and tested for two indirect pathways through negative affect (NA) and cognitive interference (CI). The personality trait neuroticism predicted greater RTI independent of mean response time performance and demographic covariates; the results were age-invariant. Furthermore, NA (but not CI) accounted for this association and moderated mediation model results indicated that older adults were more vulnerable to the adverse effects of NA. Neuroticism predicts greater response time inconsistency irrespective of mean performance and this effect is driven largely by heightened negative emotionality that may be particularly detrimental for older adults.

  6. Classification and Optimization of Decision Trees for Inconsistent Decision Tables Represented as MVD Tables

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad; Moshkov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Decision tree is a widely used technique to discover patterns from consistent data set. But if the data set is inconsistent, where there are groups of examples (objects) with equal values of conditional attributes but different decisions (values of the decision attribute), then to discover the essential patterns or knowledge from the data set is challenging. We consider three approaches (generalized, most common and many-valued decision) to handle such inconsistency. We created different greedy algorithms using various types of impurity and uncertainty measures to construct decision trees. We compared the three approaches based on the decision tree properties of the depth, average depth and number of nodes. Based on the result of the comparison, we choose to work with the many-valued decision approach. Now to determine which greedy algorithms are efficient, we compared them based on the optimization and classification results. It was found that some greedy algorithms Mult\\_ws\\_entSort, and Mult\\_ws\\_entML are good for both optimization and classification.

  7. Reduction of image-based ADI-to-AEI overlay inconsistency with improved algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Liang; Lin, Shu-Hong; Chen, Kai-Hsiung; Ke, Chih-Ming; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    In image-based overlay (IBO) measurement, the measurement quality of various measurement spectra can be judged by quality indicators and also the ADI-to-AEI similarity to determine the optimum light spectrum. However we found some IBO measured results showing erroneous indication of wafer expansion from the difference between the ADI and the AEI maps, even after their measurement spectra were optimized. To reduce this inconsistency, an improved image calculation algorithm is proposed in this paper. Different gray levels composed of inner- and outer-box contours are extracted to calculate their ADI overlay errors. The symmetry of intensity distribution at the thresholds dictated by a range of gray levels is used to determine the particular gray level that can minimize the ADI-to-AEI overlay inconsistency. After this improvement, the ADI is more similar to AEI with less expansion difference. The same wafer was also checked by the diffraction-based overlay (DBO) tool to verify that there is no physical wafer expansion. When there is actual wafer expansion induced by large internal stress, both the IBO and the DBO measurements indicate similar expansion results. The scanning white-light interference microscope was used to check the variation of wafer warpage during the ADI and AEI stages. It predicts a similar trend with the overlay difference map, confirming the internal stress.

  8. Empirical Tryout of a New Statistic for Detecting Temporally Inconsistent Responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Matthew J

    2018-01-01

    Statistical screening of self-report data is often advised to support the quality of analyzed responses - For example, reduction of insufficient effort responding (IER). One recently introduced index based on Mahalanobis's D for detecting outliers in cross-sectional designs replaces centered scores with difference scores between repeated-measure items: Termed person temporal consistency ( D 2 ptc ). Although the adapted D 2 ptc index demonstrated usefulness in simulation datasets, it has not been applied to empirical data. The current study addresses D 2 ptc 's low uptake by critically appraising its performance across three empirical applications. Independent samples were selected to represent a range of scenarios commonly encountered by organizational researchers. First, in Sample 1, a repeat-measure of future time perspective (FTP) inexperienced working adults (age >40-years; n = 620) indicated that temporal inconsistency was significantly related to respondent age and item reverse-scoring. Second, in repeat-measure of team efficacy aggregations, D 2 ptc successfully detected team-level inconsistency across repeat-performance cycles. Thirdly, the usefulness of the D 2 ptc was examined in an experimental study dataset of subjective life expectancy indicated significantly more stable responding in experimental conditions compared to controls. The empirical findings support D 2 ptc 's flexible and useful application to distinct study designs. Discussion centers on current limitations and further extensions that may be of value to psychologists screening self-report data for strengthening response quality and meaningfulness of inferences from repeated-measures self-reports. Taken together, the findings support the usefulness of the newly devised statistic for detecting IER and other extreme response patterns.

  9. Inconsistency and social decision making in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Nora; Brändle, Laura S; Hager, Oliver M; Haynes, Melanie; Fischbacher, Urs; Hasler, Gregor

    2016-09-30

    Inconsistent social behavior is a core psychopathological feature of borderline personality disorder. The goal of the present study was to examine inconsistency in social decision-making using simple economic social experiments. We investigated the decisions of 17 female patients with BPD, 24 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 36 healthy controls in three single shot economic experiments measuring trust, cooperation, and punishment. BPD severity was assessed using the Zanarini Rating Scale for BPD. Investments across identical one-shot trust and punishment games were significantly more inconsistent in BPD patients than in controls. Such inconsistencies were only found in the social risk conditions of the trust and punishment conditions but not in the non-social control conditions. MDD patients did not show such inconsistencies. Furthermore, social support was negatively correlated with inconsistent decision-making in the trust and punishment game, which underscores the clinical relevance of this finding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reaction time inconsistency in a spatial stroop task: age-related differences through childhood and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin R; Strauss, Esther H; Hultsch, David F; Hunter, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    Age-related differences in inconsistency of reaction time (RT) across the life span were examined on a task with differing levels of demand on executive control. A total of 546 participants, aged 5 to 76 years, completed a spatial Stroop task that permitted observations under three conditions (congruent, incongruent, and neutral) according to the correspondence between the required response (based on stimulus direction) and stimulus location. An interference effect was observed across all ages. Analyses of neutral condition data replicated previous research demonstrating RT inconsistency follows a U-shaped developmental curve across the life span. The relationship between age and inconsistency, however, depended on condition: inconsistency in the congruent condition was higher than inconsistency in both the neutral and incongruent conditions across middle-aged groups. Reaction time inconsistency may reflect processing efficiency that is maximal in young adulthood and may also be sensitive to fluctuations in performance that reflect momentarily highly efficient responding.

  11. The relationship between everyday problem solving and inconsistency in reaction time in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Catherine L; Strauss, Esther; Hultsch, David F; Hunter, Michael A

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether inconsistency in reaction time (RT) is predictive of older adults' ability to solve everyday problems. A sample of 304 community dwelling non-demented older adults, ranging in age from 62 to 92, completed a measure of everyday problem solving, the Everyday Problems Test (EPT). Inconsistency in latencies across trials was assessed on four RT tasks. Performance on the EPT was found to vary according to age and cognitive status. Both mean latencies and inconsistency were significantly associated with EPT performance, such that slower and more inconsistent RTs were associated with poorer everyday problem solving abilities. Even after accounting for age, education, and mean level of performance, inconsistency in reaction time continued to account for a significant proportion of the variance in EPT scores. These findings suggest that indicators of inconsistency in RT may be of functional relevance.

  12. Bias field inconsistency correction of motion-scattered multislice MRI for improved 3D image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A; Corbett-Detig, James M; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2011-09-01

    A common solution to clinical MR imaging in the presence of large anatomical motion is to use fast multislice 2D studies to reduce slice acquisition time and provide clinically usable slice data. Recently, techniques have been developed which retrospectively correct large scale 3D motion between individual slices allowing the formation of a geometrically correct 3D volume from the multiple slice stacks. One challenge, however, in the final reconstruction process is the possibility of varying intensity bias in the slice data, typically due to the motion of the anatomy relative to imaging coils. As a result, slices which cover the same region of anatomy at different times may exhibit different sensitivity. This bias field inconsistency can induce artifacts in the final 3D reconstruction that can impact both clinical interpretation of key tissue boundaries and the automated analysis of the data. Here we describe a framework to estimate and correct the bias field inconsistency in each slice collectively across all motion corrupted image slices. Experiments using synthetic and clinical data show that the proposed method reduces intensity variability in tissues and improves the distinction between key tissue types.

  13. Inconsistency in the analysis of morphological deformities in chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmelin, Johanna; Vuori, Kari-Matti; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of morphological deformities of chironomid larvae as an indicator of sediment toxicity has been studied for decades. However, standards for deformity analysis are lacking. The authors evaluated whether 25 experts diagnosed larval deformities in a similar manner. Based on high-quality digital images, the experts rated 211 menta of Chironomus spp. larvae as normal or deformed. The larvae were from a site with polluted sediments or from a reference site. The authors revealed this to a random half of the experts, and the rest conducted the assessment blind. The authors quantified the interrater agreement by kappa coefficient, tested whether open and blind assessments differed in deformity incidence and in differentiation between the sites, and identified those deformity types rated most consistently or inconsistently. The total deformity incidence varied greatly, from 10.9% to 66.4% among experts. Kappa coefficient across rater pairs averaged 0.52, indicating insufficient agreement. The deformity types rated most consistently were those missing teeth or with extra teeth. The open and blind assessments did not differ, but differentiation between sites was clearest for raters who counted primarily absolute deformities such as missing and extra teeth and excluded apparent mechanical aberrations or deviations in tooth size or symmetry. The highly differing criteria in deformity assignment have likely led to inconsistent results in midge larval deformity studies and indicate an urgent need for standardization of the analysis. © 2015 SETAC.

  14. Are neurocognitive speed and inconsistency similarly affected in type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Bonnie P; Dixon, Roger A; Hultsch, David F; MacDonald, Stuart W S

    2011-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of aging with indirect but detectable and cumulative neurological implications. We systematically tested whether neurocognitive speed (mean rate) or inconsistency (intraindividual variability) was the more sensitive clinical marker of T2D. Three of four research questions used a cross-sectional wave of the Victoria Longitudinal Study (VLS) divided into T2D (age 55-81 years) and control (age = 53-91 years) groups. The fourth question addressed relative two-wave longitudinal changes. Each of four speeded tasks produced intraindividual mean rate (IM) and intraindividual standard deviation (ISD) scores. First, the T2D group performed more slowly than the controls. Second, this deficit extended to inconsistency, but less uniformly. Third, based on logistic regression analyses, IM was the more effective predictor of T2D status. Fourth, we observed similar longitudinal change patterns for IM and ISD. Results are linked to the theoretical location of T2D on an adjusted neural vulnerability continuum.

  15. Flexibility of Gender Stereotypes: Italian Study on Comparative Gender-consistent and Gender-inconsistent Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Sagone

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this study is flexibility in gender stereotyping linked to attribution of toys, socio-cognitive traits, and occupations in 160 Italian children aged 6 to 12 years. We used the Gender Toys Choice, the Gender Traits Choice, and the Gender Jobs Choice, a selected set of colored cards containing masculine and feminine stimuli to assign to a male or female or both male and female silhouette (the flexible-choice technique. In order to verify the change of flexibility in gender stereotyping, we made use of four cartoon stories with male and female characters with typical or atypical traits and performing gender-consistent or gender-inconsistent activities. Results indicated that the exposure to cartoon stories with gender-inconsistent information rather than cartoon stories with gender-consistent information increased flexibility in gender stereotyping, showing age differences in favor of children aged 11-12. Implications in relation to the developmental-constructivist approach were noted.

  16. Formalization of taxon-based constraints to detect inconsistencies in annotation and ontology development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungall Christopher J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gene Ontology project supports categorization of gene products according to their location of action, the molecular functions that they carry out, and the processes that they are involved in. Although the ontologies are intentionally developed to be taxon neutral, and to cover all species, there are inherent taxon specificities in some branches. For example, the process 'lactation' is specific to mammals and the location 'mitochondrion' is specific to eukaryotes. The lack of an explicit formalization of these constraints can lead to errors and inconsistencies in automated and manual annotation. Results We have formalized the taxonomic constraints implicit in some GO classes, and specified these at various levels in the ontology. We have also developed an inference system that can be used to check for violations of these constraints in annotations. Using the constraints in conjunction with the inference system, we have detected and removed errors in annotations and improved the structure of the ontology. Conclusions Detection of inconsistencies in taxon-specificity enables gradual improvement of the ontologies, the annotations, and the formalized constraints. This is progressively improving the quality of our data. The full system is available for download, and new constraints or proposed changes to constraints can be submitted online at https://sourceforge.net/tracker/?atid=605890&group_id=36855.

  17. Peer assessment of aviation performance: inconsistent for good reasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Mavin, Timothy J

    2015-03-01

    Research into expertise is relatively common in cognitive science concerning expertise existing across many domains. However, much less research has examined how experts within the same domain assess the performance of their peer experts. We report the results of a modified think-aloud study conducted with 18 pilots (6 first officers, 6 captains, and 6 flight examiners). Pairs of same-ranked pilots were asked to rate the performance of a captain flying in a critical pre-recorded simulator scenario. Findings reveal (a) considerable variance within performance categories, (b) differences in the process used as evidence in support of a performance rating, (c) different numbers and types of facts (cues) identified, and (d) differences in how specific performance events affect choice of performance category and gravity of performance assessment. Such variance is consistent with low inter-rater reliability. Because raters exhibited good, albeit imprecise, reasons and facts, a fuzzy mathematical model of performance rating was developed. The model provides good agreement with observed variations. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. Religious variations in perceived infertility and inconsistent contraceptive use among unmarried young adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Amy M; Haynes, Stacy H; Hill, Terrence D; Bartkowski, John P

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we examine associations among personal religiosity, perceived infertility, and inconsistent contraceptive use among unmarried young adults (ages 18-29). The data for this investigation came from the National Survey of Reproductive and Contraceptive Knowledge (n = 1,695). We used multinomial logistic regression to model perceived infertility, adjusted probabilities to model rationales for perceived infertility, and binary logistic regression to model inconsistent contraceptive use. Evangelical Protestants were more likely than non-affiliates to believe that they were infertile. Among the young women who indicated some likelihood of infertility, evangelical Protestants were also more likely than their other Protestant or non-Christian faith counterparts to believe that they were infertile because they had unprotected sex without becoming pregnant. Although evangelical Protestants were more likely to exhibit inconsistent contraception use than non-affiliates, we were unable to attribute any portion of this difference to infertility perceptions. Whereas most studies of religion and health emphasize the salubrious role of personal religiosity, our results suggest that evangelical Protestants may be especially likely to hold misconceptions about their fertility. Because these misconceptions fail to explain higher rates of inconsistent contraception use among evangelical Protestants, additional research is needed to understand the principles and motives of this unique religious community. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interesting association rule mining with consistent and inconsistent rule detection from big sales data in distributed environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh J. Prajapati

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is an increasing demand in mining interesting patterns from the big data. The process of analyzing such a huge amount of data is really computationally complex task when using traditional methods. The overall purpose of this paper is in twofold. First, this paper presents a novel approach to identify consistent and inconsistent association rules from sales data located in distributed environment. Secondly, the paper also overcomes the main memory bottleneck and computing time overhead of single computing system by applying computations to multi node cluster. The proposed method initially extracts frequent itemsets for each zone using existing distributed frequent pattern mining algorithms. The paper also compares the time efficiency of Mapreduce based frequent pattern mining algorithm with Count Distribution Algorithm (CDA and Fast Distributed Mining (FDM algorithms. The association generated from frequent itemsets are too large that it becomes complex to analyze it. Thus, Mapreduce based consistent and inconsistent rule detection (MR-CIRD algorithm is proposed to detect the consistent and inconsistent rules from big data and provide useful and actionable knowledge to the domain experts. These pruned interesting rules also give useful knowledge for better marketing strategy as well. The extracted consistent and inconsistent rules are evaluated and compared based on different interestingness measures presented together with experimental results that lead to the final conclusions.

  20. Consistency and Inconsistency in PhD Thesis Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid; Lovat, Terry; Fairbairn, Hedy

    2008-01-01

    This is a mixed methods investigation of consistency in PhD examination. At its core is the quantification of the content and conceptual analysis of examiner reports for 804 Australian theses. First, the level of consistency between what examiners say in their reports and the recommendation they provide for a thesis is explored, followed by an…

  1. 49 CFR 382.403 - Reporting of results in a management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of results in a management information... Confidentiality § 382.403 Reporting of results in a management information system. (a) An employer shall prepare... that the FMCSA specifies in its request. The employer must use the Management Information System (MIS...

  2. 75 FR 32484 - Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ...] Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and Interpretation... public meeting: Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and... cytogenetic tests. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on June 30, 2010, from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Location...

  3. Reaction time performance in adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: evidence of inconsistency in the fast and slow portions of the RT distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin R; Strauss, Esther H; Hultsch, David F; Hunter, Michael A; Tannock, Rosemary

    2007-04-01

    Inconsistency across trials of 2-choice reaction time (RT) data was analyzed in 72 adolescents (age 12-17 years) within 4 groups differentiated by the presence or absence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and reading difficulties (RD). ADHD participants were more inconsistent (across all trials, and in the slow portion of the RT distribution) than controls, but only when RD was present. Within the fast portion of the RT distribution, ADHD participants were more inconsistent than controls regardless of RD. The results highlight the importance of fluctuations in cognitive performance in ADHD and suggest that there may be independent sources of variation in inconsistency affecting the fast and slow portions of the RT distribution.

  4. 'Misclassification error' greedy heuristic to construct decision trees for inconsistent decision tables

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad; Moshkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    A greedy algorithm has been presented in this paper to construct decision trees for three different approaches (many-valued decision, most common decision, and generalized decision) in order to handle the inconsistency of multiple decisions in a decision table. In this algorithm, a greedy heuristic ‘misclassification error’ is used which performs faster, and for some cost function, results are better than ‘number of boundary subtables’ heuristic in literature. Therefore, it can be used in the case of larger data sets and does not require huge amount of memory. Experimental results of depth, average depth and number of nodes of decision trees constructed by this algorithm are compared in the framework of each of the three approaches.

  5. Correcting Inconsistencies and Errors in Bacterial Genome Metadata Using an Automated Curation Tool in Excel (AutoCurE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome data are invaluable for large-scale comparative genomic studies. Current sequencing technologies have made it feasible to sequence entire bacterial genomes with relative ease and time with a substantially reduced cost per nucleotide, hence cost per genome. More than 3,000 bacterial genomes have been sequenced and are available at the finished status. Publically available genomes can be readily downloaded; however, there are challenges to verify the specific supporting data contained within the download and to identify errors and inconsistencies that may be present within the organizational data content and metadata. AutoCurE, an automated tool for bacterial genome database curation in Excel, was developed to facilitate local database curation of supporting data that accompany downloaded genomes from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. AutoCurE provides an automated approach to curate local genomic databases by flagging inconsistencies or errors by comparing the downloaded supporting data to the genome reports to verify genome name, RefSeq accession numbers, the presence of archaea, BioProject/UIDs, and sequence file descriptions. Flags are generated for nine metadata fields if there are inconsistencies between the downloaded genomes and genomes reports and if erroneous or missing data are evident. AutoCurE is an easy-to-use tool for local database curation for large-scale genome data prior to downstream analyses.

  6. Tank 241-BY-112, cores 174 and 177 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Results from bulk density tests ranged from 1.03 g/mL to 1.86 g/mL. The highest bulk density result of 1.86 g/mL was used to calculate the solid total alpha activity notification limit for this tank (33.1 uCi/g), Total Alpha (AT) Analysis. Attachment 2 contains the Data Verification and Deliverable (DVD) Summary Report for AT analyses. This report summarizes results from AT analyses and provides data qualifiers and total propagated uncertainty (TPU) values for results. The TPU values are based on the uncertainties inherent in each step of the analysis process. They may be used as an additional reference to determine reasonable RPD values which may be used to accept valid data that do not meet the TSAP acceptance criteria. A report guide is provided with the report to assist in understanding this summary report

  7. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  8. Towards reporting standards for neuropsychological study results: A proposal to minimize communication errors with standardized qualitative descriptors for normalized test scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Mike R; Rum, Ruba S

    2017-11-01

    Rapid, clear and efficient communication of neuropsychological results is essential to benefit patient care. Errors in communication are a lead cause of medical errors; nevertheless, there remains a lack of consistency in how neuropsychological scores are communicated. A major limitation in the communication of neuropsychological results is the inconsistent use of qualitative descriptors for standardized test scores and the use of vague terminology. PubMed search from 1 Jan 2007 to 1 Aug 2016 to identify guidelines or consensus statements for the description and reporting of qualitative terms to communicate neuropsychological test scores was conducted. The review found the use of confusing and overlapping terms to describe various ranges of percentile standardized test scores. In response, we propose a simplified set of qualitative descriptors for normalized test scores (Q-Simple) as a means to reduce errors in communicating test results. The Q-Simple qualitative terms are: 'very superior', 'superior', 'high average', 'average', 'low average', 'borderline' and 'abnormal/impaired'. A case example illustrates the proposed Q-Simple qualitative classification system to communicate neuropsychological results for neurosurgical planning. The Q-Simple qualitative descriptor system is aimed as a means to improve and standardize communication of standardized neuropsychological test scores. Research are needed to further evaluate neuropsychological communication errors. Conveying the clinical implications of neuropsychological results in a manner that minimizes risk for communication errors is a quintessential component of evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Empirical evidence about inconsistency among studies in a pair‐wise meta‐analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rebecca M.; Higgins, Julian P. T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how inconsistency (as measured by the I2 statistic) among studies in a meta‐analysis may differ, according to the type of outcome data and effect measure. We used hierarchical models to analyse data from 3873 binary, 5132 continuous and 880 mixed outcome meta‐analyses within the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Predictive distributions for inconsistency expected in future meta‐analyses were obtained, which can inform priors for between‐study variance. Inconsistency estimates were highest on average for binary outcome meta‐analyses of risk differences and continuous outcome meta‐analyses. For a planned binary outcome meta‐analysis in a general research setting, the predictive distribution for inconsistency among log odds ratios had median 22% and 95% CI: 12% to 39%. For a continuous outcome meta‐analysis, the predictive distribution for inconsistency among standardized mean differences had median 40% and 95% CI: 15% to 73%. Levels of inconsistency were similar for binary data measured by log odds ratios and log relative risks. Fitted distributions for inconsistency expected in continuous outcome meta‐analyses using mean differences were almost identical to those using standardized mean differences. The empirical evidence on inconsistency gives guidance on which outcome measures are most likely to be consistent in particular circumstances and facilitates Bayesian meta‐analysis with an informative prior for heterogeneity. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26679486

  10. 48 CFR 52.225-14 - Inconsistency between English Version and Translation of Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... English Version and Translation of Contract. 52.225-14 Section 52.225-14 Federal Acquisition Regulations... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.225-14 Inconsistency between English Version and Translation of... and Translation of Contract (FEB 2000) In the event of inconsistency between any terms of this...

  11. Timing of schema activation and memory: Inhibited access to inconsistent information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, A.; Knippenberg, A. van

    1995-01-01

    In the present experiment, recognition of consistent and inconsistent information was measured as a function of time of schema activation. A schema was either activated before or after encoding, or not at all. Schema activation after encoding reduced recognition of inconsistent information while

  12. Trait Implications as a Moderator of Recall of Stereotype-Consistent and Stereotype-Inconsistent Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijksterhuis, Ap; Knippenberg, Ad van

    1996-01-01

    Tests the assumption that organization in memory of behavior information and recall depends on the descriptive relatedness of consistent information with inconsistent information. Subjects read stereotype-consistent and stereotype-inconsistent behavioral descriptions implying the same trait dimension or different trait dimensions. Predictions were…

  13. Analyzing inconsistent cases in management fsQCA studies: A methodological manifesto

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balachandran Nair, L.; Gibbert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cases inconsistent with theoretical expectations are by default indicators for a lack of theory-data fit, and as such are prime candidates for theory building. However, the conventional tendency is to ignore inconsistent cases in Management research. The current article focuses on the

  14. Efficacy of bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for negative symptoms of schizophrenia : results of a multicenter double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlabac-de Lange, J. J.; Bais, L.; van Es, F. D.; Visser, B. G. J.; Reinink, E.; Bakker, B.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Aleman, A.; Knegtering, H.

    Background. Few studies have investigated the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment for negative symptoms of schizophrenia, reporting inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate whether 10 Hz stimulation of the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during 3

  15. Agency-communion and interest in prosocial behavior: social motives for assimilation and contrast explain sociocultural inconsistencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Jochen E; Sedikides, Constantine; Lüdtke, Oliver; Neberich, Wiebke

    2014-10-01

    Identifying the "prosocial personality" is a classic project in personality psychology. However, personality traits have been elusive predictors of prosocial behavior, with personality-prosociality relations varying widely across sociocultural contexts. We propose the social motives perspective to account for such sociocultural inconsistencies. According to this perspective, a focal quality of agency (e.g., competence, independence, openness) is the motive to swim against the social tide-agentic social contrast. Conversely, a focal quality of communion (e.g., warmth, interdependence, agreeableness) is the motive to swim with the social tide-communal social assimilation. We report two cross-sectional studies. Study 1 (N = 131,562) defined social context at the country level (11 European countries), whereas Study 2 (N = 56,395) defined it at the country level (11 European countries) and the city level (296 cities within these countries). Communion predicted interest in prosocial behavior comparatively strongly in sociocultural contexts where such interest was common and comparatively weakly where such interest was uncommon. Agency predicted interest in prosocial behavior comparatively strongly in sociocultural contexts where such interest was uncommon and comparatively weakly where such interest was common. The results supported the social motives perspective. Also, the findings help to reestablish the importance of personality for understanding prosociality. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Some difficulties and inconsistencies when using habit strength and reasoned action variables in models of metered household water conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Bradley S; Martin, John F; Pearce, Meryl; Willis, Eileen

    2013-01-30

    Research employing household water consumption data has sought to test models of water demand and conservation using variables from attitude theory. A significant, albeit unrecognised, challenge has been that attitude models describe individual-level motivations while consumption data is recorded at the household level thereby creating inconsistency between units of theory and measurement. This study employs structural equation modelling and moderated regression techniques to addresses the level of analysis problem, and tests hypotheses by isolating effects on water conservation in single-person households. Furthermore, the results question the explanatory utility of habit strength, perceived behavioural control, and intentions for understanding metered water conservation in single-person households. For example, evidence that intentions predict water conservation or that they interact with habit strength in single-person households was contrary to theoretical expectations. On the other hand, habit strength, self-reports of past water conservation, and perceived behavioural control were good predictors of intentions to conserve water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Three approaches to deal with inconsistent decision tables - Comparison of decision tree complexity

    KAUST Repository

    Azad, Mohammad; Chikalov, Igor; Moshkov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    In inconsistent decision tables, there are groups of rows with equal values of conditional attributes and different decisions (values of the decision attribute). We study three approaches to deal with such tables. Instead of a group of equal rows, we consider one row given by values of conditional attributes and we attach to this row: (i) the set of all decisions for rows from the group (many-valued decision approach); (ii) the most common decision for rows from the group (most common decision approach); and (iii) the unique code of the set of all decisions for rows from the group (generalized decision approach). We present experimental results and compare the depth, average depth and number of nodes of decision trees constructed by a greedy algorithm in the framework of each of the three approaches. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Ingestion of an orthodontic archwire resulting in a perforated bowel: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Preeti; Machesney, Michael Robert; Sharma, Pratik K

    2016-09-01

    Accidentally, ingesting components of an orthodontic appliance can result in serious consequences for the patient. This paper presents one such complication, not previously reported, where the patient needed emergency surgery to retrieve part of an orthodontic appliance. This case report highlights the consequences of and possible solutions to prevent patients inhaling or ingesting parts of their appliance.

  19. Risk of bias and brand explain the observed inconsistency in trials on glucosamine for symptomatic relief of osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Patrick; Bartels, Else M; Altman, Roy D

    2014-01-01

    placebo-controlled trials was performed, and random-effects models were applied with inconsistency (I(2) ) and heterogeneity (tau(2) ) estimated using Review Manager and SAS, respectively. The major outcome was reduction of pain; the standardized mean difference (SMD [95% confidence interval (95% CI......)]) served as effect size. RESULTS: The inclusion criteria yielded 25 trials (3,458 patients). Glucosamine moderately reduced pain (SMD -0.51 [95% CI -0.72, -0.30]), although a high level of between-trial inconsistency was observed (I(2) = 88%). The single most important explanation (i.e., covariate......) was brand, reducing heterogeneity by 41% (P = 0.00032). Twelve trials (1,437 patients) using the Rottapharm/Madaus product resulted in significant pain reduction (SMD -1.07 [95% CI -1.47, -0.67]), although a sensitivity analysis of 3 low risk of bias trials using the Rottapharm/Madaus product showed less...

  20. Inconsistencies Between Two Cross-Cultural Adaptations of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture Into French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussat, Bastien; François, Patrice; Gandon, Gérald; Giai, Joris; Seigneurin, Arnaud; Perneger, Thomas; Labarère, José

    2017-11-15

    Two cross-cultural adaptations of the 12-dimension Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) into French coexist: the Occelli and Vlayen versions. The objective of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Occelli version in comparison with those reported for the Vlayen and the original US versions of this instrument. Using the original data from a cross-sectional study of 5,064 employees at a single university hospital in France, we examined the acceptability, internal consistency, factorial structure, and construct validity of the Occelli version of the HSOPSC. The response rate was 76.8% (n = 3888). Our study yielded lower missing value rates (median, 0.4% [range, 0.0%-2.4%] versus 0.8% [range, 0.2%-11.4%]) and lower dimension scores (median, 3.19 [range, 2.67-3.54] versus 3.42 [range, 2.92-3.96]) than those reported for the Vlayen version. Cronbach alphas (median, 0.64; range, 0.56-0.84) compared unfavorably with those reported for the Vlayen (median, 0.73; range, 0.57-0.86) and original US (median, 0.78; range, 0.63-0.84) versions. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis were consistent between the Vlayen and Occelli versions, making it possible to conduct surveys from the 12-dimensional structure with both versions. The inconsistencies observed between the Occelli and Vlayen versions of the HSOPSC may reflect either differences between the translations or heterogeneity in the study population and context. Current evidence does not clearly support the use of one version over the other. The two cross-cultural adaptations of the HSOPSC can be used interchangeably in French-speaking countries.

  1. Final Report on the Analytical Results for Tank Farm Samples in Support of Salt Dissolution Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1996-01-01

    Recent processing of dilute solutions through the 2H-Evaporator system caused dissolution of salt in Tank 38H, the concentrate receipt tank. This report documents analytical results for samples taken from this evaporator system

  2. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Sixth Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration that includes 13 advanced-d...

  3. Recurrent hydramnios as a result of fetal Bartter′s syndrome (a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available Bartter′s syndrome has been reported as a rare case of hydramnios. A unique case of recurrent hydramnios in pregnancy as a result of fetal Bartter′s syndrome on both occasions is presented.

  4. HIV Risk Behaviors and Correlates of Inconsistent Condom Use Among Substance Using Migrants at the Mexico/Guatemala Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Erin E; Swanson, Kate; Morales-Miranda, Sonia; Fernández Casanueva, Carmen; Mercer, Valerie J; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2017-07-01

    This study assessed correlates of inconsistent condom use with casual partners and the prevalence of sexual risk behaviors and STIs in the Mexico/Guatemala border region using a sample of 392 migrants (303 men, 85 women) who reported current substance use or problem drinking. We ran separate univariate logistic regression models for men and women, and multivariate logistic regression models for men only. Prevalence of syphilis was 1.2% among women and 2.3% among men; HIV prevalence was 2.4% among women and 1.3% among men. Inconsistent condom use with casual partners was higher in women with greater education and lower among women who sold sex. In men, less access to free condoms, drug use with sexual partners, and drug use before sex were independently associated with inconsistent condom use with casual partners. Sexual and substance use risk behaviors were common, and HIV/STI prevention efforts should target both genders and expand beyond most-at risk populations.

  5. Sex with sweethearts: Exploring factors associated with inconsistent condom use among unmarried female entertainment workers in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Siyan; Tuot, Sovannary; Chhoun, Pheak; Pal, Khuondyla; Ngin, Chanrith; Chhim, Kolab; Brody, Carinne

    2017-01-05

    Despite the success in promoting condom use in commercial relationships, condom use with regular, noncommercial partners remains low among key populations in Cambodia. This study explores factors associated inconsistent condom use with sweethearts among unmarried sexually active female entertainment workers (FEWs). In 2014, the probability proportional to size sampling method was used to randomly select 204 FEWs from entertainment venues in Phnom Penh and Siem Reap for face-to-face interviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine independent determinants of inconsistent condom use. Of total, 31.4% of the respondents reported consistent condom use with sweethearts in the past three months. After adjustment, respondents who reported inconsistent condom use with sweethearts remained significantly less likely to report having received any form of sexual and reproductive health education (AOR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.22-0.99), but more likely to report having been tested for HIV in the past six months (AOR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.03-4.65). They were significantly more likely to report having used higher amount of alcohol in the past three months (AOR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.01-1.99) and currently using a contraceptive method other than condoms such as pills (AOR = 4.46, 95% CI = 1.34-10.52) or other methods (AOR = 9.75, 95% CI = 2.07-9.86). The rate of consistent condom use in romantic relationships among unmarried FEWs in this study is considerably low. The importance of consistent condom use with regular, non-commercial partners should be emphasized in the education sessions and materials, particularly for FEWs who use non-barrier contraceptive methods.

  6. General practitioners′ attitudes toward reporting and learning from adverse events: results from a survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Thorbjørn H.; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2006-01-01

    , and circumstances under which such exchange is accepted. SUBJECTS: A structured questionnaire sent to 1198 GPs of whom 61% responded. RESULTS. GPs had a positive attitude towards discussing adverse events in the clinic with colleagues and staff and in their continuing medical education groups. The GPs had...... a positive attitude to reporting adverse events to a database if the system granted legal and administrative immunity to reporters. The majority preferred a reporting system located at a research institute. CONCLUSION: GPs have a very positive attitude towards discussing and reporting adverse events......OBJECTIVE: To investigate GPs' attitudes to and willingness to report and learn from adverse events and to study how a reporting system should function. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: General practice in Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: GPs' attitudes to exchange of experience with colleagues and others...

  7. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Fifth Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 13 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published four previous reports describing operation of these buses. This report presents new and updated results covering data from January 2015 through December 2015.

  8. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Sixth Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-11

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 13 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published five previous reports describing operation of these buses. This report presents new and updated results covering data from January 2016 through December 2016.

  9. Patient-reported speech in noise difficulties and hyperacusis symptoms and correlation with test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridakou, Chrysa; Luxon, Linda M; Bamiou, Doris E

    2012-07-01

    To compare self-reported symptoms of difficulty hearing speech in noise and hyperacusis in adults with auditory processing disorders (APDs) and normal controls; and to compare self-reported symptoms to objective test results (speech in babble test, transient evoked otoacoustic emission [TEOAE] suppression test using contralateral noise). A prospective case-control pilot study. Twenty-two participants were recruited in the study: 10 patients with reported hearing difficulty, normal audiometry, and a clinical diagnosis of APD; and 12 normal age-matched controls with no reported hearing difficulty. All participants completed the validated Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability questionnaire, a hyperacusis questionnaire, a speech in babble test, and a TEOAE suppression test using contralateral noise. Patients had significantly worse scores than controls in all domains of the Amsterdam Inventory questionnaire (with the exception of sound detection) and the hyperacusis questionnaire (P reported symptoms of difficulty hearing speech in noise and speech in babble test results in the right ear (ρ = 0.624, P = .002), and between self-reported symptoms of hyperacusis and TEOAE suppression test results in the right ear (ρ = -0.597 P = .003). There was no significant correlation between the two tests. A strong correlation was observed between right ear speech in babble and patient-reported intelligibility of speech in noise, and right ear TEOAE suppression by contralateral noise and hyperacusis questionnaire. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Multiculturalism and inconsistency in the perception of sex education in Australian society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahbobi, Ghanim

    2012-01-01

    A group of individuals who share common beliefs form a culture in which they communicate their values and attributes about certain aspects of society. Sex education remains one of the early teachings that humans experience irrespective of the race or level of development of a given society. However, different cultures perceive sex education differently due to differences in attitudes and beliefs, leading to significant diversity in the management of sex education among different societies across the globe. Many studies have found that in a traditional society with a homogeneous culture, the foremost reason for the different approaches to sex education is related to traditional values, in addition to other factors such as religion and political belief. In order to improve sex education, and consequently, sexual health in a modern multicultural society such as Australia, it becomes imperative to identify the inconsistency in beliefs about sex education among individuals with different cultural backgrounds in the Australian population. In this report, the author highlights similarities and differences in the methods employed by certain cultures of the Australian population. The report considers the different cultural environments of specific societies, the prevalence of sex education in these societies and how culture influences the prevalence. The concluding thoughts reflect on the success of the education programs in Australia, based on the idea that resolving the problems of sex education needs support from a number of bodies within Australian society.

  11. Progress in increasing electronic reporting of laboratory results to public health agencies--United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Electronic reporting of laboratory results to public health agencies can improve public health surveillance for reportable diseases and conditions by making reporting more timely and complete. Since 2010, CDC has provided funding to 57 state, local, and territorial health departments through the Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases cooperative agreement to assist with improving electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) from clinical and public health laboratories to public health agencies. As part of this agreement, CDC and state and large local health departments are collaborating to monitor ELR implementation in the United States by developing data from each jurisdiction regarding total reporting laboratories, laboratories sending ELR by disease category and message format, and the number of ELR laboratory reports compared with the total number of laboratory reports. At the end of July 2013, 54 of the 57 jurisdictions were receiving at least some laboratory reports through ELR, and approximately 62% of 20 million laboratory reports were being received electronically, compared with 54% in 2012. Continued progress will require collaboration between clinical laboratories, laboratory information management system (LIMS) vendors, and public health agencies.

  12. Pre- and Post-Test Results of KEEP Class 2: 1973-74. Technical Report #40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Candy

    This report presents the pre-and posttest results for the kindergarten year of the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) Class 2, 1973-1974. Results are presented for the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI), the Metropolitan Readiness Test (MRT), and the Standard English Repetition Test (SERT). Comparisons are made…

  13. Replication of Psycholinguistic Experiments and the Resolution of Inconsistencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rákosi, Csilla

    2017-01-01

    Non-exact replications are regarded as effective tools of problem solving in psycholinguistic research because they lead to more plausible experimental results; however, they are also ineffective tools of problem solving because they trigger cumulative contradictions among different replications of an experiment. This paper intends to resolve this…

  14. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

  15. Consequences of Inconsistency in Air Force Tobacco Control Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando-King, Elizabeth A; Malone, Ruth E; Haddock, Christopher K; Poston, Walker S Carlos; Lando, Harry A; Jahnke, Sara A; Hawk, Nita; Smith, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-01

    Although the United States Air Force (USAF) has been a leader in efforts to reduce tobacco use among service members, tobacco continues to be a problem and initiatives to decrease tobacco use further require buy-in from leadership. We explored line leaderships' perspectives on tobacco. A diverse group of 10 senior commissioned and 10 non-commissioned personnel were interviewed. Respondents reported substantial changes in the culture of tobacco use during their years of service, from near ubiquity to restricted use areas. They also perceived mixed messages coming from the USAF, including simultaneous discouragement of and accommodations for tobacco use, and variability in policies and enforcement. Many respondents indicated that allowing tobacco use creates conflict and undermines military discipline and suggested that a tobacco-free policy would be the best way to eliminate these contradictions. Although there has been substantial movement away from a culture of tobacco in the USAF, current policies and variable enforcement of these policies create unnecessary contradictions. Establishing a tobacco-free service would resolve these issues in addition to improving the health of service members and veterans.

  16. Ordering molecular genetic tests and reporting results: practices in laboratory and clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Ira M; Caggana, Michele; Constantin, Carolyn; Gross, Susan J; Lyon, Elaine; Pagon, Roberta A; Trotter, Tracy L; Wilson, Jean Amos; McGovern, Margaret M

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that patient care may be compromised as a consequence of poor communication between clinicians and laboratory professionals in cases in which molecular genetic test results are reported. To understand better the contributing factors to such compromised care, we investigated both pre- and postanalytical processes using cystic fibrosis mutation analysis as our model. We found that although the majority of test requisition forms requested patient/family information that was necessary for the proper interpretation of test results, in many cases, these data were not provided by the individuals filling out the forms. We found instances in which result reports for simulated diagnostic testing described individuals as carriers where only a single mutation was found with no comment pertaining to a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Similarly, reports based on simulated scenarios for carrier testing were problematic when no mutations were identified, and the patient's race/ethnicity and family history were not discussed in reference to residual risk of disease. Remarkably, a pilot survey of obstetrician-gynecologists revealed that office staff, including secretaries, often helped order genetic tests and reported test results to patients, raising questions about what efforts are undertaken to ensure personnel competency. These findings are reviewed in light of what efforts should be taken to improve the quality of test-ordering and result-reporting practices.

  17. Report of results on the research and development work 1979 of the Institute for Technical Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    The results report on the research and development work in 1979 carried out at the Institute for Technical Physics of the Nuclear Research Centre, Karlsruhe is concerned here. The main field of this development work is the research into superconducting magnets for fusion reactors. Studies are published on the material, processing and shape of these magnets. Furthermore, a report is given on fusion magnet technology, superconducting fundamentals and technical superconductors, as well as an cryonergy technique and cryotechnique. (KBI) [de

  18. Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test results in European countries: an ESCMID cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Céline; Tebano, Gianpiero; Mutters, Nico T; Tacconelli, Evelina; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jarlier, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results is one possible laboratory-based antibiotic stewardship intervention. The primary aim of this study was to identify where and how selective reporting of AST results is implemented in Europe both in inpatient and in outpatient settings. An ESCMID cross-sectional, self-administered, internet-based survey was conducted among all EUCIC (European Committee on Infection Control) or EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) national representatives in Europe and Israel. Of 38 countries, 36 chose to participate in the survey. Selective reporting of AST results was implemented in 11/36 countries (31%), was partially implemented in 4/36 (11%) and was limited to local initiatives or was not adopted in 21/36 (58%). It was endorsed as standard of care by health authorities in only three countries. The organisation of selective reporting was everywhere discretionally managed by each laboratory, with a pronounced intra- and inter-country variability. The most frequent application was in uncomplicated community-acquired infections, particularly urinary tract and skin and soft-tissue infections. The list of reported antibiotics ranged from a few first-line options, to longer reports where only last-resort antibiotics were hidden. Several barriers to implementation were reported, mainly lack of guidelines, poor system support, insufficient resources, and lack of professionals' capability. In conclusion, selective reporting of AST results is poorly implemented in Europe and is applied with a huge heterogeneity of practices. Development of an international framework, based on existing initiatives and identified barriers, could favour its dissemination as one important element of antibiotic stewardship programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-Reported Juvenile Firesetting: Results from Two National Survey Datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Howell Bowling, Carrie; Merrick, Joav; Omar, Hatim A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to address gaps in existing research by examining the relationship between academic performance and attention problems with juvenile firesetting. Two datasets from the Achenbach System for Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) were used. The Factor Analysis Dataset (N = 975) was utilized and results indicated that adolescents who report lower academic performance are more likely to set fires. Additionally, adolescents who report a poor attitude toward school ...

  20. Self-reported juvenile firesetting: Results from two national survey datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Carrie Howell Bowling; Joav eMerrick; Joav eMerrick; Joav eMerrick; Joav eMerrick; Hatim A Omar

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to address gaps in existing research by examining the relationship between academic performance and attention problems with juvenile firesetting. Two datasets from the Achenbach System for Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) were used. The Factor Analysis Dataset (N = 975) was utilized and results indicated that adolescents who report lower academic performance are more likely to set fires. Additionally, adolescents who report a poor attitude toward school...

  1. Tank 241-SY-102, January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BELL, K.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results

  2. Adaptive Robotic Fabrication for Conditions of Material Inconsistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Zwierzycki, Mateusz; Clausen Nørgaard, Esben

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes research that addresses the variable behaviour of industrial quality metals and the extension of computational techniques into the fabrication process. It describes the context of robotic incremental sheet metal forming, a freeform method for imparting 3D form onto a 2D thin...... and the fabrication process? Here, two adaptive methods are presented that aim to increase forming accuracy with only a minimum increase in fabrication time, and that maintain ongoing input from the results of the fabrication process. The first method is an online sensor-based strategy and the second method...

  3. Why is electricity consumption inconsistent with economic growth in China?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Boqiang; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Studies have indicated that there exists a relatively stable and positive correlation between electricity consumption and economic growth and there should not be a large deviation between them. However, the deviation between electricity consumption and economic growth in China during the Asian Financial Crisis and Global Economic Crisis sparks intense debates. We attempt to explain the deviation from the perspective of inventory investment adjustment in the business cycle using the SVAR model in this paper. The results show that the effects of inventory investment adjustment shock and electricity consumption structure shock on the deviation are positive but tend to be negative for electricity efficiency shock. The results of historical decomposition of these shocks also show that the inventory investment adjustment shock is the main factor that influences the deviation during the Global Economic Crisis. Economic fluctuation in the short term can not change the economic development pattern and the characteristics of electricity demand. Once the economy returns to stable growth, the deviation between electricity consumption and economic growth will shrink and disappear soon. - Highlights: • We analyze the deviation between GDP and electricity consumption in business cycle. • The inventory investment adjustment mainly impacts the deviation in China. • Concentrated electricity consumption of heavy industry magnifies the deviation.

  4. The inconsistent nature of symptomatic pancreatico-jejunostomy anastomotic strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, Aram N; Kent, Tara S; Callery, Mark P; Vollmer, Charles M

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatico-jejunostomy strictures (PJS) after pancreatiocoduodenectomy (PD) are poorly understood. Methods Patients treated for PJS were identified from all PDs (n =357) performed for all indications in our practice (2002 to 2009). Technical aspects of the original operation, as well as the presentation, management and outcomes of the resultant stricture were assessed. Results Seven patients developed a symptomatic PJS for an incidence of 2%. ‘Soft’ glands and small ducts (≤3 mm) were each present in 3/7 of the original anastomoses. Pancreatic fistula occurred in 6/7. The latency period to stricture presentation averaged 41 months. Diagnosis of PJS was confirmed by secretin magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP). Therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was attempted – each unsuccessfully – in four patients. All patients required operative correction of their PJS by takedown/revision of the original pancreatico-jejunal anastomoses (PJA) (n =4) ± a modified Puestow (n =2). One patient's PJS was completely inaccessible due to dense adhesions. Another patient's stricture recurred and was successfully revised with a stricturoplasty. At a mean follow-up of 25 months, all are alive, but only 4/7 are pain free. Conclusion A symptomatic PJS appears to be independent of original pathological, glandular or technical features but pancreatic fistulae may contribute. Secretin MRCP is diagnostically useful, whereas ERCP has been proven to be therapeutically ineffective. Durable resolution of symptoms after surgical revision is unpredictable. PMID:20815857

  5. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: Second Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2012-07-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 new fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. The first results report was published in August 2011, describing operation of these new FCEBs from September 2010 through May 2011. New results in this report provide an update through April 2012.

  6. What is This Thing Called Sensemaking?: A Theoretical Framework for How Physics Students Resolve Inconsistencies in Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, Tor Ole B.

    Students often emerge from introductory physics courses with a feeling that the concepts they have learned do not make sense. In recent years, science education researchers have begun to attend to this type of problem by studying the ways in which students make sense of science concepts. However, although many researchers agree intuitively on what sensemaking looks like, the literature on sensemaking is both theoretically fragmented and provides few guidelines for how to encourage and support the process. In this dissertation, I address this challenge by proposing a theoretical framework to describe students' sensemaking processes. I base this framework both on the science education research literature on sensemaking and on a series of video-recorded cognitive, clinical interviews conducted with introductory physics students enrolled in a course on electricity and magnetism. Using the science education research literature on sensemaking as well as a cognitivist, dynamic network model of mind as a theoretical lens, I first propose a coherent definition of sensemaking. Then, using this definition I analyze the sensemaking processes of these introductory physics students during episodes when they work to articulate and resolve gaps or inconsistencies in their understanding. Based on the students' framing, gestures, and dialogue I argue that the process of sensemaking unfolds in a distinct way, which we can describe as an epistemic game in which students first build a framework of knowledge, then identify a gap or inconsistency in that framework, iteratively build an explanation to resolve the gap or inconsistency, and (sometimes) successfully resolve it. I further argue that their entry into the sensemaking frame is facilitated by a specific question, which is in turn motivated by a gap or inconsistency in knowledge that I call the vexation point. I also investigate the results of sensemaking, arguing that students may use the technique of conceptual blending to both

  7. Resolution of an apparent inconsistency in the electromagnetic Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnes, H; Olaussen, K; Ravndal, F; Wehus, I K

    2007-01-01

    The vacuum expectation value of the electromagnetic energy-momentum tensor between two parallel plates in spacetime dimensions D > 4 is calculated in the axial gauge. While the pressure between the plates agrees with the global Casimir force, the energy density is divergent at the plates and not compatible with the total energy which follows from the force. However, subtracting the divergent self-energies of the plates, the resulting energy is finite and consistent with the force. In analogy with the corresponding scalar case for spacetime dimensions D > 2, the divergent self-energy of a single plate can be related to the lack of conformal invariance of the electromagnetic Lagrangian for dimensions D > 4. (fast track communication)

  8. Post-stroke rehabilitation in Italy: inconsistencies across regional strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, D; Spallazzi, M; Baldereschi, M; Di Carlo, A; Ferro, S; Rota E Morelli, N; Immovilli, P; Toni, D; Polizzi, B M; Inzitari, D

    2014-06-01

    Remarkable differences among European countries have been found in stroke rehabilitation models, owing to the fact that stroke rehabilitation services are embedded in health care systems. Comprehensive data on service utilization by stroke survivors in Italy are lacking, but would be instrumental in improving efficiency and effectiveness of post-acute stroke care, and consequently, in containing costs and improving outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to survey the Italian regional legislations in order to examine the provision of rehabilitation services for stroke survivors in Italy. This is a cross-sectional, observational study. Post-stroke intra- and extra-hospital rehabilitation. All decrees and resolutions as to post-acute stroke rehabilitation were collected from each Italian region. All decrees and resolutions were examined by the means of a check list including quantitative and qualitative characteristics, selected in accordance with national official recommendations. Each completed check list was then sent to each regional reference person, who filled in the section on the implementation of the indications and compliance. The study was carried out from November 2009 to September 2010. The documents were collected from 19 out of the 20 Italian regions. The results of the study indicate that there are many, remarkable regional variations in health policies concerning post-stroke care. Instruments for evaluation and criteria for allocating stroke patients to proper rehabilitation setting vary across regions, but data on the potential impact of these variations on clinical outcomes are still lacking. The study highlights the issue that, in Italy, delivery of post-stroke rehabilitation services is not uniform nation-wide and varies substantially across regions. The lack of a comprehensive post-acute stroke strategy is a major obstacle to service availability. The study results advocate the need for a consistent and comprehensive strategic planning of

  9. Time inconsistency and reputation in monetary policy: a strategic model in continuous time

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jingyuan; Tian, Guoqiang

    2005-01-01

    This article develops a model to examine the equilibrium behavior of the time inconsistency problem in a continuous time economy with stochastic and endogenized dis- tortion. First, the authors introduce the notion of sequentially rational equilibrium, and show that the time inconsistency problem may be solved with trigger reputation strategies for stochastic setting. The conditions for the existence of sequentially rational equilibrium are provided. Then, the concept of sequen...

  10. Human (InConsistencies in Ian McEwan’s Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anghel Florentina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ian McEwan’s Amsterdam has supplied its readers with psychological, moral and social topical issues presented in an easy flowing and exhilarating style. Starting from the assumption that life consists of a series of inconsistencies which are inherent and bring their contribution to the individual’s formation, the paper aims at demonstrating that the protagonists’ judgmental and moral inconsistencies, which are used as a plot generator and are environmentally determined, reveal features of their personality.

  11. Resolving inconsistencies in utility measurement under risk: Tests of generalizations of expected utility

    OpenAIRE

    Han Bleichrodt; José María Abellán-Perpiñan; JoséLuis Pinto; Ildefonso Méndez-Martínez

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores inconsistencies that occur in utility measurement under risk when expected utility theory is assumed and the contribution that prospect theory and some other generalizations of expected utility can make to the resolution of these inconsistencies. We used five methods to measure utilities under risk and found clear violations of expected utility. Of the theories studied, prospect theory was the most consistent with our data. The main improvement of prospect theory over expe...

  12. Results From Denmark's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lisbeth Runge; Troelsen, Jens; Kirkegaard, Kasper Lund

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The first Danish Report Card on Physical Activity (PA) for Children and Youth describes Denmark's efforts in promoting and facilitating PA and PA opportunities for children and youth. METHODS: The report card relies primarily on a synthesis of the best available research and policy...... strategies identified by the Report Card Research Committee consisting of a wide presentation of researchers and experts within PA health behaviors and policy development. The work was coordinated by Research and Innovation Centre for Human Movement and Learning situated at the University of Southern Denmark...... and the University College Lillebaelt. Nine PA indicators were graded using the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card development process. RESULTS: Grades from A (highest) to F (lowest) varied in Denmark as follows: 1) Overall Physical Activity (D+), 2) Organized Sport Participation (A), 3) Active Play (INC...

  13. Perceived consequences of hypothetical identity-inconsistent sexual experiences: effects of perceiver's sex and sexual identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, Mariana A; Johnson, Kerri L

    2014-04-01

    Most people organize their sexual orientation under a single sexual identity label. However, people may have sexual experiences that are inconsistent with their categorical sexual identity label. A man might identify as heterosexual but still experience some attraction to men; a woman might identify as lesbian yet enter into a romantic relationship with a man. Identity-inconsistent experiences are likely to have consequences. In the present study, we examined lay perceptions of the consequences of identity-inconsistent sexual experiences for self-perceived sexuality and for social relationships among a sexually diverse sample (N = 283). We found that the perceived consequences of identity-inconsistent experiences for self-perception, for social stigmatization, and for social relationships varied as a function of participant sex, participant sexual identity (heterosexual, gay, lesbian), and experience type (fantasy, attraction, behavior, love). We conclude that not all identity-inconsistent sexual experiences are perceived as equally consequential and that the perceived consequences of such experiences vary predictably as a function of perceiver sex and sexual identity. We discuss the role lay perceptions of the consequences of identity-inconsistent sexual experiences may play in guiding attitudes and behavior.

  14. Preprocessing in Matlab Inconsistent Linear System for a Meaningful Least Squares Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Symal K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical models of many physical/statistical problems are systems of linear equations Due to measurement and possible human errors/mistakes in modeling/data, as well as due to certain assumptions to reduce complexity, inconsistency (contradiction) is injected into the model, viz. the linear system. While any inconsistent system irrespective of the degree of inconsistency has always a least-squares solution, one needs to check whether an equation is too much inconsistent or, equivalently too much contradictory. Such an equation will affect/distort the least-squares solution to such an extent that renders it unacceptable/unfit to be used in a real-world application. We propose an algorithm which (i) prunes numerically redundant linear equations from the system as these do not add any new information to the model, (ii) detects contradictory linear equations along with their degree of contradiction (inconsistency index), (iii) removes those equations presumed to be too contradictory, and then (iv) obtain the . minimum norm least-squares solution of the acceptably inconsistent reduced linear system. The algorithm presented in Matlab reduces the computational and storage complexities and also improves the accuracy of the solution. It also provides the necessary warning about the existence of too much contradiction in the model. In addition, we suggest a thorough relook into the mathematical modeling to determine the reason why unacceptable contradiction has occurred thus prompting us to make necessary corrections/modifications to the models - both mathematical and, if necessary, physical.

  15. Superior episodic memory in inconsistent-handers: a replication and extension using fNIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propper, Ruth E; Patel, Neil; Christman, Stephen D; Carlei, Christophe

    2017-11-01

    A large body of evidence supports the existence of a robust handedness difference in episodic memory retrieval, with inconsistent-handedness being associated with superior memory across a wide variety of paradigms, including superior retrieval of lab-based and real world memories. Despite superior episidoc memory in inconsistent-handers, and despite neuroanatomical and neurophysiological differences in cortical regions between inconsistent- and consistent-handers, we are aware of no studies to date that have examined physiological activity in the brains of inconsistent- versus consistent-handers while engaged in memory tasks. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to present a first look at this issue, using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a simple, non-invasive measure of frontal lobe activity during encoding and recall of list words in inconsistent- and consistent-handers. Behaviourally, we replicated prior studies, finding a significant inconsistent-handed advantage in free recall. Using fNIRS-derived oxygenated haemoglobin (O 2 Hb) as a measure of frontal lobe activity, we found the first evidence for handedness differences in brain activity that are associated with the handedness differences in episodic retrieval. Specifically, the primary finding was that increased O 2 Hb in the right hemisphere during recall was associated with better retrieval, but for consistent-handers only.

  16. Reports on memorial lecture meetings on co-operative application finish of the SF cyclotron and its result reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The SF cyclotron at the Institute for Nuclear Study (INS) of University of Tokyo began its co-operative application in 1997 to continue its smooth operation during 21 years reaching March, 1997. Together with improvement of INS organization on April, 1997, it was transferred to the Center for Nuclear Study School of Science, University of Tokyo, INS continued a co-operative research for two years thereafter with Tanashi campus of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization also established on April, 1997. This co-operative research was finished without accident at the end of March, 1999, to close history of co-operative application of cyclotron during 23 years. This report contains 15 memorial lecture and convivial meeting reports at the co-operative application finish of cyclotron and some results of co-operative applications and experiments, during 23 years. (G.K.)

  17. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Third Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-05-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published two previous reports, in August 2011 and July 2012, describing operation of these buses. New results in this report provide an update covering eight months through October 2013.

  18. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2013-01-01

    SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

  19. Tank 241-T-204, core 188 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-07-24

    TANK 241-T-204, CORE 188, ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR THE FINAL REPORT. This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241 -T-204. Push mode core segments were removed from Riser 3 between March 27, 1997, and April 11, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-8 Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-204 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TRAP) (Winkleman, 1997), Letter of instruction for Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241- T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LAY) (Bell, 1997), and Safety Screening Data Qual@ Objective (DO) ODukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group and are not considered in this report.

  20. KEEP Reading Research 1974: Overall Strategy and Preliminary Results. Technical Report No. 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Roland G.; And Others

    Reading research is an important aspect of the Kamehameha Early Education Program. This report describes the overall strategy of the reading research program, which is based on a conceptual framework that divides lines of inquiry into motivation, linguistics, instructional procedures, and correlational analysis. Preliminary results for each of…

  1. KEEP Reading Research and Instruction: Results of the 1973-74 Program. Technical Report No. 26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kathryn H.; Speidel, Gisela E.

    This report summarizes research related to the use of a conventional basal reading program with students in the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Results of instruction were measured by the number of objectives gained each quarter, the total number of objectives gained, the number of lessons taken for each objective, and scores on the…

  2. Standardized Test Results: KEEP and Control Students. 1975-1976, Technical Report #69.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antill, Ellen; Speidel, Gisela E.

    This report presents the results of various standardized measures administered to Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) students and control students in the school year 1975-1976. In contrast to previous comparisons, KEEP employed more rigorous procedures for the selection of the control students and for the conditions of test administration.…

  3. Report of the Results of an IMS LEarning Design Expert Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, Susanne; Klebl, Michael; Griffiths, David; Hernández-Leo, Davinia; De la Fuente-Valentin, Luis; Hummel, Hans; Brouns, Francis; Derntl, Michael; Oberhuemer, Petra

    2009-01-01

    Neumann, S., Klebl, M., Griffiths, D., Hernández-Leo, D., de la Fuente Valentín, L., Hummel, H., Brouns, F., Derntl, M., & Oberhuemer, P. (2010). Report of the Results of an IMS Learning Design Expert Workshop. International Journal Of Emerging Technologies In Learning (IJET), 5(1), pp.

  4. 49 CFR 655.72 - Reporting of results in a management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of results in a management information... management information system. (a) Each recipient shall annually prepare and maintain a summary of the... recipient's or employer's behalf. (d) As an employer, you must use the Management Information System (MIS...

  5. 1999 Transit customer satisfaction index : final report : results of survey and conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the results and analysis of the data collected in the 1999 Florida Transit Properties Customer Satisfaction Index project, as well as to briefly review the data sources and the weighting methodo...

  6. Results for Learning Report 2014-15: Basic Education at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jean-Marc; Amelewonou, Kokou; Bonnet, Gabrielle; Rubiano-Matulevich, Eliana; Soman, Kouassi; Sonnenberg, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The 2014/2015 Results for Learning Report: Basic Education at Risk examines the progress achieved by Global Partnership for Education (GPE) partner developing countries over the period 2008-2012. Universal primary education has never been so close, yet there are still 58 million children of primary school age who do not go to school around the…

  7. Tank 241-BY-109, cores 201 and 203, analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-BY-109 push mode core segments collected between June 6, 1997 and June 17, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (Bell, 1997), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow, et al, 1995). The analytical results are included

  8. Generic Community System Specification: A Proposed Format for Reporting the Results of Microgrid Optimization Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Antonio [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-03-14

    This document provides a proposed format for reporting the results of microgrid optimization analysis. While the proposed format assumes that the modeling is conducted as part of a renewable energy retrofit of an existing diesel micro-grid, the format can certainly be adopted for other situations.

  9. Programs in Fortran language for reporting the results of the analyses by ICP emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three programs, written in FORTRAN IV language, for reporting the results of the analyses by ICP emission spectroscopy from data stored in files on floppy disks have been developed. They are intended, respectively, for the analyses of: 1) waters, 2) granites and slates, and 3) different kinds of geological materials. (Author) 8 refs

  10. 7 CFR 52.83 - Reporting results of the plant survey and inauguration of inspection services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting results of the plant survey and inauguration... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES...

  11. 40 CFR 205.57-5 - Reporting of the test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting of the test results. 205.57-5 Section 205.57-5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.57-5...

  12. Task Listings Resulting from the Vocational Competency Measures Project. Memorandum Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    This memorandum report consists of 14 task listings resulting from the Vocational Competency Measures Project. (The Vocational Competency Measures Project was a test development project that involved the writing and verification of task listings for 14 vocational occupational areas through over 225 interviews conducted in 27 states.) Provided in…

  13. Inconsistent Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Asenjo, F. G.

    2011-01-01

    Um certo número de trabalhos foi dedicado à viabilidade e interesse da matemática inconsistente, mas até hoje poucos esforços comparáveis foram feitos no que diz respeito à física. Alguns poucos tópicos de física são aqui descritos no qual a presença de contradições é indisputável e clama por um tratamento lógico diferenciado. O argumento baseia-se em dois fatos. Primeiro, antinomias não são necessariamente geradas por negação: a conjunção de dois enunciados opostos pode igualmente gerar uma ...

  14. Inconsistent Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær; Riis, Morten S.

    2017-01-01

    The growing integration of sounding art as research practice in academia is a part of the “practice turn” in humanities and social sciences, where artistic practices and artefacts themselves become a form of academic inquiry. As the process of creating art represents a valid research method...... at “not-knowing” or “not-yet-knowing” within artistic research encompassing the unexpected, the spontaneous and involuntary. We argue that the implicit human-centred perspective present in these alternative understandings of knowledge production in artistic research prevents us from fully engaging...... with the objects in question on their own premises. Therefore, tuning into the “not-knowing” requires expanding the perspective to encompass non-human forms of knowledge incorporated through an object-oriented ontological line of thinking. By switching the focus from the human perspective to that of the objects...

  15. Reporting of Positive Results in Randomized Controlled Trials of Mindfulness-Based Mental Health Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Coronado-Montoya

    Full Text Available A large proportion of mindfulness-based therapy trials report statistically significant results, even in the context of very low statistical power. The objective of the present study was to characterize the reporting of "positive" results in randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-based therapy. We also assessed mindfulness-based therapy trial registrations for indications of possible reporting bias and reviewed recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses to determine whether reporting biases were identified.CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, ISI, MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and SCOPUS databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-based therapy. The number of positive trials was described and compared to the number that might be expected if mindfulness-based therapy were similarly effective compared to individual therapy for depression. Trial registries were searched for mindfulness-based therapy registrations. CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, ISI, MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and SCOPUS were also searched for mindfulness-based therapy systematic reviews and meta-analyses.108 (87% of 124 published trials reported ≥1 positive outcome in the abstract, and 109 (88% concluded that mindfulness-based therapy was effective, 1.6 times greater than the expected number of positive trials based on effect size d = 0.55 (expected number positive trials = 65.7. Of 21 trial registrations, 13 (62% remained unpublished 30 months post-trial completion. No trial registrations adequately specified a single primary outcome measure with time of assessment. None of 36 systematic reviews and meta-analyses concluded that effect estimates were overestimated due to reporting biases.The proportion of mindfulness-based therapy trials with statistically significant results may overstate what would occur in practice.

  16. Use of quantification in cardiac reporting: How does it change the clinical result?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasegaran, G.; Hilson, A.J.W.; Buscombe, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Many gamma camera systems are now sold with cardiac quantification packages. These are said to increase the accuracy of reporting. However the use of such quantification packages may change the clinical report as read from the tomographic slices. The aim of this study was to quantify the differences between qualitative visual reporting and quantification. The stress and rest myocardial perfusion studies were quantitatively reported in 37 patients comprising 333 segments of the heart (9 segments/patient). A defect was defined by a reduction in activity of >50% in each of the segments. For the tomographic qualitative reporting the data was reconstructed using iterative reconstruction with a Wiener smoothing filter. Quantification used an Emory bull's eye system with gender and age matched normal controls. Number of abnormal segments noted by qualitative reading of data were 119 at stress and 79 at rest. For the bull's eye plot 98 abnormal segments were seen at stress and 76 at rest. Thirty-three segments (10%) were abnormal on the qualitative reading of data alone and 7 (2%) were abnormal on bull's eye alone. Of the 55 segments reported as ischaemic qualitative reading of data, 26 (48%) were normal on bull's eye, 13 of these in the right coronary artery (RCA) territory segments. Of the 67 segments reported on the qualitative reading of data as infarct, 10 (13%) were normal on bull's eye, 7 of these in the territory of the RCA segments. There are significant differences in the results of reporting scans using a bull's eye plot especially in identifying inferior wall ischaemia. Therefore before using such a quantification method a full assessment of the accuracy of each method should be performed. (author)

  17. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: First Results Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This report provides the early data results and implementation experience of the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service.

  18. Food allergies in children: a comparison of parental reports and skin prick test results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilia Metadea Aji Savitri

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Food allergy is common in children and its prevalence is generally on the rise. Imprecise parental reports about reactions to particular foods can lead to unnecessary restrictions. Since children have specific growth requirements, such nutritional restrictions may have disturbing effects on children’s growth and development. Objective To compare parental reports on food reactions to skin prick test results in their children. Method Retrospective, cross sectional study using patient’s medical record data during one-year study period. Data were analyzed manually and statistically, to assess the degree of agreement (Kappa’s coefficient and significance (P. Results We collected data from 154 subjects aged 0-18 years. For every allergen assessed, parents reported more food reactions than positive skin prick test results. Allergy incidence were caused, in order, by cow’s milk and chicken (25.3%, eggs (22.1%, chocolate (20.1%, fruits (14.3%, seafood (13%, and saltwater fish (1.9%. Kappa coefficient are all poor (0.05 except for chicken (P=0.02. Conclusion Most parents tend to overestimate which food cause reactions in their children, as reactions reported were not necessarily allergenic. Therefore, every patient experiencing allergy reactions should undergo skin prick testing to confirm the possibility of allergy.

  19. Reports of the research results for the peaceful uses of atomic energy, no. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Many valuable results have been obtained by the tests and researches concerning the peaceful utilization of atomic energy, and they accomplished major role in the promotion of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy in Japan. In this report, the results of the tests and researches on the peaceful utilization of atomic energy carried out by national research institutes and others in 1978 fiscal year are outlined. It is desirable to deepen understandings further on the recent trend and results of the tests and researches with this book. The report is divided into the following chapters: nuclear fusion, safety research (technological safety research, environmental radioactivity safety research), food irradiation, countermeasures to cancers, agriculture, forestry and fishery (fertilized soil, quality improvement, farm product protection, breeding improvement), medicine (diagnosis and therapy, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene, application to living body pathology), mining and industry (radiation chemistry, radiation measurement, process analysis), power utilization (nuclear reactor materials, nuclear ships), civil engineering, radioactivation analysis, and injury prevention research. (Kako, I.)

  20. Costs and Benefits of Orthographic Inconsistency in Reading: Evidence from a Cross-Linguistic Comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Valeria Marinelli

    Full Text Available We compared reading acquisition in English and Italian children up to late primary school analyzing RTs and errors as a function of various psycholinguistic variables and changes due to experience. Our results show that reading becomes progressively more reliant on larger processing units with age, but that this is modulated by consistency of the language. In English, an inconsistent orthography, reliance on larger units occurs earlier on and it is demonstrated by faster RTs, a stronger effect of lexical variables and lack of length effect (by fifth grade. However, not all English children are able to master this mode of processing yielding larger inter-individual variability. In Italian, a consistent orthography, reliance on larger units occurs later and it is less pronounced. This is demonstrated by larger length effects which remain significant even in older children and by larger effects of a global factor (related to speed of orthographic decoding explaining changes of performance across ages. Our results show the importance of considering not only overall performance, but inter-individual variability and variability between conditions when interpreting cross-linguistic differences.

  1. Early insulin sensitivity after restrictive bariatric surgery, inconsistency between HOMA-IR and steady-state plasma glucose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dielen, Francois M H; Nijhuis, Jeroen; Rensen, Sander S M; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Wiebolt, Janneke; Koks, Afra; Prakken, Fred J; Buurman, Wim A; Greve, Jan Willem M

    2010-01-01

    The low-grade inflammatory condition present in morbid obesity is thought to play a causative role in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance (IR). Bariatric surgery fails to improve this inflammatory condition during the first months after surgery. Considering the close relation between inflammation and IR, we conducted a study in which insulin sensitivity was measured during the first months after bariatric surgery. Different methods to measure IR shortly after bariatric surgery have given inconsistent data. For example, the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) levels have been reported to decrease rapidly after bariatric surgery, although clamp techniques have shown sustained insulin resistance. In the present study, we evaluated the use of steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) levels to assess insulin sensitivity 2 months after bariatric surgery. Insulin sensitivity was measured using HOMA-IR and SSPG levels in 11 subjects before surgery and at 26% excess weight loss (approximately 2 months after restrictive bariatric surgery). The SSPG levels after 26% excess weight loss did not differ from the SSPG levels before surgery (14.3 +/- 5.4 versus 14.4 +/- 2.7 mmol/L). In contrast, the HOMA-IR values had decreased significantly (3.59 +/- 1.99 versus 2.09 +/- 1.02). During the first months after restrictive bariatric surgery, we observed a discrepancy between the HOMA-IR and SSPG levels. In contrast to the HOMA-IR values, the SSPG levels had not improved, which could be explained by the ongoing inflammatory state after bariatric surgery. These results suggest that during the first months after restrictive bariatric surgery, HOMA-IR might not be an adequate marker of insulin sensitivity. Copyright 2010 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2012-05-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

  3. Diclofenac Potassium in Acute Postoperative Pain and Dysmenorrhoea: Results from Comprehensive Clinical Trial Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Andrew Moore

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the efficacy of diclofenac potassium in unpublished clinical study reports (CSRs and published reports to examine publication bias, industry bias, and comprehensiveness. Novartis provided CSRs of randomised double-blind trials of diclofenac potassium involving postoperative patients following third molar extraction (3 trials, n=519, gynaecological surgery (3 trials, n=679, and dysmenorrhoea (2 trials, n=711 conducted in 1988–1990. Searches identified published reports of 6 trials. Information from 599/1909 patients was not published; trials with 846/1909 patients were published in a defunct journal. Greater methodological information in CSRs contributed to lesser risk of bias than published trials. Numbers needed to treat (NNT from CSRs for all six postoperative trials for at least 50% of maximum pain relief over 6 h were 2.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.9–2.6 and 2.1 (1.8–2.4 for 50 and 100 mg diclofenac potassium, respectively. A Cochrane review of published trial data reported NNTs of 2.1 and 1.9, and one comprehensive analysis reported NNTs of 2.2 and 2.1, respectively. All analyses had similar results for patients remedicating within 8 h. No data from dysmenorrhoea CSRs appeared in a Cochrane review. CSRs provide useful information and increase confidence. Stable efficacy estimates with standard study designs reduce the need for updating reviews.

  4. Interim report on Mitsubishi's results using rainbow for stage 1 verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Y.; Kinjo, H.; Itoh, K.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical work on the benchmark problems is underway at Mitsubishi by using RAINBOW code. This interim report contains the results of examples 1, 2, 4 and 5. In the following, the brief outline of RAINBOW code is described, and then the analyzed results of the examples are reported. RAINBOW code is a three-dimensional core deformation analysis code developed by Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries, Inc. In the RAINBOW code, core elements are approximated in straight beams and the beam theory is applied in the analysis of their deflections due to mechanical interactions among core elements. It can handle various sectors of the whole core, assuming a boundary condition of rotational or reflective symmetry. (author). 6 tabs, figs

  5. Tank 241-T-105, cores 205 and 207 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-T-105 push mode core segments collected between June 24, 1997 and June 30, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Field,1997), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Safety DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Tank 241-T-105 Sample Analysis (memo) (Field, 1997a). The analytical results are included in Table 1. None of the subsamples submitted for the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis or total alpha activity (AT) exceeded the notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Field, 1997). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report

  6. Tank 241-AN-104, cores 163 and 164 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AN-104 push mode core segments collected between August 8, 1996 and September 12, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AAr-1 04 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Winkelman, 1996), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et at., 1995) and the Flammable Gas Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Benar, 1995). The analytical results are included in a data summary table. None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT), Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Plutonium analyses (239,240 Pu) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report

  7. Tank 241-AX-103, cores 212 and 214 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AX-103 push mode core segments collected between July 30, 1997 and August 11, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AX-103 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Comer, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT), plutonium 239 (Pu239), and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Conner, 1997). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report

  8. Special report: results of the 2000-2002 association of residents in radiation oncology (arro) surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Buck, David A.; Kang, Song; Palermo, James

    2004-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2002, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted its 18th, 19th, and 20th annual surveys of all residents training in radiation oncology in the United States. This report summarizes these results. The demographic characteristics of residents in training between 2000 and 2002 are detailed, as are issues regarding the quality of training and career choices of residents entering practice

  9. First ONPE report - French national observatory of fuel poverty. Definitions, indicators, first results and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherel, Didier; Nolay, Pierre; Devaliere, Isolde; Teissier, Olivier; Maresca, Bruno; Guimard, Sebastien; Moisan, Marie; Rousseau, Nicolas; Jouffe, Yves; Poutrel, Severin; Buresi, Sandrine

    2014-09-01

    This first report from the French national observatory of fuel poverty (ONPE) aims at defining fuel poverty and at characterizing and measuring this phenomenon through indicators and inquiries. An additional dimension concerns the vulnerability linked with everyday mobility which is presented in a separate chapter. The national and local policies against fuel poverty are presented with their results, efficiency and possible improvements. A short glimpse on fuel poverty in Europe is given before the conclusion and recommendations

  10. Dietary habits of the Irish population: results from SLÃÅN Annual Report 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health (Ireland)

    2003-01-01

    Dietary habits of the Irish population: results from SLÃÂÅN Annual Report 2003 The National Nutritional Surveillance Centre was established in 1992, in the Department of Health Promotion, National University of Ireland,Galway. In 2003 the Centre moved to the Department of Public Health Medicine and Epidemiology, University College Dublin. Its main functions are to provide nutrition-related information to relevant organizations in an accessible form and to monitor trends in health status i...

  11. Report of the research results with JAERI's facilities in fiscal 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    Results of the research works by educational institutions using facilities of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in fiscal 1975 are reported in individual summaries. Facilities utilized are research reactors, Co-60 irradiation facilities, hot laboratory, Linac and electron accelerators. Fields of research are the following: nuclear physics, radiation damage/solid-state physics, positron annihilation, activation analysis/nuclear chemistry, hot atom chemistry, irradiation effects, biology, and neutron diffraction; and, cooperative works to JAERI. (Mori, K.)

  12. Inconsistency between direct and indirect comparisons of competing interventions: meta-epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fujian; Xiong, Tengbin; Parekh-Bhurke, Sheetal; Loke, Yoon K; Sutton, Alex J; Eastwood, Alison J; Holland, Richard; Chen, Yen-Fu; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Deeks, Jonathan J; Altman, Doug G

    2011-08-16

    To investigate the agreement between direct and indirect comparisons of competing healthcare interventions. Meta-epidemiological study based on sample of meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and PubMed. Inclusion criteria Systematic reviews that provided sufficient data for both direct comparison and independent indirect comparisons of two interventions on the basis of a common comparator and in which the odds ratio could be used as the outcome statistic. Inconsistency measured by the difference in the log odds ratio between the direct and indirect methods. The study included 112 independent trial networks (including 1552 trials with 478,775 patients in total) that allowed both direct and indirect comparison of two interventions. Indirect comparison had already been explicitly done in only 13 of the 85 Cochrane reviews included. The inconsistency between the direct and indirect comparison was statistically significant in 16 cases (14%, 95% confidence interval 9% to 22%). The statistically significant inconsistency was associated with fewer trials, subjectively assessed outcomes, and statistically significant effects of treatment in either direct or indirect comparisons. Owing to considerable inconsistency, many (14/39) of the statistically significant effects by direct comparison became non-significant when the direct and indirect estimates were combined. Significant inconsistency between direct and indirect comparisons may be more prevalent than previously observed. Direct and indirect estimates should be combined in mixed treatment comparisons only after adequate assessment of the consistency of the evidence.

  13. The elephant in the room: Inconsistency in scene viewing and representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotorno, Sara; Tatler, Benjamin W

    2017-10-01

    We examined the extent to which semantic informativeness, consistency with expectations and perceptual salience contribute to object prioritization in scene viewing and representation. In scene viewing (Experiments 1-2), semantic guidance overshadowed perceptual guidance in determining fixation order, with the greatest prioritization for objects that were diagnostic of the scene's depicted event. Perceptual properties affected selection of consistent objects (regardless of their informativeness) but not of inconsistent objects. Semantic and perceptual properties also interacted in influencing foveal inspection, as inconsistent objects were fixated longer than low but not high salience diagnostic objects. While not studied in direct competition with each other (each studied in competition with diagnostic objects), we found that inconsistent objects were fixated earlier and for longer than consistent but marginally informative objects. In change detection (Experiment 3), perceptual guidance overshadowed semantic guidance, promoting detection of highly salient changes. A residual advantage for diagnosticity over inconsistency emerged only when selection prioritization could not be based on low-level features. Overall these findings show that semantic inconsistency is not prioritized within a scene when competing with other relevant information that is essential to scene understanding and respects observers' expectations. Moreover, they reveal that the relative dominance of semantic or perceptual properties during selection depends on ongoing task requirements. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Making Sense of Inconsistencies in Psycho-Educational Assessment: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Miller, Robyn; Ward, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The case is presented of an 8-year-old boy who was referred for psycho-educational assessment because of difficulties with writing. The article provides an example of the way in which a case unfolds as further assessment data become available, and describes a number of challenging aspects of the assessment process. In this case, dilemmas arose…

  15. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The test and research regarding the utilization of atomic energy carried out in national institutions have produced many valuable results in diverse fields so far, such as nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation and medicine, since the budget had been appropriated for the first time in 1956. It has accomplished large role in the promotion of atomic energy utilization in Japan. This report is volume 28, in which the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization carried out by national institutions in fiscal year 1987 are summarized. It is hoped that the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization is further promoted by this report. The contents of this report are nuclear fusion; the research on engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety; food irradiation; the countermeasures against cancer; fertilized soil, the improvement of quality, the protection of plants and the improvement of breeding in agriculture and fishery fields; diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene and the application to physiology and pathology in medical field; radiation measurement and process analysis in mining and industry fields; nuclear reactor materials and nuclear-powered ships; civil engineering; radioactivation analysis; the research on the prevention of injuries; and the basic researches on materials and acessment and reduction of irradiation risk. (J.P.N.)

  16. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The test and research regarding the utilization of atomic energy carried out in national institutions have produced many valuable results in diverse fields so far, such as nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation and medicine, since the budget had been appropriated for the first time in 1956. It has accomplished large role in the promotion of atomic energy utilization in Japan. This report is volume 27, in which the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization carried out by national institutions in fiscal year 1986 are summarized. It is hoped that the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization is further promoted by this report. The contents of this report are nuclear fusion; the research on engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety; food irradiation; the countermeasures against cancer; fertilized soil, the improvement of quality, the protection of plants and the improvement of breeding in agriculture and fishery fields; diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene and the application to physiology and pathology in medical field; radiation chemistry and radiation measurement in mining and industry fields; nuclear reactor materials and nuclear-powered ships; civil engineering; radioactivation analysis; and the research on the prevention of injuries. (Kako, I.)

  17. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The test and research regarding the utilization of atomic energy carried out in national institutions have produced many valuable results in diverse fields so far, such as nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation and medicine, since the budget had been appropriated for the first time in 1956. It has accomplished large role in the promotion of atomic energy utilization in Japan. This report is Volume 25, in which the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization carried out by national institutions in fiscal year 1984 are summarized. It is hoped that the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization is further promoted by this report. The contents of this report are nuclear fusion; the research on engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety; food irradiation; the countermeasures against cancer; fertilized soil, the improvement of quality, the protection of plants and the improvement of breeding in agriculture and fishery fields; diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene and the application to physiology and pathology in medical field; radiation chemistry and radiation measurement in mining and industry fields; nuclear reactor materials and nuclear-powered ships; civil engineering; radioactivation analysis; and the research on the prevention of injuries. (Kako, I.)

  18. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    As for the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy in national institutes, the budget was appropriated for the first time in fiscal year 1956, and since then, the many valuable results of research have been obtained so far in the diversified fields of nuclear fusion, safety research, the irradiation of foods, medicine and others, thus the test and research accomplished the large role for promoting the utilization of atomic energy in Japan. In this report, the gists of the results of the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy carried out by national institutes in fiscal year 1985 are collected. No.1 of this report was published in 1960, and this is No.26. It is desired to increase the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization with this book. The researches on nuclear fusion, engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety, the irradiation of foods, the countermeasures against cancer, fertilized soil, the quality improvement of brewing and farm products, the protection of farm products and the improvement of breeding, diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene, the application to physiology and pathology, radiochemistry, radiation measurement, process analysis, nuclear reactor materials, nuclear powered ships, civil engineering, radioactivation analysis and injury prevention are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Equality Hypocrisy, Inconsistency, and Prejudice: The Unequal Application of the Universal Human Right to Equality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In Western culture, there appears to be widespread endorsement of Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (which stresses equality and freedom). But do people really apply their equality values equally, or are their principles and application systematically discrepant, resulting in equality hypocrisy? The present study, conducted with a representative national sample of adults in the United Kingdom (N = 2,895), provides the first societal test of whether people apply their value of “equality for all” similarly across multiple types of status minority (women, disabled people, people aged over 70, Blacks, Muslims, and gay people). Drawing on theories of intergroup relations and stereotyping we examined, relation to each of these groups, respondents’ judgments of how important it is to satisfy their particular wishes, whether there should be greater or reduced equality of employment opportunities, and feelings of social distance. The data revealed a clear gap between general equality values and responses to these specific measures. Respondents prioritized equality more for “paternalized” groups (targets of benevolent prejudice: women, disabled, over 70) than others (Black people, Muslims, and homosexual people), demonstrating significant inconsistency. Respondents who valued equality more, or who expressed higher internal or external motivation to control prejudice, showed greater consistency in applying equality. However, even respondents who valued equality highly showed significant divergence in their responses to paternalized versus nonpaternalized groups, revealing a degree of hypocrisy. Implications for strategies to promote equality and challenge prejudice are discussed. PMID:25914516

  20. The upper end of climate model temperature projections is inconsistent with past warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stott, Peter; Good, Peter; Jones, Gareth; Gillett, Nathan; Hawkins, Ed

    2013-01-01

    Climate models predict a large range of possible future temperatures for a particular scenario of future emissions of greenhouse gases and other anthropogenic forcings of climate. Given that further warming in coming decades could threaten increasing risks of climatic disruption, it is important to determine whether model projections are consistent with temperature changes already observed. This can be achieved by quantifying the extent to which increases in well mixed greenhouse gases and changes in other anthropogenic and natural forcings have already altered temperature patterns around the globe. Here, for the first time, we combine multiple climate models into a single synthesized estimate of future warming rates consistent with past temperature changes. We show that the observed evolution of near-surface temperatures appears to indicate lower ranges (5–95%) for warming (0.35–0.82 K and 0.45–0.93 K by the 2020s (2020–9) relative to 1986–2005 under the RCP4.5 and 8.5 scenarios respectively) than the equivalent ranges projected by the CMIP5 climate models (0.48–1.00 K and 0.51–1.16 K respectively). Our results indicate that for each RCP the upper end of the range of CMIP5 climate model projections is inconsistent with past warming. (letter)

  1. Inconsistent food safety pressures complicate environmental conservation for California produce growers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Controlling human pathogens on fresh vegetables, fruits and nuts is imperative for California growers. A range of rules and guidelines have been developed since 2006, when a widespread outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 was linked to bagged spinach grown in California. Growers face pressure from industry and government sources to adopt specific control measures on their farms, resulting in a complex, shifting set of demands, some of which conflict with environmental stewardship. We surveyed 588 California produce growers about on-farm practices related to food safety and conservation. Nearly all respondents considered both food safety and environmental protection to be important responsibilities for their farms. Responses indicate that clearing vegetation to create buffers around cropped fields, removing vegetation from ditches and ponds, and using poison bait and wildlife fences are commonly used practices intended to reduce wildlife movements onto farm fields. The survey also revealed that on-farm practices vary substantially even among farms with similar characteristics. This variability suggests inconsistencies in food safety requirements, auditors' interpretations or growers' perception of the demands of their buyers. Although site-specific considerations are important and practices should be tailored to local conditions, our findings suggest growers, natural resources and food safety would benefit from clearer, more consistent requirements.

  2. Equality Hypocrisy, Inconsistency, and Prejudice: The Unequal Application of the Universal Human Right to Equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Dominic; Houston, Diane M; Van de Vyver, Julie; Vasiljevic, Milica

    2015-02-01

    In Western culture, there appears to be widespread endorsement of Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (which stresses equality and freedom). But do people really apply their equality values equally, or are their principles and application systematically discrepant, resulting in equality hypocrisy? The present study, conducted with a representative national sample of adults in the United Kingdom ( N = 2,895), provides the first societal test of whether people apply their value of "equality for all" similarly across multiple types of status minority (women, disabled people, people aged over 70, Blacks, Muslims, and gay people). Drawing on theories of intergroup relations and stereotyping we examined, relation to each of these groups, respondents' judgments of how important it is to satisfy their particular wishes, whether there should be greater or reduced equality of employment opportunities, and feelings of social distance. The data revealed a clear gap between general equality values and responses to these specific measures. Respondents prioritized equality more for "paternalized" groups (targets of benevolent prejudice: women, disabled, over 70) than others (Black people, Muslims, and homosexual people), demonstrating significant inconsistency. Respondents who valued equality more, or who expressed higher internal or external motivation to control prejudice, showed greater consistency in applying equality. However, even respondents who valued equality highly showed significant divergence in their responses to paternalized versus nonpaternalized groups, revealing a degree of hypocrisy. Implications for strategies to promote equality and challenge prejudice are discussed.

  3. Globally inconsistent figure/ground relations induced by a negative part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Feldman, Jacob

    2009-09-10

    Figure/ground interpretation is a dynamic and complex process involving the cooperation and competition of a number of perceptual factors. Most research has assumed that figure/ground assignment is globally consistent along the entire contour of a single figure, meaning that the one side of each boundary is interpreted as figure along the entire length of the boundary, and the other side interpreted as ground. We investigated a situation that challenges this assumption, because local cues to figure/ground conflict with global cues: a "negative part," a contour region that appears locally convex but that the global form requires be concave. To measure figure/ground assignment, we use a new task based on local contour motion attribution that allows us to measure border ownership locally at points along the contour. The results from two experiments showed that the more salient a negative part is, the more border ownership tended to locally reverse within it, creating an inconsistency in figure/ground assignments along the contour. This suggests that border ownership assignment is not an all-or-none process, but rather a locally autonomous process that is not strictly constrained by global cues.

  4. Results Without Authority Controlling a Project When the Team Doesn't Report to You

    CERN Document Server

    KENDRICK, Tom

    2012-01-01

    It's tricky enough to spearhead a big project when you're the boss. But when you're the leader of a team of people who don't report to you, the obstacles are even greater. Results Without Authority is the definitive book for project managers looking to establish credibility and control. A groundbreaker in the field, it supplies a start-to-finish system for getting successful project results from cross-functional, outsourced, and other types of teams. The completely updated second edition includes new information on: * Agile methods and evolving project management tools * Strategies for working

  5. Inconsistencies in patient perceptions and observer ratings of shared decision making: the case of colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Tracy; Cooper, Gregory; Divine, George; Flocke, Susan; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Stange, Kurt; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2010-09-01

    To compare patient-reported and observer-rated shared decision making (SDM) use for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and evaluate patient, physician and patient-reported relational communication factors associated with patient-reported use of shared CRC screening decisions. Study physicians are salaried primary care providers. Patients are insured, aged 50-80 and due for CRC screening. Audio-recordings from 363 primary care visits were observer-coded for elements of SDM. A post-visit patient survey assessed patient-reported decision-making processes and relational communication during visit. Association of patient-reported SDM with observer-rated elements of SDM, as well as patient, physician and relational communication factors were evaluated using generalized estimating equations. 70% of patients preferred SDM for preventive health decisions, 47% of patients reported use of a SDM process, and only one of the screening discussions included all four elements of SDM per observer ratings. Patient report of SDM use was not associated with observer-rated elements of SDM, but was significantly associated with female physician gender and patient-reported relational communication. Inconsistencies exist between patient reports and observer ratings of SDM for CRC screening. Future studies are needed to understand whether SDM that is patient-reported, observer-rated or both are associated with informed and value-concordant CRC screening decisions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interim Report on Heuristics about Inspection Parameters: Updates to Heuristics Resulting from Refinement on Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Forrest; Seaman, Carolyn; Feldman, Raimund; Haingaertner, Ralf; Regardie, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, we have continued analyzing the inspection data in an effort to better understand the applicability and effect of the inspection heuristics on inspection outcomes. Our research goals during this period are: 1. Investigate the effect of anomalies in the dataset (e.g. the very large meeting length values for some inspections) on our results 2. Investigate the effect of the heuristics on other inspection outcome variables (e.g. effort) 3. Investigate whether the recommended ranges can be modified to give inspection planners more flexibility without sacrificing effectiveness 4. Investigate possible refinements or modifications to the heuristics for specific subdomains (partitioned, e.g., by size, domain, or Center) This memo reports our results to date towards addressing these goals. In the next section, the first goal is addressed by describing the types of anomalies we have found in our dataset, how we have addressed them, and the effect of these changes on our previously reported results. In the following section, on "methodology", we describe the analyses we have conducted to address the other three goals and the results of these analyses are described in the "results" section. Finally, we conclude with future plans for continuing our investigation.

  7. Results From the First French Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucouturier, Julien; Ganière, Caroline; Aubert, Salomé; Riviere, Fabien; Praznoczy, Corinne; Vuillemin, Anne; Tremblay, Mark S; Duclos, Martine; Thivel, David

    2017-08-01

    Many countries publish periodic Report Cards on physical activity for children and youth. This paper presents the results from the first French Report Card providing a systematic synthesis and assessment of the national engagements to facilitate childhood physical activity. A search for nationally representative data on 8 indicators of physical activity was conducted and the data were assessed by an expert panel according to international procedures. Whether children across France are achieving specific benchmarks was rated using an established grading framework [A, B, C, D, F, or INC (incomplete)]. Data were interpreted, grades assigned and detailed in the 2016 Report Card that was produced and disseminated. The expert panel awarded the following grades: Overall Physical Activity: INC; Organized Sport Participation: D; Active Transportation: D; Sedentary Behaviors: D; Family and Peers: INC; School: B; Community and the Built Environment: INC; Government Strategies and Investment: INC. The grades reveal that efforts must be done to improve youth's physical activity and that several gaps in the literature still need to be addressed. Collectively the results highlight that children's physical activity levels are low and that further national supports and investments are needed to promote childhood healthy active living in France.

  8. Tank 241-T-203, core 190 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-203 push mode core segments collected on April 17, 1997 and April 18, 1997. The segments were subsainpled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-203 Push Mode Core Sampling andanalysis Plan (TSAP) (Schreiber, 1997a), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Leffer oflnstructionfor Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI)(Hall, 1997). The analytical results are included in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Schreiber, 1997a). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997b) and not considered in this report

  9. Tacrolimus interaction with nafcillin resulting in significant decreases in tacrolimus concentrations: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wungwattana, Minkey; Savic, Marizela

    2017-04-01

    Tacrolimus (TAC) is subject to many drug interactions as a result of its metabolism primarily via CYP450 isoenzyme 3A4. Numerous case reports of TAC and CYP3A4 inducers and inhibitors have been described including antimicrobials, calcium channel antagonists, and antiepileptic drugs. We present the case of a 13-year-old patient with cystic fibrosis and a history of liver transplantation, where subtherapeutic TAC concentrations were suspected to be a result of concomitant TAC and nafcillin (NAF) therapy. The observed drug interaction occurred on two separate hospital admissions, during both of which the patient exhibited therapeutic TAC concentrations prior to exposure to NAF, a CYP3A4 inducer. Upon discontinuation of NAF, TAC concentrations recovered in both instances. This case represents a drug-drug interaction between TAC and NAF that has not previously been reported to our knowledge. Despite the lack of existing reports of interaction between these two agents, this case highlights the importance of therapeutic drug monitoring and assessing for any potential drug-drug or drug-food interactions in patients receiving TAC therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Significant ELCAP analysis results: Summary report. [End-use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, R.G.; Conner, C.C.; Drost, M.K.; Miller, N.E.; Cooke, B.A.; Halverson, M.A.; Lebaron, B.A.; Lucas, R.G.; Jo, J.; Richman, E.E.; Sandusky, W.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Ritland, K.G. (Ritland Associates, Seattle, WA (USA)); Taylor, M.E. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (USA)); Hauser, S.G. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The evolution of the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) since 1983 at Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has been eventful and somewhat tortuous. The birth pangs of a data set so large and encompassing as this have been overwhelming at times. The early adolescent stage of data set development and use has now been reached and preliminary results of early analyses of the data are becoming well known. However, the full maturity of the data set and the corresponding wealth of analytic insights are not fully realized. This document is in some sense a milestone in the brief history of the program. It is a summary of the results of the first five years of the program, principally containing excerpts from a number of previous reports. It is meant to highlight significant accomplishments and analytical results, with a focus on the principal results. Many of the results have a broad application in the utility load research community in general, although the real breadth of the data set remains largely unexplored. The first section of the document introduces the data set: how the buildings were selected, how the metering equipment was installed, and how the data set has been prepared for analysis. Each of the sections that follow the introduction summarize a particular analytic result. A large majority of the analyses to date involve the residential samples, as these were installed first and had highest priority on the analytic agenda. Two exploratory analyses using commercial data are included as an introduction to the commercial analyses that are currently underway. Most of the sections reference more complete technical reports which the reader should refer to for details of the methodology and for more complete discussion of the results. Sections have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Feminism, status inconsistency, and women's intimate partner victimization in heterosexual relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Cortney A; Menaker, Tasha A

    2014-07-01

    This study used a random community sample of 303 women in romantic relationships to investigate the role of educational and employment status inconsistency and patriarchal family ideology as risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization, while considering demographic factors and relationship context variables. Sequential multivariate logistic regression models demonstrated a decrease in the odds of IPV victimization for Hispanic women and women who were older as compared with their counterparts. In addition, increased relationship distress, family-of-origin violence, and employment status inconsistency significantly increased the odds of IPV. Clinical intervention strategies and future research directions are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Institutions, credibility and crisis: the inconsistencies of Argentine exchange rate policy (1991-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLÁS CHERNY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is twofold. The first is to explain the time inconsistencies of the convertibility regime that led to the 2001 crisis. The argument suggests that the credibility requirements for convertibility induced a dynamic of legal, fiscal, financial and external commitments that increased exit costs and time inconsistencies. The second objective is to explain the tensions of the floating regime that replaced convertibility in 2002. We describe the effects of a floating exchange rate on macroeconomic imbalance and the growing tension between competitiveness and inflation.

  13. Inconsistency in serial choice decision and motor reaction times dissociate in younger and older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Bunce, D; MacDonald, SWS; Hultsch, DF

    2004-01-01

    Intraindividual variability (inconsistency) in reaction time (RT) latencies was investigated in a group of younger (M = 25.46 years) and older (M = 69.29 years) men. Both groups performed 300 trials in 2-, 4-, and 8-choice RT conditions where RTs for decision and motor components of the task were recorded separately. A dissociation was evident in that inconsistency was greater in older adults for decision RTs when task demands relating to the number of choices and fatigue arising from time-on...

  14. Phonological inconsistency in word naming: Determinants of the interference effect between languages

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, E.M.G.; Sandra, D.M.J.; Martensen, H.E.; Dijkstra, A.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch-English participants named words and nonwords having a between-language phonologically inconsistent rime, e.g., GREED and PREED, and control words with a language-typical rime, e.g., GROAN, in a monolingual stimulus list or in a mixed list containing Dutch words. Inconsistent items had longer latencies and more errors than typical items in the mixed lists but not in the pure list. The consistency effect depended on word frequency, but not on language membership, lexicality, or instructi...

  15. Inconsistency of speech in children with childhood apraxia of speech, phonological disorders, and typical speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuzzini, Jenya

    There is a lack of agreement on the features used to differentiate Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) from Phonological Disorders (PD). One criterion which has gained consensus is lexical inconsistency of speech (ASHA, 2007); however, no accepted measure of this feature has been defined. Although lexical assessment provides information about consistency of an item across repeated trials, it may not capture the magnitude of inconsistency within an item. In contrast, segmental analysis provides more extensive information about consistency of phoneme usage across multiple contexts and word-positions. The current research compared segmental and lexical inconsistency metrics in preschool-aged children with PD, CAS, and typical development (TD) to determine how inconsistency varies with age in typical and disordered speakers, and whether CAS and PD were differentiated equally well by both assessment levels. Whereas lexical and segmental analyses may be influenced by listener characteristics or speaker intelligibility, the acoustic signal is less vulnerable to these factors. In addition, the acoustic signal may reveal information which is not evident in the perceptual signal. A second focus of the current research was motivated by Blumstein et al.'s (1980) classic study on voice onset time (VOT) in adults with acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) which demonstrated a motor impairment underlying AOS. In the current study, VOT analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between age and group with the voicing distribution for bilabial and alveolar plosives. Findings revealed that 3-year-olds evidenced significantly higher inconsistency than 5-year-olds; segmental inconsistency approached 0% in 5-year-olds with TD, whereas it persisted in children with PD and CAS suggesting that for child in this age-range, inconsistency is a feature of speech disorder rather than typical development (Holm et al., 2007). Likewise, whereas segmental and lexical inconsistency were

  16. Results of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis-Reporting Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Jabalameli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The knee is the most commonly affected joint in the pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS. If misdiagnosed or mismanaged, PVNS, especially the diffused form can destroy joints and can result in terminal degenerative joint disease. Case Presentation We report 3 cases of diffuse form of PVNS with grade 3 osteoarhtritis that IS treated by total synovectomy and total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The mean duration of the follow-up was 46.5 (9, 11, 120 months. In 2 cases, staged posterior then anterior synovectomy and TKA were done with excellent results. In 1 case, simultaneous synovectomy and TKA was performed with hematoma formation postoperatively and quadriceps tendon rupture 10 weeks later with fair final result. Conclusions TKA in PVNS is a challenging procedure. We recommend open posterior synovectomy then anterior synovectomy and TKA in 2 separate operations. Quadriceps mechanism must be protected during synovectomy.

  17. Using the time and motion method to study clinical work processes and workflow: methodological inconsistencies and a call for standardized research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Guo, Michael H; Hanauer, David A

    2011-01-01

    To identify ways for improving the consistency of design, conduct, and results reporting of time and motion (T&M) research in health informatics. We analyzed the commonalities and divergences of empirical studies published 1990-2010 that have applied the T&M approach to examine the impact of health IT implementation on clinical work processes and workflow. The analysis led to the development of a suggested 'checklist' intended to help future T&M research produce compatible and comparable results. We call this checklist STAMP (Suggested Time And Motion Procedures). STAMP outlines a minimum set of 29 data/ information elements organized into eight key areas, plus three supplemental elements contained in an 'Ancillary Data' area, that researchers may consider collecting and reporting in their future T&M endeavors. T&M is generally regarded as the most reliable approach for assessing the impact of health IT implementation on clinical work. However, there exist considerable inconsistencies in how previous T&M studies were conducted and/or how their results were reported, many of which do not seem necessary yet can have a significant impact on quality of research and generalisability of results. Therefore, we deem it is time to call for standards that can help improve the consistency of T&M research in health informatics. This study represents an initial attempt. We developed a suggested checklist to improve the methodological and results reporting consistency of T&M research, so that meaningful insights can be derived from across-study synthesis and health informatics, as a field, will be able to accumulate knowledge from these studies.

  18. 7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinge, Dennis C. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Michael E. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

    2011-04-01

    The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

  19. Tank 214-AW-105, grab samples, analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AW-105 grab samples. Twenty grabs samples were collected from risers 10A and 15A on August 20 and 21, 1996, of which eight were designated for the K Basin sludge compatibility and mixing studies. This document presents the analytical results for the remaining twelve samples. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DO). The results for the previous sampling of this tank were reported in WHC-SD-WM-DP-149, Rev. 0, 60-Day Waste Compatibility Safety Issue and Final Results for Tank 241-A W-105, Grab Samples 5A W-95-1, 5A W-95-2 and 5A W-95-3. Three supernate samples exceeded the TOC notification limit (30,000 microg C/g dry weight). Appropriate notifications were made. No immediate notifications were required for any other analyte. The TSAP requested analyses for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) for all liquids and centrifuged solid subsamples. The PCB analysis of the liquid samples has been delayed and will be presented in a revision to this document

  20. Tank 241-S-106, cores 183, 184 and 187 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-S-106 push mode core segments collected between February 12, 1997 and March 21, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Safety DQO), the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO). The analytical results are included in Table 1. Six of the twenty-four subsamples submitted for the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis exceeded the notification limit of 480 Joules/g stated in the DQO. Appropriate notifications were made. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyses were performed on all samples that produced exotherms during the DSC analysis. All results were less than the notification limit of three weight percent TOC. No cyanide analysis was performed, per agreement with the Tank Safety Program. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. Statistical evaluation of results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. No core composites were created because there was insufficient solid material from any of the three core sampling events to generate a composite that would be representative of the tank contents

  1. How does the mass media report and interpret radiation data? The results of media content analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perko, T. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK.CEN, Institute for Environment Health and Safety (Belgium); Cantone, M.C. [University of Milano, Faculty of Medicine (Italy); Tomkiv, Y. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway); Prezelj, I. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Social Sciences (Slovenia); Gallego, E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Melekhova, E. [Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    In communication with the general population, experts often provide quantitative information related to ionizing radiation, expressed with different units of radioactivity. However, quantitative information about radiation risks may be meaningful only to people who have the ability to comprehend basic numerical concepts and possess knowledge related to radiation. Thus, the media, as a bridge between experts and the general population, has to 'translate' quantitative information into a qualitative one. How successful and accurate are the mass media in this transformation of scientific results into publicly understandable information? Our research investigates media reporting on the concept of ionizing radiation in a case of nuclear emergencies. The presentation is focused on summarizing the 'lessons learned' from the use of radiation data in media reporting about the Fukushima nuclear accident. The in-depth media content analysis was conducted in twelve quality newspapers in Belgium, Slovenia, Italy, Spain, Norway and Russia using the same scientific methodology and analyzing the same time period. Preliminary results identified miss concepts of radiation data by media and even within emergency responders and decision makers. The research is a result of FP7 project Innovative integrated tools and platforms for radiological emergency preparedness and post-accident response in Europe - PREPARE and upgraded with a Russian experience. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  2. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D; Kuss, Daria J; Billieux, Joël

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games.

  3. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D.; Kuss, Daria J.; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games. PMID:27156376

  4. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results. Fourth Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-02

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 12 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The FCEBs in service at AC Transit are 40-foot, low-floor buses built by Van Hool with a hybrid electric propulsion system that includes a US Hybrid fuel cell power system and EnerDel lithium-based energy storage system. The buses began revenue service in May 2010.

  5. Recording of measurement results und data evaluation in water quality. Final report. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanisch, H.H.; Krahe, P.

    1989-05-01

    The report presented includes different hydrological contributions which deal predominantly with the possibilities of evaluating and representing water quality data with statistical and graphical methods, with the exception of the contributions on guidelines for oil barriers and calculations on the progression of a pollutant wave in the Rhine. Experience gained on the basis of practical examples shows that techniques and methods of data interpretation ought to be taken into consideration in measurement programmes in order to be able to attain problem-related results. (orig.). 123 figs., 3 tabs., 14 refs [de

  6. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. Report on the results of research and development 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The report contains a description of the research projects, a list of the institutes and departments of the scientific-technical range with short articles concerning the results of the institutional work, and a bibliography of all publications of 1985. The main aspects of the projects and research programs are fast breeder, separation nozzle process, nuclear fusion, waste recycling and reprocessing, final storage, nuclear safety, the range of technique-man-environment, solid state and materials research, nuclear and elementary particle physics, and research programs of different institutes. (HK)

  7. Tank 241-S-102, Core 232 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEEN, F.H.

    1998-11-04

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-S-102 push mode core segments collected between March 5, 1998 and April 2, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-S-102 Retained Gas Sampler System Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (McCain, 1998), Letter of Instruction for Compatibility Analysis of Samples from Tank 241-S-102 (LOI) (Thompson, 1998) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1998). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

  8. Tank 241-U-106, cores 147 and 148, analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, F.H.

    1996-09-27

    This document is the final report deliverable for tank 241-U-106 push mode core segments collected between May 8, 1996 and May 10, 1996 and received by the 222-S Laboratory between May 14, 1996 and May 16, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-U-106 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP), the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO), Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). The analytical results are included in Table 1.

  9. Status report on education in the economics of animal health: results from a European survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waret-Szkuta, Agnès; Raboisson, Didier; Niemi, Jarkko; Aragrande, Maurizio; Gethmann, Jörn; Martins, Sara Babo; Hans, Lucie; Höreth-Böntgen, Detlef; Sans, Pierre; Stärk, Katharina D; Rushton, Jonathan; Häsler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Education on the use of economics applied to animal health (EAH) has been offered since the 1980s. However, it has never been institutionalized within veterinary curricula, and there is no systematic information on current teaching and education activities in Europe. Nevertheless, the need for economic skills in animal health has never been greater. Economics can add value to disease impact assessments; improve understanding of people's incentives to participate in animal health measures; and help refine resource allocation for public animal health budgets. The use of economics should improve animal health decision making. An online questionnaire was conducted in European countries to assess current and future needs and expectations of people using EAH. The main conclusion from the survey is that education in economics appears to be offered inconsistently in Europe, and information about the availability of training opportunities in this field is scarce. There is a lack of harmonization of EAH education and significant gaps exist in the veterinary curricula of many countries. Depending on whether respondents belonged to educational institutions, public bodies, or private organizations, they expressed concerns regarding the limited education on decision making and impact assessment for animal diseases or on the use of economics for general management. Both public and private organizations recognized the increasing importance of EAH in the future. This should motivate the development of teaching methods and materials that aim at developing the understanding of animal health problems for the benefit of students and professional veterinarians.

  10. Standardization of uveitis nomenclature for reporting clinical data. Results of the First International Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabs, Douglas A; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Rosenbaum, James T

    2005-09-01

    To begin a process of standardizing the methods for reporting clinical data in the field of uveitis. Consensus workshop. Members of an international working group were surveyed about diagnostic terminology, inflammation grading schema, and outcome measures, and the results used to develop a series of proposals to better standardize the use of these entities. Small groups employed nominal group techniques to achieve consensus on several of these issues. The group affirmed that an anatomic classification of uveitis should be used as a framework for subsequent work on diagnostic criteria for specific uveitic syndromes, and that the classification of uveitis entities should be on the basis of the location of the inflammation and not on the presence of structural complications. Issues regarding the use of the terms "intermediate uveitis," "pars planitis," "panuveitis," and descriptors of the onset and course of the uveitis were addressed. The following were adopted: standardized grading schema for anterior chamber cells, anterior chamber flare, and for vitreous haze; standardized methods of recording structural complications of uveitis; standardized definitions of outcomes, including "inactive" inflammation, "improvement'; and "worsening" of the inflammation, and "corticosteroid sparing," and standardized guidelines for reporting visual acuity outcomes. A process of standardizing the approach to reporting clinical data in uveitis research has begun, and several terms have been standardized.

  11. Remediation strategies for contaminated territories resulting from Chernobyl accident. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, P.; Fesenko, S.; Firsakova, S.K.

    2001-03-01

    The present report realizes a settlement specific approach to derive remediation strategies and generalizes the results to the whole affected area. The ultimate aim of the study is to prepare possible investment projects on remediation activities in the contaminated territories. Its current aim was to identify the areas and the remedial actions that should be primarily supported and their corresponding cost. The present report starts with an outline of the methodology of deriving remediation strategies, a description of data for 70 representative settlements and of parameters of the remedial actions considered, and a classification of the contaminated territory according to radiological criteria. After summarising aspects of the contamination situation and applications of remedial actions in the past, dose calculations and derived remediation strategies for the representative settlements are described. These are generalized to the total contaminated territory. Within the contaminated territory private produce is of main importance for the radionuclide intake. At the end of the report, radiological aspects of the produce of collective farms are described. (orig.)

  12. Delayed spinal extradural hematoma following thoracic spine surgery and resulting in paraplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban Chandra JKB

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Postoperative spinal extradural hematomas are rare. Most of the cases that have been reported occured within 3 days of surgery. Their occurrence in a delayed form, that is, more than 72 hours after surgery, is very rare. This case is being reported to enhance awareness of delayed postoperative spinal extradural hematomas. Case presentation We report a case of acute onset dorsal spinal extradural hematoma from a paraspinal muscular arterial bleed, producing paraplegia 72 hours following surgery for excision of a spinal cord tumor at T8 level. The triggering mechanism was an episode of violent twisting movement by the patient. Fresh blood in the postoperative drain tube provided suspicion of this complication. Emergency evacuation of the clot helped in regaining normal motor and sensory function. The need to avoid straining of the paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period is emphasized. Conclusion Most cases of postoperative spinal extradural hematomas occur as a result of venous bleeding. However, an arterial source of bleeding from paraspinal muscular branches causing extradural hematoma and subsequent neurological deficit is underreported. Undue straining of paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period after major spinal surgery should be avoided for at least a few days.

  13. Analysis on the capacity degradation mechanism of a series lithium-ion power battery pack based on inconsistency of capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhen-Po; Liu Peng; Wang Li-Fang

    2013-01-01

    The lithium-ion battery has been widely used as an energy source. Charge rate, discharge rate, and operating temperature are very important factors for the capacity degradations of power batteries and battery packs. Firstly, in this paper we make use of an accelerated life test and a statistical analysis method to establish the capacity accelerated degradation model under three constant stress parameters according to the degradation data, which are charge rate, discharge rate, and operating temperature, and then we propose a capacity degradation model according to the current residual capacity of a Li-ion cell under dynamic stress parameters. Secondly, we analyze the charge and discharge process of a series power battery pack and interpret the correlation between the capacity degradations of the battery pack and its charge/discharge rate. According to this cycling condition, we establish a capacity degradation model of a series power battery pack under inconsistent capacity of cells, and analyze the degradation mechanism with capacity variance and operating temperature difference. The comparative analysis of test results shows that the inconsistent operating temperatures of cells in the series power battery pack are the main cause of its degradation; when the difference between inconsistent temperatures is narrowed by 5 °C, the cycle life can be improved by more than 50%. Therefore, it effectively improves the cycle life of the series battery pack to reasonably assemble the batteries according to their capacities and to narrow the differences in operating temperature among cells. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  14. Impact of Negative Quality Inconsistency on Brand Loyalty – Case of Croatian Food Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ferenčić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Attracting and keeping consumers’ loyalty in Fast Moving Consumer Goods segment became the main concern for all producing companies and retailers, too. Many marketing researchers argue that product or service quality perception is one of the key elements in brand loyalty building process. When talking about food market, one has to be aware that food consumption has direct impact on human health and, in that context, process of building brand loyalty for food brands is not possible, or it can be hard, if the product quality of food brands is not on the expected level and according to defined food quality standards. The goal of this paper was to understand aspects of connection between food product quality and brand loyalty process better and to explore how problems with negative quality inconsistency in different food categories can influence brand loyalty. An empirical research (on-line survey was conducted to prove and explain the connection between food product quality and food brand loyalty. The research results shows that the main reasons for being loyal to a certain food brand or product are related mostly to positive brand experience, high and stabile product quality, and recognizable taste. In the context of these research results, it can be concluded that long term consumer satisfaction as a factor in food brand loyalty process depends on stabile product quality, so food manufacturers or food brand owners should be focused on preventing or minimizing the aspect of negative quality issues. Regarding research limitations, the study was conducted only on users from Croatian market; so broadening the survey to other markets should give a clearer view on the connection between food product quality and brand loyalty process.

  15. Iatrogenic alterations in the biodistribution of radiotracers as a result of drug therapy: Reported instances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladik, W.B. III; Ponto, J.A.; Lentle, B.C.; Laven, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter is a compilation of reported instances in which the biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical has been (or could be) modified by the administration of a therapeutic nonradioactive drug or contrast agent in such a way as to potentially interfere with the interpretation of the nuclear medicine study in question. This type of phenomenon is commonly referred to as a drug-radiopharmaceutical interaction. In this chapter, interactions are arranged according to the radiopharmaceutical involved; each interaction is characterized by use of the following descriptors: 1. Interfering drug: the interfering nonradioactive drug that alters the kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical and thus changes the resulting diagnostic data obtained from the study. 2. Nuclear medicine study affected: the nuclear medicine study in which the interaction is likely to occur. 3. Effect on image: the appearance of the image (or the effect on diagnostic data) which results from the interaction. 4. Significance: the potential clinical significance of the interaction

  16. Appendix to the report from the low-residue soldering task force: Phase 2 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J.; Huffman, D.D. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The LRSTF report for Phase I of its evaluation of low-residue soldering was issued in June 1995. This Appendix summarizes the results of follow-on testing performed in Phase II and compares electrical test results for both phases. Deliberate decisions were made by the LRSTF in Phase I to challenge the design guideline limits in MILSTD-275, Printed Wiring for Electronic Equipment The LRSTF considered this approach to produce a ``worst case`` design and provide useful information about the robustness of LR soldering processes. As such, good design practices were sometimes deliberately violated in designing the LRSTF board. This approach created some anomalies for both LR boards and RMA/cleaned controls. Phase II testing verified that problems that affected both RMA/cleaned and LR boards in Phase I were design related.

  17. Report on results of seventeen years in consultations of radiation exposed pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, L.; Arndt, D.; Laude, G.

    1992-01-01

    In a survey it will be given results of consultations of pregnant women exposed during the pregnancy in the period of 1976 to 1992 formerly in the National Board of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR and since 1990 in the Clinic-diagnostical Division of the Federal Health Office. The report includes dose estimations of the embryo and medical assessments of 430 pregnant women. The radiation exposure were mainly received by X-ray diagnostic (n = 406 cases) and the others by applications of radiation in nuclear medicine, research and vocational training (n = 24 cases). Results of dose and risk estimation were summarized in tables. Women having incurred fetal doses in excess of 100 mGy were recommended to interrupt pregnancy. A fetal dose above 100 mGy occured in 9 cases. The anatomico-pathological and embryological findings of the embryo or fetus showed only in one case a reference of teratogenic radiation damage. (orig.) [de

  18. Evaluation of the PISC-2 trials results PISC 2 report No.5. Final issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    Ultrasonic testing is widely used for detecting, locating and sizing flaws in primary circuit elements at various stages of plant life. The successive PISC projects have constituted the most notable, sustained, international effort to assess the effectiveness of these inspection techniques. The Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components (PISC-II, 1981-1986) constitutes a detailed evaluation of the best performance obtainable by modern ultrasonic techniques under optimal conditions. The present report gives a complete evaluation of the results of PISC-II obtained on various plates presenting different types of defects. Three levels of evaluation are considered: a comparison between teams, a comparison between procedures, and a comparison of the individual techniques and components of the procedures. Results are discussed as a function of the tolerance on sizing, as a function of subgroups of defects (defect position, size, characteristics)

  19. Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESCH, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4microCi/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report

  20. PREVALENCE OF SELF-REPORTED SPINAL PAIN IN BRAZIL: RESULTS OF THE NATIONAL HEALTH RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIZA GOMES SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the prevalence and distribution of cases of self-reported spinal disorders by persons who are 18 years or older living in Brazil according to sociodemographic variables. Methods: We used the Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde (PNS, national health research, developed by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE in partnership with the Ministry of Health. The data obtained from the website of IBGE System of Automatic Recovery - SIDRA were analyzed using the SPSS Statistics software version 20.0, IBM. Results: In Brazil 19% of the adult population report chronic spinal pain, 15.26% (± 4.56 men and 20.08% (+/- 4.11 women. After the age of 60, the prevalence is higher. Regarding skin color 18.26% (± 3.53 are white, 17.27% (± 6.65 are black and 17.93% (± 4.05 are brown, with no statistical difference. As for education, 23.55% (±5.70 had low or absent schooling (p < 0.001. The southern region of Brazil has the highest percentage (23.3% of adults with chronic problems in the spine, and the state with the highest percentage is Paraná, with 26%. Conclusions: The results showed that there is a relationship between spinal pain and sociodemographic characteristics, pointing to the southern region as the most affected by spinal disorders when compared to other regions of the country.

  1. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    As for the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy by national organizations, the budget was appropriated for the first time in fiscal year 1956. Since then, many valuable results of research have been produced in the diverse fields of nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation, medicine and others, in this way, the test and research have played large roles in the promotion of the utilization of atomic energy in Japan. This is the 23rd report, in which the results of the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy carried out in fiscal year 1982 by national organizations are summarized. 5 researches on nuclear fusion, 12 researches on engineering safety, 5 researches on environmental radioactivity safety, 3 researches on food irradiation, 5 researches on the countermeasures to cancer, 8 researches on soil fertilization, 4 researches on quality improvement, 7 researches on crop protection, 5 researches on the improvement of breeding, 8 researches on diagnosis and treatment, 8 researches on pharmaceuticals, 10 researches on the application to pathology, 6 researches on mining and industry, 6 researches on power reactors and nuclear ships, 1 research on underground water, 6 researches on activation analysis and 3 researches on injury prevention are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    As for the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy by national organizations, the budget was appropriated for the first time in fiscal year 1956. Since then, many valuable results of research have been produced in the diverse fields of nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation, medicine and others, in this way, the test and research have played large roles in the promotion of the utilization of atomic energy in Japan. This is the 24th report, in which the results of the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy carried out in fiscal year 1983 by national organizations are summarized. 5 researches on nuclear fusion, 19 researches on engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety, 3 researches on food irradiation, 6 researches on the countermeasures to cancer, 19 researches on agriculture, forestry and fishery, 30 researches on medicine, pharmaceuticals and environmental hygiene, 6 researches on mining and industry, 6 researches on power reactors and nuclear ships, 1 research on agricultural water, 7 researches on activation analysis and 4 researches on injury prevention are reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. An harmonic smile resulted from the use of ceramic prosthesis with zirconia structure: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Goncalves, Leticia Machado; Dias, Ana Paula; Dias, Anna Claudia Pereira; Malheiros, Adriana Santos; Silva, Alice Carvalho; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-06-01

    The rehabilitation of patients requiring an esthetic smile demands a multidisciplinary approach. This clinical report describes a treatment plan for recovery aesthetics' smile of anterior teeth using ceramic prosthesis with zirconia structure. Initially, a review of aesthetic parameters, diagnostic waxing, mock-up and provisional restorations was performed. A contextual assessment of aesthetic, proportion and shape of teeth was done to recreate a natural looking for teeth in consonance with the smile line. Subsequently, based on these parameters, fixed prostheses of the upper anterior teeth using ceramic restorations with zirconia infrastructures were performed. The use of ceramic restorations with zirconia structures associated with a careful treatment plan allows the professional to integrate esthetic and function for satisfactory clinical results. How to cite the article: Tavarez RR, Gonçalves LM, Dias AP, Dias AC, Malheiros AS, Silva AC, Bandeca MC. An harmonic smile resulted from the use of ceramic prosthesis with zirconia structure: A case report. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):90-2.

  4. Comparison of Estrogen Receptor Assay Results from Pathology Reports with Results from Central Laboratory Testing: Implications for Population-Based Studies of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, LC; Marotti, J; Baer, HJ; Deitz, AC; Colditz, GA; Tamimi, RM

    2014-01-01

    Population-based studies of women with breast cancer commonly utilize information culled from pathology reports rather than central pathology review. The reliability of this information, particularly with regard to tumor biomarker results, is of concern. To address this, we evaluated the concordance between estrogen receptor (ER) results as determined from the original pathology reports and ER results obtained on the same specimens following testing in a single laboratory. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were constructed from paraffin blocks of 3,167 breast cancers that developed in women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study. ER immunostains were performed on all TMA sections in single run. Results of ER immunostains performed on the TMA sections were compared with ER assay results abstracted from pathology reports. Among 1,851 cases of invasive breast cancer in which both ER results from pathology reports and central ER test results were available, the reported ER status and the ER status as determined from immunostains on TMAs were in agreement in 1,651 cases (87.3 %; kappa value 0.64, ppathology reports is a reasonable, albeit imperfect, alternative to central laboratory ER testing for large, population-based studies of patients with breast cancer. PMID:18230800

  5. The reliability of computer analysis of ultrasonographic prostate images: the influence of inconsistent histopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesen, R. J.; Huynen, A. L.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Schaafsma, H. E.; van Iersel, M. P.; Aarnink, R. G.; Debruyne, F. M.; Wijkstra, H.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a method to investigate the influence of inconsistent histopathology during the development of tissue discrimination algorithms. Review of the pathology is performed on the biopsies used as training set of a computer system for cancer detection in ultrasonographic prostate

  6. An investigation of inconsistent projections and artefacts in multi-pinhole SPECT with axially aligned pinholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kench, P L; Meikle, S R; Lin, J; Gregoire, M C

    2011-01-01

    Multiple pinholes are advantageous for maximizing the use of the available field of view (FOV) of compact small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detectors. However, when the pinholes are aligned axially to optimize imaging of extended objects, such as rodents, multiplexing of the pinhole projections can give rise to inconsistent data which leads to 'ghost point' artefacts in the reconstructed volume. A novel four pinhole collimator with a baffle was designed and implemented to eliminate these inconsistent projections. Simulation and physical phantom studies were performed to investigate artefacts from axially aligned pinholes and the efficacy of the baffle in removing inconsistent data and, thus, reducing reconstruction artefacts. SPECT was performed using a Defrise phantom to investigate the impact of collimator design on FOV utilization and axial blurring effects. Multiple pinhole SPECT acquired with a baffle had fewer artefacts and improved quantitative accuracy when compared to SPECT acquired without a baffle. The use of four pinholes positioned in a square maximized the available FOV, increased acquisition sensitivity and reduced axial blurring effects. These findings support the use of a baffle to eliminate inconsistent projection data arising from axially aligned pinholes and improve small animal SPECT reconstructions.

  7. Inconsistency of Bayesian Inference for Misspecified Linear Models, and a Proposal for Repairing It

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünwald, P.; van Ommen, T.

    2017-01-01

    We empirically show that Bayesian inference can be inconsistent under misspecification in simple linear regression problems, both in a model averaging/selection and in a Bayesian ridge regression setting. We use the standard linear model, which assumes homoskedasticity, whereas the data are

  8. Inconsistency in Serial Choice Decision and Motor Reaction Times Dissociate in Younger and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, D.; MacDonald, S.W.S.; Hultsch, D.F.

    2004-01-01

    Intraindividual variability (inconsistency) in reaction time (RT) latencies was investigated in a group of younger (M=25.46 years) and older (M=69.29 years) men. Both groups performed 300 trials in 2-, 4-, and 8-choice RT conditions where RTs for decision and motor components of the task were recorded separately. A dissociation was evident in that…

  9. An Evaluation of the MMPI-2 and MMPI-A True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Richard W.; Arnau, Randolph C.; Archer, Robert P.; Dandy, Kristina L.

    2006-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--Adolescent (MMPI-A) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--2 (MMPI-2) True Response Inconsistency (TRIN) scales are measures of acquiescence and nonacquiescence included among the standard validity scales on these instruments. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of…

  10. Parental Inconsistency versus Parental Authoritarianism: Associations with Symptoms of Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan Adeeb

    2008-01-01

    While in western countries, such as the US and Europe, authoritarian parenting is associated with negative psycho-social outcomes. Studies have indicated that this is not the case in collective/authoritarian cultures. It has been hypothesized that inconsistency in parenting style and culture contributes to these negative outcomes. In this study a…

  11. The Belief that Alcohol Use Is Inconsistent with Personal Autonomy: A Promotive Factor for Younger Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kimberly L.; Shtivelband, Annette; Comello, Maria Leonora G.; Slater, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored an understudied promotive factor, a belief that alcohol use is inconsistent with personal autonomy, which may reduce adolescent intention to drink and subsequent alcohol use. Autonomy was examined as an attitudinal construct within the Theory of Reasoned Action. Longitudinal data from 2,493 seventh grade students nested in 40…

  12. Memory for stereotype (in)consistent information : The role of in-group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doosje, Bertjan; Spears, Russell; de Redelijkheid, Hans; van Onna, Joost

    Effects of identification with one's group on memory of stereotype consistent and inconsistent information about one's group were examined in two studies. In the first study, we focused on supporters of a low status soccer team, and observed that diehard fans were more likely to remember

  13. Inconsistency of Bayesian inference for misspecified linear models, and a proposal for repairing it

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.D. Grünwald (Peter); T. van Ommen (Thijs)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWe empirically show that Bayesian inference can be inconsistent under misspecification in simple linear regression problems, both in a model averaging/selection and in a Bayesian ridge regression setting. We use the standard linear model, which assumes homoskedasticity, whereas the data

  14. A theory of Markovian time-inconsistent stochastic control in discrete time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjork, Tomas; Murgoci, Agatha

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theory for a general class of discrete-time stochastic control problems that, in various ways, are time-inconsistent in the sense that they do not admit a Bellman optimality principle. We attack these problems by viewing them within a game theoretic framework, and we look for subgame...

  15. Setting standards and detecting intrajudge inconsistency using interdependent evaluation of response alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Lei; van der Linden, Willem J.; Vos, Hendrik J.

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces a new test-centered standard-setting method as well as a procedure to detect intrajudge inconsistency of the method. The standard-setting method that is based on interdependent evaluations of alternative responses has judges closely evaluate the process that examinees use to

  16. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree Information of Sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Mulder, H.A.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype

  17. James Bay air quality study : report on the results of field monitoring in 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-02-08

    An air quality study in James Bay was conducted, in order to establish general levels of pollutants in outdoor air in the James Bay area of Victoria, British Columbia. The primary sources of air pollution in the area include light duty and heavy duty vehicle traffic, helicopters, floatplanes, and marine vessels such as cruise ships, passenger ferries, commercial fishing and whale watching boats, and recreation motorboats. Air quality monitoring represented the first phase of the project. The second phase involved a detailed pollutant dispersion model including all emission sources. This report described the use of sampling equipment and the measurement of nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, fine particulate matter and contributing sources, and volatile organic compounds, specifically benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene/xylene and naphthalene. Supporting data, including traffic counts, wind speed and direction, precipitation, and cruise ship schedules were collected to assist in the interpretation of the field monitoring results. For each of these pollutants, the report provided responses to several questions, such as defining each pollutant; describing the sources of each pollutant in the James Bay neighbourhood; presenting the results of the field monitoring; discussing the limitations of the monitoring equipment and sampling design; interpreting the results; comparing monitored levels to those measured at other times or locations; and comparing monitored levels to air quality standards or guidelines. Conclusions about each pollutant were presented. It was concluded that phase 2 pollutant dispersion modelling should include estimates of 1-hour, 24-hour, and seasonal average pollutant levels at varying elevations above ground level, with a focus on residential apartment buildings in the study area. 5 tabs., 52 figs., 7 appendices.

  18. Comparing individual differences in inconsistency and plasticity as predictors of cognitive function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, Jacob H G; Stawski, Robert S; MacDonald, Stuart W S

    2016-01-01

    Recent theorizing differentiates key constraints on cognition, including one's current range of processing efficiency (i.e., flexibility or inconsistency) as well as the capacity to expand flexibility over time (i.e., plasticity). The present study uses intensive assessment of response time data to examine the interplay between markers of intraindividual variability (inconsistency) and gains across biweekly retest sessions (plasticity) in relation to age-related cognitive function. Participants included 304 adults (aged 64 to 92 years: M = 74.02, SD = 5.95) from Project MIND, a longitudinal burst design study assessing performance across micro and macro intervals (response latency trials, weekly bursts, annual retests). For two reaction time (RT) measures (choice RT and one-back choice RT), baseline measures of RT inconsistency (intraindividual standard deviation, ISD, across trials at the first testing session) and plasticity (within-person performance gains in average RT across the 5 biweekly burst sessions) were computed and were then employed in linear mixed models as predictors of individual differences in cognitive function and longitudinal (6-year) rates of cognitive change. Independent of chronological age and years of education, higher RT inconsistency was associated uniformly with poorer cognitive function at baseline and with increased cognitive decline for measures of episodic memory and crystallized verbal ability. In contrast, predictive associations for plasticity were more modest for baseline cognitive function and were absent for 6-year cognitive change. These findings underscore the potential utility of response times for articulating inconsistency and plasticity as dynamic predictors of cognitive function in older adults.

  19. An iterative approach to case study analysis: insights from qualitative analysis of quantitative inconsistencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain J Barnett

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-N comparative studies have helped common pool resource scholars gain general insights into the factors that influence collective action and governance outcomes. However, these studies are often limited by missing data, and suffer from the methodological limitation that important information is lost when we reduce textual information to quantitative data. This study was motivated by nine case studies that appeared to be inconsistent with the expectation that the presence of Ostrom’s Design Principles increases the likelihood of successful common pool resource governance. These cases highlight the limitations of coding and analysing Large-N case studies. We examine two issues: 1 the challenge of missing data and 2 potential approaches that rely on context (which is often lost in the coding process to address inconsistencies between empirical observations theoretical predictions.  For the latter, we conduct a post-hoc qualitative analysis of a large-N comparative study to explore 2 types of inconsistencies: 1 cases where evidence for nearly all design principles was found, but available evidence led to the assessment that the CPR system was unsuccessful and 2 cases where the CPR system was deemed successful despite finding limited or no evidence for design principles.  We describe inherent challenges to large-N comparative analysis to coding complex and dynamically changing common pool resource systems for the presence or absence of design principles and the determination of “success”.  Finally, we illustrate how, in some cases, our qualitative analysis revealed that the identity of absent design principles explained inconsistencies hence de-facto reconciling such apparent inconsistencies with theoretical predictions.  This analysis demonstrates the value of combining quantitative and qualitative analysis, and using mixed-methods approaches iteratively to build comprehensive methodological and theoretical approaches to understanding

  20. RTE - 2013 Activity Report, 2013 Activity and Sustainable Development Report, financial results for 2013, Report of the Chairman of the Supervisory Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    RTE is the operator of the high and extra high-voltage transmission system in France. RTE operates, develops and maintains it. This role places RTE at the heart of smart power, supplying its customers: generators, distribution system operators, industrial customers and traders. RTE deploys its expertise to achieve smart power, with three objectives: - To optimise the power system so that everything operates at the lowest cost, every second, whatever the weather brings, whatever the level of supply and demand. - To guarantee a secure power supply, by offering tools and mechanisms that can be used to adjust generation and power consumption. - To adapt the grid to energy transition through constant innovation. RTE counts 8,400 employees. This document gathers both French and English versions of the 2013 Activity and Sustainable Development Report and the English version of the 2013 financial results and of the Report of the Chairman of the Supervisory Board

  1. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2015 results. 2016 Mission report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 365 830 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.7 % compared to 2014. The average individual dose in 2015 was very close to the value in 2014. Furthermore, 14 138 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 606 workers received more than 5 mSv. 2 workers received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 56.3 to 61.9 man.Sv (10 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 62.4 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.6 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.4 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.1 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.17 mSv and 1.38 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 877 individual examinations have been performed in 2015, 52 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 48 % are direct body counting. In 2015, 2 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 3 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2015, the average individual dose of 19 565

  2. Structural determinants of inconsistent condom use with clients among migrant sex workers: findings of longitudinal research in an urban canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sou, Julie; Shannon, Kate; Li, Jane; Nguyen, Paul; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Shoveller, Jean; Goldenberg, Shira M

    2015-06-01

    Migrant women in sex work experience unique risks and protective factors related to their sexual health. Given the dearth of knowledge in high-income countries, we explored factors associated with inconsistent condom use by clients among migrant female sex workers over time in Vancouver, BC. Questionnaire and HIV/sexually transmitted infection testing data from a longitudinal cohort, An Evaluation of Sex Workers Health Access, were collected from 2010 to 2013. Logistic regression using generalized estimating equations was used to model correlates of inconsistent condom use by clients among international migrant sex workers over a 3-year study period. Of 685 participants, analyses were restricted to 182 (27%) international migrants who primarily originated from China. In multivariate generalized estimating equations analyses, difficulty accessing condoms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-12.47) independently correlated with increased odds of inconsistent condom use by clients. Servicing clients in indoor sex work establishments (e.g., massage parlors) (AOR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.15-0.77), and high school attainment (AOR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.09-0.50) had independent protective effects on the odds of inconsistent condom use by clients. Findings of this longitudinal study highlight the persistent challenges faced by migrant sex workers in terms of accessing and using condoms. Migrant sex workers who experienced difficulty in accessing condoms were more than 3 times as likely to report inconsistent condom use by clients. Laws, policies, and programs promoting access to safer, decriminalized indoor work environments remain urgently needed to promote health, safety, and human rights for migrant workers in the sex industry.

  3. 2015 Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results Report for Project Rulison, Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, Rick [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kautsky, Mark [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 20–22 and 27, 2015. Several of the land owners were not available to allow access to their respective properties, which created the need for several sample collection trips. This report documents the analytical results of the Rulison monitoring event and includes the trip report and the data validation package (Appendix A). The groundwater and surface water monitoring were shipped to the GEL Group Inc. laboratories for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high- resolution gamma spectrometry. Tritium was analyzed using two methods, the conventional tritium method, which has a detection limit on the order of 400 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), and the enriched method (for selected samples), which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L.

  4. Tank 241-AP-105, cores 208, 209 and 210, analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-AP-105. Push mode core segments were removed from Risers 24 and 28 between July 2, 1997, and July 14, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-AP-105 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997) and Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, or total organic carbon (TOC) analysis exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP and DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Two cores, each consisting of four segments, were expected from Tank 241-AP-105. Three cores were sampled, and complete cores were not obtained. TSAP states core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three calendar days from the time each segment is removed from the tank. This requirement was not met for all cores. Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis and identifies their sources. This reference also relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory sample numbers

  5. Tank 241-T-201, core 192 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-08-07

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-201. Push mode core segments were removed from Riser 3 between April 24, 1997, and April 25, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-201 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997), Letter of Instruction for Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI) (Bell, 1997), Additional Core Composite Sample from Drainable Liquid Samples for Tank 241-T-2 01 (ACC) (Hall, 1997), and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report.

  6. Tank 241-AP-105, cores 208, 209 and 210, analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-10-24

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-AP-105. Push mode core segments were removed from Risers 24 and 28 between July 2, 1997, and July 14, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-AP-105 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997) and Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, or total organic carbon (TOC) analysis exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP and DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Two cores, each consisting of four segments, were expected from Tank 241-AP-105. Three cores were sampled, and complete cores were not obtained. TSAP states core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three calendar days from the time each segment is removed from the tank. This requirement was not met for all cores. Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis and identifies their sources. This reference also relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory sample numbers.

  7. Intraabdominal actinomycosis resulting in a difficult to diagnose intraperitoneal mass: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Naoto; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Nakahara, Yujiro; Wakasugi, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Takachi, Kou; Oshima, Satoshi; Yoshida, Kyotaro

    2018-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous disease caused by Actinomyces israelii. Preoperative confirmed diagnosis is very difficult, so most cases are diagnosed preoperatively as malignant tumors. We report a case of intraabdominal actinomycosis which was difficult to diagnose preoperatively. A woman, 60 years old, experienced discomfort in her lower right abdomen. She complained of nausea and anorexia and visited our hospital. Laboratory blood tests, abdominal CT, and abdominal MRI led to a diagnosis of a uterine sarcoma or primary intestinal mass, and she underwent surgery. Her histopathological diagnosis was intraabdominal actinomycosis. Actinomycosis is a chronic purulent granulomatous inflammation caused by Actinomyces israelii. No clinical symptoms or laboratory findings are characteristic of abdominal actinomycosis, so this disorder is very difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Therefore, many cases are diagnosed as malignant tumors and undergo surgery. After surgery, long-term antibiotic treatment (penicillin) is usually administered. We reported a case of intraabdominal actinomycosis that resulted in a difficult to diagnose intraperitoneal mass. When a large intraperitoneal mass is found, actinomycosis needs to be included as one of differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Tank 241-T-201, core 192 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-201. Push mode core segments were removed from Riser 3 between April 24, 1997, and April 25, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-201 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997), Letter of Instruction for Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI) (Bell, 1997), Additional Core Composite Sample from Drainable Liquid Samples for Tank 241-T-2 01 (ACC) (Hall, 1997), and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report

  9. SeqReporter: automating next-generation sequencing result interpretation and reporting workflow in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Somak; Durso, Mary Beth; Wald, Abigail; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2014-01-01

    A wide repertoire of bioinformatics applications exist for next-generation sequencing data analysis; however, certain requirements of the clinical molecular laboratory limit their use: i) comprehensive report generation, ii) compatibility with existing laboratory information systems and computer operating system, iii) knowledgebase development, iv) quality management, and v) data security. SeqReporter is a web-based application developed using ASP.NET framework version 4.0. The client-side was designed using HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript. The server-side processing (VB.NET) relied on interaction with a customized SQL server 2008 R2 database. Overall, 104 cases (1062 variant calls) were analyzed by SeqReporter. Each variant call was classified into one of five report levels: i) known clinical significance, ii) uncertain clinical significance, iii) pending pathologists' review, iv) synonymous and deep intronic, and v) platform and panel-specific sequence errors. SeqReporter correctly annotated and classified 99.9% (859 of 860) of sequence variants, including 68.7% synonymous single-nucleotide variants, 28.3% nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants, 1.7% insertions, and 1.3% deletions. One variant of potential clinical significance was re-classified after pathologist review. Laboratory information system-compatible clinical reports were generated automatically. SeqReporter also facilitated quality management activities. SeqReporter is an example of a customized and well-designed informatics solution to optimize and automate the downstream analysis of clinical next-generation sequencing data. We propose it as a model that may envisage the development of a comprehensive clinical informatics solution. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Set size influences the relationship between ANS acuity and math performance: a result of different strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Julia Felicitas; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian; Huber, Stefan

    2017-08-29

    Previous research has proposed that the approximate number system (ANS) constitutes a building block for later mathematical abilities. Therefore, numerous studies investigated the relationship between ANS acuity and mathematical performance, but results are inconsistent. Properties of the experimental design have been discussed as a potential explanation of these inconsistencies. In the present study, we investigated the influence of set size and presentation duration on the association between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and math performance. Moreover, we focused on strategies reported as an explanation for these inconsistencies. In particular, we employed a non-symbolic magnitude comparison task and asked participants how they solved the task. We observed that set size was a significant moderator of the relationship between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and math performance, whereas presentation duration of the stimuli did not moderate this relationship. This supports the notion that specific design characteristics contribute to the inconsistent results. Moreover, participants reported different strategies including numerosity-based, visual, counting, calculation-based, and subitizing strategies. Frequencies of these strategies differed between different set sizes and presentation durations. However, we found no specific strategy, which alone predicted arithmetic performance, but when considering the frequency of all reported strategies, arithmetic performance could be predicted. Visual strategies made the largest contribution to this prediction. To conclude, the present findings suggest that different design characteristics contribute to the inconsistent findings regarding the relationship between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and mathematical performance by inducing different strategies and additional processes.

  11. Irradiation effects test series, test IE-5. Test results report. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croucher, D. W.; Yackle, T. R.; Allison, C. M.; Ploger, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Test IE-5, conducted in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, employed three 0.97-m long pressurized water reactor type fuel rods, fabricated from previously irradiated zircaloy-4 cladding and one similar rod fabricated from unirradiated cladding. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the influence of simulated fission products, cladding irradiation damage, and fuel rod internal pressure on pellet-cladding interaction during a power ramp and on fuel rod behavior during film boiling operation. The four rods were subjected to a preconditioning period, a power ramp to an average fuel rod peak power of 65 kW/m, and steady state operation for one hour at a coolant mass flux of 4880 kg/s-m/sup 2/ for each rod. After a flow reduction to 1800 kg/s-m/sup 2/, film boiling occurred on one rod. Additional flow reductions to 970 kg/s-m/sup 2/ produced film boiling on the three remaining fuel rods. Maximum time in film boiling was 80s. The rod having the highest initial internal pressure (8.3 MPa) failed 10s after the onset of film boiling. A second rod failed about 90s after reactor shutdown. The report contains a description of the experiment, the test conduct, test results, and results from the preliminary postirradiation examination. Calculations using a transient fuel rod behavior code are compared with the test results.

  12. Incident reporting to BfArM - regulatory framework, results and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Robin; Stößlein, Ekkehard; Lauer, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Medical devices are manifold and one of the most innovative fields of technology. As technologies advance, former limits cease to exist and complex devices become reality. Medical devices represent a very dynamic field with high economic relevance. The manufacturer of a medical device is obliged to minimize product-related risks as well as to demonstrate compliance with the so-called "essential requirements" regarding safety and performance before placing the device on the market. Any critical incident in relation to the application of a medical device has to be reported to the competent authority for risk assessment, which in Germany is either the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) or the Paul Ehrlich Institute (PEI) depending on the type of device. In this article, the German regulatory framework for medical devices and the resulting tasks for BfArM are described as well as the topics of its recently installed research and development group on prospective risk identification and application safety for medical devices. Results of failure mode and root cause analyses of incident data are presented as well as further data on cases with the result "root-cause analysis not possible". Finally an outlook is given on future challenges regarding risk assessment for medical devices.

  13. Numerical Studies of Magnetohydrodynamic Activity Resulting from Inductive Transients. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovinec, Carl R.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes results from numerical studies of transients in magnetically confined plasmas. The work has been performed by University of Wisconsin graduate students James Reynolds and Giovanni Cone and by the Principal Investigator through support from contract DE-FG02-02ER54687, a Junior Faculty in Plasma Science award from the DOE Office of Science. Results from the computations have added significantly to our knowledge of magnetized plasma relaxation in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and spheromak. In particular, they have distinguished relaxation activity expected in sustained configurations from transient effects that can persist over a significant fraction of the plasma discharge. We have also developed the numerical capability for studying electrostatic current injection in the spherical torus (ST). These configurations are being investigated as plasma confinement schemes in the international effort to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for environmentally benign energy production. Our numerical computations have been performed with the NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) using local computing resources and massively parallel computing hardware at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. Direct comparisons of simulation results for the spheromak with laboratory measurements verify the effectiveness of our numerical approach. The comparisons have been published in refereed journal articles by this group and by collaborators at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (see Section 4). In addition to the technical products, this grant has supported the graduate education of the two participating students for three years

  14. Radioecological monitoring carried out near the Gravelines NPP. Report of 2014 results. Comments and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernollin, A.; Barbey, P.; Boilley, D.; Josset, M.; Dolignon, D.; Rougier, G.; Dunand, E.

    2015-01-01

    The local information committee (CLI) of Gravelines NPP requested an independent survey of radioactivity levels in the environment for 2014.This survey was carried out by the ACRO organization according to applicable standards and common practices. Even if Gravelines NPP effluents have been the primary aim of the survey, other possible contributions like those from other French and UK NPPs, Areva's reprocessing plants and all past atomic bomb and Chernobyl fallouts, have been considered too. The report presents: the sampling performed, the results of the analyses made (gamma spectroscopy and liquid scintillation) and the comments of these analyses (artificial radioactivity in algae, molluscs, sediments, waters (tritium), foodstuff/vegetables, terrestrial ecosystems). Finally, a comparison is made with the previous 2010 survey and with other data from the Normandy coastline

  15. Radioecological monitoring carried out near the Gravelines NPP. Report of 2010 results. Comments and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernollin, A.; Barbey, P.; Boilley, D.; Josset, M.; Migeon, A.; Dunand, E.

    2011-01-01

    The local information committee (CLI) of Gravelines NPP requested an independent survey of radioactivity levels in the environment for 2010.This survey was carried out by the ACRO organization according to applicable standards and common practices. Even if Gravelines NPP effluents have been the primary aim of the survey, other possible contributions like those from other French and UK NPPs, Areva's reprocessing plants and all past atomic bomb and Chernobyl fallouts, have been considered too. The report presents: the sampling performed, the results of the analyses made (gamma spectroscopy and liquid scintillation) and the comments of these analyses (artificial radioactivity in algae, molluscs, sediments, waters (tritium), foodstuff/vegetables, terrestrial ecosystems). Finally, a comparison is made with other data from the Normandy coastline

  16. Seismic decoupling of an explosion centered in a granite chimney rubble -- scaled experiment results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, C. [Science & Engineering Associates, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States); Miller, S.; Florence, A.; Fogle, M.; Kilb, D.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the small scale evaluation of the feasibility of significant decoupling by siting an explosion in granite rubble. The chimney characteristics scaled to laboratory dimensions were those of the PILE DRIVER event. The scaled charges were of 1 KT and 8KT in the PILE DRIVER chimney. The measure of the effect was the velocity field history in the granite outside the chimney volume with the chimney rubble and with no rubble. A number of chimney sizes and shapes were studied. The explosion process was modeled via two-din=mensional, finite-difference methods used for prediction of velocity histories at the Nevada Test Site. The result was that both the spectral shape and the magnitude of the transmitted shock wave were drastically altered. The chimney geometry was as important as the rubble characteristics.

  17. Associations between self-reported working conditions and registered health and safety results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høivik, Dordi; Baste, Valborg; Brandsdal, Einar; Moen, Bente E

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the association between self-reported working conditions and registered health and safety results in a petroleum company in Norway. We analyzed data from company surveys of working and organizational conditions in 2003 and 2004 and data from the company's files of sickness absence, personal injuries, serious incidents, and undesirable incidents in 2003 and 2004 as well as personal injuries from 2000 to 2004 using Pearson's correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analyses. Good perception of confidence in management in 2003 and 2004 was significantly negatively correlated with the number of personal injuries from 2000 to 2004. Management style and trust in the manager are important factors for predicting personal injuries. The company's working and organizational survey might be used as an indicator for injury risk.

  18. Re-Computation of Numerical Results Contained in NACA Report No. 496

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Boyd, III

    2015-01-01

    An extensive examination of NACA Report No. 496 (NACA 496), "General Theory of Aerodynamic Instability and the Mechanism of Flutter," by Theodore Theodorsen, is described. The examination included checking equations and solution methods and re-computing interim quantities and all numerical examples in NACA 496. The checks revealed that NACA 496 contains computational shortcuts (time- and effort-saving devices for engineers of the time) and clever artifices (employed in its solution methods), but, unfortunately, also contains numerous tripping points (aspects of NACA 496 that have the potential to cause confusion) and some errors. The re-computations were performed employing the methods and procedures described in NACA 496, but using modern computational tools. With some exceptions, the magnitudes and trends of the original results were in fair-to-very-good agreement with the re-computed results. The exceptions included what are speculated to be computational errors in the original in some instances and transcription errors in the original in others. Independent flutter calculations were performed and, in all cases, including those where the original and re-computed results differed significantly, were in excellent agreement with the re-computed results. Appendix A contains NACA 496; Appendix B contains a Matlab(Reistered) program that performs the re-computation of results; Appendix C presents three alternate solution methods, with examples, for the two-degree-of-freedom solution method of NACA 496; Appendix D contains the three-degree-of-freedom solution method (outlined in NACA 496 but never implemented), with examples.

  19. Monju operator training report. Training results and upgrade of the operation training simulator in 2002 YF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyagoshi, Naoki; Sasaki, Kazuichi; Sawada, Makoto; Kawanishi, Tomotake; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2003-09-01

    The prototype fast breeder reactor, Monju, has been performing deliberately the operator training which is composed of the regulated training required by the government and the self-training. The training used a full scope type simulator (MARS: Monju Advanced Reactor Simulator) plays an important role among of the above mentioned trainings and greatly contributes to the Monju operator training for Monju restarting. This report covers the activities of Monju operator training in 2002 FY, i.e. the training results and the remodeling working of the MARS in progress since 1999. (1) Eight simulator training courses were carried out 46 times and 180 trainees participated. Additionally, both the regulated training and self-training were held total 10 times by attended 34 trainees, as besides simulator training. (2) Above training data was reduced compare with the last year's data (69 times (338 trainees)) due to the indispensable training courses in Monju operator training were changed by reorganized operator's number and decreasing of training times owing to remodeling working of the simulator was conducted. (3) By means of upgrading of the MARS completed in 2002 FY, its logic arithmetic time was became speedier and its instructing function was improved remarkably, thus, the simulator training was became to be more effective. Moreover, it's planning to do both remodeling in the next year as the final working: remodeling of reactor core model with the aim of improvement simulating accuracy and corresponding to the sodium leakage measures. Regarding on the Monju training results and simulator's remodeling so far finished, please referring JNC report number of JNC TN 4410 2002-001 Translation of Monju Simulator Training owing Monju Accident and Upgrade of MARS''. (author)

  20. Report: EPA Needs Accurate Data on Results of Pollution Prevention Grants to Maintain Program Integrity and Measure Effectiveness of Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0276, September 4, 2015. Inaccurate reporting of results misrepresents the impacts of pollution prevention activities provided to the public, and misinforms EPA management on the effectiveness of its investment in the program.

  1. 2011 report on radioactivity monitoring in French Polynesia. Summary of results from the IRSN monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouisset, P.; Bernagout, S.; Leclerc, G.; Rua, J.; Delabbaye, P.; Cagnat, X.; Jonhson, I.; Taputu, G.; Paeamara, H.; Tamarii, R.; Temarohirani, T.; Flores, T.

    2013-01-01

    Radiological monitoring of the French environment is one of IRSN's permanent tasks as part of public policy on nuclear safety and radiological protection. It helps to guarantee the best possible protection for the population. Carried out in Polynesia since 1962, this monitoring focuses on seven islands (Tahiti, Maupiti, Hao, Rangiroa, Hiva Oa, Mangareva and Tubuai) which are representative of the five archipelagoes. It consists in taking monthly samples of various kinds from the different environmental compartments (air, water, soil, food, etc.) with which the population may be in contact. Regarding food, the samples analyzed are representative of the diet of Polynesians living in the five archipelagoes of the region and are taken from the marine environment of the open sea, the lagoon environment and the terrestrial environment. Almost all samples are measured at the IRSN Laboratory for the Study and Monitoring of the Environment, based in Vairao on the island of Tahiti, plus a few samples at the IRSN Orsay Laboratory. The year 2011 was marked by the Fukushima nuclear accident, which occurred on March 11. Within this context, IRSN stepped up its monitoring activities in French Polynesia and was able to confirm the absence of radiological impact in New Caledonia and Polynesia. As the results of these analyses were published in the previous annual report (report DEI/SESURE 2011-40), this report does not include all the data and results relating to the accident, but provides a summary for the year 2011. As in recent years, levels of radioactivity, which fell steadily as of 1974 when French atmospheric nuclear weapons testing came to an end, were stable and very low in 2011. The residual radioactivity is mainly due to 137 Cs. In terms of additional dose, this artificial and residual radioactivity is lower than 5 μSv.yr -1 (5 micro-sieverts per year). This corresponds to less than 0.5% of exposure due to natural radioactivity in Polynesia (approximately 1000

  2. Effects of implicit theories of ability and stereotype-inconsistent information on handgrip strength in older adults: A regulatory fit perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Mélanie; Chalabaev, Aina; Colson, Serge S; Vaulerin, Jerome; Falzon, Charlene; D'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2017-03-01

    This study examined whether stereotype-inconsistent information interacts with implicit theories of ability to affect handgrip strength in older adults. Eighty-two retired older adults (13 men and 69 women) from 61 to 89 years old (M age = 75.8 years; SD = 6.9) performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) during a handgrip task in a design manipulating implicit theories of ability and stereotype-inconsistent information related to physical decline with aging. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: incremental condition, entity condition, or control group. The results showed that in the incremental condition the stereotype-inconsistent information improved the peak MVC, the average MVC, the peak rate of force development (RFD), and RFD in the initial 50 ms of the MVC. This study therefore demonstrated that individuals with an incremental mindset who are exposed to stereotype-inconsistent information can boost their physical performance. These findings are discussed from the perspective of regulatory fit (i.e., when task framing is congruent with the individual's goal). © 2016 The Authors. Psychophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  3. Benchmarking Glucose Results through Automation: The 2009 Remote Automated Laboratory System Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marcy; Zito, Denise; Kongable, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia in the adult inpatient population remains a topic of intense study in U.S. hospitals. Most hospitals have established glycemic control programs but are unable to determine their impact. The 2009 Remote Automated Laboratory System (RALS) Report provides trends in glycemic control over 4 years to 576 U.S. hospitals to support their effort to manage inpatient hyperglycemia. Methods A proprietary software application feeds de-identified patient point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) data from the Medical Automation Systems RALS-Plus data management system to a central server. Analyses include the number of tests and the mean and median BG results for intensive care unit (ICU), non-ICU, and each hospital compared to the aggregate of the other hospitals. Results More than 175 million BG results were extracted from 2006–2009; 25% were from the ICU. Mean range of BG results for all inpatients in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 was 142.2–201.9, 145.6–201.2, 140.6–205.7, and 140.7–202.4 mg/dl, respectively. The range for ICU patients was 128–226.5, 119.5–219.8, 121.6–226.0, and 121.1–217 mg/dl, respectively. The range for non-ICU patients was 143.4–195.5, 148.6–199.8, 145.2–201.9, and 140.7–203.6 mg/dl, respectively. Hyperglycemia rates of >180 mg/dl in 2008 and 2009 were examined, and hypoglycemia rates of Automated POC-BG data management software can assist in this effort. PMID:21129348

  4. Interpretation of coagulation test results using a web-based reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Andres E; Jabcuga, Christine E; Nguyen, Alex; Wahed, Amer; Nedelcu, Elena; Nguyen, Andy N D

    2014-01-01

    Web-based synoptic reporting has been successfully integrated into diverse fields of pathology, improving efficiency and reducing typographic errors. Coagulation is a challenging field for practicing pathologists and pathologists-in-training alike. To develop a Web-based program that can expedite the generation of a individualized interpretive report for a variety of coagulation tests. We developed a Web-based synoptic reporting system composed of 119 coagulation report templates and 38 thromboelastography (TEG) report templates covering a wide range of findings. Our institution implemented this reporting system in July 2011; it is currently used by pathology residents and attending pathologists. Feedback from the users of these reports have been overwhelmingly positive. Surveys note the time saved and reduced errors. Our easily accessible, user-friendly, Web-based synoptic reporting system for coagulation is a valuable asset to our laboratory services. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  5. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The tests and researches on the development and utilization of atomic energy in national laboratories were begun in 1956, and have accomplished the great role for the advance of the development and utilization of atomic energy in Japan by having produced many valuable results so far. Atomic energy has been utilized in diverse fields, and also in national laboratories, the research for expanding the development and utilization of atomic energy in food irradiation, medicine, agriculture, forestry, fishery and others in addition to the basic research on nuclear fusion and safety have been advanced. Further expecting the pervasive effect to general science and technology, the development of basic technology and integrated research are promoted from the viewpoint of new techical innovation and creative technology. This is 31st report in which the results of the tests and researches carried out by national laboratories in fiscal year 1990 are summarized. Nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation, cancer countermeasures, agriculture, forestry, fishery, medicine, mining and manufacture, power utilization, construction, radioactivation analysis and so on were the main subjects. (K.I.)

  6. Reporting altered test results in hemolyzed samples: is the cure worse than the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Plebani, Mario

    2017-07-26

    The management of laboratory data in unsuitable (hemolyzed) samples remains an almost unresolved dilemma. Whether or not laboratory test results obtained by measuring unsuitable specimens should be made available to the clinicians has been the matter of fierce debates over the past decades. Recently, an intriguing alternative to suppressing test results and recollecting the specimen has been put forward, entailing the definition and implementation of specific algorithms that would finally allow reporting a preanalytically altered laboratory value within a specific comment about its uncertainty of measurement. This approach carries some advantages, namely the timely communication of potentially life-threatening laboratory values, but also some drawbacks. These especially include the challenging definition of validated performance specifications for hemolyzed samples, the need to producing reliable data with the lowest possible uncertainty, the short turnaround time for repeating most laboratory tests, the risk that the comments may be overlooked in short-stay and frequently overcrowded units (e.g. the emergency department), as well as the many clinical advantages of a direct communication with the physician in charge of the patient. Despite the debate remains open, we continue supporting the suggestion that suppressing data in unsuitable (hemolyzed) samples and promptly notifying the clinicians about the need to recollect the samples remains the most (clinically and analytically) safe practice.

  7. Tank 241-B-108, cores 172 and 173 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L., Fluoro Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-04

    The Data Summary Table (Table 3) included in this report compiles analytical results in compliance with all applicable DQOS. Liquid subsamples that were prepared for analysis by an acid adjustment of the direct subsample are indicated by a `D` in the A column in Table 3. Solid subsamples that were prepared for analysis by performing a fusion digest are indicated by an `F` in the A column in Table 3. Solid subsamples that were prepared for analysis by performing a water digest are indicated by a I.wl. or an `I` in the A column of Table 3. Due to poor precision and accuracy in original analysis of both Lower Half Segment 2 of Core 173 and the core composite of Core 173, fusion and water digests were performed for a second time. Precision and accuracy improved with the repreparation of Core 173 Composite. Analyses with the repreparation of Lower Half Segment 2 of Core 173 did not show improvement and suggest sample heterogeneity. Results from both preparations are included in Table 3.

  8. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The tests and researches on the development and utilization of atomic energy in national laboratories were begun in 1956, and have accomplished the great role for the advance of the development and utilization of atomic energy in Japan by having produced many valuable results so far. Atomic energy has been utilized not only in the field of nuclear power but also in diverse fields, and in national laboratories, the research for expanding the development and utilization of atomic energy in medicine, agriculture, forestry, fishery, radioactivation analysis and others in addition the basic research on nuclear fusion have been advanced. Further expecting the pervasive effect to general science and technology, the development of integrated research are promoted from the viewpoint of new technical innovation and creative technology. The safety research of nuclear facilities have been carried out to keep them high level on the basis of the yearly program enacted by Nuclear Safety Commission. This is the report No. 33, in which the results of the test and research in the fields of nuclear fusion safety research, food irradiation, cancer countermeasures, agriculture, forestry, fishery, medicine, mining and manufacture, power utilization, construction, radioactivation analysis carried on in fiscal 1992 are summarized. (J.P.N.)

  9. Power-cooling mismatch test series. Test PCM-2A; test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawood, G.W.; Holman, G.W.; Martinson, Z.R.; Legrand, B.L.

    1976-09-01

    The report describes the results of an in-pile experimental investigation of pre- and postcritical heat flux (CHF) behavior of a single 36-inch-long, pressurized water reactor (PWR) type, UO 2 -fueled, zircaloy-clad fuel rod. The nominal coolant conditions for pressure and temperature were representative of those found in a commercial PWR. Nine separate departures from nucleate boiling (DNB) cycles were performed by either of two different methods: (a) decreasing the coolant flow rate while the fuel rod power was held constant, or (b) increasing the fuel rod power while the coolant flow rate was held constant. DNB was obtained during eight of the nine cycles performed. For the final flow reduction, the mass flux was decreased to 6.1 x 10 5 lb/hr-ft 2 at a constant peak linear heat generation rate of 17.8 kW/ft. The fuel rod was allowed to remain in film boiling for about 210 seconds during this final flow reduction. The fuel rod remained intact during the test. Results of on-line measurements of the fuel rod behavior are presented together with discussion of instrument performance. A comparison of the data with Fuel Rod Analysis Program-Transient 2 (FRAP-T2) computer code calculations is included

  10. Parent and adolescent reports in assessing adolescent sleep problems: results from a large population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Yaqoot; Doi, Suhail A R; O'Callaghan, Michael; Williams, Gail; Najman, Jake M; Mamun, Abdullah Al

    2016-09-01

    To compare parent and adolescent reports in exploring adolescent sleep problems and to identify the factors associated with adolescent sleep problem disclosures. Parent (n = 5185) and adolescent reports (n = 5171, age=13.9 ± 0.3 years), from a birth cohort were used to explore adolescent sleep problems. Kappa coefficients were used to assess the agreement, whereas, conditional agreement and disagreement ratios were used to identify the optimal informant. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors affecting adolescent sleep problem disclosure. Parental reports identified only about one-third of the sleep problems reported by adolescents. Whereas adolescent reports identified up to two-thirds of the sleep problems reported by parents. Combined reports of parents and adolescent did not show any considerable difference from the adolescent report. Adolescent and parent health, maternal depression, and family communication were significantly associated with adolescents sleep problem disclosures. Adolescent reports could be used as the preferred source to explore adolescent sleep problems. Parental reports should be used when parents as observers are more reliable reporters, or where adolescents are cognitively unable to report sleep problems. Additionally, the impact of poor health, maternal depression and family communication on sleep problems disclosure should be considered for adolescent sleep problem diagnosis. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Tank 241-TX-104, cores 230 and 231 analytical results for the final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-104 push mode core segments collected between February 18, 1998 and February 23, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-104 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (McCain, 1997), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al., 1995) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et.al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Alpha Activity (AT) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Attachment 1 is a cross reference to relate the tank farm identification numbers to the 222-S Laboratory LabCore/LIMS sample numbers. The subsamples generated in the laboratory for analyses are identified in these diagrams with their sources shown. Core 230: Three push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-TX-104 riser 9A on February 18, 1998. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory on February 19, 1998. Two segments were expected for this core. However, due to poor sample recovery, an additional segment was taken and identified as 2A. Core 231: Four push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-TX-104 riser 13A between February 19, 1998 and February 23, 1998. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory on February 24, 1998. Two segments were expected for this core. However, due to poor sample recovery, additional segments were taken and identified as 2A and 2B. The TSAP states the core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three

  12. Inconsistent-handed advantage in episodic memory extends to paragraph-level materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Eric C; Christman, Stephen D

    2017-09-01

    Past research using handedness as a proxy for functional access to the right hemisphere demonstrates that individuals who are mixed/inconsistently handed outperform strong/consistently handed individuals when performing episodic recall tasks. However, research has generally been restricted to stimuli presented in a list format. In the present paper, we present two studies in which participants were presented with paragraph-level material and then asked to recall material from the passages. The first study was based on a classic study looking at retroactive interference with prose materials. The second was modelled on a classic experiment looking at perspective taking and the content of memory. In both studies, the classic effects were replicated and the general finding that mixed/inconsistent-handers outperform strong/consistent-handers was replicated. This suggests that considering degree of handedness may be an empirically useful means of reducing error variance in paradigms looking at memory for prose level material.

  13. Causes of the armed conflict in Croatia 1991. Resolving conceptual and methodological inconsistencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosta Nikolić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This text is intended to identify, clarify and resolve the most frequent examples of methodological inconsistencies found in the current literature by Serbian and foreign researchers, and to point to their conceptual, methodological and factual inconsistencies. This work follows the basic line of conceptual delimitation concerning the phenomenon of the breakup of Yugoslavia, on one hand, and of the violent conflicts in certain Yugoslav republics, on the other. It is based on the interdisciplinary analysis of the findings in the field of international relations and historical analysis, while relying primarily on the fundamental sources of historical material. Henceforth, this paper will address the issues of correct determining of the main and secondary actors, temporal determination and elements for making a clear and unambiguous definition of the armed conflict in Croatia.

  14. An inconclusive study comparing the effect of concrete and abstract descriptions of belief-inconsistent information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Katherine A; Clément, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Linguistic bias is the differential use of linguistic abstraction (as defined by the Linguistic Category Model) to describe the same behaviour for members of different groups. Essentially, it is the tendency to use concrete language for belief-inconsistent behaviours and abstract language for belief-consistent behaviours. Having found that linguistic bias is produced without intention or awareness in many contexts, researchers argue that linguistic bias reflects, reinforces, and transmits pre-existing beliefs, thus playing a role in belief maintenance. Based on the Linguistic Category Model, this assumes that concrete descriptions reduce the impact of belief-inconsistent behaviours while abstract descriptions maximize the impact of belief-consistent behaviours. However, a key study by Geschke, Sassenberg, Ruhrmann, and Sommer [2007] found that concrete descriptions of belief-inconsistent behaviours actually had a greater impact than abstract descriptions, a finding that does not fit easily within the linguistic bias paradigm. Abstract descriptions (e.g. the elderly woman is athletic) are, by definition, more open to interpretation than concrete descriptions (e.g. the elderly woman works out regularly). It is thus possible that abstract descriptions are (1) perceived as having less evidentiary strength than concrete descriptions, and (2) understood in context (i.e. athletic for an elderly woman). In this study, the design of Geschke et al. [2007] was modified to address this possibility. We expected that the differences in the impact of concrete and abstract descriptions would be reduced or reversed, but instead we found that differences were largely absent. This study did not support the findings of Geschke et al. [2007] or the linguistic bias paradigm. We encourage further attempts to understand the strong effect of concrete descriptions for belief-inconsistent behaviour.

  15. VIPER:a visualisation tool for exploring inheritance inconsistencies in genotyped pedigrees

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, Trevor; Graham, Martin; Kennedy, Jessie; Law, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Background Pedigree genotype datasets are used for analysing genetic inheritance and to map genetic markers and traits. Such datasets consist of hundreds of related animals genotyped for thousands of genetic markers and invariably contain multiple errors in both the pedigree structure and in the associated individual genotype data. These errors manifest as apparent inheritance inconsistencies in the pedigree, and invalidate analyses of marker inheritance patterns across the dataset. Cleaning ...

  16. Social, demographic and situational characteristics associated with inconsistent use of oral contraceptives: evidence from France.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Caroline; BOUYER, Jean; Gilbert, Fabien; Group, Cocon; Bajos, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    The COCON group includes : Beatrice Ducot, Michèle Ferrand, Danielle Hassoun, Nadine Job-Spira, Monique Kaminski, Nathalie Lelong, Henri Leridon, Nicolas Razafindratsima, Clementine Rossier and Josiane Warszawski.; CONTEXT: Oral contraceptives are the most popular form of reversible contraception used in developed countries. Their efficacy depends on how consistently and correctly they are used. METHODS: The incidence of inconsistent pill use was estimated from data from a random sample of 1,...

  17. An inconclusive study comparing the effect of concrete and abstract descriptions of belief-inconsistent information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Collins

    Full Text Available Linguistic bias is the differential use of linguistic abstraction (as defined by the Linguistic Category Model to describe the same behaviour for members of different groups. Essentially, it is the tendency to use concrete language for belief-inconsistent behaviours and abstract language for belief-consistent behaviours. Having found that linguistic bias is produced without intention or awareness in many contexts, researchers argue that linguistic bias reflects, reinforces, and transmits pre-existing beliefs, thus playing a role in belief maintenance. Based on the Linguistic Category Model, this assumes that concrete descriptions reduce the impact of belief-inconsistent behaviours while abstract descriptions maximize the impact of belief-consistent behaviours. However, a key study by Geschke, Sassenberg, Ruhrmann, and Sommer [2007] found that concrete descriptions of belief-inconsistent behaviours actually had a greater impact than abstract descriptions, a finding that does not fit easily within the linguistic bias paradigm. Abstract descriptions (e.g. the elderly woman is athletic are, by definition, more open to interpretation than concrete descriptions (e.g. the elderly woman works out regularly. It is thus possible that abstract descriptions are (1 perceived as having less evidentiary strength than concrete descriptions, and (2 understood in context (i.e. athletic for an elderly woman. In this study, the design of Geschke et al. [2007] was modified to address this possibility. We expected that the differences in the impact of concrete and abstract descriptions would be reduced or reversed, but instead we found that differences were largely absent. This study did not support the findings of Geschke et al. [2007] or the linguistic bias paradigm. We encourage further attempts to understand the strong effect of concrete descriptions for belief-inconsistent behaviour.

  18. Family-Specific Investments and Divorce: A Theory of Dynamically Inconsistent Household Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Anderberg, Dan; Rainer, Helmut; Roeder, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    This paper bridges two distinct areas of inquiry: the economic theory of the family and behavioral research on time-inconsistent preferences. In our model, hyperbolic discounting couples engage in household production activities, thereby accumulating family-specific capital over time. At any given point in time, the gains to continued marriage depend on the accumulated stock of this capital and a temporary random shock to match quality. Couples whose match quality deteriorates may choose to d...

  19. Comparison of pediatric self reports and parent proxy reports utilizing PROMIS: Results from a chiropractic practice-based research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Ohm, Jeanne; Alcantara, Junjoe

    2017-11-01

    To measure the cross-informant variant of pediatric quality of life (QoL) based on self-reports and parent proxy measures. A secondary analysis of baseline data obtained from two independent studies measuring the QoL based on the pediatric PROMIS-25 self-report and the PROMIS parent-proxy items banks. A scoring manual associated raw scores to a T score metric (mean = 50; SD = 10). Reliability of QoL ratings utilized the ICC while comparison of mean T Scores utilized the unpaired t-test. A total of 289 parent-child dyads comprised our study responders. Average age for parents and children was 41.27 years and 12.52 years, respectively. The mean T score (child self-report: parent proxy) for each QoL domains were: mobility (50.82:52.58), anxiety (46.73:44.21), depression (45.18:43.60), fatigue (45.59:43.92), peer-relationships (52.15:52.88) and pain interference (47.47:44.80). Parents tend to over-estimate their child's QoL based on measures of anxiety, depression, fatigue, peer-relationships and pain interference. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Project Deep Drilling KLX02 - Phase 2. Methods, scope of activities and results. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekman, L.

    2001-04-01

    Geoscientific investigations performed by SKB, including those at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, have so far comprised the bedrock horizon down to about 1000 m. The primary purposes with the c. 1700 m deep, φ76 mm, sub vertical core borehole KLX02, drilled during the autumn 1992 at Laxemar, Oskarshamn, was to test core drilling technique at large depths and with a relatively large diameter and to enable geoscientific investigations beyond 1000 m. Drilling of borehole KLX02 was fulfilled very successfully. Results of the drilling commission and the borehole investigations conducted in conjunction with drilling have been reported earlier. The present report provides a summary of the investigations made during a five year period after completion of drilling. Results as well as methods applied are described. A variety of geoscientific investigations to depths exceeding 1600 m were successfully performed. However, the investigations were not entirely problem-free. For example, borehole equipment got stuck in the borehole at several occasions. Special investigations, among them a fracture study, were initiated in order to reveal the mechanisms behind this problem. Different explanations seem possible, e.g. breakouts from the borehole wall, which may be a specific problem related to the stress situation in deep boreholes. The investigation approach for borehole KLX02 followed, in general outline, the SKB model for site investigations, where a number of key issues for site characterization are studied. For each of those, a number of geoscientific parameters are investigated and determined. One important aim is to erect a lithological-structural model of the site, which constitutes the basic requirement for modelling mechanical stability, thermal properties, groundwater flow, groundwater chemistry and transport of solutes. The investigations in borehole KLX02 resulted in a thorough lithological-structural characterization of the rock volume near the borehole. In order to